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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1840-1845

Articles taken from Trewman's Exeter Flying Post

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs:
Names Included:
Ackland; Adams; Addicott(2); Alford(3); Allen(2); Allery; Andrews; Apsey; Arbery; Arnold; Arthur; Ash; Ashley; Atwell; Austin; Babb; Back; Back; Badcock; Baker; Baker(7); Bailey; Balderson; Baldwin; Bale; Ball(3); Ballamy; Balle; Bament; Barnes(2); Barrell; Barrett(4); Barrow; Bartholomew; Bartlett; Bastin; Bate(2); Batten; Beard(2); Beavis; Beckford; Beer(3); Bell; Bennett(2); Bent; Berdick; Berry(2); Bickford; Bickle; Bidgood; Bignell; Billet; Bird; Bishop; Blackmore(3); Blanchford; Bolt(2); Bond(2); Bonner; Boult; Bowden; Bower; Bowhay; Bradley; Bragg(2); Brailey(2); Braund; Bray; Brealey; Brely; Brewer(2); Brice(2); Bright; Brimblecombe; Brimson; Briscoe; Britton; Brock; Bromell; Brook; Brooks(2); Brown(2); Browning; Buckingham; Budd; Burard; Burch(2); Burnell; Burridge; Burrough(2); Burton; Cable; Cann(2); Canniford; Cannon; Cape; Carpenter; Carter; Cawley(2); Chambers; Channon; Chapman(2); Chapple(2); Chard; Charlton; Chichester; Chick; Chilcott; Ching; Chudleigh; Churchward; Clapp(2); Clark(2); Clarke(2); Cleave; Clegg; Clogg; Cobley; Cocker; Coffin; Cole; Coles; Collard; Collins; Colwell; Commins; Coneybeare; Cook; Coombe; Cooper; Cosway(2); Cottey; Courtenay; Cowans; Cox(2); Cranford; Crebar; Creswell; Crispin; Croot; Cropp; Crossman; Crowle; Cudmore; Daiment; Damerel; Darby(2); Dare; Darke(2); Darracott; Davey(2); Daw; Dawson; Densham; Dibble; Dingle; Discombe; Dowden; Downey(2); Drake; Duckham; Dugorn; Dummett; Dyer(2); Eales(2); Easterbrooke; Easton; Ebdon; Edmunds; Edwards(2); Ellacott; Ellard; Elliott(3); Ellis; Elson; Elston; Empson; Endicott; Essery; Farley; Farrant; Ferris; Fice; Fletcher; Flood; Follett (2); Ford; Foster; Fouracres; Fowler(5); Fox; Franklin; Fraser; French(3); Friend; Friendship; Froome; Frost(2); Fry; Fulford; Furze; Gapper; Garrett; Garton; Gay; Geary; German; Germon; Gibbs(2); Gill; Gillard; Glanville(2); Glass; Godfrey; Gollop; Gooding; Gorden; Gordge; Gornan; Gosling; Goss; Gould; Gravel; Greaves; Greenslade; Gregory; Gribble; Griffin; Grigg; Gullick; Guy; Hake; Halfyard; Hall; Hannaford(2); Hannibus; Harner; Harper; Harris(5); Hart; Harvey; Harwood; Hatchell; Hatherley; Hawkins(2); Hay; Haydon(2); Hayman; Haynes; Haywood; Heall; Heard; Hearder; Hearle; Hearn; Heddon; Hellier; Hely: Hemmett; Hepper; Hewitt; Hews; Hexter; Heys; Heyward; Hicks; Higgins; Hill(4); Hilman; Hoar; Hock; Hockings; Hoggin; Holly; Holway; Honey; Honywill; Hooper; Hore(2); Horrill; Hosegood; Hosgood; Houlditch; Hoyten; Huet; Humphreys; Hutchings; Ingram; Isaac; Jackman; Jackson(2); James; Jarvis; Jenkins(2); Jennings(2); Johnson(3); Jones(3); Jope; Karslake; Keeth; Kelland; Kellaway; Kelly; Kemble; Keys; King(2); Kinnard; Kirk; Kittlewell; Knapman; Knighton; Knowles(2); Lamprey; Lane; Lang; Langaller; Langdon; Langham; Langman; Langsford; Langworthy; Lawrence(2); Lear; Lethaby; Lethbridge; Leworthy; Lightfoot; Lightholder; Lindsay; Litheby; Llewellyn; Lloyd; Long; Lovering; Lowe; Lowman; Luke(2); Luscombe(2); Luxton; Lyle; Lynch; Mackay; Major(2); Manley(2); Mann; Manning; Mappledoram; Mardon; Marks; Marrack; Marshall; Martin(3); Matthews(2); May(2); Maybin; Maynard; Memory; Merifield; Middleton; Mildon; Milford; Mills(2); Milton; Mitchell(4); Modley; Moldrum; Molland; Monk; Moor; Moore(2); Moorman; Morgan(3); Morris; Morrish; Mortimore(2); Moxhay; Mullena; Mundy; Narramore; Neale(2); Netherton; Nevett; Newcombe; Newman; Newton; Nichols; Nicholls; Northam; Nosworthy; Oakford; Oldridge; Oliver; Osborn; Osment; Osmond; Owens; Oxenbury; Paddon; Page; Paget; Palmer; Parish; Parker(2); Parkhouse; Parsons(2); Partridge; Passmore; Paton; Pawle; Payne(2); Peagum; Pearce(3); Pearcy(2); Peek; Penallum; Pengilly; Perham; Perkins; Perring; Perry; Pethybridge; Phillips; Pickard; Pike (3); Pile; Pillar; Pillman; Pim; Pine; Pitt; Pitts; Pollard(3); Ponsford; Pook; Porter; Potter; Pound; Priddis; Prideaux; Prout; Prowse; Pyke; Pyne; Quick(2); Rackley; Radford; Radmore; Ranger; Ratcliffe; Raymond; Reddicliff; Reed (4); Rees; Reeves; Rendall; Rendle; Rennells; Restorick; Reynolds; Richards(4); Richmond; Roberts(2); Robins; Rodden; Roleston; Rolstone; Rookley; Rosewell; Rowe(3); Rowsell; Rudd; Rugg; Russell; Ryder; Saltern; Same; Sanders(3); Sanford; Saunders(5); Savage; Sclater; Scriven(2); Seagrave; Sealy; Searle; Seedsman; Selley; Sellick; Sercombe; Shapland(2); Sharland; Shepherd; Shirley; Short; Shortridge; Shute; Simmons; Skinner; Skitch; Sloggitt; Sloly; Smaldridge; Smale(3); Smith(5); Snell(6); Snow; Snowden; Soper (2); Southard; Southwood; Sowton; Sparkes; Spilsbury; Spurway; Squire(3); Stabb; Stacey; Staddon; Stamper; Stanton; Stark; Steer(2); Stevens (4); Stiles; Stocker; Stokes; Stone; Stoneman; Stranger; Strike; Stroud; Stuckes; Studley; Sweetland; Sydenham; Symes; Tallack; Tancock; Tapp; Tapsell; Tatchell; Tattershall; Taylor (5); Thomas(3); Thorn(2); Thorne; Thornton; Tierney; Tiller; Tillour; Tolly; Tout(2); Towl; Townsend(3); Tozer; Trace; Treen; Tremlett(2); Trenhick; Trapnoll; Trelfield; Trigger; Triscott; Truscott; Tucker (3); Tuckett(2); Turner(4); Twiggs; Underhay; Veale; Vellacott; Venton; Vicary; Vickery(2); Vinson; Vowden; Wakeley; Walker; Watts; Way(3); Weatherdon; Webber(4); Webster; Wedlake; Welsman; Were; West(2); Westacott; Western; Weston; Wheller; Whiddon; White(2); Whitfield; Wilcocks; Wilkey; Wilkins; Willmott; Wills(2); Wilson; Wingyett; Windeat; Windeatt; Windsor; Winyard; Wise; Wivell; Wood; Woodman(2); Woolcott; Wooten; Worsell; Wotton(2); Wrentmore; Wright(2); Yelland; Yendle; Yeo.]

Thursday 17 April 1800, Issue 1906 – Gale Document No. Y3200646952
Plymouth, Wednesday 9 April
An Inquest of a most solemn and affecting nature was held at the Guildhall of this borough on Monday the 7th instant, and continued by adjournment all Tuesday and Wednesday last, before George Eastlake, gent. Coroner, and a most respectable Jury, on a view of the body of a female, called GRACE ELLIS, aged 13 years, parish apprentice to Mr John Friend, clothier, of this town, who was supposed to have died for want of the necessaries of life and medical assistance. The body was dug up by order of the Coroner, and examined by two eminent surgeons, (Mr Sercombe and Mr Bragg,) and the Jury, and exhibited a most shocking and afflicting spectacle. After a painful, laborious, impartial, and minute investigation of the existing circumstances of the whole by the Coroner and Jury, and the examination of several witnesses, particularly of two other apprentices to Mr Friend, whose pallid and woe-worn figures exhibited evident signs of want of care and food, Mr Eastlake proceeded, with great professional ability, to sum up the evidence, and in his charge to the jury, which lasted an hour and three quarters, he pointed out the different species of murder with great perspicuity; he then, adverting to the case in point, displayed a great deal of legal knowledge, to the satisfaction of the Jury and the most crowded court ever seen in the Guildhall of this borough. The Jury then retired to the Council-chamber, and after an hour's serious deliberation, returned into court, and by their foreman, William Crees, Esq. gave in a verdict to the Coroner of "Wilful and deliberate Murder against John Friend and Ann his wife." They were accordingly immediately committed to take their trials for the murder at the next Exeter Lammas assizes.

Thursday 15 May 1800, Issue 1910 – Gale Document No. Y3200646990
Plymouth, Wednesday 7 May
Mr Whitford, Coroner for Devon, took an inquest on the body of a farmer, called W. SLOGGITT, who hung himself in a public-house at Stoke. Verdict – Lunacy.

Thursday 17 July 1800, Issue 1918 – Gale Document No. Y3200647079
Plymouth, Wednesday 9 July
Mr Whitford, Coroner for Devon, took an inquisition at Egg-Buckland, on a view of the body of __ FARLEY, a smith, who had been fighting with Mr Butland, a respectable butcher, and his son-in-law, by which means he received a violet blow, which occasioned his death. The Jury, on an impartial investigation of the existing circumstances of the case, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Mr Butland and his son-in-law. They of course will surrender to take their trials at the next assizes for the county of Devon.

Thursday 31 July 1800, Issue 1920 – Gale Document No. Y3200647097
Plymouth, Wednesday 23 July
This day G. Eastlake, gent. Coroner of this borough, took an Inquest on a view of the body of a female servant, __ LLEWELLYN, living with Major Wall, Hewer's Row, who was found hanging over the door of an upper room; she was cut down in a few minutes, but though every means of resuscitation as practised, she was too far gone to recover. The circumstances which came out before the Coroner and Jury were, that a discovery of the footman's being married, who had paid her great attention, brought on a dejection of spirits, which occasioned the unhappy catastrophe above recited. The Jury returned a Verdict of Lunacy.

Thursday 13 November 1800, Issue 1935 – Gale Document No. Y3200647237
Plymouth, Wednesday 5 November
G. Eastlake, Esq. Coroner for this borough, took an inquisition on the body of W. THORNE, aged 70, a very industrious lying stationer of this town for near 30 years: He was helping to unload cheese, and dropped down dead. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 18 December 1800, Issue 1940 – Gale Document No. Y3200647288
Plymouth, Wednesday 10 December
Sunday last Mr Whitford, Coroner, took an inquisition on the body of MR W. COSWAY, found dead on Stonehouse Bridge; he had been dining with a friend, and was returning home early to Dock, and 'tis supposed was taken in a fit and expired directly. - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God. He was aged 62, was reputable boatswain in the Royal Navy, and had served with reputation in this and preceding wars, in America, the West Indies, and Straits, with unblemished reputation.

Thursday 2 April 1801, Issue 1955 – Gale Document No. Y3200647407
Plymouth, Wednesday 25 March
Mr Whitford, Coroner, took an inquest on JOHN MORRISH, a seaman, who, in a fit of lunacy, stabbed himself, and died instantly. Verdict, Lunacy.

Thursday 25 June 1801, Issue 1967 – Gale Document No. Y3200647492
Yesterday morning a woman, named SUSANNAH WRIGHT, threw herself into the River Exe, above Head Wear, and was drowned. The body was found some time after, but too late to render any assistance towards recovering animation. It is supposed she had quarrelled with some of her friends, which was the cause of her committing this rash action. The Coroner's Inquest sat upon the body, and brought in their verdict, Lunacy.

Plymouth
Monday. This morning a melancholy accident happened in this town. MR P. FURZE, an eminent tradesman, under prosecution from the Admiralty for having King's naval stores in his possession, was under confinement, and was to have proceeded to Exeter this morning: in a fit of despondency, previous to the coach arriving at seven o'clock, he cut his throat so dreadfully as to expire in a few minutes. Surgical assistance was had, but in vain, as he was quite dead. Mr Eastlake, coroner for this borough, held an inquest on the body of the late MR FURZE, and the jury taking the existing circumstances into their serious consideration, returned a verdict of Lunacy.

Thursday 10 December 1801, Issue 1990 – Gale Document No. Y3200647667
Last Monday MR J. DAW, of Beerferris, was found drowned in the river Tamer; it is supposed, from being in a melancholy way, he jumped into the river. The Coroner's Inquest returned a verdict of Lunacy.

Thursday 18 March 1802, Issue 2004 – Gale Document No. Y3200647770
Plymouth, Wednesday 10 March
This day Mr Whitford, Coroner for Devon, took an Inquest, on Nanger Down, on the body of the unfortunate W. NETHERTON, junr. who has been missing for four months; his body was much shrivelled, and his legs and thighs much cut and mangled. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Dead.

Thursday 30 December 1802, Issue 2045 – Gale Document No. Y3200648062
Plymouth, Wednesday 22 December
Mr Whitford, Coroner for Devon, took an Inquest on the body of JAMES BENNETT, a miner, 36 years of age, who was employed in fitting up a tin-shaft of a mine, near Buckland Monachorum Abbey, the seat of the Right Honourable Lord Heathfield, that had ceased working some centuries past; he was in a hurry to fill it up as a job, but the earth slipped under him, and he was precipitated to the bottom, near 80 feet, and smothered; he was a strong, hale man, and good workman, and was dragged out by some tinners from the shaft, after having been missing some days. - Verdict, - Accidental Death.

Thursday 9 May 1805, Issue 2168 – Gale Document No. Y3200648973
Tuesday last the body of MR WILLS, the unfortunate excise officer of Brixham, who was unhumanly murdered five weeks since by some smugglers, was by two little boys who were searching for birds nests, discovered jammed betwixt the rocks; his body was immediately brought to Brixham in a boat, and on Friday the Coroner's Inquest brought in the Verdict of Wilful murder against some person unknown.

Thursday 11 September 1806, Issue 2238 – Gale Document No. Y3200649529
Exeter, Wednesday 10 September
On Saturday last a Coroner's Inquest was held, at the commercial coffee-house, in this city, before Mr Samuel Walkey, Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH BOND, servant of Mr Pickslay, who, whilst returning to her master's house, fell down in an apoplectic fit and died immediately. The Jury returned a verdict, died by the visitation of God.

Thursday 25 September 1806, Issue 2240 – Gale Document No. Y3200649544
Exeter, Wednesday 24 September
On Tuesday last a Coroner's Inquest was held at the white hart inn, in this city, before Mr Samuel Walkey, Coroner, on the body of RICHARD DYER, mason, who fell from a house in the mint where he was at work, and was killed on the spot. - Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 13 November 1806, Issue 2247 – Gale Document No. Y3200649601
Exeter, Wednesday 12 November
On Friday last a Coroner's Inquest was held at the blue boar, in this city, before Mr S. Walkey, Coroner, on the body of MARY SHARLAND, 3 years of age, who was burnt to death, in consequence of her clothes unfortunately catching fire: verdict, accidental death.

Yesterday afternoon a Coroner's Inquest was held, at the valiant soldier, in this city, before Mr S. Walkey, Coroner, on the body of GEORGE OAKFORD, two years of age, who was burnt to death, in consequence of his clothes unfortunately catching fire: verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 1 January 1807, Issue 2254 – Gale Document No. Y3200649663
Exeter, Wednesday 31 December
On Thursday last a Coroner's Inquest was held at the white hart inn, in this city, before Mr S. Walkey, Coroner, on the body of MICHAEL JONES, who fell down in an apoplectic fit the preceding evening as he was returning from Mount Radford, and instantly expired. - Verdict, visitation of God.

Plymouth, 30 December
Mr Whiteford, Coroner for Devon, took an Inquest on the body of MARY MORRIS, a young woman of Plymouth Dock, a melancholy instance of suicide. The case was as follows:- She was betrothed to a young man of Dock, and their banns were published. After this, she gave her company to one of the Lancashire sharp-shooters, which so irritated her former betrothed lover, that he upbraided her with her perfidy; this she took so to heart, that feeling the force of her ingratitude, she went home, and took a strong dose of arsenic, and died in the most excruciating torments. The Jury, after taking the case into consideration, returned a Verdict of Lunacy.

Thursday 15 January 1807, Issue 2256 – Gale Document No. Y3200649684
Exeter, Wednesday 14 January
On Monday last a Coroner's Inquest was held in Southgate prison, before Mr S. Walkey, Coroner, on the body of EDWARD HEYS, one of the debtors, who suddenly expired the same morning as he lay in his bed. - Verdict, Visitation of God.

Thursday 2 April 1807, Issue 2267 – Gale Document No. Y3200649775
Exeter, Wednesday 1 April
On Friday last a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier, before Samuel Walkey, esq. Coroner, on the body of
WILLIAM OLDRIDGE, hellier, who was killed in consequence of being bruised between the wheel of a timber carriage and the wall. - Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 9 April 1807, Issue 2268 – Gale Document No. Y3200649786
Exeter, Wednesday 8 April
On Sunday last a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Star inn, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, esq. Coroner, on the body of JOSEPH HOAR, a child two years old, who was scalded to death, by the oversetting a basin of hot broth on itself. - Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 7 May 1807, Issue 2272 – Gale Document No. Y3200649823
Exeter, Wednesday 6 May
On Thursday last a Coroner's Inquest was held at the sign of the Bell, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, esq. Coroner, on the body of GEORGE TOWNSEND, a labourer, who was drowned in consequence of falling into the canal while at work. - Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 28 May 1807, Issue 2275 – Gale Document No. Y3200649851
Exeter, Wednesday 27 May
On Friday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held at the sign of the Plume of Feathers, before Samuel Walkey, esq. Coroner, on the body of JOHN CRANFORD, a soldier, who was drowned, in consequence of going into the river to bathe himself. - Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 4 June 1807, Issue 2276 – Gale Document No. Y3200649862
Exeter, Wednesday 3 June
Monday last died, at the Barnstaple inn, in this city, much lamented, the REV. MR STACEY, a very respectable clergyman of Crediton. His death was occasioned by having been thrown from his horse about a fortnight since, in consequence of the animal being frightened by an umbrella: - In the fall he ruptured the principal artery of his arm; and a mortification having immediately struck to the part, he was obliged to undergo the painful operation of having the arm amputated above the elbow, and since that, to suffer a second amputation, close to the shoulder; but all the art of surgery was ineffectual for his relief, the mortification could not be subdued, he languished till Monday last and then expired. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, pro forma, whose verdict was accidental death.

On Thursday last a Coroner's Inquest was held at the valiant soldier inn, before Samuel Walkey, esq. Coroner, on the body of JOHN WESTON, a joiner, who put an end to his existence by cutting his throat with a chisel: - Verdict, Lunacy.

On Tuesday an Inquest was held at the star inn, on the body of HENRY YOUNG DARRACOTT, a lieutenant in the navy on half-pay, who put a period to his existence by shooting himself with a pistol: - Verdict, lunacy.

The same evening an Inquest was held at the blue boy public-house, on the body of JOHN BELL, a soldier in the royal Lancashire militia, who was drowned in consequence of falling into a lake while in a state of intoxication: - Verdict, accidental death.

This day an Inquest was held at the sign of the Marquis Cornwallis, on the body of WILLIAM FRENCH, a hellier, who was killed in consequence of the ruins of a house falling on him:- Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 16 July 1807, Issue 2282 – Gale Document No. Y3200649914
Exeter, Wednesday 15 July
Last week, a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body of MARY TOUT, who fell down in a fit, and soon afterwards expired. – Verdict, Visitation of God.

An Inquest was also held on the body of WILLIAM WESTACOTT, a child 2 years of age, who was scalded to death, in consequence of drinking boiling water out of a teakettle. – Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 23 July 1807, Issue 2283 – Gale Document No. Y3200649924
Exeter, Wednesday 22 July
On Monday last a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body of JOHN TREMLETT, a labourer, who was killed by a tree rolling over him. – Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 8 October 1807, Issue 2296 – Gale Document No. Y3200650036
Exeter, Wednesday 7 October
On Friday last an Inquest was held before Samuel Walkey, esq. Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM SHORTRIDGE, who fell down in a fit, as he was returning home from work, and expired: Verdict, Visitation of God.

On Sunday last an Inquest was also held on the body of SUSAN MUNDY, who died n consequence of an injury which she received from the stage coach breaking down at Alphington: Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 4 February 1808, Issue 2313 – Gale Document No. Y3200650216
On Tuesday last an Inquest was held at Southgate prison, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. coroner, on the body of HENRY PARKER, a prisoner, (committed a few days since on suspicion of horse-stealing,) who put an end to his existence by hanging himself: verdict, felt de se.

Thursday 26 May 1808, Issue 22329 – Gale Document No. Y3200650380
Exeter, Wednesday 25 May
On Sunday last an Inquest was held at the Red Lion, in Saint Sidwell's, before Samuel Walkey, esq. Coroner, on the body of THOMAS SAUNDERS, a private in the Glamorganshire militia, who died from a wound which he received from a dragoon. The following are the particulars:- On Easter Monday last, in the evening, a party of the Glamorganshire militia had assembled at the Moreton Inn, in St. Thomas's, to drink beer, when an affray took place between them up-stairs; the landlady, hearing the noise, desired two dragoons to go up, in order to quell the disturbance; on which the militia-men drew their bayonets, and compelled them to withdraw; the dragoons, however, returned armed with their swords, but still were overpowered by the militia, who followed them downstairs into the passage, here a general scuffle ensued, in which the unfortunate soldier received a wound on his hand, which proved mortal. The Jury, after hearing all the evidence, returned a verdict of self-defence on behalf of the dragoon.

Thursday 21 July 1808, Issue 2337 – Gale Document No. Y3200650456
Exeter, Wednesday 20 July
On Friday last an Inquest was held at the Old London Inn, before Samuel Walkey, gent. Coroner, on the body of MARY CHILCOTT, who put an end to her existence by poisoning herself. - Verdict, lunacy.

Thursday 25 August 1808, Issue 2312 – Gale Document No. Y3200650501
This morning a coroner's inquest was held on the body of JAMES TIERNEY, a prisoner in High Gaol, who put an end to his existence by hanging himself, in his cell; the string with which he effected his purpose, was formed of pieces of cloth, torn from his shirt sleeves and stockings. The deceased was convicted of sedition at the Lammas Assize in 1804, and received sentence of death; but being found by inquisition to be insane, was ordered to remain during his majesty's pleasure. Verdict lunacy.

Thursday 15 September 1808, Issue 2315 – Gale Document No. Y3200650528
Exeter, Wednesday 14 September
Friday last, MRS ALLEN, wife of the REV. MR. ALLEN, dissenting minister, of this city, put an end to her existence by strangling herself with a buckle garter. A coroner's inquest was held on the body the following day: verdict, lunacy.

Monday se'nnight was found drowned, in a small inlet of the sea, near Arne, in Purbeck, the body of the REV. JOHN EDWARDS, of Crediton, Devon. He left home in a deranged state of mind, and eluded the diligent search of his friends. From the orderly state in which his clothes were found by the water side, it is evident he intended to bathe, and went beyond his depth. He was seen bathing the day before in the river Frome, a few miles from Dorchester. A coroner's inquest sat on the body, and brought in their verdict, drowned by accident.

Thursday 15 December 1808, Issue 2327 – Gale Document No. Y3200650665
Plymouth
Tuesday Mr Whiteford, coroner for Devon, held an inquest on the body of W. JENKINS, carpenter's mate of the Spencer, of 74 guns, who died in consequence of a wound he received by a blow on his intestines, from R. BURROWS, a waterman, in an affray at the Jolly Sailor, in Plymouth-Dock. After a patient investigation of the existing circumstances of the case, the jury found a verdict of Manslaughter against BURROWS, who was committed to Exeter jail, to take his trial at the next Exeter assizes.

Thursday 22 December 1808, Issue 2328 – Gale Document No. Y3200650675
Exeter
Sunday an inquest was held on the body of ELIZABETH HILMAN, a poor old woman, who was burnt to death the preceding night, in her apartment in St. Catherine's Alms Houses, in this city; occasioned, it is supposed, by her falling on the fire in a fit.

Also, on the body of a little girl, 11 years of age, named HEXTER, found drowned on Saturday evening in one of the lakes, near the island. Verdict on each, accidental death.

Thursday 22 December 1808, Issue 2328 – Gale Document No. Y3200650676
An inquest was held on Friday morning on the body of the unfortunate captain BALDERSON, when the jury, after fully investigating the transaction, returned a verdict of wilful murder against James Smith.
The remains of Capt. BALDERSTON were interred on Saturday last, with naval and military honours, in the church-yard of Stonehouse Chapel.
On Monday a court-martial was held on board the Salvador del Mundo, in Hamoaze, to try Smith, when he was found guilty, and sentenced to be hanged at the yard-arm of one of his Majesty's ships, at such time as the right honourable the lords commissioners of the admiralty shall please to direct.

Thursday 2 February 1809, Issue 2335 – Gale Document No. Y3200650742
Exeter.
This evening an inquest was held before Samuel Walkey, gent., coroner, on the body of HARRIET STUDLEY who was burnt to death by her clothes catching fire. - Verdict, accident.

Thursday 20 April 1809, Issue 2346 – Gale Document No. Y3200650851
Exeter.
Saturday last, an inquest was held at the Old London Inn, before Samuel Walkey, gent., coroner, on the body of TEMPERANCE PYNE, an old woman, who was burnt to death, in consequence of her clothes catching fire. - Verdict accidental death.

Thursday 1 June 1809, Issue 2352 – Gale Document No. Y3200650907
Exeter.
Sunday an inquest was held before Samuel Walkey, gent., on the body of MR CHARLES WINGYETT, of this city, cabinet-maker, who cut his throat the preceding Thursday in a fit of insanity: Verdict, lunacy.

Thursday 15 June 1809, Issue 2354 – Gale Document No. Y3200650928
Exeter, Wednesday 14 June
Yesterday afternoon an inquest was held, before Samuel Walkey, gent., coroner, on the body of ANN HOCK, who expired suddenly in bed, by the side of her husband. Verdict, Visitation of God.

Thursday 24 August 1809, Issue 2364 – Gale Document No. Y3200651023
On Saturday last an Inquest was taken at Teigngrace on the body of SAMUEL BISHOP, a young man, who unfortunately lost his life in consequence of a humane attempt to save some hounds that had taken to the water in couples. His foot slipping, he immediately sunk¨ it is presumed, that being entangled in the weeds, he could not rise again. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 23 November 1809, Issue 2377 – Gale Document No. Y3200651145
Exeter, Wednesday 22 November
This afternoon, an Inquest was held before Samuel Walkey, gent. Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH CLEAVE, who was burnt to death, inconsequence of her cloaths catching fire. - Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 14 December 1809, Issue 2310 – Gale Document No. Y3200651176
Exeter, Wednesday 13 December
On Friday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before Samuel Walkey, gent. Coroner, on the body of JOHN BEER, who died in consequence of a horse treading on his hand, which occasioned a lacerated wound, attended with a locked jaw: Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 15 February 1810, Issue 2315 – Gale Document No. Y3200651271
Exeter, Wednesday 14 February
On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the Black Horse public-house, before Samuel Walkey, gent. Coroner, on the body of HUGH WATTS, a private in the 9th light dragoons, who put an end to his existence, by shooting himself with a pistol: Verdict, Lunacy.

Thursday 1 March 1810, Issue 2317 – Gale Document No. Y3200651290
Exeter, Wednesday 28 February
On Sunday morning last, LIEUT. DARBY, of his Majesty's ship Impetueux, put an end to his existence, by shooting himself in the head with a pistol, in his bedroom, at the New London Inn, in this city, where he had arrived the preceding evening, on his way to join his ship at Plymouth. He had written several letters, addressed to his father, sister, &c., informing them of the rash act he was about to commit, attributing his unhappiness of mind to an unfortunate love attachment, and that having received a challenge from a rival, which, at the earnest entreaties of his friends, he had declined accepting, the dread of the imputation of cowardice had rendered life miserable. In the evening a coroner's inquest was held on the body, when the jury returned a verdict of felt de se; and on the following day his body was interred according to the usual form of law in similar cases.

On Friday last an inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier, before Samuel Walkey, gent., coroner, on the body of EMANUEL WILLMOTT, a hellier, who died in consequence of a fracture of his skull, which he received from falling from a scaffolding 34 feet high, in Theatre-lane: verdict, accidental death.

The same day an inquest was held at the London ale-house, on the body of HUMPHRY SANDERS, who fell down in a fit in the street, and soon afterwards expired: verdict, visitation by God.

On Saturday an inquest was also held at the Valiant Soldier, on the body of ELIZA COOMBE, a child eleven months old, who was burnt to death in consequence of her clothes catching fire: verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 8 March 1810, Issue 2318 – Gale Document No. Y3200651299
Exeter, Wednesday 7 March
On Sunday last an Inquest was held at the Duke of York public-house, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, gent. Coroner, on the body of JOAN LANGHAM, an old woman, who suddenly expired in the street, after coming out of a coach from a journey: Verdict, Visitation of God.

On Monday an Inquest was also held at the Valiant Soldier, on the body of THOMAS BAKER, an infant, who was burnt to death by falling into the fire from his mother's arms, she being subject to fits: Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 5 April 1810, Issue 2322 – Gale Document No. Y3200651337
Exeter, Wednesday 4 April
On Saturday last an inquest was held at the sign of the Anchor, before Samuel Walkey, gent. coroner, on the body of KEZIA BAKER, a child 4 years of age, who fell out of a window three stories high, and soon afterwards expired: verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 17 May 1810, Issue 2328 – Gale Document No. Y3200651396
Exeter, Wednesday 16 May
On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the sign of the Plume of Feathers, before Samuel Walkey, gent. Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH ROWE, who was found dead in her bed the same morning: Verdict, Visitation of God.

Thursday 31 May 1810, Issue 2330 – Gale Document No. Y3200651418
Plymouth, 29 May
Last evening a most shocking accident happened in Pembroke-street, Dock. MR DUGORN, one of his Majesty's pilots of a frigate on the coast of France, who had been married about six months to a young lady of Dock, of a respectable family, returned from sea, and taking it into his head to be extremely jealous, on entering the house desired his wife to go into another room with him, apparently unconcerned; on her going in with him he drew a pistol, fired it, and shot her through the hart, and she dropped dead on the carpet. Hearing the report, some persons were nearly at hand, he immediately fired his other pistol through his own heart, and dropt dead on the floor. A coroner's inquest will sit tomorrow.

Thursday 21 June 1810, Issue 2333 – Gale Document No. Y3200651444
Exeter, Wednesday 20 June
On Monday last an inquest was held at the sign of the White Hart inn, before Samuel Walkey, gent. coroner, on the bodies of CLEMENT TATTERSHALL and GEORGE CAPE, two young men, who were drowned on Sunday morning while bathing in the river Exe, neither of them being able to swim. Verdict, accidental death.

On Tuesday an inquest was also held at the sign of the Three Mariners, Quay Gate, on the body of GEORGE REED, master of the sad house, who was drowned, in consequence of falling into the river while washing himself. Verdict accidental death.

Thursday 5 July 1810, Issue 2335 – Gale Document No. Y3200651461
Exeter, Wednesday 4 July
This evening an inquest was held at the Plume of Feathers, before Samuel Walkey, gent. coroner, on the body of JOSEPH WAY, a child two years old, who was drowned in consequence of falling into the engine stream: verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 19 July 1810, Issue 2337 – Gale Document No. Y3200651481
Exeter, Wednesday 18 July
Friday last MR JAMES LUKE, a very respectable grocer and tea-dealer of this city, put a period to his existence. As he was possessed of considerable property, and born a character unimpeached, it is supposed that the recent failures in this neighbourhood, and in London, by which he had been a severe sufferer, had occasioned so great an agitation in his mind, as to bring on a temporary derangement of his intellects, and, in the frenzy of the moment, he committed this rash act. The Coroner's Jury, composed of some of the principal inhabitants of this city, held an Inquest on the body on Friday afternoon, and returned a verdict of Lunacy.

Thursday 16 August 1810, Issue 2341 – Gale Document No. Y3200651519
Exeter, Wednesday 15 August
Yesterday an inquest was held at the Plume of Feathers, before Samuel Walkey, gent. coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM SNOW, of this city, who was found drowned that morning in the river Exe. He had breakfasted at Cowley Bridge, and on his return went into the water to bathe, opposite the Red Cow public-house, from which place the body had floated as far as the Head Wear, a distance of more than a quarter of a mile. The deceased had been many years principal clerk in the employ of Mrs Kingdon and Sons, bore an unblemished character, and was universally respected by all who knew him.

This evening an inquest was also held at the sign of the Wool Pack, on the body of THOMAS ARTHUR, the landlord, who was found dead in his bed this morning: verdict, visitation by God.

Thursday 20 September 1810, Issue 2346 – Gale Document No. Y3200651564
Exeter, Wednesday 19 September
Yesterday afternoon an inquest was held in this city, before Samuel Walkey, gent. coroner, on the body of JANE WOOTEN, a child 8 years of age, who had been absent from her parents a week, but yesterday morning was discovered floating in the river near the Quay: verdict, found drowned.

Thursday 1 November 1810, Issue 2352 – Gale Document No. Y3200651621
Exeter, Wednesday 31 October
On Friday last an inquest was held at the Red Lion, before Samuel Walkey, gent. coroner, on the body of BENJAMIN TAPSELL, a private in the East Kent Militia, who died in consequence of an injury received in his back from a quantity of earth falling on him while working some weeks since in the common sewer in the High-street of this city: verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 31 January 1811, Issue 2365 – Gale Document No. Y3200651751
Exeter, Wednesday 30 January
On Monday last an inquest was held at the sign of the White Horse, before Samuel Walkey, gent. coroner, on the body of THOMAS HELY, a child two years old, who was burnt to death, owing to his clothes catching fire: verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 28 March 1811, Issue 2373 – Gale Document No. Y3200651834
Exeter, Wednesday 27 March
On Monday last, an inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier, before Samuel Walkey, gent. coroner, on the body of MARY ANN HORRILL, a child four years old, who was burnt to death in consequence of her clothes catching fire: verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 23 May 1811, Issue 2381 – Gale Document No. Y3200651898
Exeter, Wednesday 22 May
On Wednesday last died, at Sandford, Devon, MR RICHARD KELLAND, of that place, tanner. His death was occasioned by his taking a quantity of arsenic A coroner's inquest was held on the body the following day, and returned a verdict of lunacy.

Thursday 24 September 1812, Issue 2455 – Gale Document No. Y3200652572
Exeter, Wednesday 23 September
Last evening a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body of MISS SARAH COFFIN, of this city, haberdasher, who put an end to her existence by hanging herself. It was clearly proved that ever since the death of her uncle, the late MR JOHN HITCHCOCK, the deceased had been in a deranged state of mind, and the Jury, without a moment's hesitation returned a verdict of lunacy.

Thursday 1 July 1813, Issue 2495 – Gale Document No. Y3200652958
On Saturday a coroner's inquest was held at Heavitree, on the body of MR JOHN BARRELL, of that place, farmer, formerly butcher, who put an end to his existence the preceding day by blowing his brains out with a fowling-piece in an orchard near his dwelling house. The most satisfactory evidence was adduced of the disordered state of mind under which the deceased had for some time laboured, and the jury returned a verdict of lunacy.

Thursday 16 December 1813, Issue 2519 – Gale Document No. Y3200653196
Sunday afternoon a coroner's inquest was held on the body of MRS NEVETT, of this city, widow, some time since mistress of the Elephant Inn, North street, who was found drowned on Saturday in the River Exe, below James's Weir. She left her home early the preceding evening, and is supposed to have wandered about the fields the whole night in a state of despondency, and thrown herself into the water early in the morning. - Verdict, lunacy.

Thursday 23 December 1813, Issue 2520 – Gale Document No. Y3200653205
Exeter, Wednesday 22 December
Saturday the body of a man, named THOMAS BALLE, a labourer, was taken out of the Canal, a little below the Double Lock. A coroner's inquest was held on Sunday, when, from the evidence, it appeared that the deceased had been missing six weeks, and is supposed to have fallen off the bank on his return from work: verdict, found drowned.

Thursday 10 February 1814, Issue 2527 – Gale Document No. Y3200653283
Exeter, Wednesday 9 February
Monday last an inquest was taken at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of SARAH GRIFFIN, a child 10 years old, who was burnt to death in consequence of her clothes taking fire. - Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 10 March 1814, Issue 2531 – Gale Document No. Y3200653324
Exeter, Wednesday 9 March
On Saturday a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body of RICHARD EASTERBROOKE, residing in Coombe-street, in this city, who cut his throat with a razor on the morning of that day. The unfortunate man was formerly a respectable farmer of Moretonhampstead, but has latterly been reduced to extreme poverty: - Verdict, lunacy.

Thursday 28 July 1814, Issue 2551 – Gale Document No. Y3200653513
Exeter, Wednesday 27 July
On Friday an inquest was held at the King's Arms, Tavistock, before Joseph Whiteford, Esq. coroner, on the body of MR THOMAS JOPE, who had put an end to his existence by cutting his throat. Mr William Bredall, surgeon, stated that he had known the deceased about 60 years, and that within the last 12 months he had had two paralytic seizures, and has since laboured under a very great depression of spirits. The Jury returned a verdict of lunacy. The deceased was a most exemplary character, and highly respected in the neighbourhood. He was Surveyor to his Grace the Duke of Bedford.

Thursday 15 September 1814, Issue 2558 – Gale Document No. Y3200653580
Exeter, Wednesday 14 September
An inquest was held on Monday, at Stonehouse, before Joseph Whiteford, Esq. Coroner, on the body of THOMAS COWANS, a seaman on board the Salvador, who on Friday last, had made a bet he would go up and stand on the truck at the main-top royal mast head, which he had effected about half past 7 o'clock in the evening, but on attempting to come down by holding only with his hands on a rope called the top-gallant-back-stay, he came down so swift that he could not keep his hold, and fell from just under the main-top on the starboard side of the deck, on his face, quite insensible; the blood gushed out from his mouth and ears, and one of his thighs was fractured; he languished till about one o'clock in the morning, when he died. - Verdict, Accidental death.

Thursday 27 October 1814, Issue 2564 – Gale Document No. Y3200653637
Exeter, Wednesday 26 October
Friday a coroner's inquest was held on the body of WILLIAM GAY, who, during the performance of the Messiah at the Cathedral, on Tuesday morning, having climbed up to the window at the west-end of the Church; on descending from the parapet wall, the coping stone (of great weight) which he had hold of, gave way, and forced him back on the iron spikes of the railing, two of which passed several inches through both his thighs. In disengaging him from his perilous situation, his flesh was dreadfully lacerated, and he bled profusely. He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he languished until Thursday night: - Verdict, accidental death.
A collection was made for the mother of the deceased at the doors of the Cathedral on Friday, which amounted to sixty-one pounds.

Monday an inquest was held on the body of ELEANOR GRAVEL, an apprentice to a child-bed linen-maker, of this city, who was found drowned in the river Exe. It appeared in evidence, that the deceased left her home last on Friday night, and proceeded to Cowley Bridge, a distance of two Miles, where she threw herself off the Centre Arch, leaving a pair of scissors and other trifling articles close to the spot. She had made frequent applications to Mr Sadler, in the course of the week, for permission to ascend with his balloon, and appeared to possess a weak and disordered mind: - Verdict, Lunacy.

Thursday 1 December 1814, Issue 2569 – Gale Document No. Y3200653692
Exeter, Wednesday 30 November
ACCIDENT. - As a MR PENGILLY of Milton Abbot, was returning in a cart from his work, on Saturday evening last, with his daughter, a girl of about 9 years old, who was sitting on its edge; it unfortunately overturned, and killed her upon the spot, but the father escaped unhurt. Such an instance should deter every one from sitting in such a perilous situation. An Inquest was held upon the body of Tuesday at Kelly, near Tavistock before Joseph Whitford, Esq. Coroner. Verdict – accidental death.

Thursday 18 May 1815, Issue 2593 – Gale Document No. Y3200653935
Exeter, Wednesday 17 May
On Sunday last, MR JAMES WOODMAN, of Sowton, near this city, farmer and miller, put an end to his existence by hanging himself in a stable, near his dwelling-house. The body was not discovered until the following morning. He was a man of good character and respectable connexions, but has lately appeared distressed in spirits, occasioned it is supposed by a losing concern in business. He has left a widow and six children. A coroner's inquest has been held on the body, verdict Lunacy.

Thursday 15 June 1815, Issue 2597 – Gale Document No. Y3200653971
Monday the 5th inst., as EDWARD MORTIMORE, mason, his son, and two men, were working on a scaffold, 18 feet high, in the court of the White Hart Inn, in Moretonhampstead, one of the supporters of the scaffold broke, by which means MORTIMORE and his son were precipitated to the ground; the father was taken up apparently dead, his skull was fractured, and otherwise much bruised; he languished till Friday morning, when he died, leaving a widow and four children to lament his loss. The son received very little hurt. The other two men preserved themselves from falling, by catching hold of the scaffold poles. A coroner's inquest was held on the body, verdict Accidental Death.

Thursday 27 July 1815, Issue 2603 – Gale Document No. Y3200654029
Exeter, Wednesday 26 July
Melancholy Occurrence - CAPTAIN LOWE, formerly of the 25th Light Dragoons, who has for some time resided in an obscure cottage at Hill's Court, in this city, put an end to his existence early this morning by hanging himself in his bed-room. His wife first discovered him, and in a most frantic manner alarmed the neighbourhood; medical assistance was procured, but he was found past recovery. The unfortunate deceased had retired from the army many years, and embarked in the farming line, a speculation which it appears, caused his ruin; he had long laboured under great despondency of mind, and was at length so reduced as to be incapable of providing the necessaries of life; he has left a widow and two young children, in a state of distress beyond description. We shall thankfully receive any donation for the relief of this truly wretched family, which the charitable and humane may be pleased to bestow. A coroner's inquest was held on the body this afternoon, - verdict Lunacy.

Thursday 26 October 1815, Issue 2616 – Gale Document No. Y3200654158
Exeter, Wednesday 25 October
Vicissitude in Life – A man, named BONNER, who kept a public-house at Bradninch, Devon, was married on Tuesday in the last week, he hung himself on Friday, a coroner's inquest was held on his body on Saturday, and he was buried on Sunday.

Thursday 21 December 1815, Issue 2624 – Gale Document No. Y3200654240
Exeter, Wednesday 20 December
A Coroner's inquest was held in this city on Sunday last, on the body of JOHN MOORE, a journeyman taylor, who was seized with a fit of coughing in the High-street, on the preceding evening, which caused the bursting of a blood vessel, and he expired shortly afterwards: Verdict, ~Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 25 January 1816, Issue 2629 – Gale Document No. Y3200654291
Exeter, Wednesday 24 January
Yesterday an inquest was held in this city, on the body of JEREMIAH LIGHTHOLDER, by trade a whitesmith, who was found dead on the preceding day, in a privy at the bottom of Holloway-street, where he was seen to enter not more than five minutes before he was discovered in a lifeless state: - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 7 March 1816, Issue 2635 – Gale Document No. Y3200654349
On Saturday night last, about twelve o'clock MR JOSEPH WELSMAN, of Sidbury, was found dead near the bottom of the town of Honiton. He was lying under the belly of his horse, with his feet in the stirrups, and the bridle in his hand – the horse, which was blind, standing quite still. It appears that he left the Swan Inn, Honiton, about ten o'clock that night, to go to Sidbury, and nothing was heard of him till he was found in the state described two hours afterwards, not two gun-shots from whence he set out, and in the public street. There appeared a deep wound in his side; and it was supposed at first he had been shot. An inquest was held on the body, on Sunday night, when it appeared that this unfortunate man had been by some means crushed to death: his breast bone was broken to pieces and one of his ribs had been driven through his side, which occasioned the appearance of the wound of a shot. No clue whatever to the cause of his death can be discovered.

Thursday 30 May 1816, Issue 2647 – Gale Document No. Y3200654467
Exeter, Wednesday 29 May
Saturday night, about ten o'clock LIEUT. TREMLETT, of the Royal Navy, put an end to his existence at his lodgings in Okehampton-street, St Thomas. He was sitting by the fire conversing with the mistress of the house, with his usual complacency, when suddenly taking a pistol from his pocket, he placed the muzzle to his temple, and discharged the contents into his head. His hand dropt, the pistol fell to the ground, and he died instantly without the slightest struggle, the body retaining the same position on the chair as before. A Coroner's inquest was held on the body on Sunday: Verdict, lunacy. Pecuniary embarrassment is supposed to have occasioned the rash act.

Thursday 1 August 1816, Issue 2656 – Gale Document No. Y3200654560
Exeter, Wednesday 31 July
Monday afternoon, about 13 years of age, sons of SERGEANT BAKER, of the East Devon militia, fell from a horse, near the Cullompton Turnpike, and his foot remaining in the stirrup, he was dragged a considerable distance, by which his head was bruised in so shocking a manner, that he expired almost immediately. A Coroner's inquest was held on the body yesterday: Verdict, accidental death.

A coroner's inquest was held on the 27th instant, at the Cot Inn, in the parish of Dartington, near Totnes, on the body of WM. BARRETT. It appeared in evidence that the deceased was at the bull baiting on the Totnes Marsh, on the 17th instant, being the Races; that he went so near the bull, that he was attacked by the animal and received a wound in the breast, which occasioned his death in about a week after. - Verdict, that the said WM. BARRETT came by his death by means of a wound received from the horn of the bull.
The Bull, or the value thereof, becomes a deodand to the Lord of the Manor. The Jury felt determined to give such a verdict, to prevent, if possible, the horrid practice of full baiting.

The following inquests were last week held by Joseph Whiteford, Esq. on of the Coroner's of the county of Devon, on the body of JOHN BRISCOE, a marine, who was found much cut and bruised, near Stonehouse-Mills, but the evidence not being sufficient to account for the manner in which he came by his death, the Jury adjourned their sitting until Tuesday, when, as no further light could be thrown on the melancholy affair, they found a verdict of – Found dead with considerable marks of violence, but by whom inflicted, there is no evidence before the Jury.

On the body of ELISHA CREBER, a child, found drowned at Oreston, in the parish of Plymstock.

On the body of HENRY INGRAM, found drowned at Salcombe.

On the body of FREANCIS TOZER, accidentally killed by a fall from his horse at the parish of Ermington.

On Sunday last, on the body of WILLIAM FOWLER, who unfortunately fell over-board in the Sound from one of the Victualling Hoys belonging to this port, a few days since. The body was picked up in Catwater. Verdict – Found drowned.

Thursday 8 August 1816, Issue 2657 – Gale Document No. Y3200654571
Exeter, Wednesday 7 August
This afternoon a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body of THOMAS HORE, who put an end to his existence yesterday, by strangling himself in his bed-room with his neckcloth: Verdict, lunacy. The deceased was 36 years parish-clerk of St. Martin's in this city, but from which situation he had lately been removed.

Thursday 7 November 1816, Issue 2670 – Gale Document No. Y3200654709
Exeter, Wednesday 6 November
Friday last, MR SMITH, of Topsham, proprietor of a car which conveys passengers to and from this city, put an end to his existence, by hanging himself at the bed-post in his lodging room. He was first discovered by his wife, to whom he had a short time before complained of illness, saying he would go and lie down on the bed. Pecuniary embarrassment is considered as the cause of this rash act. The Coroner's inquest was held on the body, verdict – Lunacy.

Thursday 14 November 1816, Issue 2671 – Gale Document No. Y3200654722
Exeter, Wednesday 13 November
On Wednesday last, a horrid murder was perpetrated at Babicombe, near St. Mary Church, in this county, by THOMAS VINSON, on the body of his own wife, whose head he nearly severed from her body with a large knife; he then stabbed, in various parts of his body, her father, who is a very aged man, but we are happy to learn he is not dead; he then, with the same weapon, attempted suicide, by stabbing himself three times, but not mortally, and surgical aid being immediately called, it is expected he will soon be recovered to meet that punishment due to the enormity of his crime. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body of MRS VINSON, and returned a verdict of – Wilful Murder.

Thursday 16 January 1817, Issue 2680 – Gale Document No. Y3200654825
A Coroner's Inquest was held on Sunday night last, on the body of MR FRANCIS WILSON, respectable linen draper and mercer of Plymouth, who put a period to his existence on the preceding day by cutting his throat. The jury returned a verdict of Lunacy.

Thursday 31 July 1817, Issue 2707 – Gale Document No. Y3200655141
On Saturday last, an inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, Gent. Coroner, on the body of JOHN PARISH, who received his death by the kick of a horse, belonging to Mr Pidgley, which was frightened in consequence of two dogs fighting, between his legs, while the man was taking it out of a gig. - Verdict, Accidental Death, and 1s. placed upon the shoe of the said horse; also the dog which was the occasion of the accident, was immediately ordered to be drowned, which was done.

Thursday 25 September 1817, Issue 2715 – Gale Document No. Y3200655228
Exeter, Wednesday 24 September
SUDDEN DEATH - Late on Monday night a Coroner's Inquest was held at the New Gold Lion, in Silver-street, on the body of MR WILLIAM COOPER, of this city, broker, who went to the above house about eight o'clock on the same evening in perfect health and good spirits; he had not been in the room more than ten minutes, and while in the act of pouring out a glass of beer, he was seized with a sudden trembling, the cup fell from his hand, his head dropt on the arm of a friend sitting next him, and he instantly expired without a groan or a struggle. Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God. - The deceased was about 32 years of age, and has left a widow and four young children to lament their severe loss.

Thursday 23 October 1817, Issue 2719 – Gale Document No. Y3200655281
MURDER. - On Thursday last, a murder was committed at Plymouth-Dock; the following particulars of which were given in evidence before the Coroner, Joseph Whiteford, Esq. JOHN GREEN, attendant on the boat which conveys the Cornish mail from Dock to Torpoint, and REBECCA SMITH, wife of GILBERT SMITH, a rigger in his Majesty's Dock-yard, met together at the Lion and Anchor in Cherry-garden street, Dock. After drinking a pint of beer, GREEN called for another, requesting the landlady to warm a glass of it for the female; whose mouth he said, was sore. They sat opposite to each other in the back parlour, with the door open to the passage, apparently on the most amicable terms. Soon afterwards SMITH left the room and returned again, when GREEN went to the tap-room fire, lighted his pipe, and rejoined her in the same apartment. In about a quarter of an hour subsequent to this, the landlady, (Sarah Coats) saw SMITH coming to the bar, moving her lips as if endeavouring to speak, though unable to do so, while blood flowed profusely from her throat. Mrs Coats instantly called out for assistance, and having seated SMITH in a chair, and placed her under the care of another woman, hastened in search of a surgeon. In the mean time, the landlord ran to the back room, the door of which was still open, where he discovered GREEN behind the door, in the act of wiping off the blood from his face and hands, with which his clothes also were nearly covered. The landlord exclaimed, "what have you been doing, you scoundrel?" GREEN replied, "she attempted to cut my throat and I have cut her's." He was then taken into custody by two men, from the tap-room, who conveyed him to the town prison. The surgeon, on examining SWMITH, found there was no chance of saving her life: the wound was mortal. A case knife, dyed with gore, was discovered by the peace-officers, secreted under some shavings in the apartment where the prisoner and SMITH had been sitting, and afterwards sworn to, as belonging to Elizabeth Simmonite, at whose house the prisoner had lodged five weeks. GILBERT SMITH, husband of the deceased, stated that she eloped with GREEN a year and half since, leaving behind her two children, and had cohabited with him in Ireland until two months preceding this event, when she entreated permission to return to her husband and children, to which he consented, on her promise of amendment. Soon after her arrival at Dock, GREEN made his appearance, and being frequently seen by the husband loitering about the door, was desired to abstain from such conduct. Mrs Wilson, living in a room adjoining that occupied by the deceased, at No. 17, Fore-street, said, that in an interview she witnessed between the prisoner and deceased, the latter said to the former, "JACK GREEN, you mean nothing but to murder me:" to which he answered, "I value not my own life but I don't wish to hurt you." She then requested that he would never again come into her presence which he promised, but neither of the parties had resolution enough to abide by this determination. They met again on Thursday last. The Jury, without any hesitation, brought in a verdict of Wilful Murder, and GREEN was accordingly committed to Devon County gaol, to be tried at the next assizes.

Thursday 6 November 1817, Issue 2721- Gale Document No. Y3200655308
Child Murder - On the 26th ult. an inquest was held at Buckfastleigh, near Ashburton, before Joseph Gribble, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a male child, about 3 weeks old. It appeared in evidence before the Coroner, by the testimony of several witnesses, as well as two surgeons, that FRANCES CLARK, singlewoman, living at Buckfastleigh, was delivered of a bastard child (her second) about three weeks before; that she had been summoned to appear before the Magistrates on the 25th to swear to the father of the child; that on the 24th (the day before) the said FRANCES CLARK, living in the house with several other persons, contrived to administer "vitriol" to the child, which lingered in agony until the 25th, and then died; the lip and inside of the mouth and throat appeared very much burnt, as well as the whittle and apron the child had on at the time. The medical men present were of opinion, that the death of the child was occasioned by vitriol; and from various other circumstances which appeared in evidence, fifteen out of twenty-three of the Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against the said FRANCES CLARK, upon which she was committed by the Coroner to the Devon County Gaol, to take her trial at the next Assizes.

Thursday 4 December 1817, Issue 2726 – Gale Document No. Y3200655363
Exeter, Wednesday 3 December
Yesterday afternoon, a Coroner's Inquest was held at the sign of the Royal Oak, in this city, on the body of JOHN CHAPPLE, who died suddenly on Sunday evening, at his house in Guinea-street, when a most respectable jury returned a verdict of – Sudden death, having died of apoplexy. He lived 14 years as principal waiter at the Globe Tavern: and whose general character was that of an honest and faithful servant. He has left a widow and seven children to deplore his irreparable loss.

Thursday 29 January 1818, Issue 2734 – Gale Document No. Y3200655468
On Tuesday, the 13th instant, a sheriff's officer went to the house of PETER HOLWAY, a farmer, at Hemiock, near Wellington, to levy an execution for £14. His wife upbraided him for not before informing her of his having been served with the initiatory process, as in that case the expenses consequent on his negligence might have been avoided. In the course of her reproaches she expressed a wish that he was dead. HOLWAY then said he would go to his son's, a distance of about two miles, to get his assistance to pay the amount of the levy. Just before mounting his horse, he took out his snuff-box, and presenting it to his wife, asked her to take a pinch, which she scornfully declined, and said, she wished "that he might break his neck before he came home." This wish was unhappily realized; for on returning home with his son, from the house of the latter, he suddenly dropped from his horse in a fit, and dislocating his neck by the fall, expired without uttering a syllable! A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body, who returned a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God. The wife, from the circumstance of the event, has been ever since in a most afflicting state of wretchedness.

Thursday 16 April 1818, Issue 2745 – Gale Document No. Y3200655596
Exeter, Wednesday 15 April
Yesterday, an Inquest was held, in the parish of St. Leonard, before C. D. Pugh, Esq., one of the Coroners for the county of Devon, on the body of MISS ELIZABETH LANGWORTHY, of this city, who was found drowned in the river Exe, opposite the Exeter Lime Kilns, on the preceding afternoon. She had been seen walking near the spot a short time previous, and a mantle and other parts of her dress were found on the bank. The body was but a short time in the water, yet although every means of recovery, as recommended by the Humane Society, were used, they failed to restore animation. The deceased was 46 years of age, of respectable connexions, and had long been in a low and desponding state of mind. - Verdict, Insanity.

Thursday 23 July 1818, Issue 2759 – Gale Document No. Y3200655748
Exeter, Wednesday 22 July
A Coroner's Inquest was held, on Sunday last, on the body of MR JOHN PIM, of the firm of "Oxenham and Pim," paper-makers, of Wear, near this city, who put a period to his existence on the evening preceding, by hanging himself in a drying loft, in his mill. The deceased had, for a long time past, laboured under mental derangement, and the jury instantly returned a verdict of Insanity.

Thursday 17 December 1818, Issue 2779 – Gale Document No. Y3200656006
Exeter, Wednesday 16 December
On Friday last, as MISS MARY JACKSON, who resided in the parish of Bishop's Clist, near this city, was walking on the Terrace, in front of Summerland Place, on her return home, she was suddenly alarmed at the approach of a cow towards her, and, in her haste to avoid the animal, she fell from off the footpath. She was instantly taken, in a most terrified state, to the house of a gentleman, close by, where she experienced every attention that humanity could suggest. Medical assistance was procured, she was bled, and appeared to have recovered, in some degree, from the effects of her fright. She was then, at her particular request, taken to the house of an acquaintance, in Paris-street, where, we are sorry to add, she died shortly after her arrival. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, at the Old London Inn, on Saturday, when the Jury returned a verdict – Died by excessive fright, occasioned by a cow.

TOTNES, Dec. 13, 1818 – An Inquest was, this day, held before Joseph Gribble, esq. Coroner, and a respectable jury, at the Seven Stars Inn, in this town, on the body of a young man, named WM. LUSCOMBE, who had been drowned the day before in the river Dart. It appeared in evidence, that the deceased was one of Torbryan, and had been to Totnes market, as a butcher, had delivered some meat in the country, and was returning to Totnes again, about two o'clock, riding, aside, on his horse behind a pair of panniers, and on the Totnes Bridge, which is narrow, and the parapet walls broken down, he met another horse, with panniers, coming against him, the two horses came in contact, and MR LUSCOMBE'S horse was forced with his hind legs upon the broken parapet wall, when he directly fell over into the river, above twenty feet high, and altho' assistance was immediately rendered, and the body taken out of the water within ten minutes, and every exertion used by the medical men to restore life, proved ineffectual. The Jury, after a little hesitation, agreed on the following verdict:- "That the said WILLIAM LUSCOMBE was accidentally drowned, occasioned by some person or persons unknown having wantonly broken down the parapet walls of the bridge, and the same having been left unrepaired for many months by the Corporation of Totnes."

MURDER. - MARY WOODMAN, was, this day, committed to the Devon County Gaol, by Thomas Colby, gent. Coroner, charged with the wilful murder of her husband, CHARLES WOODMAN, of the parish of Oakhampton.

Thursday 4 February 1819, Issue 2786 – Gale Document No. Y3200656101
The body of ANN PITTS, who was drowned in the River Exe, on the 25th November, 1818, was found last Thursday, near Pyne's Wear. It is an act of justice due to Mr John Hodge, against whose character the most malicious and wicked reports have been in circulation, to add, that clearer and more decisive evidence could not be given to the Coroner and the Jury, as to the cause of the death of the poor girl, which was entirely accidental.

Thursday 11 March 1819, Issue 2790 – Gale Document No. Y3200656164
Exeter, Wednesday 10 March
An Inquest was held on Friday evening last, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, esq. Coroner, on the body of MARY POTTER, aged 30 years, servant to Mr William Dean, fuller, who was found dead in her bed early on the above morning. The deceased, accompanied by her sweetheart, had taken a walk to Whitstone, a few miles from hence, on the preceding evening, to visit her mother, from whence she returned, and went to bed in perfect health. A bucket was found close by her bed side, from which, it appeared, she had been taken sick in the night, and it is supposed her death was occasioned by violent retching. - Verdict – Died by the visitation of God.

Thursday 24 June 1819, Issue 2805 – Gale Document No. Y3200656344
Absconded from Justice.
WILLIAM JOHNS, late of Great Torrington, in the county of Devon, Maltster, who stand charged, on the Coroner's Inquest, with having killed one ANN DAVEY, at Great Torrington aforesaid. The said WILLIAM JOHNS is aged about 30 years, fair complexion, one of his fore teeth injured, slight impediment in his speech, walks upright, and is about five feet ten inches high.

Thursday 19 August 1819, Issue 2813 – Gale Document No. Y3200656445
Exeter, Wednesday 18 August
On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken before Samuel Walkey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES DENSHAM, aged 19 years, who was drowned the preceding evening, whilst bathing at Head-Weir, - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Another Inquisition was yesterday forenoon taken before Mr Walkey, at the sign of the Fuller's Arms, on view of the body of a young man, called JOSEPH SEALY, a sailor, belonging to the William and Mary, London-trader, of this port, who was taken out of the river at our Quay the preceding afternoon. The deceased had been missing since Thursday night last, when he was seen in a state of intoxication, and is supposed to have fallen from off the plank on going from the Quay to the vessel. Verdict – Found Drowned.

A melancholy circumstance occurred last week to MRS STEVENS, wife of MR STEVENS, of the Globe spirit shop, Market-street, Plymouth. She was in the habit of bathing under the Hoe, and on Friday, whilst in the water, the surf carried her off her legs and threw her against the rocks, by which the right side of her head was so injured as to cause her almost instant death. An inquest was held in the course of the day, and the jury returned a verdict of – Accidental Death.

Thursday 7 October 1819, Issue 2820 – Gale Document No. Y3200656547
On Wednesday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held at Shute, on the body of ABSALOM CHAPPLE, a parish apprentice, bound on Sir William Templer Pole, Bart. The deceased was in company with other persons beating for game, in the plantations, and unfortunately received in his head the contents of a fowling-piece, which was fired at some game by a servant of Sir William's, who was on the opposite side of the hedge, and could not perceive the boy. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 25 November 1819, Issue 2827 – Gale Document No. Y3200656631
Exeter, Wednesday 24 November
On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before Samuel Walkey, Gent. Coroner, at the Swan Tavern, in this city, on the body of JOHN HELLIER, who was found drowned in the Canal, on the Haven Banks, on Sunday morning, after being absent from home since Friday week last. Verdict – Found Drowned.

Thursday 20 January 1820, Issue 2836 – Gale Document No. Y3200656727
Exeter, Wednesday 19 January
JAMES MEMORY, the man who was stabbed by a Dutchman, belonging to the Prins Frederick Dutch man of war, on the evening of the new year's day, died on Friday last of the wound he received. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the next day, and a verdict of Wilful Murder was returned against the Dutchman, who has been in custody since the affray.

Thursday 13 April 1820, Issue 23848 – Gale Document No. Y3200656904
An Inquest was held on Sunday last, at the parish of Stoke Damarel, on the body of ELIZABETH PIKE, who put a period to her existence, by hanging herself – Verdict, Lunacy.

Thursday 4 May 1820, Issue 2851 – Gale Document No. Y3200656953
Exeter, Wednesday 5 May
A melancholy accident occurred here on Thursday night, to a young woman, of the name of SARAH HILL, aged 19 years, servant to Mr T. Cole, of this city, builder. It appears, that about half-past nine o'clock, the girl informed her master that three men were gone up a ladder, that was resting against the front of the New Subscription Rooms, which are close to Mr C.'s residence, and of which building he has the management. Depredations having been recently committed on the premises, he ascended the roof, by another way, for the purpose of taking the offenders into custody; on his approach they quickly descended; and, in his anxious endeavours to secure them, he accidentally pushed the ladder (which is fifty feet long) on one side, and it fell on the unfortunate girl, who was standing below; her skull was fractured, and her shoulder much bruised; she was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, in a state of insensibility, where she expired about three o'clock on the following morning. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, Friday afternoon, verdict – Accidental death, occasioned by the fall of a ladder.

Thursday 21 September 1820, Issue 2871 – Gale Document No. Y3200657221
An Inquest was taken on Saturday last, at Moretonhampstead, before Joseph Gribble, Esq. Coroner, on the body of JAMES BRIMBLECOMBE, a boy, who met his death by a kick from a horse, while standing at his father's door, near that town. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and imposed a fine of one shilling as a deodand. The rider of the horse was admonished by the coroner, and cautioned to be more circumspect in future.

Thursday 14 December 1820, Issue 2883 – Gale Document No. Y3200657376
Plymouth, 12th December
On Sunday morning last, MR WORSELL, late Commander of the Providence Revenue cutter (but superannuated from that service,) was found dead in a Lime-stone Quarry, in Firestone Bay, a short distance from the Long-room Barracks, at Stonehouse, with marks of great violence on his person, supposed to have been murdered. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body yesterday, which was adjourned till this day; their verdict has not yet transpired. MR WORSELL had taken tea with a friend in this town on Saturday, and quitted about six o'clock in the evening for his residence at Compton, about a mile in the country; but the cause of his having taken so different a obscure a route, and the circumstances attendant on his melancholy end, is at present involved in great mystery.

Thursday 28 December 1820, Issue 2885 – Gale Document No. Y3200657404
Exeter, Wednesday 27 December
On Wednesday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Dolphin Inn, Exmouth, on the body of JOHN REED, a young man twenty years of age, who died the preceding night. - Verdict, Died by excess of drinking spirits. It is supposed he drank upwards of a quart of strong Cognac Brandy.

Thursday 4 January 1821, Issue 2886 – Gale Document No. Y3200657417
Exeter, Wednesday 3 January
This afternoon, a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Volunteer public-house, Goldsmith-street, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH GULLICK, aged 42, who, on the preceding evening, while in bed, was seized with an apoplectic fit and expired. Verdict – Died by the visitation of God.

Thursday 18 January 1821, Issue 2887 – Gale Document No. Y3200657446
Exeter, Wednesday 17 January
On Wednesday last, an inquest was held, in this city, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of SARAH EALES, a servant girl, whose death was occasioned by taking a large quantity of oil of vitriol on the preceding day. The surgeons who examined the body, say, that they never witnessed such a horrid mass as the stomach exhibited, being entirely decomposed by the burning powers of the acid. It appears that the unfortunate girl, who was about 20 years of age, was the victim of an artful villain, who, under pretence of affection, succeeded in effecting her ruin, and then left her to lament her misfortune and his inconstancy. Insupportable remorse soon preyed upon her spirits, and the miserable object of seduction, being four months advanced in pregnancy, and worn down by shame and sorrow, ended her life, in a moment of insanity, by the dreadful means we have described. The bottle from which the fatal draught was poured was marked "Laudanum," and it is supposed she had before swallowed a quantity of that opiate, without the intended effect. The Jury, after several hours deliberation, returned a verdict of Insanity.

Thursday 8 March 1821, Issue 2894 – Gale Document No. Y3200657541
On Friday evening last, a man named THOMAS SAUNDERS, who has for some time worked on the roads in the neighbourhood of Exeter, fell into the Exe, close by Cowley-bridge, where the water was little more than five feet deep, and was drowned. It is supposed that he was in a state of intoxication when the accident happened. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body Saturday afternoon, when the Jury returned a verdict – Found Drowned.

Thursday 29 March 1821, Issue 2897 – Gale Document No. Y3200657572
Exeter, Wednesday 28 March
SUDDEN DEATH - On Monday night last, between the hours of eight and nine o'clock, MR JOSEPH ROWE, of Paris-street, in this city, builder and auctioneer, was discovered, by a man and his wife, (servants to Jas. Buller, Esq. of Downes,) lying on the turnpike-road, in a senseless state, about a mile and half from Crediton. A cart happening to pass at the time, he was conveyed to the White Hart Inn, at Crediton, where medical aid was procured as soon as possible, but without producing the desired effect; some blood was taken from him, and he vomited twice, but never uttered a word from the time he was found in the road, and expired in little more than an hour after. - The deceased had dined at a friend's house, in Crediton, which place he left at eight o'clock, in his usual good health, and it is supposed, fell from his horse in an apoplectic fit, as there was no appearance of any blow, received in the fall, that could have occasioned death. MR ROWE has left a widow and large family to mourn their severe loss. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body yesterday. Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God from Apoplexy.

Thursday 7 June 1821, Issue 2906 – Gale Document No. Y3200657687
Charge of Murder
Whereas MARY ANN WINDEATT, late of Chagford, in the county of Devon, singlewoman, Stands Charged, on the Coroner's Inquest, with the Wilful Murder of her Female Bastard Child, who was found dead on the 28th ult., in a Plantation near Ashburton: The Churchwardens and Overseers of Ashburton, do hereby offer a Handsome Reward to any Person who will Apprehend the said MARY ANN WINDEATT, and lodge her in the County Gaol, at Exeter.
The said MARY ANN WINDEATT is apparently about 22 or 23 years old, short, and rather slight, and good looking; when she left Ashburton, was dressed in a black straw bonnet, black or dark stuff gown, black stockings, and check apron, with a handkerchief round her face; and is supposed to be gone into Somersetshire with a man called Edmonds, a stonemason, with whom she has lately cohabited.
Ashburton, 4th June, 1821.

Thursday 9 August 1821, Issue 2915 – Gale Document No. Y3200657806
Exeter, Wednesday 8 August
MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. - Yesterday morning, about nine o'clock JOHN CHANTER, of this city, hellier, fell from the roof of a house, in Gandy's-street, where he was t work, by which he had his skull fractured in a most shocking manner, and was otherwise dreadfully bruised: he was immediately conveyed, with great care, to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but he never spoke after his fall, and expired about one o'clock. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body last evening; Verdict of the Jury – Accidental Death. The deceased was 43 years of age, of honest and industrious habits, and has left a widow and six children, of whom he was the sole support. The distressed case of his unfortunate family appears in an advertisement in this page.

Thursday 30 August 1821, Issue 2918 – Gale Document No. Y3200657846
Death - At Wolston, near Kingsbridge, on Friday the 17th instant, DACRES FURLONG WISE, Esq. He was preparing to attend the funeral of Mr Savery, but having retired for a moment previously, he died suddenly while alone He was only 26 years of age, of an excellent disposition and character. A Coroner's Inquest sat upon the body on the following day: - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of Almighty God.

Last Saturday week, a fine lad, aged 16, eldest son of MR GEORGE HUTCHINGS, a respectable farmer, of East Cornworthy, in this county, hung himself in his father's loft. He was soon discovered, but the vital spark had fled: - Coroner's Inquest, Lunacy. He had but that day returned from Exeter, where he had been with his father attending the Assizes.

Thursday 20 September 1821, Issue 2921 – Gale Document No. Y3200657891
Horrible Suicide - A most awful instance of suicide was committed in Dodbrooke, near Kingsbridge, on Friday the 14th inst. MRS RICHARDS, a very respectable widow, who has for some time past been in a desponding state of mind, put an end to her existence by cutting her throat; she divided both carotid arteries, and died before assistance could be procured; she was found weltering in her blood. The same person, on Wednesday the 22nd of August last, cut her throat with a clasp knife from ear to ear, completely divided the wind pipe and part of the swallow; but, through the skill and assiduity of the medical gentleman who attended her, she perfectly recovered, and on the Monday previous to her death she went on a visit to her brother. Being thus baffled in her first attempt, but determined on self-destruction, she procured a razor on Thursday, which she carefully concealed until an opportunity offered for her purpose; and on the following day went into a lodging-room at the upper part of the house and perpetrated the horrid deed a second time. No real cause can be assigned for it, although reports say it is a love affair. A Coroner's Inquest is summoned to sit on the body.

Thursday 13 December 1821, Issue 2933 – Gale Document No. Y3200658061
Murder - An inquest was taken at Great Torrington, on Sunday last, before James Cutcliffe, Esq. Mayor and Coroner, on the body of MARY STEVENS, single woman; and a verdict of wilful murder returned against PHILIP CHAPPELL, of the said borough, glover; who was on Monday committed to the Devon County Gaol, under the Coroner's warrant. It appeared that the miserable girl was courted by CHAPPELL, and pregnant. They had been seen walking together on Friday evening, near the spot, where the body was found next morning lying on a bank, by a mill-pool. Bruises appeared on her forehead; yet from other circumstances it is conjectured that she had been drowned in the mill-pool, and drawn out again.

Thursday 10 January 1822, Issue 2937 – Gale Document No. Y3200658122
In the forenoon of Monday se'nnight, two females, named MARIA ROLESTON and MARTHA CRISPIN, the former about 28, and the latter 12 years of age, set out from Christow to go to Chudleigh. In their way they had to cross a wooden bridge over the Teign; but the railing of the bridge having been washed away by the last flood, they lost their footing, and were both carried down the stream and drowned. It appeared on the Inquest, from the evidence of a carpenter, who was employed to repair the bridge, that he had left the spot about ten minutes to procure poles, and on his return found a basket and umbrella on the Chudleigh side of the river, near his tool-bag, but had not seen any one deposit them; from this circumstance it should seem that one of the unfortunate sufferers had crossed the bridge in safety, and had returned to help her companion. The melancholy event was not known to their friends until the following afternoon, when immediate search was made, and the body of M. CRISPIN was found in the river about two miles below the place where she fell in: the other was not found on Thursday morning last, though every practicable means had been exerted for that purpose.

Plymouth-Dock - On Tuesday the 1st instant, an inquest was held in this town, on MRS E. BROMELL, of Fore-street, who, whilst eating her dinner alone, on that day, was seized with a fit and fell on the fire in the grate, which communicated to her clothes, and caused her death before the fatal occurrence was known.

Friday another Inquest was held here, on THOMAS TALLACK, a child who was left by his mother at play with other children, and during her absence, his apron caught fire, which scorched him so dreadfully that he lived only a few hours after. Verdicts - Accidental Death.

Thursday 7 February 1822, Issue 2941 – Gale Document No. Y3200658177
The Inquest, noticed in an Exeter Paper of last week, which was holding at Southleigh, in this county, and afterwards by adjournment at Colyton, to inquire into the cause of the death of JOHN SCRIVEN, terminated on Monday morning, after a patient investigation which occupied several days. Mr Tucker, of Exeter, surgeon, who dissected the body, deposed, that if he had not been previously acquainted with the injury imputed, he could and should have very satisfactorily accounted for his death, from natural causes. There were no external marks of injury. The cavity of the thorax or chest was laid open, when the most extensive injury was discovered to have ensued from repeated attacks of inflammation. Both lungs had suffered much, particularly the left, on which there were several tubercles or small abscesses. In the cavity of the abdomen also, very serious mischief had taken place, for the small intestines had in some places gone into a state of mortification or gangrene. These no doubt had ensued from recent inflammation, and could not be dated so far back as the imputed injury. The immediate cause of death, was loss of blood from a rupture or ulceration of a branch of the mesenteric arteries. In these opinions, Mr Tucker was borne out by four other medical gentlemen; and the jury found that the deceased died of internal inflammation, arising from natural causes.

Thursday 28 February 1822, Issue 2944 – Gale Document No. Y3200658198
Charge of Murder
Whereas, ANN SNELL, of the Parish of South Tawton, in the county of Devon, single woman, stands charged on the Coroner's Inquest, with the Murder of her Female Bastard Child on the 23rd ult.: The Churchwardens and Overseers of South Tawton, do hereby offer a handsome Reward, with all reasonable expences, to any Person who shall apprehend and Lodge the said ANN SNELL in any of his Majesty's Gaols.
The said ANN SNELL is about 22 years of age; five feet four inches high, rather thick lips, think face, with a sallow complexion, and light brown hair. She is supposed to have been secreted in the neighbourhood of Zeal Monachorum or Crediton.
South Tawton, Feb. 24, 1822.

Thursday 28 February 1822, Issue 2944 – Gale Document No. Y3200658206
On Tuesday last, an inquest was held before C. D. Pugh, Esq. Coroner, on the body of THOS. BRICE, of Tiverton. The deceased was a farmer, and possessed considerable property. On Saturday, the servant being sent to look for him, discovered him suspended by a rope in a linhay. It appears he had taken every precaution to render his destruction certain, by tying several knots in the cord, and when found was quite lifeless. Verdict - Insanity.

Thursday 14 March 1822, Issue 2946 – Gale Document No. Y3200658231
CHARGE OF MURDER. Whereas, ANN SNELL, of the Parish of South Tawton, in the county of Devon, single woman, stands charged on the Coroner's Inquest with the Murder of her Female Bastard Child on the 23rd ult.: The Churchwardens and Overseers of South Tawton, do hereby offer a handsome REWARD, with all reasonable expenses, to any Person who shall Apprehend and Lodge the said ANN SNELL in any of his Majesty's Gaols.
The said ANN SNELL is about 22 years of age, five feet four inches high, rather thick lips, thin face, with a sallow complexion, and light brown hair. She is supposed to have been secreted in the neighbourhood of Zeal Monachorum or Crediton.
South Tawton, Feb. 24, 1822.

Thursday 4 April 1822, Issue 2949 – Gale Document No. Y3200658268
On Wednesday last an inquest was held at Wonton, in the Parish of South Brent, on the body of JOHN PENALLUM, a child about six years old, who was killed by attempting to cross the road at the time the Eclipse coach was passing with six horses, the wheel of which crushed his head, but did not pass over it, though the skull was dreadfully fractured. A verdict of Manslaughter was returned against Wm. Brice, the coachman, and John Purty, the postillion, who were taken into custody by Mr Harding, constable of South Brent, and conveyed to Exeter for commitment; but on application to the Magistrates at the Castle on Friday, they were immediately liberated upon bail, as it was deposed that the coach was not going faster than six miles an hour, and was turning a sharp corner at Wonton when the child was knocked down by the leading horses. A deodand of 35l. was levied on the coach and horses.

Thursday 30 May 1822, Issue 2957 – Gale Document No. Y3200658369
Exeter, Wednesday 29 May
MURDER FROM JEALOUSY - A man named JOHN CHAPMAN has been committed to our County Gaol, for the murder of his wife. The following are the facts connected with this melancholy affair. The prisoner is a labourer on the Bude Canal, and had discovered an improper intimacy between his wife and another labourer. The parties had been all drinking together at a public-house, and on leaving, the husband requested her to go home with him, but she refused, and went away with the other man. The husband then in a paroxysm of rage ran home for a gun, and followed them about half a mile; on coming near them, he saw her paramour's arm round her neck, he immediately fired his gun, and killed his wife upon the spot. He did not attempt to elude justice, but was taken immediately into custody, and requested to go back and look upon the body, which was permitted. He then said, he was contented, that he loved her, and could die for her. A Coroner's Inquest was summoned, and brought in a Verdict of Wilful Murder, and CHAPMAN is committed to take his trial at the next assizes. The prisoner is about 25 years of age, and has only been married the short space of nine months.

Thursday 13 June 1822, Issue 2968 – Gale Document No. Y3200658396
Exeter, Wednesday 12 June
On Thursday morning, between five and six o'clock, MR DARKE, butcher and dairy-man, of George's-lane, in this city, went out milking, according to his usual custom, leaving his wife in her bed-room. On his return, he found her on her knees near the bed with her throat cut, which it appears she had effected with a butcher's knife. The wound was immediately sewn up, but she expired at ten o'clock. A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body, Verdict "The deceased but her throat in a temporary fit of insanity."

Thursday 20 June 1822, Issue 2970 – Gale Document No. Y3200658407
Exeter, Wednesday 19 June
An Inquest was held yesterday, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner, at the Red Cow public-house near this city, on the body of WILLIAM RENDALL, a lad 17 years of age, in the service of Captain Barton, R.N., at the Elms, in the parish of St. David, who shot himself with a pistol, on the back premises of his master's house, the same morning. An attachment to one of the female servants, which, on account of his youth, did not meet return, is assigned as the cause of this rash act. - Verdict, "Shot himself while in a state of mental derangement."

Thursday 16 January 1823, Issue 3016 – Gale Document No. Y3200658838
Plymouth, January 11th, 1823
An inquest was held on Saturday on the body of ELIZ. ESSERY, of this town. The deceased, who was a very infirm woman, and upwards of eighty-eight years of age, was in her apartment reading, on Thursday night, when her cap caught fire, and her daughter, who resides in the same house, on going into her room, for the purpose of fetching her some beer, found her lying on the floor, much burnt, and quite dead. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 3 April 1823, Issue 3026 – Gale Document No. Y3200658991
Exeter, Wednesday 2 April
This day an Inquest was held at the Windmill Inn, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of EDWARD SMALE, who died in the Hospital, from an injury he received on the 21st of February last, from a wheel of a cart (unknown) having passed over his thigh, near New-bridge, on the Crediton road. The witnesses being unable to prove, owing to the darkness of the morning, which of the carts, so passing along the road at the time occasioned the man's injury. The Jury returned a Verdict, Accidental Death from a cart wheel.

Thursday 8 May 1823, Issue 3031 – Gale Document No. Y3200659065
Early on Saturday morning, the body of a man named THOMAS SHUTE, belonging to the parish of Chawleigh, who has been some time in the habit of begging, was found near Eggesford, with many bruises on his body, and a large wound on his head, which caused a suspicion of his having been murdered. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body on Sunday, and upon inquiry, it was found that the man was subject to fits, and the Jury returned their verdict, "Died from the wounds which it was supposed he had received struggling in a fit."

Thursday 5 June 1823, Issue 3034 – Gale Document No. Y3200659132
Exeter, Wednesday 4 June
Last evening, an Inquisition was taken at the Plume of Feathers Inn, David's-hill, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of FRANCES POLLARD, aged 26, who was found dead in her bed yesterday morning, at her lodgings, in Exe-Lane. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God, through Epilepsy," – to which it appeared she had been subject from her infancy.

Thursday 19 June 1823, Issue 3036 – Gale Document No. Y3200659155
Plymouth
The body of a young woman, about 19 years of age, named MARY MULLENA, was picked up on Wednesday in Hamoaze. The deceased was apprenticed to Mr Pengelly, farmer, of Tamerton, who on Whitmonday last, gave her permission to visit her friends in Dock, with whom she remained until the following Friday, when she left them on her return home, and was observed going through Knacker's Knoll towards Tamerton the same evening, since which time she had not been seen, nor could any further traces of her be discovered. The surgeon who examined the body of the unfortunate girl found her to be pregnant. An Inquest was held on her the same day, and suspicions being entertained by the Jury as to the manner in which she came to her death, two adjournments took place, in order that every information might be obtained from several witnesses who were summoned to attend by the coroner. After some time the Jury returned a verdict – Found drowned, but how or by what means she became so drowned, no evidence appeared.

Thursday 3 July 1823, Issue 3038 – Gale Document No. Y3200659176
MR FRANCIS CHICHESTER, who was found drowned near Westminster Bridge, as noticed in our last, was the eldest son of a gentleman of the most respectable family, residing at Hall, near Barnstaple, and was a Member of Trinity College, Oxford. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, and there being no evidence to prove how the deceased came into the water, the jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 10 July 1823, Issue 3039 – Gale Document No. Y3200659187
Exeter, Wednesday 9 July
SUICIDE - Yesterday afternoon, an Inquisition was taken at the Red Lion public-house, St. Sidwell, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner for this city, on the body of ANN MACKAY, aged 42, wife of MR DANIEL MACKAY, residing in a cottage near Sids Well, in that parish, who about half past ten o'clock, on Monday night, shot herself, in her bed-room, with a fowling-piece of her husband's which was kept in the house loaded with shot. She effected her purpose by doubling and tying her garter, one-end of the loop being placed on the trigger, the other under her foot, placing the muzzle under her stays, and discharging its contents into her body, causing a large wound, from which a portion of the bowels protruded. The unfortunate woman lived about three hours after the fatal transaction, when death terminated her sufferings. The following is a brief summary of the evidence adduced on this melancholy occasion:-
Mary Herd, char-woman to the deceased, said, her mistress was a remarkably fine woman, of a sanguine temperament, and strong passions, that she was aunt to the late Thos. Elliott, Esq. (of sporting celebrity,) who shot himself some little time since in London, and by whose death it is supposed she would have obtained an increase to her property; she was many years younger than her husband, - MR MACKAY being 67 years of age:- latterly they had lived very unhappily, from his being jealous of a young man of the name of Strong, who boarded and lodged with them: she said her master came home on the afternoon in question about four o'clock; he appeared to have been drinking, a quarrel ensued between her master, mistress and Strong, and the two latter left the house, but not in company, Strong quitting it first; soon after five o'clock her master also went out: in the course of the evening they all returned, MR MACKAY coming home first, her mistress returned at about a quarter before eight o'clock. – Strong was there before; her master and Strong had both drank, but Mr Strong appeared most intoxicated; the quarrel was resumed, and witness, who was in the wash-house, hearing a great noise, was induced to go into the house and found her master and Mr Strong fighting; at the request of her mistress she called Mr and Mrs Lawless, who came – on her return Mr Strong was out of the house, and she did not see him afterward – her mistress at this time was in a state of great agitation and did not appear to know what she was about, she complained much of her husband's ill usage, that is, of his being jealous – he had never struck her. Mr and Mrs Lawless quitted the house about nine o'clock, wishing MR and MRS MACKAY good night – her mistress went up stairs, master remaining in the kitchen – there was always a gun on her master's side of the bed, it was generally loaded – she saw MRS MACKAY several times afterwards, and removed the gun from the room, but which her mistress again got possession of – witness offered to remain in the house for the night, but this MRS MACKAY refused – at her master's request, when about quitting the house, she asked her mistress if she wanted her any more, who answered no, and before she had power to descend into the kitchen, heard the report of a gun.
Susan Bartlett corroborated the testimony of the former witness, and said, when she heard the report of the gun, MR MACKAY called out, "Good God, she has shot herself," and ran up stairs; he burst open the door, which was locked; MRS MACKAY was laying on her back on the floor, with the gun, at the bottom of the bed; MRS MACKAY was on fire, which was put out by witness; did not observe how the gun was, but there was much smoke, and a strong smell of gunpowder; she was living, but did not speak; MACKAY was then desiring her to speak to him, when she cried out "Oh! cruel MACKAY;" she kissed him and forgave him.
Mr Land, Surgeon, said he was called about half-past ten o'clock on Monday night, was told MRS MACKAY had shot herself – found her laying on the bed – examined her, found a gun-shot wound on the right side, one of the smaller intestines protruded, with part of the omentum, which he reduced; she died about half-past one on Tuesday morning; considered her death occasioned by the gun-shot wound.
Dr Collins, gave similar evidence as to the nature of the wound, and cause of death, - asked deceased what led her to commit the act, she said she was driven to madness by the conduct of her husband, but she hoped that God would forgive her. - Witness was of opinion no sane person would commit such an act.
Mrs Elizabeth Batt, sen. had intimately known the deceased about two years and a half; within the last five or six months had observed a marked alteration in her manner, appeared much depressed in spirits, and at times thought her out of her mind, - the cause Mrs Batt understood to be jealousy on the part of her husband, but for which she assured witness there was no foundation.
The Jury, after a long, laborious and patient investigation, and hearing Mr Walkey, who, in a most able and feeling manner, summed up the evidence, commenting as he went on, and stating the strong impression on his mind, strengthened as it most certainly was by the circumstance of her nephew having terminated his own existence, delivered the following verdict – "Shot herself, then labouring under temporary derangement."
We understand, MR MACKAY loses an annuity of about 70l. per annum, by his wife's death.

On the same day an Inquest was taken at the Fullers' Arms public-house, Rock's-lane, by S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM BEARD, aged 8 years, who on the preceding day fell off the steps at the Quay, and was drowned. Verdict Accidental Death.

Thursday 14 August 1823, Issue 3044 – Gale Document No. Y3200659254
Exeter, Wednesday 13 August
On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of JOSEPH WOOLCOTT, aged 7 years, who about a fortnight before fell over the Cliff from the Friar's Walk on the Quay, by which his skull was fractured, and otherwise severely injured, he had lingered from that time in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, when death terminated his sufferings. - Accidental Death.

Thursday 2 October 1823, Issue 3050 – Gale Document No. Y3200659348
Exeter, Wednesday 1 October
Yesterday a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Lord Nelson Public- house, Rock's Lane, in this city, before Saml. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of GEORGE FRY, aged 7 years. It appeared the poor little fellow, with another boy, were trundling their hoops on Monday afternoon, in a lane beneath the city walls, near the back of the Custom-house, the hoop by some mismanagement was driven down the dipping steps, eager to regain, he ran swiftly after it, and was precipitated into the Mill Leat, which ran beneath, and before assistance could be rendered was unfortunately drowned. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

On Monday afternoon, the body of a female was found floating on a part of the River Exe, below Salmon Pool, commonly called Duck's Lake, and a bonnet and some other articles of female apparel were discovered under a bush adjoining the bank; the body was got out of the water and taken to the Reception House of the Exeter Humane Society, near the Lime Kilns, but though it appeared to have been but a short time in the water, all efforts to restore animation were unavailing. Yesterday an Inquest was taken before George Whitelocke, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, who after viewing the body, adjourned to the Windmill Public-house, Holloway-street, in this city. The deceased was MRS ELIZABETH SERCOMBE, 66 years of age, wife of MR RICHARD SERCOMBE, of the Fountain Public-house, on the Quay; a woman whose conduct through life had gained her the love and esteem of all who knew her, she left her house on Monday afternoon between two and three o'clock, and was seen walking on the bank of the river, but no evidence came before the Jury, as to the manner of her getting into the water, and they returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 16 October 1823, Issue 3052 – Gale Document No. Y3200659376
Exeter, Wednesday 15 October
Melancholy Accident - On Thursday last, as Messrs WILLIAM and GEORGE FARRANT, sons of MR FARRANT, of this city, surgeon, were on a shooting excursion at Honiton's Clist, about three miles from home; GEORGEW being upon a hedge was in the act of taking the gun (which had a percussion lock) from his brother, when a bramble caught the hammer, that had been cautiously placed on the spillet, and drew it back sufficiently to cause detonation; the whole charge entered just under the right breast of the unfortunate youth, who exclaimed "Oh!" and instantly expired. A Coroner's Jury held an inquest upon the body in the afternoon, and returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The deceased MR GEO. FARRANT was about 19 years of age.

Thursday 6 November 1823, Issue 3055 – Gale Document No. Y3200659418
Exeter, Wednesday 5 November
Died - On Sunday last, aged 38, MR FRANCIS STEVENS, drawing-master, South-street; he had dined that day with his friend Mr Moxhay, in Paul-street, whose house he quitted about seven in the evening in company with Mr Carter, who parted from him at the end of Gandy's-street, Mr S. proceeding down Martin's-lane, into the Cathedral-yard, on his way home, and was found a few minutes afterwards lying in the road way near Mr Chave's, (Perfumer,) a corpse. He had previously complained of being unwell, but in the latter part of the afternoon appeared more cheerful. Mr S. was a native of London, but had resided several years in this city, was eminent in his profession, and highly esteemed by his numerous friends who now mourn his loss.
A Coroner's Inquest was held n the body at the Valiant Solder, Magdalene street, on Monday before S. Walkey, Esq. - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 4 December 1823, Issue 3059 – Gale Document No. Y3200659481
Exeter, Wednesday 3 December
Yesterday, an Inquest was taken at our Workhouse, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of SARAH STONE, aged 26, wife of SAMUEL STONE, in the employ of Messrs Hayman, coach-makers, in this city, - who, being insane, in order that proper care might be taken of her, had been an inmate of the Workhouse from the 15th Sept. and had died suddenly during the night of Monday last. The body was opened at the request of the Governor and Guardians of the Poor, in the presence of the Coroner, the Jury, and several most respectable Medical Gentlemen; the appearances presented, on examining the head, leaving no doubt as to the cause of her death – the Jury returned a verdict of – Died by the Visitation of God, from Apoplexy.

Thursday 1 January 1824, Issue 3063 – Gale Document No. Y3200659538
Exeter, Wednesday 31 December
Coroner's Inquests.
Saturday lat an Inquest was held at the Red Lion, Saint Sidwell's, before Samuel Walkey, Gent. Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH SOPER, a pauper, who was found the same morning hanging by a rope fastened to a beam in her lodging-room. After the Jury had heard a very satisfactory account, from several witnesses, that the deceased had been deranged for nearly twelve months, they immediately returned a verdict that "The deceased hanged herself while labouring under a state of insanity."

On Sunday an Inquest was also held at the Honiton Inn, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, Gent. Coroner, on the body of JANE PIKE, who was found dead in her bed-room on the preceding day. It appeared, from evidence, that deceased was an occasional servant at the General Bank, in this city, having been employed by Mr J. Sparkes, for nearly eight years, to clean the Bank in the morning. In consequence of some suspicion having been excited, for the last three months, as to the honesty of the deceased, Mr J. Sparkes ordered one of the junior clerks to secret himself in the Bank, on the morning of Saturday last. Accordingly the deceased, while in the Bank, was observed to open a locked drawer, and examine it, but was not observed to take away any property. This improper conduct was immediately told to Mr J. Sparkes, who had the woman before him, and told her what had passed, which she said was quite false, called God to witness as to her innocence. Mr J. Sparkes said, "I have every reason to believe what my clerk has informed me of, and under these circumstances I cannot employ you any longer;" and discharged her. It should be mentioned, that when Mr J. Sparkes discharged the deceased from his service, he affirmed that she appeared particularly agitated, and looked wild in her countenance; he never sae her look so agitated before. This happened about half past ten on Saturday morning – about eleven the deceased was found in her bed room, laying on the floor, quite dead, by a person who went to call on her; the deceased had then the appearance of having died from apoplexy. Soon after, Dr Collins, and Mr Harris, surgeon, were requested to see her; and having been informed of what had occurred at the Bank, began to suspect the cause of her death. A boy, about eight years old, son of the deceased, saw his mother, when she came home from the Bank, take, as he thought, some salts, in her bed-room, after which he went out of the house. The tea-cup, which contained the supposed salts, was examined by the medical gentlemen, who declared it was not salts,, but tasted quite acid, which caused a strong suspicion that the deceased had taken some poisonous substance. Some of the contents of the stomach, vomited before death, were carried home by Mr Harris, who analyzed them, and found that there certainly was a poisonous substance mixed, called oxalic acid; the test was proved before the Jury. This poison so much resembles the common Epsom salts, that the difference can only be ascertained by tasting them; which is a caution all persons ought to adopt before taking Epsom salts, as many serious accidents have happened from mistaking one for the other. The Jury, having been charged by the Coroner to this effect, requested that the stomach might be examined, which was done by Mr Harris, surgeon, in the presence of Dr. Collins, who on oath deposed that the stomach presented itself quite black on the inside, with the internal coat entirely destroyed, and in two or three places nearly corroded through, from the effects of the poison taken by the deceased, and the medical gentlemen gave it as their decided opinion, that the deceased died from taking poison commonly called Oxalic acid. After hearing several witnesses, and being perfectly satisfied of the deceased having taken the said poison, the Jury, being particularly requested by the Coroner to take into their consideration the charge made against the deceased, which charge was fully substantiated, directed them to weigh fully in their minds the result o that charge, that of the deceased being dismissed from her employer, and what sudden effect that dismissal had on the mind of the deceased, returned the following verdict. - That the deceased, JANE PIKE, died from taking a poison, called Oxalic Acid, while labouring under a state of temporary derangement. The Inquest lasted four hours.

Thursday 8 January 1824, Issue 3064 – Gale Document No. Y3200659554
Exeter, Wednesday 7 January
On Monday morning, the body of a man, much mutilated, was found by some fishermen, on the river Exe, near Turf Point, in the parish of Powderham; - on Tuesday, an Inquest was taken in Powderham Castle, before Charles Dally Pugh, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, when it appeared the deceased was JOHN HEALL, 74 years of age, who a few years since kept the Masons' Arms public-house, Preston-street, in this city, but had latterly been much reduced, and, with his family, (three children now totally unprovided for,) suffered great distress; - he had been missing since the 8th December, on which day he had taken dinner with a friend, at Topsham, and, as his sight was very defective, it is supposed he missed his way on his return home, and fell into the river. - Verdict, Found Drowned.

Thursday 22 January 1824, Issue 3066 – Gale Document No. Y3200659584
Melancholy Occurrence.
It is with the deepest concern and regret, we have to announce to our readers the following distressing accident: - MR CHARLES FOLLETT, had been for some days on a visit at Hillersdon-House, near Cullompton, the residence of Capt. Burn, - on Monday morning last being about to accompany Capt. b. on a shooting excursion, he went into the yard, for the purpose of turning out the dogs, taking his fowling piece with him, - the door of the kennel not opening readily, Mr Follett struck it forcibly with the butt end of the gun, which caused it to explode, and the whole contents was lodged in his left side, in the direction of the heart. – his death was instantaneous. A Coroner's Inquest has been taken on the body. Verdict, - Accidental Death.
The deceased was the second sons of BENJ. FOLLETT, Esq. of Topsham, 25 years of age, an amiable young man, and will be much regretted by all who knew him; the grief of his relatives, and the family at Hillersdon, may be conceived but cannot be described.

Exeter, Wednesday 21 January
INQUESTS. - taken before Samuel Walkey, Esquire, Coroner - On Friday last, at the Blue Boar public-house, on the body of SARAH HAWKINS, aged 42, a maiden woman, residing with her father, in the Leper's-Alms-houses, Magdalene-street, in this city, who on the preceding day cut her throat with a razor, and, though prompt surgical assistance was rendered, she expired in about three hours. - Verdict, Destroyed herself while labouring under mental derangement.

And on Monday, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on the body of HENRY EDWARDS, a poor boy, aged 12 years, who, a fortnight before, while at work in Mary Arches-street, in this city, fell from a ladder, and fractured his skull; he had lingered in that invaluable Institution, where every assistance and attention had been rendered him till that morning, when he expired. - Verdict, Accidental Death.


Thursday 12 February 1824, Issue 3069 – Gale Document No. Y3200659629

Exeter, Wednesday 11 February
On Friday morning last, about twelve o'clock, CHARLES ALFORD, of this city, tailor, was found drowned in the river Exe, just below the King's Arms Sluice. It is supposed he was in the act of washing his face, and, that a sudden seizure in the head, with which it is said he was afflicted, caused him to fall in. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body. Verdict – Found Drowned.

Thursday 22 April 1824, Issue 3079 – Gale Document No. Y3200659789
Exeter, Wednesday 21 April
Melancholy Accident.
It has been an holiday custom in Tiverton, for many years past, that the Sexton should permit children to ascend to the top of the Tower of St. Peter's Church, on receiving a small fee from each. A shocking accident which occurred on Monday last, will, it is hoped, put an end to so dangerous a practice. About five o'clock in the afternoon, a fine boy, about 9 years old, the son of MR PERHAM, Brickmaker, was leaning over the battlements, when, by some accident, his hat fell off, and in endeavouring to regain it, he precipitated himself to the ground, and was instantly taken up a corpse. The heighth from which he fell was upwards of 100 feet, and his body was severely mutilated.
A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) who returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 29 April 1824, Issue 3080 – Gale Document No. Y3200659806
Exeter, Wednesday 28 April
A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before S. Walkey, Esq. on the body of ANN RUSSELL, an old woman, who, while dipping water from the river Exe, fell in, and was drowned. Verdict - Found Drowned.

Thursday 20 May 1824, Issue 3083 – Gale Document No. Y3200659860
Exeter, Wednesday 19 May
An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the parish of Beer Ferris, before Joseph Whitford, Esq. on the body of JOHN COOK, who was killed by the sudden explosion of gunpowder in a rock. Verdict – Accidental Death.

On Sunday afternoon last, as a boy named RICHARD SKITCH, about 4 years of age, whose parents reside in Exe Island, in this city, was throwing stones at some ducks, from the Bonhay, he over-balanced himself, and fell into the river, which from excessive rain, was much swollen and very rapid, the poor little fellow was immediately carried off by the strength of the current, and in sight of many persons, (amongst whom was his distracted father) but who were unable to render assistance, driven under the Bridge, and nearly as far as the Quay, when a young man courageously jumped into the stream, and brought the body to the shore it was immediately taken to the Humane Society's Reception House, in Rock's-lane, and every means tried to restore animation, but in vain. An Inquest was taken on the body the same afternoon before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 3 June 1824, Issue 3085 – Gale Document No. Y3200659891
Exeter, Wednesday 2 June
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Monday afternoon last, as Chapple's Stage Waggon, was entering this city from the North of Devon, it was stopped for a few seconds at the upper end of North-street, near High-street; at this instant a remarkably fine boy named
JONATHAN CROWLE, about six years of age, who was passing on the flagged pavement dropped half-penny, which rolled into the road, and under the wagon, the eager little fellow stooped for the purpose of regaining it, and the waggoner, ignorant of any person being near, calling to his horses to proceed, he was knocked down and the wheel passing over him, caused instant death. - An Inquisition was taken on the body yesterday at the Anchor, public-house, Paul-street, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner, when after a strict enquiry, John Franklin, the waggoner, was exonerated from any degree of blame, it being proved he was in his proper place attending his horses, and several persons bore testimony to the excellence of his character for sobriety and carefulness; indeed he appeared to labour under great distress of mind at having (though innocently) been the cause of the child's death. - The Jury returned a verdict of Accident Death, and the wheel having become forfeited, recommended that a fine of 1s. should be levied on the proprietor as a Deodand, in lieu thereof.

Thursday 10 June 1824, Issue 3086 – Gale Document No. Y3200659906
On Monday, as THOMAS LAWRENCE, of Ottery, was returning from Bridgewater in his cart, his horse fell, and threw him off his seat in the front of the cart, and killed him on the spot; a man at work saw the accident, and ran to his assistance, and carried him into a neighbouring house. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the same evening. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 17 June 1824, Issue 3087 – Gale Document No. Y3200659922
Exeter, Wednesday 16 June
On Thursday evening last, a poor old woman, of the name of BRIMSON, who had been confined to her bed for many months, proceeded, in the absence of her children, to rise and dress herself; she then took part of the bed furniture, attached it to one of its pillars, and having fastened it round her neck, thus destroyed herself. Coroner's Verdict, - Temporary Insanity.

On Monday last, an Inquest was held before Joseph Whiteford, Esq. Coroner, on view of the body of ELIZABETH FICE, wife of THOMAS FICE, Miller, at Cotless Mills, in the parish of Modbury, who came by her death in the following melancholy manner: - Two boys, called respectively John Lapthorne and William Rogers, apprentices of Mr John Wotton, of Butland Farm, went out to work in the morning of Tuesday the 8th instant, in their masters fields, and Lapthorne took a gun with him, for the purpose of killing rooks, when as he was ploughing the last furrow before dinner, he found a marble, and while the other boy Rogers, was gone into an adjoining field with the horses to grass, he loaded the gun with powder and the marble, - and not seeing at the time any rooks, he put the gun into the hedge as it was. In the evening he had occasion to go into Modbury to get some part of the plough repaired, and before going asked Rogers whether he was going to Cotless that evening, and, if he did, desired him to take the gun down to JOHN FICE, son of the above named THOMAS FICE, but entirely forgot to tell him the gun was loaded. He accordingly went down with some cattle, and took the gun with him, which he carried into the mill to JOHN FICE, who was on the mill-bed to work, - he went up to him, and laid the gun on the floor. About five minutes after, as Rogers understood, FICE asked to see the gun, Rogers took it up for that purpose, with the muzzle pointing down the steps, which are directly opposite to the kitchen door, where the said ELIZABETH FICE was sitting, when in an instant the gun went off, and shocking to relate, the marble (after passing between two boys, one of which had his face scarred with it,) entered the upper part of her left thigh, with a direction downward, and shattered the thigh bone in pieces. - Medical assistance was instantly called in, but to no purpose as a mortification quickly ensued; and after lingering in the greatest agonies until Friday evening, about 8 o'clock, she expired leaving her husband and numerous family to lament her valuable loss. After about 5 hours patient investigation by the Coroner, the Jury found their verdict. - Accidental Death, and ordered the gun to be forfeited to the Lord of the Manor.

INQUESTS HELD BY MR COX. - On Wednesday last, at Colyton, on the body of JANE ROWSELL, servant to Mr William Hawkins, yeoman, who was accidentally shot by his son, Henry, a lad between eleven and twelve years of age. It appeared in evidence, that the youth was in the act of handing a loaded gun out of the chamber window to a servant boy below, of the name of Chapple, when it accidentally went off, and shot the unfortunate woman, (who happened to be in a passage behind) through the head, and caused instantaneous death. Verdict – Accidental Death, with a deodand of 1s. on the gun.

On the same day at Axminster, on the body of ELIZABETH RESTORICK, a girl about nine years of age, whose death was occasioned by her clothes catching fire on Sunday morning last, at the house of Mr J. Hill, her Grandfather. Verdict – Accidental Death.

On Thursday morning, at East Budleigh, on the body of HENRY ROSEWELL, yeoman, aged 92, who was found dead in the garden behind his Dwelling House on the evening of Tuesday last. - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

Plymouth, June 15.
An Inquest was held on Monday last, before R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner for Plymouth, on the body of JOH BURCH, a shipwright in his Majesty's Dock-yard, who met with his death in the following manner:- Returning home on Saturday evening in a state of intoxication, he was prevailed upon by a female of loose character to accompany her home, when a quarrel arising he was locked in a front room, from the window of which he endeavoured to get out, and falling fractured his head. He was taken to the Richmond Inn, where he died on Sunday night. The woman and her associates underwent a strict examination, and were discharged. Verdict, Accidental Death. The deceased has left a wife and family residing at Devonport.

Thursday 1 July 1824, Issue 3089 – Gale Document No. Y3200659955
Exeter, Wednesday 30 June
Horrid Murder. - On Monday night last, about eleven o'clock, a horrid murder was committed in the road leading from this city to Cullompton, by WILLIAM MARSHALL, a husbandman, about 42 years of age, residing at a place called Hill-head, in the parish and about a quarter mile from the town of Broad-Clist, towards Exeter. The unhappy perpetrator of this dreadful act served on the earlier part of his life in the Marines, and was for a considerable period quartered in this city, performing the duties of a corporal in the recruiting service, but was discharged at the Peace, and since that time has resided at Broad-Clist, where he got married; for the last two years 'tis said he has been subject to fits, and has laboured but little, receiving parochial relief from the parish of Broad-Clist. Having a child very ill, he was on Monday last sent to Exeter for some leeches, which had been directed to be applied to the child's head; his stay, it seems, was longer than it need have been, and it was evening before he returned, appearing to have drank pretty freely; on entering his house, he said he had brought the leeches, when the deceased, who had then his sick and evidently dying child on her lap, answered, "I fear, WILLIAM, it is too late;" - MARSHALL soon went up stairs to bed, and in a short time the child expired; - about an hour had elapsed when he was heard coming again over the stairs, - at this time, there was assembled below, his wife, and a living child, his brother's wife, a neighbour named Susan Thorne, and Ann Taylor; they were in the act of stripping and washing the dead infant, and fearing some tumult from the state in which he appeared on going to bed, endeavoured to prevent his coming down, but were unsuccessful, - he went through the kitchen to an out-house, in which among other things was kept his husbandry tools, and in a few seconds rushed again into the kitchen, armed with a spade, with which he aimed a blow at his wife, but suspecting his intention, she ran under his arm, and escaped the intended mischief; the other three women seeing this, fled from the house, - Ann Taylor, and the brother's wife, ran on the road towards Exeter, they were pursued by MARSHALL, when, finding he gained on them, Ann Taylor turned, with a view, it is supposed, to get into the hedge, thinking that in the darkness she might escape him, but far otherwise was the result, - he sae the movement, and being now close upon the unfortunate woman, struck her with the spade, (which from the length of the handle was a most formidable weapon,) the first blow, it is imaged, was down across the face, and she was struck to the ground, as her more fortunate companion in flight heard a cry of murder and for help; the blow was repeated, and her cry ceased for ever; - the skull was literally clove, and the blood and brains scattered on the road. The neighbourhood was by this time alarmed, and after some resistance he was secured.
An Inquest was taken yesterday afternoon before Charles Dally Pugh, Esq. Coroner, at the Red Lion public-house, Broad-Clist, when, after viewing the body and hearing the evidence, as also that of a surgeon as to the nature of the wounds, the Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder, and the miserable man was about 8 o'clock last evening, brought into the Devon County Gaol, under the coroner's warrant. His behaviour while being taken to prison, (during which he was recognized by many persons) was very proper, and exhibited no symptoms of hardihood or ferocity.
ANN TAYLOR the deceased, was about 50 years of age, the wife of a husbandman, and mother of six children, residing at Burriton, in Broad-Clist, and had kindly lent her assistance on the illness of MARSHALL'S child, by which she has so unfortunately lost her life.

Thursday 22 July 1824, Issue 3092 – Gale Document No. Y3200659997
Exeter, Wednesday 21 July
Suicide - On Saturday last, JAMES LANE, a young man about 20 years of age, who resided with his grandfather, MR SMITH, at Benbow, in the parish of Farringdon, hung himself from a tree in the orchard, and was not discovered 'till life was extinct; some unpleasant circumstances which had occurred, and for which he had been reproached, is supposed to have preyed on his mind, and led to the fatal catastrophe. The deceased was the eldest son of MR JOHN LANE, butcher, of South-street, in this city. On Sunday, a Coroner's Inquest was taken on the body - Verdict, Insanity.

Thursday 12 August 1824, Issue 3095 – Gale Document No. Y3200660038
Exeter, Wednesday 11 August
Death - Monday morning, aged 37, MR THOS. TAYLOR, of Tiverton, fruiterer. He retired to bed on Sunday evening in perfect health, but early on the following morning, his wife was alarmed by hearing him groan, when, on examination, she found him dead. Medical assistance was immediately procured, but arrived too late. An Inquest was yesterday held on the body. Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God.

Accident - On Saturday last, about 11 o'clock in the forenoon, the men at work in the Stone Quarry of Messrs Hooper, at Heavitree, near this city, perceived a part of the superincumbent earth giving way; an alarm was immediately given at this time, the two master quarry men were the only persons on the face of the rock in the direction the moving mass was taking; the other workmen being below who easily secured themselves under the projections, one of the master quarrymen moved on one side, and, holding firmly by a projecting part of the rock, escaped unhurt; but the other, JOHN GERMON, attempting to escape over the front of the quarry, fell from a height of about 25 feet; he was taken up senseless, and immediately brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, though every attention was paid him, he never recovered from the stupor in which he was brought in, and died on Sunday; there were many severe bruises on different parts of his body, and one of his legs was fractured. The deceased was 51 years of age, had worked many years as a quarryman, in the parish of Heavitree, bore the character of an honest, industrious, and inoffensive man, and has left a wife, and seven children, (5 of them unprovided for) to lament his loss: A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, before S. Walkey, Esq. on Monday, - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 19 August 1824, Issue 3096 – Gale Document No. Y3200660052
MARY ANN SOPER, the wretched woman whose commitment to prison was noticed in our last, put an end to her existence on Sunday morning last. Her conduct, from the time of her committal, had displayed strong symptoms of insanity; and during the night previous to the fatal act, had been very noisy and troublesome, insomuch that she had been visited by one of the Keeper's family, with a view to calm her, and which seemed, for the time, successful; but, at the usual time of unlocking in the morning, it was found the door of her cell could not be opened, and force being used, this unfortunate victim to dissolute habits, at the age of 42, was found stretched lifeless on the floor. It appeared she had taken a neck-kerchief from her person, in one end of which she had formed a running noose, which placing round her neck, she had tied the other end firmly to the leg of the iron bedstead, and laying herself on the floor, had pushed with her feet against the door of the cell so as to cause strangulation. A Coroner's Inquest was held before S. Walkey, Esq. on Sunday evening, to enquire into the cause of her death, when the Jury returned a verdict - Died of strangulation, being in a state of Insanity.

Thursday 16 September 1824, Issue 3100 – Gale Document No. Y3200660108
RICHARD WINDSOR, the sawyer, whose unfortunate accident we noticed a fortnight since, died yesterday morning, in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. An Inquest was held on the body the same day, before S. Walkey, Esq. coroner, - Verdict, "Accidental Death," The deceased was 45 years of age and belonged to Broad-Hempston, in this county.

Thursday 28 October 1824, Issue 3106 – Gale Document No. Y3200660191
An Inquest was held Monday, at the Black Horse Inn, Tiverton, by C. D. Pugh, Esq. Coroner, on the body of __ WERE, who died on Sunday last. It appeared in evidence that the deceased (a mason's labourer) was employed to do some repairs in the cellar of Mr Boyce, spirit-merchant; while at work, he and his companions discovered a cask of gin, with a common cock in it, and, procuring a cup, proceeded to help themselves. The deceased drank too freely, and forfeited his life in consequence. - Verdict, Died from the effects of excessive drinking.

Thursday 4 November 1824, Issue 3107 – Gale Document No. Y3200660204
Exeter, Wednesday 3 November
On Sunday last, Mr John Mitchell, at the ferry-house, on the Quay, observing something floating in the river, dispatched a boat, with several stout lads in it, to ascertain what it was, which, coming up with, about half way between the ferry-house, and the King's arms sluice, on the Haven Bank side, they found to be the body of the unfortunate WILLIAM STILES, of the barge, Harwood, who had been missing since the 15th ult.; on being brought on shore, in his waistcoat pocket was found a bird skin purse, containing 11s. in silver, and three half-pence, and in his trowsers pocket £4 in Bank Notes, and 4s. 6d. in silver, and there is not the slightest doubt but that he fell accidentally into the water. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, at the Duke of York, Public-house, Rock's lane, and a verdict of Found Drowned recorded. The deceased who bore an excellent character, and was much respected, was about 28 years of age, and a native of Plymouth; his remains were interred yesterday, in Southernhay burying-ground, followed to the grave by his sorrowing wife and relatives, whose feelings have been cruelly sported with by its having been reported that he was alive, and had returned to his vessel.

On Thursday last a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before S. Walkey, Esq. on the body of a boy, named JOHN MARDON; - it appeared that on the preceding day, MARDON and other boys had gone from the city, down to the Quay, and on board a boat belonging to the Unity, which lay there; they had repeatedly been driven from, but had as constantly returned to the boat, for the purpose of rocking themselves in it, - when, by a more than ordinary roll of the boat, the deceased was thrown into the river, and drowned. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 11 November 1824, Issue 3108 – Gale Document No. Y3200660221
Exeter, Wednesday 10 November
Fatal Suicide - On Monday last, about one o'clock in the afternoon, a man, meanly attired, walked down the Haven Banks, and when a little distance below the ferry-boat landing-place, made a halt, look steadfastly at the water, placed his hat on the bank, and walked deliberately into the river; several boats immediately put off from the Quay, but near twenty minutes had elapsed, before the body was taken up, it was immediately carried to the Humane Society's Reception House, the Lord Nelson public-house, in Rock's-lane, and every means used to restore animation, but in vain. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, and a most respectable Jury; - it appeared, the deceased was WILLIAM CANN, a husbandman, or labourer, of West Morchard, between 40 and 50 years of age, a widower, and had five children, for the last six months he had very frequently come from his home to Exeter, and cohabited with one of those miserable women who infest our streets, in which time he had expended on this woman and her associates nearly £50, a sum which as far as could be made out had come into his hands in the form of a legacy, but the supply of cash failing, the manner of the prostitute changed towards him, and the preceding evening at a public house in the west quarters a quarrel had taken place, and a fight ensued between the deceased and a man present, on whom the attentions of the female seemed more particularly lavished, the marks of the combat, were indeed very visible on the dead body, the woman and other men quitted the house, and CANN was put to bed; the next morning he declared his intention of returning home, but about noon when finally quitting the house, on being asked by the landlady where he was going, said "where my hat is, there will my body be found" - The Coroner in a clear and most explicit manner summed up the evidence, and stated to the jury that it was always his wish to avoid saying any thing that could by possibility appear like an attempt to bias the mind of a jury, or lead to any particular conclusion, yet it was his duty in the present instance, to distinctly state that in the evidence which had come before them, he saw none of those aberrations of mind and conduct, which could lead to what might humanely be termed a favourite verdict still it was not him (the Coroner) but they who were to decide, and he doubted not but they would do so to the best of their judgment. After about a quarter of an hours consideration one of the jury said, he thought it probably that jealousy from the apparent preference given by the woman to the other man might have operated strongly on the unhappy man's mind, and occasioned temporary insanity. - Coroner, "it might have been so," but you have no evidence to that effect. After a few moments more of deliberation, the Foreman returned a Verdict of "Drowned himself while labouring under temporary insanity," upon which one of the jury said, Mr Coroner, "I protest against that verdict, and quitted the room.

Thursday 18 November 1824, Issue 3109 – Gale Document No. Y3200660237
Exeter, Wednesday 17 November
BRAILEY, Mr Durant's waggoner, whose accident we noticed a fortnight since, died on Thursday last, in the Devon and Exeter Hospital; a Coroner's Inquest was held the same day, but the necessary witnesses not being in attendance, it was adjourned to Saturday, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

On Thursday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held at Crediton, on the body of a little girl (belonging to the charity school at that place) named WEST, who dropt down in the school-room on the Wednesday preceding, whilst eating her dinner. She was taken home senseless, and died the next morning. Verdict – Died by the visitation of God.

Thursday 2 December 1824, Issue 3111 – Gale Document No. Y3200660268
INQUEST. - On Thursday last, at the King's Arms, Ottery St. Mary, an Inquisition was taken by Isaac Cox, Esq. on the body of a bastard female infant, born on the preceding Wednesday.
It appeared that the mother, MARY ANN ROBERTS, a young woman of about twenty, was, only a few weeks since, taken in the family of Mr Evans, a most respectable inhabitant of Ottery, as a maid of all work: that very shortly after, suspicions were entertained as to her condition; but, on being taxed, she resolutely denied that she was in a state of pregnancy. On Wednesday last, she waited upon the family at tea, as usual, about seven o'clock the shopman, and a lad, on going into the salt-house, hearing an unusual noise in the back kitchen, went there, to ascertain what it was. On entering, they saw MARY ANN ROBERTS near the pump, in a stooping position, with one hand under her petticoats, apparently pulling or pressing something; and, on being asked what she was about, or whether she was killing any thing, she said she would tell them bye and bye. They went away; but, again hearing the noise, one of them returned, and saw her in the same position; the noise also having been heard by the nursery-maid in the house, her suspicions were excited, and, in a few minutes afterwards, she was seen to come out of the dairy, which adjoining the back kitchen. An alarm having been given, Mr Evans, went into the back kitchen, when he saw MARY ANN ROBERTS come out from the dairy; he asked her whether she was ill, she smiled, and said she was not, and he went away, but, on hearing what had been seen by the shopman, he again returned to the back kitchen, and on examining it, he found blood on the floor, which was traced to the dairy, on a shelf of which was found the body of a female infant, wrapped in a clothe, in a mangled and pitiable condition – its mouth torn on the right side to the jaw bones, one of which was broken, the infant was found to be alive, and was, with its mother, immediately sent to the alms-house – it, however, died on the following morning.
Mr Hodge and Mr Carpenter, surgeons, were called, both of whom deposed to the possibility, and even to the probability, of the wound on the infant having been accidently made during the agitation and alarm of the woman in attempting to deliver herself, particularly as she had been so repeatedly interrupted, and Mr Hodge deposed that he did not think the wounds sufficient to cause death; and that, from the weakly state of the child, he was of opinion it would have died had no such wounds been inflicted; he also stated his opinion that the birth was premature.
The Jury were then adjourned to the alms-house, where MARY ANN ROBERTS was in bed. She appeared anxious to hear all the evidence, and declared that she had no intention of destroying the child, but that the injury she had done it was occasioned by her anxiety to deliver herself, and was accidental. - The Jury were in consultation several hours; and at length fifteen of them delivered a verdict that "MARY ANN ROBERTS, in attempting privately to deliver herself of the child, accidentally inflicted the wounds; that she secreted the birth of the child; but whether the child died of the wounds it received, they were ignorant." The remainder of the Jury were for a verdict of "Wilful Murder;" all of them expressed a desire to the parish officers that a further examination should take place, in order that the woman might be punished for secreting the birth of the child. During some part of the examination some of the Jury were desirous that the room should be cleared, but the Coroner refused, stating it was an open court.

Thursday 30 December 1824, Issue 3115 – Gale Document No. Y3200660321
Exeter, Wednesday 29 December
On Monday afternoon last, WILLIAM STUCKES, of Thorverton, left his home for the purpose of examining some mole-traps, which he had set in the grounds of Mr Upcott, his not returning as expected id not excite any uneasiness in his family, who imagined, being Christmas, that he had stopped at one of the neighbouring farm-houses; but on Tuesday morning, Mr Upcott's son being out with the grey-hounds, the dogs were attracted in a peculiar way to one spot, and on Mr Upcott and his companions repairing thither, they found the body of poor STUCKES near one end of the mole-traps, who must have lain there the whole night; pulsation was at this time barely perceptible, but though attended to with the greatest humanity, he expired before they reached his home. The deceased was in the 66th year of his age; an inquest will be held on the body this afternoon.

On Sunday last, at Moretonhampstead, an Inquest was taken before Joseph Gribble, Esq. Coroner, on the body of ANN ASH, nearly four years of age, daughter of a husbandman of that place. This was another instance of the folly and danger attending leaving children in rooms where fires are kept, without some grown person being present; about three weeks since, the father being at his labour, and the mother having occasion to leave her house, placed the child for security with the children of a neighbour, - while at play, with whom her clothes caught fire, and before effectual assistance could be rendered, was so dreadfully burnt that she lingered in great agony till Friday last, when death terminated her sufferings. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 13 January 1825, Issue 3117 – Gale Document No. Y3200660346
INQUESTS. – On Saturday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held at Sandford, in this county, on the body of JAMES ELLIOTT, late of that place, blacksmith. A verdict of manslaughter was returned by the Jury against John Fisher, a labourer, of the same place. It appears that they had been drinking together, and some quarrel arising between them, blows followed, and Fisher struck the deceased a violet blow on the head with an old gun barrel, which proved fatal. Fisher is committed to the County Gaol for trial.

An Inquest was taken yesterday, at Whiteleigh, in Black Torrington, before F. Kingdon, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a young man named BEER, who was found dead in a hayloft the preceding Saturday, having been missing from Thursday. There were marks of blood about the abdomen. - It appeared he had been subject to fits, and evinced great imbecility of mind, very nearly if not quite amounting to idiotism. After a patient investigation, the Jury returned a verdict, "That being subject to fits, he had died during one of its paroxysms." The deceased was 18 years of age, and maintained by the parish.

Thursday 20 January 1825, Issue 3118 – Gale Document No. Y3200660359
Exeter, Wednesday 19 January
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - The following Inquests have, during the last week, been taken before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner:-
On Friday last, at the Honiton Inn public-house, Paris-street, on the body of MR JOHN FRANKLIN, master of the said house, who, that morning in a fit of despondency had terminated his existence. Verdict, Insanity.

Same day, at the Guildhall, on the body of JOHN FOWLER, who had been picked up that morning in the river near Exe Bridge; it appeared the deceased was a Newfoundland sailor, and a native of Torquay, about 21 years of age, and a fine young man, he had come to this city to see his sister, living at the Star Inn, from whom he parted on the evening of the 20th December last, in order to sleep in St. Thomas, since which he had never been heard of; it is supposed he must have missed his way and fallen into the river, as his watch and money were found about his person. Verdict, Found Drowned.

On Sunday, at the Lord Nelson public-house, Rock's-lane, on the body of JOHN THOMAS, a journeyman baker, about 23 years of age; it came out on the enquiry, that the deceased had spent the evening of Saturday on board the Owners' Goodwill, lying at our Quay, and had requested permission to sleep on board, but was told this could not be granted by any one but the master, on which one of the crew of the Liberty who was present, offered him to sleep on board that ship, which was lying close alongside, this was accepted, and THOMAS endeavouring to reach the Liberty by going over the bow of the Owners' Goodwill, but missing his footing fell between the two ships, one of his companions in trying to save him nearly sharing the same fate, and though every exertion was made the body was not found till Sunday morning. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 17 February 1825, Issue 3122 – Gale Document No. Y3200660424
CORONER'S INQUEST – An Inquest was taken yesterday, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of ROBERT FOWLER, whose accident was reported in our paper of the 3rd inst.; for some days after his being brought to the Hospital hopes were entertained of rendering him effectual assistance, but he became worse, and latterly his sufferings had been very great; he died on Sunday evening, and on inspection, it was found the pelvis was fractured. – Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 24 March 1825, Issue 3127 – Gale Document No. Y3200660483
MARY MITCHELL, was indicted for the murder of her female bastard child, in the parish of Colyton. The prisoner was committed under the warrant of Isaac Cox, Esq., Coroner, on the 16th of December last. The surgeon who had examined the body declared that in his opinion the child had been born alive, but that its death was occasioned by a retarded birth, and the erect posture of the parent; the child appearing to have fallen on its head, and to have been suffocated by the haemorrhage natural on such occasions. As there was no evidence to contradict this opinion, the Jury, under the direction of the Court, Acquitted the prisoner.

Thursday 14 April 1825, Issue 3130 – Gale Document No. Y3200660531
A man named WM. BAKER was last week committed to the Devon County Gaol, on the warrant of the Coroner, Isaac Cox, Esq. charged with killing his wife, occasioned by a sudden blow inflicted by the prisoner during the heat of a quarrel. Since his commitment he has evinced much sorrow for the consequences of his unguarded violence.

Thursday 19 May 1825, Issue 3135 – Gale Document No. Y3200660607
Exeter, Wednesday 18 May
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Monday afternoon last WALTER BECKFORD, shoe-maker, of Cock-wood, near Starcross, who had come to this city on business, sat out on his return home; he was, what is denominated among the gentle-craft, a wet one, and was observed by the ferry-man at our Quay when taken across between five and six o'clock, to be very tipsy; he had then with him a bundle of leather, and a bag, and was noticed by many persons on his way down the banks as being much intoxicated, occasionally indulging himself in singing and otherwise acting incoherently; on arriving at the public-house, at Double-Lock, he again drank, and proceeded on his way home; about half an hour after which his body was found in the canal, a short distance on the Exeter side from the Countess Weir draw-bridge, by some Lighter men; BECKFORD was laying apparently poised on the water, with his face downwards, the bundle of leather having slipped, got under him, and across his breast; he was immediately taken out, and if report be t all correct the body was then warm, but on being taken to the Double-Lock public-house was in humanly refused admittance, and before the persons who conveyed the body could reach the nearest Reception-house of our Humane Society, in the parish of St. Leonard, the unfortunate man was quite dead – he was about 50 years of age, and has left a widow and children, but the latter are grown up – an Inquest was taken on the body before C. D. Pugh, Esq. Coroner, on Tuesday. Verdict, Found Drowned, but we understand the Coroner and Jury, expressed themselves strongly on the conduct of the landlord at the Double-Lock.

Thursday 16 June 1825, Issue 3139 – Gale Document No. Y3200660676
Exeter, Wednesday 15 June
FATAL ACCIDENT. – On Monday evening last, several persons having taken a boat from our Quay for the purpose of pleasure, proceeded down the river, when just opposite the lime kilns while in the act of changing the rowers, two on the same side sliding together, the boat was instantly upset, and all in it were thrown into the river; though prompt assistance was immediately rendered, one of them was unfortunately drowned. An Inquest was taken on the body yesterday afternoon at the Windmill public-house, Holloway street before C. D. Pugh, Esq. Coroner, and a verdict returned of Accidental Death with direction that the boat should be forfeited. The deceased was WILLIAM SNELL, a journeyman cabinet-maker, of this city, and we understand has left a widow and several children totally unprovided for.

Thursday 1 September 1825, Issue 3150 – Gale Document No Y3200660883
Exeter, Wednesday 31 August
Coroner's Inquest
This afternoon, an inquest was held at the Lord Nelson public-house, Rock's-lane, before S. Walkey, Esq. coroner, on the body of WILLIAM BEER, in the 18th year of his age, belonging to the Schna, of Plymouth, now unloading at our Quay, who yesterday afternoon while in the act of rowing a boat, caught in a rope, was thrown backward into the river and drowned. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 22 September 1825, Issue 3153 – Gale Document No. Y43200660880
Exeter, Wednesday 21 September
On Sunday morning last, the body of a man named JOHN SNELL, 29 years of age, a native of Southtawton, but who has latterly been living as a servant with farmer in this neighbourhood, was taken out of the river near the weir above Exwick; - he had been missing, and the body appeared to have been in the water some days, but no enquiry had been made after him from its being supposed he had returned to his native place, having previously complained of being unwell and neglected his food; - the body was conveyed to Brampford Speke, where an Inquest was taken before C. D. Pugh, Esq. Coroner, on Monday - Verdict, Found Drowned. – Being jilted by a frail fair one is supposed to have been the cause.

Thursday 10 November 1825, Issue 3160 – Gale Document No. Y3200660991
An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Swan Inn, Tiverton, before C. D. Pugh, Esq. Coroner, on the body of __ KEYS, a boy about 14 years of age, who was killed on Saturday evening by an explosion of gunpowder, whilst he was celebrating with others the anniversary of the Popish Plot. From the evidence of other boys, who were present, it appeared that the deceased held a bottle of powder in one hand, and a small pistol and a light in the other; and that whilst emptying powder from the bottle into the pistol, the explosion took place, - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 8 December 1825, Issue 3164 – Gale Document No. Y3200661062
Plymouth, Devonport and Stonehouse
CORONER'S INQEUSTS have been held at Plymouth, on the bodies of MR GEORGE HUGH CHAMBERS, midshipman of the Genoa, attached to the Reynard tender, drowned in Mill-Bay, by the boat striking a rock during a severe gale on the evening of the 28th ultimo. - Verdict, Accidentally Drowned;

and of MR HENRY SQUIRE, a volunteer of the second class, belonging to the Shamrock, in Hamoaze, missing since the night of 21st October, supposed to have fallen overboard. – Verdict, Found Drowned.

Thursday 16 March 1826, Issue 3176 – Gale Document No. Y3200661301
Exeter, Wednesday 15 March
THOMAS DYER, servant to the Rev. J. Deane, was found on Thursday last, with his throat cut, in a field in the parish of Horwood, near Barnstaple. It appeared on the Inquest that he committed the rash act in a fit of insanity.

Thursday 30 March 1826, Issue 3179 – Gale Document No. Y3200661332
Exeter, Wednesday 29 March
Monday morning, 9 o'clock, as one of the Plymouth Coaches was proceeding down the High-street, in this city, for that place; when opposite Broad Gate-place a little boy attempted to cross the street directly in front of the horses, he was knocked down, and though the coachman, who did not see the child, pulled up the instant the alarm was given, both wheels on the side on which he fell, had passed over his body; he was instantly conveyed to the Hospital, but death terminated his sufferings in a few minutes after entering that Institution.
An Inquest was taken the same afternoon before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, when it appeared the deceased's name was THOMAS DAWSON, 6 years of age, son of the late MR D. DAWSON, boot-closer, of Mary Arches-street; he was a fine boy, and his sister who stood waiting for him on the opposite side of the street, witnessed the fatal accident. After a patient investigation the Jury returned a Verdict of Accidental Death, and imposed a mitigated fine of £2 2s. as a deodand on the wheels, expressly declaring that this was done not because there was any thing in this case peculiarly requiring it, but because the Law on this head was imperative, for it was their unanimous opinion that not the slightest blame was attributed to Rose, the driver.

Last night about ten o'clock, an alarm was excited by the smell f fire, proceeding from the residence of MARY STOCKER, an aged woman, residing in Cowick-street, St. Thomas, near the Dunsford Turnpike-gate. On the door being opened the unfortunate inmate was found lying on the floor, much burnt, and quite dead. The deceased was 86 years of age, and from infirmity a woman had been hired to take care of her; this person left the house to go to the fair, and while absent it is supposed deceased clothes caught fire. An Inquest will be held on the body tomorrow (Thursday).

Thursday 6 April 1826, Issue 3179 – Gale Document No. Y3200661347
Exeter, Wednesday 5 April
A fatal accident happened yesterday in St. Sidwell's to a bricklayer named WILLIAM TRAPNOLL, who whilst at work on a scaffolding, fell off, by which he was so dreadfully injured that in being conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, he expired. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body yesterday afternoon – Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 11 May 1826, Issue 3183 – Gale Document No. Y3200661434
A melancholy and fatal accident occurred last week at Southmolton. MR JAMES DOWNEY, a respectable butcher and grazier of Tiverton, on his return from Torrington Fair on Thursday last, slept at the house of his brother-in-law at Southmolton. In the morning he arose, took a gun, and proceeded towards a rookery alone; his not returning either to breakfast or dine caused considerable alarm, and on a search being made, he was discovered lying in a hedge-trough shot through the body. It seems that in attempting to get over the hedge, a bough by which he was holding suddenly broke, and in falling backwards he received the fatal wound.
This is the most probably conjecture that can be formed, as when found he had a quantity of the leaves &c. clenched in his fist, and there were evident marks of his falling from the hedge. A Coroner's Inquest was held next day, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," - He was a man in the prime of life, an excellent and truly worthy Tradesman, and has left a wife and 3 children to lament their untimely loss.

Thursday 1 June 1826, Issue 3186 – Gale Document No. Y3200661485
Exeter, Wednesday 31 May
Yesterday afternoon, as HUGH WHITFIELD, and his son, a lad about 16 years of age, masons, in the employ of Messrs. Hooper and Son, of this city, were engaged in footing up a cob wall, adjoining the new-buildings at Oak Close, near the Heavitree turnpike, a considerable portion of the wall suddenly gave way, and buried them both beneath it, on being dug out the lad was found crushed in a terrible manner, particularly about the head, the fathers injuries were less severe, both were immediately removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but the unfortunate boy died within an hour of reaching that Institution. An Inquest was taken this afternoon before Mr Walkey, verdict, Accidental Death. What adds to this calamity is the singular circumstance that the poor boy's mother was also a patient in the Hospital when himself and father were brought in.

On Saturday last an Inquest was held before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN OSBORN, a child two years of age, whose mother resided in the butcherow. The investigation took place in consequence of its having been said the child's death was occasioned by injury received about three months since, from a horse ridden down the High-street, but no evidence to that effect came before the Jury, though it appeared the child was suffered to fall by an elder sister in whose care it was, and they returned a verdict of Accidental Death, in consequence of a blow from falling on the ground in crossing the carriage road.

Thursday 20 July 1826, Issue 3189 – Gale Document No. Y3200661578
Exeter, Wednesday 19 July
Fatal Accident - On Tuesday morning, about half past 5 o'clock, Mr Taylor, of the Royal George public-house, Quay-Gate, in this city, was alarmed by cries of distress proceeding from the brew-house, he hastened to the spot and found his brewer, who had been up all night, fallen backward into the hot grains, his legs were hanging over the kieve and he had contrived to catch hold with his hands, but was unable to lift his body from the almost burning mass. Mr Taylor succeeded in getting him out, but terribly scalded, the whole of the cuticle slipping off from the parts which had come in contact with the grains: he was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, in about 6 hours, death terminated his sufferings. From the account he gave, it seems the first wort had been drawn off about an hour, and he was sitting on the edge of the mashing kieve watching the boiler, when, from drowsiness, he slipped from his seat and fell backward into the grains; he had been repeatedly cautioned against placing himself in such a dangerous situation. The deceased's name was
JOHN STEER, he was a native of Drewsteignton, 65 years old, and formerly for many years kept the Black Lion's Inn, South-street, but had latterly been in reduced circumstances; he buried his wife about a fortnight since, and has left one child. Verdict on the Coroner's Inquest Accidental Death.

On the 9th inst. at Chagford, before J. Gribble, Esq. Coroner, an Inquest was taken on the body of ROBERT, youngest son of MR RICHARD THORN, of that place; the deceased was between 8 and 9 years of age, and was drowned the preceding day whilst bathing in the river Teign, - a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 17 August 1826, Issue 3194 – Gale Document No. Y3200661634
Exeter, Wednesday 16 August
Coroner's Inquests.
S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner for the city, has held Inquests on the body of JOHN BARTLETT FORD, 4 years of age, killed by the fall of deal planks, on which he was at play on the Quay. – Verdict, Accidental Death, and a fine of 5s. levied on the deals.

On Sunday, on the body of BETTY FOURACRES, an aged woman, for many years servant to the late Mr Horswill, of North-street, in this city, on whom the dread of a work-house is supposed to have operated so powerfully, as to lead to self destruction. No evidence could be obtained as to how she came into the water, and the Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

On Sunday, J. Gribble, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, took an inquest at Fingle-Mill, in Moretonhampstead, on the body of THIRZA, the infant daughter of MR JOHN BRELY, accidentally drowned in her father's mill-leat, the child was 1 year and 11 months old – and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

J. Cox, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, has taken Inquests, at Budleigh Salterton, on the body of WM. GIBBS, fisherman of Beer, drowned by the sinking of his boat, in a sudden squall on the 22nd ult., of Weston Mouth, Branscombe. – Accidentally Drowned.

At Broadhembury, on the body of MRS CHARLOTTE BALL, wife of MR ROBT. BALL, a respectable farmer, - Apoplexy.

At Axminster, on the body of JOHN TURNER, blacksmith, in consequence of its having been said his death arose from injuries received in a skittle-alley, about a month or five weeks previous, but the surgeon's evidence satisfactorily proving he died from typhus fever, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

At Tiverton, on Friday last, on the body of JOHN COCKER, who died the preceding day, under the following circumstances:- the deceased, a boy aged 13, was employed at Messrs. Heathcoats' manufactory. On the Wednesday morning he was at work at a small factory, some distance from the main buildings, and at eight o'clock, was ordered to go home; he stayed, however, and lighted a fire in the open air for the purpose boiling some meat for a dog, belonging to the foreman; while thus engaged his clothes took fire, and he ran into a corn-mill adjoining, where the miller endeavoured to extinguish the flames by wrapping him in a quantity of empty sacks, and at length by plunging him into the mill-pond. He was, however, so dreadfully scorched, that scarce any hopes were entertained for his life, and he died next morning. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Last week, the body of CAPTAIN THOMAS PILLMAN, of the brig Hazard, of and lying in the port of Bideford, was found in the mud, near the Quay; he was seen on board his vessel the preceding evening at ten o'clock, and is supposed to have fallen overboard. – Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 31 August 1826, Issue 3195 – Gale Document No. Y3200661670
On Sunday last an Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq. at Kenton, on the body of JAMES LANGDON, a servant in husbandry to Mr Sweet, who died on the Friday night in consequence of an injury he received on Haldon the preceding day. A great number of witnesses had been summoned to attend the Inquest by E. P. Lyon, Esq. It appeared, in evidence that the deceased, and a man of the name of Helyar, of Heavitree, had quarrelled in one of the booths on the hill, and, by agreement went out on the Down to fight, but they there explained matters, shook hands, and returned to the booth and drank together; they however quarrelled again, the question between them simply turning upon which was the best man, they again went out to fight and fought five rounds, there was not the slightest charge of unfair conduct on the part of Helyar. In the first two or three rounds the deceased had the advantage, but being more intoxicated with the exertion he became less able, but more eager to engage, He was described by the witnesses (amongst whom was his brother) as making fiercely at his opponent, and though the precise made in which he fell was not clearly made out, yet it seemed that in attempting to throw Helyar in the struggle over the fore-hip, he threw himself violently on his head, and fell almost lifeless on the ground. He was taken upon a plank to a booth kept by Mr A. Cann, but (we are sorry to say) was not treated with that humanity which might have been expected, for it was stated, that Mr Cann ordered the man to be taken out or he would kick him out. It appears his companions were not at all aware of the extent of the injury he had received, and he was kept in another booth all night, and till eight the following morning, when he was conveyed to his lodgings near Kenton. Medical assistance was procured, but he died the same evening at about 10 o'clock. Mr Collins, who attended the Inquest, inspected the body, and it appeared the neck was dislocated between the 2nd and 3rd vertebra, and that one of the processes of the vertebra was broken. The body was in a very putrid state, and Mr Collins unfortunately punctured one of his fingers during the dissection – we hope, however, no evil will result to him. After a very long examination of the matter, the Jury found a verdict that the deceased, having been in a struggle with Helyar, accidently fell with his head on the ground and dislocated his neck. The deceased was a very fine young man, 21 years of age, and highly spoken of for his general good character and conduct.

Mr Cox, also held an Inquest on HARRIS EDWIN RACKLEY, the infant son of MR RACKLEY, of Starcross, who was discovered dead in its bed by the mother. A surgeon gave evidence that the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned their verdict accordingly.

Thursday 7 September 1826, Issue 3195 – Gale Document No. Y3200661687
Exeter, Wednesday 6 September
An Inquest was taken on Saturday before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of ANN ATWELL, 64 years of age, residing in Preston-street, in this city, who terminated her existence by hanging herself on the preceding Thursday evening, as no one lived with her she was not discovered until Saturday morning. Verdict – Insanity.

Thursday 21 September 1826, Issue 3199 – Gale Document No. Y3200661724
It is our painful task this week to record a most melancholy and fatal event which occurred on Saturday morning last, to MR CARPENTER, Surgeon of Ottery St. Mary, who was out shooting, on Cotleigh Farm, with Mr Thomas Yelverton. It appears that MR CARPENTER and Mr Yelverton were both in a Coppice, called Cotleigh Brake, just before the accident happened, that MR CARPENTER left Mr Yelverton, and went towards the hedge of the brake to go into Fluxton Farm, he had not left more than a minute or two, before Mr Yelverton heard the report of a gun in the direction MR CARPENTER went, and immediately after a deep groan; Mr Yelverton ran to the spot and saw his friend falling on the opposite side of the hedge, on getting there, he found MR CARPENTER, with his feet upwards against the hedge, and blood gushing from a wound in the upper part of the breast towards the left shoulder. He took the deceased in his arms, who looked at him, but was unable to speak, and died almost instantly. It is supposed that in getting over the hedge the gun which the deceased carried, accidentally went off and lodged the contents in his body. An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq. the same afternoon, and a Verdict of Accidental Death returned. The deceased was a gentleman of superior talent in his profession, and universally respected and beloved; he was about 34 years of age, and has left a wife and 4 children, and MRS CARPENTER is we hear pregnant.

Thursday 26 October 1826, Issue 3202 – Gale Document No. Y3200661809
An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq. at Exmouth, last week, on the body of JOHN MITCHELL, a labourer, whose death was occasioned by drinking brandy to excess on board of the Fame, of Teignmouth, to which vessel the deceased, with two others, had been to endeavour to take the unloading her cargo, consisting of timber. The deceased on returning to land, began to feel the effects of the spirits, reeled and staggered about, and was obliged to be carried home. Mr Land, a surgeon, was sent for, and he administered medicine, bled him, and emptied his stomach by means of the stomach pump, but all to no effect. - Verdict, "Died by Excessive Drinking."

Thursday 9 November 1826, Issue 3203 – Gale Document No. Y3200661843
An Inquest was taken on Friday, at Honiton, on the body of HARRIET FROOM, whose death was occasioned by taking laudanum, administered in improper quantities by her sister, as a remedy for ague, - a Verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 30 November 1826, Issue 3208 – Gale Document No. Y3200661898
Exeter, Wednesday 29 November
Friday a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Inn, in North-street, before S. Walkey, Esq. on the body of a little boy, about two years and half old, named SAUNDERS, who during the absence of the servant maid from the kitchen but for a few moments, went to the fire and lighted a stick, which communicating to his apron speedily enveloped him in flames. The poor little sufferer, though dreadfully burnt, lingered for three days, when he expired.

Thursday 21 December 1826, Issue 3209 – Gale Document No. Y3200661953
CORONER'S INQUESTS.
The following Inquests have been taken before I. Cox, Esq. on the Coroner's for Devon.
At Farringdon, on the body of THOS. MILLS, labourer, aged 45, who hung himself to the beam of a linhay, adjoining his dwelling. Evidence being adduced of his having been some time in a low desponding state, the Jury returned a verdict, "Hung himself in a fit of temporary derangement." The deceased was a widower, and has left 7 children.

At Axminster on the 13th instant, on the body of JOHN BAKER, labourer, aged 87. It appeared that on the 14th Oct. last, Hayman Loveridge, servant, in riding smartly through Axminster, got entangled among a flock of sheep, passing in a contrary direction, by which Loveridge was thrown, falling against the deceased who was in the road; Loveridge immediately regained his feet, assisted the deceased to rise, treated him with great humanity, offered pecuniary satisfaction, and desired a respectable individual to furnish him with any thing that might be necessary, which he would pay for. The deceased being from his age infirm and also previously labouring under disease, took immediately to his bed, where he languished until the 10th inst. when he died. After a patient investigation, of all the circumstances and hearing the evidence of Mr Arnold, the surgeon, the Jury returned their verdict "That JOHN BAKER casually and by misfortune came to his end."

At Axminster, on the 15th inst. on the body of SARAH CLEGG, aged 45. The deceased had been servant to Mrs Tucker, of that place, 23 years; Mrs Tucker stated that she returned from a journey at half past seven in the evening of the 14th inst., the deceased was at the door, enquired the cause of her being so late, took the luggage, and came up to the drawing-room to shake hands with the Miss Tucker's, not having seen them for some time – having done so she said, "Oh! how giddy I am," fell to the floor and instantly expired. Mr Symes, surgeon, had no doubt but Apoplexy was the cause of death, and the Jury returned their verdict accordingly.

Thursday 8 February 1827, Issue 3216 – Gale Document No. Y3200662080
Exeter, Wednesday 7 February
An Inquest was held on Wednesday last at the Round Tree Public-house, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a poor aged woman, named ANN JOHNSON, who was found drowned at Mr Ratcliffe's mills; - the miller, in consequence of finding the mill impeded, went with a crook to discover the cause, when he pulled out the body. It is supposed she fell in whilst dipping up a pitcher of water, in Horse-pool lake, on the Monday preceding.

On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the Swan Inn, Tiverton, before Mr James Partridge, Coroner, on the body of CHARLES PEARCE, a boy late in the employment of Messrs. J. Heathcoat and Co. It appeared the deceased had come in to work at 5 in the morning, and whilst at play had got his apron entangled in the upright shaft, by which means he was carried round and jammed between the shaft and a bench by the side of it, which ensued his death in a few hours. Verdict – Accidental Death.

On Thursday last, at Lifton, JOSEPH MARTIN was found dead in an outhouse, where he had been at work – sawing wood. The deceased was found lying on his face and hands across the piece of wood which he had been sawing. Verdict – Died by the visitation of God.

Thursday 22 March 1827, Issue 3220 – Gale Document No. Y3200662171
Exeter, Wednesday 21 March
Last week, ELIZABETH CABLE, wife to the gardener of a gentleman in this city, going to the hot house to seek her husband, dropped down in an apoplectic fit and expired immediately. - Verdict on the Inquest, Died by the Visitation of God.

Horrid Murder - It is with regret we lay before our readers the following particulars of a most horrid murder, committed on Monday evening last, in a part of Devon hitherto rarely marked by the commission of atrocious crime, - jealousy appears to have provoked the bloody deed. The perpetrator is said to be in tolerable circumstances, and has fled from justice, but we trust the efforts using for his apprehension will prove effectual:-
An Inquest was yesterday held in the parish of Ashbury, in this County, by Francis Kingdon, Eq. one of the Coroners, on view of the bodies of MISS SARAH GLASS, 24, and THOMAS GLASS, 14, who were found lying that morning on Wadland Down, two yards distant from each other, with their throats cut. It appeared by the evidence, that the deceased left their home about half past seven o'clock on Monday evening, for the purpose of meeting the mother of the deceased SARAH GLASS, on her return from her son's, who lived at Northlew, and that in going to Northlew they had to pass over Wadland Down, where the murder was committed. The mother, who was on horseback, returned over Wadland Down about half past nine, and on her entering the Down her horse started, which it had not been accustomed to do. On the following morning, about half-past seven, Mr Tucker and his servant had to pass over the Down, when they discovered the dead bodies on the ground; there was a lantern and hat near where the bodies lay, and a butcher's knife near the body of SARAH GLASS; an handkerchief lay over the body of EDWARD GLASS, which had been cut in two places, and it is presumed that it had been staffed into the mouth of the deceased, and that while the boy was pulling it out the murderer cut his throat, and in doing it cut the handkerchief also. The bodies were found at the place where MRS GLASS' horse started on the night preceding, and where, no doubt, the murder had been previously committed. The knife and handkerchief before alluded to were identified as being the property of Thomas Friend, who has absconded. The Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against Thomas Friend, and the Coroner immediately issued a warrant for his apprehension. Friend had lived for 11 years in the service of the mother of the deceased SARAH GLASS, and during that period had saved several hundred pounds. It appeared that he had repeatedly solicited the affections of the deceased, which she had refused. Friend is supposed to be gone towards Plymouth – he is about 39 years of age, dark hair and whiskers, about 5 feet 9 inches high, black eyes, a bruise on the fore finger of his right hand, and the nail almost off, has a cut across the left hand, occasioned by a reap-hook – worn away a white fustian jacket, which had not been washed, dark striped swansdown waistcoat, plush breeches, partly covered with corduroy, long gaiters, nailed shoes, and common shag hat.
It is currently reported this afternoon that Friend has been apprehended at Horrabridge, between Tavistock and Plymouth.

Thursday 5 April 1827, Issue 3222 – Gale Document No. Y3200662199
Exeter, Wednesday 4 April
On Friday last, an Inquest was taken before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, for this city, on the body of THOMAS GODFREY, journeyman silversmith, who on the preceding morning had terminated his existence by cutting his throat with a razor. – Verdict Insanity.

Last week, the body of a corporal in the Royal Marines, named THOMAS CHARD, was found hanging by the neck in a cow-house at Furze-hill lane, about half a mile on the Tavistock-road. It appeared, by evidence on the Coroner's Inquest, that the deceased had been some time in a desponding state of mind. - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 10 May 1827, Issue 3227 – Gale Document No. Y3200662291
Melancholy Occurrence - On Friday evening last an Inquest was held at the Dolphin Inn, in this city, before Samuel Walkey, Gent. on the body of MARY ANN POLLARD, an unmarried woman, who died after five or six hours illness, at her father's lodgings in South-street the same evening It appeared on evidence, from the mother-in-law, MARY POLLARD, that about nine o'clock on Thursday evening the deceased was taken very sick, in a room at the back of the house, where she vomited much, and continued, at intervals, so to do, attended with much pain, until 3 o'clock the following morning, when she expired, in the presence only of her father and mother-in-law. The deponent, upon being asked if any medical person had been sent for while she was ill, said no, as she did not consider the deceased to be in any danger. Deponent then said that she had known the deceased taken ill before, in a similar manner, and vomited. She denied any knowledge of the deceased being new pregnant – she certainly had been so twice, and one of the children was now living; but positively swore, on being asked if she ever saw any thing like poison taken by the deceased, or suspected that she had taken any, that she knew nothing of the kind. When the deceased was all-but-dead, the mother-in-law, MARY POLLARD, called up a person named Ann Beer, who lodged in the house; and when she came up stairs, which was about three o'clock, the deceased had died, lying on something like bedding, on the floor in the front room; at which MARY POLLARD said, "Oh! I am afraid she is dead;" and Ann Beer said, "Indeed she is." MARY POLLARD added, "I am afraid the deceased has taken something, I don't know what." About an hour after she died, Mr Pridham was sent for, who, when he came, expressed much surprise, and suspicion arose from these different circumstances. The contents of the stomach vomited by the deceased had been saved; and no particular or satisfactory evidence being adduced before the Jury that evening, they adjourned until Saturday evening.
In the meantime, the contents of the stomach were analyzed by Dr Collins and Mr Pridham, but no existence of poison could be found after several tests. Mr Pridham gave it also as his opinion, united with that of Dr Collins, that, although no poison was detected by these experiments, yet arsenic might still be lodged in the stomach. The Coroner here produced a piece of brown and a piece of white paper, which had been wrapped in each other, and given him by Ann beer; which papers were given to her by the mother-in-law on Saturday afternoon – on the brown paper was printed the word "Poison" and on the white the words "Arsenic, Poison." MARY POLLARD upon being re-examined, deposed that, as she was hanging some clothes on a line, on Saturday afternoon, in the empty room where the deceased was first taken sick, a bundle of line fell from a hole over the door, and the papers now produced fell with it; that she immediately called out for Ann Beer, and gave them to her, when Ann Beer opened them, and found them empty as produced – she further declared, that she was perfectly ignorant of any such papers being secreted there. Ann beer corroborated all the former witness had said. Upon this discovery, the jury requested that the body might be opened which took place on Monday by Dr Collins & Mr Pridham.
The Jury again met on Monday evening at five o'clock, according to adjournment, when Mr E. P. Pridham deposed, upon oath, that he opened the body of the deceased on Sunday morning, at 9 o'clock, in the presence of Drs. Collins and Blackall, Mr Edye, surgeon, the Coroner, and other assistants; - the stomach appeared extremely inflamed, and was removed from the body and opened, the contents were carefully emptied into a basin; the internal part of the stomach had the most acute inflammation on it, almost to the destruction of its texture, and a few white granular bodies were seen adhering to the stomach, which were carefully put on paper; the whole contents of the stomach were put into bottles, and sent to Dr Collins for him to submit to various tests. Dr Collins sworn, deposed that he very carefully submitted the contents of the stomach, brought to him by Mr Pridham, to the various certain tests for detecting arsenic if any was to be found, and on washing the contents of the stomach several times, with pure water – 22 grains of white oxyd of arsenic were found; he then submitted a solution of the arsenic so found to eight tests, and the whole of them clearly proved the existence of arsenic to have been taken into the stomach; the deceased was also far advanced in pregnancy. No doubt remaining of the existence of poison having been taken, by the deceased, the next deponent was Langworthy Wills, shopman to Mr Harding, druggist, in High-street, who deposed, that the papers presented to him now, he could swear to the writing of the words "arsenic, poison," was his hand-writing, and that the printed label on the brown paper corresponded with the one which he had in the shop – the both were produced, and they did so exactly; that on Thursday last in the forenoon, a woman came to the shop while his master was there, and asked for two or three penny worth of arsenic to destroy rats; she was carefully told by his master that it was poison, she said she had bought some before – he then said, I wish you to remember that it is enough to kill a hundred people; no person came with the woman, and on several questions being asked the deponent how she was dressed, and what sized person she was, there was no doubt vesting on the Juries mind that it was the same woman who was dead. ELIZABETH SAUNDERS, aunt to the deceased, sworn, deposed that on Wednesday and Thursday last, the deceased came to her house, in Goldsmith-street; - she appeared dejected in her spirits, and cried very much, she then had a child on her lap, which she said she cried about, - I made a remark to my daughter after deceased was gone, saying how dejected, and in trouble MARY POLLARD looks; but no particular conversation took place; she appeared not to know what she was doing – I never to my knowledge saw her in that state before, and that she certainly was not right in her mind at the time. Here closed the evidence; and after some few minutes, the Jury returned, being perfectly satisfied, the following verdict – "that the deceased died by taking a deadly poison, called white arsenic, while labouring under temporary Insanity."

Thursday 31 May 1827, Issue 3230 – Gale Document No. Y3200662346
JOHN STARK, has been committed to the Devon County Gaol, on the Coroner's warrant, charged with Manslaughter, under the following circumstances. The prisoner's father, PHILIP STARK, 68 years of age, a shoemaker, residing at Uffculm, had attended on the 22nd inst. at Culmstock fair, where he drank freely, and at 2 o'clock, on the morning of Wednesday, fell into company with his son, a quarrel took place, the father stripped to fight, some blows ensued and the old man fell over a bank, he remained there some time, almost in a state of insensibility, and died before medical assistance could be obtained. The evidence, on the Inquest, was of a conflicting nature, and after an adjournment from Wednesday to Thursday, late in the evening of the latter day, the Jury returned their verdict as above. The unfortunate son conducts himself in prison with the greatest propriety, expressing deep regret for what has happened, and declaring that whatever he did was entirely in self-defence; he is a fine stout athletic man, 32 years of age, and 6 ft. 2 in. in height; is understood to be of good character and was his offence bailable, security to any amount would be given for his appearance at the Assizes.

Thursday 16 August 1827, Issue 3239 – Gale Document No. Y3200662516
JOSEPH ROWLAND, 45, charged in the Coroner's Inquest with the wilful murder of GEORGE BRADLEY, the younger, of Luppitt, on the 16th of July by casing at and upon him a certain hay pick, which striking him between the second and third ribs, caused a wound by which he died. Mr Jeremy said, there was a difficulty in this case, inasmuch as the grand Jury had thrown out the bill for murder, and returned a bill for manslaughter only. The judge saw no difficulty in this, they could proceed on the Coroner's Inquest, and the Jury would, (he though) be readily enabled to make up their minds on the subject, and return a proper verdict on it. Mr Dampier appeared for the defence. The evidence in this case contained nothing additional, nor did it differ in any respect from the particulars detailed in our paper at the time the unfortunate occurrence took place. The Judge summed up and stated, that it had been his publicly expressed opinion at the commencement of the Assizes, that there was not the slightest pretence for the charge of murder, they would therefore say he was not guilty of the charge of murder, but guilty of manslaughter. The Judge pointed out to the Court the situation of the prisoner at the bar, as an additional proof of the necessity of having control over our passions; it was a most unfortunate transaction, and one which he (the Judge) supposed must occasion the bitterest anguish in the mind of the prisoner, as long as he lived. The legislature had vested the Judges with a discretionary power in punishing cases f this kind, extending where marked by aggravating circumstances, to transportation for life; however, melancholy as all the circumstances attending this case was, he was happy to think there was nothing that called for severity of punishment, and the sentence of the Court was, that he should be Imprisoned in the Gaol for the space of 4 months.

Thursday 6 September 1827, Issue 3241 – Gale Document No. Y3200662574
Inquests held by Isaac Cox, Esq.
At Otterton, on the 22nd ult., on the body of DAVID WAY, a child of 2 years old, who was found drowned in the mill leat, the preceding day. The father of the child, a young man, received it from a person who took it out of the water, but was unconscious it was his own until he had taken it to a neighbouring house. The mill leat, the bridge across, and a bridge adjoining the mill, being unfenced and dangerous, evidence was received by the Coroner as to the persons bound to repair. It was proved by one man that he had taken four children out of the let; and several other persons gave evidence that lives had been lost there. The Jury found that the miller, Mr Hill, and Messrs. Bastin & Burrough, occupiers of Otterton and South Farms, the estates of Lord Rolle, were bound to repair, and the Coroner stated that he should return such persons, if the bridges were not fenced before the Michaelmas Sessions.

On the 26th ult., at Uplyme, on the body of JOB CLARKE, aged 4 years, son of THOMAS CLARKE, dairyman. Deceased, his two brothers and sister, (all older than himself) were alone in the house on the evening of the 24th, and during the temporary absence of their mother in the adjoining milk house, one of them went into another room and brought out a gun, (which had been left there by an elder brother, and who had previously drawn the charge) and amused himself with blowing into the muzzle of it and handed it to the deceased, and whilst he (deceased) was so engaged, the few grains of powder left in the gun exploded, and scalded his mouth and throat; he lingered till the following morning, and died in great agony.

On the 27th ult., at Shute, on the body of STEPHEN GILL, (uncle and only relative of the Rev. Mr Gill, of Stockland) aged 74. He was lying at the bottom of the stairs of his dwelling-house where he lived alone; his head twisted so as to be looking into the room, jammed by his body between the stairs and the wall, presenting a horrible spectacle to the Jury. He was supposed to have fallen from the top to the bottom of the stairs; he had not been seen for several days, and on opening the house, he was found as above described.

On Friday last, at Broadclist, on the body of ELIZABETH NEWTON, widow, aged 81 years. Deceased had been living at Broadclist with her son-in-law, Richard Davey. On the preceding Saturday she rose between five and six o'clock in the morning, and went into the house of William Maunder, a neighbour, for a stick of fire-wood, which she suspected one of Maunder's children had taken away; on entering she asked Mrs Maunder for the stick, which she said she knew nothing about; deceased then went into an inner room where William Maunder was, and began to look about for the stick; Maunder's wife then said, the stick was burnt. Maunder ordered her out f the house, and then took hold of her and began to push her out; deceased hitched her toe in the threshold of the door and fell down; Maunder and wife assisted in raising her. Deceased's daughter, ELIZABETH DAAVY, came to her mother's assistance – she found her bleeding at the head, and from one of her arms – blood was also running from the right leg, which was bruised. She was got into her daughter's house, where she died the Thursday following. Mr Salter, surgeon, of Broadclist, stated that he was called in on Sunday, (the day after the deceased received the injury,) that he found a contused wound over the forehead, one of her arms bruised and the skin gone – that he did not discover any fracture in the skull, nor any symptoms of concussion, and he did not consider that death was occasioned by the injury the deceased received in the head. He added, he had seen her a few weeks before, when she was in a feeble state, and he considered it possible, from her advanced age, the fright might have caused such an extraordinary degree of excitement, as to have caused death, and he considered she died from natural causes, but that the fright occasioned by the fall, added to her debilitated state and advanced age, might have accelerated her death. The Jury, (who were summoned from the parishes of Broadclist and Whimple) after a patient investigation, returned a special verdict to the effect of Mr Salter's evidence.

On Saturday, at Tiverton, on the body of WILLIAM MAJOR, aged 52, a considerable farmer of turnpike-tolls, who was found dead in his bed the preceding morning. He had enjoyed a good state of health up to the time of his death. His wife had risen at her usual time and went into the garden, and remained there about three quarters of an hour; when she returned she looked up at the bed-room window; in order to ascertain whether deceased was dressing, and not perceiving him, she immediately went up stairs and found him laying on his side quite dead. - Mr Gervis, the surgeon, was examined, who was of opinion that the deceased died in a fit of apoplexy. Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 15 November 1827, Issue 3248 – Gale Document No. Y3200662755
Plymouth, Devonport and Stonehouse.
Inquest held by A. B. Bone, Esq. - On Tuesday last, on the body of MR T. HEARLE, of this town, who was found dead in his bed, on Sunday morning last. It appeared from the evidence, that on the preceding day the deceased was in good health and spirits, that he went to bed well about 9 in the evening. - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 13 December 1827, Issue 3254 – Gale Document No. Y3200662841
On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken at Tiverton, before J. Partridge, Esq. Coroner, on the body of MRS ANN TURNER, aged 57, wife of S. TURNER, Esq. found dead in bed, by the side of her daughter, on the preceding Tuesday morning; when it appearing the deceased had long laboured under severe asthma, in a fit of which she is supposed to have expired, - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 31 January 1828, Issue 3260 – Gale Document No. Y3200662962
Exeter, Wednesday 30 January
On Monday last a young woman of ill fame, named SMALDRIDGE, having been charged by her mother, who was blind, with stealing silver spoon, denied it with dreadful imprecations, saying that she wished God might strike her dead that moment if she had. Awful to relate, she fell from her seat immediately after, and expired; and the duplicate of the spoon was found in her bosom. An Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God returned.

Yesterday a Coroner's Inquest was held at the College Kitchen public-house, in this city, before S. Walkey, Esq. and a respectable Jury, on the body of MARIA LONG, whose death was occasioned by taking arsenic; when, after a long deliberation the Jury returned their verdict, that the death of the deceased was occasioned by taking arsenic, whilst labouring under temporary insanity, occasioned by jealousy.

Inquests held by Isaac Cox, Esq. Coroner - On the 14th instant, at Uffculm, on the body of MARY BURROUGH, widow, aged 82 years, who was found dead in her dwelling-house the preceding day. Verdict – "Died by the Visitation of God."

On the 18th instant, at Honiton, on the body of JOHN FILDEW SEEDSMAN, aged 52 years: on the morning of the 17th deceased complained of having a paid in his side, an emetic was administered to him in the evening, and his feet put in warm water. His wife retired to bed, and in the morning when she awoke she discovered that her husband was dead. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 28 February 1828, Issue 3264 – Gale Document No. Y3200663041
Plymouth and Devonport
An Inquest was held a few days since by Mr Bone, on the body of a labouring man, named WM. KITTLEWELL, who fell over a precipice near the Old Gunwharf-field, Devonport, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 28 February 1828, Issue 3264 – Gale Document No. Y3200663040
On the 17th inst. an Inquest was taken at Sticklepath, near Okehampton, before F. Kingdon, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES BOND, who had died the preceding Friday, of an apoplectic fit The public are indebted for this very proper enquiry (rendered necessary under the following circumstances) to the exertions of Mr Pearse, jun. On the afternoon of the 9th inst. the deceased ( a cripple) and his wife had a quarrel, when deceased's son put him out of the house, and barred the door; his wife desiring him to go to the poor-house, and the son offering to accompany him thither; their offers of escort were declined, BOND saying he would go by himself, and left that evening for the purpose. He was not seen till Monday evening following, when he returned his house, speechless, and in a state bordering on insensibility, and so continued until the Friday, when the attack of apoplexy terminated his sufferings. After a patient investigation, a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned, but the Coroner severely reprimanded the wife and son for their inhuman and unnatural conduct, and told them their escape from imprisonment and probable punishment had been narrow indeed, and said the thanks of all were due to Mr Pearse for the part he had taken in sifting this affair.

Thursday 15 May 1828, Issue 3274 – Gale Document No. Y3200663239
Exeter, Wednesday 14 May
On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at Stoke Canon, before James Partridge, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, on view of the body of JAMES SPURWAY, a postillion in the service of Mrs Street, of the Hotel in this city, who was drowned the preceding afternoon. It appeared the deceased and another post boy of the name of Horsham were on their return from Tiverton, each with a pair of horses, and at Stoke bridge entered the Culm for the purpose of washing them, when the horses SPURWAY rode getting into a pit, sunk, on rising again to the surface, SPURWAY was still on the horse, but immediately fell backward into the deep water. Several persons had by this time assembled, but not one able to swim, nor was there any thing at hand by which to lay hold of him or throw to his assistance; and though the distressed Horsham put his own life in jeopardy, his unfortunate companion, after once or twice rising to the surface, disappeared from view. About a quarter of an hour after the accident Major Chichester rode by, and being informed of it, instantly plunged into the river, - three times he essayed the bottom of the pool, but, the water being foul, to no purpose. Shortly after another casual passenger repeatedly dived but to no effect, and the body was finally recovered by means of iron hooks tied to a rope. From evidence adduced before the Coroner it appeared that between 20 and 30 years ago a person bathing in the same pool, was drowned, - that the pool is smaller now than at that time, a quantity of gravel below having been taken to repair the road at the end of the bridge, by the County Surveyor, which has given the water a freer passage. That about 10 years ago the arches of the bridge immediately above the pool was rebuilt by the County, and the platform or bed of the river under the arches is considered to be so constructed as to disturb the gravel and create the whirlpool; - that it is a dangerous pool, particularly to strangers, and has never been fenced from the highway, which highway was raised and repaired by the county about 10 years ago. And the jury returned a verdict that SPURWAY was accidentally drowned; and presented the County for suffering the nuisance to remain. SPURWAY had been 7 years in the service of Mrs Street, and was a sober and faithful servant. The horses were got out without injury.

Thursday 10 July 1828, Issue 3282 – Gale Document No. Y3200663368
Exeter, Wednesday 9 July
Coroner's Inquests.
An enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JANE LINDSAY, took place on Monday, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, for Exeter, at the Golden Ball public-house, Mary-Arches-street; when, during a long investigation, the following facts were elicited. The deceased was the wife of a journeyman paper-maker, working at Countess Weir Mills, 42 years of age, married between 19 and 20 years, had had several children, of whom three are living. The marriage had been an unhappy one, and for 6 or 7 years, the parties have been separated, the husband during that time moving into another part of the kingdom and cohabiting with other females, one of whom bore him a son About 7 or 8 months since the husband returning to this neighbourhood, the connection with his wife was resumed, and from that time to Wednesday last, they lived together at Weir. The injuries she had sustained appeared however, to have made such deep impression as not to be readily forgotten, and from frequent recurrence to them, bickering arose. After some quarrel of this kind on the day before named, she quitted her home, and under great distress of mind came to a sisters in Mary-Arches-street, in this city, stating her determination not again to live with her husband; she subsequently procured lodgings on St David's-hill, where her conduct was so strange and incoherent, accompanied with hysterical affections, that medical advice was sought, and she was attended by a young gentleman, pupil of Mr Tucker, surgeon, who directed that she should not be left for an instant – that every thing with which injury might be inflicted should be removed out of her way, and sent some medicine. On Saturday she became more rational, and employed her time in sewing. On Sunday she declined accompanying the woman with whom she lodged to church, but occasionally read from a prayer, and sacrament books. Towards evening she acquainted those about her with an engagement she had to work the next day at the house of Mr J. C. Williams, near the Lime Kilns, on the banks of the Exe, just below the city, and that for the purpose of being in proper time, should go that evening and sleep in the house; - her sister was present, and as she knew her to have worked for Mr William's family, no suspicion was excited, particularly as it was proposed that the woman with whom she lodged and the sister should accompany her to Mr William's door. Setting out with this intent they took Mary-Arches street in their way, where, as well as greatly prolonging the time, the woman of the lodging-house was got rid of, and while the sister was employed in searching in an adjoining room for something the unfortunate maniac wanted, she escaped from the house. The first idea on finding the room in which she had been left unoccupied, was, that she had concealed herself, nor till search proved vain, did the truth flash on the mind of the distressed sister, who, it being now between ten and eleven at night, procured a lantern and with hasty steps sought her way to Mr Williams' – here all was silent, save the roar of the neighbouring weir, and on the bank, near Mr Williams' house, the bonnet and shawl of the deceased, told the rest. Alarm being given, search was immediately made, but without effect; it was resumed at day break, and continued till 10 o'clock on Monday forenoon, when the body was found. It appeared that the unfortunate woman was seen just before 11 o'clock, sitting on the ground within a few yards of the water, in front of the large door of Mr Williams' premises, by Harriet Tout and William Attwood, who went up to, and several times spoke to her, but finding her not disposed to answer, pursued their way. The Jury returned a verdict, "Destroyed herself while labouring under temporary derangement."

Inquest held by Isaac Cox, Esq. - On the 26th ult, at Awliscombe on the body of ELIZABETH DARE, infant daughter of JOHN DARE, of Awliscombe, miller, aged 3 years. The father and mother of the deceased, together with the remainder of the family, had been busily employed on the shove day in a hay-field adjoining the house, and deceased had been amusing herself also there. About one o'clock, the mother not seeing her in the field, enquired where she was, and not gaining a satisfactory answer immediately went in search of her, followed by the father of deceased and several others, when the body was discovered in the mill-dam near the house; it was instantly removed and restoratives promptly administered, but the vital spark had fled. Verdict – Accidental Death.

On the second instant at Haywoods, in the parish of Cullompton, on the body of JOHN SHEPHERD, dairyman, aged 51 years. Deceased had been unwell for the last two or three months, but not prevented thereby from working. On the preceding day he had been assisting in a hay-field, and on his return home had gone to a pump in the court to wash himself, (his wife being in the same court milking); after he had finished, he went into the house, and was soon after followed by his wife, who found him lying on the floor quite dead, having fallen from the chair on which he was sitting, in a fit. Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 7 August 1828, Issue 3286 – Gale Document No. Y3200663436
Exeter, Wednesday 6 August
An Inquest was yesterday held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the body of JOHN MARTIN, a mason's labourer, who met his death by the falling in of a quantity of earth, while at work, on Thursday last, in excavating for a cellar, near the Subscription Rooms. - Verdict accordingly, accidental death. The deceased was about 19 years of age, a native of Chudleigh, and had lately come to this city for employment.

Inquest held by Isaac Cox, Esq. - On the 10th ult., at Aylesbeare, on the body of WILLIAM SAUNDERS, aged about 6 years, the son of THOMAS SAUNDERS, a labourer in husbandry. Deceased and several other children had been amusing themselves in a hay field in which their parents were working. The deceased had climbed on an elm tree growing in one of the hedges of the field, adjoining the turnpike road, leading from Aylesbeare to Honiton's Clist, and unfortunately fell from the tree into the road below. He was immediately removed, when it was found that his head and neck were seriously injured, and he died shortly afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 14 August 1828, Issue 3287 – Gale Document No. Y3200663454
An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq. Coroner, on the 2nd instant, at Kilmington, on the body of MARY FRENCH, wife of JOHN FRENCH, aged 60 years, whose death is, was rumoured, had been occasioned by violence; as the body when first discovered appeared to be bathed in blood, and a wound was perceived in her breast.
The deceased and her husband it appeared had not lived together for many years, in consequence of their continually disagreeing, but that he frequently called to see her. The husband latterly was not in a sound state of mind, occasioned by the ill behaviour of the deceased, and the unkind treatment he received from her, and has more than once been placed at an Asylum for Lunatics. In consequence of his getting better he was discharged from the Asylum, but having no fixed residence, he was in the habit of sleeping about in stables and haylofts, generally resting during the day, and wandering by night. About four o'clock in the afternoon of the 1st instant he was at the house of his son, who lived nearly opposite the residence of the deceased, and he afterwards went over to her house for the purpose of frying a fish. A dispute arose about a table which the husband claimed – the table was upstairs, and deceased was very violent, and threatened to stab her husband if he attempted to fetch it, and then went to the front door and called "Murder." - The husband did not attempt to strike her. She threw herself in a violent passion, and became consequently faint. One of her neighbours endeavoured to restore her, but it was a long time before she perfectly recovered; during this time the husband left the house with his fish partly dressed, and returned to his son's stating that deceased "was up in a fit again;" the son requested his father to go to a farm house for him, about a mile distant, which he did. Soon after this the deceased was seen sitting at her door vomiting violently. Elizabeth Spiller, a person who regularly slept with the deceased, stated that she left her about seven o'clock, to go to a neighbouring farmer's for some wood, and did not return till a little before nine; on her return she found the door fastened inside, and after calling in vain to the deceased for admittance, and not getting an answer, she fetched deceased's son and requested him to draw the staple of the door; this was done, and on going up stairs they discovered the deceased with her head (which was covered with blood) leaning on the edge of the bedside, and partly resting on a chair near; a pan was under her moth, in which was a quantity of phlegm and blood and blood was flowing from her mouth and nose. On lifting her up she was quite dead. In the sheet, and just at the back of the deceased, was found a sharp-topped clasped knife, which she had been accustomed to use about the house, the handle and top of the blade of which were bloody; her right hand was also stained with blood. A wound was discovered on the left side of the collar bone, and her neck was very black and swollen, and its appearance was such as would have led persons to believe she had been strangled. From the evidence called it appeared the deceased had been many years subject to an internal complaint, which sometimes nearly choked her, and upon those occasions she vomited much, and that she was a woman of violet and irritable temper.
A surgeon was called in, who examined the body; he stated that he found the cavity of the chest full of blood, which arose from the rupture of a large blood vessel in the chest, occasioned (he thought) by violent vomiting, and the agitated state of mind in which the deceased appeared to have been in; that the wound in the collar bone was superficial, and not possible to occasion death; and, that his opinion was, the rupture of the blood vessel had caused her death. The Jury, after consulting a short time, returned their verdict – Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 4 September 1828, Issue 3289 – Gale Document No. Y3200663498
An Inquest was held on Thursday week, at the Lion Inn, at Wiveliscombe, on the body of MRS A. SLOLY, of Bideford, whose death was occasioned by the overturning of the Barnstaple mail coach, on Saturday se'nnight. After several witnesses had been examined, the Coroner observed, that he was perfectly satisfied, from the evidence which had been adduced, that not the slightest blame could be attached to the guard, coachman, or proprietors, and in this belief the Jury expressed their decided concurrence; who, having been left to consider their verdict, in ten minutes returned the following: "The Jury are all unanimously of opinion that MRS ABIGAIL SLOLY died in consequence of an injury sustained by the overturning of the Barnstaple mail-coach, which happened by mere accident, and without the slightest inattention or negligence of the coachman, guard, or any other person" - It was finally decided that a deodand of one shilling should be levied on the trunk. It is consolatory to know, by the above inquest, that not a shadow of blame is imputable to any person concerned in the coach, the management of which has been quite exemplary ever since it commenced running on that new and beautiful line of road.

Thursday 11 September 1828, Issue 3290 – Gale Document No. Y3200663513
On Friday last, as MR HOSEGOOD, quarry-man and stone-cutter, at Thorverton, was looking over a quarry, he by accident fell a height of 20 feet, and broke his back. Death soon terminated his sufferings, and at the Coroner's Inquest, on Saturday, a verdict accordingly was returned.

Thursday 18 September 1828, Issue 3291 – Gale Document No. Y3200663532
An inquest was taken a few days since at Langford, in Cullompton, before I. Cox, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a blind man, 45 years of age, named ENDICOTT, who at the funeral of an old lady expressed a wish that he could be her substitute, being weary of existence, and the following day he fell over the stairs, dislocated his neck, and expired immediately.
Verdict – Accidental Death

Thursday 25 September 1828, Issue 3291 – Gale Document No. Y3200663548
Exeter, Wednesday 24 September
Dreadful Accident - Caution to Waggoners and Cart Drivers.
As MR SMALE'S cart of Moretonhampstead, was returning from our potatoe market, yesterday morning, the driver very incautiously left his horse and cart at Mr Tucker's door, Fore-street-hill, while he went on some errands, the horse, during his absence, started away and made for his usual quarters, the King's Arms Inn, in St Thomas, on entering the gateway of which Inn, a fine little girl about 4 years old, daughter of MR DINGLE in that parish, was knocked down, & the wheel of the cart going over her head killed her on the spot. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body in the afternoon, when a verdict of Accidental Death, with a deodand of £3 on the horse and cart was returned.

An accident of a most singular nature, and attended with fatal consequences occurred on Friday last, at Drewsteignton. MISS ANN KNAPMAN, about 14 years of age, daughter of MR KNAPMAN, of Drascombe, in that parish, was returning from school in company with her brother, riding a they had been accustomed, on two donkies; when nearly arrived home MISS KNAPMAN incautiously fastened the halter round her waist, and alighting, the animal gave a sudden spring, which brought her to the ground, & after being dragged a considerable distance the infuriated animal kicked her so as to cause instant death. The unfortunate father was in an adjoining field, and hearing the cries of his children, hastened in the direction, but too late to render the required assistance. An Inquest was taken on Sunday before J. Gribble, Esq. Coroner, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned, with a deodand of 1s. on the Ass.

Thursday 4 December 1828, Issue 3297 – Gale Document No. Y3200663677
Inquests have, since our last, been taken before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on the body of THOS. WILLS, 4 years of age, whose death was occasioned by falling from the steps leading to the drying lofts on the Friars, about eight days previously,

and on a little boy, named WM. PROWSE, son of a labourer, at Sandford, near Crediton, who died in consequence of injury from his clothes catching fire, about three weeks before, and in both instances verdicts of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday 1 January 1829, Issue 3301 – Gale Document No. Y3200663733
Exeter, Wednesday 31 December
Awful Effects of Intoxication. - On Christmas day, three youths of this city, named SAMUEL GREGORY, George Hill, and Wm. Lander, having been carousing the whole of the preceding night, and forenoon of that day, were, about three in the afternoon, in a state of beastly intoxication, near the lime kilns, in the parish of St. Leonard's, when Hill proceeded to wash GREGORY'S face at the steps leading to the river, and during which process he was pushed by GREGORY into the deep water. Hill was fortunate enough to succeed in extricating himself, and they all ascended the hill, towards the Friars, together. GREGORY was so far overtaken as to require to rest himself, and while doing so, said, that he must die, and he would die, and escaping from them, he descended the hill, and plunged into the river. Having rose to the surface he was heard to call "George! Bill! Bill! but they were in no state to help him, and no other assistance being near, after struggling and gaining the surface three or four times, he sunk. An hour and half elapsed before the body was discovered, when life was entirely extinct. The Jury on the Inquest, held before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, at the Fuller's Arms, Rock's-lane, returned a verdict that the deceased drowned and suffocated himself, whilst labouring under temporary derangement, from liquor.

Thursday 8 January 1829, Issue 3302 – Gale Document No. Y3200663753
Exeter, Wednesday 7 January
An Inquest was taken on Friday last, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner for this city, on the body of SOLOMON BRIGHT, 50 years of age, whose death was occasioned by falling on the 22nd of December into the hold of a coal lighter, lying near the premises of Mr Ebbels. – Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 15 January 1829, Issue 3303 – Gale Document No. Y3200663777
Exeter, Wednesday 14 January
An Inquest was taken on Tuesday, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a child named JENKINS, who on the preceding day during the absence of its parents from their residence in Mary-Arches street caught it clothes on fire and was so much burnt as to occasion its death.

An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq. Coroner, at Axminster, on the 5th inst. on the body of AGNES HAYMAN, aged about 60 years. Deceased had been for some time unwell but still capable of attending to her usual employments, and on the above day as she was walking along the street in Axminster, she fell down and instantly expired. – Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

On the 12th inst. at Newhouse in the parish of Upottery, on the body of JAMES PYKE, aged 4 years, son of ROBERT PYKE of that parish, labourer. On the Friday preceding, the Mother of the deceased went to a neighbouring farm-house for some milk, leaving the deceased and his brother ( a child about 2 years old) by the fire; soon after she had left, deceased's clothes caught fire – he rang out of the house, and went towards that of his Grandmother's a distance of a quarter of a mile, where he arrived without any clothes on the whole of them having been burnt from his body, with the exception of his shoes; assistance was immediately procured and remedies applied; but after lingering until the middle of the following day he died in great agony. The screams of the deceased were heard by several persons, at a distance, who were unable to reach him in time to render any assistance. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 26 February 1829, Issue 3309 – Gale Document No. Y3200663862
An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Coroner, at Feniton, on the 18th inst. on the body of JOHN MARKS, a respectable farmer of that parish, aged 60 years, who had hung himself the preceding morning. From the evidence produced before the Coroner, it appeared that the deceased had been considerably depressed in his mind, from the losses in sheep he had met with during the last year, from the peculiarly unfavourable weather for that kind of stock. This had been observed by his family, and their fears were aroused lest he should do himself any injury. He went to bed on Monday evening apparently in good health; - it seems, however, that he had a restless night, and on his wife waking about 6 o'clock on the following morning, she found he was not in bed. She immediately called to her son and a servant and requested them to go out and search for the deceased, when they discovered him suspended from one of the couples of an outhouse; he was immediately cut down, but life was extinct. Verdict, Insanity.

Thursday 12 March 1829, Issue 3310 – Gale Document No. Y3200663889
An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq. Coroner, at Clist Honiton, on the 3rd instant, on the body of FRANCES BUDD, aged 12 years, the illegitimate child of a poor woman of that parish, named ANN BUDD. Deceased had been bound by the parish officers of Clist Honiton, to a Mr Joseph Salter, as a parish apprentice, and had lived in his service nearly two years On the preceding Sunday she had been sent by her master to a field, to keep off birds from his what, with directions to return home in an hour. About half-an-hour after she had left, she was brought back dreadfully burnt, and destitute of clothing. A surgeon was immediately sent for, and every assistance rendered, but without effect, as she died early on the following morning. From the statement made by the deceased, the evening before her death, it appeared that she had gone to the field as she had been desired, in which she had kindled a fire, that she threw her armful of potatoe stalks on it, which began to blaze up, and in endeavouring to extinguish it, her apron caught fire; - she tried to smother the flame, but finding she was unable to do so, she ran towards a neighbouring house for assistance; - her cries were heard by the inmates, and also by a person named Waldron, who was two fields from her. Waldron instantly ran to her aid, when he found her surrounded by the flames from her clothes being all on fire, - he tore them from her person, when the deceased exclaimed, "Oh, Mr Waldron, I have burnt myself to death!" He took her up, and with the assistance of a woman named Cowley, she was taken to her master's house. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

At Roughgrey Farm, in the parish of Dunkeswell, on the 4th inst. on the body of JOHN MOOR, a labourer in husbandry, aged 18 years. Deceased had left his master's house on the preceding Sunday, with the intention of going to church, - he was however taken ill on the road and returned home. His master gave him some rum and water, and advised him to go to bed, which he soon after did. In the early part of the evening he appeared better, and his mistress gave him some peppermint water, and wrapt flannel about him. He continued in this state till about 12 o'clock at night, when he complained of a violet pain in his stomach, but he still thought himself better than when he had gone to bed. About 5 o'clock in the morning, he was discovered, however, by a little boy, that had slept with him, that he was dead. Verdict, Died by the visitation of God.

Thursday 28 May 1829, Issue 3321 – Gale Document No. Y3200664046
At Dawlish, on Friday last, an Inquest was held by T. Gribble, Esq. Coroner, on the body of GEORGE KNIGHTON, a waterman, thirty-seven years of age, who cut his throat the preceding day. The deceased was said to have exhibited many previous symptoms of insanity, and bore an excellent character. Verdict, Insanity.

At the same place, on the body of THOS. TUCKETT, landlord of the Swan public-house, about forty-three years of age, who hung himself on Saturday morning with a pocket handkerchief to the tester of his bed. No cause was assigned for his having committed the rash act, but a previous depression of spirits. Verdict – Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 25 June 1829, Issue 3325 – Gale Document No Y3200664105
Exeter, Wednesday 24 June
ANN MANLEY, a servant at Mr Swale's lodging-house, Mile-End-Buildings, Topsham-Road, having on Thursday evening last been reprimanded by her mistress for impropriety of conduct, took an opportunity, after the family had retired to rest, to quit the house. On being missed search was directed to be made, when the discovery of her bonnet on the bank of the river left little doubt as to her fate, but notwithstanding exertions used, it was not until Sunday that the body was found, when it was removed to the house of her parents at Wonford, where the jury, on the Coroner's Inquest, on Monday, returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

Inquests have been held by J. Partridge, Esq. at Thorverton, on the body of ANN TUCKER, 17 years of age, found dead in a brook. Verdict - Found Drowned.

And by S. Walkey, Esq. in Exeter, on the body of JOHN LITHEBY, whose death was occasioned by a tree falling on him at Newton St. Cyres. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 2 July 1829, Issue 3326 – Gale Document No. Y3200664123
An Inquest was held yesterday before S. Walkey, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at the Black Dog public-house, North-street, on the body of JAMES BADCOCK, in his 10th year, whose parents reside in Arthur's Court, Paul-street. The unfortunate lad, it appeared, had gone on the preceding evening with other boys to the river for the purpose of bathing, and though unable to swim, incautiously got into the water between the two Weirs, at the Head Weir, where he almost immediately sunk, and no assistance being near was drowned. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 30 July 1829, Issue 3329 – Gale Document No. Y3200664182
Exeter, Wednesday 29 July
AWFUL DEATH - Whilst the inhabitants of this city were congratulating themselves on what appeared a diminution of crime among them, discovery has been made of one of the blackest transactions that has probably for years disgraced its annals. That a circumstance of this nature should have occasioned considerable sensation will scarcely be wondered at, as little will it that the reports on the subject should be as various as the persons who relate them; we therefore hesitate not, though the preliminary enquiry is as yet incomplete, to satisfy the public mind by affording them correct means of information, and to which, we have reason to believe, nothing material will more be added, and particularly as such course will not interfere with the ends of justice, the whole of the parties implicated being in custody. - Early on Tuesday morning the body of an elderly man, in the dress of a reputable countryman or small farmer, was discovered in a passage known by the name of Northam's passage, in Mary-Arches-street; he had evidently been designedly placed there, and in all probability many hours dead, but the neighbourhood disclaimed all knowledge of him. There were no marks of violence, but in whatever way he had come by his death, it was clear he had been in bad hands, as the pockets of his small-clothes &c. were turned inside out, and every thing in the shape of money gone from them. An active individual living near, caused the body to be removed to a vacant room, and calling the officers to his aid set on foot an enquiry, in order to the discovery of who and what he was, and how he came into that situation, the result of which was that Smallridge detained two females of loose character, named Grace Bryant, recently from Stonehouse, and Elizabeth Cousins, a native of Bow, both in Devon, who were residents in a house of ill fame near where the body was found, kept by a woman of the name of Baker, otherwise Bissett, otherwise Cornish, and a man called Baker, who now passes for her husband. The two females being placed in safe custody, the enquiry continued to be followed up, from which it has been learnt that the deceased was MR WM. LANGMAN, a farmer, residing at Cox Moor, in the parish of Bow, about 60 years of age, with a wife and nine children, and left his home, as some allege, to attend the Exeter Races, on Monday. He this, however, as it may, he arrived in this city on Monday afternoon, and having called and drank at the Black Dog public-house, North-street, and seen some relatives living near, he departed with one of them in company, an elderly female named Skinner, in order, as he said, to sleep at the house of another relative, a farm on the old Stoke Canon road. With this view, Mrs Skinner accompanied him beyond St. Sidwell's Church, where, about half-past nine o'clock, she took leave, he, as far as she knew, pursuing his way out of the city, and she returning to her home. At the Black Dog he was known to have had both gold and silver on his person.
At 5 o'clock in the afternoon, a Jury assembled before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, at the house of Mr Samuel Moore, the London Alehouse, Mary-Arches-street, to pursue the enquiry, which continued to sit until half-past ten at night, and adjourned to this afternoon at five; the post mortem examination having taken place in the presence of many medical gentlemen this forenoon.
Grace Bryant, who during some part of her examination had an infant at her breast, gave her evidence in effect that being in Fore-street, just above Mary Arches-street, about half past 120 on Monday night, the deceased, a stranger to her, tapped her on the shoulder, and with an air of familiarity invited her to drink; she acceded to his request, and desired Elizabeth Cousins, who was standing nearer the corner of the street, to accompany them. They all went together to the Smith's Arms (Mrs Presswell's) in Mary Arches-street, and when they got into the house the old man (LANGMAN) instantly recognised Cousins as being the daughter of one of his neighbours. The first proposition had been to have beer, but on this discovery he determined to treat them on rum and shrub, of which half a pint was ordered, and complaining of hunger he enquired if he could be furnished with some bread and cheese; this however not being at hand, he was provided with six penny worth of bread and meat; these articles being all paid for from loose money the deceased had in his pocket. A second half-pint f liquor followed, in payment for which he tendered a sovereign, putting on his spectacles to examine the change, and having placed it in his purse, deposited the whole in his pocket. Of this last half-pint, a watchman, known to the females, drank two glasses at the door, and the party, (the old man though intoxicated appearing to know what he was about) left the house; - it was I think about 11 o'clock. From this time the witness through the course of a long examination,(having set out with a story evidently concocted for the purpose) prevaricated in such a manner as to render it evident there was not one syllable of truth in what she was uttering, and which was in substance a denial of ever having seen him from a few seconds after leaving the public-house, and that he did not accompany them to Baker's house, nor did she know how he came in Northam's passage.
The Coroner, whilst treating her with great humanity, was firm, and finding nothing could move him from his determination to commit her, she said, "I will, Sir, tell the truth," Mr Baker was the man that put him out of the house – he put him over the stairs." The witness was at this time much agitated, and wept bitterly, and said she should not have done as she had but for the instructions of Baker and his wife in the morning. - Her examination being resumed, she said, the old man (LANGMAN) accompanied them home – Baker and his wife were there – Cousins went out again – it was proposed to have something to drink, the old man put out the money, and Mrs Baker fetched the liquor, I believe from this (Moore's) house – it was rum and shrub – the last words he said, were "wa'el have another half pint" – he drank none of this liquor, he was instantly asleep – he fell asleep in his chair – no one offered him violence, nor was any thing done to him in the room except taking his money from him – I wished him to be laid on my bed till morning, he was so tipsy, but Baker would not permit it – he said, "in this house he shall not stop" – before he was moved they both said it was better to take his money as he would be robbed otherwise before morning - Mr and Mrs Baker both said this – the money was taken out of his pocket by me – (the witness here instantly checked herself,) and said – no, not out of his pocket – out of his hand – he still held the purse he had taken out to give Mrs Baker the money for the liquor – there was no gold that I SAW, BUT WHEN WE HAD TAKEN THE SILVER Mrs Baker said, "he must have more, I heard paper rattle just now" – I then looked about and just underneath and rather behind where he sat, saw a bit of paper having something wrapped in it, I took it up and we found it was a £5 Note – they persuaded me to go instantly and change the Note and I went – I saw Elizabeth Cousins by the way, there was some one with her – a man – they went with me – we turned into a dark narrow street, I do not know the name of it, and went into a house where liquor was sold – I don't know whether a public-house, or a shop for selling spirit only, but believe the latter – a short dark- complexioned woman tended me, and changed the £5 Note I had half a pint of rum and shrub – we did not want the liquor, it was only pretence to get the Note changed – the woman gave me 4 sovereigns and the remainder in silver, I brought it home and gave it to Mrs Baker, and she put it in a tea cup in the cupboard, and there it was this morning when I was taken away. The old man was still sitting where I left him – he leaned rather over the chair – he was alive then – he appeared sleepy as a man that was tipsy, and drew his breath snoringly, but was not sensible – nothing was done to him to injure him, nor was his neck-cloth drawn tighter, or touched that I saw – he was not taken ill, or at least did not complain of being ill before he was overcome with sleep – I do not know that any thing was kept in the house to cause persons to sleep, nor did he to my knowledge take any thing at all in Baker's house. Baker said he should be put out of the house, and took him by the shoulders whilst I rested (held up) his feet, and we got him over the stairs – I helped him as far as the front step of the door and then left him with Baker and returned upstairs – he was alive when I left him and I did not then see that his pockets were turned inside out. - Baker returned in about 5 or 10 minutes and told me he had put him in the passage. Cousins came as he was getting over the stairs, and when Baker came back enquired if we had taken his money, and whether it was not the old man's money I had changed at the shop where the rum and shrub was bought – we did not tell her, and she said she would go see what he had then in his pockets – when she returned she said he had nothing left and believed was dying, as she heard him groan and give a pote (struggle). The purse was burnt just afterwards, I believe Mrs Baker burnt it, - the old man's stick was burnt this morning. I think he must have had about £6 1s. when first I saw him in the Fore-street. I do not know what time he was put out of the house, I heard no clock strike. I do not know whether Baker was afterwards out of the house, - he was up and dressed this morning before me, and when the alarm was, Mrs Baker said she wished he had been permitted to stop, and then perhaps this might not have happened.
As this evidence proceeded the Coroner learned that Baker had not been able to be found, but as it was now evidently very material to secure him, a party of peace officers set out in pursuit, and as the witness closed her testimony it was announced that they had been successful.
Elizabeth Cousins, though warned of what had taken place, persisted for some time in the story originally told by Bryant, but finding it obtained no credit, and threatened with imprisonment, at length gave way, and in all parts coming within her knowledge confirmed what that witness had latterly stated, declaring also, that the pockets were turned out when she felt the old man as he lay in the passage – that the person with her when they went for the liquor, which was purchased at Mrs Godfrey's in Friernhay street, was a young man called "Jem," but not known to her by any other name, and that he knew nothing of what was going on within, nor took any part in it. She (Cousins) had known the deceased from her childhood, he being her father's nearest neighbour, and only residing three fields off. That his purse was the foot of an old stocking, and that it was she who burnt it, by the direction of Mr and Mrs Baker, the latter saying, "burn the purse for God's sake," and the former, "that if there was any stir and that was found, he should come to short about it." – Saw nothing of a watch, nor did she believe he carried any. She further stated, that when she came in, they had got farmer LANGAMAN (LANGMAN) at the foot of the stairs, where he lay doubled up, Grace having hold of his arm; she did not know how they got him over the stairs, but had no reason to suppose they threw him down; they took him out the passage, and Grace returned in about half a minute – Baker staid longer.
Mrs Godfrey being sent for, she and her son produced the Note – a £5 of the Exeter Bank, and the former recognized the woman (Bryant) who changed it.
A daughter of Mrs Presswell's confirmed the testimony of the woman as to what had taken place in her mother's house.
Eliz. Campion, residing in a Courtlage to which Northam's passage is the entry, passed tho' it to her home about ten minutes past twelve. There was no person then lying there – nor did she hear any noise, scuffle, or bustle.
Mr Ware, a constable, and Smallridge, now informed the Coroner, that in consequence of Baker having assured them he would point out the spot where the change, when removed from the cupboard, had been secreted, they had taken him, properly secured, into Bartholomew's burying ground, and from behind a tomb-stone the 4 sovs. half crowns & shillings, produced, had been taken.
At the adjournment, and under the Coroner's direction, Baker, his wife, Bryant and Cousins were taken to the city prison. The result of the Inquest, and any thing that may further arise in the case, in our next.

Thursday 6 August 1829, Issue 3330 – Gale Document No. Y3200664196
Proceedings at the Inquest on WILLIAM LANGMAN.
(Resumed from our last.)
The Coroner and Jury re-assembled on Wednesday afternoon at 5 o'clock, when Wm. Drew, a labourer, supposed to be the first person who saw the deceased in the passage on Tuesday morning, was called in; - his testimony was to this effect – that he first saw LANGMAN about quarter past 4, lying in the passage on his belly, with one hand to his head and the other arm extended at length backwards, the hand being turned towards, and apparently resting on his back; that supposing him to be a drunkenman he struck him with his toe across the feet, telling him to get up, and then passed on about his business; - returning in about half an hour he saw him still there and mentioning the circumstance to Henry Channing they went together to the passage, when witness moved LANGMAN'S leg and arm and found that he was dead; - his hand was cold, but there was warmth about the face, WHICH WAS BLACK. Other persons came and he left him.
Mr John Edye, surgeon, stated that according to the request of the Coroner, he had, in company with his friend Mr Arscott, examined the body of the deceased LANGMAN, and having failed to discover any mark of ligature, or external injury, or appearance whatever, beyond that of a congestion of blood suffused extensively under the skin and pervading the face and neck ( a circumstance very common in cases of sudden death) they had proceeded to examine it by dissection. - I first examined the head and dividing the scalp was struck with the extreme fullness of the external blood vessels from which the blood flowed freely on their being divided. On removing the skull cap I was equally struck with the amazing turgidity and fullness of the whole of the vessels of the membranes of the brain. My examination was most minute, but without discovering any marks to denote a blow, or any appearances beyond the immense turgidity already spoken of, and great determination of blood to the head, the vessels of which were literally gorged and from whence from 8 to 10 ox. flowed during the operation. I then proceeded to examine the viscera of the abdomen, the general appearance of which was extremely healthy excepting the lower part of the large intestine where there was an appearance of contraction – the descending arch of the colon towards the rectum being contracted several inches, except at its extreme latter part which was distended and had a peculiar appearance; this however had no connection with his death, it was of long standing and might have been from birth. I removed the stomach from the cavity, the external marks of which were those of health and corresponding with that below; it was perhaps a third full. - I next examined the viscera of the thorax which were very healthy, there was no rupture of the blood vessels either of the thorax or abdomen, nor any appearances beyond that of the particular fullness of the blood vessels implying an immense determination of blood to the head producing apoplexy and causing death.
Having separated the stomach from the body I took it home with me in order more at leisure to examine and if necessary analyze its contents; on opening it I turned the contents into a vessel in order to examine its internal coats, which, with the exception of one or two small points towards its larger end, presented no sign of inflammation – nor any thing out of the ordinary nature with the exception of an increase of vascular appearance. - I then proceeded to examine the contents which consisted of a confused mass of half digested matter and sent forth a strong and offensive odour of spirits, which I am inclined to attribute to the rum or shrub the deceased had taken into the stomach so recently before death. In the effluvia there was nothing to denote the presence of any narcotic or vegetable poison, nor was there any heavy or mineral substance in the stomach, - nor the appearance of any thing deleterious except the spirit; - the vascular appearance might have been occasioned as well by the spirit, as the suddenness of death, or both conjointly. I have not had time to analyze the contents of the stomach, nor indeed seen any thing to justify such examination.
In answer to questions put to Mr Edye, he replied, - that death, and similar appearances might be induced in a variety of ways, how in this particular case it was impossible more accurately to say, as any thing preventing the return of blood from the head t the chest was sufficient to occasion it; he had referred to authorities which bore him out most completely in opinion that persons dying from excess of drink might be placed, or place themselves in such a situation as by causing preternatural pressure on the windpipe and preventing the ingress or egress of air to the lungs, to occasion death. – I consider that the deceased died from the perfect engorgement of the blood vessels of the head producing apoplexy; the attack might doubtless be assisted in its progress by the position in which he either placed himself, or was laid by others.
Mr R. F. Arscott fully concurred in the testimony of Mr Edye.
The medical gentleman having closed their observations, the Coroner addressed the Jury, putting it to them, whether they had not now sufficient before them to enable them to fulfil their part of the duty imposed by their country under lamentable circumstances like the present; that he had at the outset, as his manner always was, pointed out to them their peculiar duty; - it was in this as in all other cases simply to enquire how and by what means WM. LANGMAN came by his death; - whether from natural causes or by violence, and to return their verdict accordingly. With other matters connected with this or any other similar affair, they had nothing to do; they were not nor had they the power of erecting themselves into a court of judicature, and determining on offences, foreign to any thing placed within the cognizance of the Coroner, but of this they might be satisfied that he (the Coroner) would not lose sight of what had transpired in that room, and that whatever their verdict might be the parties implicated should be placed in such situation as that full justice should be done. It was neither his duty nor his wish to dictate to juries, but he did put it to them, after the clear and to him satisfactory testimony of the medical gentlemen, whether it was necessary to proceed any further, and if they were of opinion it was unnecessary he would immediately proceed to recapitulate the evidence.
Several of the Jury said they were not satisfied, and the Coroner observed – then it was his duty to wait. - From this time to half-past 10 o'clock, when another adjournment took place, the former witnesses were repeatedly recalled, but without eliciting one tittle that was new, and Baker and his wife underwent long examinations, of which it was impossible to believe one syllable, and to detail would be merely to fill our columns to the exclusion of more important matter. Evidence of other kinds was also sought, and Martha Eliza Rumson and Frances Nichols alias Newman, presented themselves before the Jury; to give the testimony of these women would, however, be to throw an air of ridicule over a very serious matter, amounting as it did in brief to this, - that Rumson spent the Monday evening at Newman's; that the latter had no time-piece and calculated the wearing away of the night by her candle; always burning short six's ("moulds, gentleman"); that her door opens on some evenings oftener than it does on others, and according as this is frequent or otherwise so is the burning of her candle, making from the increase of draught about a quarter of an hour difference; that at her house visitors no longer drink rum and shrub, and that on the night in question she and Mrs Rumson contented themselves with a pint of best and similar quantity of small. That sometimes she went to bed at 12 and sometimes not at all, naughty boys being in the habit, if her door was painted "green" of painting the knocker "red" and if she caused her door to be made a corresponding colour, then on the following night they painted the knocker "white."
At 5 o'clock on Thursday afternoon the Jury once more assembled, -the Coroner repeated what he had many times before said to them, but several were still unsatisfied. In this way things continued until nearly 8 o'clock, when the Coroner in a clear and explicit manner recapitulated all the evidence really bearing on the case, and at quarter to 9, a verdict was returned "That the deceased was found dead in a passage called Northam's passage, from some cause unknown to the jurors."
The Coroner directed the four persons (the male and female Baker, Bryant, and Cousins) implicated in this transaction to be detained in the city prison; and on Friday forenoon at 11, they were brought before the Magistrates, the investigation continuing to 3 o'clock, when they were remanded to Saturday; on which day a similar lengthy enquiry was gone into, and Elizabeth Cousins admitted an evidence against her companions: her testimony being precisely as before and adding to it that she had known Bryant from the Monday week before she was taken into custody having lodged with her at a Mrs Williams' in Back Lane, and had gone to Baker's the Thursday following in consequence of Bryant knowing the female and having met them in the street. No material circumstances that we have not before given were elicited during these investigations; ANN LANGMAN, the widow was present on Friday, and from her it appeared that her husband carried from home a £5 Exeter note, 2 sovereigns, 2 half crowns, and a shilling, the whole being in a purse formed from the upper part of a purple cotton stocking.
Several witnesses, in addition to those already named, were examined in corroboration, the only part of which that need be more particularly alluded to was that of Samuel Tucker, millwright, living near where the body was found, who described, with great accuracy, the manner in which it lay. The deceased was on his belly; the collar of his fustian jacket dragged partially over his head, as if it had given up to the force applied by those who had placed him there; his shirt was drawn from without his small clothes, probably from the same cause, and a portion of his body bare, his right arm was extended forward, the right cheek resting on it, but the witness was positive the nostrils and mouth were clear of, and by no means pressed on his dress; there was froth about the lips, and some moisture had escaped on the sleeve and waistcoat; his left arm was as described by Drew. An adjournment from Saturday having taken place, the prisoners were again brought up on Monday, when John Baker, Elizabeth Baker, otherwise Blissett, Cornish, and Grace Bryant, were informed that the Magistrates thought a case sufficiently strong had been made out against them to warrant their committal for trial, at the Sessions, on charges, 1st, of Manslaughter, in having caused the death of WM. LANGMAN; and, 2dly, for feloniously robbing him of his property. The several parties were, at the same time, bound over to prosecute and give evidence, and Elizabeth Cousins, in default of bail, was directed to be taken care of in prison until the time of trial.
It is understood that among the memorandums of the deceased, at his late residence, there has been found a paper containing the number and date of a £5 Promissory Note of the Exeter Bank, corresponding with that delivered up by Godfrey, and by her received from Bryant.

Thursday 3 September 1829, Issue 3334 – Gale Document No. Y3200664261
Exeter, Wednesday 2 September
Supposed Murder - Yesterday morning the body of a man, named THOMAS CROPP, was discovered floating down the river nearly opposite the factory, at Trew's Weir. There were several severe injuries on the head and face, and, from appearances, drowning was not the cause of his death; it is imagined life must have been extinct previous to his immersion in the water. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Brunskill, tailor, of this city, and was a very excellent workman; he had absented himself from his master's employ about a fortnight, leaving a coat he was working on unfinished, but from his having been in the habit of continually changing lodgings, and always averse to inform even his shopmates of the place of his abode, together with frequently leaving for what is commonly called a spree, no notice was taken of his disappearance. He had led rather a dissipated life, and recently formed a connection with the wife of another man, of whom CROPP has been frequently heard to express his dread. Reports, which, should they prove correct, will tend to place an individual in jeopardy, are afloat, but at present, in the absence of any thing like proof, we deem it our duty to abstain from publishing them. A Coroner's Inquest will be held on the body this evening, the result shall appear in our next. He was a native of St. Columb, where his relatives, who are respectable, reside, and, previously to his coming here, had worked in the employ of the first houses in London and Bath.

Thursday 24 September 1829, Issue 3337 – Gale Document No. Y3200664307
Murder, at Stevenstone, near Torrington.
Annexed are the details of another instance of the perpetration of this dreadful crime in the county of Devon:-
On Sunday last, an Inquest was held at Stevenstone, near Great Torrington, the seat of the Right Hon. Lord Rolle, before Francis Kingdon, Esq. Coroner, on view of the body of a new-born male bastard child, of which ANN SMITH, Lord Rolle's cook, was delivered the same morning between the hours of three and four o'clock.
It appeared on the Inquest that the said ANN SMITH, who is about 25 years of age, had always been in respectable service, and having lived with Earl Howe she on the 4th of April last entered on Lord Rolle's service as cook with an unexceptionable character, and pursued her employment with the greatest diligence up to Saturday last, without any suspicion of her being with child till the preceding day or two. Early on Sunday morning strong suspicions were entertained that she had been delivered of a child; in consequence whereof, Mr Caddy, of Great Torrington, surgeon, was called upon to investigate the matter; and on examination, he told her she had been delivered of a child, which she admitted, but observed she had been with child only four or five months, and that it was in the water-closet, which was immediately searched, but no child could be found.
Anna Plimsole, another servant in the employ of Lord Rolle, and who slept with ANN SMITH, stated, that about two o'clock on the morning of Sunday the 20th instant, she awoke and found ANN SMITH out of bed; she asked her what was the matter, ANN SMITH replied "nothing;" she remained in bed till about three o'clock in the morning, when she quitted the room with a candle, and returned again about 4 o'clock without a candle, and came into bed apparently in great pain, holding the bedstead with both her hands. Anna Plimsole again asked what was the matter, she answered she had been dreaming. About half-past six o'clock in the morning, Anna Plimsole asked her if she had not been sick, she answered "yes," and then desired her to tell the kitchen-maid to send her a bucket of warm water, which was not done, but she mentioned the circumstance to Mrs Denslow, Lord Rolle's housekeeper, who made them known to Lord and Lady Rolle; they directed that an investigation of the matter should immediately take place.
Mrs Denslow stated, that she had only for a few days suspected that ANN SMITH was in the family-way. About 7 o'clock on Sunday morning, she went to SMITH'S bed-room and found her unwell, and asked her to take tea, which she refused, saying that she was going to get up; she heard a conversation which passed between Mr Caddy and ANN SMITH, about seven o'clock on the Sunday morning, and ANN SMITH say that she had been delivered of a child that morning, and that it was in the water-closet, which she and Mr Caddy searched, but no child could be found. In consequence whereof, and by the direction of Lord Rolle, a general search was made for the child, and about ten o'clock the same morning John Hooper and Grace Smale, servants in the employ of Lord Rolle, found a full grown male child, remarkably stout, wrapped up in a gown belonging to ANN SMITH, and which she had worn the preceding day, in a charcoal-house near the kitchen, at Stevenstone. They immediately placed the child before Mr Caddy, when, on examination, he found a wound about one inch in length and about two inches in depth, on the left side of the lower part of the neck, and an appearance of a ligature or cord having been tied around the neck, and a fracture of the skull. He opened the body and found, on examining the wound, it had the appearance of being made by a sharp pointed instrument, which had divided the carotid artery; the lungs he found in a healthy state, and had been inflated; Mr Caddy was therefore decidedly of opinion the child had been born alive. On dividing the scalp, there was some coagulated blood on the skull, and a fracture on the upper part of the left parietal bone about an inch in length. He thought the death of the child was occasioned by the wound in the neck.
Lord Rolle with another Magistrate attended the Inquest, who gave every facility to the investigation. It appeared in evidence, that ANN SMITH had received great kindness and attentions as well from Lord and Lady Rolle, as from her fellow servants. ANN SMITH would not discover the putative father of the child, but she made a declaration it was not any of Lord Rolle's servants, but it was some person in London, with whom she had been long acquainted, by whom she had a child about two years old.
After the Coroner had summed up the evidence the Jury retired for a few minutes and returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against the said ANN SMITH, who was then committed to the Devon County Gaol, but the execution of the commitment was suspended till she could undertake the journey with safety.

Thursday 1 October 1829, Issue 3338 – Gale Document No. Y3200664320
Exeter, Wednesday 30 September
An Inquest was held last (Tuesday) evening, at the Anchor public-house, castle-street, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner for the city, to enquire into the cause of the death of JOSEPH SMALE, an infant 8 months old, whose widowed mother resides in Coffin's Place, and had that morning found it dead in bed with her; when the Jury returned a verdict of Died in a fit of the Cramp.

Thursday 12 November 11829, Issue 3343 – Gale Document No. Y3200664394
On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken at the Duke of York public-house, St. Sidwell, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on the body of MARY TUCKER, a widow, aged 51, found dead in her bed that morning. - Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God.

An Inquest has been taken before J. Partridge, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, at Indylake-farm, in the parish of Knowstone, on the body of MR JOHN FOLLETT, 77 years of age, who was found dead extended on the floor of the barn in which he had been threshing; two grand-children had left him but a few minutes before, apparently in good health. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 19 November 1829, Issue 3344 – Gale Document No. Y3200664411
Exeter, Wednesday 18 November
SUICIDE
The case to which we alluded last week having terminated fatally, a Jury were impannelled at five o'clock on Monday evening before S. Walkey, esq. Coroner for Exeter, at the Elephant Inn, North Street, to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE VICARY, whose body then lay at Mrs Tucker's in St. Kerian's-place. After viewing the body, the Coroner proceeded to call the evidence, - the first witness being:
Mary Densham – The substance of whose testimony was – that she resided at Ide, the deceased was her nephew, and from 22 to 23 years of age; had for several years been Clerk in the Savings Bank, and for about the last 2 ¼ years at the West of England Fire Office, with a Salary of £65 a year; that at his first going to the Fire Office he lodged with witness at Ide, but as winter approached took lodgings at Mrs Sanders', St Sidwell's in this city, from whence he had removed to an aunt's, Mrs Cummins, South-street; his habits were perfectly regular and conduct correct until some months since he contracted an intimacy with a female of light character, residing in Friernhay-street, of the name of Ann West; for this he had been subjected to the merited reproof of his friends, but never to the withdrawal of countenance or discontinuance of any act of kindness; he had repeatedly expressed contrition and promised to abandon the connexion, - a promise unfortunately he wanted firmness to carry into effect; as a consequence of this state of things, and with a view to removal from evening to morning from the sphere of this female's influence, about a fortnight since he again returned to witness, requesting to be permitted to sleep at her house, which was readily acceded to upon the condition already stated; he was at this time agitated and depressed in spirits – his whole manner exhibiting uneasiness, but not of a nature to excite suspicion, as he regularly attended his duties at the office in Exeter. In this way he continued from Sunday to Thursday, when he did not return to Ide for the night, assigning as a reason the desire to witness the fire-works on the 5th Nov.; this was about seven o'clock on Friday morning. On the Sunday night following, he again absented himself, returned on Monday morning, and shortly quitted for the office, returning no more to witness house, who next heard of him by a boy on Tuesday morning, desiring that she or her husband would come to him at Reed's or Searle's in Friernhay-street; displeased at his conduct no attention was paid to this, and the same boy returned secondly with a note, which in some measure acquainted them with his state, she immediately sat out for Exeter, and on arrival was informed of the whole truth by her relative Cummins, and Mr Hele, of the Dispensary, opposite which, in Friernhay-street, she found her nephew, at the house of a person she understood of the name of Reed; the only answers she could elicit to her enquiries of why he had committed the rash act, being "that he did not know;" a female was in the room, whom she supposed to be the person who had been the means of bringing this affliction upon them, but had no conversation with her or the other persons in the house. Witness had understood that Mr Edye had been called in, and that his active course of treatment had been the means of prolonging his life. Mr James, she stated, had been the medical gentleman attending her family, she saw him on the business, who expressed his readiness to see the young man if she wished it, but assured her he was in perfectly safe hands, and that all that medical skill could do, would be done for him; his relatives then removed him from the brothel, the same afternoon, to Mrs Tucker's house, with whom he had formerly lived for several years, and where he died.
Mr John Edye, surgeon, was called on the morning of Tuesday the 16th inst. – thinks between 4 and 5 o'clock, by a man of the name of Searle, requesting him to come immediately as a person in Friernhay-street had taken poison or something to injure himself, witness was not certain which, but thinks the word poison was used – I asked who it was, he replied a young man by the name f GEORGE VICARY. I immediately went with the messenger, taking such medicines as I deemed suitable – as we proceeded through the streets I learnt the way in which it had been discovered what deceased had taken was by finding two papers in the room with the word poison written on them. I then proceeded to the room up one pair of stairs opposite the Dispensary; the staircase opening into the street, and there found the deceased GEORGE VICARY in bed, and again enquiring the reason there was to think the person before me had taken poison – was shown a basin into which he had vomited, at the bottom of which was precipitated a powderous whitish powder; I was also shown a tumbler with a quantity of powder matter at the bottom and around the edges, at first view looking like magnesia, but on taking a portion of it between my fingers the gritty feel convinced me of the truth of what had been stated. Satisfied that no time was to be lost, I instantly administered a strong emetic that soon acted very powerfully, and whilst awaiting its result collected a portion of the substance from the tumbler which being placed on a live coal gave forth a strong alliaceous odour, or garlic-0like smell, convincing me that it was arsenic – think the collection I experimented upon was about half a drachm. Determining now to use the pump as one of the most powerful means of relieving the stomach, I sent to Mr Hele at the Dispensary, desiring he would attend me with the instrument belonging to that Institution; - in the interim, by the action of the emetic, a large quantity of similar pulverized substance to that spoken of in the basin and tumbler had been thrown up: - in such a distressing case I was anxious to come at the truth, and in the intervals of sickness questioned the young man as to what he had taken; he evinced considerable reluctance both to answer my questions and to admit the application of remedies; I told him it was of no use as the latter I should certainly enforce, and he had better answer the former and tell me the truth; he upon this admitted that he had taken something. Whether my next question was "what" or if it was "arsenic" I do not recollect, neither can I positively say whether he answered simply "yes" to my question or said "he had taken arsenic" but in whatever terms he or I used it was an admission that such was the fact. I asked how much he had taken? he replied three penny worth – and where he procured it? at Mr Lang's in Fore-street. Upon this I instantly dispatched a messenger to Mr Lang's to enquire into the truth and received for answer that ¾ of an oz. of arsenic had been sold the preceding day to al young man; two of the papers in which it was enclosed being marked Poison. Previous to this Mr Hele had arrived with the stomach pump, which by him and myself was vigorously applied, the warm water at first ejected being loaded with a substance corresponding with that I had before examined, our exertions were however continued until the ejections became perfectly colourless, the water thrown up being as pure as when poured in. Being desirous to learn how the young man came into the place in which I found him my enquiries to this end were directed to Mrs Searle and the young woman West, and I learnt from the former that VICARY and West came to her house on Monday evening, the former asking for dinner, with which he was supplied; he afterwards drank a tumbler of brandy and water, and enquired if he could have a bed; that sometime in the night West came to her and said GEORGE was very ill, and not long after returned in alarm from having found a paper, and being induced to suppose he had taken something improper – he appeared to be treated by them with great humanity. I continued with the deceased until about seven in the morning, when directing the course of treatment in my absence I left the house, considering him then relieved from immediate danger. I saw him again in about 2 hours, and at about 3 in the afternoon he was removed in a carriage to Mrs Tucker's, where I continued to attend, and saw him last about 11 o'clock on Sunday night. I understand no material change was observable from that time until death, which took place (according to those about him) just after six that morning. No symptoms of paralysis had appeared, and on the day of the morning of which the poison had been taken he had assisted in dressing himself, and with inconsiderable help walked down stairs and from 20 to 30 feet in the street to the carriage. After such an unusually protracted period Mr Edye declined giving any opinion as to the cause of death without inspection of the body by dissection, and was requested by the Coroner to proceed with such examination, and meet him and the Jury the following afternoon.
Ann West, lives in Friernhay-street, now lodges at Searle's, has recently and did at the time of this transaction lodge at Reed's – has known the deceased GEORGE VICARY, about 18 months, and was often in the habit of seeing him – he had from the first promised marriage, and often importuned me to marry him, without the sanction or knowledge of his relations, this I refused. Many parts of this female's testimony are unfit for the public eye, it was however easy to learn from it the irregular life the deceased had in this respect led, as notwithstanding the admonitions of his friends and his repeated promises – assignations were continually making between them, and that he was by far too frequently at those houses in Friernhay-street: it will surprise no one after this that he was in pecuniary difficulty, and it came out from this witness, and subsequently that his debts to his aunt Cummins before Michaelmas, amounted to about £26; some small bill was owing at Searle's and West considered he owed her £5, and in the course of this enquiry it will appear that for some weeks he had been nearly destitute of means to supply the extravagancies of those with whom, in defiance of reproof, he continued to associate. On the night of the 5th of Nov. he was in Friernhay-street, again on Sunday, and about 4 on Monday afternoon, - "he appeared then very cheerful" – and said his friends had denied his coming to Ide again, - he had previously, when talking of money matters complained that his aunt Cummins treated him unkindly, and that he did not care what became of himself. On the Monday afternoon he had dinner, cold pork and fowl, and drank a tumbler of water – during the evening he drank a tumbler of brandy and water, and retired to bed about 9 or between that and 10 o'clock he did not appear at all unwell, but said he wanted sleep. At what hour of the night the poison was taken will probably never be known, there is certainly the appearance of discrepancy in this part of the witness' testimony, - if she is to be believed he (wholly without her knowledge,) mixed and took it in the dark, there being no light in the room, and a considerable time must have elapsed ere he began to feel its effects, she being awakened by his vomiting – she was not at first alarmed, but acquainted Mrs Searle and got a light, when she saw a paper and noticed the tumbler on the wash hand-stand with the white powder remaining about it – she then asked if he had taken any thing, he replied no, he had not, - she asked secondly, he still denied, - she said, then what is in the glass? He replied he did not know, she then searched his pockets, and in those of his trowsers found the two papers with the word poison written on them; she think it was then about 4 o'clock, Mr and Mrs Searle were apprized, and measures taken to procure the attendance of a medical man. To all this the deceased was opposed and to avoid it, according to this witness, dressed himself, descended to the street, and went nearly as far as Bartholomew-yard with a declared intention of returning to his aunt at Ide, but at witness' entreaties was prevailed on to return, though he positively refused going ain to Searle's, and was at length taken and put to bed at West's lodgings at Reed's where Mr Edye found him. Had never heard him utter any expressions be-tokening an intention or the contemplation of laying violet hands on himself, but on the contrary, had often heard him express himself strongly against such course.
Isaac Lang IS 15 YEARS OLD, AND ASSISTS HIS BROTHER William, a druggist at 94, Fore-street, remembers that about half-past eight, or from that to nine o'clock, on the morning of Monday, the 9th inst. a young man with a cast in one eye (the deceased) came and either asked for arsenic, or whether they had arsenic, - witness replied yes, and he asked for three pennyworth – witness weighed ¾ oz. wrapped it in three separate papers, writing the word "poison" on two of them, and delivered it to him, telling him it was a strong poison, and he must be careful of it; - deceased replied he knew it. Did not previously know the young man – never saw him before – no one was with him, he came in a composed manner – my brother never cautioned me as to the sale of this article.
Wm. Cann is clerk at the West of England Fire Office, the deceased had been in the office from Midsummer two years – his general character and conduct had been excellent – no young man could conduct himself better in the office, nor as connected with it do I know of any thing that has occurred that is at all blameable – certainly he has latterly been depressed in spirits – he had contracted an intimacy with the female Ann West, whose testimony has just been given, and having imprudently driven her home from the races in a gig, the circumstance came to the knowledge of the Directors, and he was cautioned upon it; he also ceased to be regular in payment at his lodgings, and his aunts came to the office on the subject, it was at length agreed, as it was understood with his perfect consent, that his aunt Cummins should receive the whole quarter's salary due at Michaelmas in part payment of her debt, with this recommendation, that VICARY should be supplied with a small sum for his necessities; witness had heard that this had not been complied with. On Monday the 9th instant, he was at the office the whole day, nor did any thing occur to excite suspicion.
At half-past nine, the Inquest was adjourned to Tuesday evening five o'clock, when
Elizabeth Tucker to whom he was related, and to whose house he was removed from the brothel, related the circumstances that led to this step; from that time he had of course been under her particular care, and she had questioned him as to the rash act he had committed, to all which he had simply replied that he was in a great deal of trouble, but that what he had done he said "let it die with me" – "let it rest with me" – he died about 20 minutes past 6, on Monday morning.
Mr Edye was now requested by the Coroner to relate the result of the post mortem examination of the body of the deceased into which he had entered that day. Mr Edye trusted that his motives in declining on the preceding day, notwithstanding the strong presumptive proof, to give a decided opinion as to the cause of death of the deceased, would not be misconstrued; it had arisen simply from the caution that he deemed necessary to observe in a case more than usually protracted, and where it was not impossible but hat disease, otherwise induced, might have supervened; and it was now only, after examination by dissection, that he was enabled to say that VICARY died from the effects of arsenic. The examination had been very minute; - the blood-vessels of the stomach were in a state of congestion, slight abrasion of its mucus or internal coat had also taken place, & there was a general softness of all its parts, evidently resulting from some deleterious substance having been brought in contact with it; the examination was extended to other parts of the body – the abdomen and the brain, but there had been no rupture, and the general exterior appearance of the viscera was healthy – on some parts internally there were livid spots, but the appearances were by no means so strong as might have been expected from the quantity of poison taken, still sufficiently so, connected with the evidence he had heard, and his own previous knowledge of the case, to say that the deceased came by his death from the effect of poison taken into the stomach, and that poison was arsenic.
The Coroner observed that the mitigated nature of the appearances doubtless arose from the efficacy of the stomach-pump, so promptly and judiciously applied in this case; and Mr Edye said that so satisfied was he of the importance of that instrument, that notwithstanding the present case had proved unfortunate, he should have no hesitation in resorting to it in future in case equally or even more protracted with considerable hope, and if early applied, he considered it, as a means of preserving life, invaluable.
After this Jane and Samuel Searle were examined, but their evidence threw no light whatever on the distressing business on which the Jury had assembled, whilst its details would only occasion a sigh for the depravity of human nature.
The Coroner in a most humane manner summed up, and after some consideration, the Jury (just before 9 o'clock) returned a verdict – "That the deceased came by his death by taking arsenic, not being of sane mind at the time."

Thursday 10 December 1829, Issue 3347 – Gale Document No. Y3200664454
Exeter, Wednesday 9 December
An Inquest was taken on Tuesday at the Wynard's Hospital, Magdalene-street, in this city, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN JOHNSON, 84 years of age, an inmate thereof, who on the preceding evening had been found dead, immersed in the soil of the common privy of the Institution. It appeared on enquiry that the deceased had been subject to fits, and the probability being that in one of them he had fallen in, a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 24 December 1829, Issue 3349 – Gale Document No. Y3200664486
Exeter, Wednesday 23 December
An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq., Coroner, at Sidford, on the 14th instant, on the body of WILLIAM HARRIS, a parish apprentice, in the service of Mr Richard Tripe, of Sidford, farmer. From the evidence, it appeared that on the morning of the 11th instant, Mr Tripe had sent the deceased to see some bullocks that were depasturing at some distance from the farm – that on his way he called at a neighbouring farm-house, and prevailed on the farmer's son to accompany him – and, on returning, went into the house, and ate some bread and cheese that he had brought in his pocket. The farmer's son (in the absence of his father and mother) fetched a wine glass full of distilled cider, drank half of it himself, and gave the remainder to the deceased, who drank the greater part of it, and instantly fell senseless from his seat; he was taken to an adjoining room and laid on some straw, and covered up; he appeared as if sound asleep, and every effort to arouse him was fruitless. He was taken to his master's house about 9 o'clock in the evening, and put to bed, where he lay in the same state till towards the morning, when he began to recover a little and complained of thirst and asked for some water to drink: some tea was given him; and, on his requesting to have some water, his master gave him some chilled. He continued better and got up, and after some little time went into the barn, and remained there the greater part of the forenoon; he again complained of thirst, and said he felt ill: nourishment was given him, and a surgeon sent form, but he died before the arrival of the surgeon.
Two surgeons attended the investigation: they stated that they had examined the body, and were of opinion, from the contents of the stomach, that the death of the deceased had been caused by drinking ardent spirits: and the Jury returned their verdict accordingly.

At Ottery East Hill, on the 21st instant, on the body of ELIZABETH ANN ACKLAND, aged 4 years, daughter of ABRAHAM ACKLAND, labourer. On Thursday, the 17th, the mother of the deceased went into the garden adjoining the dwelling-house, leaving the deceased and two other children by the fire, the eldest of whom was six years old; she had not been absent above a minute or two before the eldest child came running out screeching, and told her that the deceased was on fire. She instantly ran into the house and rapped an apron round her, and extinguished the fire: a surgeon was also sent form, who administered to her necessities, but the deceased died on the following day. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 25 February 1830, Issue 3358 – Gale Document No. Y3200664607
Exeter, Wednesday 24 February
On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, in this city, on the body of W. KINNARD, an infant 3 months old, who had died from injuries received on the Friar's-walk the preceding day, an irritated bullock having made its escape from the fair and taken that direction in its way to the river side, which it reached just above the Lime Kilns in St Leonard's and coursing down the bank upset several other persons, leaping the gates and stiles with all the facility of a hunter, and passing the cotton factory, was finally secured and driven off by its unknown owner from the fields below. The verdict was in accordance with the facts, with a deodand on the animal.

An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq., Coroner, at Honiton, on the 12th instant, on the body of ALICE JENNINGS, daughter of JAMES JENNINGS, labourer, aged 7 years. It appeared that the deceased had gone into a neighbours' house, on Friday the 5th instant, and whilst playing with another child, before the fire, in an upstair room, her clothes took fire; the poor woman who lived there was so much frightened, as not to be able to afford any assistance, but led the deceased down stairs, and ran to the door for help, her screeches instantly brought several persons to the spot, who succeeded in extinguishing the fire, but not till the deceased was very much burnt; medical assistance was promptly administered, but the little suffered lingered until the following Friday when she died. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 8 April 1830, Issue 3364 – Gale Document No. Y 3200664671
INQUESTS HELD BY ISAAC COX, Esq.
At the King's Arms Inn, Ottery St. Mary, on the 24th ult. on the body of SARAH PRIDDIS, aged 67, a lunatic pauper, residing in the poor-house of that parish, who died on the 14th and was buried on the 21st; but, in consequence of information received from several individuals as to the cause of the death of the deceased, the Coroner felt it necessary to have the body disinterred. On the investigation, the following facts were elicited: - Deceased, who was of a nervous irritable habit and subject to temporary nervous fevers, was residing with Elizabeth Harding, one of her sisters, at Ottery, in July last, receiving from the Overseers 2s. per week; she was at this time in as good health as might be expected from the nature of her constitution and her advanced age; and was considered to be a very cleanly careful woman. She was enabled to earn a small pittance (about 1 ½d. a day) at making lace; and on the Overseers hearing of this, they reduced her pay to 1`s. per week. The deceased, finding she could not subsist upon this sum, applied to the Select Vestry for her regular pay, viz. 2s. per week, which they refused to give, and referred her to a neighbouring farmer, who, they said, would give her employment in his fields; but it was shewn that she had been past this employment for some years. Upon finding the Committee would not give her pay, she ran out of the Vestry, as if in despair, into the Church, an fell away in a fit; she recovered, and was taken home to her sisters'. The deprivation she suffered in consequence of the loss of her pay and in being obliged to sell several articles of her clothing, is supposed to have preyed upon her mind, thereby increasing her naturally nervous temperament, till at length ended in insanity. Several solicitations were made to the Committee by her sister for additional relief, in consequence of the illness, but without effect; and the poor woman finding that she was unable to provide for the deceased, made an application for her admittance into the workhouse. Another sister, however, (Mary Fowler) removed the deceased to her house, where she remained several weeks in a most deplorable state, her poor friends sitting up by her by day and night. For the first three weeks the Overseers allowed 1s. per week and afterwards 2s., but this being so small, she was compelled to pawn all the things belonging to the deceased; when this source was exhausted and also her own means, the deceased was again taken home to Elizabeth Harding's where her malady increased, and after remaining there about a week was conveyed to the workhouse; where, in a little more than 6 weeks, death put a period to her sufferings. On examining into the treatment the deceased had received at the workhouse it appeared that she had been confined alone in a room without fire and candle, the greater part of the window boarded up, part of the glass of the window broken, and that she died alone. It also appeared, that the deceased complained of the mistress of the workhouse having beaten her, which fact was substantiated by one of the inmates who had heard the stripes and the screeches of the deceased. Persons in the neighbourhood also spoke to the screams of the deceased to be let out, for her friends, &c. and of children mocking her. It appeared that the poor in this workhouse are farmed out to the governess at the following rates:- for an able bodied person, (of which there are 9) 2s. 6d. each, 2 bed liers, 2s. 9d. each; 3 insane persons, 5s. each; for the deceased she was allowed 3s. 6d. for the last two weeks 4s., the gentlemen would not allow more. The governess was further allowed 12s. per week to find coals, soap, candles, and all other necessaries, including the wear and tear of furniture of the house, except beds and bedding, and except wine in sicknesses; and that for waking, 6d. per night was allowed. the master of the workhouse is a labourer in the employ of the Rev. Mr Elliott, except one day a week, which he devotes to the business of the workhouse. The body, on disinterment, exhibited a shocking spectacle; being extremely emaciated, and ashes having been substituted in the coffin for bran. The Jury occupied all the day in the investigation, when the foreman returned a verdict of Natural Death. - The Coroner expressed himself in terms of strong disapprobation of the conduct of the Vestry and Parish Officers, in consequence of a notice on the workhouse door prohibiting any one to enter except by order of the Select. The Coroner said he should consider it as a prison, and hold Inquests on all persons who died there.

At Sidmouth, on Friday, the 26th ult., on the body of FRANCES, the infant daughter of GEORGE TAYLOR, shoemaker. From the evidence of AMELIA TAYLOR, the mother of the deceased, it appeared that between 1 and 2 o'clock on the preceding day she was absent about 5 minutes – and on her return found that the deceased had caught her clothes on fire, and nothing remained on her body but a flannel petticoat – she was unable to speak. Medical assistance was procured, but of no avail, as the little sufferer lingered until the evening, when she died. - Verdict Accidental Death.

At Ottery St. Mary on the 27th ult., on the body of SARAH CAWLEY, widow, aged 79, a pauper f that parish and residing in the workhouse. The deceased was dropsical, and had been under the occasional care of a surgeon for some time. Thursday morning, the 25th, she was taken suddenly ill, and died in a few minutes. Verdict Natural Death. The Coroner expressed himself satisfied that the deceased had had proper care and attention. The Coroner inspected the state of the lunatic paupers, and found 2 men and 1 woman confined by chains to their beds in the same room, with only a slight partition between them. He pointed out the illegality of this proceeding, without the sanction of the Justices, since the 9th Geo. IV.


Thursday 29 April 1830, Issue 3367 – Gale Document No. Y3200664707

Exeter, Wednesday 28 April
Suicide. - Another melancholy instance of this kind has just occurred in this city, SARAH ELSTON, a native of Newton Bushel, and between 20 and 30 years of age, has been for the last month a servant in the family of Mr John Force, in the Mint, into which she was taken from the kindest motives, but her conduct not having been so correct as it ought, was this day to have left; very early in the morning however it was found that in the course of the night she had taken laudanum, procured the preceding evening, and notwithstanding prompt medical assistance and the use of the stomach pump, death soon terminated her sufferings. An Inquest is being held at the Star Inn, as we are going to press.

Thursday 29 April 1830, Issue 3367 – Gale Document No. Y3200664709
Manslaughter, and Attempted Suicide.
An Inquest was held by Isaac Cox, Esq., at Uffculm, on Saturday last, on the body of J. SWEETLAND, a very respectable yeoman, aged 36 years, residing with his Father, MR WM. SWEETLAND. From the evidence of Mr Thomas Hewett, yeoman, it appeared that he was at MR SWEETLAND'S house in the afternoon of Thursday the 22nd, when Thomas Ballyman Churley, a neighbour of MR SWEETLAND'S, came there to borrow the deceased's Gun, for the purpose, as he said, of shooting some wild ducks. Churley drank some cyder with the deceased, his father, and witness. Deceased drew the charge from his Gun, and after blasting it, delivered it to Churley, desiring him at the same time not to carry it home to his (Churley's) house, for fear the Bailiffs should take it, - an execution being then in the house, under a bill of sale, at the suit of his, (Churley's) brother. Deceased then left home to go into Uffculm. Churley remained there about ¾ of an hour, during which he spoke of his pecuniary affairs – of his brother having put the Bailliff's in the house – he said he (T. B. Churley) had torn the tiles from the roof of his house, and broken the windows – that he must come to the parish, and his brothers should also – that if his mother would have sacrificed £100, it would not have happened. He then loaded the gun with powder and shot he had with him, and said he was going to shoot his wild ducks, because his brother should not have them; MR SWEETLAND begged him not to load the gun till he got to the place where the ducks were, but he did not hear him, and soon afterwards took his leave. Witness saw nothing in Churley's manner which led him to suspect he was unfit to be entrusted with a gun.
Elizabeth Churley, wife of Charles Churley, and sister-in-law to T. B. Churley, stated that, on the day in question, deceased came to her house to borrow a knife, to kill a pig; that whilst he stayed there, witness told him she had heard T. B. Churley was determined to blow her husband's brains out, on hearing which deceased trembled, and told her of Churley being at his house to borrow the gun: Witness implored the deceased not to lend it, and he left her house for the purpose of preventing it.
Prudence Evans, sister to the deceased, deposed that she was in her house which adjoins the road, on the above day, and saw Churley pass by – that in about a minute after he had passed, witness heard the report of a gun, and some one screech, she heard a second screech, and then ran out towards the spot, where she found her brother lying in the ditch – witness said "good God JOHN what's the matter?" Deceased said, "Churley has shot me. I shall die;" that assistance was immediately procured, and deceased was taken home; the deceased was fully aware of his situation, and stated his conviction he must die. Witness was present on the following day, when Charles Churley was with deceased, he asked the deceased how the accident happened, when the deceased said: "I had been to your house, and your wife was alarmed, fearing he would come there & kill her -0 on my way home, your mother's servant called me in to speak to her, she said, I have heard Thomas is at your house, I said he was and wanted to borrow a gun, she said don't let him have it, he has threatened to kill me, and another, and destroy himself, I said I won't, and she said, can I depend upon your word for it? I said you may for I dare say I shall see him, and he shan't have it." Deceased then stated that on his way home he met Churley, that he said to him: "Mr Churley, you must not have the gun, for after what I have heard since I came into town, I can't suffer you to take it where you are going, and he shot at me directly, and ran off." Witness said to deceased that Churley had sent to inquire for him that morning – deceased said "that's a poor recompense, isn't it Charles?" That deceased said, he said to Churley, "he should not take the gun," he did not say there had been any further words. Deceased said that when he said he could not lend it, Churley said, "he would be damned if he would not have it." Witness had never heard there had been any animosity between the deceased and Churley. Witness asked deceased if he had the muzzle of the gun in his hand, he said he had not, but he was quite close – deceased did not say Churley pointed it at him.
MR SWEETLAND, the father of the deceased, stated that he had a conversation with his son on Friday, that witness said: "John, did he shoot to you accidentally or wilfully?" Deceased said "it was wilfully." That witness asked the deceased if he had any suspicion that Churley was going to shoot him? when deceased answered "no, not in the least." This witness poke of the good humour they were all in when at his house before his son left, and of the deceased and Churley being always very friendly.
Several witnesses spoke to their seeing Churley coming in the direction from MR SWEETLAND'S house, with a gun – and confirmed that part of Mrs Evans statement of having heard the report of a gun, and finding the deceased as above described; no one, however, it seems saw Churley commit the act.
John Mills deposed that, being employed in a Garden belonging to Mr Nott, he heard the report of a gun, and ran to look into the road. He saw Churley come from the spot where the deceased lay, towards witness – and as he came on witness saw him cut his throat with a razor, which he threw away, and which witness went and picked up.
Mr Nott, Surgeon, stated that on hearing the alarm, he ran into the street, he followed a track of blood into the Fountain Inn, where he found Churley, with his throat cut in a shocking manner. Witness took measures to stop the flowing of the blood but, conceiving from the state of the wound he could render no assistance, he left Churley to attend upon deceased. Mr Nott stated that he found the deceased had received a gun shot in the lower part of his belly – that the gun must have been close to the body of the deceased, as the wound externally was very small, the shot had perforated the abdomen, passing downwards and somewhat inwards, the intestines were much inflamed, and the Os pubis much shattered; witness stated that the deceased was impressed at first with the conviction that he could not live, which he retained to the last.
Mr Nott attended the deceased, and afforded him every assistance which skill and humanity could suggest, which were of no avail, as he lingered on till Friday evening, when death put a period to his sufferings.
J. B. Churley soon recovered so far as to make signs for paper and pen and ink, on which he wrote as follows: - "Kiss my dear wife! Love my Children! may God forgive my mother and brothers. I die in charity with all men. Poor JOHN SWEETLAND! My dear friend, Oh! Oh! my dear friend. How is dear poor JOHN SWEETLAND? Oh! Oh! help me to my dear wife! Let me see her, Oh my poor dear wife!" He struck out the word brothers, after he had written it. He was then taken to his uncle's house, where he lies in a very dangerous state.
Several witnesses spoke to the general good character of Churley, up to within a very short period – and also of the agitated state of mind in which he was in, in the morning: of his having the razor in his pocket, and stating that it should do execution – of violet execrations against his mother and brothers; and his uncle and aunt, who appeared to have done all in their power to soothe him, - alarmed at his expressions and demeanour, solicited the aid of a constable to take him into custody, which unfortunately was not done.
The Jury returned a unanimous verdict of Manslaughter Thos. Balyman Churley, - and the Coroner issued his warrant for his apprehension, but it was supposed his death would shortly supersede all other proceedings.
In this unhappy affair, a most worthy and excellent man, MR SWEETLAND, who was the prop and consolation of his aged and highly respectable father, has been lost to society thro' his humane interference – it seems to be the most desirable thing that can happen to the miserable and unfortunate being, who perpetrated the shocking act, that death should relieve him from its temporal consequences and temporal sufferings. We know no enough of the transaction that occasioned the madness and violence to which Churley was goaded to pronounce an opinion on the conduct of his relatives – but, whatever may be the merits, they appear to have proceeded to great extremities, and have thus produced the dreadful issue.

Thursday 8 July 1830, Issue 3376 – Gale Document No. Y3200664853
On Monday last, a man named JOHN MORGAN, whilst mowing in a field at Withecombe Raleigh, (Exmouth) accidently stepped one leg into a gutter, concealed by the grass, which throwing him off his centre, he was pitched forward, and the other leg with force came in contact with the edge of the scythe; the wound was of the most formidable description. Medical assistance was as quickly as possible procured, to stay the effusion of blood, but an immediate removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital was recommended: so great however had been the haemorrhage, that the unfortunate man expired within a few minutes of reaching the house, where an inquest was taken yesterday, before Mr Walkey, and a verdict returned accordingly.

Thursday 5 August 1830, Issue 3380 – Gale Document No. Y3200664902
Exeter, Wednesday 4 August
An aged woman, named MARY WILCOCKS, residing in Guinea-street, dropped down and expired instantly, on Thursday evening last. She had been heard saying her prayers about a quarter of an hour before she was found dead. An Inquest was held on the body of S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, and a verdict returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

On Friday se'nnight, a woman called MARY WOOD, an inhabitant of Loxbeer, who had been on a visit to her niece, at Rackenford turnpike-gate, took leave of her to return home. Nothing more was heard of her till the Tuesday following, when J. Sillifant, Esq. who was fishing in the brook that runs through his plantation at Cruwyshay, attended by his footman, discovered the body in the water. It was instantly removed to the Bell Inn at Rackenford, to be submitted to a Coroner's Inquest; but no evidence can be found whether her death was the effect of accident or premeditation.

Thursday 26 August 1830, Issue 3383 – Gale Document No. Y3200664931
A melancholy accident occurred at Kerswell limestone quarry, in Uplyme, on the 18th instant, in consequence of the falling of the heading of the quarry, by which two labourers, GEORGE FOWLER and BENJAMIN BEAVIS, were buried in the rubble and killed on the spot. Inquests were held on their bodies on the following day by Isaac Cox, Esq., when the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death upon each of them.

An Inquest was held at Sidmouth on the 21st instant, on the body of JOHN TURNER, of that parish, hair-dresser, aged about 67 years. The deceased had left his home on the preceding evening for the purpose of going to Coombe, in Salcombe, to shoot rabbits, which he was in the habit of doing – he had his gun with him. About 6 o'clock a report of a gun was heard in an enclosure near the Coombe, and it was believed that it proceeded from the deceased's gun. The deceased did not return to his friends in the evening as usual, and several persons went in search of him; but he was not found till the following morning, when he was discovered in an inclosure called South Down quite dead; his gun was lying about 10 yards from him – his clothes were not broken or disturbed – nor were there any marks as if violence had been used. Mr Underdown, surgeon, was examined, who stated that he had attended the deceased frequently for some time past, and that from his symptoms he considered that the deceased laboured under ossification of the heart or some of the larger blood vessels, which for the most part often produced death. The jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of Natural Death.

Thursday 2 December 1830, Issue 3396 – Gale Document No. Y3200665072
Exeter, Wednesday 1 December
An Inquest, before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, was taken on Tuesday evening, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on the body of SAMUEL DAVEY, about 4 years old, son of MR ROBERT JOHN DAVEY, of lower North-street, in this city, who having on Monday morning been sent in his bed-gown from the up-stair to the ground floor room of his father's house with a lighted candle, unfortunately caught his dress on fire, and was so burnt that, after enduring great agony, he died in the Hospital the following morning. Verdict, Accidental Death.

On Thursday last, an Inquest was held, before Francis Kingdom, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN DRAKE, of Tucking Mills – an account of whose death by drowning we noticed in our last, when the Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned – it appearing a probability of his having fallen into the leat from accident. Mr Drake was a man much respected, and his premature death is much lamented.

Thursday 30 December 1830, Issue 3400 – Gale Document No. Y3200665113
A shocking affair, and one which has caused a great sensation in Topsham, occurred on Monday last, when, it is supposed from animosity, arising out of previous difference, a man of the name of BERRY, a pig-killer, rat-catcher, &c., awaited the emerging of a young man named HARRIS, (son of Mr Harris, wheelwright, in that town,) from a public-house, and with a gun he had, fired at and wounded Harris so grievously, that he shortly expired. The result of the inquest was not known when our papers went to press.

Thursday 24 November 1831, Issue 3446 – Gale Document No. Y3200665478
Shocking Infanticide - On Saturday, an Inquest was held by A. B. Bone, Esq. Coroner, at Plymouth, on the body of a female child, to which MARY KELLAWAY had, on the morning of that day, given birth. It appeared by the evidence adduced at the inquest, that the mother was a servant in the employ of a respectable farmer in the parish of St. Budeaux, and being with child by a labourer of the same parish, she left her situation, and took lodgings at a house at Dock-wall, in Plymouth, where she was in the habit of sleeping in company with the wife of a seaman. On the night of Friday last, she was observed to leave her bed 3 several times, which, with the appearance of the room the next morning, raised the suspicions of her bed-fellow, who charged her with having been delivered of a child, which she sternly denied, as she had, on several occasions previously, when charged with being en ceinte. The suspicions of her bed-fellow were soon communicated to the neighbourhood, and a search was made in the bed-room for the child, which was eventually discovered in a bureau-bed, wrapped in a quilt. The body was then in a very fresh state, and blood was oozing out of the mouth. A cord was fastened tight round the neck, which had evidently produced strangulation. the face was of a livid colour. The mother was present, and took the child from the person who found it, and, with a pair of scissors, was observed to cut a string from off the child's neck. She was charged with the murder of the child, which she denied, but acknowledged that she had given birth to the infant. Information was immediately given to Day and Nosworthy, the beadles, and, on the inquest being held, a verdict of Wilful Murder was returned against the mother, who was immediately apprehended on the Coroner's warrant.

Thursday 12 January 1832, Issue 3453 – Gale Document No. Y3200665508
Exeter, Wednesday 11 January
Sudden Death - A female servant of Mr Woodman, Surgeon, St. Thomas, adjoining this city, named ANN SNELL, having on Monday been sent to the shop of Mr Manley, butcher, Alphington-street, had scarcely entered it when she dropped down and expired immediately. An Inquest before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, was taken on Tuesday, at the King's Arms, Cowick-street, and a verdict, consistent with the circumstances stated, returned accordingly.

An Inquest was taken on Tuesday, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, at the King's Arms, Cowick-street, St. Thomas, on the body of SARAH HANNAFORD, 17 years of age, which had been taken from the river Exe on the preceding Sunday evening. The deceased is the daughter of a poor widow woman, residing near the Black Boy Turnpike, St Sidwell's, in this city, and was a servant in the family of Mr Sharland, grocer, High-street. The causes that led to this desperate act are unknown – she had uniformly been treated with kindness, nor had any thing occurred, save, a week or two before, a kindly meant and parental reproof, on its being discovered that she had absented herself from church, (for the purpose of attending which she had left home,) on the Sunday. In the afternoon of Sunday last, she as usual, again left home for the purpose of attending church, but at the close of the service, did not return. Imagining she might have gone to see her mother, no particular uneasiness was for some time felt, but the evening advancing, without her return home, Mr Sharland's family became alarmed, and enquiry being made, it was found her mother knew nothing of her. An immediate search was set on foot, but speedily terminated by information being received that the body of a female had been taken from the river, and which proved to be hers. From all the information that can be obtained, it would appear that she must have got into the river at, or about the steps at the end of the coal-yard, at the entrance to the Haven-banks, from Alphington-street, as near the spot her bonnet and shawl were found. The body was taken out of the river near Salter and Owen's brewery. The investigation before the Coroner was of considerable length, but nothing further could be elicited, and, under these circumstances – a verdict was returned of "Found Drowned, but by what means did not appear to the jury."

Thursday 12 April 1832, Issue 3466 – Gale Document No. Y3200665576
A Coroner's Inquest was held on Thursday evening, before R. H. Aberdein; Esq., at the Ship Inn, in Heavitree, to inquire into the death of a new born male child. The constable deposed that he was requested to go to the house of Mr Pedder, of Midway Terrace, on the previous morning, when, from something that transpired, he searched the privy, and with a rake took up from under the soil a pocket handkerchief and a new born child – no marks of violence appeared to have been used on the neck o body of the child. Mr Madden, surgeon, deposed that he saw the body of the child, and examined it after it was washed; it appeared healthy and well formed, but small; there was no appearance of bruise or discolouration about its neck or body; according to his judgment it was a seven month's child. He would not swear whether or not the child was born alive, as he did not know any decided test to prove the fact; he would say in his opinion that the child was not born alive. Jane Bidgood, servant to Mr Pedder, said that her fellow servant, MARY SNELL, is about 20 years of age, and that she had lived about five or six weeks in her master's service, and that they slept in one bed; that they went to bed about half-past ten on Tuesday night, and that she was not awoke by an thing until the next morning, when MARY SNELL got up MARY SNELL then left the room, and the witness arose, and from appearances she was led to suppose something unusual had happened; she went down stairs and told MARY SNELL that she was thinner than usual, and called a Nurse who was attending a lady in the next house. The Nurse told MARY SNELL she had either miscarried, or had been delivered of a child, when, after several times denying, she said she had miscarried. Mr Madden was again called, and said that MARY SNELL, then in bed in the Inn, had recently been delivered of a child. This investigation continued upwards of seven hours, when a verdict was returned, "That the child was still born, but that AMARY SNELL had concealed the birth."

Thursday 24 May 1832, Issue 3472 – Gale Document No. Y3200665611
Exeter, Wednesday 23 May
A few days since an Inquest was taken at Torrington, on the body of MR WM. GORDEN, many years a carrier between this city and that place, who on the arrival of his wagon at Torrington, was found dead in it. Verdict – "Died from Suffocation."

Thursday 6 September 1832, Issue 3487 – Gale Document No. Y3200665689
Exeter, Wednesday 5 September
An Inquest was taken yesterday, before S. Walkey, Esq., Coroner for this city, on the body of MRS SARAH BRAGG, 59 years of age, and widow of the late MR T. BRAGG, baker, Gandy-street, who having that morning been left a short time by her nurse, was, on her return, found to have fallen from her bed, and laying by the side of it dead; and a verdict returned that having fallen from weakness in removing herself from her bed, she had died in an attack of cholera. Her only daughter was among the deaths from this disease about a fortnight since, and since which she had not held up her head.

Thursday 6 December 1832, Issue 3500 – Gale Document No. Y3200665859
Plymouth
On Saturday morning, MR AUSTIN, formerly a draper of Devonport, in which town he still resided, was found in his apartment with his throat cut, in a very dreadful manner, the laceration being nearly from ear to ear; he was quite dead when discovered. It appeared he had been in a desponding state for some time past. An Inquest was held on his body, and a Verdict returned of "Temporary insanity."

Thursday 10 January 1833, Issue 3505 – Gale Document No. Y3200665919
On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the Horse and Groom, Heavitree, before James Partridge, Esq., Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, on the body of JAMES FRASER, late of Baring Crescent, Esq., whose body was discovered by a Fisherman, early on Saturday morning last, floating on the river Exe, near Salmon Pool. It appeared in evidence that this unfortunate Gentleman left his house between seven and eight o'clock on the previous evening, and was not heard of again till the melancholy intelligence reached his family of his premature loss. It was also proved that the deceased's mind had been of late much distracted by the embarrassed state of his affairs, attributable as we understand to an unsuccessful Mining speculation in Gloucestershire. The Jury after a short deliberation returned their verdict:- Found drowned but by what means to them unknown."

Thursday 17 January 1833, Issue 3506 – Gale Document No. Y3200665937
Coroner's Inquest - On Saturday last, a jury assembled before S. Walkey, Esq., Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, I this city, to make enquiry touching the death of ELIZA DAMEREL, about 35 years of age, who had been found dead in the room in which she resided in James-street, on the preceding evening. The story of this unfortunate woman, as far as it is known, is a hapless one, her husband was a respectable tradesman in this city, and there was that about herself to the last, that denoted the care that had been taken of her in her youth, and displaying powers of mind, and information from which better things might have been expected. She became a Widow and fell into pecuniary difficulties, and unhappily her conduct ceased to be correct. Over this charity would now draw the veil, but that her appearance so often at the Guildhall, gave her a kind of fearful notoriety. The excitement under which she laboured was always but too apparent, and the paroxysm of her grief, though exciting the laughter of the unthinking, told but too plainly what would be her end. She fell step by step into poverty, and a tendency to apoplectic attack came on, and to a fit of this kind, alone and unattended, she became a victim on the evening named. No one heard her, - no one took the alarm, and as she fell so she lay, until a man who had some acquaintance with her entered the room, and in the darkness of it spurned on the dead body of the wretched woman he sought! It being deemed necessary that a post mortem examination of the body should take place, an adjournment of the Inquest to Monday, was directed. This was performed by Mr Ottley and Mr Pridham; surgeons, but there being no appearances involving any one in her death, her remains were deposited in their last resting place on Sunday; and when the jury re-assembled on Monday, these circumstances were stated to them, and a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God from attack of apoplexy, was returned.

Thursday 7 March 1833, Issue 3513 – Gale Document No. Y3200666051
Exeter, Wednesday 6 March
On Friday last, an Inquest was taken before J. Gribble, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, at Woosten, in Moretonhampstead, on the body of JAMES, the second son of MR WINDEAT, of that place, aged 10 years, who had accidentally met his death by coming in contact with the Threshing Machine, when a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 4 April 1833, Issue 3517 – Gale Document No. Y3200666111
Melancholy Catastrophe - On the forenoon of Sunday, the 24th ult., the town of Moretonhampstead was thrown into al state of consternation by the death of a young and unoffending female, (if report speaks true,) effected in such a gold-=blooded and cruel manner as can scarcely find a parallel. A person in that town, of the name of Henry Heyward, represented as being from 17 to 18 years of age, whose mother is a Widow, for a complaint of the eyes has a seton in his neck. This was dressed and attended by a servant of his mother's, of the name of PETHYBRIDGE, a girl represented as being about 15 or 16 years of age. Under this necessary care the lad had winced and conducted himself in so childish a manner, that the girl had, (perhaps naturally enough,) laughed at him; and having on that morning made a fresh exhibition of himself in this way, she, in the course of the forenoon, imitated him as she related the circumstance to a lad named Frost, one of his companions. For this the young ruffian said, in a surly tone, "if you mock me again I'm d—d if I don't shoot you." The poor girl repeated the mimickery, when he deliberately took a loaded pistol he carried about him, from his pocket, and shot at her! The ball took effect in the corner of the left eye, and passing through the brain was extracted by Mr Puddicombe from the back part of the skull. The unfortunate girl lived in agony several hours, but never spoke from the time of the injury being inflicted on her. Notwithstanding a deed so black as this was, committed in the centre of a not inconsiderable town, and in the middle of the day, it is said, not the slightest effort was made by an peace-officer or other police existing in it, to seize the offender, who is reported to have been at large until Tuesday, when an inquest was taken on the body of the girl, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for the county of Devon, and when the Jury returned a verdict of MANSLAUGHTER!!! The Coroner immediately issued his warrant, and on the following day the offender was lodged in the County Gaol; whence, however, he has since been liberated on bail!! as it is rumoured, of two sureties of £500 each. In this case there appears to have been the most studious care exercised to conceal it from the knowledge of the Public Press; but, if this really was the intention, the persons exercising themselves in it must have had short memories indeed, or they would have recollected the old adage, "That Murder will out." It is said that the unhappy mother of this girl, who lives in the town, was so shocked when the news was communicated to her, that she has remained since in a state of stupor, and fears are entertained that her reasoning faculties will never return.

Thursday 23 May 1833, Issue 3524 – Gale Document No. Y3200666235
Suicide - On Thursday, R. B. TRUSCOTT, lately residing with his brother, in Howe-street, Plymouth, in a fit of frenzy, deprived himself of life. The deceased was of a religious character, and moral conversation. Coroner's Verdict, "Insanity."

An Inquest was held last week, before T. Copner, Esq., Coroner, in the parish of Landkey, on the body of MR JOHN HEDDON, yeoman, aged sixty years, who was found suspended by a rope in his pound-house. There were various proofs of apparent previous insanity; and the Jury returned a verdict, "Temporary Derangement."

Thursday 20 June 1833, Issue 3528 – Gale Document No. Y3200666305
Suicide - A respectable female named MARY HEYWARD, aged 23, in the service of J. I. Lee, Esq., Ottery St. Mary, was on Monday week last found drowned in a fish pond in that gentleman's grounds. She possessed much persona, attraction and was of good character; it is understood a love affair was the cause of this rash resolve. An Inquest was held on the body and a verdict given of Found Drowned.

Thursday 5 September 1833, Issue 3539 – Gale Document No. Y3200666501
Plymouth
Melancholy Circumstance - An Inquest was held on Tuesday week, before A. B. Bone, Esq., at Wembury House, the residence of the Right Hon. SIR EDWARD THORNTON, G.C.B., on the body of DUDLEY THORNTON, eldest son of SIR EDWARD, who was drowned while bathing in the Yealm on the preceding day. It appeared from the evidence adduced that the deceased, who is about 17 years of age, and his two brothers, went with their father and the hind to bathe at the spot where they had been in the habit of bathing for the last two months. SIR EDWARD remained on the beach until his three sons and the hind, who always bathed with them, as a precaution against accident, were in the water, and saw his two elder sons, the deceased and his second son, EDWARD, beginning to swim in the shallow water. He then walked down the beach, and was returning towards the spot where he left his sons, when he heard a call for aid; he ran towards the spot, and on enquiring of his younger sons where their brother DUDLEY was, he was told he had just sunk in the deep water. SIR EDWARD immediately rushed into the water towards the spot pointed out by his sons, but finding he could not swim with his clothes on, he was obliged to return to the shore, and having taken off his clothes, again went into the river. In the mean time, SIR EDWARD and his hind called loudly for assistance, and two small boats put off from the opposite shore to their aid. The boatmen stated that being unable to swim, they could not dive for the body, which they could see lying at the bottom, but it was very speedily recovered with the boat hook, and taken on shore; blankets were procured from the preventive station, and the most strenuous efforts used, under SIR EDWARD'S directions, to resuscitate the body; it was subsequently removed to the station house, and here again every means were adopted by Mr Luscombe, surgeon, and other persons present, to effect resuscitation, but without success. Mr E. Thornton and the hind corroborated this testimony, and the jury returned a Verdict of Accidentally Drowned.

Thursday 26 September 1833, Issue 3542 – Gale Document No. Y3200666562
A Coroner's Inquest was held at Crediton, on Monday, on the body of a poor man named JOHN FLOOD, who had long been in a very emaciated condition, and died on Sunday morning, in consequence of having swallowed three parts of an ounce of laudanum on the preceding evening. Verdict – "That his Death was occasioned by his having taken laudanum to ease him of his pain."

Exeter, Wednesday 25 September
A young man of the name of ROBER RENNELLS, about 19 years of age, and a native of Truro, but in the employ of Mr A. E. Abraham, optician of this city, was this morning found dead in his room. A Coroner's Inquest will take cognizance of the matter; as, however, he had been before unwell, it is believed it will prove a circumstance only of ordinary occurrence.

Thursday 14 November 1833, Issue 3549 – Gale Document No. Y3200666693
Exeter, Wednesday 13 November
Fatal Accident. - About 11 o'clock, on the night of Saturday last, MR BENJAMIN CRESWELL, fuller, Rock's-lane, in this city, returned to his house: his wife had retired to rest, and he entered a sitting room on the first floor, the window of which is low and looks into the Courtlage. He had been troubled with Asthma for some years, and it is supposed opened and placed himself at the window for the sake of air. Of course precisely how occasioned can never now be known, but out of this window he fell into the Courtlage, fracturing his skull so severely that the brain protruded and his death must have been instantaneous. About 5 in the following morning, his wife awoke, and missing him became alarmed: she provided herself with a light, and coming from the bed-room into that her husband had last been in, the opened and broken window led her to fear the worst, and in the Courtlage, as before mentioned, his dead body was found. An Inquest was held on Monday, before Samuel Walkey, Esq., Coroner, for this city, at Spiller's King's Arms public-house, Rock's-lane, when after an enquiry into the circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. The deceased was 62 years of age.

Thursday 5 December 1833, Issue 3552 – Gale Document No. Y3200666746
On Tuesday an Inquest was held at Appledore, before Francis Kingdon, Esq., Coroner, on the bodies of BENJAMIN PILE and SAML. BLACKMORE, who were accidentally drowned. It appeared from evidence that these unfortunate men, with 6 others, on Sunday last, went out in a life boast, No. 2, which was sent to Appledore from the "Royal Marine Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck, London," through the assistance and influence of the Rt. Hon. Lord Rolle, to aid the brig Mary Ann, of Exeter, as she lay stranded at the back of Northam Burrows. The boat reached the brig in safety; and whilst the crew were looking out. to see if any persons were on board, a heavy sea struck the boat, and capsized her with her crew under. In a few minutes the other boat, No. 1, went out and succeeded in saving four of the crew of the first boat, which, after the lapse of an hour drifted on shore; and on raising her, the two men above named were found drowned, lashed to the thwarts, another was miraculously preserved, fastened across the thwart. Every means which the most ready medical aid could suggest were resorted to, without effect, to recover those men. On Thursday morning an Inquest was held at Northam Burrows, supposed to be one of the crew of the above brig. The whole of the crew, expected to have numbered about ten, have met a watery grave. Verdict – Found Drowned.

Thursday 26 December 1833, Issue 3555 – Gale Document No. Y3200666805
Exeter, Wednesday 25 December
Coroner's Inquest. - We last week noticed the disappearance and supposed death of JOSEPH BESLEY COX, a foreman in the employ of Mr James Green, engineer, of this city, and residing on the Haven Banks, at the head of the New Basin. All doubt concerning him was removed on the same evening, by his body being found by Elias Wannell, a Topsham pilot, as he was fishing in the Exe, at Greenland on the eastern bank of the river. The tide had partly left it, and having known the deceased, he brought the body to Holmes' Haven Banks Inn, just below this city. Blood flowed from the mouth, and nose after the body was got into the boat, and the head and face were black on one side. On Thursday an Inquest was taken before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon; when a variety of evidence was adduced, but tending to scarcely anything more than the confirmation of that which was stated in our last, that at the time he came by his death, he was intoxicated. The details of any thing of this nature are ever of the most humiliating description, and either littleness of mind or something worse it is imagined must prevail where there is a greediness of appetite displayed for them. There was also in the evidence something of the wonderful mixed up, but which it is though the Jury showed their good sense in saying by their verdict that they had paid little heed to it. In fact nothing is known save that having left this city late on the night of Thursday, the 12th instant, to return home, his hat was found in the river on the following day, near Topsham; and his body, as just stated, on Wednesday last, still lower on the river below Topsham, at a part known by the name of "Greenland." And where probabilities only can be brought into exercise, it is apprehended that entitled to the greatest weight, in that in passing the banks, he got off the path-way and fell into the river. Of course a post mortem examination was extremely desirable, and this was performed by Mr Harris, accompanied by Mr T. G. Norris, surgeons, of this city; and the results given in evidence as follows:
Mr Harris, - I have examined the head of the deceased. On the outside of the head, there is a severe bruise on the right forehead, two small wounds on the back kart of the head, neither of which can be traced down to the skull, and therefore they are not of material consequence. On cutting through the scalp, I found it very much thickened and loaded with blood; there was an extravasation of blood immediately under the blow in the forehead, the whole appearance of the {/} the skull, is very vascular. The vessels of the brain are very much enlarged, and full. There is no fracture of the skull, nor any otherwise in the head which might account for death. Any violet death, or suffocation, would produce these appearances in the head, and would expect to find them in a drowned person. There was extravasation immediately under the coats of the left eye; the skin of the upper [?] are much abraded , and a lacerated wound below the left eye. The mark of a severe bruise on the bridge of the nose, but the skin unbroken. The Chest has also been examined; the lungs were [?] healthy, filling nearly the whole cavity of the chest. Upon cutting the lungs, I found the air-passages containing a quantity of fluid; lungs were also much gorged with blood. I examined the [?] right cavities were filled with coagulated blood; the left cavit[?] nearly empty. The stomach contained about a pint of yellow[?] fluid, which smelt strongly of some spirit. With regard to the {/} appearance, the limbs were perfectly relaxed, and the hands [?]; there is no gravel or mud under the nails; there is no sign of [?]sition. The face is very livid, and much bruised generally; the [?] forcibly clenched by the teeth.
Mr Norris – I have assisted Mr Harris in the post mortem examination – I concur in what has been stated by Mr Harris.
The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict – "Found Drowned, but by what means the blows [?] came on the head, there is no evidence before the Jurors to [?]."

Thursday 20 February 1834, Issue 3563 – Gale Document No. Y3200666929
Sudden Death - On Thursday morning last, the 13th inst., MRS ASHLEY, wife of MR W. ASHLEY, of Okehampton, currier, was discovered in bed a corpse. On Saturday an Inquest was held on the body by Mr Gribble, of Ashburton, one of the Coroners for the county, and a most respectable Jury, when the following evidence was adduced. MR ROBT. ASHLEY, (son of the deceased) stated that his mother retired to rest on Wednesday night in good health and spirits, but as she was occasionally afflicted with fits, he begged her to allow the servant girl to sleep with her, (MR ASHLEY, the husband, being at Plymouth) but to this she objected to and retired to rest alone. The servant girl stated on Thursday morning, as her mistress was not down stairs at her usual hour, she proceeded to her bed-room door and called her, but receiving no answer she went into her room, when she discovered her mistress in bed on her right side and her head laying over the side of the bed dead and quite cold. Mr Thorne, surgeon, Okehampton, deposed that in his opinion, the death of MRS ASHLEY was occasioned by a fit, and which no doubt occasioned a rupture of a blood vessel in the brain or near the heart. On this evidence the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. MRS ASHLEY was a woman of most respectable character, and the gloom which was depicted on the inhabitants generally on hearing the melancholy intelligence of her death, was a proof that her loss will be severely felt, not only by her immediate friend, but by the poor, to whom she was every ready to extend her benevolence. Her remains were interred this day (Tuesday) when a large concourse of persons testified their respect to her memory by attending at the funeral.

Thursday 20 March 1834, Issue 3567 – Gale Document No. Y3200666984
MELANCHOLY AND FATAL ACCIDENT. – On Thursday afternoon, as MR J. MANN, tanner, of Ashburton, was walking on the banks of the Exeter Basin, outside a partition, near the coal yards, his foot gave way, and he immediately fell backwards into the water. A lad who was near the spot witnessed the occurrence, and gave instant alarm; he was in a few minutes taken out, and conveyed to the House of Reception, near the lime kilns where every means were used to restore life, but unfortunately the vital spark had fled. He has left a wife and family to lament their premature bereavement. A Coroner's Inquest has been since held, when a verdict agreeably to the circumstances of the case was returned.

Thursday 1 May 1834, Issue 3575 – Gale Document No. Y3200667067
An Inquest has been held at the Guildhall, at Southmolton on the body of MARGARET VICKERY, 21 years of age, who had arrived at that place ( which appears to be her home,) about a fortnight before, by Seldon's wagon, from Exeter, in the neighbourhood of which she had been living at service, having miscarried the Friday previous to her reaching Southmolton. From the statements it would appear that she had been taking medicine with a view to procure abortion, and the evidence of Mr Southcombe, surgeon, and Dr Newbolt, was to the effect, that the deceased died from the effect of severe and general inflammation, but the proximate cause of which they could not take upon themselves to determine. The jury, therefore, returned a verdict of died from the effects of general inflammation, but how that inflammation was caused no evidence had been adduced.

Thursday 5 June 1834, Issue 3580 – Gale Document No. Y3200667137
Exeter, Wednesday 4 June
The body of a man named HOOPER, employed in towing vessels on our Canal, was found on Sunday morning in the New basin. It is supposed that in attempting to pass from one coal-yard to another his feet slipped, and he fell into the water: and on the inquest a verdict was returned accordingly

An inquisition, for the purpose of enquiring into the circumstances of the death of MR JOHN CHARLTON, bleacher, Okehampton-Street, St Thomas, adjoining this city, took place yesterday (Tuesday), at Friend's Seven Stars Inn, before Joseph Gribble, Esq. one of the coroners for Devon. On the Monday morning under the influence of great excitement, he had cut his throat with a razor, and a verdict of his being labouring under insanity was returned.

An Inquest was held on Monday, before Saml. Walkey, Esq., Coroner for this city, at Wilcocks Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of a carter of the name of ROBERT JAMES, who on descending a hill near Crediton, with a heavy load, in stooping to put on the shoe, was pressed on, and being thrown, the wheel passed over him severely fracturing one of his legs. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where amputation was found necessary, but the injuries were so extensive that death terminated his sufferings, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 12 June 1834, Issue 3581 – Gale Document No. Y3200667145
Exeter, Wednesday 11 June
An Inquest was taken on Thursday last, before Samuel Walkey, Esq., Coroner for this city, at Taylor's Barnstaple Inn, North-street, on the body of a young woman named MARY ANN TILLOUR, which had been taken from the river Exe, just above the Head Weir, on the preceding day. She was a washerwoman employed in the Island, and had been missing from the night of Sunday. The subject afforded a fine scope for the marvellous, but after a most patient investigation, the jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

An inquest has been taken before James Partridge, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of GEORGE CONEYBEARE, who died in consequence of the injuries he received in an attack made on him at the Black Dog Inn, on the Southmolton-road, by George Sully, and when such a verdict was returned has led to his committal, by the Coroner, to the County Gaol, charged with killing and slaying, but he has since been admitted to bail.

Thursday 26 June 1834, Issue 3583 – Gale Document No. Y3200667169
Exeter, Wednesday 25 June
On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before S. Walkey, Esq., Coroner, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, on the body of THOMAS BURTON, who died in the Hospital on the preceding Saturday. It came out in evidence that on the afternoon of Friday, the deceased was riding on the top of a hawker's van, the property of his brother, when a short distance beyond Broadclist, on their way here, one of the hind wheels came off, by which accident he was thrown to the ground, and in the fall fractured his neck. He was immediately conveyed to the Hospital, but, as already stated, expired on the following day, - Verdict:- Accidental Death, with a deodand of one shilling on the wheel.

MELANCHOLY SUICIDE – On Friday last, at Barnstaple, MISTER GEORGE STANTON, a young gentleman said to have been heir to a baronetcy, the only child of a widowed mother, who has resided in that town for several years, put an end to his existence by shooting himself in the head with a pistol. The young gentleman, who had been observed at times low-spirited, and talking in an incoherent manner, was found in his dressing-room, about six o'clock in the evening, quite dead, with a quantity of blood under his head: on the body being examined, it was found that the ball had entered about an inch above the right ear, and had lodged in the head. The pistol appeared to have fallen from his hand and was lying at his side. Search was made for a bottle of phosphorus which he had exhibited to a gentleman in the afternoon, but without success. He appeared to have been making gunpowder; the ingredients, brimstone, charcoal, and salt, were lying on his dressing table. In a dressing room adjoining, which the deceased was want to term his armoury, was a dirk, a sabre, a fowling piece, a helmet and several other articles, with which he used to amuse himself. Several witnesses having been examined, the Coroner stated, that there was no further evidence to be submitted to the Jury, and the foreman almost instantly stated that the jury were unanimous in the opinion "that the deceased shot himself in a state of insanity," which verdict was recorded. The unfortunate young gentleman (who had just attained his 16th year) was of a noble disposition, and possessed of high intellectual abilities.

FATAL ACCIDENT - Last week while two men, named JOHN TUCKER and WILLIAM CHAPPLE, were employed in sinking a well for Farmer Watts, at Marwood, and had got to the depth of about thirty feet, there was an intimation of danger from above, and CHAPPLE caused himself to be drawn up in a bucket. In his ascent he unluckily came in contact with a mass of loose earth, which fell and buried his companion under it. By dint of instant exertion, the rubbish was soon cleared away to the depth of the poor man's head and breast, so that he was enabled to speak, and had some brandy administered to him; but unfortunately a second mass of rubbish fell down, which the men employed in endeavouring to extricate him from his horrible situation had but just time to escape, and again buried him. The men who had been so active in their efforts to preserve the life of their companion could not again be prevailed upon to descend, it being near midnight, without any prospect of preserving him, and he was dug out the following morning having apparently been dead several hours. An Inquest was held on the body by T. Copner, Esq. on Wednesday, and a verdict of "accidental death" recorded. Deceased has left a widow and five children. It is said that his mother and brother came to untimely ends within the last few years.

Thursday 3 July 1834, Issue 3584 – Gale Document No. Y3200667183
Suspected Death by Poisoning - On the 19th inst., an Inquest was held at North Petherwin, on the body of J. BICKLE, who died in the morning of the 16th. The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against PENNY, alias PENELOPE BICKLE, the wife f the deceased, who was apprehended on the Coroner's warrant, and committed to the County Gaol for trial at our next Assizes.

Thursday 7 August 1834, Issue 3591 – Gale Document No. Y3200667254
Exeter, Wednesday 6 August
FATAL ACCIDENT – Early on the afternoon of Saturday last, a fatal accident occurred in this city, from the unlawful and very reprehensible practice of training horses in the streets. WM. BEAL, in the employ of J. Clapp, a trainer of horses, was so engaged in Paris-street, with a spirited animal in a break, when the horse becoming restive broke from all control and dashed off at a furious rate. As it reached the head of this street, near the Old London Inn, a man of the name of GOULD, from the neighbourhood of Aylesbeare, who was crossing it, and it is believed busily engaged in counting the money he had just received in payment for hay or straw, by which he was so absorbed as to be unaware of his danger, was knocked down, and the wheels of the break passing over him, he was so injured, that though removed to the Hospital, death immediately ensued. The vehicle itself was only stopped by the horse coming in contact with the windows and pillars of Messrs. Hayman's Coach Manufactory, and by which Beal was thrown from his seat. On the post mortem examination of the body of GOULD, it was found that a portion of the breast bone had penetrated the heart. An Inquest was taken the same night, before J. Walker, Esq., coroner, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier, and verdict of Manslaughter returned against Beal, who has been committed to prison on the Coroner's warrant.

An Inquest was taken last week in St. Thomas, on the body of JOHN HARWOOD, a chimney-sweep and tinker, which been found in the canal, and there being no evidence as to how he had come by his death, a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 16 October 1834, Issue 3602 – Gale Document No. Y3200667407
Exeter, Wednesday 15 October
On Thursday last, GEORGE HATHERLEY, a loyal, regular Church and King man, whose name has often appeared in print, in attempting to ascend the flight of steps, that lead from the ascent of David's Hill, to the top of the bridge, fell to the ground and was severely injured. He was immediately taken to the Hospital, but medical aid was vain, and on Saturday death put a period to his existence. He was 67 years of age. An Inquest was taken and after much inquiry, a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Between 10 and 11 o'clock on the night of Saturday last an accident fatal in its nature occurred near Duryard, on the Cowley Bridge Road. A man of the name of JOHN HEMMETT who for several years has been the foot post-man from Bow to Crediton, came to this city for the purpose of contracting as a riding post-man in a direction northward from Crediton, in a new arrangement of the Posts in that district which is about to take place. For this purpose he purchased a horse, and, accompanied by another person, was, at the time spoken of, on his return home. Near Duryard they met a one horse fly returning to Exeter, and in some way, which neither by the driver nor his companion can be accounted for, HEMMETT rode directly against the carriage, and with such force as not only to injure, but severely wound the horse, and sent both the animal and its rider over. Poor HEMMETT fell with great force, and it became evident to the driver of the fly, who was not in the slightest degree to blame, but stopped and instantly rendered his assistance, as well as to his companion, that the injury he had sustained was severe. The nearest house was Bowden's New Inn, Cowley Bridge, and the driver of the fly, offered the carriage to convey him hither. Into this they assisted him, and on arriving at Cowley Bridge medical aid was sought. The Gentleman, however, as soon as he saw him, gave it as his opinion that he had not many hours to live, but that no means might be left untried, recommended an immediate removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, to which he was accordingly brought, but expired about 3 o'[clock on Sunday morning. The deceased was 36 years of age, and an Inquest being taken on Monday before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner for this city at Wilcocks Valiant Soldier Inn, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 23 October 1834, Issue 3603 – Gale Document No. Y3200667424
CHARGE OF CHILD MURDER. – On Wednesday last GRACE MERIFIELD, of Wear-Gifford, single woman, was committed to the County Gaol, by Francis Kingdon, Esq. Coroner, charged under the Coroner's Inquest with the wilful murder of her female bastard child, on the 6th instant. The child was found on Monday last in a heap of ashes in the prisoner's house.

Thursday 6 November 1834, Issue 3605 – Gale Document No. Y3200667450
The Late GEORGE HARVEY, F.R.S. - In the discharge of our duties there is nothing more painful to us than the announcement of the deaths of those who have been the ornaments of their generation, and whose attainments confer credit on the age: among these must be reckoned the late GEORGE HARVEY. This gentleman was a native of Plymouth and early in life gave proof of the possession of talents of no ordinary kind, and of great proficiency. As a mathematician he rose t distinguished eminence; indeed, so highly were his abilities estimated that he was appointed one f the Mathematical Masters of the Military Academy at Woolwich, a situation which it appears he had resigned, and returned to Plymouth, where, labouring under aberration of mind, he terminated his existence on Wednesday last, by hanging himself with a silk handkerchief to a hook in the cellar of his residence. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the same day. The son of deceased said that for the last fortnight, from his father's conduct, he had a presentiment that such an occurrence would take place. During that time he appeared very much depressed in spirits; he had an idea that he was a bankrupt, and spoke despondingly of his affairs; he appeared very nervous, and thought the house was watched to arrest him; his bodily health was apparently good, with the exception of the nervousness alluded to. Verdict, "The Jury are of opinion that the deceased committed the act which caused his death when in a state of mental derangement, under which he had been labouring for some months previous."

Thursday 27 November 1834, Issue 3608 – Gale Document No. Y3200667485
Exeter, Wednesday 26 November
On the morning of Wednesday last, in the absence of the mother, who had gone with her husband's dinner, a little boy, between six and seven years of age, son of JAMES WEBBER, jun., a journeyman mason, residing in a Courtlage in Bartholomew Yard, caught his clothes on fire by bringing them in contact with the grate, and was so dreadfully burnt that, although removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where every attention was paid him, he died the following day. An Inquest was taken on the body at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Thursday 29 January 1835, Issue 3617 – Gale Document No. Y3200667613
Discovery of the remains of the Late MR MAYNARD.
It will be in the recollection of our readers, that about six months since, an advertisement appeared, offering a reward of £100, for the apprehension of MR RICHARD MAYNARD, Chief Clerk of the Horrabridge Woollen Factory, who was supposed to have absconded with a large sum of money, the property of his employers Messrs. Gill and Co., of Tavistock. From this time, up to Tuesday last, no trace of him could be discovered further than when last seen he was reading near one of the mines in the neighbourhood. Diligent search was made at the time, and some of the old mining pits explored, in the supposition that he might have fallen or thrown himself into one of them. All however was without success, and the discovery on the morning in question, was a mere accident. Some labourers taking advantage of the fall of snow, were engaged tracing game in Hockworthy wood, about a mile from his late residence, and following a the track of a rabbit, were led into a re[?]ed part of the thicket, where they discovered a skull, the remains of some clothing, and a few scattered bones, evidently the remains of a human body. The alarm having spread, further search was instituted, and it was soon placed beyond a doubt that the remains were those of the late MR MAYNARD. An open razor and a penknife were found near the spot, with which the wretched man, no doubt, committed suicide. Close by the razor, 13 sovereigns, his gold watch and some silver, were picked up, as was also his pocket-book, in which were various letters, one of which was the last written to him by his late employer, Mr Gill, of Fetrum Hill. The body having been discovered by foxes and other wild animals, the bones were dispersed in various directions. A stocking being found at some distance from the other parts of the dress, and the trowsers in parts in another direction, nothing remained but the bones and the property above-named. The remains were carefully collected and taken to Horrabridge, where an Inquest was held by A. B. Bone, Esq. The deceased was 25 years of age, and unmarried.

Thursday 5 March 1835, Issue 3622 – Gale Document No. Y3200667680
Exeter, Wednesday 4 March
On the 24th ult. as John Babb, a young man about 21 years of age, in the service of Mr John Manley, of this city, butcher, was turning the corner by the Valiant Soldier Inn, into Holloway Street, the horse unfortunately knocked down a woman named MARY HOGGIN, 66 years of age, and did her such injury that she died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, Thursday. On the following day an Inquest was taken on the body, before Samuel Walkey, Esq. Coroner, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, when, after an investigation of the circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Babb, who, on the Coroner's warrant was committed. It has been asserted, however, that the jury, though feeling themselves called upon to return this verdict, were yet unanimous, from what appeared to them the extenuating circumstances of the case, in the expression of their hope that these would be considered by the Magistrates, and that Babb would be admitted to bail. And further, that in this the Coroner also concurred. Accordingly, on Monday, Mr George Wm. Turner, solicitor, applied to the Magistrates, for the admission of Babb to bail, stating unexceptionable bail to be ready, if, as he hoped, his request were acceded to. Mr Gidley explained the law upon the subject and reminded Mr Turner, that the Magistrates had nothing in this matter before them, save his application: the proper course, therefore, would be for him to cause the depositions taken on the Inquest to be laid before the Magistrates, from which alone they could judge, how far it would be proper they should take upon themselves the responsibility of admitting to bail on a charge of felony. In this the Magistrates concurred; and being put in possession of the proceedings on the Inquest, Mr Turner will renew his application.
Babb has been 8 or 9 years in the service of Mr Manley, and was exceedingly well spoken of by Mr Manley, as also Mr John Manley, jun. who were present. It is understood that the proceeds of his labour are rendered assistant to the support of a widowed mother, and though it cannot be attempted to justify the rapid riding, as well as driving, that is but too common in the streets of this city, yet in this case it appears Babb pulled up at the instant, himself rendering and exerting himself to procure every assistance for the unfortunate woman: his sorrow being extreme, and riding himself to acquaint those whom she served, with what had occurred.

Thursday 19 March 1835, Issue 3624 – Gale Document No. Y3200667699
An Inquest was held on Monday the 9th day of March inst. at Ashreigney, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of THOS. SMITH CUDMORE, a boy about 9 years of age, and after a post mortem examination it was adjourned to Thursday last, as poison was suspected to have been administered. Mr Roger Kingdon, of Torrington, Mr Wm. Luxton, of Chulmleigh and Mr John Cocks, of High Bickington, deposed that they had analyzed the contents of the stomach, but found no mineral poison therein, & that the contents were too much decomposed to discover whether or not vegetable poison had been taken. Verdict accordingly. The mother of the boy, (GRACE CUDMORE) had been summoned by the Coroner to give evidence touching the death of her son at the adjourned Inquest, but she is supposed to have destroyed herself the preceding day, having attended the funeral of her son on Wednesday last, and shortly afterwards was found drowned in a brook of water close to her residence in Ashreigny. An Inquest was held on her body on Friday last, by the above gentleman, when the Jury, after having retired for five hours and a half, returned a Verdict of "Found Drowned". The neighbouring Magistrates attended the Inquest, the parish being in a state of great excitement.

Thursday 2 April 1835, Issue 3626 – Gale Document No. Y3200667720
Exeter, Wednesday 1 April
Inquest On The Late MR WM. MANNING. On Monday last, a Jury was impannelled, before Samuel Walkey, Esq., Coroner, at Roach's Bull Inn, Goldsmith-street, to enquire into the circumstances attending, and cause of death of MR WM. MANNING, licensed dealer in game, and a waiter, resident in Gandy-street, in this city.
Mr Edwin Williams, surgeon, Paul-street, said, I was sent for about half-past seven on the morning of Saturday last, to visit the deceased. I found him in bed in a state of collapse. I enquired of him how he had been taken; to which he made no reply, but shook his head. I then enquired if he was suffering from pain in his head. Still he made me no answer, but again shook his head. I now requested that he would put out his hand in order that I might feel his pulse; but seeing that he appeared unable to do so, I took hold of his arm, and found the pulsation scarcely perceptible. It immediately occurred to me, from the paralysis of the upper and lower extremities, that some injury must have been done to the spinal chord of the neck; and on examining it, he appeared to be in great pain about the fourth cervical vertebra. I then left him, and in about an hour visited him again, when I found him able to speak. He then told me that on the preceding day he had been attending as waiter at a gentleman's house in this city, from whence he had returned home about three o'clock that morning. He placed his hat and gloves on the table in the kitchen, and was about to go up stairs, when he became giddy, fell down, and had no recollection of what afterwards occurred until he found himself in bed. He now complained of great pain at the part of the next where, when speechless, he had appeared to be so sensibly affected, and I requested the attendance of Mr Barnes and Mr Arscott, to see him; who, after examining him, were of opinion with myself that he could not recover, as he was evidently labouring under symptoms of pressure on the spinal chord in the neck. He lingered from this time, labouring under acute pain at the part already spoken of, but the whole body otherwise palsied, yet perfectly sensible until three o'clock on Sunday afternoon, when he expired.
During the proceedings of the Inquest, the post mortem examination was going on, the result of which our Reporter understood fully confirmed the opinion given by Mr Williams, and concurred in by the other medical gentlemen, as to the cause of MR MANNING'S death, - namely, a fracture of the body of the fourth cervical vertebra, and hence the paralysis of every part of the body which derived its nerves from the spinal chord below that point.
The Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a Verdict of "Accidental Death."
MR MANNING was 45 years of age, much respected, and has left a widow and 5 children to mourn this sudden bereavement.

Thursday 23 April 1835, Issue 3631 – Gale Document No. Y3200667761
Exeter, Wednesday 22 April
On Wednesday last, an Inquest was taken before Samuel Walkey, Esq., one of the Coroners for this city, on the body of a female of the name of SARAH SMITH, who had come to her death in consequence of taking arsenic. The deceased was 18 years of age, the daughter of a superannuated Mail Guard, and for three weeks previous only, had been in the service of Mr John Bucknole, vintner, Paris Street, as maid of all work, having previously lived two years in one place. It appeared that on the previous Monday evening between 8 and 9 o'clock, without the knowledge of her mistress, she left the house, leaving open the front private door, and did not return until half-past ten; for this she was properly reproved, as also it was signified that if more confidence could not be placed in her, she would not be kept after her month was up. This preyed on her mind, and finding arsenic, which was improperly kept in a cupboard, on Tuesday morning she infused a portion of it in cider, and swallowed the dose. As soon as this was known, Mr Land, surgeon, was called in, and the stomach-pump used: and, subsequently, Dr Shapter saw her, but from the time which had elapsed and quantity taken, their efforts failed, the unfortunate female dying about 4 o'clock. Under these circumstances the Jury returned a Verdict, that the deceased came by her death by taking arsenic, while labouring under temporary insanity. The Coroner took opportunity, from what had in this instance again occurred, to call attention to the danger and great impropriety of leaving poisonous articles in situations by which either accident might occur, or the most fatal use by made of them; and desired to impress upon all who heard him the necessity that existed, even if under any circumstances it should become necessary to purchase poison, hat the whole should be instantly used. Here it had been obtained for the purpose of killing rats, and they had heard from Mrs Bucknole that the cupboard in which it was kept, was generally locked: the paper containing it was also labelled, and the deceased could read and write, and yet so sad a catastrophe had followed. The practice was wrong, and ought to be most carefully avoided by every person.

On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before Samuel Walkey, Esq., Coroner, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene Street, in this city, on the body of MR SAMUEL SMALE, of Newton Abbot, a carrier from this city, by way of Newton, to Dartmouth, who had come to his death under the following unfortunate circumstances:- On Saturday morning MR SMALE was on his way to this city, he himself being riding on the front of his cart, and having as passengers in it, two females, (one of them young,) and a boy. In crossing Haldon, the horse tripped and fell, SMALE pulled the reins home in order that the animal might recover its legs, but this being done with a sudden jerk, and the horse not having power sufficient instantly to answer it, poor SMALE himself became the victim of the act, being by the re-0action drawn from his seat, and becoming entangled in the breeching, he was at length thrown with considerable force into the road, pitching heavily on his head. He lay for some minutes insensible, those with him being incompetent to afford assistance, which, through the medium of some travellers, was at length obtained from Kennford. Being placed in his cart, a young man of Kennford drove it to Exeter, where it arrived at his quarters at the Mermaid-yard, Preston-street, about 11 o'clock. He had by this time so far recovered himself, that he assisted in taking the packages from the cart, and for a period declined the advice of those about him, to go to the Hospital, in order that any injury he had sustained might be examined into. At length, however, he became but too sensible that this was the proper course, but even then was enabled to walk to the Hospital. From this time, however, the approach of the final catastrophe was rapid, he became senseless and expired about 7 o'clock in the evening. On the post mortem examination an extensive fracture of the skull was found; the brain had sustained considerable injury, and an extravasation of blood taken place, and the jury having heard the evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." MR SMALE was 42 years of age, son of the late MR SAMUEL SMALE, of Newton Abbot, a family for many years engaged as carriers between this city, Newton, Totnes, Torquay, Paignton, Brixham, and Dartmouth; he was unmarried, and, in his situation in life, much respected. His remains were removed from this city to Newton, on Monday afternoon and interred yesterday.

Thursday 30 April 1835, Issue 3632 – Gale Document No. Y3200667781
An Inquest was last week taken at Barnstaple, before Thomas Copper, Esq., one of the coroners for Devon, on the body of MR J. D. FROST, a mercantile traveller for his father, MR FROST, a respectable factor of Birmingham, who had arrived at the Fortescue Arms in that town, by the Nimrod Plymouth coach on the preceding evening, in a state of great exhaustion. He was immediately put to bed, every care taken, and medical aid called in, but in about an hour he breathed his last. On the post mortem examination, it was found the liver had been consumed by disease, and the Jury returned a Verdict of Died by the Visitation of God. It is not a little remarkable that the elder brother of the deceased died while on his journey, at Bideford, about 3 years ago, and his remains have been interred by the side of those of his brother, at Bideford.

Thursday 7 May 1835, Issue 3633 – Gale Document No. Y3200667795
An Inquest was held on the 24th ult., at Hartland, by H. A. Vallack, Esq. Coroner, on the body of RICHARD CHING, a respectable farmer of Clovelly, who was found dead in the turnpike-road – Verdict, Found Dead. The deceased had been to Hartland fair, and it is supposed he fell from his horse on his return home, as he had drank very freely at Hartland.

Thursday 18 June 1835, Issue 3639 – Gale Document No. Y3200667876
Exeter, Wednesday 17 June
On Monday evening JOHN TAYLOR, a youth about 16 years of age, son of MR JOHN TAYLOR, one of the Serjeants at Mace in this city, and an apprentice to Messrs. Hayman, Coachmakers, went with others to bathe, at Sandy Point, a part of the river Exe, above the city, and nearly parallel with the suburbs on the Crediton road: Though it appears but an indifferent swimmer, he reached the opposite bank of the river, and, with a youthful companion on either side, was on his return, when unfortunately he struck into a part where from the inequality of the bottom the water is of far more than the ordinary depth. He appeared instantly to become sensible of this, and not improbably lost his self confidence, as the effect was visible to those who were with him, and who in the buoyancy of youth endeavoured to cheer him by each taking him by the hand, and saying, "don't be afraid." Whether from some sudden affection of the system, however, or the effect of terror merely, which can now never be known, he appeared bereft of all power of muscular exertion, and his young friends not being possessed of strength sufficient to support him, he sank. Unfortunately among those on the banks, no one who was able to swim was of an age to give them strength to bring him out, consequently all their generous and hazardous efforts to this end failed of success, and he lay until Wm. Stuckes, the eldest son of Mr John Stuckes, builder, David's-hill, a powerful young man, who heard of the accident in this city, and has before most meritoriously distinguished himself in this way, with all the speed he was capable of using, arrived at the spot. He instantly dived and brought the poor boy out, he had, however, now been 37 minutes in the water, and was to all appearance dead: still, not deterred, he continued to lend the most active assistance in conveying the body to Tarrant's Red Cow Inn, where every attention was given to it, while Howard, the brother officer of poor TAYLOR'S father, ran into the city for medical aid. This was promptly afforded by Mr Webb, (Johnson and Webb, surgeons,) but whose efforts, from the length of time the body had lain in the water, were of no avail. On Tuesday an Inquest was taken on the body at Tarrant's, by S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday 2 July 1835, Issue 3641 – Gale Document No. Y3200667903
An Inquest was held on Thursday last by James Partridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES RICHARDS, of East Mare, near Tiverton, aged 64, and very def, found dead in the public road, near Chevythorne, having been rode over and dreadfully mangled, by some one of those reckless rapid riders, who so often endanger the lives of foot passengers. A verdict of manslaughter is recorded against ---Palmer, of Ashbrittle, and --- Sweet, two young farmers, who were seen riding very hard just before the body was found.

Thursday 9 July 1835, Issue 3642 – Gale Document No. Y3200667913
MURDER AND ATTEMPT AT SUICIDE - On Sunday last, the inhabitants of Plymouth were thrown into a state of excitement, by a very appalling occurrence. A man named HONEY, a professor of music, who resides in King Street, and who had been absent from his house for two or three days preceding, came home and while dressing, a violent quarrel ensued between him and his wife, and while in the act of shaving, he became highly exasperated and cut his wife's throat with his razor, and immediately after swallowed the contents of a phial of laudanum: the poor woman ran into the street, but was at once brought again into the house by some neighbours, who sent directly for a medical gentleman, who could do nothing for her, the wound being of so fearful a description that she expired within a few minutes. The stomach pump was then used for the husband and a great portion of the laudanum extracted which prevented its having the intended effect. A Coroner's Jury was summoned the same day to inquire into the whole of the circumstances connected with the death of the deceased, before __ Squire, Esq., Coroner for Plymouth, at the Coach and Horses, King Street, (afterwards adjourned to the Workhouse, when after a long and patient investigation, and repeated adjournments, the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder," at about five o'clock yesterday (Tuesday) evening; and the prisoner was committed to take his trial at the next County Assizes.

CORONER'S INQUEST – On Saturday last an inquest was taken before James Partridge, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at the Horse and Groom public-house, Upton Pyne, on the body of Wm. HOSGOOD, who had been found dead in that parish, on the preceding Thursday evening. The deceased was 31 years of age, and eldest son of MR HOSGOOD of the Thorverton Stone Quarry. He left home on Thursday afternoon, with intention of visiting some friends near Pynes, taking with him, as was generally his custom, his double-barrel gun. He has always taken a great delight in field exercise, and was a keen sportsman. In passing through Upton Pyne, he stopped at the Horse and groom, and paid Mrs Pitts, the landlady, £6 for a tub of cider, and during the time he remained, drank two glasses of gin and water; he then proceeded on his way, and not long after, some persons near, observed a smoke to arise from a field on the Oakford estate, and a rick of hay having recently been put together, it was imagine some accident had occurred to that. On coming to the spot, however, they found it to proceed from some part of the cloathing of MR HOSGOOD, which was on fire. He was lying dead in a field tilled to Barley, of about 4 acres, through which was a footpath leading from Upton Pyne to Exeter; his gun was by him, and it is said, a hare was in his pocket. It is imagined he came by his death in the following manner, - that on his attention being roused by the appearance of game, he cocked both barrels, in order to be ready if the first shot missed. The first, however, probably was successful, when, as is a too common but very dangerous custom, he leaned on the gun, looking out for a second shot. While in this position with the gun perpendicular before him, it would seem that some part of the cock caught in his clothing, and caused an immediate explosion, as the charge entered about the mouth and came out at the back part of the head, and his death must have been instantaneous. The fire from the pin ignited the clothing, and hence the prompt discovery of his body already stated. The Jury, after obtaining all the evidence that was possible in the case, returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 23 July 1835, Issue 3644 – Gale Document No. Y3200667994
Exeter, Wednesday 22 July
Dreadful Murder.
It is our painful duty this week to record the death of a respectable individual under circumstances most appalling to our nature. In this county in modern times it almost stands without a parallel; such a disruption of the peace of society has rarely presented itself, seldom – very seldom indeed has any thing so dreadful occurred here. It has usually happened that when the fearful cry of murder has broke upon the ear, still there have been attendant circumstances though not mitigatory in their character as regarded the act itself, yet have offered themselves in a manner extenuating for our common nature, inasmuch as the deed has been the result of passion, and accompanied with features of irritation that have lamentably caused reason to break from all control. But here is a murder with all the horrifying and blackening circumstances of the crime, cook – premeditated, and, assassin like, effected under the darkness and during the silence of the night, and with a degree of savage ferocity, the very thought of which causes the heart to sicken, whilst it also humiliates us to the dusts. Such is the character of the tale of barbarity we have to unfold, in stating the circumstances attendant upon the murder of MR JONATHAN MAY, within a mile of the town of Moretonhampstead, in this county, on the night of Thursday last, the 16th instant. On this day a considerable Fair for the sale of Cattle and Sheep, had been held in the town of Moretonhampstead, situate about 12 miles S. W. of this city, which MR MAY had attended on business, as also that he was a native of that parish, but now resided at Sowton Barton, a farm on the eastern side of the adjoining parish of Dunsford, and about 7 miles in the direction of this city, from Moreton. MR MAY was a man of considerable property as an Agriculturist, and large dealings, and from this it is not improbable an inference was drawn that he was likely to have a weighty purse, as respected its amount, with him. On his way home he passed the turnpike at the end of Moreton town, about ten o'clock. He was quite sober, many persons having seen and spoken to him as he left. After a short descent, the road rises for a considerable distance, and it was in ascending this hill, short of a mile from the town, in the public road, new, and as regards its fences, quite open, indeed, any thing rather than a secluded spot, that he was attacked. This also could not have exceeded ten minutes from the time of his passing the turnpike. MR MAY had no weapon of defence save a slight rod, but he was a tall and powerful man, and the fatal spot and ground around still bears bloody testimony to the firmness of his resistance. This also would appear from the state of his clothing, which was nearly rent in pieces: his shirt was very much broken, and the frill at the breast town off and laying on the ground, completely saturated with blood: the marks of a bloody hand were also about the shirt, as well as his breeches, apparently as if the villain or villains had been grasping for his watch, which was taken, and both his pockets turned inside out. It would also appear that two distinct attacks were made upon this unfortunate man: that having robbed and severely beaten him, from some circumstances or other that occurred, either that of being known to and recognised by him, or suspicious that such was the case, the villains returned to their victim, determined to act upon the infernal principle that "dead men tell no tales," and to use a slang phrase, to "finish him.". The reasons for this inference are that it is scarcely possible the frill of the shirt had been torn off in the first scuffle, it could have become so completely dyed in blood: in favour of this hypothesis also, the state of the road on the following morning, clearly showed that MR MAY received the last and fatal blows 30 or 40 paces nearer Moreton than where he was first attacked, and this distance there can be little doubt he either crawled or rambled. Near where his body was found, a stick also was discovered, about three feet in length, covered with blood, and broken about five inches from the smaller end. This stick is about the size of a man's thumb, it is of ash, without any rind, and there are appearances on the larger end of it as if it had been struck or grazed upon the ground, probably by striking the ground with force, when the assassin missed his aim in blows intended for poor MR MAY'S head. It is hoped this stick may go a material way in the discovery of the murderers: indeed, it has afforded a clue already which is actively following up. All persons acquainted with the situation of the place appear satisfied there were at least two persons engaged in this murder, the probabilities are that there were more, and this opinion is justified as well by the circumstance of time as of place. The time could not have exceeded 10 minutes or, at the farthest, a quarter past 10 o'clock: this was comparatively an early hour scarcely out of sight of the town: on a great public thoroughfare, with persons frequently returning in that direction from the Fair. Under circumstances like these, nothing comes so much within the range of probability as that he was a marked man before he quitted the town, and that besides the actual perpetrators of the cruel deed, accomplices were watching both above and below on the road, in order to give notice of the approach of persons by which in their work of blood, they would be interrupted. And then as to the number immediately concerned in the atrocious act, there must have been another bludgeon of larger dimensions used then the stick that has been found, or some instrument equally capable of breaking the skull, which was much fractured, especially on the back part. In the Fair also that day, had been many suspicious characters. Then their bloody purpose was completed, they either threw, or MR MAY fell on the road side, the horse, as we understand it, retrograding and grazing up an old and unfrequented piece of road. From this it was that though thus maltreated so early as quarter past ten o'clock, he was not discovered until one o'clock on the following morning, when Farmer Avery, otherwise Taverner, who resides at Harcot, by the road side, about a quarter of a mile further on than where MR MAY lay, passed by, and seeing a man lying, went to him, and found who it was, as also the great injuries inflicted on him. It has since come out that several persons passed in the interim, but seeing a man lying against the hedge, they supposed him to be intoxicated, and, without further examination, proceeded on. In corroboration also of the opinion that previous to his leaving the town, he was supposed to have money, and was a marked man, it appears that a Mr Loveys passed the place not long before MR MAY, and there saw two men waiting in the road, who came near, looked at him, and then drew off and separated, permitting Mr Loveys to ride between them. He was much alarmed and moved on at a brisk pace, being convinced they were on the look out for prey.
Farmer Avery immediately gave an alarm and got assistance, and the senseless victim was borne back to Mrs Cann's, the White Hart Inn, in Moreton. Here he received very medical attention, and we understand Mr Barnes went out from this city, but the fractures of the skull were so extensive as to put it out of human power to aid him, and, without having spoken, he expired at a quarter to 9 o'clock on that (Friday) evening.
It seems probable that the murderers were disappointed as to the amount of plunder, as although some time since it was a practice with MR MAY to carry cash with him, he has latterly carried with him a cheque-book, and effected his purchases by cheques on the General Bank, in this city, and from the circumstance of two Five Pound Notes being found in a breast pocket inside his waistcoat, it is hoped and expected he had not much money in his pockets which were turned inside out. As well as his watch, his pocket book is gone, and with it a cheque for £26 odd, paid him in the course of the day by Mr Thos. White, tanner, at Moreton. This, however, is of no use to the murderers, payment of it being stopped.
This horrid murder was heard of with feelings of sympathy and astonishment throughout the district, and the Rev. Mr Gregory, of Dunsford, a Magistrate, instantly took such steps and intituted such proceedings as we hope may eventually lead to the detection and punishment of the perpetrators. In these also the Rev. Magistrate has received most valuable assistance from Mr M. W. Harvey, Solicitor, at Moreton; and the consequence was the taking into custody of GEORGE AVERY, otherwise TAVERNER, a most powerful man, well known in the Wrestling Ring, and a native of that district; as also of ELIZABETH HARRIS, a female with whom he cohabited, on circumstances of suspicion, and they were, about 9 o'clock the same evening, lodged for safe custody in the County Gaol. On the death of MR MAY, a messenger was also dispatched to Mr Gribble, Coroner for that district of the county, who resides at Ashburton, and, at the time of the arrival of the messenger was engaged in taking an Inquest at Kingsbridge, many miles further South.
As an unavoidable result of this, Mr Gribble was unable to reach Moreton until Sunday morning between 9 and 10 o'clock, when he forthwith impannelled a most respectable Jury at the White Hart Inn, and the examinations consequent on the Inquest were proceeded on. Mr John Ponsford, and Mr Alfred Puddicombe, surgeons at Moreton, deposed to the state of the deceased, their evidence being in substance, that having opened the head, they found at its backer part a most extensive fracture of the skull, caused by a blow or blows from a bludgeon, and sufficient to cause death. The examinations of various witnesses were continued to 5 o'clock in the afternoon, the Rev. Mr Gregory, assisted by Mr Harvey sitting in another room, collecting and arranging the evidence for the Coroner's Jury, but a detailed statement of which, it must be obvious, at the present moment it would be highly improper to publish. Suffice it, therefore, that the reader is put in possession of every fact relative to the horrid deed itself, which, except from the murderers themselves or their accomplices, can be known. At 5 o'clock, then, on Sunday afternoon, the Coroner adjourned the Inquest to Tuesday (yesterday) morning; and, from what had come out, the Rev. Mr Gregory issued warrants against certain parties, as to whom strong suspicions are entertained, with which two persons were despatched to this city, where they arrived about 8 o'clock. Mr Crockett, a city Magistrate, residing immediately within side the Bridge, was naturally the first applied to, the co-o0peration of the city Magistrates being requested by Mr Gregory: this was instantly afforded, and the police of the city, as well as of St. Thomas, placed upon the alert, the result of which was Nurton and Ginham's taking into custody, at a low lodging-house in this city, Richard Prichard, Andrew Carpenter, and Elizabeth Weeks, who were lodged for the night in the City Prison and Back Grate. On the person of Carpenter, a wandering vagabond, were found sixteen sovereigns. On Monday morning, those, under charge of Taylor and Ginham, were taken to Moreton, from which place these officers returned in the course of the afternoon, and from information obtained, our police, at a lodging house in the Butcherow, took into custody Wm. Simpson, and Elizabeth Simpson, who were lodged in the City Gaol; Taylor and Ginham immediately setting off southward, and on Tuesday morning Elizabeth Simpson was taken to Moreton, where the proceedings on the Inquest were again resumed.
On Monday also, Mr Harvey, acting under the instructions of the friends of the deceased, caused the issuing bills offering One Hundred Pounds reward for the discovery of the murders this being to be paid to any accomplice or accomplices, not actually the person or persons who committed the said murder.
MR MAY was in his 49th year, and a bachelor, though it is understood, about shortly to be married to a lady near Tiverton. He has left a will, the contents of which, of course were unknown on Sunday: - one brother, and two nephews, sons of his deceased eldest brother who died at Whitstone. His remains were interred at Dunsford, yesterday (Tuesday) forenoon.
Moreton – Tuesday. - The Jury reassembled this afternoon at 2 o'clock, and the examination of a variety of evidence was proceeded with until last in the evening, when the Coroner summed up, and, at half-past 10 o'clock, the jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against some person or persons to the jurors unknown." Though, however, no other verdict could have been returned, still have these enquiries been of the greatest use, and we know will be perseveringly followed up by the Magistracy and the inhabitants, and we trust will at length be crowned with success in the development of proof, and punishment of the offenders. At ten o'clock last night, Mr Gregory remanded Prichard, carpenter, and the woman Weeks, to the County Gaol, (where they arrived about 2 o'clock, this morning, for further examination on Monday next. And about noon this day, under charge of Taylor and Ginham, (who have not rested since first engaged in the unravelling this horrid business,) and also under directions of Mr Gregory, William Simson, and Arthur Perdew, said to be a wrestler, have been brought in and are lodged in the County Gaol.
Avery and Harris were to have been further examined before the Magistrates of the Division this day, at the County Gaol, but at the time of our going to Press, the Magistrates had not assembled.

FORGERY AND SUICIDE AT NEWTON.
On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, Newton, on the body of WILLIAM LLOYD, who came by his death under the following circumstances, as deposed by the witnesses:-
JOHN BEAZLEY, of the Globe Inn, stated that on Thursday last, he received a letter by post, purporting to come from Lord Southampton, the contents of which were to the effect, that Lord Southampton and family would be in Newton in about a week, and requested Mr Beazley to provide him with two sitting-rooms and four bed-rooms; that he was coming on a fishing excursion, and enclosed a bill of £19 8s. 0d., which Mr Beazley was requested to get cashed and hand the money to his Butler would be at the house in three or four days, assigning as a reason for not sending the money, his being in Exeter, and too late for the Bank and anxious to proceed to Plymouth that night. The letter was signed "Southampton". The Bill was drawn on Messrs Coutts and Co., and accepted by Lord Southampton's son, Lord Fitzroy, and made payable to him or bearer. On Sunday evening about 9 o'clock an individual calling himself Wm. Miles, called at Mr Beazleys, and enquired if Lord Southampton's family were staying there. He stated himself to be the Butler of Lord Fitzroy, and being answered in the negative, he made a great many enquiries and asked if any money had been sent there for him, to which Mr Beazley replied that he had received a letter and bill, which he considered to be forgeries, and refused to pay him. The individual told a most plausible story, and said that he then came from Torquay having arrived there the night previous in a steamer. He remained the night at Mr Beazley's, precautions having been taken to prevent his escape. The next morning he was taken into custody, but, Geo. Templer, Esq., magistrate of the Newton district, refused to commit him till the next day, when he should be enabled to get some evidence. He appeared perfectly composed and repeated several times during the day that his master would arrive on Wednesday. During the day the Rev. T. Whipham recognised the man, as having been at one time the servant of Capt. Reed, of Dawlish. In the evening he attempted to make his escape, but the constable after a short time secured him. Capt. Reed was sent for on the Tuesday morning, the man saw him from the window and exclaimed to the constable, a little surprised, "Oh, my old Master and Mistress are come." Capt. Reed's servant, who knew him, then came into the room and after talking with him a minute or two, appearing a little agitated in body, though perfectly composed in mind, he said "this beer annoys me, I want to go into the yard." (he had just been taking some beer and bread and cheese,) he walked into the court and immediately destroyed himself by discharging a pistol at his head.
Ebenezer Mutherell, constable, said the man appeared to him, during the whole time of his being in custody to be in a perfectly sane state of mind; he conceived he must had hid the pistol under his pillow on the Monday night, as he took his clothes from him and there was no pistol then in his possession, there was little powder found on his person after his death inside his flannel waistcoat.
Some other unimportant witnesses were then examined, the surgeon who was called in &c., who, however, gave no fresh evidence as to the state of his mind. The Jury consulted but could not agree as to the verdict, seven of them being for "felo de se," and six for "died in a moment of insanity." The Coroner told them they must endeavour to decide on the evidence they had heard, and he must consequently lock them up till they came to a decision. They were locked up between 3 and 4 hours, when the Coroner informed them he had adjourned the Inquest till Friday, when he would endeavour to get fresh evidence.
Friday - Today, many fresh witnesses were examined but all but one (his wife) knew little of his state of mind previously to his destroying himself, other wise than not perceiving anything unusual in his appearance.
His wife stated that he had appeared unhappy of late, owing as she supposed, to having lost his character, he seldom came home till 2 or 3 o'clock in the morning, had seen him with a pistol some time before, he was accustomed to drink much, but had not seen him of late in a state of intoxication, she did not consider him to have been in his right senses for the last month or so.
Capt. Reed stated he had lived with him, but he discharged him for drunkenness, he had always found him an excellent servant in every other respect, had never remarked the slightest symptoms of alienation of mind. The Jury consulted for about an hour, when they returned a verdict that the deceased "came by his death in a moment of Insanity."

Thursday 13 August 1835, Issue 3647 – Gale Document No. Y3200667983
Exeter, Wednesday 12 August
A very sad and distressing accident occurred last evening at the gardens of MR CHARLES SCLATER, Summerlands, on the Heavitree-road, in this city. JULIA, one of his daughters, a little girl about 5 years old, while playing in the garden, unfortunately fell into a well 14 feet deep. The accident was seen, but no proper means being at hand for her rescue, about half an hour elapsed before she was got out, when life had become extinct. An Inquest has this afternoon been taken on the body at Hillier's Axminster Inn, Paris Street, and a verdict returned accordingly.

On the evening of Friday last, a young man, named WM. LETHABY, 21 years of age, son of a widow residing in a Courtlage in North-street in this city, was drowned while bathing at Head Weir, and at the Inquest a Verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Yesterday morning, as a man named PETER WAY, in the employ of Mr Charles Smith, bricklayer, in this city, was at work on the Friars, engaged in loading a cart with sand, he burst a blood vessel, and expired in about ten minutes. The deceased was 50 years of age, and, at the Inquest, held at Badcock's Custom House Inn, near the Quay, the same evening, a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God was returned.

Thursday 27 August 1835, Issue 3649 – Gale Document No. Y3200668007
Coroner's Inquest - On Monday last an Inquest was taken at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, before John Gidley, Esq., one of the Coroners for Exeter, on the body of RICHARD SANDERS, who had been brought to that institution on the preceding Saturday, from Powderham, with severe injury of the right arm, and died the same evening. Ezekiel Phillips is in the employ of Mr Wm. Beal, of Powderham Mills. I knew the deceased RICHARD SANDERS; he was employed in Mr Beal's mill as an assistant under me. On Saturday morning last, the 22nd inst., about a quarter past 8, I told him to soap the cogs of the mill that was still; that mill had not been at work for the morning. I was busy grinding grists about ten minutes after, and heard a jerk between the gear or stones of the mill that was at work; I went to the ladder which was two or three steps from the mill trough where I was standing and cast my eye upon the mill-bed, but saw nothing there I then looked between the ladder which commanded a view of the two pit-wheels, and there saw the deceased in the act of rising; he came out before I had power to go to him, and said to me, oh! Ezekiel, I'm afraid I've broke my arm. I replied, poor fellow, you have broke your arm sure enough. I then held him across the upper part of his right arm which remained sound, and led him across the mill, and called for assistance. I remained with him until Mr Bastin, a surgeon, came; then I left him in the care of the people in the house: he bled a great deal in coming across the mill. I believed the accident happened as follows:- The deceased was applying the grey-soap to the fly-wheel and the stone nut of the fly-wheel caught his fingers and broke his arm, by drawing it in between the fly wheel and the stone.
Edward John Parker Pridham, Pupil of Samuel Barnes, Esq., of Exeter, Surgeon, was at the Devon and Exeter Hospital when the deceased was brought in, between 12 and 1 o'clock in the day, on Saturday last. I was present when he was examined, and assisted in the examination: his right arm was very much torn, and the arm bone and elbow joint were fractured. There was a tourniquet on, and the deceased was very faint. Mr Barnes saw him about 2 o'clock, and about ½ past 3 amputated the arm. In the mean time the deceased had ammonia, laudanum, and wine administered to him for the purpose of producing re-action, and we also applied bottles of warm water to his feet, but he did not revive at all, and died about 6 o'clock. I think his death was caused by the loss of blood occasioned by the injury which he sustained. Mr Gidley summed up the evidence, and the jury returned a Verdict of Accidental Death.

Suicide - Last week, at Irishcombe, in the parish of Lapford, MR JAMES DOWNEY, yeoman, was found in his barn, suspended by a rope from the beam. An Inquest was held before James Partridge, Esq., Coroner, of Tiverton, and a verdict of felo de se returned. The body was interred on Saturday night about 10 o'clock, in a remote corner of the church-yard of Rose Ash.

Thursday 3 September 1835, Issue 3650 – Gale Document No. Y3200668022
On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before J Gidley, Esq., one of the Coroners for this city, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of MARY ANN THOMAS, between 6 and 7 years of age, and daughter of a labouring man in the parish of Topsham, whose death had been occasioned by her clothes accidentally catching fire, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 22 October 1835, Issue 3657 – Gale Document No. Y3200668121
An Inquest took place at Southmolton last week, before W. Hole, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN MARSHALL, hatter, who was found dead in his bed the preceding Saturday night, about half past eleven o'clock. He had attended the market in the course of the day, where he was in the habit of keeping a standing with hats. Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 5 November 1835, Issue 3659 – Gale Document No. Y3200668144
On Saturday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held at Crediton, on the body of MR GEORGE SAVAGE, who had lately laboured under mental derangement: he was discovered to have left his bed about midnight on Thursday last, and on search being made for him, his coat and neckerchief were found near the well, into which it was found he had thrown himself. He was extricated as quickly as circumstances would admit, but was quite dead. Verdict – Temporary Insanity. The deceased was well known in this neighbourhood as Sub-Surveyor of the Exeter Turnpike Roads, in the execution of which office he has been always very indefatigable.

Thursday 26 November 1835, Issue 3662 – Gale Document No. Y3200668180
At Sidmouth, a child, 3 years old, of the name of EBDON, having been left with a sister, while the parents were at church, was so much burnt that death ensued on the following morning, and, on the Inquest, a verdict was returned accordingly.

An Inquest has been taken at Mary Church, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of a female bastard child of ELIZABETH BUCKINGHAM, recently engaged in service in that place. From the evidence it was learnt that the mother of the child went into the service of Mrs Fox, lady of Major Fox, on the evening of Thursday the 5th inst., and on the following morning, being called up by her mistress, appeared very unwell. She was questioned, and in reply, complained of violet head-ache; appearances, however, causing suspicion, she was charged by one of the servants with having had a child, and confessed she had miscarried. Upon this a surgeon was sent for, to whom she made a similar statement; but her answers not being satisfactory, her bed-room was searched, and the body of a full grown female infant found tied up in a cotton handkerchief, and concealed in a large bundle of wearing apparel she had brought with her. An examination of the infant was made by Mr Blackaller, surgeon, Torquay, and Mr Appleton, surgeon, Mary Church, who gave a very elaborate and minute detail of the appearance, external and internal, drawing the inference that the child had been born alive, and that the cause of its death was an extensive fracture of the right parietal bone of the head. A verdict of wilful murder was returned, and the coroner's warrant issued for her committal to the County Gaol, as soon as in a state to be removed.

Thursday 10 December 1835, Issue 3664 – Gale Document No. Y3200668203
On the 30th ult. an Inquest was taken before T. Copner, Esq., at Ilfracombe, on the body of JAMES CLOGG, aged 86, who, as he was going up stairs on the preceding evening, fell back and expired instantly; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Last week an Inquest was taken before T. Colby, Esq., Major of Torrington, on the body of an infant child of a carpenter named SAME; when it came out that it being wanted to get the child to sleep, its grandmother administered an over doe of some soporific, which sent it to sleep so effectually as never to require a repetition of such maternal kindness more, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 17 December 1835, Issue 3665 – Gale Document No. Y3200668218
Exeter, Wednesday 16 December
On Friday last, a Jury assembled before S. Walkey, Esq., Coroner, at Castle's Black Dog Inn, North-street, in this city, in order to enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of an infant six weeks old, of the name of JOHN PERKINS. The mother of this infant resided in an upper room with many other persons, herded together in a most singular manner, and sleep0ing on rags and straw, on the floor, in a large house in Bartholomew-street (North). She is a native of this city, about 40 years of age, of the name of NANCY 9or as she was more commonly called) NANCE PERKINS, and has many relatives still living in it. Her countenance is peculiar, and from her childhood she has been a person of weak intellect. A few years ago, however, she married a labouring man of the name of PERKINS, who settlement is in North Bovey, which of course, became that of his wife also. By this man she had children, one of whom, a girl about 9 years of age, survives, but the husband deserted her about 7 years since, and the child whose death was the subject of this enquiry, was illegitimate. The means of living of the mother have been of the most scanty and precarious kind, derived chiefly from assisting in the removal of goods on market days, and her food little other than bread and tea. Her not applying for relief having arisen from a dread of being removed to a parish where she was a stranger, and during her confinement and since, she had been destitute of necessaries. The evidence of a female named Clap, an inmate of the same room, was that she had frequently been in the habit of giving the child food because it had not sufficient, nor did she think that what she was able to give it in aid was sufficient nourishment. PERKINS is a stupid and dull woman: she had often advised her to apply for relief, but she refused to do so because she would not go into the workhouse. She was certainly in great distress, and, on her oath, she (Clapp) believed the child died of want. Before the death of the child, the mother applied, through another person, to the proper officer of the city, for relief, but it was refused, on the ground, as she believed, of the mother's refusal to go to her parish or the workhouse: she was an obstinate woman and would go to neither. This female appeared to have acted with the greatest kindness and humanity towards both mother and child. As had also Mrs Tuckett, living near, who no sooner herd of the case of distress, then she went instantly to the wretched abode, and anxiously lent herself as well by personal assistance as administering proper and nutritive sustenance, to the recovery of the child, but it was too late. Mr J. Tucker, Surgeon, also, as soon as he heard of the circumstance, went immediately to the place, and directed both for mother and children, all such things as were required. Acts as to all these persons that require no comment. The daughter, by her husband, was presented to the Coroner and Jury, and appeared to be half starved. A liberal subscription was made by these for their relief, and being feelingly addressed by Mr Walkey, the wretched mother consented to be placed in the care of the proper authorities, in order that she and her daughter might be taken to the workhouse.
A discussion took place between the Jury on the question that application had been made to the officer of the Poor in this city, for relief, before the death of the child, and that he declined to grant relief, and did not send to enquire in the case, and the Coroner, from this, deeming a post mortem examination necessary, in order that the real cause of death might be ascertained, adjourned the Inquest to the following day; requesting Mr Tucker, in the interim, to make the necessary examination of the body.
Saturday - On this day, the Jury re-assembled, and having heard the evidence of Mr Tucker, which was given with minuteness, and the summing up of the Coroner, consulted together and returned the following Verdict, "Died of Inflammation of the Lungs accelerated by the want of proper nourishment; and it is the unanimous opinion of this Jury that a severe censure should be passed on the Sub-Treasurer of the Poor of this city, in refusing assistance to the mother and child when an application was made to him in their behalf."
This verdict the coroner declined to record, as considering the latter part work of supererogation. The Jury, however, declined to alter the terms of their verdict, desiring to remind him that they could suffer nothing like dictation, it was they who were called on their oaths to return a verdict according to the evidence, and not him, whose duty was merely ministerial, to expound the law: to legally assist in the elucidation of the facts; to record the verdict of the Jury; and to act upon it, in his character of Coroner, if further proceedings were necessary.

Thursday 24 December 1835, Issue 3666 – Gale Document No. Y3200668234
Inquests were taken last week before H. A. Vallack, Esq. Coroner, on the body of RACHEL SALTERN, found dead in her bed at High Bickington;

and at Northtawton, on the body of JOHN WEBBER, who arose in the morning in apparent good health, and having lighted his fire, sat down to put on his boots, when he fell from off the seat, and instantly expired.
Verdict in both cases, Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 3 March 1836, Issue 3676 – Gale Document No. Y3200668380
A female child, named COLE, was by accident scalded to death a few days since at Dartmouth. A Coroner's Inquest was held and a verdict returned accordingly.

Thursday 10 March 1836, Issue 3677 – Gale Document No. Y3200668397
Exeter, Wednesday 9 March
Coroner's Inquests - Monday last, an Inquest was taken before Samuel Walkey, Esq., Coroner, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen Street, in this city, on the body of ELIZABETH COMMINS, about 80 years of age, of the parish of Whitstone, who being troubled with fits, on the preceding Thursday, while labouring under attack of this kind fell into the fire. On being extricated she was immediately removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but expired on Saturday. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Case of Suicide - On the morning of Friday last, immediately after taking his breakfast HENRY HUMPHREYS, bout 30 years of age, a farm servant to Mr R. Gibbings, Higher Brenton, Exminster, repaired to a hay-loft and hung himself. The deceased had always preserved a good character, and it was understood, at Lady-day, was about to be married to a female servant in his master's house, with whom, at a relative's, and by permission of his master the preceding evening had been spent. No cause is known for the commission of this rash act, and immediately on its being discovered, Mr Calder, surgeon, Alphington, was called in, but whose efforts for his restoration were ineffectual, life being extinct. An Inquest was taken on the body on Saturday, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, when the jury returned a verdict of Insanity. The deceased had lived with Mr Gibbings about 3 years, and was a man of very steady and sober habits.

A man named WRENTMORE, who had, we learn, at one time moved in a respectable sphere of life, cut his throat on the night of Sunday last, in his bed room, at a road side public-house, kept by W. Bond, between Ashburton and Chudleigh. The deceased was about to run an Omnibus between Plymouth and Exeter.

Thursday 5 May 1836, Issue 3685 – Gale Document No. Y3200668504
Exeter, Wednesday 4 May
CALAMITOUS FIRE AND LOSS OF HUMAN LIFE.
A fire more calamitous and distressing in its attendant circumstances than any that has for a long period occurred here, broke out yesterday (Tuesday) morning, in Cowick-Street, St. Thomas, adjoining this city. About half-past eight o'clock in the morning, it was discovered that the kitchen chimney of MR CHARLES TUCKETT, who has lately taken possession of a beer-house and bake-house there, was on fire. This, however, excited nothing more than an ordinary share of attention, and was supposed to be extinguished. Adjoining this beer and bake-house on the West, or in the direction towards the Church, were many small houses filling up the space between that and a lane which runs South from Cowick-Street and communicates with the Church-fields; these houses were entirely covered with thatch, while TUCKETT'S is nearly a new house with a brick front and covered with slate. About 9 o'clock, smoke was discovered issuing from the thatch of those houses that ran parallel with TUCKETT'S and fronted the street. The alarm now became general, and messengers were dispatched into the city, in order to the assistance of the engines from the different fire offices, and those of the West of England, Norwich Union, and Sun, were ordered to the spot. Unfortunately, however, the wind blew strong from the north, and the whole mass from the front to the street, to the Church-fields, consisting of sixteen small houses, besides out-houses and appendages to the several premises, as also part of the back premises of TUCKETT, became like the glowing oven and spite of all efforts, are entirely destroyed. The distress of the inhabitants, - and they were all poor, was great beyond description, the rapid spreading of the flames giving no time for the preservation of their little property, while what was snatched from the devouring element is in a broken and damaged state. But now comes the most heart rending part of the tale. Among the inhabitants of these houses were a widow woman of the name of ELIZABETH WESTERN, about 50 years of age, with four children, two of them living with her, and one of these a cripple; and a person of the name of TOWNSEND, between 40 and 50 years of age, the wife of a joiner, who has also children, some of whom are young. The first of these had got her children out of her house, and saved portions of her furniture, but naturally anxious still to preserve more from the wreck, she returned once too often into the burning pile, and lamentable to relate, perished in the flames; her mutilated remains (only to be identified by a fragment of a cotton gown such as she was known to have worn,) being, after considerable search, dug from the ruins. The right arm was entirely gone, as were both the feet, and part of the left leg. On the left side there was some portion of the bone of the arm, as if shrivelled with an intense heat; while the remainder was a charred and humiliating mass from which those appearances that help to make up our estimate of humanity had been removed. Under the direction of the Clergyman, these remains were taken and decently laid out in the belfry of the parish Church. The woman TOWNSEND it is said, had carried her husband's breakfast, and was just returned as this calamity occurred. She also, anxious to rescue as much as possible of their whole worldly stock from the flames, ventured too often into the burning building, and likewise fell a prey to the flames, becoming buried under such a mass of rubbish, that it was not until the afternoon that her remains were found, and then in a state such as rendered it difficult to imagine that a mass so unsightly had ever worn an animated form. It was a truly melancholy picture, and the remains were placed beside those of her unfortunate neighbour, there to await that proper investigation which belongs to the office of Coroner, though here there can be no doubt as to the result.
The houses were the property of a man of the name of Jacob Wright, and, it is said, insured in the West of England Fire Office. It is hoped, however, that the destruction thus occasioned, in open day, in the midst of a large population, and with some of the most powerful and effective fire engines in England, will lead those in authority seriously to see if there be no method of causing the entire removal of thatch.
For the poor and unfortunate inhabitants we ask the public commiseration, which never, under calamitous circumstances of this kind, has yet been withheld.
An Inquest has been taken upon the bodies of the unfortunate women this forenoon, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at the Workhouse, St. Thomas, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 26 May 1836, Issue 3688 – Gale Document No. Y3200668543
On Wednesday last, the 18th inst. as THOMAS POLLARD, a man obtaining his livelihood by the performance of those works which are necessary to a perfect system of irrigation, and at that time in the employ of Mr Edward Osmond, at Hayne, in Newton St. Cyres, was engaged with a party fishing, he slipped in crossing a bank, and fell into a deep part of the river Creedy, by which, before assistance could be rendered, he was unfortunately drowned. An Inquest was taken on the body, on Friday, before James Partridge, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned. The deceased was about 33 or 34 years of age, and much respected for his steadiness and honesty. He has left a widow and five children, in aid f whom, from the estimation in which her husband and their father was held, the parishioners of Newton St. Cyres, to their great honour, have raised by subscription a sum amounting to more than £20.

A man named JAMES LAMPREY, a superannuated officer of the Customs, aged 70, hung himself on Monday last at Barnstaple. Coroner's Verdict – "Temporary insanity."

Thursday 21 July 1836, Issue 3696 – Gale Document No. Y3200668651
Exeter, Wednesday 20 July
On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Badcock's Custom House Inn, Quay Gate, on the body of ELIAS FORWARD ELSON, about 7 years of age, who, on the preceding evening while at play, it is supposed had fallen into the water. Verdict – "Found Drowned."

An Inquest was taken on Monday last, before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for this city, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of JOHN SEAGRAVE, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on the preceding morning. The deceased had been a patient in the Hospital two months, having been brought there in consequence of a dreadful accident he met with, in being thrown from a colt he was breaking in. His skull was fractured, and he has lingered in a state of great suffering, and a verdict was returned accordingly. SEAGRAVE was an Irishman, and came to this city some years since with the 16th Light Dragoons, in which he had for a considerable time served; and was well known here. He was a Roman Catholic, and his last moments attended by the Rev. George Oliver, the Catholic Clergyman in this city.

On the 11th inst., an Inquest was taken before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at the Bee Hive, Teignmouth, on the body of SERGEANT JAS. PASSMORE, of Newton, who died while the South Devon Yeomanry, to which corps he belonged, was on permanent duty in that town. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God. The deceased who has left a widow and six children, was interred on the following Thursday, with military honours.

Thursday 28 July 1836, Issue 3697 – Gale Document No. Y3200668666
Exeter, Wednesday 27 July
Yesterday (Tuesday) morning, MR GEORGE TUCKETT, hairdresser, Sidwell-street, in this city, about 50 years of age, was found dead just within his own passage door. It appeared that rather late on the preceding night, and when under the influence of liquor, he had been assisted thus far in his way to his sleeping apartment, but no one coming to him, had fallen down, and, from his position, death had been the consequence. The jury, on the Inquest, returned a verdict of Died from apoplexy.

On Thursday last, MR JOSEPH BLACKING, the keeper of an eating house, South-street, in this city, in apparent good health, left his home to attend the funeral of a relative at Crockernwell. The procession being ready to proceed, MR BLACKING was found missing, and search being made, he was discovered in the yard of the house dead, it being supposed, that he had been in that state for an hour. An Inquest was taken on Saturday, and a verdict Died by the Visitation of God, returned.

Thursday 28 July 1836, Issue 3697 – Gale Document No. Y3200668670
Exeter, Wednesday 27 July
On the 20th instant, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of THOMAS GOLLOP, late a waggoner in the service of Mr Elworthy, woollen manufacturer at Wellington, who, on the 14th of May last, being returning from this city, when a few miles from it, on the road to Cullompton, in attempting to jump upon the shaft for the purpose of riding, fell, and the near wheels of the wagon passed over his right leg. Wm. Perham, another waggoner, went to the unfortunate man's assistance, and obtaining the aid of a person passing between 6 and 7 o'clock in the evening, conveyed GOLLOP, on the tail-board of the wagon, to the Crab Tree Inn; the master and mistress, however, refused to receive him into their house. GOLLOP himself begged they would let him to taken into the stable or any where, but the landlord and landlady told witness to go on, saying there was no bone broken, and the man was tipsy. In consequence of which he went on about a mile and half, till the deceased begged to be taken down: a cart was afterwards procured, and, several hours after the accident, he was brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The bone was fractured, and the main blood vessel of the limb wounded. On the 28th of May, he underwent amputation, but being of weak constitution, sunk, and died. The jurors returned a verdict of Accidental Death, attaching to their verdict the following censure: - "The jurors assembled to inquire into the cause of death of THOMAS GOLLOP, are unanimously of the opinion that the conduct of Mr and Mrs Badcock, who keep the Crab Tree Inn, in the parish of Broadclist, in refusing to receive or assist the said THOMAS GOLLOP, after he had sustained such a severe accident, is deserving of great censure.

Thursday 11 August 1836, Issue 3698 – Gale Document No. Y3200668686
Last week Inquests were taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, on the body of JOHN ALFORD of Stoke Canon, Labourer, who died on Southernhay. The deceased had come to this City, in order to have the advice of Dr Budd, for a complaint he laboured under. Here he received a prescription, and was on his way back to St. Sidwells, when he was taken worse and obliged to sit down. In this situation his wife found him, when giving her the prescription, she repaired to a druggist – procured the medicine and returned to the spot. In the mean time, however, her husband had been removed to a coach-house, where she gave him a portion of the medicine. He was also visited by Mr Harris, surgeon, whose attention had been called to the circumstance; and by Mr F. H. Warren, a pupil of Mr Harris, who gave such directions as they thought requisite, but he expired in about a quarter of an hour: and the jury returned a verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

On the body of WM. HEPPER, a labourer, of Sandford, who fell from a hay-rick and dislocated his neck; and being taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital; died there.

Also on the body of RICHARD BASTIN, who died in the Hospital, from injuries of the head; having fallen from the shaft of a wagon in Cowick Street, St. Thomas, when the wheel passed over him. The verdict being in both instances – Accidental Death.

FATAL ACCIDENT - On the 2nd inst. the REV. P. GILLARD, whilst bathing at Ebbery-sands, in the parish of Churstow, near Brixham, in Torbay, got out of his depth and being alone, and unable to swim, was unfortunately drowned; the body, when picked up, had evidently been in the water a considerable time, and was discovered by the circumstance of the rising tide floating off the deceased's clothes, which led to a search,. The body was soon discovered, taken on shore, and every means used to restore animation, but without effect. An Inquest was held on the body the following day, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" returned.

LINTON. - A very melancholy and deeply afflictive accident occurred at Linton, on the evening of the 28th ult. MISS MARY ANN WEBSTER, a maiden lady, of Birmingham, who was riding on a donkey, and enjoying the romantic and peculiar beauties of the Valley of Rocks, was accidentally thrown off the animal, fell some distance on a green plot below, and then rolled down a precipice of 60 feet into the water. The unfortunate lady was taken up alive, but survived only two hours. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner; and a verdict of accidental death was returned. The body was removed on Monday in a hearse for interment at Birmingham.

Thursday 18 August 1836, Issue 3699 – Gale Document No. Y3200668697
On the night of the 5th inst., a fatal accident occurred to a young man named GEORGE BURARD, a small farmer, aged about 23, of the parish of Georgeham, North Devon. The deceased had been to Barnstaple market, and left the town early in the evening, rather intoxicated; after which he remained at an inn in Braunton, and drank to still further excess; he proceeded on his way home between eight and nine o'clock, and was found by two gentleman at half-past nine, between Braunton and Georgeham, lying in the hedge, with a dreadful wound in the back of his head. He was insensible and speechless, and was immediately conveyed home, where he lay in the same state until Sunday morning, when he died. From the nature of the wound, it is supposed he was riding furiously, and was thrown from his horse, by which his head came in contact with a sharp stone. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body on Monday, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". It is said that the deceased exhibited money to the amount of £10 when he was in the inn at Braunton, and that but £2 was found upon his person when he was picked up; from this circumstance some have imagined that he was robbed and murdered, but there is no sufficient evidence to bear out the conjecture. The deceased has left an afflicted wife and three very young children to mourn his untimely end.

Thursday 15 September 1836, Issue 3703 – Gale Document No. Y3200668751
TIVERTON. - A Coroner's Inquest was held here on Tuesday which excited a considerable sensation. The facts are as follow:- The child of a labourer named JOHN SEARLE was taken ill of scarlet fever, and the wife applied to Mr Macdonald, one of the parish surgeons, to attend it; he referred her to Mr Beck, the overseer, for an order for medical attendance. This, Mr Beck told her he could not give, as the wages of her husband and children amounted to 17s. 6d. per week. Mr Macdonald had, however, previously told her what was the complaint f the child, and subsequently advised her to give it senna and toast and water for a beverage, but she refused to attend to it. This was on the Thursday, on the Friday the child appeared rather better; but on Saturday it became worse, when she applied to the Coroner, Mr Gervis who is a medical man, he pronounced the child to be dangerously ill, and gave the mother a note to take to Mr Mills, another of the overseers stating the fact, who immediately gave her an order, to the Parish Surgeon, Mr Macdonald, who immediately attended and gave the mother some medicine. The child died at three o'clock on the Sunday morning. The Surgeon Mr Macdonald corroborated this statement of the mother. The Overseer Mr Beck stated that he refused to give the order in consequence of having received a letter from the Clerk of the Guardians requesting him to be careful what orders he gave for medical relief. He said that he could not see that the case came under the denomination of "sudden and urgent" necessity, so as to justify him in giving the order on application. But for this communication Mr Beck said he would not have withheld the order. The Coroner summed up. The Jury remained some time in deliberation, and then returned a verdict "That HARRIET SEARLE died of the scarlet fever, and that it appears to the Jury that her death was hastened for want of timely medical aid," and they requested the Coroner to transmit their verdict, with the depositions on which it was founded, to the Poor Law Commissioners.

Thursday 22 September 1836, Issue 3704 – Gale Document No. Y3200668767
Exeter, Wednesday 21 September
Charge of Manslaughter - On the 14th inst. an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for this city, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene Street, on the body of JANE LUXTON, aged 60, who met her death from injuries she received on being knocked down and run over on the Heavitree road, by a horse ridden by John Page, the son of a butcher at Broadclist, on Monday. The following witnesses were examined:- George Gidley was driving two horses with an empty cart, and passed the spot where the accident took place; he saw the boy on the horse gallop past him, and also saw the deceased, who was crossing the road, when the horse struck her down and went over her. J. H. James, Esq., one of the surgeons of the Hospital, saw the deceased soon after the accident. On examining her he found on the left side of the head, marks as if caused by a severe blow; there was a large quantity of extravasated blood on the left side of the brain, and bruises on other parts of the body. The appearances were such as were likely to have been produced by a severe blow, and quite sufficient to cause death. Deceased died at eight o'clock on Tuesday morning. Richard Sanders, servant to Mr Shepcote, carrier, et the boy beyond Heavitree bridge, riding very fiercely; his master called out to the boy that he was a rascal for riding so fast; witness had no reason to believe that the boy had lost the command of his horse. John Page, aged 15, who rode over the woman, stated to the jury that he had a basket with meat in it on his arm, which he was moving, when the horse ran away, and he could not stop it until he came to Sandy Gate. The jury, after a very long deliberation, returned a verdict, - "Manslaughter against John Page."

Thursday 27 October 1836, Issue 3709 – Gale Document No. Y3200668828
Exeter, Wednesday 26 October
On Friday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner, for this city, at Veysey's Old Bell public-house, Old Bridge-street, on the body of a woman named MARY BENT, upwards of 60 years of age, which had been taken out of one of the mill leats, running near that place. The deceased, understood to be a native of the emerald isle, has for a considerable time lived near the bridge leading from the Quarter to the Shilhay, and earned her livelihood principally by unveiling the secrets of futurity to the credulous, or, as it is commonly termed, "telling their fortunes." It would seem, however, that in the present age this is but an indifferent sort of calling, as falling in arrear for rent, and, after much forbearance, no money being forthcoming, an opportunity was taken when she moved out on some matter of business, to place a padlock on the door. It is believed that from that time she had no place which could be called a home, but at night crept in anywhere that presented itself for shelter. Her state of destitution appeared to be extreme, and on Thursday morning she begged a cup of coffee, "for God's sake," saying she had no friend in the world, and would destroy herself. On the afternoon of this day, her little furniture was sold, having been taken in execution, and, after dark on that evening it was supposed she must have thrown herself into the leat and was carried by the current down among the mills, when the dead body was discovered and taken from the water, and a verdict was returned "Found Drowned" there being no evidence to prove how she got into the water.

Thursday 17 November 1836, Issue 3712 – Gale Document No. Y3200668860
EXMOUTH. – On Friday an Inquest was taken in this town, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., a Coroner for Devon, on the body of HY. TILLER, shipwright, aged 40, who, for the last eight years, had been unable to work from the effects of severe asthma, he was in the habit of taking laudanum to procure sleep. On Wednesday night he took three pills, and being uneasy and not able to sleep, he desired his wife to send for some laudanum, which she did, and gave him; the next morning he was found dead in his bed. After a careful investigation before a respectable Jury, assisted by Mr Land, surgeon, of Exmouth, the Jury returned a verdict of:- Died from the effects of poison administered by his wife. It appeared that the person who sold the laudanum is not a chemist or druggist, but keeps a shop for the sale of various articles, and was in the habit of supplying them with a similar quantity, and therefore gave no particular caution or direction; but surely when poisonous articles are sold a caution and direction should invariably be given. We are led from this, as well as other similar events, to remark, that as all medical practitioners are obliged to produce proofs of their abilities to practice, the same should be done by chemists and druggists as to their abilities for dispensing medicine; and those articles should never be sold in huckster's shops, or dispensed by persons not duly qualified, especially as when any accident occurs a stigma is thrown upon the respectable and regular dispenser, as it is seldom mentioned who sold the article by which the accident occurred.

Thursday 22 December 1836, Issue 3717 – Gale Document No. Y3200668935
Exeter, Wednesday 21 December
Suicide - On Wednesday last, ROBERT HALFYARD, a smith residing at Whipton, a hamlet of Heavitree, on the Bath road, and a short distance from this city, deliberately cut his throat with a razor, in his cellar. The deceased was about a middle age, and the jury, on the Inquest, having returned a verdict of felo de se, the Coroner issued his warrant to the parish officers of Heavitree, for the internment of the remains between the hours of 9 and 12 at night.

On Wednesday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held by J. Gribble, Esq., at Willowstone, in the parish of Moretonhampstead, on the body of THOMAS DAIMENT, a young man 27 years of age, who hung himself the Monday before in a hayloft. Verdict, Temporary Insanity. This young man was, through affliction rendered incapable of working so as to support himself, and he received some support under the Poor Law Union: this not being enough, an application was made in his behalf for further relief, but was refused, and an order was issued to carry him to the Workhouse at Ashburton, and this having prayed so much on his mind, was believed to be the cause of his committing so rash an act.

On Sunday the 11th inst., as W. TOUT, of Southmolton, aged 72 years, was returning from afternoon Church Service, he fell down in East-street, and died instantly. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 5 January 1837, Issue 3719 – Gale Document No. Y3200668963
Exeter, Wednesday 4 January
On Monday, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, gent., Coroner, of this city, at Sampson's Turk's Head, on the body of the infant daughter of MR RICHARD THORN, glazier, Waterbeer Street, and, after a short investigation, a verdict "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday 12 January 1837, Issue 3720 – Gale Document No. Y3200668981
A labouring man of the name of THOS. WHIDDON, of St. Sidwells, while passing over David's-hill, on the evening of Thursday last, suddenly staggered in his walk, and being taken into Mrs Elmore's the Pack Horse public-house, Mr May, the surgeon, was sent for, who instantly came to his assistance, but in a few minutes the man was a corpse. Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God. The cause of death being apoplexy.

DISTRESSING SUICIDE - On Thursday se'nnight an Inquest was held in the parish of Sampford Arundell, before Mr Caines, and a highly respectable jury, on view of the body of the REV. EDWARD HOULDITCH, who destroyed himself under the following melancholy circumstances:- It appeared from the evidence of Mr Bridge, his medical attendant, and of the Rev. C. B. Sweet, the clergyman of the parish, and his intimate friend, that the deceased had for a long time been subject to aberrations of intellect, accompanied by extreme depression of spirits. That, during the last three weeks, this depression had greatly increased: and that it terminated fatally on the morning of the 27th ult., when the deceased cut his throat with his razor while in the act of shaving. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, unanimously returned a verdict of Insanity. The deceased was in his 73rd year: he was a man of high religious principle, and superior mental endowments: and was respected by all who knew him.

SOUTHMOLTON. - As the North Devon Coach was proceeding from this place to Barnstaple on Saturday evening, about five o'clock, it came in contact with a cart returning from market, in which were two farmers, of the parish of Swymbridge, MR WILLIAM BREALEY and MR W. DOWN. The cart was upset, by which MR BREALEY was killed on the spot, and MR DOWN much injured. A Coroner's Inquest held on the body, before T. Copner, Esq. returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". We understand no blame could be attached to Terry, who was driving the coach at the time.

MR ROBERT STRANGER, of Northmolton, when returning home from this place, on Saturday last, after having attended the market, was thrown from his horse, the animal having taken fright and galloped off at a furious rate, and received so much injury that he died about an hour after the accident occurred. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Thursday 13 April 1837, Issue 3733 – Gale Document No. Y3200669136
Shocking Suicide - MR WILLIAM CHURCHWARD, a gentleman of Newport, near Barnstaple, committed suicide on Monday the 3rd inst., by shooting himself with a fowling piece. The particulars of this dreadful and melancholy event, as given on the Inquest, held before T. Copner, Esq. and a highly-respectable Jury, are as follow: - About half-past eleven o'clock in the forenoon of Monday, the mother of the deceased heard a noise up stairs, which she though proceeded from his lodging-room. On going to the door, to ascertain the cause, she knocked, but could get no answer, when Catherine Hill, a servant who had lived in the family eighteen years, forced open the door, and a dreadful spectacle presented itself. Deceased was partly dressed, lying across the bed, and almost lifeless. She observed him to breathe only once after she entered the room. this witness, in her evidence, stated that she had many times of late observed appearances of derangement in the conduct of the deceased, so much that she had mentioned it to his sister; and in particular, on the morning of his death, his proceedings were exceedingly inconsistent. Mr James Salter, the organist of Newport Chapel, who was well acquainted with deceased, and saw him frequently, deposed that he had often remarked symptoms of derangement, and that on Sunday last he seemed unusually agitated, and was very restless. The Jury declined hearing further evidence, and returned a verdict that deceased destroyed himself while in a state of temporary derangement.

Thursday 20 April 1837, Issue 3734 – Gale Document No. Y3200669149
Exeter, Wednesday 19 April
On Friday last, a woman named COSWAY, aged 65, living in the Butcherow, was burnt to death. She appears to have been sitting near the fire when her clothes accidentally caught, and in a few minutes were in a complete blaze; the neighbours, who were alarmed by her cries, came to her assistance, but they found her in so dreadful a state, that after extinguishing the fire, they conveyed her to the Hospital, where she shortly afterwards died. On Saturday an Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 27 April 1837, Issue 3735 – Gale Document No. Y3200669160
Exeter, Wednesday 26 April
On the 18th inst., an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner, for this city, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MARY MILFORD, of Tedburn St. Mary, who died on the preceding day in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased was 46 years of age, a married woman and with several children, and it appeared had been subject to fits all her life. A daughter who gave evidence on this melancholy occasion, said, that she left her mother between 4 and 5 o'clock on the afternoon of the preceding Friday, and went into the fields to collect some colt's-foot for tea; and when she returned, found her sitting in a pan of water, endeavouring to extinguish the fire which had communicated itself to her garments. She was promptly removed from a situation so distressing as this, and brought to the Hospital, but the injuries were so serious that medical skill was of no avail, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 4 May 1837, Issue 3736 – Gale Document No. Y3200669171
An Inquest was held on the 22nd ult., at Barnstaple, before Thos. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JAMES PAYNE, of the Bell Inn, in that town. The deceased had been in a bad state of health for some time; on the preceding day he had retired to bed in the afternoon, and soon after became seriously worse: medical aid was obtained without any delay, but before that could arrive, the unfortunate man was a Corpse. Verdict, died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 18 May 1837, Issue 3738 – Gale Document No. Y3200669203
Barnstaple - Forgery and Suicide.
A lamentable and awful occurrence has recently taken place in this town. A man named THOMAS KELLY, by trade a mason, who resided at Newport, was apprehended on Friday week, under suspicion of forging two cheques on the West of England and South Wales District Bank. It appears that in the afternoon of the above day, he went to the shop of Mr Alexander, a watch-maker, in High-street, to purchase a watch, in payment for which he tendered a cheque for £16 6s. drawn in favour of Richard Gilbert, and signed Francis Squire. Mr Alexander, suspecting that all was not right, went immediately to the Bank, leaving KELLY in his shop, for the purpose of getting the cheque cashed. On his way there he met Mr Thorne, the manager, who discovered it to be a forgery. KELLY, was, in consequence, apprehended, and identified as the person who had succeeded in passing a forged cheque for £14 8s. at the shop of Mr Kenward, linen draper, on the 17th of April last, when he purchased some cloth, and received about £12 in cash. The deposition of Mr Kenward was taken before a Magistrate and KELLY was remanded to prison till the following day. In the course of the night, however, he put an end to his existence by hanging himself, being discovered by the turnkey on going his round in the morning, suspended quite dead in his cell; a handkerchief was round his neck, which had been affixed to the grating. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, and after hearing evidence confirmatory of deceased's soundness of mind prior to committing the act, the Jury returned a Verdict of "felo-de-se." The body was interred in a rough shell at 12 o'clock the same night in the Church-yard without any prayers being read over it amidst a most revolting scene from numerous half-drunken bye-standers.

Thursday 25 May 1837, Issue 3739 – Gale Document No. Y3200669219
Exeter, Wednesday 24 May
On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before S. Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner for this city, at Taylor's Barnstaple Inn, Hart's Row, on the body of MRS AGNES GRIGG, who died suddenly the preceding afternoon, at her lodgings on David's Hill. The deceased was unmarried, about 45 years of age: of very retired and eccentric habits, and had lived as housekeeper in several highly respectable families. And having heard the evidence of the case, the jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 1 June 1837, Issue 3740 – Gale Document No. Y3200669229
Exeter, Wednesday 31 May
INQUESTS. On Saturday last an Inquest was held by John Warren, Esq., Coroner, for this city, at the Bull Inn, Goldsmith-street, on the body of WILLIAM GARTON, aged 60, who died on Friday morning. It appeared in evidence that the deceased had for some days been labouring under a depression of spirits, and that on Thursday night he took poison. On Friday morning Mr Webb, surgeon, was called in, but too late to be of any assistance. Mr Webb's evidence, which was confirmed by that of Mr Williams, surgeon, there was no doubt but the deceased had taken laudanum, which had caused his death. The deceased had been in the employ of Messrs. Kingdon, as foreman of the whitesmith's department, upwards of thirty years. The jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Melancholy Accident - On Saturday last, as a little girl between 7 and 8 years of age, the daughter of a tradesman, named BROWN, who keeps a huckster's shop in St. Sidwell-street, was playing with a young sister in that neighbourhood, a cart belonging to Mr Manley, butcher, was seen advancing at a brisk pace towards them, and the poor child being anxious for the safety of her little charge, run heedlessly into the road to rescue it. Unfortunately in her haste, the child while passing in front of the horse, (as we understood,) fell, and before the person driving the cart could pull up, the wheel passed over the poor sufferer's neck, who was killed on the spot. An Inquest was held the same evening on the body, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death." The other child escaped unhurt. No blame whatever is attributed to the driver.

CHILD BURNT – CAUTION TO PARENTS. - On the 23rd inst. a little boy, about a year and three-quarters old, the son of a labouring man named MICHAEL HEWITT, residing at Ashford, near Barnstaple, was so shockingly burnt during the temporary absence of his mother for some milk, that he survived the injuries only a few hours. Every part of the child's boy except his face, was scorched almost to a cinder. An Inquest was held on Wednesday, and a Verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

An Inquest was held at Down St. Mary, on Wednesday, before J. Partridge, Esq. on the body of a little girl named VEALE, 5 years of age, who had come by her death through the ignition of her clothes during the temporary absence of her mother. - Verdict, "Accidental Death." - The Coroner observed upon the neglect of parents, and said the average number of Inquests held before him, on similar cases, was twenty a year.

Thursday 15 June 1837, Issue 3742 – Gale Document No. Y3200669260
WM. ADDICOTT and WM. BARNES, agricultural labourers in the employ of Mr Wm. Jarman, at Bickleigh, were accidentally drowned at that place last week, and, on the Inquest, a verdict returned accordingly.

Thursday 12 July 1837, Issue 3745 – Gale Document No. Y3200669311
FATAL ACCIDENT - On Monday last, as a man called RICHARD TRACE and another labourer, were raising stone in a quarry belonging to Mr Berry, of Shebbear, one side of the quarry fell in on them. After three hours hard work, in removing the stones and rubbish, TRACE was taken out in a mangled state quite dead, great hopes are entertained that the other man will recover. An Inquest was immediately held by Mr Vallack, on the body of TRACE, Verdict "Accidental Death."

An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Chawleigh, before Mr Vallack, Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of JAMES SIMMONS, (Earl Fortescue's Groom.) The deceased on the 1st inst., went to the seat of the Honorable Newton Fellowes, M.P., at Eggesford, for a mare and colt, to take back to Castle Hill. It appeared from the testimony given by Mr Fellowes's groom, that SIMMONS had started about seven o'clock in the evening, leading the mare and bolt, and riding his own horse – the deceased appeared dull when he left, but not tipsy, and that he took a road which witness and others strongly advised him not to go, and recommending a better road to take a mare and colt, deceased appeared obstinate. About a quarter of an hour after deceased had parted with Mr Fellowes's groom, he was found by one of the Eggesford workmen, lying on his face and hands, in the road, ( a few gun shots only from the spot where he started with the horses,) in an almost insensible state, from the effect of a violent blow which he had received on the temple. Mr Davy, surgeon, of Chulmleigh, was immediately sent for, and every possible care and attention was given deceased, until his death, which took place on the 5th inst., from that fatal blow. When the deceased was first found in the road, he enquired where he was, and said, that he was glad somebody was come to put him in the right way, and that he had received the blow from a man by whom he was knocked off his horse. The deceased, however, was in a very stupid and almost senseless state, and from the evidence it appeared unlikely that any man had passed at the time, except a gentleman on horseback, (supposed to be the Rev. Mr Kempe, of Morchard,) and the gentleman was observed to pass and speak to deceased. The Honorable Newton Fellowes had taken much trouble in investigating this mysterious case, previously to the arrival of the Coroner, and in course of the inquiry expressed his great surprise that Me Kempe, (to whom he had written the day before,) was not in attendance, and very properly remarked that it was a duty to the public, that all persons who could give, if but the slightest intelligence, should voluntarily attend the Coroner's Inquiry. A special messenger was at once dispatched to Mr Kempe, with another letter from Mr Fellowes, to learn if he was the gentleman seen in conversation with deceased, but up to half-past eleven o'clock at night, the messenger had not returned, and as it was uncertain whether or not Mr Kempe was the gentleman in question, the Coroner (at the request of the Jury,) summed up the evidence, and a Verdict was returned in accordance with the testimony before him.

On the 4th inst., an Inquest was taken at Greenway Farm, Churston Ferrers, before J. Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of WILLIAM REEVES, aged 10 years, apprentice to Mr John Hannaford; it appeared from the evidence that deceased was in a field with several horses, and leading one up too near another, the horse attempted to kick at it and struck the boy a violent blow on the cheek, which ruptured a vessel, and he died in a few minutes. - Verdict, Accidental Death, - Deodand 1s. on the horse.

Thursday 20 July 1837, Issue 3746 – Gale Document No. Y3200669325
An Inquest was held at Goodleigh on Wednesday last before T. Copner, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM HAY, aged ten years, who fell from off a cart to the ground, and the off wheel passing over his body, occasioned death the following day.

Thursday 3 August 1837, Issue 3748 – Gale Document No. Y3200669352
Exeter, Wednesday 2 August
SUDDEN DEATH. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held by J. warren, Esq., Coroner for this city, at the Black Lions Inn, South-street, on the body of a respectable man named WILLIAM LYLE, a resident of the parish of Launcells, in Cornwall, who died suddenly on Wednesday evening, very shortly after his arrival in this city. The evidence adduced was that of the carrier named Adams, with whom the deceased travelled from Holsworthy to this city, where they arrived about seven o'clock and who stated, that the deceased had been a farmer and was now living retired, that his business here was to pay a sum of money to a Miss Tanner, living in Longbrook-street, whither the deceased went immediately on his arrival, that on returning down Fore-street he (the carrier) met him, and they went to a spirit shop ,and had one glass of porter and one glass of ginger-beer together and left for the Black Lions to get some supper, he procured some bread and cheese for deceased, and left him to take his own supper, after finishing which, Adams, on leaving the Inn, passed deceased at the doorway, who told him he felt very ill, he led deceased back to a stool in the passage, and seated him, where in about five minutes he died. Witness stated that he had known the deceased man years and that he was a very abstemious man, he supposed him to be about 60 years old. A female servant living with Mrs and Miss Tanner, deposed, that the deceased called at her mistresses house on Wednesday evening, about half-past 7 o'clock, and payed Mrs Tanner a sum of money, that on asking Mrs Tanner how her health was, deceased said that since last he had seen her he had been so ill as to be obliged to be supported in his bed by pillows in an upright posture, he then left. Mr Edye, Surgeon, stated that on being called in he found deceased quite dead, he said he would not pretend to account for his death, as it might arise from various causes, but from the suddenness of his death the probability was that it was a disease f the heart, but he did not give it as a medical opinion. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 14 September 1837, Issue 3754 – Gale Document No. Y3200669436
Exeter, Wednesday 13 September
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Saturday last, an inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for this city, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of JOHN RUGG, who, from the effect of severe accident, had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased was 24 years of age; was brought from Broadhembury; and a Verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

On Monday, an Inquest was taken before Mr Warren, at the same inn, on view of the body of an elderly female named ALICE GORDGE, who met her death under the following melancholy circumstances. The deceased belonged to Charmouth, Dorset, her family employing themselves in the season in the collection of shrimps and prawns, which were partly disposed of in this city, and to facilitate the trade the mother usually resided here while it continued, receiving her baskets by the coaches, &c. This season she has resided some where at the bottom of Paris-street, and on Saturday afternoon expecting a basket by one of the Eastern Mails, was on the look out for it. At quarter-past 2 o'clock, the Mail coming down the hill from Heavitree, and opposite Sweetland's garden, she advanced into the road in order to make inquiry of the coachman; in fact it appears there was a basket on the coach for her. At this instant the Quicksilver or London Mail was descending Paris-street, the two coaches being rapidly approaching each other, and her age (68 years) having deprived her of those powers of activity so necessary to one who had placed herself in such a perilous situation, she was knocked down by the leaders of the in-coming Mail, the horses of which had advanced 10 or a dozen yards before it was possible for the coachman to pull up. This, however, being done, persons from it and also inhabitants ran to her assistance, but the wheels had passed over a considerable part of her body, and the injury was of the most serious description. She was taken up and removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but expired before they reached that Institution. Not the slightest blame is attributable to the coachman, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 28 September 1837, Issue 3756 – Gale Document No. Y3200669466
Exeter, Wednesday 27 September
CORONER'S INQUESTS.
On Thursday last, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for this City, at Palmer's King's Arms Inn, West-street, on the body of JOHN KEMBLE, a labourer and one of the night police, 49 years of age, and had resided on Stepcote hill, who being engaged to collect the pears on a tree in the garden of Capt. Foote, Bartholomew-terrace, fell from it, and a concussion of the brain being the consequence, was followed by death in a few hours. And the facts having been given in evidence, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was a sober and industrious man, and had been in the service of his employers many years. By his death a widow and a family of children are left quite destitute, and a subscription has been commenced in order to their assistance.

On Monday an Inquest was taken before the same gentleman, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of PHILIP BRAUND, a waggoner, who met his death under the following circumstances. He was in the employ of Mr Vicary, of Northtawton, and about two o'clock in the afternoon of the preceding Saturday, was returning from this city with his master's wagon laden with hides, being himself riding on the fore part of it. The deceased was descending the hill near Newton St. Cyres at a quick pace, and had omitted to use the drag. At this instant a gentleman appeared in a gig on the opposite direction; the deceased jumped off, caught the shaft horse by the head for the purpose of stopping them, when he was immediately thrown down and both near wheels passed over his head and the unfortunate man had also five ribs broken. Every attention was immediately paid him, and he was placed in a cart in order to being brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital; when the vehicle, however, reached that Institution, it was found he had expired on the road; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was supposed to be from 33 to 34 years of age, and in this case also it is understood there is left a widow and family.

Thursday 12 October 1837, Issue 3758 – Gale Document No. Y3200669495
FATAL ACCIDENT - On the 2nd inst. an accident fatal in its nature and melancholy in its attendant consequences occurred at East Coombe in North Bovey, the residence of MR WM. NOSWORTHY. His son and only child, about 4 ½ years old, while playing about the house and moving backwards, accidentally fell into a tub of boiling water, and although the father was present and instantly caught him up, and his clothes were stripped from him with all the expedition possible, the poor little fellow was so dreadfully scalded, that he died the following day. He was an interesting child, and the feelings of the parents may be conceived of, but cannot be described. On the 4th inst. an Inquest was taken on the body before Joseph Gribble, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, and a verdict returned accordingly.

Thursday 2 November 1837, Issue 3761 – Gale Document No. Y3200669527
Exeter, Wednesday 1 November
An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday), at the John Bull, Exwick, by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN MANLEY, aged 48, foreman to Messrs. Matthews and Chubb, who was found in the mill leat on Sunday morning. There being no evidence to shew by what means deceased came into the water, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." He was a strictly honest man, had worked between 30 and 40 years in the family of his employers, by whom he is much and deservedly regretted – he has left a wife and four children to mourn their sad bereavement.

EFFECTS OF INTOXICATION - An Inquest was held at the Select Vestry Room, Topsham, on the 23rd ult., on the body of JOHN PROUT, (a Cornishman) who met his death in consequence of drinking a quantity of raw spirits on the 22nd. The deceased was carried home to his lodgings and put to bed; and the following morning at six o'clock he was found dead and cold by a fellow lodger. - Verdict accordingly.

On Thursday last an Inquest was taken at Tavistock, before A. B. Bone, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of
WM. VENTON, who met his death under the following circumstances:- Deceased had been for some time past in the habit of drinking to great excess, and on the evening of Tuesday was seen by several persons in the streets of Tavistock in a helpless state of intoxication. He fell many times, and was at last placed by some bystanders in a wheel-barrow and taken to his own house, where he was put to bed. On the following morning he was so ill, that Mr Mitchell, surgeon, was called in, who found his breathing very laborious, the face was livid, limbs cold, and the pulse at the wrist almost imperceptible. There was a wound on the back part of the head, occasioned, it is presumed, by falling on the previous evening, about half an inch in length and extending inwards. He died about three hours after Mr Mitchell visited him.

The parish of Shillingford St. George, near this city, has been thrown into a great state of excitement by the disclosure of a scene of inhumanity and barbarity such as happily for human nature does not often present itself. In this parish lived an aged couple named JOHN and SUSAN BOULT, the former 64, and the latter 60 years of age. BOULT had been in the habit of ill treating his wife, by kicking her and using other violence, and on Saturday the 21st ult. she died under circumstances of great suspicion, the consequence of which was his apprehension and examination before a Magistrate, but without a sufficiency of proof to warrant his committal. He was, however, detained in custody, in order to await the result of a Coroner's Inquest, which took place on the following Monday, at the King's Arms public house, Shillingford.
Here Short, a constable, stated that having on several occasions been called to the assistance of the deceased, when BOULT had been beating and otherwise ill treating her. A daughter of the prisoner corroborated this testimony, and added, that on some occasions her father had said he would murder the deceased. Mary Hanley, a neighbour, was called on the preceding Thursday, the deceased being in a fit. On recollection returning, the deceased took witness by the hand, and on the husband coming towards her, she made a motion with her hand indicating a desire to keep him off, and then struck her breast several times. None of the witnesses, however, saw BOULT strike or kick the deceased on that day, nor heard any cries from her; but the daughter stated that her mother was well in the morning when she left the house. Mr S. C. Brown, a surgeon, was requested by BOULT to visit his wife, who he said was ill, & going to the house accordingly, he found her labouring under a fit. He directed such means as he deemed necessary, and the next day visited the deceased again, when a woman who had been attending her mentioned to him an injury, the deceased was suffering under in her leg, which led to an examination and discovery of a severe fracture of the left leg. Immediate attention was paid to this, but the unfortunate woman sunk under it, and died about noon on Saturday. In the post mortem examination Mr Brown was assisted by Mr Land, surgeon, St. Thomas, and their attention was first directed to the injured leg, on laying open which a most extensive comminuted fracture was found in the centre of the tibia, and the fibula was fractured high up. The throat was inspected, but no marks indicating violence were found there. On opening the head and examining the brain, about four ounces of extravasated blood was found, particularly in the right ventricle, but extending into the left, and thus inducing apoplexy, was pronounced to be the immediate cause of death. The medical gentlemen were both of opinion that the fracture of the leg could not have been caused by a fall, but that it was produced by a blow or blows from some blunt instrument: a nailed shoe might have occasioned it. They also stated that a fit of apoplexy might be brought on either by excessive joy, or fear and terror. The Jury deliberated some time, and returned a verdict: - "Died of Apoplexy." - JOHN BOULT was then called in, and the result of the Inquiry communicated to him. He was also severely reprimanded for his barbarity to his wife, the Jury expressing themselves very strongly on the suspicious nature of the case, observing to him that he had narrowly escaped being sent before another tribunal. BOULT is the father of the unfortunate young man of that name, some years since, executed at the Devon County Gaol, for shooting and dreadfully wounding a young woman, through jealously.

Thursday 16 November 1837, Issue 3763 – Gale Document No. Y3200669560
Exeter, Wednesday 15 November
Sudden Death - On the evening of the 7th inst., MR ADAM ARNOLD, of the oil-mill, Clyst St. Mary, near this city, dropped down, and expired immediately. He had been to this city during the day on business, and had reached Mr Taylor's, the Maltster's Arms, Mary's Clist, on his way home, when death so suddenly and awfully arrested his progress. The deceased was 43 years of age, and has left a widow. He was well known in our market and much respected. The verdict on the Coroner's Inquest was "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 30 November 1837, Issue 3765 – Gale Document No. Y3200669587
A man of the name of ABRAHAM GREENSLADE, a resident of Totnes who had been excavating a gutter in a field, in the parish of Berry Pomeroy, not returning to his house during the night of Friday, the 17th inst., his wife became alarmed, and with a neighbour went in search of him in the morning, when shocking to relate he was found buried beneath a quantity of earth which had fallen into the gutter. Assistance was soon procured, and on digging, the found him perfectly upright, his head being about two feet under the top of the earth; his hat prevented his being suffocated. After much labour and difficulty he was released from his earthly prison, but how long he had been there it is impossible to say, as he spoke but two or three sentences after his release: it will be remembered the night was extremely cold. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death was recorded.

Thursday 7 December 1837, Issue 3766 – Gale Document No. Y3200669601
INQUEST - A melancholy and distressing accident occurred at Heathfield Farm, in the parish of Honiton, on the morning of Saturday the 25th ult., to MR THOMAS COX, a respectable farmer. He had been as was his custom every morning, to attend the cattle himself, which were all turned out to field with the exception of two, a gale and a heifer, which were in the stalls, and intended to be fattened. MR COX who had previously fed these two with turnips, observing that the gale which had been only taken in the day before, did not eat the turnips readily, said to a servant who was at work in the barn that he would go back and cut them for the bullock; he went back for that purpose, and shortly after the man heard a noise, and ran to the gate of the stall to see what was the matter, when he saw MR COX lying in the crib on his back, and the gale, which was chained to a post, trying to hit at him with his horns as he laid. Assistance was immediately procured, and on lifting MR COX, he was observed to bleed very profusely, and died within a quarter of an hour after the accident. Mr Sweeting, surgeon, of Honiton, was sent for, and arrived just before the deceased had expired – he was then unable to speak, and breathed but once or twice after. On examination a lacerated wound was discovered on the inside of the right thigh, which it is supposed must have divided the larger vessels of the thigh, and occasioned such a considerable haemorrhage as to cause death in the short space of time above related. - An Inquest was held the same evening before R. H. Aberdein, Esq. Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was unanimously returned. The bullock, which had always been of a fierce and vicious disposition, has been since destroyed.

Thursday 21 December 1837, Issue 3768 – Gale Document No. Y3200669629
On Wednesday, the 7th inst. the wife of WILLIAM HORE, a labouring man of Christow, went to fetch some water at a short distance from the house, leaving her two little boys aged about six years and four years, comfortably seated by the fire side, she had been absent only a minute or two, when becoming alarmed by the cries of the children, she instantly returned, and melancholy to relate, she met the younger at the door enveloped in flames. The Rev. Mr Woollcombe very kindly and humanely attended and dressed the wounds, and medical aid was immediately procured, but the poor little creature was so dreadfully burnt that he expired after the greatest agony the next morning. An Inquest was held on Tuesday, by Jos. Gribble, Esq. one of the Coroners, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Last week, at Little Torrington, three children of a poor man named BURCH, their ages from two to five years, were taken alarmingly ill. One died the day after, and the other two the day following that. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the bodies, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., and there being no evidence to show that the extraordinary fatality was occasioned by other than natural means, the Jury gave a verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God." They were buried in one coffin.

Dartmouth - An Inquest was lately held by Mr Richard Anthony, Coroner, at the Seven Stars Inn, on the body of MR EDMUND TOWL. It appeared that the deceased kept a small farm and dairy, and having left his home in the morning for the purpose of visiting it, and not returning in the evening, search was made for him, when he was found lying dead in a court adjoining his barn, his cows standing round him expecting to be milked, it being past the usual time. He had complained of slight indi8sposition a few days previous. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the jurors unanimously returned a verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 28 December 1837, Issue 3769 – Gale Document No. Y3200669649
Exeter, Wednesday 27 December
On the 19th instant an Inquest was held on the body of ANN MAJOR, aged 50 years, wife of DAVID MAJOR, of Honiton, labourer, who fell from her chair the preceding day, and died shortly after. This case had excited a good deal of interest, a report having gone abroad that her death had been caused by ill-treatment from her husband. Upon investigation, this did not appear to have been the case, although a quarrel had taken place between the deceased and her husband about a fortnight since, during which he put her out of doors, and it is believed struck her several times. The whole of the evidence tended to show that she had been complaining of ill health for some time past, and had suffered much from pain in her side; and that her husband had been into Honiton the Saturday before, and procured some medicine to take for the complaint. On a post mortem examination of the body, which was made by Mr Woodward, surgeon, of Honiton, who had been called in to attend her when she died, the heart was found to be much enlarged, and a considerable portion of it highly inflamed, so much so as to have produced two ulcers; there was a considerable effusion of water into the right cavity of the chest, and into the membrane surrounding the heart. Mr Woodward expressed his belief that her death was occasioned b y the sudden effusion of water on the chest, but that disease of the heart, which appeared of long standing, was sufficient to cause death, and that there was not the least reason to believe, that she died in consequence of any external violence. Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 4 January 1838, Issue 3770 – Gale Document No. Y3200669665
SUICIDE. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, before R. J. Squire, Esq. Coroner for Plymouth, on the body of MR PEEK, foreman of the salt-works, Backwell-street, in that town, which was found in the reservoir on the works, on the morning of the same day. The deceased, who was about 34 years of age, was much respected by his employers. On Thursday morning his family first observed a change in his manner, but not of such a serious nature as to require any particular care, and on the following morning he was found as described.

On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the Turk's Head, Plymouth, on the body of SARAH TRELFIELD. From the evidence of deceased's medical attendant, L. Tripe, Esq., and other persons, it appeared that her death was occasioned by injuries received in the month of September last, when she was thrown over a flight of stairs by a private soldier belonging to the 29th regt., named Daniel Troy. The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Troy, who will be removed to Exeter for trial.

Thursday 18 January 1838, Issue 3772 – Gale Document No. Y3200669708
Exeter, Wednesday 17 January
A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday), by J. Partridge, Esq., at the Huntsman Inn, Ide, on the body of ANN STROUD. The Inquest had excited much attention in Ide and its vicinity, and a large number of persons had assembled on the occasion. It appeared the deceased was a widow woman 79 years of age, and resided in the village of Ide. On Sunday last her daughter, MARIA STROUD, who lived at a few miles distance from Ide, accompanied by a man, came to see her mother, and a quarrel having ensued between them, MARIA STROUD struck the deceased with her fist on the left side, and death ensued shortly afterwards. A post mortem examination of the body was made by Mr Lyddon, Surgeon, who gave it as his opinion the deceased had died from apoplexy,, accelerated by the blows which she received, and the general excitement produced by the quarrel. The Coroner addressed the Jury stating it would be for them to determined whether from the evidence adduced the death of ANN STROUD was accelerated by the blows which had been given her. the Jury consulted a returned a verdict of Manslaughter against MARIA STROUD, and she was accordingly committed to the Devon County Gaol to take her trial at the ensuing Lent Assizes.

An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) at the Valiant Soldier Inn, by John Warren,. Esq. on the body of GEORGE MONK. From the evidence of John Sobey, who lived as servant with Mr James Turner, of Whelmstone, Colebrooke, it appeared that MONK was about 17 or 18 years of age, and an apprentice of Mr Turner's. On the 0th inst. the deceased and witness came to this city with barley, the latter with a wagon and three horses, and MONK with a cart and one horse. About 2 p.m. they were returning, the witness with the empty wagon, and the deceased following with the cart at about a distance of ten land-yards. When they had got four or five yards beyond the Red Cow Turnpike-gage, witness heard the report of two guns close together, and upon this the horse which the deceased was driving took fright and ran away. Witness then endeavoured to stop the horse on its coming up to him, but could not, as it passed on galloping. The deceased had no reins – was provided with reins, but had left them home, and it was his own fault he had not the reins with him. When about ten yards from witness' wagon, the deceased was seen to jump off the fore part of the cart where he had been sitting, the horse still galloping – the cart caught his smock-frock and he fell, the near wheel going right over his head. Witness ran up to him, and found John Phillips assisting him – he was quite insensible, and was bleeding very much from his mouth and ears, and was at once taken to the Hospital. The horse and cart proceeded about 40 yards from the spot where the accident occurred before they were stopped. When witness heard the report of the guns he did not see the persons discharging them, but the reports appeared to come from the ground on the river side of the road. - John Phillips, of St. David, labourer, in his evidence corroborated the statement of Sobey. Mr S. G. Sloman, jun., a pupil of Mr S. Barnes, stated that the deceased was brought to the Hospital in an insensible state, with much bleeding from both ears and also the nose. The deceased died on Monday, the preceding day, at 1 p.m. There had not been any post mortem examination, but there was every reason to suppose that there was a fracture at the base of the skull, and evidently a concussion of the brain; he did not regain his senses, and there was never any chance of his recovery. A verdict of Accidental Death was accordingly returned.

Thursday 25 January 1838, Issue 3773 – Gale Document No. Y3200669720
Exeter, Wednesday 24 January
Death of a Man from Cold and Exhaustion
Yesterday (Tuesday) an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for this city, at Sampson's Turk's Head Inn, High Street, on the body of a man who had been taken in charge by the police on Saturday night, and died on the following evening; the case having excited much attention here.
The first witness was Jane Belworthy, wife of Samuel Belworthy, of the Butcherow, who said, I and my husband keep a lodging house for travellers. The deceased was at our door on Saturday. I have known him 4 or 5 years as a traveller occasionally frequenting our house. He has told me that his name was WM. TURNER, and that he came from Budleigh. About the middle of the day on Saturday, he came to our house, and desired to warm himself: I gave him leave and he stayed about half an hour, and then went away. Between 6 and 7 the same evening, he came again in company with a lad, who was a stranger to me. The lad said he had brought my lodger. I said he was no lodger of mine. The deceased appeared to be intoxicated. I desired the boy to take him away, and the boy said, he did not know where to take him. I refused to receive him. The deceased said he was very ill, and begged for God's sake that I would let him in, but I said I would not be burdened with him. All this was at my door. I took him by the arm and helped him across the street, and he reeled a great deal as if he was in liquor: he stood at the corner of Mrs Marengo's shop; I shut my door, and never saw the deceased alive afterwards. It must have been near about 7 o'clock when I last saw him. - I did not push the deceased away. - I should have had no objection to take him again if I had room.
Thomas Peters, of South-street, butcher, saw the deceased, on Saturday night, about 7 o'clock before the door of Belworthy's house. Belworthy's wife opened the top hatch of the door, and told the deceased he should not come in there to night. She added, where you have been spending your money, you may go and get your lodgings, and shut the door. I did not hear the deceased speak. Mrs Belworthy then came round from her back door, took the deceased under his arms, and helped him up the street a few yards, when he fell. She supported him on again when he caught hold of a scaffold pole, and there I left him. He was then off his legs. When he got hold of the pole, Mrs Belworthy left him. I do not know whether the deceased was tipsy or not. The scaffold pole was on the opposite side of the street to Belworthy's house. There were several people present. I heard Mrs Belworthy saw to the deceased, that she supposed he had been up to Marengo's and spent his money in cider, and had nothing left to pay for his lodgings.
Richard Tuckett, of Mary Arches street, labourer, corroborated this evidence.
John Ginham is an officer of police, and was on duty on Saturday night. In consequence of a message, about ½ past 7 o'clock I went with sanders to the Butcherow; I there found the deceased standing in the street, with a great number of boys about him. I knew the deceased by sight but not by name. I thought he was drunk, and asked him where he had been drinking. He said he had not been drinking. I still supposed him to be drunk. I should have taken him to one of the lodging houses in the neighbourhood, but in consequence of some one saying he had been refused admittance, I took him to the station house at the Guildhall. In a few minutes, the Mayor came in and told the deceased to warm himself at the fire. The deceased staggered to the fire and sat down. In about half an hour, he still appearing to be drunk, was, by the order of the Mayor, put into one of the cells behind the hall, for the purpose of being taken care of for the night. He was supplied with clean straw and a large great coat. I wrapped him up and left him about 9 o'clock. I saw him again in about half an hour. I still believed the man to be drunk, but as he answered better when I spoke to him, I fancied he was recovering. I went off duty, and saw no more of him till the following morning.
John Sparks - Is a police-officer, and was on duty on Saturday night. About ½ past 10, in consequence of instructions, went to the cell where deceased was lying. He appeared to be asleep. Saw him again about ½ past 12, when asking him how he was, he said, "Are you the lodging-house keeper?" I said I supposed I was for the night; then, said he, "Bring me some more bedclothes." I told him I had no more clothes, but desired him to pull the straw more over him, of which there was plenty. I saw him twice afterwards – the last time about 5 o'clock, when I was going off duty; I spoke to him but he made no answer, and supposing him to be asleep I did not disturb him.
John Stone - Is an officer of police; saw deceased brought in by Ginham and Sanders, and afterwards removed to the cell. At 9 o'clock the following morning I went to see how he was, in order that I might report to the Mayor. I found the deceased scarcely able to speak, and then supposed he was ill; I reported accordingly to the Mayor. The Mayor soon came to the Hall, and I went for medical assistance. Mr Tucker came with me, and by order of the Mayor and Mr Tucker, the deceased was taken to the Turk's Head Inn. He was attended during the day by Mr Tucker, and a nurse from the workhouse. Dr Miller visited the deceased with Mr Tucker on Sunday. He died on Sunday night between 7 and 8 o'clock.
John Tucker, surgeon, was called to the deceased between 9 and 10 o'clock on Sunday morning; found him in one of the cells behind the Guildhall – insensible and thought him at once in a dying state; attended him during the day, and saw him many times; he was taken to the Turk's Head at my suggestion; every care was afforded him, and he died in the evening. I attributed his death to exhaustion and the influence of cold. When I first saw him, I gave him a glass of brandy and water, three parts of which he drank, and then said, "I can't drink any more." After he was in bed, he said he was getting warm and more comfortable. The pulse rose a little, and then I had some faint hopes of him, but he had a convulsive attack about 3 o'clock, from which he never rallied.
The jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death", but attached to it the following remark. - "The Jury desire to express their sense of the great attention and care bestowed by the Mayor, the medical gentlemen & the police officers, and Mr Sampson, of the Turk's Head Inn, on the deceased; but while they do so, they cannot forbear to add, that the cell in which the unfortunate man was put as a place of refuge, is, in their opinion, unfit for a human being." - John Gove, Foreman.

Thursday 8 February 1838, Issue 3775 – Gale Document No. Y3200669753
Children Burnt to Death - On the 27th ult. an Inquest was taken in the parish of Stokeinteignhead, in this county, on the body of a child about four years of age, named BOWDEN. The mother, a poor woman residing at a place called "One o'Clock," in that parish, having occasion to go from home for a short time, left the deceased and a younger child, about two years old, sitting by the fire. On her return, after an absence of about 20 minutes, she found the eldest lying on the hearth and presenting a most shocking spectacle, her clothes being destroyed and the poor girl literally roasted. The younger child was also severely burnt, and lies in a dangerous state. The Rev. Dr. Collyns, the clergyman of the parish, hearing of this distressing event, immediately furnished remedies for the survivor, and himself sat out a distance of several miles to procure medical assistance. The verdict was Accidental Death; and the Coroner stated that he had that day returned from holding an Inquest upon a child burnt at Kenton, which was the third child destroyed by fire within the week.

Thursday 15 February 1838, Issue 3776 – Gale Document No. Y3200669767
Coroner's Inquest - On the 6th inst., an Inquest was taken at Moretonhampstead, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of MARY, the wife of JOHN PARKER, of that place, tailor, who was found dead in her house, the Sunday morning preceding. It appeared from the evidence, that about half-past 8 on the Sunday morning, the deceased went to a neighbour's house to light a stick, in order to the kindling of her own fire, and while there complained of being very cold. In about three parts of an hour from this time, another neighbour, a female, went to the deceased's house, and found her on her knees, with her head and hands resting on a chair. This person spoke to the deceased, but received no answer; she then tried to arouse her but to no purpose. Mr Nosworthy, surgeon, was sent for, but the vital spark had fled. The deceased was 82 years of age, and her husband, an aged and infirm man, had not risen from his bed at the time his wife was thus found. The jury returned a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God.

On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the Town Hall, Tiverton, before F. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner for that borough, on the body of MR JAMES QUICK, 78 years of age, an inhabitant of one of Greenway's alms-houses. The deceased was formerly for years, landlord of the White Horse Inn, in that town, and one of the witnesses referred to by the Rev. C. Colton, for the truth of the statement he published respecting the Sampford Ghost, in 1810. He had become reduced in circumstances, and was admitted to the alms-houses, where he had recently given tokens of a wandering state of mind. On the evening previous to his death, however, he went to his bed quietly, and n the night a noise was heard by the neighbours in his apartment, but they being old and infirm, and the night bitterly cold, none of them got up. In the morning, however, some one went into the room in order to ascertain the cause of the disturbance, when the furniture was broken to pieces and MR QUICK not there. He was subsequently found in the garden underneath the window of the room, in his shirt, and still living, although the descent was about 20 feet. A surgeon was sent for, but the poor old man never spoke, and expired shortly afterwards. It is supposed that in a paroxysm of insanity he had broken the furniture in pieces, and then leapt from the window, and a verdict of temporary insanity was returned.

On Monday the 5th inst., an Inquest was taken at Luppitt, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on the body of CHARLOTTE LOWMAN, 19 years of age, servant to Mr Henry Griffin, of Smithayes, in that parish, who hung herself on the preceding Saturday evening, in a swing, put up for the use of the children. No cause could be assigned for this rash act, which appears to have been effected in the most determined manner, the deceased being discovered apparently kneeling on the floor, her arms extended by her side, and her body straight up against the rope of the swing which was twisted once round the neck, and passing behind the ear, was fastened to two of the couples of the roof of the barn. She had been in her master's service about year, and no alteration had been observed in her manner. Under these circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se.

On Friday last, in the absence of her mother, who had scarcely left her room a minute, AUGUSTA MARY, about four years of age, daughter of MR SAMUEL JACKSON, of the Distillery, Plymouth, caught her clothes on fire, and was so dreadfully burnt, that although immediate medical assistance was rendered, she died on Sunday. Verdict on the Inquest, Accidental Death.

Thursday 5 April 1838, Issue 3783 – Gale Document No. Y3200669862
Exeter, Wednesday 4 April
On the 26th ult., an Inquest was taken before F. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner of Tiverton, on the body of SARAH ANN BROOKS, 7 years of age, daughter of a carpenter, employed in the lace manufactory of Messrs. J. Heathcoat and Co., who, in endeavouring to lift the blow-coal off the fire, in the work-shop, in the temporary absence of the father, caught her clothes on fire, and was so burnt that she expired on the following evening. Verdict - Accidental Death.

On the 27th ult. a person of the name of BIDGOOD, a butcher, of Tiverton, who had been staying a few days with his nephew, Mr Upton, at Teignmouth, terminated his existence by cutting his throat with a razor. He had intended to leave for this city that morning and solicited Mr Upton to accompany him a short distance, who on entering his room, found him partly dressed, in the state described, quite dead. Verdict on the Inquest, on the following day, - Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 19 April 1838, Issue 3785 – Gale Document No. Y3200669888
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On the 6th instant, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at East Budleigh, on the body of PETER CLARK, Esq., which had been disinterred for that purpose. The deceased was 88 years of age, and formerly a Surgeon of that place; his death having been occasioned by injuries received in falling from his horse; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.
On Wednesday last, at Tiverton, before F. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner for that Borough, on the body of RICHARD PITT, 59 years of age, who having gone to the river about 9 o'clock on the preceding evening, with his net, being at that time somewhat intoxicated, was found about half past 5 that morning at Head Weir, about a mile above the town, laying across the Weir, with his head in the water, and quite dead. In his net were found five trout. He was subject to cramp, in a fit of which it is supposed he had fallen, and a verdict was returned of Found Drowned.

Thursday 3 May 1838, Issue 3787 – Gale Document No. Y3200669915
Coroner's Inquests
At Ashburton, before Joseph Gribble, Esq. Coroner, on the body of WM. TREEN, a pauper, on his way, under an order, in one of the stage wagons, from Devonport to Bristol, his native place, who had died in that town. A respectable jury summoned on this occasion, wished to satisfy themselves that his poor man had had that attention paid him which his circumstances and ill health demanded, and Messrs. Gervis and Hele, surgeons, in that town, were requested to inspect the body. Witnesses also were examined from Devonport, Plymouth, Biddeford Bridge, and Buckfastleigh, and after the closest investigation, the jury (after the Coroner had recapitulated the evidence and made a few remarks thereon) retired for two hours to consult and then returned the following verdict – "That the said WM. TREEN died a natural death, the result of an established disease, namely, a dropsy in the chest, but his death was accelerated by his removal in a very weak state from Plymouth to Ashburton on his road to Bristol, being exposed for eleven hours in a sage wagon and not sufficient clothing to keep him warm, and notwithstanding the high reputation which the relieving officer has, the jurors think he acted inadvertently, and his conduct with the other acting officers deserves censure."

At Sidmouth, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on the body of a little boy about 3 ½ years old, son of MR CLARKE, linen-draper, who having accidentally fallen over the fender, under the fire, in the hurry and agitation in taking him up, a half pint of boiling water in a warmer fell over the child's neck. Medical assistance was immediately procured, and the child, though excited, seemed going on favourably. On the following day, however, it became worse, and soon after expired. Verdict - Died from excessive irritation, occasioned by the accident.

SUICIDE - An Inquest was held on Sunday last, at the New Inn, Drewsteignton, by Joseph Gribble, Esq., and a respectable jury, on the body of MARY BLANCHFORD, (alias ALLENT,) aged 35, wife of SAMUEL BLANCHFORD, who was found dead on Saturday morning, about nine o'clock, in her bed room, suspended to a small staple by a large cord. It appeared by the evidence adduced, that the deceased had a few days previously taken some potatoes from a Mr John Smith, and he very prudently informed the husband, requesting he would desire his wife to desist from doing it again, and he would think nothing more of it, which was accordingly done. It is supposed from the above circumstances that the deceased committed the rash act. The Jury, after hearing further evidence which only tended to corroborate the above statement, returned a verdict, "That the deceased hung herself while in a fit of temporary insanity."

Thursday 24 May 1838, Issue 3790 – Gale Document No. Y3200669949
BRAUNTON - A sad accident happened in this parish last week: JOHN CONIBEER, a servant of Mr John Atkins, of Lob, on Friday afternoon, had loaded a gun with the intention of shooting some rabbits. He was in a stooping position and leaning on the gun, when by some mischance it went off, and lodged the contents in his left shoulder, entering under the arm; he was taken to the North Devon Infirmary, where he expired from the injuries he had received. Verdict on the Inquest – Accidental Death.

AN UNNATURAL MOTHER - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was taken at the Plymouth Workhouse, before R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner for that Borough, on the body of a male infant child of a woman named MARGARET WALKER, which had been disinterred in consequence of some suspicions having arisen that it had come unfairly by its end. The child was born about a month since, and was illegitimate, the husband of the woman having been at sea for a considerable period, and the child had been nursed by another woman, in order to conceal its birth from him on his return. Mr Derry, surgeon, who examined the body, gave it as his opinion, that the child came to its death from the want of suitable nutriment; and the jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Thursday 31 May 1838, Issue 3791 – Gale Document No. Y3200669964
SUICIDE – An inquisition was held at the Citadel, Plymouth, on the 23rd inst., before R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MICHAEL LYNCH, a private soldier of the 29th regiment. From the evidence of two of deceased's comrades, who were examined, it appeared that LYNCH was frequently intoxicated, had on the morning of that day been sentenced to extra drill and confinement to the barracks for having been absent on the two previous days. On returning to the barrack-room from the guard-room, he told a comrade what his punishment was, but observed, "it was no matter, as he did not intend to undergo it." He then began to dress himself as if preparing to go on drill; during this time he was humming a tune to himself, and his manner appeared quite composed. No particular notice was taken of him by the other men in the room, as there was nothing uncommon in his conduct except as regarded the expression that "he would not undergo the punishment," by which they thought he meant that he would desert. He retired from the room for a few minutes, when he returned singing, and almost immediately after placed the muzzle f a gun in his mouth and discharged it with his foot, a string being tied to the trigger. Almost at the moment of the explosion he told a comrade standing by that he was nearly ready for drill. The ball, after passing the skull, shivered a shelf over the door of the room, and passed into the unfortunate man's own knapsack. The Jury, after a few minutes@ consultation, returned a verdict of felo de se.

Thursday 12 July 1838, Issue 3797 – Gale Document No. Y3200670037
On the 2nd inst., an Inquest was held before F. S. Gervis, Esq. Coroner, at Tiverton, on the body of GRACE BAKER, a poor woman who had been found dead in her bed the preceding morning. It appeared that she was a pauper of Burlescombe, and had been required to go into the Union Workhouse, but this she refused to comply with, and had been allowed to remain out with 1s. 6d. per week. She lived with a daughter, about 16 years of age, who earns 2s. to 2s. 4d. per week. She had been ill of water on the chest, and general debility. Mr Macdonald, the parish surgeon, considered that much of her suffering and symptoms arose from impoverished diet. And the jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God, but hastened by the want of a proper supply of food." - Which they requested the Coroner to communicate, with the evidence, to the Poor Law Commissioners.

Thursday 2 August 1838, Issue 3800 – Gale Document No. Y3200670074
CORONER'S INQUEST - An Inquest was taken on Saturday last, before J. Partridge, Esq. Coroner, at the Horse and Groom Inn, Heavitree, on the body of WM. CHANNON, of Budleigh Salterton, labourer, who was found very ill, near Sandy Gate, under a hayrick of Mr T. Pidsley of Sowton, last Thursday, and died on being removed to the Royal Oak public-house, in Heavitree, next morning. Webber, a labourer, deposed to finding the deceased in a great state of destitution in the place described, which was corroborated by Mr Pidsley, who behaved with the utmost humanity to the deceased and tried every means to renovate nature, though in vain. He was a drover, when employment was to be had and had seen better days. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of Providence, but accelerated by the exposure to the wet and damp," he having been under the rick for full 24 hours, unseen and unheeded. He had three pawn tickets in his pocket for clothes, &c. Mr Madden, surgeon, was called in and tried every human means, and all the efforts of modern pharmacy and skilful treatment but in vain.

At Thorverton, on the 21st ult., as HENRY HEARDER, a respectable young man of that place, was in a loft taking down hurdles for the purpose of forming sheep pens for the fair, his foot slipped, and he fell upon a hurdle that was beneath, by which he received such severe injury of the abdomen, that having lingered in great agony until the forenoon of the following day (Sunday), he expired. Verdict on the Inquest, Accidental Death. The deceased was much respected as an honest and industrious man; and has left a wife and two children to mourn this sudden bereavement.

Thursday 6 September 1838, Issue 3805 – Gale Document No. Y3200670139
On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Manning's Red Lion Inn, Sidwell-street, on the body of THOMAS TOWNSEND in the employ of Mr Joseph Ward, coach builder; who on the preceding day dropped down suddenly in Mr Ward's garden, in a fit of apoplexy, and expired almost immediately. And a verdict was returned accordingly. The deceased was about 50 years of age, and has left a widow and family.

BIDEFORD. Accidents. Thursday morning, about two o'clock, a lighter belonging to MR THOMAS LEY, merchant, of this port, got across the gullet of the bridge, and was stranded. The men belonging to the lighter were using their exertions to get her off, when they heard a tremendous plunge into the water, but from the darkness of the morning nothing was perceptible. In the space of a short time they heard some groaning, apparently a person in the agonies of death, of which the men apprised their master early in the morning, who caused the bridge pool to be dragged, and every effort made use of to discover the body supposed to be lost, but without effect. Soon after a person named TAYLOR, shipwright, belonging to the yard of Mr Brooke, was found missing, and it was generally supposed to be TGAYLOR that had fallen from the bridge, which proved to be correct, his body being found this morning afloat near Foard, and a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, when, after a full investigation before T. L. Pridham, Esq., coroner, and a respectable jury, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 20 September 1838, Issue 3807 – Gale Document No. Y3200670170
On the 11th instant an Inquest was taken at Littleham, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq. Coroner, on view of the body of HENRY BARRETT, 13 years of age, who was sent on the preceding morning by his father, to turn out a mare into a field, and not returning to dinner, search was made for him, when the animal was found lying on its back in a ditch on the side of a lane he had to pass, and the unfortunate boy dead under it. There could be no doubt of this being the result of accident and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 4 October 1838, Issue 3809 – Gale Document No. Y3200670197
Exeter, Wednesday 3 October
On the morning of Friday last, the body of a female was discovered in one of the mill leats, near the Bonhay, in this city. It was taken to a reception house of the Exeter Humane Society, in Exe-lane, but the person, whose name was found to be
ANN BREWER, had to all appearance been some time dead. She was young in years, and had lived at service, but latterly her life has been of a disreputable description, and it is conjectured that being discarded by a young man with whom she had associated herself, led to this rash act. On Saturday morning an Inquest was taken on the body, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at Taylor's Barnstaple Inn, Hart's Row, when no evidence as to how the body came into the water coming before the Jury, they returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

An Inquest was held on Monday the 24th ult., at Great Torrington, by Mr Vallack, Coroner, on the body of MARY FRIENDSHIP, who was found drowned in the Rolle Canal; - there was no proof of her having committed the act, but there is little doubt of it, as, for the previous month, she had been in a weak delirious state. Verdict, "Found drowned."

On Monday the 1st instant, at North Petherwin, on the body of MR WILLIAM STRIKE, a respectable yeoman of that parish, who whilst taking his supper, apparently in the best health and spirits, suddenly expired. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 18 October 1838, Issue 3811 – Gale Document No. Y3200670222
Exeter, Wednesday 17 October
Suicide - A labouring man named JOHN HAYNES, aged 57, residing in Coombe Street, destroyed himself on Saturday morning last, between the hours of 5 and 6. An Inquest was held on the body, when it appeared that the deceased, who was labouring under aberration of mind, had left his house to drown himself at 3 o'clock the same morning, but was met, and stopped by the watchman, who took him home again: - and he went to bed, his wife being with him. The deceased was more quiet, and his wife fell asleep, but waking between 5 and 6 she missed him, and on going down stairs found her unfortunate husband hanging by his garter and a piece of strop, to a hook in the kitchen; she gave the alarm, and deceased was cut down, being still quite warm. All attempts however to restore animation proved fruitless. Verdict – "Insanity."

Yesterday an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at Tarrant's Red Cow Inn, St. David's, in this city, on the body of a child 21 months old, named JOHN RAYMOND, which met its death by being run over by a wagon, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 25 October 1838, Issue 3812 – Gale Document No. Y3200670230
MELANCHOLY DEATH - An Inquest was held at the Rolle's Arms, Budleigh Salterton, on the 16th instant, by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on the body of MISS HARRIET SHIRLEY, of Sherington, near Kidderminster, who was on a visit to her sister, MRS GOULLET, a resident of Salterton, whither she had come only the previous Tuesday. On Saturday, about the middle of the day, MISS SHIRLEY went out to take a walk on the Western Cliff; not returning at dinner time, her friends were alarmed, and Mrs Goullet first went to meet her; not finding her, persons were dispatched in all directions to see for her, but without avail. Late in the afternoon a young gentleman discovered the half of a footstep – the heel of a foot only, so close to the edge of the cliff, that he thought a person could not have advanced so far without going over the cliff, which is between 200 and 300 feet high. He went to the edge and looked down; at about 50 or 60 feet below him he saw a bonnet hanging to a bush; he mentioned it to a Mr Webber who was passing who went home for a hook and line which he let down and pulled up the bonnet, which was at once identified by Mrs Goullet. Persons were then dispatched to examine the cliff from above and below, but no trace of MISS SHIRLEY was to be seen. Late in the evening, being satisfied that she must be there somewhere, a man of the name of John Teed was let down over the face of the cliff by a rope, with a candle and lantern, and in a fissure or gully of the cliff below him, he heard a groan. He was lowered to the spot and there he found the unfortunate lady standing upright, with her arms crossed – her legs jammed in the narrow crevice. The man then raised her up by main force and lowered her to the beach, having first of all fastened a rope round her. She was here received by the people below, and under the direction of Mr Vowell, surgeon, who was in attendance, conveyed to Mrs Goullet's house. She lingered in a state of insensibility till Monday morning, when she died, so that no clue could be offered as to the cause of the melancholy catastrophe. The fissure of the rock in which the unhappy lady was found, was rather concealed under the face of it – so that a person desiring to throw himself off, could not have fallen into it. It was a particularly squally day, and it is supposed that her bonnet, having been blown over the cliff, she approached to look after it, and thus fell over; although she had fallen 100 feet, there was not a single fracture of a limb – the symptoms under which she died being concussion of the brain. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 8 November 1838, Issue 3814 – Gale Document No. Y3200670254
Exeter, Wednesday 7 November
This morning an Inquest was taken before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Manning's Red Lion Inn, Sidwell-street, on the body of ELIZABETH PEARCY, who has been living as a servant in the family of A. H. Attwater, Esq., of that parish, upwards of two years, and was found on the preceding morning between 8 and 9 o'clock, suspended by the neck with a cord to one of the cloak pins in her bedroom. She was quite dead but still warm, and about 18 years of age. Her conduct had drawn upon her reproof, and notice to quit the service of this family, which she was to have left that day. Verdict – Suicide being a Lunatic.

Thursday 27 December 1838, Issue 3821 – Gale Document No. Y3200670357
On the 18th instant, an Inquest was taken at Ottery St. Mary, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN APSEY, aged about 50, who was found dead in a field called Yonder Moor, near Bishops Court, in that parish, on the previous morning. It appeared that the deceased, who was a miller by trade, had lived at Axminster, where he failed in business, and where it is believed his wife and family still reside, had about a month or six weeks ago been committed to Bridwell for not maintaining them. He called on Saturday afternoon at the house of Mr Richard Dening, of Ottery, who had married his wife's sister, and who gave him some bread and cheese, and desired him to go home. He was afterwards seen by another person, when he complained of being very ill. He did not appear tipsy, but in a stupefied idiotic state – he was then about 20 yards from the gate of the field leading into Yonder Moor. A cut was found over the left eye, but too slight to endanger life; and from the abrasions on the palms of both hands, and on the knees, it was inferred that the deceased had fallen forwards on his face and hands, and thus received the injury on the forehead. It was the medical opinion that death was occasioned by congestion of the brain, produced by exposure to the cold.

Thursday 31 January 1839, Issue 3826 – Gale Document No. Y3200670431
CORONER'S INQUEST – Alleged Ill-Treatment of a Woman by Her Husband.
On Friday morning last an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter at Manning's Red Lion Inn, St. Sidwell-street, on the body of BARBARA SOUTHARD, 59 years of age, the wife of JOSEPH SOUTHARD, a slater and plasterer, who it was alleged had met her death in consequence of injuries received from her husband. From the evidence of John Johnson, whose wife and the deceased were sisters, it appeared that she and her husband occupied two rooms in his house. On the afternoon of the preceding Wednesday, he found the deceased in her apartments cold and very ill. He fetched her husband, who came about 5 o'clock. The deceased was then very faint and fell off her chair. The husband said she was drunk, and struck her several blows in the head. He then took and carried her into the adjoining room and threw her on the bed. The deceased did not speak again after that, and 11 o'clock at night, Mr W. Land, surgeon, being sent for, pronounced her dead. Johnson further said the deceased was subject to fits, but was a sober woman. He was confirmed in his evidence by his wife, who said that SOUTHARD having thrown his wife on the bed, refused to allow a doctor to be sent for, and actually left her insensible. The deceased never spoke after receiving the blows, but groaned a great deal. Mr Land said he had attended the deceased professionally for some time, and supposed her to be labouring under an affection of the heart, which might have caused sudden death, had no blow been inflicted. But further examination of the body being desired, the Jury adjourned to the evening, when Mr Land further stated that he had examined the body of the deceased, assisted by his partner Mr Besly; Mr F. Warren, and Dr Coster. He opened the head and found disease of the brain long standing, which was sufficient to account for her death. He found no marks of violence on the exterior of the head, excepting a bruise on the temple, which might have been caused by a fall. He thought Apoplexy the cause of the death of the deceased, and did not deem it necessary to examine the heart. Dr Coster thought any violence would be likely to hasten the death of a person labouring under a disease like that of the deceased, but he could not undertake to say whether it had done so in this instance. After hearing this evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

An Inquest has been taken before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of WM. WOTTON, carpenter, at Ideford, who hung himself to an apple tree in an orchard. It appeared that he was engaged to pay a certain sum of money on the following day, which he was unable to accomplish, and a verdict of insanity was returned.

Thursday 7 February 1839, Issue 3827 – Gale Document No. Y3200670443
Inquests Taken Last Week by Mr Vallack, of Great Torrington, County Coroner.
At Woolfardisworthy, on the body of a child, called ELIZABETH WAKELEY, who was burnt in consequence of her frock taking fire.

At Merton, on ELIZA ELLACOTT, aged 5 years, who was accidentally burnt during the temporary absence of her elder sister who was left in charge of her.

At Wembworthy, on the body of a tailor, called SAMUEL STEVENS, who whilst sitting and conversing by the fireside in perfect health fell from his chair and instantly expired. "Died by the Visitation of God."

At Sampford Courtenay, on the body of WILLIAM JACKMAN, a farmer's son, aged 16 years. The deceased with others had, on Thursday last, been for some hours tracing a fox in the snow, which they succeeded in destroying about the middle of the day. He, with two men, proceeded the same afternoon with their fox, with a view of collecting money, to the houses of the neighbouring farmers, by whom they were too liberally supplied with beer and cider. The three parted company in the evening, all much intoxicated; about 7 o'clock the poor lad was met, without his hat, rambling towards his home, being then within a quarter of a mile of it, and the next morning about daybreak he was discovered laying by the side of the road within a hundred yards of his Father's house frozen to death!

Thursday 14 March 1839, Issue 3832 – Gale Document No. Y3200670503
An Inquest has been taken at Tiverton, before Mr Gervis, the borough Coroner, on the body of SUSAN YELLAND, a woman of weak intellect, who in the absence of the person with whom she lodged, caught her clothes on fire, and before it was discovered, was burnt in some parts literally to a cinder. She survived the accident nearly 24 hours, but surgical aid was unavailing; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 11 April 1839, Issue 3836 – Gale Document No. Y3200670559
Exeter, Wednesday 10 April
SUDDEN DEATH - On the forenoon of Thursday last, MR S. H. WINYARD, of Waterbeer-street, in this city, gun maker, attended at the Guildhall to give evidence, should it be necessary, in a case to be heard there. The Inquiry took place before the Magistrates, in the Private Hall, and while it was proceeding, MR WINYARD, who was seated on one of the benches, suddenly dropped from it, and being removed to the Council Chamber, Mr Harris, surgeon, accompanied him, but in a few minutes life was extinct. An Inquest was taken in the afternoon of the same day, before John Warren, Esq. Coroner, when Mr Harris giving it as his opinion that the death was occasioned by the rupture, or ossification of some of the vessels of the heart, a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned. The deceased has not been a great while in this city, and had not had good health. He was about the middle age, and has left a wife and two children to mourn this sudden bereavement.

Thursday 6 June 1839, Issue 3844 – Gale Document No. Y3200670671
SUICIDE – On the evening of the 28th ult. an Inquest was seen before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at the city workhouse, on the body of RICHARD HALL, an inmate f that establishment, whose death was the consequence of a wound he had inflicted on his throat with a clasp knife, on the morning of the 20th ult.. It appeared that about four o'clock that morning, the deceased was observed by another pauper to be lying in an unusual posture, with his head over the side of the bed, and on examination it was found he had inflicted a deep wound on his throat, from which a large quantity of blood had flowed, the clasp knife with which this act had been perpetrated, was laying in the blood. On being questioned why he had done this, he replied, "Let me alone, I wish to die." Medical assistance was immediately sent for, and promptly rendered by Mr J. Tucker, surgeon, and Mr Wm. Warren, a pupil of that gentleman. The wound was sewed up, and it was expected the unhappy man would survive; but he became worse, and about ten o'clock on the Monday evening, died. He was a quiet, inoffensive man, and of very reserved habits. He had been labouring under a dropsical complaint, and expressed alarm at the swelling of his legs and arms; being observed on several occasions on the Sunday preceding the commission of this fatal act, to shed tears, but for which he would assign no reason. He received every attention from the medical officers, the governor and matron of the workhouse; and before his death expressed his thankfulness to all; adding, "I hope the Lord will forgive me for what I have done." The Jury returned a verdict of "Destroyed himself while labouring under temporary Insanity."

On Thursday last in taking the house lately occupied by Mr Thos. Knott, Chemist, in the High-street, in this city, the materials of which have been sold, in order to forming the entrance from this street to Queen Street, and the New Eastern Market, from some neglect or mismanagement on the part of persons who had been purchasers, a chimney and part of a flooring suddenly gave way, burying underneath it two children who were incautiously wandering about the ruins for the purpose of picking up laths and bits of wood; and also injuring one of the workmen. One of the children was soon extricated, and taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, much bruised, but it is hoped not seriously hurt. It was, however, three hours before the body of the other was dug out, whose death, as it would appear, must have been instantaneous. This was a boy about ten years of age, called JOHN MITCHELL, son of a plasterer, residing in Exe Lane. An Inquest was taken on the body on the following evening, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at Taylor's Barnstaple Inn, North-Street, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

On the morning of the 25th ult, a man named THOMAS BERDICK, who resided at Turf, and was employed on the towing-path of the Exeter Canal, was found dead in his bed by his wife. It is supposed he had received some mental injury on the preceding evening, from one of the horses, and, on the Inquest, a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 13 June 1839, Issue 3845 – Gale Document No. Y3200670686
ACCIDENTS - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Woolfardisworthy by Mr Vallack, County Coroner, on the body of a child called JAMES SHORT who fell off a stool into the fire, and died in consequence of the burns he received.

On Saturday last at Pyworthy, on the body of JOHN BATTEN, aged 72 who whilst at work in a quarry there raising stones, the side of the quarry fell in upon him, and killed him on the spot, he was taken out for under the stones and rubbish in about ten minutes after the accident happened in a mutilated state.

On Monday last at Littleham, on the body of SAMUEL BARTHOLOMEW aged 17, who was drowned in the river Torridge on the Sunday preceding, whilst bathing. - Verdicts, Accidental Death.

Thursday 20 June 1839, Issue 3846 – Gale Document No. Y3200670697
CORONER'S INQUESTS.
On Friday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, for Exeter, at Mountstephen's Honiton Inn, Paris-street, on the body of a full grown female child, which had been discovered that morning, in a state of nudity, dead, and bearing marks of violence on its person, in an open piece of ground in rear of Cox's Buildings, in that street. The proceedings commenced about 6 in the evening, and the first witness was a boy named George Ellery, who found the body about half past 6, that morning.
Mr John Tucker, surgeon, was called early that morning, to examine the body. It was that of a full grown, apparently healthy female child. He found several fractures on the skull, the bone called the parietal bone was fractured in many places: under the skin there was a great deal of extravasated blood, as also under the bone pressing on the brain, the contusion of which was sufficient to cause death. Had the child been born alive, a blow which would cause such a fracture would stun and cause instant death. There had been a considerable quantity of blood lost from the body; the umbilical cord had been tied, but not in a skilful manner. He should think the cord had been tied by a person unused to such occurrences. On examining the body, he found the lungs and all the other parts in a healthy state, and by using the usual tests of immersion of the lungs in water, he found they contained air and floated. He by no means stated this as an infallible test, but taking all the circumstances into consideration, namely that of perceiving an haemorrhage issuing from the nose, which could not have taken place if there had been no life; the floating of the lungs which contained air, together with the healthy appearance of the body, and likewise finding the skull fractured, he should unhesitatingly say the child was born alive; but that the fracture of the skull might have been produced by the child falling to the ground, supposing the mother to have been unassisted at the time of her labour.
Henry Francis Sampson is a tailor, residing in Cox's Buildings. A young woman named MARY ANN EDMUNDS came to his house on the preceding Tuesday, to work at needle work, and had since remained there. Learnt that morning a child had been found in the rear of his premises. It being now half-past 9 o'clock, an adjournment took place to the following (Saturday) morning at 9 o'clock, when the proceedings were resumed.
Mr Samuel Walkey is surgeon to the City Prison. Saw MARY ANN EDMUNDS, who had been taken into custody on this charge, at 3 o'clock on the preceding afternoon, at the Guildhall. She acknowledged that she had been delivered of a child without any assistance. She was removed from the Guildhall to the prison, where every care that her situation required was afforded her. The prisoner made a full confession of the birth of the child, which she sad had taken place in the kitchen, but declared it was not born alive, and that she never would have exposed it, had it not been born dead. He (Mr Walkey) could not judge from present appearances whether the fracture in the head of the child had been occasioned before death, or after death. It was a full grown large child, apparently healthy. It might or might not have been alive when born. His impression was that the fracture was occasioned by the child falling on the stones in the kitchen. From a medical examination of the prisoner, he was inclined to believe her statement true as to the birth. Had she used violence on the skull to cause the death of the child, by a blow or otherwise, it would, he thought have occasioned a different kind of fracture than that existing. There was no doubt whatever that she had received no assistance, and that the child had come into the world without any previous preparation. The prisoner acknowledged that she laid it outside the garden. From observation, he felt convinced this was not the first child the prisoner had been delivered of. At the request of some of the Jury, Mr Walkey again examined the body of the child. He said, there was certainly an extensive fracture on the head, but he still thought it might have been occasioned by a fall on the stones. He would not undertake to say the child was still born. Many children were born in an insensible state. He had closely examined the neck and found no marks of any ligature, which there undoubtedly would have been had the mother tied a string round its neck.
Mrs Sampson, the wife of H. F. Sampson, had only known MARY ANN EDMUNDS a short time, and had employed her in needle work from Tuesday to Friday in that week. She allowed her to sleep in the house, in consequence of her friends living at Alphington, which was too far for her to walk home at night. She slept with the two daughters of witness – one 15, the other 12 years old. Nothing occurred to make her suspicious that she had given birth to a child, until the body was found on Friday morning. EDMUNDS did not seem alarmed when the infant was first discovered, but sat and took her breakfast as usual with witness and her husband. When she (Mrs Sampson) heard of the discovery, she began to suspect that EDMUNDS had given birth to the child, and in order to obtain from her some acknowledgement of it, told her she expected the houses in the row would all be searched. She then appeared much agitated, but said nothing. Witness now related symptoms of indisposition in EDMUNDS on the Thursday, but which at the time did not excite any particular notice. And was confirmed in her evidence by Caroline Bannister, a servant; and Mary Sampson, daughter of Mrs Sampson, who stated that EDMUNDS got up very early on Thursday morning.
Frederick White, officer to the Commissioners of Improvement, was called on Friday to the house of Sampson. EDMUNDS acknowledged to him, that she had given birth to a child between 3 and 4 o'clock on Thursday morning, and had put it in the place where it was found.
The Coroner having summed up, the Jury retired and were engaged for three hours in deliberation, when they returned a verdict: "That the deceased is the child of MARY ANN EDMUNDS, single woman, and was born alive on the 13th of June. That it was found dead on the 14th of June, having several fractures of the skull, which fractures had caused its death. But that no evidence appears how or by what means these fractures were occasioned."
EDMUNDS is a dress-maker, a young woman of prepossessing appearance, and it is understood respectably connected. She was sent to prison charged with the murder of her female infant child, and under that order still remains there.

On Monday an Inquest was taken before Mr Warren, at Tapp's Courtenay Arms public house, Mary Arches-street, on the body of FRANCIS MODLEY, a child about 1 ¾ years old, son of JOHN MODLEY, shoemaker, residing in that street. It appeared that on Saturday morning while the little fellow's smother was busied about the breakfast, unobserved by her, he lifted a small kettle of boiling water that stood by the side of the fire, and drank out of it. He was immediately taken to the Dispensary, and Mr Hele having given such directions as the case called for, but without the slightest hope of any successful result, lost no time in apprising the medical gentlemen of the institution, who were most prompt in rendering their aid; but medical skill was of no avail, and the child died on the following morning. Verdict - "Died in consequence of drinking boiling water."

On the same day an Inquest was taken before Mr Warren, at Roberts's Globe public house, Bartholomew yard, on the body of JOHN PORTER, between five and six years old, son of MR JOHN PORTER, tea-dealer, Mint-lane, who met his death under the following distressing circumstances. On the preceding Friday morning between 7 and 8 o'clock, the servant having lit the fire, dressed this child in the kitchen, and left him there while she went up stairs to dress another child. By some means he caught his clothes on fire, and his screams bringing his parents and the servant to his assistance, he was found running out into the passage; and we regret to hear that MRS PORTER was much burnt in extinguishing the flames. Mr Woodman, surgeon, was immediately sent for, and every thing done that human skill could devise, but after lingering in great agony until Monday morning, death terminated his sufferings. - Verdict - "Accidental Death by burning."

On the 31st ult., an Inquest was taken at Haviland's farm, Membury, Devon, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS COLLINS, who on the morning of the preceding day was found hanging in a linhay, in a field near the above farm. The deceased, who was a labourer, belonging to the neighbouring parish of Stockland, had suspended himself to a rafter by a leather strap. He with his wife and 3 children, had been inmates of the Axminster Union Workhouse, for the last four months, which he had quitted to procure labour. - Verdict: - "Hung himself being lunatic."

On the 10th inst., an Inquest was taken at Tamerton, on the body of JANE ELLIOTT, 18 years of age, who had committed suicide by hanging herself. The poor girl had found a bundle of clothes in the road, and taking it home, her mother, (a poor but honest woman) becoming alarmed, charged her with having stolen it, which had such an effect on the mind of her daughter, as to cause her to commit the rash act.

Thursday 15 August 1839, Issue 3854 – Gale Document No. Y3200670809
ACCIDENT. - On Thursday last, whilst JOHN MORTIMORE, (aged 47) a pensioner of the Artillery was riding a horse furiously from Warfleet Hill, towards Dartmouth, he was thrown violently therefrom and died instantly. An Inquest was held the following day by Mr Rd. Anthony, the Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 22 August 1839, Issue 3855 – Gale Document No. Y3200670824
An Inquest has been held before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Pinmore in the parish of Moretonhampstead, on the body of JAMES MILTON, a servant to Mr Thomas Kelly of that place. It appeared in evidence that on Wednesday last the deceased had under his charge a horse and cart, the vehicle being loaded with stone. This was to be delivered at a particular spot, and in order to do what was necessary the cart should be backed. In doing so the horse was stubborn, and not moving backwards in the way deceased wished, he struck it, upon which the horse suddenly sprung forward, knocked the deceased down, and one of the wheels passing over his body, caused such severe injury, that on Friday he expired. - Verdict - Accidental Death.

Thursday 5 September 1839, Issue 3857 – Gale Document No. Y3200670856
SUDDEN DEATH. - On the 23rd ult. JAMES DIBBLE, a currier, late Bampton, in this county, on his way to Sherborne, Dorset, on a visit to a sister he had residing there. He reached Taunton, in a cart, at 4 o'clock, on the morning of the 24th, and thence proceeded the remainder of the journey, a distance of twenty miles, on foot, which he accomplished, reaching the residence of his sister at two o'clock on the afternoon of that day; but very much fatigued. On the Sunday morning about 8 o'clock, his nephew, who slept with him, found him dead by his side. And, on the Inquest, a verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 24 October 1839, Issue 3857 – Gale Document No. Y3200670953
Exeter, Wednesday 23 October
An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday), by John Warren, Esq. Coroner, on the body of THOMAS PALMER, who for very many years was a porter in the employ of Messrs. Kingdon, of this city. Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God. The deceased was in perfect health up to the time of going to bed, his wife thought that she heard him breathe hard, and attempted to rouse him, but found him dead. He was a man of excellent character and much respected by his employers; his sudden death has left a widow and seven Children in a state of the greatest affliction and distress. It is a case well worthy the attention of the charitable and humane, and any subscriptions for the relief of the distressed widow and family will be received and properly applied by Messrs. Kingdon, his late employers.

Thursday 5 December 1839, Issue 3863 – Gale Document No. Y3200671048
Exeter, Wednesday 4 December
On the 25th ult. an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WM. KIRK, 4 years old, and son of GEORGE KIRK, tailor, who came by his death under the following circumstances. On the previous Saturday morning about 9 o'clock, the little fellow having been at play, and become thirsty, suddenly ran in and unobserved by his father, went to the tea-kettle, which was by the side of the fire, with the water in a boiling state, for the purpose of drinking out of it. The steam was issuing from the spout, and it is believed no water reached his mouth, but the steam occasioned such injury, that after lingering until 2 o'clock on the afternoon of Sunday, death terminated his sufferings. The jury returned a verdict in substance, that the child came by its death by its own act.

Thursday 16 January 1840, Issue 3869 – Gale Document No. Y3200671138
On Tuesday last the 7th instant, a little child between five and six years of age, daughter of al mason named HATCHELL, in the employ of Mr Simon Warren, Builder, &c. Broad Clist, was so dreadfully burnt, that she died a few hours after. A Coroner's Inquest was taken before James Partridge, Esq., and a respectable Jury, on Thursday last when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 30 January 1840, Issue 3871 – Gale Document No. Y3200671170
FATAL ACCIDENT - In our obituary last week, we noticed briefly the death of MR SIMON NEWCOMBE, of Langabeer, in Sampford Courtenay; and will now advert to the particulars attending the demise of this highly respected and much lamented gentleman. About ½ past 3 o'clock, on the afternoon of Thursday, the 16th inst., - no one else capable of aiding in this way being present at the time, - MR NEWCOMBE went to assist one of his men in throwing some hay into a loft. The man went into the loft, and it is supposed the deceased got on the cart, from whence he fell into the yard beneath, as on the man coming to the front to receive the hay, he saw his master lying on his back on the ground, and hastening to his assistance, and raising an alarm, he was found to be senseless. Mr Budd, of Northtawton, surgeon, was immediately sent for, and attended with great promptitude, but found it a case presenting no hope of recovery, and in about 2 ½ hours from the occurrence of the accident, and without apparent pain, MR NEWCOMBE expired. He has left a widow and one daughter (the wife of Mr Geo. Mortimer, of Meadhay, Dunsford,) together with a numerous circle of friends, to lament their loss. An Inquest was held on the following Saturday, at the residence of the deceased, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, and a highly respectable jury, and after a short enquiry, a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The funeral took place on Wednesday the 22nd inst., when the manner in which MR NEWCOMBE was esteemed by his neighbours was shown in the attendance of upwards of 100 yeoman on horseback. He was also a Guardian of the Poor, for the Okehampton Union, who have lost a most humane and kind benefactor, their sense of which was manifested by a large attendance at the funeral. The church at Sampford Courtenay, in the aisle of which he was buried, was completely thronged, and numbers could not obtain admittance. The burial service was read by the Rev. G. P. Richards, the Rector, whose manner of performing the ceremony, and observations upon the sad event which had thus drawn them together, were most appropriate and sublime, and made a deep impression upon the numerous auditory. MR NEWCOMBE had only reached his 49th year, and his life was completely one of usefulness. In his family he was beloved, and his widow is inconsolable; and the opinion entertained of him both by rich and poor, was most fully evinced in the scene presented at his funeral.

Thursday 13 February 1840, Issue 3873 – Gale Document No. Y3200671204
Exeter, Wednesday 12 February
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before S. Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Bromell's Blue Boar's Head public house, Magdalene-street, on the body of SARAH SCRIVEN, aged 77, an inmate of the Wynard's Hospital, who had fallen down on the preceding evening, in her own house, inflicting a wound on her forehead, and had died from the effects of the blow. And a verdict was returned accordingly.

On Saturday an Inquest was taken before the same gentleman, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of EDWARD COBLEY, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital having received injury that proved fatal, under the following circumstances. On the night of the preceding Saturday, persons residing near the lime kilns of Messrs. Hooper and Ebbels, St. Leonards, adjoining this city, were alarmed by groans proceeding from the top of one of the kilns, and going there found COBLEY lying on the ground, and his clothes in flames. It appeared he had gone there for the purpose of warming himself, and having lain down, and fallen asleep, the strength of the wind was such that the flames from the kiln were carried into contact with his clothing and caught it on fire. He was taken to the Hospital, where he lingered until death terminated his sufferings. A Verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 5 March 1840, Issue 3876 – Gale Document No. Y3200671258
TIVERTON. - On Wednesday morning last, a dreadful fire occurred in St. Andrew-street, in this town, by which twelve houses were completely destroyed. An old man of the name of JAMES DUCKHAM, who occupied one of the dwellings, in his endeavours as is supposed to save his money, (gold, to the amount of £50, having since been found,) was burnt to death, the roof in a body of fire, having fallen upon him. The body when got out presented a shocking spectacle, the limbs being consumed. An Inquest was taken before T. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner for the borough, and a verdict returned accordingly.

Thursday 12 March 1840, Issue 3877 – Gale Document No. Y3200671273
ASHBURTON - An Inquest was held on Friday last, before Joseph Gribble, Esq. Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of MRS GRACE LUSCOMBE, the widow of MR BENJAMIN LUSCOMBE, late of this place, carpenter. The general impression of the inhabitants was, that this poor woman came to her death by ill usage received from some member of her family; but after a patient investigation by the Jury, the charge could not be substantiated, though a Verdict was returned, "That she died from blows received from some person or persons, but from whom there was no evidence to prove."

Thursday 19 March 1840, Issue 3878 – Gale Document No. Y3200671287
On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken before S. Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at the City Workhouse, on the body of a girl, 11 years of age, named SARAH ANN MOORE, daughter of WM. MOORE, a wandering Irishman, who with his daughter, had been received into the Workhouse on the preceding Monday evening. When admitted, the girl was almost in a lifeless state, as well from the inroads of disease, as want of proper sustenance, and the father stated that she had been weakly from the age of two years: had been admitted into several hospitals, and discharged as incurable. In our Workhouse, every attention medical and otherwise, had been shown the unfortunate girl who died on Wednesday morning. - Verdict "Died from natural causes." The Jury expressing their approbation of the humanity and kindness shown to the deceased by the nurse, and the several officers of the Workhouse.

Thursday 26 March 1840, Issue 3879 – Gale Document No. Y3200671305
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before S. Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at the city workhouse, on the body of THOMAS JONES, an infirm man, and 70 years of age, who had been received into the workhouse on the preceding Monday, and died on Tuesday. When taken into the house he was so reduced that it was not ascertained where he belonged, but it is believed he was one of Barnstaple, or that neighbourhood. As a vagrant he was incorrigible, and as such has been twice an inmate of the city gaol, once for a month, and the last time for three months, having at his death quitted this prison but a short time, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

On the afternoon of the same day, an Inquest was taken before Mr S. Warren, at Stokes' Elephant Inn, North-street, on the body of MR THOMAS WILKINS, aged 49, who resided in Garden Square. The deceased was by trade a French-polisher, but had for some time dealt in cheese, having in this line of business, a shop in the Western Market. While there on the preceding morning, and just after assisting in taking a load of cheese, - having previously been labouring under some complaint, for which medical assistance had been necessary, - he complained of illness, returned to his home, - went to bed, and before further aid could be procured, was a corpse. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

MANSLAUGHTER - An Inquest was held on Monday last at North Tawton, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, and a most respectable Jury, on the body of RICHARD BOLT, aged 17, who received a stab in the neck on the 2nd January last, from a young man about the same age, called Thomas Nosworthy, with whom he was on the greatest terms of friendship. It appears that they had spent a considerable part of new year's day together at a beer-house, and whilst there quarrelled about the payment of some beer, - but the dispute was settled, and the two friends shook hands; however, the deceased was heard afterwards to declare with an oath that the quarrel was not over, for that he would thrash Nosworthy before he got home; they left the beer-house about 12 o'clock at night – apparently good friends – but in half an hour, wand within a few yards only of their respective residences, a quarrel took place between them, and the deceased received a wound in the neck, (dividing the carotid artery,) of which he lingered until Sunday last. Nosworthy admitted that he had stabbed the deceased with a knife shortly after it happened, and added "that he would not have done it for a thousand pounds." The Jury were unanimous in the verdict of "Manslaughter against Thomas Nosworthy. The prisoner has been in the county Gaol since January last, but the recognizances of the witnesses, who then gave evidence before the Magistrates, were respited at the late Gaol delivery to the Lammas Assizes, when the prisoner will take his trial.

Thursday 9 April 1840, Issue 3881 – Gale Document No. Y3200671336
On the afternoon of Thursday last, a little girl named MARIA SOWTON, residing in St. Sidwell's, attended school, in the course of the evening was seized with illness, and in a short time expired. An Inquest was taken on the body, on Friday, at Lisson's Acland Arms Inn, St. Sidwells, before J. Warren, Esq. Coroner when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday 16 April 1840, Issue 3882 – Gale Document No. Y3200671352
An Inquest was held by H.A. Vallack, Esq., at Pyworthy, on the 7th inst. on MRS ELIZABETH BRAGG who was found dead in her bed, having ruptured a blood vessel. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 23 April 1840, Issue 3883 – Gale Document No. Y3200671363
Exeter, Wednesday 22 April
Suicide - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday afternoon at the Falcon, in North Street, in this city, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE WILLIAM TRENHICK, a fine young man aged 27 who had been found the same morning, suspended from a beam in an apartment occupied by him, in a house in the neighbourhood. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was a stonemason, his friends resided at Torquay, and was a young man of sober and religious habits. He had lodged with a Mrs Salter, since September last. About that period, he formed an attachment for a young woman, a female servant, which at Christmas was broken off. Since the termination of this acquaintance a marked change had taken place in the manner of the deceased, and latterly he had become silent, reserved, and apparently labouring under distress of mind. On Sunday last, and for some days previously he ate scarcely anything, and his conduct at times was very strange. He returned home on Sunday night quite sober, and went to bed without saying anything. Yesterday morning ,at half past five he called to his landlady who was still in bed, to make out his bill for the week, as was her custom, and went down stairs. The front door was heard to shut violently, as if he had gone out, but it was shown that if he had done so, he could not have come in again, without its being opened from within as it had a latch key. Shortly after 6 o'clock, he was found by Mrs Salter suspended to a beam from a rope made of small twine carefully twisted together, and formed into a running knot, in his bed-room. He was immediately cut down, but proved to be quite dead.
Verdict – "Temporary Insanity."

On Sunday morning a man named OXENBURY, a labourer, was found in a lane near the Haven Banks in a complete state of exhaustion. Medical aid was procured, and he was taken to the St. Thomas Union Workhouse, and all possible attention paid him, but we regret to state he expired on the following morning. An Inquest will be held on the body this afternoon.

Thursday 30 April 1840, Issue 3884 – Gale Document No. Y3200671379
Exeter, Wednesday 29 April
On Thursday last, an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Lee's White Ball public-house, Mary Arches-street, on the body of AGNES BIGNELL, 85 years of age, - a cripple and otherwise infirm, who had resided for about a year and quarter in a room in that street. It appeared she had been last seen alive about 6 o'clock on the preceding evening, when a little girl who usually went her errands, fetched, as was customary, half-pint of beer for her supper. On opening the door of her room on the following morning, she was found lying dead behind it. She had some chips in one hand, and some in her apron; and it is supposed that when she dropped, she was in the act of preparing these for lighting her fire on the following morning. The beer remained untouched, and the bed had not that night been slept on, so sudden does her transition appear to have been. She was a married woman, her husband belonging to Tiverton, but has been separated from him 25 years. She was in the receipt of 2s. per week from Tiverton; and a very benevolent lady of this city allowed her 1s. a week more. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

SUDDEN DEATH - On Sunday, 19th inst., MR WM. IRELAND FERRIS, schoolmaster of Ashburton, left his house to walk a short distance, and on reaching the house of a relative, he complained of being faint, and was provided with a chair to sit down, when his symptoms of illness became very alarming – a medical gentleman was immediately sent for, who promptly attended just as he breathed his last. He has left a widow and four children to lament their loss. An Inquest has been held by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict "Died by the Visitation of God" returned.

An Inquest was taken before Mr Vallack, one of the Coroners of the county, on the body of ELIZABETH HICKS, a respectable woman aged 77, residing at Northpetherwin, on the 22nd inst., who was found burnt to death on the high road in consequence of the ignition of some straw which was place there for the purpose of making potatoe manure. No evidence appeared how the fire originated. The body was dreadfully burnt, the clothes being entirely consumed. Near the spot where she was discovered there was a teakettle and a pitcher found, and it is supposed she had fallen on the fire in her endeavour to extinguish it. A boy was known to go to the house where the deceased resided, and took a stick of fire to his father to light his pipe, who was working near, and it is supposed that he must have dropt part of the fire on the straw, which caused this distressing and melancholy accident. The Jury, after making every enquiry, returned a verdict of "Found Burnt."

Thursday 28 May 1840, Issue 3888 – Gale Document No. Y3200671448
DARTMOUTH – Melancholy Accident. - On Wednesday last as two fishermen were sailing in the harbour, the boat in which they were upset in a squall, and immediately sunk, when both were drowned. An Inquest was held the same evening before Richard Anthony, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN BILLET, one of the unfortunate individuals, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

DEATH BY BURNING - On the 19th instant, a poor man named THOMAS SAUNDERS, residing at Dunkeswell, accompanied by his wife, went out to work, leaving three children at home of the ages 8, 5 and 2 years respectively. There was a fire burning on the hearth, and the youngest of the children, a girl named SARAH, was playing near it with a little dog, a puppy of the sheep dog breed, which threw the child down, and she fell into the fire, her clothes bursting into a flame. The eldest boy about 8 years of age, who was employed in cutting sticks, with great presence of mind, ran to the spot and caught up his sister, and endeavoured to put out the fire and take off the clothes, but could not do so, and they were all burnt off. He sent his younger brother to call his father, who, on coming home, found the little boy sitting in the door way with his little sister in his arms. Some applications were used, but the poor infant died an hour or two afterwards. An Inquest was held on the body the day following, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidentally burnt" returned.

Thursday 11 June 1840, Issue 3890 – Gale Document No. Y3200671481
Exeter, Wednesday 10 June
CORONER'S INQUEST - On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at Stooke's Elephant Inn, North Street, in this city, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH HEARN, wife of MR JOHN HEARN, currier, residing in Chapple's Court, in the same street, who was found dead in her bed-room soon after noon on the preceding day. Her husband was at his work, and the deceased, who was 55 years old, had been seen about ten o'clock in the forenoon; the discovery of her situation taking place when her husband came home to dinner. It is supposed she had gone up stairs to make her bed, having turned the key in the door below. A medical gentleman was called in, who gave it as his opinion that she had been seized with apoplexy, and when he saw her had been dead full three hours, the body being quite cold; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

On Tuesday, the 2nd instant, an Inquest was held at her late residence, Torquay, on the body of MARY BALL aged 65, for many years a highly respectable monthly nurse. It appears that the deceased went to bed on the Saturday night in good health, but much fatigued, and stated to the inmates that it was not her intention to rise very early the next morning. In consequence of her not making her appearance at eleven o'clock, her room was entered; when she was discovered to be quite dead. A medical man was called in, who gave it as his opinion that she had been dead several hours. Verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 25 June 1840, Issue 3892 – Gale Document No. Y3200671514
Exeter, Wednesday 24 June
On the 13th inst. an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Tarrant's Red Cow Inn, St. David's, on the body of JAMES FULFORD, about 9 years of age, (whose parents reside in St. Sidwell's) who had been drowned that afternoon just above Sandy Point, in the river Exe. It appeared that the deceased with other boys were bathing, he being unable to swim, but had foolishly challenged a companion or companions who should go furthest from the bank towards the centre of the river, and in this manner got out of his depth. At this moment Wm. Arden, Esq. chanced to cross the fields, and seeing the imminent danger of the lad, generously plunged into the stream, - succeeded in getting hold of the body and bringing it to the shore. Life appeared to be extinct, but, determined to leave no efforts untried for the lad's restoration, having given directions to his companions as to the mode of conveyance to the Humane Society's Reception House at Mr Tarrant's, - and notwithstanding an injury he had received in his leg and foot in clearing the bank, in jumping into the river, Mr Arden sat off himself by the nearest route for the city, in order to procure medical assistance. All however was unavailing, the "vital spark" had fled; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

On Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., at Badcock's Custom House Inn, Quay-gate, in this city, on the body of GEORGE BENNETT, a stout and fine grown youth, who would have attained his 15th year in August next. The deceased was the son of JOHN BENNETT, by trade a fuller, but more generally known as a cow-keeper, residing in the Island; and an in-door apprentice to Mr J. Hill, boot and shoe-maker, Bartholomew-street (West). It appeared that about ½ past 6 o'clock on the preceding (Sunday) evening, he was with 3 or 4 boys, bathing in the Shilhay-lake. BENNETT could not swim, and was warned by his companions to avoid a spot where they knew the water was deep. Neglecting this caution, however, he plunged in. Seeing his situation, one of his companions who could swim, hastened to his assistance, and, as he rose to the surface, caught hold of him by the hair of the head. BENNETT in turn, threw his arms about the neck of the swimmer, and being a heavy and strong boy, (to the imminent danger of his generous companion) dragged him down with him. Thus entangled, they rose again to the surface, when the swimmer freed himself from the grasp of BENNETT, who once more sunk; but rising again caught his companion by the toes. Apprehending, however, that he should again be drawn to the bottom, in order to his own preservation, he was obliged to shake him off. Further assistance was as quickly as possible rendered, and the body being got out, was removed to Mr Badcock's, but life was extinct; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 2 July 1840, Issue 3893 – Gale Document No. Y3200671530
On Monday last an Inquest was taken at Moretonhampstead, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of WM. LETHBRIDGE, servant to Mr Samuel Croote, dealer in oats, who died on the preceding Saturday night, in consequence of injuries received the Thursday week before. At this time he was on his return from Okehampton, with a loaded wagon, and his account of the matter was this: - He said he was standing on the arm or shaft of the wagon, when his feet slipping, he fell to the ground, and both wheels on the near side passed over him, causing such injuries as led to his death; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was a native of Newton Abbot, about 20 years of age; had been in the employ of his master for some time, and had conducted himself in a manner that won for him the respect of all who knew him.

About five o'clock on Monday morning the body of a man was observed floating in the river Exe, just at the back of the Seven Stars Inn, St. Thomas; and being got out was found to be much swollen, and the face of a dark hue, having evidently been some time in the water. It was recognised as the body of MR HENRY PARSONS, a gentleman of moderate property, - it is said about £200 a year, and of rather eccentric habits. He for some time resided at Alphington, and has been a widower about twelve months, but is supposed latterly to have been residing at Ipplepen. On the Wednesday week preceding, the deceased was at the Seven Stars, where he left a bundle with the Ostler, and had not been seen from that time until found as before related; the appearance of the body being such as to warrant the belief that in the entire interval it had lain in the water. In his pocket was a purse containing a sovereign, and 15s. in silver. - The body was removed to the Engine House, Cowick-street, to await the Inquest before the Coroner. MR PARSONS is said to be about 28 years of age, and a native of Aveton Gifford, in this county, where his relatives now reside. In early life he was for several years a boarder at one of the seminaries for education in this city, and afterwards a scholar at the Free Grammar School; and was known by many persons here. It is thought he must have met his death by leaning over the river's banks for some purpose near the Seven Stars, where the water is deep, and losing his balance, fell in; the body having thus lain for about eleven days at the bottom of the river before it floated. The Inquest was held at Holmes's King's Arms Inn, Cowick-street, yesterday, before J. Gribble, Esq. and a verdict of Found Drowned returned.

Thursday 9 July 1840, Issue 3894 – Gale Document No. Y3200671543
On Monday last an Inquest was taken at Manaton before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES FRENCH, a servant in the employ of Mr R. Nosworthy, of Leighon, in that parish, who met his death under the following circumstances. On the preceding Wednesday, in company with an apprentice boy, he was engaged in driving a cart, and was riding on the front part of it. In descending a hill, - the horse going at a smart trot, FRENCH jumped off to stop it, when he fell, and the wheel passed over the lower part of his bowels, causing such injury, that after lingering in the most excruciating agony until Saturday evening, death terminated his sufferings. And a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

TOPSHAM. – On Thursday last, an Inquest was holden before J. Partridge, Esq., Coroner, at Lake's Salutation Inn, on the body of MR G. LUKE, a fine young man, son of the late MR J. LUKE, ironmonger, of Exeter; whose lamentable death was occasioned by falling from a pony as he was proceeding from Topsham to Exeter, a fortnight previous. Verdict – "Death occasioned by a fall from a Horse." - Deodand on the Horse, £3. Every possible attention was paid the unfortunate young gentleman by Mr and Mrs Lake, to whose house he was taken after the accident.

Thursday 13 August 1840, Issue 3899 – Gale Document No. Y3200671637
ANOTHER OF THE DRWNED PERSONS FOUND NEAR TORQUAY - August 5th, an Inquest was held by J. Gribble, Esq., at Torquay, on the body of the late EDWARD MOULTON BARRETT, Esq., aged 33 years. Mr W. Jacob, of West Cowes, pilot stated that while sailing off Torquay, he saw the body of the deceased floating about a mile and half from the Great Rock, Torbay, bearing East, about 2 p.m., on August 4th; he proceeded to take the body into the boat, and brought it ashore, and on its being examined it was found a little mutilated in the face and hands. The following articles were found on the deceased – a purse containing 16s. in silver, a gold watch and guard, a pocket handkerchief marked E. M. B., pencil case, cigar box, and a gold ring was found in the boat which fell off his finger; the watch was identified and owned by his father and servant. Similar evidence was given as that offered on the Inquest of the late Captain Clarke, and a similar verdict was returned.

Thursday 27 August 1840, Issue 3901 – Gale Document No. Y3200671670
Exeter, Wednesday 26 August
On Friday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Palmer's King's Arms Inn, West-street, on the body of ROSA WRIGHT, an infant eight weeks old, which had been found dead in bed, by its parents. And a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 17 September 1840, Issue 3903 – Gale Document No. Y3200671718
On the 5th inst. a distressing and melancholy accident occurred in Combinteignhead. Some workmen were employed in ripping and dressing red rock, in order to the erection of a Parsonage house, for the Rev. Mr Wrey, when a mass of the rock gave way and buried a young man named URIAH GARRETT, of Abbots Kerswell, underneath it. A man who was on the top of the rock, was killed, leaving a wife and five children destitute. When the body of the unfortunate GARRETT was dug out, it presented a frightfully mangled appearance, one arm being nearly severed from his body; his bones generally broken; and his bowels protruding; and yet strange to say, his watch was unhurt and still going. An Inquest was taken on the body, on the following day, before J. Gribble, Esq. Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday 24 September 1840, Issue 3904 – Gale Document No. Y3200671736
SHOCKING SUICIDE - An Inquest was held on Monday morning, before R. J. Squire, Esq., Coroner for Plymouth, on the body of a female about 25 years of age, named LYDIA BALL, a servant in the family of Mr Robert Hebron, Windham-place, Eldad, who cut her throat on Saturday evening last, about five o'clock.
Mr Hebron, on being sworn, stated that deceased had lived in his family eleven or twelve years: that she was a very prudent and honest girl, and was treated almost as one of the family. He had allowed her the use of his books, and attributed her present misfortune to her liking for reading, and writing extracts from different works which she read. [A book of manuscript, and several loose sheets of letter paper, all closely written, in a bold and legible hand, were produced and identified by Mr Hebron as her hand-writing.] Within the last few months, she had imbibed such a high opinion of herself, that she thought every man who looked upon her was in love with her; of late there had been some inconsistency in her conduct, an evident change in the temperament of her mind, at times a little gloomy, and at other times lively. He saw no particular change in her however, until Saturday morning, when he heard her say that she had not slept for the night, and he was convinced there was something wrong. Immediately as witness left his bed-room, she went to her mistress, and told her she intended to leave, but returned again within a few minutes, and said she would remain. Shortly after this, about nine o'clock, she left the house without leave, which was an unusual thing, and came back in about ten minutes. Addressing herself to her master, she said there was something the matter, for they (meaning the family) were all looking pale. Witness assured her nothing was the matter, and she seemed pacified; but afterwards told Miss Hebron that she could not remain in the house, for she heard somebody screaming. After the conversation with her master, she went into the garden; and he, thinking it best to act decisively with her, threatened that, if she did not come into her work, he would send for a policeman. She replied, that she would come in without a policeman, and accordingly returned into the house. Witness left home about ten o'clock, and did not see her again until after her death.
Mr Thomas Reed, of Windham-place, surgeon in the Hon. East India Company's Service, deposed that he was called by Miss Hebron, between five and six o'clock on Saturday evening, to come immediately to her father's, as their servant had killed herself. On entering the kitchen, witness saw deceased lying nearly on her back, with her left arm extended, her right arm bent upwards over her body towards the throat, and her hand partially closed, as if it had grasped something; she had evidently fallen back from a stool, on which she leant to perform the act; the floor was covered with blood, at least three or four quarts; there was a knife near her person, [it was a black handled dinner knife, the blade clotted with blood] with which she had cut herself on the left side of the neck, and divided the carotid artery. When witness was called she must have been dead about fifteen minutes. He had seen her frequently, of a morning, milking her master's cow, as well as about other work, and always thought her an industrious young woman; and he believed her also, to have been strictly virtuous.
Mrs Hebron, who was so much affected that she could with difficulty be kept from fainting, spoke of the deceased in very affectionate terms, and confirmed the testimony of Mr Hebron.
Miss Maria Hebron stated that she went to the kitchen about five o'clock, to see if deceased was getting the tea; but, not finding her there, she opened the door of an adjoining kitchen, or scullery, and was terrified at the awful sight that presented itself. Miss Hebron said her behaviour throughout the day did not excite any alarm or apprehension that she intended to destroy herself.
William Hill, a horse-porter, who resides at Plymouth, who was at Mr Hebron's house on Saturday morning about nine o'clock, deposed that he knew the deceased, from going there occasionally with coals, and that he thought she was looking wild, as he had never seen her before. He saw her go out of the house, from which she was absent about ten minutes; and her manners, when she returned, was quick and hurried. He heard her master say, he would get a policeman for her; on which she asked what she had done. He said "nothing," and desired her to come into the house, with which she instantly complied.
The Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."£
The unfortunate deceased appeared to possess a very superior mind, as evinced by the extracts she had been in the habit of making from the works she had read. On one of the scraps of papers was the following:-
To be obliged, is to be in some respects imprisoned to another, and few willingly indulge the memory of an action which raises one whom they have always been accustomed to think below them, but satisfy themselves with faint praise and penurious payment, and then drive it from their minds, and endeavour to conceal it from the knowledge of others."
"Frail as the leaves that quiver on the sprays,
Like them man flourishes, like them decays."

Thursday 22 October 1840, Issue 3908 – Gale Document No. Y3200671803
Exeter, Wednesday 21 October
CORONER'S INQUEST – MELANCHOLY DEATH.
An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the Honiton Inn, in Paris Street, before S. Warren, Esq., Coroner for the city, on the body of MR FREDERICK WHITE, the well known messenger to the Commissioners of Improvement, who was found drowned in the basin on Saturday evening last.
George Freeman, a seaman belonging to the sloop "Three Brothers," of London, stated that the vessel came up the canal and into the basin on Saturday evening about six o'clock. While mooring the vessel he heard a splash as of some one falling in the water, and by the Captain's directions he and another seaman got into the boat and pulled directly for the spot. It was very dark at the time, they observed a man's hat floating which they picked up, but not being able to see the body they returned to the vessel for a boat hook, which they found was not long enough, and then they again returned for al grapnel but could not find one. On their return to the place they found a grapnel had been brought from the Haven Banks Inn, and at the second throw they brought up the body of a man who was to all appearance quite dead. They rowed up the river to a public-house called the Queen Adelaide, but the landlady declined to take in the man if he was dead, saying it could be of no service. In about two minutes the landlord came and said he knew deceased, and should have been very happy to have done him any good. They then rowed the body to the quay, and a surgeon was sent for who pronounced the man to be quite dead. Witness held the man in a sitting position in the boat, deceased never showed the least sign of life after he was taken out of the water. He was in the water eight or nine minutes.
Henry Lascelles, police officer, stated that in consequence of information he received, he went to the quay and saw the body of MR WHITE in the boat with the last witness. It was laid nearly flat on the back.
Mrs Powlesland, of the Haven Banks Inn, stated that on Saturday, about twelve 'clock, deceased came to her house and had half a pint of beer, which he promised to pay for on his return: he went down the banks and came again about three o'clock with a cup belonging to an old woman who lives close by and asked for half a noggin of gin, saying he was going to give it to a poor old soul. He gave witness 6d. and she gave him 2 ½d. change. He then went away and about five o'clock came again with a female, whom he had met just outside the door and who asked him for something to drink; deceased called for a noggin of gin which was given them in two glasses. Witness asked who was going to pay for it, and he said he was, but he had no money, and he then told her his name and address; she knew him before but not by name. She knows the woman also personally but not by name; thinks she is a married woman living in St. Sidwell's. In about ten minutes witness came back to the room but found they had both left; she looked out at the door and saw the woman going towards the town, but did not see the deceased; she did not see him again until nearly half-past six, when he was walking up and down the path between her own house and the bridge; she did not know at first who it was, he appeared thoughtful and melancholy; she said "Is that you MR WHITE?" he replied "What?" and on her repeating the question, he said "I don't understand you, are you Irish?" She then went into the house, and requested some men who were there to go and speak to him. A few minutes afterwards she heard that some man was drowned in the basin; she could not say that WHITE appeared to have been drinking, he appeared to be melancholy and she could not tell what was the matter with him.
Simon Drew, a plasterer, works for Mr Powlesland, and lodges in his house, left work on Saturday about half-past five. WHITE was then walking up and down the path and continued to do so for at least an hour, he appeared like a man lost and quite melancholy, he really thought deceased had been drinking but he seemed to be very careful in keeping in the path. The gates near the gas-works leading into the water were open on that evening, the last time he saw him was about five or six minutes before hearing he was drowned. Witness went with a grapnel as soon as he heard some one was in the water.
It was stated by some person present, that deceased had been very much depressed, and had taken a good deal to drinking since the loss of his wife 9 weeks ago.
The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury after a few minutes consultation returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." MR WHITE has left several children to lament the loss of their only parent, thus suddenly and prematurely snatched from them. MR WHITE was in the 52nd year of his age, and has been in the service of the Commissioners of Improvement of this city from the time of the passing the first Act, in the year 1812-1813, a period of 27 years. We hear there are already several candidates in the field canvassing for the situation.

Thursday 5 November 1840, Issue 3910 – Gale Document No. Y3200671831
Exeter, Wednesday 4 November
CORONER'S INQUEST - An Inquest was taken yesterday (Tuesday) afternoon, before John Warren, Esq. Coroner of Exeter, at Manning's Red Lion Inn, Sidwell street, on the body of JOHN BRAILEY, 41 years of age, and by trade a harness-maker; when it appeared in evidence that the deceased had been an ailing man these seven years, and had not for some time been enabled to work, having about five years since, sustained severe attack, from which he lost the sight in one eye, and the use of one arm; and was for a considerable time under the care of Dr Pennell. About two years since also, he again suffered from illness, and was a patient at the Dispensary. For the last five or six months, however, he has not wanted medical assistance, and on Monday appeared in better spirits than usual. He took his tea about 4 o'clock, being perfectly sober, and then went out for a walk. In about half an hour, he returned home, and remained until about 7 o'[clock. He then told his wife that he was going down to the Red Lion Inn, to supper, according to invitation. When he got there, he remained in the yard talking to a man some time. Both then went up, went to stairs into the supper room, and were engaged in conversation; and it was stated that he might have drunk half a pint of beer before the supper was brought in. When this was placed on the table, he said to the person he had been previously conversing with, "that is my favourite joint," pointing to a piece of beef; to a slice of which he was helped. He had, however, scarcely put a bit into his mouth before he was seized with illness, and rose for the purpose of leaving the table. he was asked what was the matter, but gave no answer; and quitting the room, as he descended the stairs, was seen to lay his head on the banister. A female servant told him he had better go into the Courtlage, and he went down and was in the act of crossing the court, when this servant heard him fall. She immediately went to him and found him laying on his back. She procured a chair, and assistance, and BRAILEY being raised, and placed upon it, Mr W. Land, surgeon, was sent for, who promptly attended. The unfortunate man breathed once or twice after the servant came to him, but before the arrival of Mr Land, life was extinct. The jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 12 November 1840, Issue 3911 – Gale Document No. Y3200671844
Exeter, Wednesday 11 November
AWFULLY SUDDEN DEATH - A poor man named SQUIRE, a wool sorter, in the employ of Mr Maunder, of this city, went to his work on Monday morning at 6 o'clock. About half-past 7, he became unwell, and was shortly afterwards removed to his house which was very near; assistance was instantly procured, but it was of no avail, and he expired in about 20 minutes. An Inquest was held on his body yesterday morning, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned of "died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 26 November 1840, Issue 3913 – Gale Document No. Y3200671878
A few days since a little boy about three years old, son of MR RICHARD ELLIOTT, of Lower Grimpstonesleigh, in the parish of Morleigh, in this county fell into a pond on the estate, and was drowned. A fire-pan was found at the pond, and it is supposed the unfortunate little fellow was trying the depth, when he fell in. An Inquest was taken before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned accordingly.

Thursday 3 December 1840, Issue 3914 – Gale Document No. Y3200671897
INSTANCE OF SUDDEN DEATH - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held on the body of THOMAS PILLAR, before R. H. Aberdein, esq., coroner. The deceased who was about 50 years of age, was a gardener in the employ of Lord Rolle at Bicton; he lived at Colyton Raleigh, and on Tuesday last, after taking his dinner at his son's house at Bicton, returned to his work in the gardens about 2 o'clock in the afternoon. He was occupied in fencing round some plants which occasioned his stooping very much. About ten minutes after 3 his son went to the gardens to see him, and on approaching the spot where he was at work, found him lying on his left side; he called for assistance to another man who came up, and they found him quite dead. Deceased had complained to his son of pain in his head for several days past, which he thought was worse on that day. A medical gentleman attended, who attempted to bleed the deceased but without success. – Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 17 December 1840, Issue 3916 – Gale Document No. Y3200671931
Exeter, Wednesday 16 December
CORONER'S INQUEST - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was taken before S. Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene Street, on the body of JOHN KARSLAKE, about 32 years of age, and a single man, belonging to Cruwys Morchard, who died in the Devon and Exe4ter Hospital the preceding day. It appeared that about a month since the deceased was on his way to this city with a wagon load of potatoes, and when in that part of the road which runs through the parish of Rewe, he got upon the shafts in order to ride. While sitting in that position, as is so often the case with this description of persons, he fell asleep, and fell from the shafts, when the wheels passed over his left leg and right arm, inflicting serious injury. Notwithstanding this, however, and no assistance near him, the unfortunate man succeeded in raising himself, and contrived to climb into the wagon, causing the horses to move on. The horses kept the road, moving steadily on until the wagon was overtaken by KARSLAKE's master, on his way likewise, to Exeter. Finding the wagon and team without a driver, he stopped the horses, when he found his servant covered over with a piece of tarpaulin, KARSLAKE related what had occurred, and said, "For God's sake, Sir, don't leave me, but go with me to Exeter.|" This the master did, and on arriving here, he was taken to the hospital, where he lingered until Tuesday, when death terminated his sufferings. Under these circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

On Wednesday last, a Jury was impannelled before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, at Broadhembury, in this county, to inquire into the circumstances touching the death of MRS SARAH MATTHEWS, of Dureford, in that parish, who expired the preceding Monday afternoon. The deceased, who was 51 years of age, had been a weak and ailing woman for some time, but had not sought medical advice until Thursday preceding her decease. From that time she was attended by a medical gentleman, who sent such medicine as he thought necessary, but having on Monday laboured under much excitement, and the medical gentleman not being enabled to speak positively to the cause of death, a post mortem was considered necessary; and in order to this the jury adjourned to the following day:- when from the appearances that presented themselves, it was considered the deceased had laboured under chronic inflammation of the lungs of long standing, and a verdict of "Natural Death" was returned.

ACT OF SUICIDE BY A CHILD - On Wednesday last, a little boy, about ten years old, named JOHN THOMAS HILL, was found hanging to the branch of a tree, in the road leading to Townstall Church, Dartmouth, within but a few minutes walk of his home, and when taken down, was quite dead. An Inquest was taken on the body before Mr R. Anthony, coroner for Dartmouth, when it appeared the poor little fellow had up to this time been a most obedient and dutiful child; but within a short time, from his schoolmaster's evidence, had been rather inattentive in coming to school. He had of late often remarked that he was unfairly treated, which it is supposed, preying on his mind, was the cause of his destroying himself. On the morning of the day on which he committed the fatal deed, he had been absent from school by his mother's permission, and had been a few miles in the country with another lad, who deposed at the Inquest that he noticed that the deceased was much less talkative than usual. After coming home with this boy he dined with the family as usual, and after dinner washed his 'face and hands' and cutting the rope from a pair of 'slings' used to carry milk-pails with, took it with him! His mother supposed he was going to school, but alas! it was the last time that she was destined to see him alive. He must have gone immediately and committed the rash act. The opinion of the Jury was that he did it whilst labouring under a fit of temporary insanity.

Thursday 31 December 1840, Issue 3918 – Gale Document No. Y3200671964
SALCOMBE – DREADFUL ACCIDENT. - We lament that we have to record another melancholy instance of the general want of caution in the use of fire arms, which proved fatal to a fine little girl, named EMMA COTTEY of Burndeys Farm in this parish. On the 22nd inst., a young woman named MARY ANN COTTEY, an elder sister of the unfortunate deceased, took up a gun which was standing in the corner of their inner room, with the intention of carrying it out to a young man from whom it had been borrowed; the gun stood nearly opposite to the door leading into the outer room, where the deceased child EMMA, and another sister, Rhoda, were standing. On the gun being taken from its position, the muzzle of it was towards the door, MARY ANN COTTEY unfortunately touching the trigger, the piece immediately went off. The effect of the explosion was dreadful; EMMA was seen to fall instantly from off the window bench to the floor, and Rhoda ran to another part of the room, shrieking with pain, when it was discovered that she was shot in the upper part of the left leg, and in the hip. EMMA was lifted up and put to bed, where she died in about two hours, the shot having taking effect in the lower part of the bowels. The gun had been left in the room loaded by a brother of the deceased who had not given any caution to prevent its being touched. An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 24th inst., and a verdict of Accidental Death recorded. The other poor child remains seriously ill.

UFFCULM - A most melancholy and distressing event occurred on Friday the 18th instant, at the house of SHADRACH PEARCY, of this place, weaver. The eldest son, WM. PEARCY, not being able to work at the factory on account of the frost had remained at home, and about half-past eight o'clock took down a gun which was kept hung up in the room for the purpose of cleaning it; his grandfather and 5 brothers and sisters were there seated in the chimney, and round the fire; he had the gun in his hand with the muzzle towards the fire, and was endeavouring to take out the pin that goes under the barrel and fastens it to the stock, when the trigger hitched in his waistcoat and the gun went off and shot his brother MARK, an infant about 4 years old, who was sitting within three or four feet of him in front of the fire. The shot took effect in the back part of the head, carrying off the right ear, and cheek and penetrated the skull, the child dying instantly. Providentially no other member of the family was hurt, which may possibly be attributed to the shot taking effect so near to the muzzle of the gun on the deceased child, for had it been further off and room for the shot to scatter, more lives would probably have been lost from this distressing incident. The gun had been loaded by the father on the morning previously, to shoot a blackbird in the garden, who put it away in that state, but it did not appear that the lad had seen it or knew it was loaded. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, the 21st inst., before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, and verdict of Accidental Death recorded.

The following dreadful accident occurred to al respectable farmer, MR HENRY BURROUGH, residing t Monkton, in this county, between five and six o'clock, on the evening f the 15th inst. He had been attending a sale at Aller Farm, in Upottery; and left the George Inn, Upottery, about five o'clock, mounted on a bay pony, and was seen on the road home by some men driving wagons, coming from Taunton to Honiton, which he passed, and was soon afterwards found in the road lying on his face, and quite dead; the pony, was seen in the hollow of the road about a quarter of a mile from where the body lay – the pony was young and spirited and the deceased was bleeding profusely from the ears and from a cut he had received in the head. Medical assistance was procured, and it was conjectured the deceased came to his death from a fracture of the base of the skull, occasioned by falling from his horse. Four five-pound notes and two sovereigns and half were found upon his person, which fully contradicted a report that the deceased had been way-laid and robbed. A verdict was returned of Accidental Death at an Inquest held before Mr Aberdein.

Thursday 7 January 1841, Issue 3919 – Gale Document No. Y3200671979
Exeter, Wednesday 6 January
CORONER'S INQUESTS.
On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Brewer's Cattle Market Inn, in the Bonhay, on the body of JOHN GLANVILLE, eight years of age, who having ventured on the ice in a lake in the Shilhay, it broke underneath him, when he was precipitated into the water, and an hour elapsing before the body could be got out, life was extinct. Verdict - Accidental Death.

On Friday, an Inquest was taken before Mr Warren, at the Workhouse on the body of JOHN CHICK, more commonly, however, known by the appellation of "Chickey." Who has before been an inmate of the house, but on this occasion had been there about ten days. "Chickey" was the son of an Italian who many years since settled in this city, and was known as a vendor of plaster casts. The deceased was of short stature, rather deformed, of eccentric habits, and weak intellect. He had never been brought to any business, but for a considerable time acted as a helper in the stables at Pedrick's Ship Inn, Goldsmith street; and sort of porter about the market. Notwithstanding deformity and want of intellect, however, it appears that he was married, but not living with his wife. He possessed a voracious appetite, and to this it is understood at length fell a victim. On the Wednesday afternoon he in his ward got together his own allowance consisting of potatoes, &c. with bread and cheese; and another man's potatoes, which he had purchased, and boiling the whole together, made what George Thomas, who slept with him, called "a horrid mess," and devoured the whole of it. He went to bed about 6 o'clock, but had not long been there before he complained of being ill, and violent vomiting came on. The Nurse (Arnold) was immediately apprised, and gave him a couple of pills, such as are commonly kept in families, imagining this would afford him relief. After this he lay perfectly quiet, and in a short time, without any change having been discoverable, was found to be dead. Mr De la Garde attended, and attributed CHICK'S death to spasm brought on by grossly eating. And the Jury returned a Verdict of "Natural Death."

HORRIBLE DEATH. - On the 28th ult. an Inquest was taken before F. S. Gervis, Esq. Coroner for the Borough of Tiverton, at the Guildhall in that town, on the remains of a human being supposed to have been WM. HANNIBUS, which had been found in a lime-kiln belonging to Mr Richard Davey, of the Canal Inn. A highly respectable and intelligent jury were impannelled, George Coles, Esq. and F. Hole, Esq. being also present, and appearing to take great interest in the proceedings. The remains, or body, - burnt to a cinder, insomuch that no identity could be proved, otherwise than by a cap found near the deceased not destroyed – having been viewed by the Jury, the following evidence was taken:- DOROTHEA HANNIBUS, wife of JOHN HANNIBUS, labourer, deposed as follows - My husband's son, WILLIAM HANNIBUS, informed me on Wednesday last that he had been to Mr Sellick's, the Relieving Officer, to relieve him, not having any work, but that he had not been relieved; I then wished him to go to Mr Sellick's to obtain an order to go into the Union Workhouse, he replied he would do so, but I cannot say if he made the application; I have not seen him since Wednesday morning; he has not been at his father's house for the last two years; he was 31 years of age. The cap on the table I believe to be the one he wore on Wednesday morning when I saw him. William Davey, smith, of the parish of Burlescombe, said – I was at Tiverton on Saturday night in company with two others, George Holley and Henry Holley. We were to lodge that night at one of the cottages near the lime-kilns. It was about 12 o'clock at night that we were proceeding on our way to the house at which we intended to stop; we passed close to the lime-kilns, and observing a light proceeding from one of the kilns, which we considered ought not to have been, I directed my companions to wait until I had gone up to ascertain the cause; I went, and observed some person on the side of the kiln burning; I was much alarmed and called for my companions to come up; we then went to call for assistance, and removed the body. The light of the kiln was sufficient to enable us to distinguish any object. After we had taken the body off the kiln, I went down with the others to ascertain the cause of the heating of the fire, which is not usual at this time of the year. We observed the kiln opened below, which must have been done by some person; I observed some bread on the kiln, and some other victuals, but I cannot say what in particular; I saw a cap after the body was removed from the kiln; the one on the table I think is the same I saw on the wall. - George Holley, of Burlescombe, corroborated the evidence of the last witness. James Sellick, Relieving Officer, was next sworn, and said - On Thursday evening last a child knocked at my door and said that there was a man lying down on the right hand side of the lane leading from my house; I accordingly went and aroused him; I did not know him, but seeing him very destitute I took him to my house, and gave him an order to go to the Union House; I am certain he did not ask me for relief, or an order to go into the House, either at that time or subsequently. I then ascertained his name to be WILLIAM HANNIBUS; he appeared to me to be intoxicated at the time. Joseph Collard deposed - On Thursday evening last, about seven o'clock, I received an order to admit WEM. HANNIBUS into the House. The porter stated that he considered the man was in liquor; I did not go to see him myself on that evening, but I gave directions that he should have a warm supper, which was supplied to him, and a bed, provided for him in the probationary. On the following morning I saw him: I questioned him particularly as to where he came from, and where he had been living; he told me he had been living at Rose Ash for some years; that about 12 months since he had met with an injury in the arm, which had lately prevented his working so well as before; I told him his order appeared to be for the night only, and enquired what he meant to do. He said he should return to Rose Ash and that he had lodgings there with an old man, where he had been living from the time he had met with the accident. The cap now lying on the table I believe to be the same he wore at the time. I particularly told him that if he was in want, when at Rose Ash, that he should apply to the Relieving Officer, who was bound to relieve him, or to the Overseer in the absence of the Relieving Officer; I am quite sure I did not order him to leave the house; he might have remained until Tuesday, when the Board would meet. John Radford, keeper of the Bridewell, sworn - About the 16th of November, WM. HANNIBUS was committed to the Bridewell under the Vagrant Act for one month; he had been found at the lime kilns roasting four chickens, which led to his examination and committal to the Bridewell. I have no doubt whatever that the cap now on the table belonged to him. On Thursday last I saw him; I noticed that he had parted with his boots and his shirt, which he had when he left the Bridewell. He complained to me that he had no work. On Saturday I met him in the Fore Street, he said he had nothing to eat on that day, and was nearly starved with the cold; this was about two o'clock in the afternoon. I persuaded him to go to Mr Sellick. He said "hey would not give him anything; he had been one night in the Workhouse and was turned out. I said who turned you out? He replied that it was Mr Collard, he told me to go to Rose Ash from whence I came. I then persuaded him to go either to the Relieving Officer or to Mr Mead's, and if he could not obtain relief, to go either to the Mayor's, or to Mr Coles. We then parted, and I have not seen him since to speak to. Upon this testimony, the jury delivered the verdict – "Found burnt, supposed to be the body of WM. HANNIBUS," and before separating expressed their conviction to the Coroner, of the propriety of the owners of the lime-kilns, and wharfs on the canal to put a fence around the kilns by night, or otherwise instituting a watch nightly, as this is said to be the third or fourth case of accidents having happened of this dreadful nature within these few years. The occurrence has caused a great sensation in the town, in consequence of the conflicting nature of the evidence.

Thursday 21 January 1841, Issue 3921 – Gale Document No. Y3200672012
CORONER'S INQUEST - A Man Frozen to Death.
On Friday last, an Inquest was taken before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Smalridge Farm, in the parish of Moretonhampstead, on the body of MR JOHN BUY, yeoman, who was found dead on Mardon-down, a common adjoining the above estate on the Monday preceding. It appeared from the evidence of FRANCIS GUY, son of the deceased, that his father left home on the morning of Saturday the 9th instant, to go to Mr Wreyford's at Dockham, about a mile and half from his own home, in order to get some Ferrets, to endeavour to clear a house of vermin. He had addicted himself to drink, and sometimes left his home for several days together, consequently his family were not much alarmed at his not returning at night. But the weather being very inclement, and not returning on Sunday morning, one of the family went to Dockham in search of him. It was there found that the deceased had been drinking on the preceding day at the public-house in the village, kept by Mr George Taverner, but left between two and three o'clock on the same afternoon, at which time he was seen pass through the village towards his home; apparently, however, in a state of intoxication, as he was seen to fall in his way. On receiving this intelligence search was immediately made after him, messengers being dispatched to every neighbouring farm house, as well as to the town of Moreton, and to Dunsford, but in vain; no intelligence could be obtained of the unfortunate man, the inquirers not succeeding in finding any one who had seen him from the time of his leaving Dockham. In a state of the utmost alarm the search was continued throughout the Sunday, and renewed on Monday morning, in the course of which day he was found by his son FRANCIS and an apprentice boy, some little way out of the regular path between Smalridge Farm and Dockham, lying on one side in a crooked position, dead, and frozen to the ground!! There was no appearance of his having struggled. On this evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Found dead on Mardon-down in Moretonhampstead, having no marks of violence. His death appearing to have been occasioned by having drank, and being exposed to the severity of the weather." The deceased was 54 years of age, and has left a widow and family. He was the son of a man formerly for many years a carrier from Moretonhampstead to this city.

On the same day an Inquest was taken before Mr Gribble, at Gray's White Horse Inn, Moretonhampstead, on the body of JAMES HOW of that place, surveyor, aged 64, who died almost suddenly on the Monday preceding. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene Street, on the body of a little girl named MARY ANN COLES, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the day preceding. The child was only five years old, its parents reside in Exe Lane, and it came by its death in consequence of its clothes having accidentally caught fire,. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 18 February 1841, Issue 3925 – Gale Document No. Y3200672081
Exeter, Wednesday 17 February
CORONER'S INQUESTS.
On Wednesday last an Inquest was taken before John Gidley, Esq., officiating for John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MARY BURRIDGE, aged 7 years, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased, it appeared, belonged to a school supported by a most worthy family at Crediton, and having been permitted to remain in the school-room to take her dinner, unfortunately her clothes caught fire, and she was so much burnt that removal to the Hospital was deemed necessary, where after lingering two or three days, death terminated her sufferings. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

On Thursday, also before Mr Gidley, at Palmer's King's Arms Inn, West-street, on the body of WM ROBERTS, about two years old, the son of a sawyer, who being left in the room in which his parents reside, together with a brother about seven years of age, a handkerchief bound round the upper part f his body caught fire. Both children immediately ran to the door, calling for assistance, when the current of air caused the blazing part of the apparel to burn the fiercer. A woman, however, promptly came to their assistance, and extinguished the fire with a slight burn only of the arm; but so great had been the shock, that it was soon seen medical assistance was requisite, and the matter being communicated to him, Mr A. Kempe promptly attended. Nothing however availed, - the child died from fright, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 25 February 1841, Issue 3926 – Gale Document No. Y3200672096
CORONER'S INQUEST. – SUDDEN DEATH. – Saturday evening last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Mountstephen's Honiton Inn, Paris-street, on the body of WM. MOXHAY, about 62 years of age, residing in Black-Boy-road, and understood to be in the receipt of pay from the Corporation of the Poor. The deceased had that afternoon been engaged in delivering coals, in assistance of Mr Bowden, storekeeper to the Society for the relief of the sober and industrious poor, who have a depot in Paris-street. And, according to the evidence of two persons who were at work with him, about half past four o'clock, without having complained, he suddenly fell back upon his head, and neither groaned or spoke afterwards. Mr Norris surgeon, immediately came to the place, but life was extinct. – Verdict. – Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 11 March 1841, Issue 3928 – Gale Document No. Y3200672119
An Inquest was held on Friday last, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., at Chulmleigh, on the body of JAMES PONSFORD, who complained whilst at work in a barn, of weakness, - he left his work, and shortly after arrived at his house and expired suddenly. - Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 25 March 1841, Issue 3930 – Gale Document No. Y3200672146
Exeter, Wednesday 24 March
An Inquest has been taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of a girl named JANE REED, seven years of age, who about two months preceding, at Westgate, caught her clothes on fire, and was so much burnt that she was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she lingered until death terminated her sufferings. Verdict, Accidental Death.

On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner, at Connett's Sawyer's Arms public house, Preston-street, in this city, on the body of JOHN BALLAMY, who had drowned himself, by throwing himself into the River Exe, near Trew's Weir, on the preceding day; and a verdict was returned that this act had been committed by the deceased, while labouring under temporary insanity. He was a labourer, and has left a widow and family.

The following Inquests were taken by H. A. Vallack, Esq. in the past week.-
On ROBERT SHAPLAND, at Swimbridge, aged 43, and

ANN KING at Langtree, aged 13 years – "Died by the Visitation of God."

Also on HENRY OLIVER, aged 12 years, at Tawstock, who was killed on the spot by the upsetting of his cart,

On JAMES BRITTON, a respectable farmer, aged 37 years, at Bishops Tawton, who was killed by the accidental discharge of his gun, which he incautiously placed in the cradle of his plough whilst at work.

Also on JOHN BATE, Farmer, aged 52 years, at Lane Farm, in Sutcombe, who was killed by a fall from his horse, on his return from Torrington Great Market, on Saturday last, being unfortunately in a state of intoxication. – Verdict "Accidental Death."

FATAL ACCIDENT - On the 16th inst. as a boy named OLIVER, about 12 years old, in the service of Mrs Petherbridge, of Pill, in the parish of Tawstock, was going with a horse and cart, in passing a gateway the horse started, and the cart being upset on the unfortunate boy, his head was crushed in such a manner that the brains literally protruded through the fissures caused in the bone of the skull. An Inquest was taken on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

1 April 1841, Issue 3931 – Gale Document No. Y3200672164
On Wednesday last, an Inquest was taken before Samuel Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MARY JANE WILKEY, aged 7 years, who died that morning in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. She was the daughter of a waggoner living in Exe Island, and on the preceding day, her mother being about to quite the house momentarily, forbad her from meddling with some potatoes then cooking over the fire. Contrary to this express direction, however, she did so, and caught her apron on fire, which quickly communicated to other parts of her clothing; and when the mother returned, to her indescribable distress, she found her child a mouldering mass, laying by the door. She was immediately removed to the Hospital, but in a few hours death terminated her sufferings, and a verdict to this being occasioned by accident, was returned accordingly.

Thursday 8 April 1841, Issue 3932 – Gale Document No. Y3200672179
DEATH FROM EXCESSIVE DRINKING - On the 15th ult. an Inquest was taken before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Dairy Land, in the parish of Broadhembury, on the body of WM. ANDREWS, 25 years of age, who died from excessive drinking. It appeared that on the afternoon of the 12th of March, ANDREWS came home from work, complaining of pain in his stomach, of which he had complained for some days previously. He, however, took his supper, and then went to the house of a neighbour named Bennett, asking if he (Bennett) had any distilled waters, and about a pint was given him, produced from cider dregs. This himself and Bennett drank with about two quarts of cider. The wife of ANDREWS came hither to see for him, and the deceased then made a bet of 1s. with Bennett, that he (the deceased) would rink two half pints of distilled waters more, and go to Broadhembury and back again afterwards. He drank a half-pint of these spirits, and then walked away, returning in little more than a quarter of an hour, and claiming the shilling, which Bennett admitted he had lost. He now had a quarter of a pint of spirits, which he drank raw; and appearing much intoxicated, and jumping about, he fell. He was now led home and put to bed, but died about 3 or 4 o'clock on the following afternoon, not having spoken or been sensible from the time he was put to bed. About 2 o'clock on Saturday afternoon, his wife sent for a surgeon, but her husband expired before his arrival, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 6 May 1841, Issue 3936 – Gale Document No. Y3200672237
Exeter, Wednesday 5 May
CORONER'S INQUEST - On Monday morning last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, and a most respectable Jury, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of WM. BLACKMORE, one of the unfortunate men, who, as stated in our last, met with severe injury on the premises of Mr Nicholas Tuckett, in the Fore-street, on the Tuesday preceding; and with Henley, his fellow sufferer, was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital; where BLACKMORE lingered until Saturday afternoon, when death terminated his sufferings. The inquiry into the circumstances of this melancholy case were, at the request of Mr Tuckett, most minute, and occupied the Coroner and Jury for several hours. From the evidence it appeared there was error in attributing this serious accident to the fall of a newly-erected chimney, as the facts are briefly these. BLACKMORE, Henley, and a man named Coombes, (who was among the witnesses on this occasion) were employed in driving bricks from the front towards the back of the shop, where the works were more immediately in progress. Here they in the first place lodged the bricks on a temporary boarding laid on the joists which had been fixed for receiving the permanent floor. Not long before the accident the attention of MrTuckett had been attracted to what these men were thus doing, and he not only warned them to desist, as feeling assured they were overloading the timber work, but, as he conceived the more effectually to put a stop to such dangerous proceedings, himself emptied three barrows of brick into the cellar below; and was on the spot into which the mass fell only a few minutes before the joists gave way. At the time this occurred BLACKMORE and Henley were below, and Coombes above. The only account this last can give of this part of the matter, is that he was suddenly thrown off; and this action of the disruptured pieces bringing them in contact with the new and not yet firmly united masonry, brought down portions of that also, which were added to the already large heap. Indeed, poor BLACKMORE was completely covered in the ruins, while Henley was buried to about his middle, and was the first extricated from his perilous situation. With all possible expedition BLACKMORE also was got out, and as already stated, both were conveyed to the Hospital. The evidence of Mr Barnes, was in brief, that the deceased BLACKMORE was brought to the Hospital between 11 and 12 o'clock on the preceding Tuesday, when he was seen by a pupil of Mr Barnes; Mr Barnes himself saw him between 1 and 2 o'clock on that day. He found the back of the patient was broken, and the lower extremities paralised; as also that several ribs were broken. He immediately called a consultation of his brother Medical Officers, and the back was again set in its place. The extent of the injury of the ribs was not ascertained, the death of the patient appearing inevitable; and this having taken place, as before stated, on the post mortem examination which was instituted, it was found the spinal part of the back was completely severed. The wife of BLACKMORE was also among the witnesses, and her evidence was to the effect, that while he was in the Hospital her husband told her, in what had happened there was no fault at all to be found with Mr Tuckett. Indeed the whole tenor of this part of the evidence went to exculpate this respectable tradesman from all blame, what had been done being in direct contradiction to his most express orders. Having heard and considered the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death, owning to too great a weight being placed on the joists." With a deodand of one shilling on the bricks. The deceased was one of Broadclist, but some time resident in this city as a labourer. He was 42 years of age, and has left a widow and three children; his wife being again enceinte. He had been working on this job only about three weeks.

Thursday 27 May 1841, Issue 3939 – Gale Document No. Y3200672280
A COMMERCIAL TRAVELLER DROWNED IN THE RIVER EXE. - On the 18th inst., an Inquest was taken before F. S. Gervis, Esq. Coroner for the borough of Tiverton, at the Guildhall in that town on the body of MR JAMES FOX, who had met his death by drowning in the course of the afternoon of that day. The principal witness in this truly melancholy case was Mr A. E. Mulcock, traveller for the firm of Forster, Porter and Co., London, who said he arrived in Tiverton, by the mail that morning, and at the Three Tuns Commercial Inn, met the deceased gentleman, whom he had seen at Exeter on the preceding evening. MR FOX appeared in good health and spirits, and it being market day, and no business likely to be done, it was proposed that they should pass the afternoon by a fishing excursion on the River Exe. Accordingly they left the inn at about a quarter to two o'clock, and after fishing up the stream for about an hour, MR FOX proposed that they should bathe, from which he (Mr Mulcock) endeavoured to dissuade him, and declined doing so himself. MR FOX, however, adhered to his intention, and having taken off his clothes, entered the water at a place where it was not much above his hips, and began splashing it over his head and the upper part of his body. Mr Mulcock still sat on the bank, but a few minutes only had elapsed when he perceived that MR FOX had disappeared. Alarmed, he instantly rose, and endeavoured to discover the body, in order to rendering assistance to his friend; and not being enabled to see him, ran to the road to endeavour to procure the necessary aid for extricating him from so perilous a situation. This was rendered by Mr J. Towell, of Bolam, smith, who said, that between 1 and 5 in the afternoon, he was informed some one had been drowned in the river near the weir, and his assistance was requested. He accompanied the person to the spot, when at a part where there is six feet of water, and from six to seven yards from the bank, he saw the body of the deceased lying with his face downwards. About a foot or two from this the water was much deeper. He dived and brought the body to the bank. Life was extinct, and he should suppose the deceased about 27 years of age. The Jury, under these circumstances, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased represented the house of Bartleel and Company, Noble-street, London; and it was said had in his possession very valuable property.

Exeter, Wednesday 26 May
CORONER'S INQUESTS - On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MR. W. BARRATT, or as he was more commonly called CAPT. BARRATT, of the Royal George public-house, Quay-gate, who was found dead in his bed that morning. On the preceding vending he had been as well as usual, and made no complaint on retiring to rest; but not coming down as was his custom mornings, after waiting awhile, the servant went up into the room and spoke, and not receiving any answer became alarmed, and ran and called Mr Mitchell, a friend of her Master's, who returning with her, they went up into the room and found him dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." The deceased was a widower; about 60 years of age, and much respected.

Yesterday (Tuesday), also at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before Mr Warren, an Inquest was held for the purpose of enquiring into the circumstances touching the death of RICHARD MOLDRUM, or, as the name by which he was more commonly known – MAPPLEDORAM, a fly-driver, in the service of one of the proprietors of these vehicles in this city. It appeared that on Tuesday, the 18th inst., he had been out of Exeter with his carriage, and, on his return, entered Alphington-street about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening. In this street an opening or excavation had been made in order to the laying of pipes for some public purpose; and the earth thrown up formed an embankment on each side of the trench. This, however, was unobserved by poor MOLDRUM, who drove against the embankment, and by the sudden jerk thus occasioned, was thrown from his seat into the trench, sustaining thereby a fracture of the skull. He was instantly taken up and conveyed into the Plymouth Inn, where every attention was shown him by Mr Mugford and his family; and from thence was removed to his own house in Quay-lane, where he lingered until Sunday afternoon, when death terminated his sufferings. Mr Perkins, surgeon, gave evidence as to the extent of injury and cause of death. And with respect to this excavation being left unguarded, it was shown that when the accident occurred it was still light, and a watch would have been set there at nine o'clock. The Jury, therefore, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was upwards of 40 years of age; well-known, and much respected in his situation; and, we regret to add, has left a widow and three children. In the concussion, when the accident happened, the carriage was somewhat injured, but we understand the horse escaped.

Thursday 27 May 1841, Issue 3939 – Gale Document No. Y3200672281
SUICIDE - A lamentable act of self-destruction was committed at Arlington Beccott, in the parish of Arlington, last week, by MRS BLACKMORE, the wife of MR CHRISTOPHER BLACKMORE, a respectable farmer of that place. It appears the deceased had been in a desponding state, and was much disturbed in her sleep the night before, but attended as usual to her duties in the morning, shortly before 11 o'clock she went into the garden near the farm-house, where she was found soon after with her throat cut, and quite dead. The razor with which she perpetrated the fatal act lay by her side stained with blood. The deceased has left a family of four children, the youngest of whom is 13 years of age. No cause whatever can be assigned for this rash act, as deceased was in comfortable circumstances, and lived with her family in much domestic happiness. An Inquest was held on the following day, when the Jury unanimously agreed upon a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

MELANCHOLY AND SUDDEN DEATH. – On Wednesday last, at Bideford, a poor woman, named JANE COLWELL, was discovered dead in her bed. It appeared that the woman lived with her husband, an idiot, both of whom were dependent upon their friends for support, and in the course of the day, COLWELL was asked, by a neighbour, where his wife was, the poor unfortunate man replied, "that JENNY was in bed, and he could not wake her;" and upon examination the poor woman was found dead. Her head projecting over the bed-side; an Inquest was held upon the body, before J. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict was returned – "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 10 June 1841, Issue 3941 – Gale Document No. Y3200672308
Exeter, Wednesday 9 June
ALARMING FIRE, AND FATAL CONSEQUENCES.
It is our painful duty now to record a fire more fatal in its consequences than any that has occurred in this city for many years. We speak not of property, severe as this is felt by the poor, and unfortunate sufferers, but of the loss of human life, two persons having perished in the flames, and one died from the severe injuries she received in escaping from the burning ruins. But in our melancholy and most distressing tale. About quarter past four o'clock on the morning of Sunday last, the inhabitants of this city were aroused by the ever appalling cry of fire, and it was found that this – from the nature of the materials, - was raging with even more than usual fury in a house on the left hand side from Fore Street, and not far from the western end of Mary Arches Street, which is nearly centrical in the city. This however was the property, and in the occupation of Mr Wm. Sellick, an industrious man, and a master cabinet maker. the ground floor fronting the street, was Mr Sellick's shop, in which his manufactured articles were exhibited, the room behind forming his workshop. The whole of the up-stair rooms were let out to separate persons and families. Mr Sellick himself with his family residing in a tenement in the rear, and separated from the house in front by a small Courtlage. From all that can be learnt, no doubt seem to remain that the fire originated in Mr Sellick's workshop, in the rear of the front or show-shop; and on the first alarm, the police, (under Capt. Back, who was that night on duty,) turned out, and were marched to the spot. The alarm bell was rung, and the two engines of the West of England, that of the Norwich Union, and Sun Insurance Offices, were promptly taken thither. These were well manned and judiciously and most effectively worked; by which means the fire was confined to the premises in which it broke out, but these – such was the fury of the flames – no exertions could save, and they are entirely destroyed. By dint of perseverance, however, the flames were got under in about an hour and half from the arrival of the engines. The furniture and stock-in-trade within shared the fate of the premises, and the surviving inmates have lost their all. Still, as before mentioned, heavy and distressing as this is, the most affective part of the story remains to be told. The house in front, as we already observed, was let out in rooms to separate persons and families. Among these were MRS MARY TWIGGS, a respectable woman, aged 75 (many years a widow, and the mother of the wife of Mr Wm. Sellick, - a daughter in law named TWIGGS, and several children; and a man and his wife, named Winsor. These it is understood all lived in the front rooms. In those in the rear, on the first floor, lived a single woman named ADDICOTT, in her 79th year, - a poor woman who collected bones, rags, cinders, &c. in the streets and various avenues, &c, and was well known in this city. And on the second floor, MR JOHN WEBBER, aged 72, a widower and living alone. This person formerly kept a school at Crediton, from which it was understood he received a small income or annuity. He was the father of the modern Raphael of conjuring celebrity some year or two since in this city, but himself a respectable man, and held in deserved estimation by those who knew him. He had the misfortune to be very deaf. These last named persons, and MRS MARY TWIGGS have lost their lives, the latter having died about a quarter before 9 o'clock the same morning; and the shapeless remains of MR WEBBER and MRS ADDICOTT, - an appalling and most humiliating spectacle, - been dug from among the ruins in the cellar, into which en masse it had fallen. And the evidence on the Inquests on whom will best give our readers the particulars of all that probably ever can be known of this most disastrous affair.

THE INQUESTS. - These were held on Monday, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter. The first at 9 in the morning, at Roberts's Globe Inn public house, Bartholomew-yard on the remains of MR WEBBER. When George Browne, a carpenter, was called, who said I am a son-in-law of the deceased, who formerly kept the school for the deaf and dumb, at Crediton. I lived next door to him in Mary Arches-street, and last saw him alive, at the door of my house about 7 o'clock on the Saturday evening. Soon after 4 o'clock yesterday (Sunday) morning, I was awoke by an alarm of fire, and finding it was next door, my wife, in great distress, cried out "my father, my father." I hurried on a few clothes, and going down, got into the passage of the burning house, and reaching the stairs, ran up to my father-in-law's door. He was very deaf, and calling to him would have been useless unless I could get into the room. The door was locked, and I attempted to break it open, and did succeed in forcing both panels, but my exertions failed to make an aperture sufficiently large for me to go in; and the fire coming with fierceness upon me, accompanied by volumes of smoke: the staircase being in a blaze, and the house completely in flames, I saw that all attempts to save him must be vain ,and that if I did not instantly quit the premises, my own life also, would in all probability fall a sacrifice. I regained the street with great difficulty. I feel assured the fire began in Mr Sellick's workshop. My father-in-law was not in the habit of reading in bed; and, further, the fire broke through from below into the staircase after I ascended. As soon as possible after the fire was got under, search was made in the ruins for the body, and the remains, as they have been seen by the jury, were soon found.
Wm. Sellick: I am a cabinet maker, residing in Mary Arches Street. The deceased had occupied a room in my house nearly six months. Yesterday (Sunday) morning between 4 and 5 o'clock, I was alarmed by a person who was speaking to my wife at the window of our bed-room, and I understood there was fire. Without stopping to put on any clothes, I ran down stairs, and found my workshop on fire. I ran into the street, and called "fire" several times. Having done this I returned and ascended the staircase of the front house, several times repeating the cry of fire, and heard some one, I think Mrs Addicott, answer me. I believe she said yes. I heard nothing of MR WEBBER. There was at this time twelve or thirteen persons sleeping in the house. The fire and smoke came so thick upon me, that I ran back, alarmed for the safety of my wife and children. I was all this time in my night clothes only, and so rapid were the flames, that I could not get my wife and family though the front passage, which was by this time filled with smoke and flames, and to save their lives and my own, I took a step ladder which fortunately for us was in the court, and by this means we got over a wall into an adjoining house, and then made our way across the street to the Blue Maids' Hospital, where Mr Frederick York Stephens, kindly received us into the school-room. I saw nor heard anything more of Mrs Addicott; and of MR WEBBER, I saw nor heard anything. He was very deaf. It was unknown to me that there had been any fire or candle in the workshop for a fortnight, our kitchen being close by, and the fire which was kept there, used for heating the glue pots. But on enquiry last night, one of the boys told me there had been a candle carried into the shop between 11 and 12 o'clock on the forenoon of Saturday, for some process in our business, in which the application of heat is necessary. My people, however, were at work during the remainder of the day, and neither observed or smelt anything calculated to excite apprehension; and I was there myself until quarter past 7 at night. A boy remained after me, and bolted the door on the inside, coming himself out into the court by the window; the key of the door being lost. We went to bed about ten o'clock, then neither saw nor smelt anything calculated to cause any feeling of alarm; but when I first saw the fire on Sunday morning, it appeared to come from the part of the shop in which the fire place was situate. I have lost my stock in trade, furniture, clothes, and everything. And we understood that so complete had been the destruction, that Mr Sellick had picked up the case of his watch among the ruins, but the works were destroyed.
Robert Twiggs in 13 years of age: worked with Mr Sellick; and lived in the front part of the house. When alarmed by the cry of fire on Sunday morning, I escaped out of the window by means of a ladder. On Saturday forenoon I took a candle into the workshop to the other boy, who lit some shavings with it, for the purpose of warming the tenons of a table. The other boy, when he had finished with the fire made it out by throwing water over it.
Samuel Twiggs, who is older than the last witness, also worked for Mr Sellick; and corroborated the statement of having extinguished the fire by throwing water over it; and further, that at 7 o'clock in the evening, before he left work, he again threw water over the ashes.
As to the question of the identity of the remains of MR WEBBER, although nothing was left by which his person could be at all recognised; there was no sort of doubt; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

At 11 o'clock in the forenoon, a jury was impannelled before Mr Warren, at Lee's White Ball public house, March Arches Street, to inquire into the circumstances touching the death of MRS MARY TWIGGS. When her daughter
Sarah Sellick, was called; who having stated the residence of her mother on the second floor in the front of the house, - her age, &c., said, I was alarmed about ¼ past 4 o'clock yesterday morning by Ann Addicott calling Sellick, Sellick, I hear something rapping and snapping down stairs in your workshops, and I can't think what it is. I got out of bed, and looked out of the window and saw her; she had then her cap on, and was dressed in a blue gown. I went back from the window to my husband who was waking up with the disturbance, and told him I was afraid there was fire. He ran down instantly without putting on any clothes; and perceiving that my suspicions were but too well founded, I got my children down, and (as had been stated by her husband) we were taken into Mr Stocker's court. They afterwards succeeded in getting some clothes out of our house, and I was enabled to put a dress on each of the children. About an hour after I had been got out of the house, I was desired to come to Mr Saunders's just opposite, as my mother was there and dying. I found her lying on a bed, not at all burnt, but with marks of blows on her side, and one arm. She was then quite cold; no pulse could be felt; and she appeared to be dying. Mr Williams, the surgeon had been sent for, and saw her, but said nothing could be done in the case. Mr Sellick confirmed the evidence of his wife.
Wm. Saunders, a cabinet maker, living directly opposite Mr Sellick's, said yesterday morning soon after 4 o'clock, I was alarmed by a cry of fire; I put on my trowsers and shoes and hastened to the spot. I saw it was Mr Sellick's premises that were on fire, smoke being then issuing from the first floor window. I saw at a window on this floor, a woman and four or five children – from the confusion I cannot exactly say which – (we understand it to be five,) and there being no other means of getting them out, from the passage being full of fire and smoke, I got a ladder and persons coming to my assistance, we got out the woman and children. Her name is TWIGGS, and she is the daughter-in-law of the deceased. At this time a man of the name of Winsor and his wife were at one of the second floor windows, calling for assistance, and a ladder of sufficient length being got, I went up and brought the woman down on my back. While doing so I saw the deceased also at a second story window, with one leg and one arm outside, and heard her crying for help, and for God's sake, that some one would come to her assistance. I begged her to hold on, and that I would presently come to her; and I called to Winsor to come down, that I might take the ladder to her. But I believe he was anxious to save as much of his property as he could, did not do as I wished him. I continued begging him to come away, but had not the heart to remove the ladder from the window; and the smoke and fire still increasing, I suppose the deceased could not any longer retain her hold, as she fell out, having no other clothing on her than her night cap and chemise. I ran and endeavoured to catch her, and although I did not succeed, I in some degree broke her fall, but she came down on one side and arm on the stones. I endeavoured to lift her from the ground, but could not, as she had not the slightest use of her extremities. And assistance coming, she was removed into my father's house. She was sensible and thanked me for what I had done for her. In this as in the former case, the verdict was "Accidental Death."

At 4 o'clock in the afternoon, a Jury were impannelled before Mr Warren, at Roberts's Globe public house, to inquire in like manner into the circumstances touching the death of ANN ADDICOTT, of whose body so great a proportion had been destroyed, that the comparatively diminutive remains presented even a more appalling and humiliating spectacle than those of Mr Webber; indeed there was scarcely a trace of anything human about them. The evidence was precisely as has been already given; but the Coroner asked how it was to be accounted for that ADDICOTT was up and dressed so early. To which Mrs Sellick replied, that she was, from her habits of life, accustomed to go out early; indeed, at this season of the year, sometimes so early as 3 o'clock, and frequently, save that it was light, did not know what o'clock it was until she came to St Mary Arches Church, where she was enabled to ascertain this by the dial. From the time Mr Sellick supposes she answered him, it is not known that she was either seen or heard of by any one. The verdict was similar to that in the former cases.
The house was insured, but the stock and furniture not, and Mr Sellick's loss is estimated at £300. three poor families also are left entirely destitute, while many others have sustained partial losses amounting in all to nearly £50. To relieve the distress thus occasioned, a subscription has been opened, and while we would ask the charitable consideration of the humane, we shall be happy in being made the medium of conveying to the proper quarter any sums that for this purpose may be transmitted to us.
Great credit is due to Wm. Saunders, - as he was told on the Inquest, - for his generous and fearless exertions to save his fellow creatures.
The premises destroyed, were formerly used as a public house, by the sign of "The Bottle and Glass," and have also been in the occupation of several persons as a bakehouse.

AWFUL CASE OF SUDDEN DEATH - An Inquest was held at the Queen's Arms, Stonehouse, on Thursday, June 3rd, before __ Vallack, Esq., Coroner (in the absence of Mr Bone,) to inquire into the case of the death of BETSY HANNAH HOYTEN, the wife of a superannuated pensioner, residing in Rowe's Court, Stonehouse. It appeared from the evidence, that both deceased and her husband had been in a state of intoxication for nine days. HOYTEN, according to his own account, retired to bed quite drunk about 11 o'clock, by himself, and on awaking about half-past two, and finding his wife absent, he went in search of her, and on opening his room door for that purpose, he discovered her lying at the foot of the stairs - he alarmed the neighbourhood, and when they discovered she was dead, they immediately sent for a surgeon, who informed the Jury, that in the absence of appearance of external violence, and of suspicious circumstances, it was his opinion that deceased had died from some internal disease, probably apoplexy, accelerated by the continued use of intoxicating liquors. The Jury returned their verdict, that deceased had been found dead, but how, or by what means, she came by her death, did not satisfactorily appear to them.

Thursday 17 June 1841, Issue 3942 – Gale Document No. Y3200672321
Exeter, Wednesday 16 June
On Thursday last an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Edward's Plume of Feathers Inn, North-street, on the body of MARY STADDON, an infant 9 months old, the daughter of a shoe-maker residing on David's-hill. In order to amuse the child, the person having the care of it, gave it a bottle to play with, in which was a portion of oil of vitriol. The unfortunate infant contrived to remove the cork, and drank of the deleterious liquid, which occasioned its death; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 24 June 1841, Issue 3943 – Gale Document No. Y3200672335
Exeter, Wednesday 23 June
INSTANCE OF SUDDEN DEATH. - On the Afternoon of Monday last, ROBERT BACK, in the employ of Messrs. Kingdon, of this city, ironmongers, was suddenly seized while at work in the manufactory, in Waterbeer street, and expired in a few minutes. The deceased, who was 50 years of age, had previously been poorly, but not so as to prevent him from following his occupation, or exciting any particular alarm in the minds of his wife and family; and, on the Inquest, on the following morning, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at Bromell's Blue Boar's Head public-house, Magdalene-street, a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God was returned."

SUICIDE. - At Ilfracombe, on Thursday morning, MR J. HARRIS, banker, of the firm of Messrs. Lee and Harris of that town, also an eminent and extensive ship builder of the same place, put a period to his existence by cutting his throat with a pruning knife, about five o'clock in the morning. He was first discovered by a servant who immediately gave the alarm, and surgical assistance was immediately in attendance but life was extinct and could render the unfortunate man no assistance. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body and the Jury without the least hesitation, found a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." MR HARRIS was a gentleman highly respected, a great friend to the poor, and universally deplored by all who knew him; he was a widower and has left five children to bewail his unfortunate end.

Thursday 1 July 1841, Issue 3944 – Gale Document No. Y3200672350
DREADFUL ACCIDENT - On Saturday week as a miner named PHILIP NICHOLS, aged 33 years, was engaged at work in the side of a shaft, at Owlacombe Mine, near Ashburton, the board on which he stood broke under him, and he fell to the depth of 216 feet. His death was immediate, and his body was shockingly mutilated by the fall. He has left a wife and two children. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 8 July 1841, Issue 3945 – Gale Document No. Y3200672366
Exeter, Wednesday 7 July
On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Bromell's Blue Boar's Head public house, Magdalene-street, on the body of WM. BAKER, a mason, about 35 years of age, and residing in that street, who had died from the injuries he had received on the preceding day, in falling from the roof of a house, on which he was at work, at Alphington. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 July 1841, Issue 3946 – Gale Document No. Y3200672375
TORQUAY. - Death of the RIGHT HON. T. P. COURTENAY. - A most painful sensation was caused in this town, on Thursday last, by the death of the RIGHT HON. THOMAS PEREGRINE COURTENAY, only brother of the Earl of Devon, under very distressing circumstances. The right hon. gentleman attended the nomination and election of his noble nephew, at the Castle of Exeter, on Tuesday last, and was afterwards present at the dinner. He returned to his residence, at Torquay, Meadfoot House, where he has been for some months with his wife and family, the same evening. Early on the following morning, he rose for the purpose of bathing in the sea, on Meadfoot sands, just below his house. A little girl, who was going over to the quarry with her father's breakfast, saw him go into the water at this spot, about eight o'clock. She returned again in about 25 minutes, one of the quarry men being with her, and as she saw his clothes still lying, as they previously were, on the beach, she said to the man, "where can that gentleman be?" They then both looked for him, and at length perceived a body floating some way off from the shore, with the back visible on the surface, the face being downwards. The man said to the girl "I cannot swim, so run back and call your father." The girl did so with the greatest dispatch, but by the time her father had arrived at the spot, the tide had floated the body of the lamented gentleman close to the shore. Medical aid was immediately procured, and the body was conveyed to the nearest house, that of Mrs Williams. Dr Battersby, and other professional men, promptly attended, and every possible means of restoration was tried, but, alas fruitlessly. The Earl of Devon was sent for express, and arrived a few hours after this sad catastrophe. It is supposed by the medical gentlemen, that MR COURTENAY had been seized with apoplexy, which was the cause of his being drowned. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict returned accordingly. The sad event has thrown a gloom over Torquay, for the deceased gentleman was generally and deservedly respected. He was in the sixtieth year of his age, and has left a large family. His public life is doubtless well known to our readers. He had filled the office of Secretary to the Board of Commissioners for India, & of Vic President of the Board of Trade with great ability. He was also a member of the Privy Council, and had represented the borough of Totnes in Parliament for several sessions, previous to the passing of the Reform Bill. He was the author of several works, and possessed considerable literary attainments.

SUICIDE IN BARNSTAPLE WORKHOUSE - On Saturday an Inquest was held by Alfred Drake, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a man named WILLIAM CROSSMAN, who committed suicide in the sick ward of the above establishment by cutting his throat with a razor on the previous Wednesday; the unfortunate man lingered until the Saturday following when death put a period to his sufferings. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se.

Thursday 12 August 1841, Issue 3950 – Gale Document No. Y3200672431
Exeter, Wednesday 11 August
On Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Ash's George and Dragon public-house, Black-boy-road, St. Sidwell, on the body of EDWIN PAYNE, 14 years of age, and son of a labouring man living in that neighbourhood, who was drowned on the preceding afternoon. This lad, it appeared had received directions to go to a field of Wheat in the Parish of St. Leonard, in order to watch and prevent the feathered tribes from committing depredations on the ripening corn. Instead, however, of doing so, with a younger brother and two or three other boys, he repaired to the river, and at the third marsh below James's Weir, they bathed. The deceased had swam across twice, and was on his return, when his companions observed that of a sudden the action of his legs ceased, as if from seizure of cramp. One of these, a lad of the name of Vaughan, went to him, but did not succeed in bringing him to the surface. Upon which a gentleman from the artillery Barracks, who was on the spot, stripped, and plunging into the river, at length succeeded in recovering the body which he brought to shore. It had, however, now been a quarter of an hour in the water, and appeared dead. It was in the first instance removed to Old Abbey, and then to his father's house; and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 2 September 1841, Issue 3953 – Gale Document No. Y3200672473
INQUESTS TAKEN BEFORE R. H. ABERDEIN, ESQ., One of the Coroners for Devon.
On Monday, the 16th of August, at Uffculme, on the body of ABRAHAM MILLS, who died the preceding day from the effects of poison he had taken on the 10th of that month. The deceased was a Scotchman, and had formerly been in the army, but had resided at Uffculme for the last 14 years, receiving a pension of 6d. a day; he worked as a day labourer, and had had constant employment from Mr Furze, the brewer, at Uffculme, until about two months since, when he was discharged, and had not any steady employment afterwards. He told his wife about a fortnight ago that he should go all round the parish and further to look for work, and if he should not succeed he would destroy himself. On Tuesday he had been at work all day, and came home about seven in the evening: his wife was at a neighbour's house; he went to her and asked her to come home and get him some supper; she said she would bye and bye, and he went away, and soon after came again, when he told his wife if she did not come and get him some supper that night, she should get him no more. He had some tea and bread and butter for supper, and went to bed between eight and nine o'clock. About 12 o'clock his wife awoke on his getting into bed, when he appeared very ill, and after a short time stated that he had taken poison. Medical assistance was called in, and the usual remedies applied, but without effect. He lingered until Sunday evening, when he expired. He was quite sensible during the whole time, and repeatedly stated to his medical attendant and others that he had taken arsenic, and that it was trouble that made him do it. It also appeared that the wife of the deceased was given to drinking, which had been the cause of many disputes between them. A verdict was returned of Felo de se. -

An Inquest was also held at the same place on Friday, the 20th August, on the body of WM. MORGAN, a quarryman, who died from injury received while working in a lime stone quarry on Wednesday, the 18th. It appeared that the deceased was blasting the rock with gunpowder, and had charged the hole in the rock with powder, and was in the act of filling the hole with small stones and ramming down the picker, when the charge exploded, and the deceased having his head nearly on the charge, was blown up, and fell off the rock with his head downwards. It is supposed that whilst ramming the stones against the picker, there was a spark of fire fell on the powder, and that the deceased must have neglected to put some hay over the powder before he rammed down the stones, which is usually done. He was removed to his own house in Uffculme, where he lingered until Thursday morning quite insensible and died from severe injury in the head. Verdict – Accidental death.

CORONER'S INQUEST - Considerable excitement was produced in Barnstaple, on Sunday and Monday last, by the death of MR ROBERT PAGE, aged 28, master of the National School, in consequence of a rumour that his illness and death were attributable to the operations which he had undergone from Dr Cronin, for the cure of deafness, which deceased laboured under. An Inquest was held on Monday evening at the School-room, to inquire into the circumstances of the death of the deceased. The jury having been sworn, they proceeded to view the body, which was in an advanced sate of decomposition. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned the following verdict. "Death from inflammation of the brain; but whether produced by a recent operation or by natural causes, the impossibility of satisfactory examination of the body of the deceased, in consequence of its decomposed state, precludes the jury from judging."

Thursday 9 September 1841, Issue 3954 – Gale Document No. Y3200672484
INQUESTS BY R. H. ABERDEIN, ESQ. – An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, at Withycombe Raleigh on Monday the 23rd August, on the body of JOHN HAYWOOD, labourer, who hung himself on the morning of the Sunday previous. The deceased, who was about 59 years of age, was a widower, with six children. He had complained for some days before of violent pain in his head, which he said he thought would drive him out of his mind. He returned from his work on Saturday evening, and went to bed still complaining of violet pain, and he was found by one of his sons hanging to an apple tree in the orchard adjoining the house, about half-past six o'clock on the Sunday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Hung himself, being lunatic."

An Inquest was held at Ottery on the 25th inst., on the body of JAMES BAKER, sawyer, aged 25 years, who died in the following awful sudden manner: - The deceases was at work in a saw-pit on Tuesday morning, the 24th, with another man, sawing timber, who was above and the deceased below, and another man, named Ayres, was standing by. Deceased asked what o'clock it was, and Ayres told him it wanted ten minutes to eleven, and he (Ayres) turned to go away, when the deceased asked him to stay and help to turn the piece of timber; immediately after speaking to Ayres, who was in the pit, BAKER fell down; he was directly lifted out of the pit, his eyes being opened, and his face very black, and he died immediately.

Thursday 16 September 1841, Issue 3955 – Gale Document No. Y3200672500
ACT OF SUICIDE. - On the Morning of the 8th inst., a farmer named CANNON, hitherto deemed respectable, residing in the neighbourhood of Tavistock, was apprehended and lodged in the prison in that town, on suspicion of sheep stealing. A friend of CANNON'S hearing of the circumstance, having obtained permission to visit him, proceeded to the gaol for that purpose, when to his inexpressible horror he found CANNON suspended by his neckerchief from the ceiling, and quite dead. The unfortunate deceased could not have been in the gaol half-an-hour before he committed the rash act. He has left a wife and eight children to deplore his untimely end. An Inquest will be held on the body this day.

NORTHMOLTON – Coroner's Inquest - An Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq. Coroner, on the body of MR THOMAS YENDLE, a respectable farmer of Northmolton, who left his house the preceding day for the purpose of showing a poor woman on her road, and was shortly after found dead. Verdict – "Died by the visitation of God, from a natural cause."

Thursday 25 November 1841, Issue 3965 – Gale Document No. Y3200672649
An awful instance of sudden death occurred in the parish of Gittisham, in this county on the morning of the 16th inst., to a poor man named THOMAS CANNIFORD, who was employed with others in driving dung from the court yard of Combe House, the seat of the Rev. Thomas Putt, in that parish, to the garden. The deceased was observed, a little after 11 o'clock, to put down his barrow in the garden and go out of the gate into the field adjoining the garden. He did not return again, and about one o'clock one of his fellow workmen went into the field to look for him, and found him lying under the hedge on his back; he was not cold, but appeared quite dead. At the humane suggestion of the Rev. Mr Putt, the breast of the deceased was submitted to friction, and his feet and legs put into warm water, and a medical gentleman sent for, but to no purpose, life being utterly extinct. From the appearance of the body it was conjectured that the cause of death was disease of the heart. An Inquest was held at Court House on the same evening, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of Natural Death returned.

Thursday 16 December 1841, Issue 3968 – Gale Document No. Y3200672697
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On the 7th inst. an Inquest was taken before A. Bone, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Bridestowe, on the body of a respectable farmer, named JOHN FRIEND, who lived at Fenworth, in that parish, on an estate of his own. It appeared that the unfortunate deceased, was returning in a cart from Tavistock Market on Friday last, and contrary to the wish of his wife, would persist in riding on the shafts, and having indulged rather too freely at Tavistock, when near his own house, he unfortunately fell underneath the cart, the wheels of which passed over his abdomen. Mr McLeod, surgeon of Okehampton, was promptly in attendance, and did all that science and attention could do; but on Sunday evening death relieved the unfortunate individual from further suffering. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

SUSPCIOUS DEATH. – DISINTERNMENT OF THE BODY. - On the 24th August last, JOHN SYMES, junr. who was a mason and working for his father, who is a builder at Broadclist, with several others at Newland Farm in that parish, his father being erecting a new farm house at the above mentioned farm, left the building in his dinner hour for the purpose of going to a cider house to get some cider, accompanied by James Gitsham, a carpenter, and Gregory, another mason. On the way to this cider house, which is but one field from Newland, it was agreed among them that Gitsham should go on before and order the cider, and by the time it was drawn the other two would be there. This agreement, it appears, was made on account of some previous misunderstanding which had arisen between SYMES and May, and May's having said that SYMES should never have any more cider there. By the time the cider was delivered to Gitsham, SYMES and Gregory had arrived, and on May, the landlord perceiving SYMES he said, I see that d----d blackguard SYMES is with you, and immediately asked SYMES how it was that his wife could not go into the village or elsewhere without being subject to his annoyance in calling after her. It appears from what we have been able to collect, that the workmen at Newland for some occasion or other, had given May's wife the nick name of "Ching Tung Pu," and after SYMES and May had fallen out, SYMES was in the habit of annoying Mrs May very much. After May's taxing SYMES with calling after his wife angry words arose and a quarrel ensued, and some how or other SYMES received a severe wound in his arm, just behind his wrist. In consequence of this he was laid up and gave notice to the tradesman's club, held at Bending's Plough Inn, in this village, of which he was a member for his weekly allowance, and on being asked how he met with this accident he said, in going over a stile he fell upon his knife, so it passed and he got worse and worse until the 10th of Sept. when he died of lock-jaw, occasioned by this wound, and was buried in the usual manner. Since that reports have been circulated, stating that he did not meet with the accident according to his own statement, but in a scuffle at the afore-mentioned cider house. These reports having been communicated to Jas. Partridge, Esq. one of the Coroners for this county, that gentleman thought fit, and very proper too, to institute an Inquiry, and on Saturday last the body was disinterred by his order, and an Inquest was held on it before him and a most respectable Jury, at Bending's Plough Inn. The principal evidence was that of Gregory and Gitsham: Gregory having been sworn said, that after May and SYMES had quarrelled for some time SYMES made towards him to strike him, but before he came to May he hitched his foot and fell upon his knife having it open at the time, and inflicted a wound, on being asked how it was that he did not make it known at the time, he said that SYMES begged him not to say how it happened because if it were known hoe he came by the accident he should get nothing from the Club. Gitsham being sworn said, that he met with the wound in a scuffle and yet he swore they did not touch one another. This witness was very obstinate, and the Jury being very much dissatisfied with his evidence the Coroner ordered him to be locked up, which had not the slightest effect upon him, and the Jury after a short deliberation returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - Since the Inquest terminated, it has been ascertained that the evidence of Gregory and Gitsham is false. A few days after the accident occurred SYMS accompanied a man named James Dobbs, a Maltster in the employ of Mr Chas. Francis, Maltster and brewer of this place, to Exeter, and on the road he told Dobbs how it happened. He said after May and he had quarrelled for some time, he made towards him to strike him, having first put down his knife, with which he had been previously eating his bread and cheese, but before he could do so Gitsham interfered having his knife open at the time, and while in attempting to strike May he threw his arm against Gitsham's knife and that was the way the wound was caused. This accounts for Gitsham's being so obstinate before the Jury. These circumstances have been represented to Mr Partridge, who will no doubt, reassemble the Jury in order to hear the evidence of this most important witness Dobbs.

Thursday 23 December 1841, Issue 3969 – Gale Document No. Y3200672715
Exeter, Wednesday 22 December
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday last an Inquest was taken before Samuel Warren, Esq. Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Solder Inn, Magdalene-street, to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a child named ELIZABETH WEDLAKE. When it appeared that WM. WEDLAKE, the father, (by trade a mason,) with his wife and family reside at Ide. The father is at this time absent, being at work some distance from his home. About quarter before 6 o'clock on Saturday morning the mother got up in order to prepare the breakfast for mason who works on a farm; and having taken his meal, he departed. The deceased then cried for something to drink, and finding she had no water in the house, the mother went to the well to get some. She left with the infant a brother about five years old, and thinks she was not wanting above three minutes; on her return, however, she met the little boy, who was running to seek her, and said "Mammy Lizes' frock is on fire." She hastened on ,and on the entrance steps to her dwelling met the deceased, its clothes in a blaze, and the unfortunate baby endeavouring to keep the flames down with her hands. The agonizing shrieks of the distressed mother promptly brought her neighbours to her assistance, and Mr Simpson, surgeon, was called in. the child however had sustained such serious injury, its bowels being much burnt, that this gentleman recommended an immediate removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital; where the mother arrived with it about half-past eight o'clock, and by the gentlemen of that excellent institution was humanely suffered to remain with her child. Here every attention as paid to the case, but in vain, as at about ten minutes to 3 o'clock on Sunday morning death terminated its sufferings. This child, which was the youngest of five, would have been two years old on the 30th of January next; and it was learnt from the brother, that on the departure of the mother, his little sister got hold of a candlestick, from which it was endeavouring to rub the grease at the fire, when its frock caught. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 30 December 1841, Issue 3970 – Gale Document No. Y3200672732
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Monday last an Inquest was taken before Samuel Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Salter's New Inn, Catherine-street, on the body of a child aged two years and eight months, named JOHN EASTON, the son of a jobbing gardener residing in that street, whose death had been occasioned by the clothes catching fire. It appeared that EASTON, the father, with his wife and family, occupy two apartments on the same floor in that street. On Sunday morning a daughter about 11 years of age got up to light the fire; she had done this, and leaving the candle she had used still burning by the side of the fire-place, went herself to a close for some coal. At this instant the deceased ran out from the bed room, and running to the fire-place, caught his bed-gown and shirt on fire by coming in contact with the candle. This was instantaneously seen by the sister, and the cries of both instantly brought their father to their assistance, who with proper presence of mind and the greatest promptitude stripped the burning garments from his unfortunate child; and Mr F. H. Warren, surgeon, was immediately called in. The injury from the fire did not appear to be of any great magnitude, but the shock the system had received was such that the poor little fellow died at 2 o'clock on the following (Monday) morning; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

This (Wednesday morning also before Mr S. Warren, at Pratt's Market House Inn, Guinea-street, an Inquest was taken on the body of MRS ELIZABETH RUDD, wife of MR WM. RUDD, butcher, residing in that street. The deceased, who was upwards of eighty years of age, as usual, attended her parish church, St Mary Major's, on Sunday forenoon, and when she came out requested her husband to bear in mind the text, as she wished to peruse the chapter in the afternoon. Up to this time no alteration had been observable in her manner, but she had scarcely thus expressed herself to her husband, when she suddenly dropped by his side. A fly was procured and she was taken home, but did not rally, and in the course of Monday night or Tuesday morning, life became extinct. She had once before suffered from attack of paralysis: and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Last week a fine child aged about two years, called SELLICK, living in the Higher-street, Dartmouth, unfortunately caught its clothes on fire, which caused its death on the following day. An Inquest was held by Mr Anthony, the Coroner for the Borough and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

NORTH DEVON.
SUDDEN DEATH. - It is our melancholy duty to relate an awful instance of sudden death which occurred near Barnstaple on Tuesday last. WILLIAM CHAPPLE PAWLE, Esq., the Comptroller of Customs for that port, was proceeding to Paige's Pill, a small inlet to the river Taw, in discharge of some official duty, and at a short distance from the town got on the mail coach, immediately behind the driver; they had not proceeded above a mile on the Bideford road before the coachman felt the deceased fall forward, and turning round found him in a state nearly inanimate. Mr John Pugsley, who was proceeding to Bideford with his van, happened to be passing at the moment, and Mr Passmore, of High Street, jeweller, was also in the road, hard by, and both of them immediately proceeded to the assistance of the unfortunate gentleman; he was conveyed to Barnstaple in Mr Pugsley's van, Mr Passmore supporting him all the way on his arm, having first taken the precaution of loosening his neckerchief and the collar of his shirt; but before they arrived at the town the vital spark had fled. Surgical attendance was promptly procured, but pulsation had entirely ceased. Alfred Drake, Esq. and a respectable Jury held an Inquest on the body on the following evening. Mr Cook, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death was occasioned by intensity of cold affecting the chest, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God," was returned. The deceased had held a responsible situation in Her Majesty's customs for a series of years, and was highly respected by his brother officers and the trade at large.

Thursday 6 January 1842, Issue 3971 – Gale Document No. Y3200672749
On the 25th ult. an Inquest was taken before R. Bremridge, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Southmolton, on the body of MR GEORGE WEBBER, of Chittlehampton, yeoman. The deceased was 57 years of age, and had come to Southmolton on the preceding day for the purpose of attending the market, during which he was seized with apoplexy, and being removed to the Red Lion public house, in a few hours expired. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 13 January 1842, Issue 3973 – Gale Document No. Y3200672768
Exeter, Wednesday 12 January
CORONER'S INQUESTS.
On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MARTHA DISCOMBE, a child three years old last November, and daughter of a labourer residing in the Back-lane in this city, who met her death under the following circumstances:- On the morning of the preceding day the mother of the deceased went down stairs to empty some ashes, leaving in the room a little boy about eight years of age, and his little sister the deceased, who had on her chemise and bed-gown only. The account given by the boy is, that after the mother left, his sister began playing with the fire by pushing the poker through the bars of the grate, from which some sticks were protruding, and one of these in a state of ignition falling out caught his sister's clothes on fire. In this state she ran towards the door, and their cries brought a woman, a neighbour named Turner, to their assistance, who endeavoured to strip off the remaining fragments of clothing, but these being retained by a band round the body, she very prudently enveloped the child in a cloth, and stifling the fire, then cut the band. The mother was by this time arrived, but the child was dreadfully burnt, and immediately removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The accident occurred just after 10 o'clock in the morning; the appearance of the body was that of a roasted coffee berry and about one o'clock p.m. the unfortunate child expired. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

On Thursday last, at Moretonhampstead, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of JOHN LIGHTFOOT, who while at work on the preceding Tuesday, suddenly dropped down and died almost immediately. The deceased, who was about 61 years of age, was by trade a tanner, having served his apprenticeship with the late Mr Germon, of Leign, in that parish; and worked there many years after for the late and present Mr Germon; always bearing a good character as an industrious, well-disposed, and steady man. From an affection of the heart, however, he was obliged to leave this employ, and at the time of his death was, with another man, in the service of the Waywardens, engaged in breaking stones near Court, in Moreton. A woman passing on the road observed LIGHTFOOT to be leaning over the heap of stones, and asked him what was the matter. He replied, "Oh my breast," and rolling round fell on his back. The woman and his fellow workman instantly assisted him, but found he was a corpse. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

TORQUAY – FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Wednesday evening, about dark, a poor man named RICHARD MAYBIN, Post boy at Hearder's Hotel, was found in the Turnpike Road between Tor and Kingskerswell in a state of insensibility, having been thrown from a horse. It appears that he had been sent to Exeter in the morning, and was on his return when the accident occurred. He was found a few minutes afterwards by a mechanic, and recognised by a gentleman of Torquay, who came by in his gig and very humanely took him home. Medical assistance was immediately procured, when it was found he had sustained a severe concussion of the brain. He never spoke after he was found, and on Thursday morning death put an end to his sufferings. On Friday a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body before __ Gribble, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, with a deodand of one shilling on the horse. It is supposed the horse shied and threw the deceased off on his head as it was much cut.

Thursday 13 January 1842, Issue 3972 – Gale Document No. Y3200672769
CORONER'S INQUEST - An Inquest was held before Alfred Drake, Esq. Coroner of Barnstaple, last week, on the body of a young gentleman, named PATON, the son of GEORGE PATON, Esq., of Barbacan Terrace, in this town, who died the previous day from taking too great a quantity of laudanum, a medicine which he was in the frequent habit of using. Verdict – Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 20 January 1842, Issue 3973 – Gale Document No. Y3200672788
Exeter, Wednesday 19 January
CORONER'S INQUESTS. – On Wednesday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of ELIZA SELLEY, who came by her death under the following circumstances. The deceased, who was 7 years old in May last, was the daughter of a labouring man living in the parish house at Kenn. On the Monday preceding, the father came home between one and two o'clock to get his dinner, his wife being gone to visit a brother who lay dangerously ill. When SELLEY reached the house, he found his daughter at play in the road, and saw nothing more of her until he heard screams of "fire." The deceased, it appeared, had in the interim gone to an upper room in the same house, occupied by a woman named Bulley, where, at the time, there was no one besides, except a child about four years of age; and the account given by the unfortunate girl herself, - who was perfectly sensible to the last, - was, that she went to remove a chair that was standing before the fire, when the little one in play, came and gave her a shove and pushed her directly back on the fire, and her clothes caught in a blaze. It was not above three minutes when her screams brought the father to her assistance, but in this short time the garments were all burnt, with the exception of the bands by which these had been fastened round the waist. The distressed father, as well as he could, stifled the fire in the portions of dress that remained, and then wrapped his suffering child in a sheet. A neighbour, (a female named Trim,) now arrived to his assistance, and getting a cart and horse, he brought his daughter to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. She was received there about half-past 4 o'clock, and immediately attended to by Mr De la Garde and his pupils; but was so dreadfully burnt as to make it a matter how wonder that she had survived even so short a journey. From head to foot the body had the appearance of having been roasted, and about 7, the same evening, she breathed her last. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

HAYNE FORD - The body of the lad JOHN KNOWLES, who was drowned some time since at this place, was found on Monday week, by his father and brother-in-law, about half a mile from the place, where the fearful accident occurred. The body was entangled in the roots of some alder bushes. An Inquest was held the next day and a verdict of accidental death returned.

Thursday 27 January 1842, Issue 3974 – Gale Document No. Y3200672803
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Monday last, before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of JAS. ROWE, 8 years of age in March last, the son of a labouring man residing in the parish of Topsham, who came by his death under the following circumstances. On Friday, the 7th inst. the lad's mother left her house for from half to three quarters of an hour, on an errant. Her family then at home consisted of a boy 11 years of age, the deceased, and two younger children. When near her door, on her return, she saw her son JAMES running out from the house with his clothes in flames. She instantly pulled off her shawl and threw it round him, by which she succeeded in stifling the flames; and her cries brought two neighbours to her assistance. Mr Tothill, surgeon, was sent for, who promptly attended and dressed the suffering boy, but at the same time recommended his immediate removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, accordingly, he was brought. Here every attention was given to the case, but the injury was such that the poor little fellow sunk under it, and died on Saturday morning. His account of the manner in which the sad accident occurred, as given to his mother after he was in the Hospital, was this. He said he had been making a bag for his marbles, and reached up in front of the fire, in order to replace the needle and thread on the chimney-piece, when his apron caught in a blaze. - Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Also on the body of a child, two years old, named EMMA MATTHEWS, of Exwick, St. Thomas, who being on Saturday left for a short time by its mother, on her return was found with its clothes on fire. The child was immediately brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but so great was the injury received that on Sunday morning death terminated its sufferings. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 February 1842, Issue 3975 – Gale Document No. Y3200672817
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday afternoon, a Jury assembled before John Warren, Esq. Coroner, for Exeter, at Badcock's Custom House Inn, Quay-gate, to enquire into the circumstances touching the death of MR CHARLES RATCLIFFE, about 27 years of age, youngest and only remaining son of MR JOSEPH RATCLIFFE, miller and Maltster, Okehampton-street, St Thomas, adjoining this city; whose body had been discovered in the course of the forenoon on that day, floating in the river, just off the yard of the Northern Mining Coal Company, at the lower part of the quay, and a short distance on the city side of the lime kilns. It appeared, that on good terms with his family, having just taken tea with them, he left his father's house on Christmas Eve, and did not return that night. On Christmas Day, a servant named Ann Webber, was sent to MR RATCLIFFE'S mill, on one of the leats above the Quay, to see for him, and request he would come home to dinner. She found him at the mill, and delivered her message. Shortly afterwards, Quicke, the foreman at the mill, having had directions to that effect from |MR RATCLIFFE, sen., asked him for the cash he had taken on the Christmas Eve, amounting to about a pound; and at the same time reminding him that he had been desired to come home to dinner. He told Quicke, that he was minus of the cash, and went away out of the yard of the mill house, saying he should be back again in half an hour, and then he would go home to dinner. The foreman never saw him afterwards. About six in the evening of that day, he called at Mr Bond's spirit dealer in St. Thomas, but did not go home, nor, as far as is known, was he again seen, until his body as before stated was found in the river. In order to an examination of the body by Mr Kingdon, surgeon, the jury adjourned to the following (Tuesday) morning, when Mr Kingdon stated that there were no external marks of violence, but the body was in that state of decomposition that examination internally was rendered impossible; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." Such was the state of decomposition of the body, that the unfortunate young man was only recognized by some portions of his dress, and a snuff box, & a few small articles found in his pockets.

Thursday 3 February 1842, Issue 3975 – Gale Document No. Y3200672819
Plymouth, Devonport &c.
It is our painful duty to announce the death of MR PRIDEAUX, late of North-street, who destroyed himself at Kingsbridge, on Monday morning last. MR PRIDEAUX had, for some time previous to his untimely death, suffered severely from gout, and his spirits were much depressed. He had shunned all intercourse with his friends, but no suspicions were entertained of his contemplating self-destruction. Not having quitted his bed room, on Monday, at the usual hour, MRS PRIDEAUX entered the room, where she found him suspended from the bed post by two pocket-handkerchiefs – life was perfectly extinct. An Inquest was held on Wednesday on the body, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. MR PRIDEAUX had resided at Kingsbridge for the last four months, and was universally respected by the inhabitants.

SUICIDE - An Inquest was held before R. J. Squire, Esq. Coroner, on Tuesday, on the body of MR SAMPSON HAKE, aged 74 years, who was found on the previous day in his bed-room at his son's house, Tavistock Cottage, with his throat cut. It appears from the evidence adduced at the Inquest on the body, that the deceased, who was of temperate habits, and possessed an even but reserved disposition, was formerly a respectable yeoman residing at Chattleburn, near Brixton, Yealmpton, but that he had lately been much reduced in circumstances, being dependant for support on his son, MR RICHARD HAKE, butcher of this town. This is supposed to have preyed on his mind, and joined with the fact deposed to by his daughter-in-law, that since an attack of the brain fever some years since, "he frequently did not know what he was about," there can be no doubt but that at the moment he committed the fatal act, he was suffering from an aberration of intellect. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 10 February 1842, Issue 3976 – Gale Document No. Y3200672835
SUDDEN DEATH - A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday at Chulmleigh, on the body of MRS SOUTHWOOD, widow of the late MR BENJAMIN SOUTHWOOD, of that town, who, when in the act of dressing herself on Monday, suddenly fell down and expired. She had been previously in her usual health. Verdict – "Died by the Visitation of God."

SOUTHMOLTON. – HENRY THOMAS, who had been missing some days, was on Friday last found in an old lime quarry about three parts of a mile from the town. The quarry has been out of work for a great number of years, and is full of water into which he had plunged, after tying a quantity of iron to his body to sink himself. A number of persons went out once more on Friday to search for him and dragged this pit as well as others, the grapples pulled up the body and he was found in the state described. He had been in a low way a long time previous, and appears to have given up all thoughts of this world for some time. A Coroner's Inquest was held by R. Bremridge, Esq., when a verdict of "Found Drowned, occasioned by Insanity," was returned.

Thursday 10 February 1842, Issue 3976 – Gale Document No. Y3200672836
Plymouth, Devonport, &c.
CORONER'S INQUEST. – An Inquest was held on Friday evening at Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a mason named GEORGE RODDEN, who was killed on the afternoon of the same day, by a fall from a ladder. The deceased, who had for nearly forty years past been in the employ of Mr Webber, builder, was at work at the Rev. Mr Winstanley's, in Kerr-street, and was in the act of ascending the ladder in the garden, when its sides, which were very rotten and decayed, suddenly broke, and the man fell backwards, striking, in his fall, a workman who was, by his direction, following him up the ladder. The poor man fell from a height of about 12 feet, on his head, on the paving ground of the garden, and died almost instantly. Shortly before the accident, he had been cautioned not to use the ladder, which he knew was in a decayed state; but he remarked that he could not get another into the garden without trouble, and as he had very little more to do to complete the work on the roof of the tenement to which he was going, he would use that which was there. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

On Monday, an Inquest was held at Oreston, on the body of a widow named MARY WEST, who died suddenly from a rupture of a blood vessel of the chest. Verdict – "Natural death."

Thursday 3 March 1842, Issue 3979 – Gale Document No. Y3200672881
Exeter, Wednesday 2 March
CORONER'S INQUEST – On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, on the body of
ELLEN MARTIN, a young woman between 17 and 18 years of age, the daughter of a pensioner residing in Duke's-place, Fore-street-hill, in this city, who had drowned herself that morning. It appeared the deceased was either an apprentice, or working for Messrs Burdon, stay-makers, North-street, and it was said some young man connected with the establishment had been paying his addresses to her. On the preceding evening she quitted the shop, and left this person on the same terms as usual: got up on Saturday morning at the accustomed time, and made a hearty breakfast with the family at her father's; quitting the house, as was supposed for her work. Instead however of going to North-street, she walked direct to the Head Weir, hung her bonnet and cloak on the narrow iron bridge that crosses the engine stream nearly close to the weir, and plunged into the mill leat. Persons were at hand, and she was picked up about half-past 8 o'clock, but although only about 6 or 7 minutes in the water, she was already dead. The body was conveyed to Carter's Reception House, Exe-lane; and a medical gentleman who had attended the deceased, stating that in the course of the last summer she suffered from severe fever, the effects of which she had felt since, the Jury returned a verdict of "Destroyed herself while labouring under temporary insanity."

SUDDEN DEATH. – Yesterday (Tuesday) morning, as HUMPHREY SQUIRE, a man advanced in years, and for a considerable period in the employ of Messrs. Holman and Ham, of this city, chemists, was crossing the North Bridge, he fell, and expired immediately. He had been afflicted with asthma, but is supposed to have ruptured a blood vessel. The deceased had seen better days, being formerly a respectable master shoemaker in Exeter. An Inquest was taken upon the body, before John Warren, Esq. Coroner, this morning at Tucker's Crown and Sceptre Inn, North-bridge. It appeared the deceased is 66 years of age, and a verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 24 March 1842, Issue 3982 – Gale Document No. Y3200672922
SUICIDE. – On the 14th inst., an Inquest was held in the parish of Knowstone, before J. Partridge, Esq. Coroner, on the body of ROBERT MIDDLETON, a man of rather weak intellect, and a pauper of that parish, who had committed suicide, by lacerating his left arm with a razor, and bled to death. It appeared that on Saturday the 5th, he had received half-a-crown for labour, from a farmer of the parish, and that he went to a public-house, and spent the greater part of it. In consequence of spending the money an altercation took place between him and his wife. On the Sunday morning following he was heard to say that he would destroy himself, and one of his children observed that he took a razor and made a slight laceration in his arm, from which blood appeared; soon after which he left his house, and about nine o'clock the same morning, he was discovered lying upon his face in a barn, a few hundred yards distance from his cottage. He was desired to leave the barn, which he did, and walked in the direction of a coppice on the other side of the field, and was never seen alive afterwards. He was accidently found on Sunday the 13th by his landlord, in the coppice towards which he had been seen walking. The body presented a most emaciated spectacle, being enveloped in rags and filth, with the same shirt in which he had left the Union at Christmas. In the left arm were several slight lacerations but one had divided the artery and caused death; in his waistcoat pocket was found a razor stained with blood. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se, and he was accordingly buried in the church-yard, between the hours of nine and twelve the same night.

Thursday 31 March 1842, Issue 3983 – Gale Document No. Y3200672933
On Wednesday an Inquest was held on the body of MR JOHN STABB, aged 76, who was found dead that morning in bed. Verdict – died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 7 April 1842, Issue 3984 – Gale Document No. Y3200673949
MYSTERIOUS CIRCUMSTANCE. - On Saturday last, MR NICHOLAS STEER, of Newton Abbot, builder, and a constable of the parish of Wolborough, left his home for the purpose of lodging a prisoner in his custody, in the Devon County Bridewell, in this city. Himself and prisoner rode in a small and light cart he used in his business, which was drawn by a pony. The cart and horse he left at Alphington, and having come on foot from thence and lodged his prisoner in the Bridewell, he proceeded to the transaction of his private business, for the purpose calling on several persons in Exeter. He was perfectly sober, and set out on his return home about 6 o'clock in the evening. On Sunday morning, soon after 5 o'clock, he was found by some workmen on their return from Lupton to Exeter, lying dead a short distance from the Old Newton Road, on the ascent to Haldon, in the direction of the Telegraph station. His body was covered with snow, such had been the inclemency of the night: there was a cut over one eye, a bruise on the face, and other injuries, but it did not appear that any property had been taken from the unfortunate man. The pony with the cart, it is said had turned again, and made its way to the turnpike on the Chudleigh road, near Woodlands. The body of MR STEER was brought back to Kennford, and lodged there in order to taking the Inquest. MR STEER was a steady, industrious, and sober man, and much respected: and we regret to say has left an afflicted widow and eight children. Since the above was written, we have heard that MR STEER was seen in his way through Kennford, walking, and leading his horse, and being asked why he did this, his reply was either that his horse was lame or unwell. The same evening a gentleman returning by the Haldon road from Teignmouth to this city with a horse and gig, the horse became restive, and the gentleman, for safety, jumped out behind. The horse ran swiftly on, and it is thought that poor STEER must have met it descending the hill, and seeing a horse and gig in this situation, endeavoured to stop the animal, and thus met his death, or such injury as prevented him from proceeding, and died from the severity of the night; as on the horse coming with the shafts only to Kennford, and a person being sent to see what had occurred, very near where the body was found in the morning, discovered the body of the gig. The proceedings on the Inquest commenced yesterday afternoon, at Day's, at Kennford, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner. The Jury were locked up for some time, but we have just heard the verdict was "Accidental Death, by coming in contact with a horse and gig."

Thursday 14 April 1842, Issue 3985 – Gale Document No. Y3200672967
NORTH DEVON. – Child Burnt to Death. An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before T. L. Pridham, Esq. and a respectable Jury, on the body of a fine boy about 7 years old, named BALE, who was burned to death in the Old Town, Bideford. It appeared by the evidence of some of the neighbours that the child had been left alone by the parents in the house, and that the child caught his clothes on fire from the grating of the fire-place. The poor little fellow, after having caught his clothes on fire, ran into the street, and his bitter cries brought some neighbours to his assistance, and after great trouble extinguished the fire, but he was so dreadfully burnt that he died the following day in great agony.

Thursday 21 April 1842, Issue 3985 – Gale Document No. Y3200672983
On Saturday last, a poor man named RICHARD TANCOCK, residing in Heavitree, was killed whilst at work at a place called the Gravel Pit, in the parish of Colaton Rawleigh, near the Sidmouth road, by the falling in of the upper part of the quarry. An Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The insecure state in which we have heard that many quarries now are renders it absolutely dangerous for men to remain at work therein.

Thursday 19 May 1842, Issue 3989 – Gale Document No. Y3200673044
Exeter, Wednesday 18 May
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On the afternoon of Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Patey's Old Bell public house, Edmund Street, in this City, on the body of MR HENRY NORTHAM, eldest son of MR JAMES NORTHAM, iron-founder, Commercial Road, - which had been discovered about 6 o'clock that morning, in the leat at the back of his father's foundry, having no other clothing than a shirt and stockings, and quite dead. The unfortunate deceased was 26 years old, and a clever and ingenious young man, as some notices of inventions and improvements effected by him that have appeared in our columns, will go to prove. It is understood, however, that he has not been so fortunate in some of his undertakings as ingenuity and talent such as he possessed deserved, and this preying on a naturally sensitive mind, caused a depression of spirits, and illness such as rendered it necessary that medical advice should be obtained, and we apprehend he has been under the care of Mr Calder. It was understood he was last seen alive about 10 o'clock on Sunday night; he was then in bed, and was visited by his sister for the purpose of ascertaining if there was anything he wished for more, previous to the family retiring to rest. At that time he did not appear at all worse than he had been, nor was there anything to excite apprehension in her mind, and having set all things right for him; she took an affectionate leave, and wished him good night. By the evidence of a person of the name of Bayly, it appeared clear that the body could not have been in the situation in which it was found, at 5 o'clock, and to reach the water, and in a state, as described, almost of nudity, MR NORTHAM, on getting out of the house, must have crossed his father's garden, then gone down a lane that is common to several neighbours, and got over a hedge before he reached the leat, the water in which was stated to be 10 feet deep. On hearing the evidence there could exist no doubt as to the state of mind of the unhappy man when he committed this rash act; and the Jury returned a Verdict "Destroyed himself while labouring under temporary Insanity."

Thursday 26 May 1842, Issue 3990 – Gale Document No. Y3200673061
Exeter, Wednesday 25 May
SUDDEN DEEATH. – Soon after mid-day on Monday, MR WM. MOORMAN, from 70 to 71 years of age, latterly resident in this city, but who it is said formerly kept the Compass, a public house in Taunton, met in the street a female named Catherine Smith, whose relatives he had known, and after some conversation he invited her to take a glass of spirit and water with him. This was accepted, and they went to Compton's Bear Inn, South-street. He called for two glasses of gin and water, and having drank his own, called for a second, but of which he had not drank, when rising on a sudden, having displayed no previous illness, he dropped down and died in a few minutes. An Inquest was taken on the body on Tuesday morning, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

DISGRACEFUL DISCLOSURES AND FATAL RESULT – CORONERS INQUEST.
An Inquest of more than ordinary importance in its character was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, on the afternoon of Friday last, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, occupying the attention of Coroner and Jury for a considerable time. The object of the inquiry was to ascertain by what means an infant about twelve or thirteen weeks old, that expired on the preceding day in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, had come by its death. The name by which the unfortunate child was registered and known, it appeared was MARY ANN HAWKINS, and the first witness examined was MARY SHARP, the mother of the deceased. She stated herself as residing at present in Exe-lane, in this city:- that she got her livelihood by attending at fairs and revels, selling nuts; and when not employed in this way, she sold watercresses about the streets. The child was an illegitimate child, and the father was JOHN HAWKINS, working for Mr Passmore, a dealer in coals, and vendor of small fagots of wood, in the upper part of Sidwell-street. That when the person went to register the birth of the child, she (the mother) gave no particular directions about it, but it was registered in the name of MARY ANN HAWKINS; - that when she was absent, which was seldom for an entire night, a woman called Mary Field, with whom she lived, kept the child – she (Sharp) paying her threepence per day for the service thus rendered, and providing meat for the infant:- that it was a very weakly child, but had no disease. On the Wednesday preceding, she left Exeter in the morning, with nuts, for Kentisbeare Fair, and Mary Field, having the child in her arms, went with her as far as Whipton, "to bring her going." On parting, she (Sharp) gave Field a penny, instructing her, that should the child be uneasy, she was to buy a penny-worth of poppy syrup, and give the infant some of it, "to make it more comfortable." In answer to a question to that effect Sharp said she had given her infant the breast just before she went away.
The next witness was Mary Field, who said, that having parted from Sharp, under the circumstances stated, she returned to her home in Exe-lane; -0 that the father of the child frequently visits, and generally spends his Sunday afternoon there. He came about 6 o'clock that (Wednesday) evening. The child became troublesome, and she said to HAWKINS, I wish you would look after the child while I go up and get a pennyworth of poppy syrup. I carried a teacup with me, and bought the poppy syrup and half an ounce of tobacco, at Mr Gould's, the druggist, at the corner of Paul-street. This was about 8 o'clock. The tobacco was for HAWKINS to smoke. When I returned home, I put the teacup on the table, and desire HAWKISN to look after the child while I went up in town, which he promised to do. It appeared that after Field left, the child became very troublesome, and HAWKINS gave it two teaspoonfuls of the poppy syrup and put it into bed. Field returned from her ramble between 10 and 11 at night; the poor baby was still restless, and she enquired of HAWKINS if he had given it any of the syrup. He said yes, and told her the quantity. She said, she supposed a drop more would not hurt it, and taking the teacup gave it the remainder. She then went into bed with the child, and soon fell asleep.
JOHN HAWKINS, the reputed father, now takes up the tale, and gives a finish to this picture of profligacy and scene of demoralization such as but for evidence of the fact thus obtained it would have been scarcely possible to credit as having existence in this country, much less in this city, by saying, that in this room he remained all night, being engaged in mending his shoes!!! He had finished his job just before daylight, and, as he swore, he then laid his head on the table and fell asleep. About 4 o'clock he awoke, and thought he heard the child breathing very strangely. He went to the bed's side to ascertain the cause. Field was sound asleep, and the child close at her back – its head, however, appearing to have fallen down on its breast, and he thought it looked dark in the face. He took it out of bed, and found that one of its eyes was running with gore, and lifting the lid of the other, the white of the eye alone was visible; and the child appeared dying. He now awoke Field, who got up, and soon after 4 o'clock on Thursday morning they arrived with it at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was immediately received.
Mr Wm. Willand James, a student at the Hospital, and son of Mr J. H. James, surgeon, was at the Hospital on Thursday morning by 5 o'clock and saw the child. He gave such directions as he deemed requisite under the circumstances, and himself remained with the child until 9 o'clock. He then left, but for a space of time not exceeding half an hour, and when he returned, found the child had just expired. Mr James was asked if the child had any disease more than that which arose from the poison given it. He replied, no; the child might have lived on for some years, but he did not think it a strong child, and it had had bad nursing and bad feeding. Mr James was asked what quantity of this liquid was a dose for a child of this age, with a view of producing a quieting and calming effect. He said he should suppose a middling size teaspoonful enough. He was asked if the quantity which had been administered to this unfortunate child would have caused death in a child that was older and stronger in its nature. He replied, yes, he should think this quantity – which appeared to have been half-an-ounce, or nearly four teaspoonfuls – would have killed a child of twelve months old. The body was turning black, and Mr James was asked to what cause he would ascribe this. He said this was caused by the action of the poison. The remains of the syrup in the teacup was produced, and Mr James said there was nothing but syrup of poppies there.
Mr R. Gould, druggist, &c., North-street, stated the woman Field coming to his shop on Wednesday evening for poppy syrup, as she had said in her evidence. He sold her that, and half-an-ounce of tobacco: he did not measure the poppy syrup, but judged it in the usual manner to be about half-an-ounce. The woman did not ask him as to the quantity that was a proper dose for a child, and he supposing her acquainted in that respect, made no observation as to the manner in which she should use it. If she had asked him as to the way in which it was to be used, he should have told her. Mr Gould was asked if he took the precaution of attaching the word poison to the vessel that contained it. He replied, no – the woman brought a teacup for it, and it was not usual so to designate preparations of this kind. Mr James was then asked if this precaution was not necessary. He replied, no – it was not regarded as arsenic and other poisonous substances, being used in nurseries, and probably to be found in most families where there were young children.
After hearing the evidence of Mr James, the Jury expressed their opinion that there was no occasion for a post mortem examination of the body; and the Coroner having summed up, and commented on the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from incautiously giving it an overdose of poppy syrup."
The state of this child was humiliating and melancholy, and merciful would it be if all such were removed from those who show that they are dead to the best feelings of our nature, and have far less sympathy for their young than even brutes. It had all the appearance of having been sadly neglected – was dirty in its person, and from want of attention and cleanliness, its little flanks were literally frotted into holes!!! The woman Field admitted that one condition of the payment of 3d. per day was that she should keep the infant clean. The Coroner in observations marked by humane feeling and charity, but at the same time with a severity such as the case most justly called for, strongly reprimanded the two females for their neglect of this unfortunate child, telling them, that although no case had been made out against them here, yet that, morally speaking, they were answerable for this want of care of an infant, the offspring of one of them, and in charge, for the purpose of being nursed, of the other. He also commented with proper severity on the disgusting and disgraceful nature of the life that HAWKINS as well as they appeared to lead, reminding them, if such evil courses were persisted in, of the consequences that must hereafter ensue.

Thursday 2 June 1842, Issue 3991 – Gale Document No. Y3200673077
On Thursday last, before Mr Aberdein, at Honiton, on the body of MR SAMUEL WHELLER, in the employ of Mr White, grocer, of that town; when the following circumstances were elicited . MR WHELLER, who had been remarkable for his lively disposition, which had rendered him a great favourite with those who knew him, on the preceding (Wednesday) night asked Mr White to allow him to go out for a few minutes, as he wished to speak to a friend (Mr Hussey) on particular business. Permission was granted, but e was desired not to remain long away, to which he replied, "he should not be more than ten minutes." Mr White expected his return accordingly soon after the appointed time, but he did not come, on which the master grew uneasy:- hour after hour rolled on till midnight had arrived, and still MR WHELLER returned not. Mr White then went to the friend's residence to enquire after his assistant, but Mr Hussey had neither heard of nor seen him for the evening; this alarmed Mr White, who then, accompanied by Mr Hussey, went in search but could not find him. The next morning a working man was going over Tracy Bridge, and saw a hat and letter by a gate in a field near the river; he picked them up, and they proved to have belonged to the unfortunate WHELLER, whose body was soon afterwards found near the spot. It is surprising and most unaccountable with what composure and determination this young man rushed on his own destruction; nothing different was noticed during the previous day in his manner; he had made a will wherein he gave what he possess to two of his companions, and he had written the letter which was found near his hat. It is impossible to surmise what influence could have led him to commit so awful an act. A copy of the letter is subjoined.
"Honiton.
"My Dear Friend. - To you, my dear friends, before I leave this world for ever, do I give some very earnest and sincere advice (to one of you in particular.) Look at me! one who has for the last two years carried on one complete ***!!! Oh! my #God! to what a state am, I arrived, - my career of crime and folly has at length reached its end, - 't is done – 't will soon be over – my enemies will then triumph. What will it be in a hundred years hence? Forgotten! Oh! my beloved friend, my more than brother, to you do I most earnestly entreat to take warning by me. The cold and silent grave will soon hold my remains – those waters will soon run over me, and in due course WHELLER will be forgotten. May my grave be under some tree, where my companions may often resort to talk over the days when I was living as one of the gayest of the gay – hated and beloved by some, and greatly beloved by others. Although my face has worn the appearance of happiness, although my spirits have ever been good – still, what has been the pain my heart has felt? Oh! more – much more than I can express!! My beloved parents, to you do I send for pardon. My dear, dear mother cannot survive her unhappy son – no I am confident of it. To my dear sister, and to my adopted sister, do I send my dying love. Oh! cherish it – think on me often! To my dear friends and companions – of them do I ask pardon for the many untruths I have told them, and it is my dying request that they will not censure, but forgive me. To the world I say farewell. Farewell, all friends – farewell, unhappiness and misery! Oh! Eternity! how awful, but still how pleasant. Oh, my God! into thy hand do I commend my spirit, soul and body.
SAML. WHELLER."
After several hours consultation, the Jury returned a verdict, of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 16 June 1842, Issue 3993 – Gale Document No. Y3200673108
Exeter, Wednesday 15 June
CORONER'S INQUEST. - Last (Tuesday) evening, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Mountstephen's Honiton Inn, Paris-street, on the body of EDWIN OSMENT, a lad 14 years of age in January last, - son of MR SAMUEL OSMENT, printer, who met his death by drowning while bathing on Monday evening. The deceased was employed in the office of a Solicitor, in this city, and after office hours had gone to bathe in the river Exe. From the evidence of a boy named Conner, it appeared that he met the deceased about half past 6 o'clock on the preceding evening in Sandy Point Marsh on the bank of the river, and they went together to a place called Penny Royal, in the Marsh, but further up the stream than Sandy Point, and for those who are unable to swim, which was the case with both these youths, probably as dangerous a part as is in the river, the water deepening at once from about breast high for a lad, to from 12 to 16 feet. They stripped and got in, and poor OSMENT, unaware of the treacherous nature of the ground, was soon out of his depth. Conner instantly gave an alarm, and a lad named Lockyer courageously dived after the drowning youth, (who rose three times to the surface,) but was unable to get hold of him. Parties now ran for David's-hill, where they supposed John Mason, a labourer, and celebrated as a diver, to be at work, and having at length found him, he instantly accompanied them to the river. The body, however, had now been so long in the water that all hope of the restoration when found, had vanished. Mason immediately dived, and four times repeated this without success, but on the fifth essay, he found the body in from 15 to 16 feet of water, and brought it out; being from an hour to an hour and half after the unfortunate lad got into the river. The body was removed to his father's house in Paris-street. And the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 23June 1842, Issue 3994 – Gale Document No. Y3200673124
On Sunday week, a fine lad named JAMES HIGGINS, an apprentice on board the Amelia schooner from Padstow, Pope master, now discharging slate at Bideford Quay, was drowned whilst bathing in the pool below Cross Park Rock. The body was under water upwards of an hour before it was picked up, when it was speedily conveyed to Balch's White Hart public-house. Medical gentlemen (Drs. Brock, Smith and Pridham) immediately attended, and every means were adopted to restore him to life without avail. A Coroner's Inquest was held upon the body before T. L. Pridham, esq., and a respectable jury, and a verdict returned – "Accidentally drowned."

Thursday 7 July 1842, Issue 3996 – Gale Document No. Y3200673156
Plymouth, Devonport, &c.
MELANCHOLY SUICIDE AT DEVONPORT. - On Saturday morning last, supposed to have been between the hours of 8 and 10-, JOHN REES, Esq., Manager of the Devonport Branch of the National Provincial Bank of England, one of the Magistrates recently appointed for the borough, and an Alderman, committed suicide at his residence, by cutting is throat. His bed-room door having been broken open, he was found lying on the sofa with a razor in his hand, and on a table before him was a paper with the following written with a lead pencil:- "My mind is weakened by many cruel disappointments experienced in everything, and is by recent circumstances completely prostrated. From some that have shortly occurred I find myself quite unequal to the ordinary duties of my station. I cannot bring anything like energy of mind to bear upon the matters; the merest trifle causes the greatest irritation like madness, with most unaccountable delusions. I am a mere miserable wreck of what I was even a few short weeks since. Let no one be alarmed if my mind give way; no one will lose by it. Even if my just claims are never recovered, enough will be found to meet demands and much more than enough to set all right. I am a miserable, long being, with a mind prostrated, and a broken heart. How can I bear up my mind? The difficulties I am surrounded with, yet all trifling things, have quite destroyed my peace and energies. I am so bewildered that I cannot discharge my duty. There is a difference of £150 in the notes; no more." He has been in a desponding state of mind for several weeks past, but no further reason can be assigned for the rash act. He was, it is said, married between 20 and 30 years ago, but his wife eloped in the first year of his marriage. An Inquest was held on the body the same day, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned. This sad event has caused a most painful sensation in the town and neighbourhood.

Thursday 21 July 1842, Issue 3998 – Gale Document No. Y3200673191
A man by the name of BROWNING, a labourer who was working at the Pauper Lunatic Asylum at Exminster, died suddenly on Tuesday the 12th inst., leaving a wife and family unprovided for. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Thursday, and the Jury returned a verdict – "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 11 August 1842, Issue 4001 – Gale Document No. Y3200673228
On Saturday lat, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Cridge's Paper-makers' Arms, on the body of EMMA RADFORD, about 9 years of age, - the daughter, as was understood, of persons residing in that street; - who was drowned by falling from a plank into a depth of from 8 to 9 feet of water, as she was crossing the River Exe upon it, near the Head Weir, in company with another girl about the same age. - Verdict, Found Drowned.

NORTH DEVON.
The daughter of MR AND MRS BROOK, of Bideford, who has been missing for the last 17 days, was on Monday morning discovered floating at high water, near the sea locks, three miles above Bideford Bridge. The unfortunate child was immediately conveyed to her late parental home, where the afflictions of MR AND MRS BROOK and family may be more easily conceived than described. A Coroner's Inquest has been held before J. L. Pridham, Esq. and a respectable Jury, and after a short conference together recorded a verdict of Accidentally Drowned.

Thursday 18 August 1842, Issue 4002 – Gale Document No. Y3200673248
North Devon.
DISTRESSING ACCIDENT. - On Saturday last, at Bideford, a man named PICKARD, who had been employed in the Culm Mines, in Chappel Fields, near that Town, belonging to Capt. Pollard, lost his life by the falling in of a large portion of the earth which had been excavated to raise the culm; the poor fellow's last groans were distinctly heard after the accident had occurred, and, in consequence of the immense frizure and heaps of earth the body is buried in, it will be impossible to get it out for several days. The poor fellow has left a widow and six children to lament his loss, whose sole dependence for support was upon his labour. This is the third or fourth similar occurrence attended with melancholy loss of life that has happened within a few years, since the commencement of working these mines, and we cannot be suppose that there must have been a considerable lack of knowledge in the persons employed in not securing the breaches that have been made in excavating the culm; and we earnestly hope a thorough investigation will be made at the Coroners Inquest, and report upon the same, that the public may be satisfied that the lives of her Majesty's subjects shall not be sacrificed through the ignorance of persons or want of proper skill and care required in these and other public works.

Thursday 25 August 1842, Issue 4002 – Gale Document No. Y3200673260
SUDDEN DEATH. – On the 9th inst. a basket maker, of the name of RICHARD WOTTON, after having followed his occupation during the day, and partaken of a simple supper with his family in the evening, had retired for the night apparently in perfect health. He had hardly got into his room, however, when he was observed by his wife to fall suddenly on his knees, and on going to his assistance she found him quite dead. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, at the Commercial Inn, on the Friday following, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned. The deceased, who was 64 years of age, had borne an unblemished character, and was much respected.

A most extraordinary instance of death, arising from suffocation, occasioned by the introduction of a hard substance into the throat, occurred at Beer, in this county, on Wednesday last, the 17th inst., to an infant named MARY CAWLEY, aged only 7 weeks. The deceased child had been left between three and four in the afternoon by its mother with her sister, Mary Abbott, to be taken care of while the mother went to fetch some coals; she was laid in the cradle. A little boy named John Abbot, about 21 months old, who could run about but was unable to speak, was playing about the house, and his mother sitting at her pillow making lace. About four o'clock the deceased child was heard to cry out as if in pain; Mary Abbott went to it, and found it struggling in the cradle apparently suffocated and gasping for breath. She saw a piece of shord lying on its bosom, a piece of broken blue earthenware plate; she put her hand into the child's mother and felt a piece of shord in its throat, and the mouth was bleeding. She made several efforts to get it out of the child's throat, in which she was assisted by the mother, who was sent for; a surgeon was immediately sent for from Seaton, who came between five and six o'clock, after a lapse of two hours, during the whole of which time the piece of broken ware remained in the child's throat, and the difficulty of breathing continued. The medical gentleman succeeded in extracting the substance from the throat, which was a piece of broken earthenware plate, 1 1/3 inch long, and about three quarters of an inch broad; the child was put to the breast, but it appeared to be evidently sinking, and died about twelve o'clock the same night. It is conjectured, that the little boy, John Abbott, who was playing about the house, and occasionally went to the cradle and rocked it, having very frequently seen the mother feed the deceased child, by putting food into its mouth, had, with the imitative propensity so natural to children, introduced the piece of shord into the infant's mouth, in order to feed it, and that it had been drawn into its throat by suction. No one but the little boy, and its mother, Mary Abbot, had been in the house from the time the child was left there. An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 18th inst., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

CULLOMPTON. - An unusual degree of excitement was caused here on Sunday morning last, about 8 o'clock, by MR JOHN FROST, of the Red Lion Inn, aged about 29, having shot himself. It appears that for several years he had been paying his addressed to a young Lady in the neighbourhood, but owing to the opposition of her Father the engagement was some months ago broken off between them, and the deceased became engaged and on the point of marriage with another. Through some circumstances this engagement was broken off, and the deceased again renewed his courtship with his former intended. On Saturday last, in his interview with her, she expressed her determination never to marry him without her Father's sanction, which she was afraid she should never get, and he consequently became exceedingly agitated insomuch as it was observed by many people during the day; and on the Sunday morning he again went to see her, and on her again expressing the sentiments she had the day before, he left her, shook hands, wished her well, and said she should never see him more. He had not been gone but a few minutes before the report of a pistol was heard, and on the servant going to see from whence it proceeded, found the deceased in the privy, behind Mr Farrant's house, quite dead, having shot himself through the head.
A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body yesterday, and after a lengthened investigation the Jury returned the following verdict, - that the deceased shot himself with a pistol during a fit of temporary insanity. MR FROST was a steady and respectable young man and his untimely end has cast a gloom on the inhabitants generally.

BIDEFORD. - The body of the unfortunate man PICKARD has been dug out of the Mines where he had been buried 8 days, through the falling in of the works belonging to these Mines. A Coroner's Inquest was held upon the body, and a verdict we understand of "Accidental Death" recorded. Upwards of 300 rechabites walked in procession at the funeral, of which Society he was a respected member.

Thursday 1 September 1842, Issue 4004 – Gale Document No. Y3200673273
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held before H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of ELIZABETH SMITH, the wife of OWEN SMITH, mariner of Appledore, who came to her death in a very questionable manner as regarded the husband being suspected of and the cause of her death. It appears, by the evidence of the son, a lad about 10 years old, that a quarrel took place between the father and mother about some money the mother wished to take from SMITH, who was then intoxicated, instead of going out to spend it, when a scuffle ensued, and SMITH pushed her violently backwards, and she fell down several stairs. She being pregnant at the time, abortion ensued, and she died soon after. After a lengthened investigation and several witnesses corroboration the above, it was stated that after the occurrence and the poor creature in a dying state, - her husband being almost frantic at the time, - she prayed for her children and fervently to God for her husband's forgiveness, as she knew that he did not intend to injure her as he had unfortunately done. The Jury were, however, desirous to know the real cause of her death for the satisfaction of the public, and the Coroner adjourned the Inquest until the following day; during the interim a post mortem examination took place, and the Jury being again impanelled, the evidence of the medical gentleman proved that the bruises she received from the fall brought on abortion, and was the cause of death. There was no evidence whatever against SMITH to prove any malice afore-thought, and the Jury, after an hours deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 22 September 1842, Issue 4007 – Gale Document No. Y3200673322
On Saturday afternoon, Joseph Gribble, Esq. and a Jury assembled at the Church House Inn, Stokeinteignhead, to hold an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM SANDERS, aged 64 years. It appeared that the deceased and a man named Pike had a quarrel in a harvest field; soon after the deceased exhibited symptoms of pressure on the brain. John Scarbrough, Esq., surgeon, of Shaldon, proved having been called in to the deceased, and that it was his opinion the deceased died from pressure on the brain, but without a post mortem examination he could not say from what it proceeded. Several witnesses gave Pike a good character. The Jury, under the direction of the Coroner, returned a verdict of "Died from pressure on the brain."

Exeter, Wednesday 21 September
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Saturday last the persons in the employ of Mr Thomas Kerslake, 103, Fore-street in this city, wire-worker, had their annual entertainment. This is a substantial meal, generously given by their master, and provided and served up in a convenient apartment in his own house. And to this a quantum sufficient of good liquor is added. They enjoyed themselves in their own way, - drank, smoked, and sung, and by 10 o'clock had all departed merrily and comfortably to their homes. On the Monday following this treat it has been a usage of long standing to take a half holiday, and so the men proposed to do now, having worked through the morning and forenoon, to their dinner hour at one o'clock, when they quitted the shop, with an understanding that it was not their intention to return to it again that day. It was proposed they should make an excursion down the canal, taking the wives and sweethearts of some of the parties with them; and in the way to the quay for this purpose, they were joined by some who had formerly worked for Mr Kerslake, and others their friends. Making thus a rather large party, two boats were engaged, and in that through which the said calamity we have to record occurred, eight men embarked; six of whom were in the employ of Mr Kerslake. This is represented as a boat built narrower than is usual, and calculated only for experience seamen and persons much used to the water, whereas the persons now in it were novices, or next to novices in matters of this kind. Thus then they set out, all the females being in the other and larger boat. All went well until they reached the second drawbridge in descending the canal, and nearly opposite Satterly's farm. At this time the boat in which the females were seated, had shot a head, and this giving rise to something like a feeling of rivalry, it was determined by those in the narrower boat, to endeavour to overtake, even if they could not beat their companions in rowing. For this purpose, it was suggested by THOMAS DARBY, that he would change places with one of his companions, as imaging that one could pull stronger in a particular situation than the other. DARBY rose for this purpose with his paddle in his hand, and was stepping across the boat, but this act destroying the equipoise, which from the built of the boat was extremely nice, it instantly capsized and the whole party were thrown into the water. Their companions in the headmost boat, at once pulled to the bank, and got on shore, raising an alarm, and themselves hastening to render assistance, which was most promptly afforded by Mr Satterly, and the persons at his farm. Sprague, a chair-caner, with difficulty saved himself by swimming; and three of his companions were tolerably promptly got out, a man of the name of Clarke, who had been in the foremost boat exerting himself greatly for this purpose, one of the men thus saved being George Hamlin, who has worked for Mr Kerslake 30 years, and was in the most imminent danger. A man of the name of Partridge also, remained a considerable time in the water, but happily was preserved. Lamentable, however, to relate, JAMES PHILLIPS, THOMAS RICHMOND, and THOMAS DARBY, perished; all efforts to restore them, on being taken from the water, proving of no avail. JAMES PHILLIPS was a wire weaver, who had been brought from London by Mr Kerslake, about a year and half since. He was between 30 and 40 years of age, a married man residing in King-street; and has left a wife and three children; and his wife expecting in a few weeks to be confined again. THOMAS RICHMOND, was an Irishman; also between 30 and 40 years of age, and a wire weaver: - a tramp, but who some years since worked for nine years in succession for Mr Kerslake; and having quitted him, returned again to Mr Kerslake's employ. At this time, however, he was in the employ of Mr W. C. Bodley, in the Bonhay. He lived in Bartholomew-street (North) was married and has left a wife, and one daughter, about 8 or 9 years old. THOMAS DARBY was a tinman, about 25 or 26 years of age; a native of, and the son of respectable parents residing in this city. He himself lived in the Mint; was married, and has one child; his wife being again enceinte. The bodies of the unfortunate men were removed to Perryman's Inn, at the Double Lock, where an Inquest was taken yesterday (Tuesday) afternoon, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon; and a verdict returned accordingly.
It is not correct, as has been rumoured, that these men were in liquor. It was only about 3 o'clock when this sad accident occurred, and the very excursion had been planned in order that they might be removed out of the way of indulgence in liquor.

On the 5th inst., a melancholy accident occurred in the parish of Halwell, in this county, to a labouring man named JAMES WIVELL, who with a fellow-workman had gone into a corn field for the purpose of drawing on a wagon the remaining 6 or 7 dozen sheaves, and was in the act of riding on the part of a load towards the stack, when, in consequence of the unevenness of the ridges, he was jerked off and received such injuries that he only survived till the 15th. On Saturday an Inquest was held by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded. The poor fellow was a quiet industrious man, aged 62, and has left a widow and nine children.

Thursday 29 September 1842, Issue 4008 – Gale Document No. Y3200673337
An Inquest was held at Dawlish, on the 23rd inst., by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, on JOHN BEARD, who died suddenly on the previous Tuesday, from an enlargement of the heart. Verdict accordingly

Sept. 23, at Portlemouth, on the body of WILLIAM ADAMS, aged 23 years, who, while walking in the street, dropped down and expired in a fit. Verdict as above.

Thursday 6 October 1842, Issue 4009 – Gale Document No. Y3200673353
Exeter, Wednesday 5 October
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Patey's Old Bell public-house, Edmund-street, on the body of HARRIET CHUDLEIGH, an infant 9 months and a fortnight old. It appeared that the father of this child is a labourer, residing in Edmund-street, and working for Mr Tanner. He is a widower, his wife having died about five months since, and the infant slept with him. It was well when put to bed on Saturday evening, but he found it dead by his side when he awoke on Sunday morning. There was no doubt but that this was one of the very ordinary cases of this sort, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Yesterday (Tuesday) an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MRS MARY ANN LANGSFORD, upwards of 70 years of age, and widow of the late MR JOHN LANGSFORD, of St Thomas, boot and shoemaker. The deceased has lodged at the house of Mr John Mortimer, in James Street, and on Saturday evening met with an accident by falling over the stairs; from this, however, beyond that which naturally arose from fright, no unpleasant consequences appeared to result; but on Sunday morning she was seized with apoplexy. Mr Frederick H. Warren, was immediately called to her assistance, but it was beyond the aid of medical skill, and she shortly expired. A verdict was accordingly returned of "Died of Apoplexy."

FATAL ACCIDENT. - About 10 o'clock on the forenoon of the 22nd ult. a man named GEORGE BREWER, 52 years of age, was seen at work alone in the Halstow Quarry, in the parish of Dunsford. About 3 o'clock in the afternoon, and BREWER not having been seen to quit it, it was perceived that a large portion of the rock had fallen in, it was therefore concluded the unfortunate man was buried beneath the mass. An alarm was immediately given, and men being set to work to clear away the rubbish, in about two hours discovered his mangled remains; some of the bones being broken, and life extinct. An Inquest was taken before Joseph Gribble, Esq. Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

On Monday, the 26th ult. at Exmouth, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq. Coroner, an Inquest was taken on the body of RICHARD JONES, a mariner, belonging to the smack Mary, of Port Madoc, lying in the Exe, near the ballast-bank at Exmouth, who died on the Saturday night previous, the 24th. The deceased had been failing for 3 weeks and upwards, and unable latterly to do his work, he had not kept his bed, but appeared much worse on Saturday, and sank rapidly, dying about 11 o'clock at night, he appeared to have had every attention that circumstances would allow. A verdict of Visitation of God was recorded.

At Colyford, on Thursday 29th, on the body of EMANUEL HARNER, aged 13, who died in consequence of an injury received by falling off a horse which he was riding without saddle or bridle and with a halter only. The deceased was taken up insensible and died in about half an hour afterwards. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 20 October 1842, Issue 4011 – Gale Document No. Y3200673391
North Devon.
A Child Burnt to Death. - On Sunday morning last, at Bideford, a little girl, about 10 or 11 years of age, the daughter of THOMAS NEWMAN, cooper, Potter's Lane, was put to attend the fuel of common oven, belonging to a Mrs Backway, a neighbour, and in whose absence for a short time she caught her clothes on fire, and in her fright fled into the street towards her home, when the fire was speedily put out, but she was so dreadfully injured that she died the same evening. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the following day, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally burned to Death."

Thursday 17 November 1842, Issue 4015 – Gale Document No. Y3200673454
A little girl, three years of age, named MARY ANN ALLEN, was so dreadfully burnt, on the 4th inst. at Combmartin, from its clothes catching fire, that it expired in a few hours. Verdict, on the Inquest, before R. Bremridge, Esq. Coroner, - Accidental Death.

Plymouth, Devonport &c. - Suicide.
On Tuesday, a man named NICHOLLS, a journeyman baker, put a period to his existence by hanging himself to a tree, at the end of the Five-fields, near the Royal Hospital. The unfortunate deceased was in the employ of Mr Ellis, of Devonport, and it is supposed that he was induced to commit the rash act, through fear of the consequences of having appropriated some money which he had received on his master's account, to his own use. An Inquest was held on the body, before R. J. Squire, Esq., the Coroner, when a verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Thursday 24 November 1842, Issue 4016 – Gale Document No. Y3200673474
North Devon
DREADFUL ACCIDENT. - A most distressing and fatal accident occurred a few days since, in the family of MR HUET, professor of dancing, who resides at Litchdon-terrace, Barnstaple. MRS HUET, while nursing her infant, 6 months old, rose up quickly from her chair, to reach an umbrella, which MR HUET wanted to take out with him, and, by a most unfortunate fatality, in so doing the head of the infant came in contact with the sharp corner of a square mahogany table before which she was sitting, and which inflicted a dreadful wound in the soft part of the crown of the head. A surgeon was instantly on the spot, and every means adopted which skill and attention could devise, but the poor little sufferer died within an hour of the melancholy occurrence. We will not attempt to describe the feelings of the agonised parents – they can be better conceived than drawn. The circumstance, of course, rendered an Inquest necessary, which was held before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, for the borough of Barnstaple, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 24 November 1842, Issue 4016 – Gale Document No. Y3200673475
Plymouth, Devonport, &c.
DEATH FROM A GUN-SHOT WOUND. - On Thursday morning last, about 11 o'clock, THOMAS TATCHELL, a sergeant of marines, with two other persons named THOMAS SPURAWAY and JAMES KEMP, the latter a grocer, residing in William-street, Morice Town, who had been sparrow shooting together, were returning to Morice Town, KEMP carrying the gun, which was loaded with small shot, SPURWAY observing it was cocked said it was dangerous to carry it in that state, took the gun from KEMP, and after showing him the way to uncock it, KEMP not knowing the way to do it, this being the first time he had ever fired a gun, returned it cocked into KEMP'S hands that he might do it himself. The deceased was then a short distance ahead. In KEMP'S attempt to uncock, the gun suddenly exploded, and its contents entered the deceased's side, who cried "Oh! oh"! you have killed me," and staggering about fell to the ground. He was taken home, and almost immediately expired. On Friday evening an Inquest was held at the St Aubyn Arms, Morice Town, Devonport, when a verdict was returned of Accidental Death, with a deodand of 1s. on the gun. The deceased had lately retired from the service, having been pensioned from the San Josef – he was about 40 years of age, and was a remarkably fine and athletic man.

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. - On Monday evening last, whilst three young men named ALLEN, HAYMAN, and BROCK were engaged on a shooting excursion on the Milbrook Lake, the boat was accidentally upset, and the last named individual unhappily drown. His loss is universally regretted, as he was a young man of high character and respectability An Inquest has been held, and a verdict returned of Found Drowned.

Thursday 1 December 1842, Issue 4017 – Gale Document No. Y3200673492
Yesterday (Tuesday) an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Elworthy's Country House Inn, Catherine-street, on the body of SARAH SANFORD, 68 years of age. The deceased got her living as a nurse, and in that capacity was attending a female residing in Catherine-street. On Saturday last she was seized with illness, and died on Monday. Mr Perkins, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death in this instance was occasioned by attack of apoplexy, and the jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

TORQUAY. - We stated last week that a man, named THOMAS REYNOLDS, met with a frightful accident by falling down a well which he was sinking, and with wonderful presence of mind snatched the burning fuse from the charge which he had laid for blasting the rock; he has since died, and an Inquest was held on him when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

On the 21st inst., an Inquest was held at Atherington, before Richard Bremridge, Esq. Coroner, on the body of PHILIP ISAAC, of that parish, aged 77, who died suddenly, on the day preceding, of palsy in the brain. Verdict – "Visitation of God."

On the same day, at Braunton, also before R. Bremridge, Esq., on the body of MARY VICKERY, aged 20, wife of JOHN VICKERY of that place, shoemaker, who died the day preceding, three hours after having given birth to an infant. The opinion of the medical man was, that death resulted from the exhaustion produced by childbirth, and a verdict was returned accordingly. The child did a few hours after its parent.

HEMIOCK. - A melancholy accident occurred in this parish on the afternoon of the 22nd ult., to a young man named JAMES SYDENHAM, a labourer, aged 24 years, who had been out the whole of the fore part of the day with another labouring man, in search of rabbits; they had a gun with them, which was carried by SYDENHAM, who had fired at a rabbit, but did not kill it; he then hid the gun in a plantation, at the head of Hemyock Turbury, and went with his companion over to Leigh, to try if they could find a rabbit, but did not succeed. On returning towards the plantation again, the other man took some furze and dry stuff to carry home to burn, and SYDENHAM then said he would go over to the plantation to get his gun, and he left his companion to tie up the furze. The gun was about three or four hundred yards off, and SYDENHAM had not left five minutes when the report of a gun was heard followed by a groan; the man immediately ran towards the spot, when he found JAMES SYDENHAM lying on his back in the middle of the plantation, with his feet down in a gutter; he was quite insensible; he breathed three or four times and died very shortly after. The gun was in a furze bush, straight before him, with the muzzle towards the deceased, and appeared to have been lately discharged. There was a wound on the left breast of the deceased, which appeared to have gone in a slanting, but upright direction, the shot having come out at his shoulder, and through the collar of his coat. The gun was short, and made for the stock and barrel to be separated, so as to render it readily portable, and of the kind usually carried by poachers, which, it is much to be feared was the occupation of deceased and his companion, and it is supposed that the gun was hidden by deceased, on the approach of some parties who would be likely to suspect them. An Inquest was held on the 23rd instant, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 8 December 1842, Issue 4018 – Gale Document No. YT3200673512
An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by R. Bremridge, Esq., on two bodies that were washed in on Braunton Burrows. The bodes could not be identified at the Inquest, but have since been recognised, by masters of vessels, to be those of GEORGE HART, mate, and a son of LIEUTENANT RYE, who resided some time at Ilfracombe, both of whom belonged to that ill-fated vessel the Auspicious, Captain G. Lovering, wrecked off Hartland Point about the same time the Wilberforce was driven on the rocks at Lee, near Ilfracombe. It will be a satisfaction, although a melancholy one, for the friends of the deceased to know that their remains have been rescued from the deep, and laid in the silent tomb.

On Monday, at Southmolton, on the body of ROBERT HOLLY, aged 32. Deceased was a woolcomber, and had been working at Southmolton, but his home was Wellington, and thither he intended to have proceeded on Saturday, but was prevented; in the evening of that day he was at the Hare and Hounds public-house, where the Woolcombers' Club hold its meetings, and had drank to excess, when he fell down in the settle, and rested his head on the knee of a man who was sitting by him; the landlady tried to take him to bed, but the man on whose knee he reclined thought she had better not, as he was asleep, and would bye and bye awake, refreshed; an hour afterwards, however, he was lifted up, and to the astonishment of the company was found to be dead. He was a man of industrious habits and bore a good character: but there is reason to fear that in this instance his intemperance was the lamentable cause of his death. It was the opinion of the medical man who examined the body that death had resulted from effusion on the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 8 December 1842, Issue 4018 – Gale Document No. Y3200673513
North Devon.
A little boy named PARSONS, aged 4 years, was burnt to death in Bideford on the 28th ult., by his clothes having caught fire. The accident was supposed to have occurred through the carelessness of the parents; and the Jury, in consequence, concurred with an opinion expressed by the Coroner, as to the necessity of some legislative provision to prevent accidents of a like nature.

Thursday 15 December 1842, Issue 4019 – Gale Document No. Y3200673530
CORONER'S INQUEST. – On Monday morning last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Badcock's Custom House Inn, Quay-gate, on the body of a man named JAMES COLLARD, found in the upper part of the quay, about 9 o'clock on Sunday morning. It was then discovered floating – in an erect position, the head above the water, - by a man named Fagan. When taken out, it was lodged in a cellar behind the Custom House. The body was much swollen, and had evidently been some time in the water. In the pockets of the deceased was found 1s. 6d., and his snuff box; and it was apparent that he was considerably advanced in years. It was soon, however, ascertained who he was: that he was named as above, and had been missing since the evening of Saturday, the 26th of November; a notice soliciting information respecting him by his friends having been posted at the Guildhall. The deceased was 75 years of age, by trade a shoemaker, and formerly, and for many years resided in St Thomas, but had latterly lived in the Black Boy-road, St. Sidwells, with a brother-in-law named JOHN GOSS. About 6 o'clock on the evening before mentioned, he left his home, telling his brother-in-law he had 1s. 6d. in his pocket, as he did not know what he might want before he came back again. And from that time his friends had been unable t learn anything of him until his body was found. His death is supposed to have been accidental, but in the want of all information on this head, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 29 December 1842, Issue 4021 – Gale Document No. Y3200673559
NORTH DEVON.
Awful And Melancholy Suicide. - It is with deep regret we have to announce the premature death of THOMAS VELLACOTT, Esq., Alderman, and late Chief Magistrate for the borough of Bideford, who put a period to his existence on Tuesday morning last, by cutting his throat with a razor. The awful event produced a great sensation in the town, and the utmost gloom pervaded the countenances of every person, and although the melancholy event happened upon the market day the shops of the principal inhabitants were partially closed and trade became suspended until after the funeral. A Coroner's Inquest was held upon the body before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, and it appeared in evidence that MR VELLACOTT for several months past had been labouring under hypochondriacism, producing considerable excitement of mind and frequently accompanied with great depression of spirits, that caused considerable alarm in the family, and he has been very carefully (but secretly) looked after to prevent any such melancholy occurrence which most unfortunately happened to him. That on Tuesday morning, about 7 o'clock, the unhappy gentleman got out of bed, went to his private drawers, and took a razor, and in the water closet committed the fatal deed. He was immediately discovered when Charles A. Caddy, Esq., surgeon, was sent for, who was in attendance upon the deceased in a few minutes, when he declared that the wound was so deeply inflicted that nothing could save him, and he expired in a few minutes after. The Jury, after a short consultation, recorded their verdict, "Temporary Insanity." MR VELLACOTT was a gentleman highly esteemed and beloved in the town of Bideford, he was first and foremost upon all occasions to promote the welfare of the town and the interest of the inhabitants; he was truly charitable to the poor, in whom they have lost their greatest benefactor, - he has left an amiable widow, ten children, and a large circle of friends to deplore this deep bereavement. Nearly 200 relatives and friends followed the corpse of this excellent man to his last home "The Grave!!"

Thursday 12 January 1843, Issue 4023 – Gale Document No. Y3200673595
SIDMOUTH – FATAL ACCIDENT. - On the afternoon of Wednesday last, MISS M. GREAVES, a lady of great respectability, residing at Fort Fields, in this town, came to her death under the following melancholy circumstances. Two young gentlemen Mr Robert Coates, of Sidmouth, and Mr William George Cunningham, of Sidbury, had been riding their horses on the beach for some time in company together, and after stopping in front of Fort cottage with the sister of the latter, they had cantered on towards the end of the road beside the beach towards the York Hotel. The unfortunate lady, MISS GREAVES, whose untimely end is universally deplore by the poor and indigent in the neighbourhood, was just crossing the road from the main street of Sidmouth leading from the town to the beach, when the horse rode by Mr William G. Cunningham came in contact with her and knocked her down before he had power to pull it up. It is but justice to say, that from the position of the horses on the western side of the road, leading from the street of Sidmouth unto the beach, projecting for many feet beyond the York Hotel, which is the corner house of the opposite side of the road, it is very probably that persons coming on the western side of the beach could not catch sight of any persons crossing from the main street until they were immediately upon them. Mr Coates succeed in turning his horse from the unfortunate lady, but the horse rode by Mr W. G. Cunningham who appears to have been looking on the other side, came in contact with her and knocked her down. She was taken into the York Hotel where she was assiduously attended by Mr Jeffery, surgeon, till her death, which took place in about half an hour. An Inquest was held on Friday the 6th inst. before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, and a most respectable jury, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Thursday 9 February 1843, Issue 4027 – Gale Document No. Y3200673667
MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. – Last week, at Bideford, a fine young man, named ROBERT CANN, sailor, belonging to the Regulator Schooner, fell from the bowsprit and broke his leg, which produced a concussion on the brain, in consequence of which he died a few days after. An Inquest was held on the body at the Bridge Inn, before J. L. Pridham, Esq. Coroner, and a respectable Jury, who recorded a verdict of "Accidental Death". A liberal subscription has been made by the Captains in the port, and Tradesmen of the town, for the benefit of the Widow.

Thursday 16 February 1843, Issue 4028 – Gale Document No. Y3200673680
On the 13th instant, an Inquest was held by Mr Vallack, County Coroner, at Bradworthy, on the body of ELIZABETH BRAY, a girl four years old, who was so severely burnt the preceding day as to survive but a short time. – Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 9 March 1843, Issue 4031 – Gale Document No. Y3200673725
INQUEST ON THE BODY OF JANE NEALE, a Lunatic, who died in the Exeter City Workhouse.
The public mind in this city was much excited towards the close of last week, by stories circulated respecting the death of a woman named JANE NEALE, a lunatic, and an inmate of the workhouse. As we understand the matter the circumstances were these. JANE NEALE, 36 years of age, was the wife of JOHN NEALE, a working gardening, residing in New Town, St. Sidwells. She became insane, and on the 2nd of February, under a Magistrate's order, was received into the Exeter Workhouse. She died on Sunday, the 26th of the same month, being 24 days from the time of her admission. NEALE, the husband, works in the gardens of the Rev. A. Atherley, and Mr Crowther, at Heavitree, and statements made by him respecting his wife, coming to their knowledge, an Inquiry before the Coroner was thought necessary, and not only was that officer apprised of the death which had taken place, but it seems Mr Grove, of this city, solicitor, was consulted upon it. Mr Grove, accordingly made inquiry into the facts, seeing Mr Tucker, one of the surgeons under the Corporation of the Poor, on the matter; the result f which appeared to be that it was unnecessary to pursue it further. These statements, however, had now come to the knowledge of the Corporation of the Poor, and it was determined by them that the fullest and most open investigation should take place. Accordingly, John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, issued his warrant for assembling a Jury, which met at the Board Room, at the Workhouse, on Wednesday last, when, before that gentleman, the proceedings commenced. The Jury was composed of respectable persons, Mr Wm. French, of Paris-street, being the Foreman.
On the part of the Corporation of the Poor, Mr Brutton attended. And on the part of those who first sought enquiry Mr G. G. Kekewich and Mr Laidman.
On the view of the body by the Jury, there were observed several marks, as of scratches about the hands and face, a superficial wound, as if a piece of the skin had been rubbed off above the right elbow, together with three wounds of a similar description on the right knee. There was an extensive discolouration of the right leg, having the appearance f a bruise. The nurse said these injuries were caused by the deceased's own violence, in beating herself against the bed in which she lay. And the Jury proceeded to view the bed, and place in which the deceased died.
Having returned to the Board Room, John Bragg, the house-keeper at the Workhouse, stated the time when NEALE was received into the house, and when she died. She had been attended by Mr Tucker, Mr A. J. Cumming, and Mr Pates, a pupil of Mr Tucker's. She had been constantly visited, and he (the witness) had also visited her often. She was violent in her manner, - of unsound mind, - and the day after she was brought in, had a severe attack. The nurse was Elizabeth Lewis. NEALE was fed, by order of the surgeons, with gruel, broth, panada, &c. She had also occasionally mutton, cut into very small portions; and tea. Of food she took but little at a time, being fed with a spoon, as an infant. A proper amount of bedding was afforded her, and when visited by the witness, he always found her warm, and in a glow of heat. She slept in what is called a box bed, having sides to it, to prevent her falling out. There is no fire place in the room, but it is dry and wholesome. She was insensible to the calls of nature, but was properly attended to for the purposes of cleanliness. The husband came into the house with the wife, and remained an inmate about ten days. He saw his wife once after they came in, and might have seen her whenever he liked, but did not visit her afterwards. It appeared that 3s. 6d. per week had been paid for the support of this woman, by Mr Atherley.
John Tucker, is a surgeon in Exeter, and one of the Medical Officers under the Corporation of the Poor. I first saw the deceased at her own house in New Town, on the 2nd of February. I saw her at the request of the Magistrates of Exeter. I found her nearly in a state of nudity, and gave a certificate for her being admitted to the asylum in the workhouse. On the following day, I saw her in the asylum, having been sent for by Mr Bragg. I found her in a state of apoplexy. I did what I thought necessary, and gave strict injunctions to Mrs Lewis, the nurse, as to the plan of treatment to be pursued by her. I saw NEALE occasionally afterwards, but being unwell, requested Mr Cumming to act for me, and he did so, and attended her. I saw her last, about four days before she died. A medical journal is kept, and if any thing particular occurs it is entered in it, but we do not enter every visit that is made. The husband gave permission for the examination of the body after death, and thanked me for what I had done for his wife, adding that it was a happy release for her. I wished to open the body to examine what I conceived to be a tumour, in connection with a diseased liver, but I have not done so in consequence of a communication from Mr Grove, that an Inquest was to be applied for. NEALE'S death was caused by apoplexy, - an effusion on the brain. I saw the husband on Monday last at Mr Grove's office. He told me he should have nothing more to do in the matter, and denied ever having made an imputation. On the part of the Corporation, I said they would seek, rather than avoid enquiry. Every thing was done for this woman that medical skill could suggest. The floor of the room in which she was placed, is boarded; she was properly provided with bedding; and I think it a proper place for such a patient. Mr Ponsford, of the asylum in St. Thomas, has expressed himself perfectly satisfied with the cells, and plan of treatment here. The addition of a fire place would render the room in which the deceased died more comfortable. I saw this patient a dozen times while in the house, and always found her sufficiently warm and comfortable. I directed the nurse, in case she found the feet cold, to apply a bottle containing hot water to them. The law requires that I should visit once a week at least, but I have sometimes visited five times a day. When I saw NEALE, on the 2nd of February, she was labouring under attack of inflammation of the brain, and in a state of great excitement, but was stout in body. There were bruises about her arms and thighs, but no wounds. I ordered that she should be watched, lest she should bruise herself. On the 3rd of February I bled her, she being in a convulsive state, and labouring under apoplexy. It was necessary to raise her up when food was offered her, but she could not swallow. She had proper covering, two or three rugs over and a blanket; and was rendered as comfortable as she could be, seeing that she was insensible to the calls of nature. Abrasions of the skin will take place from lying or pressure, under such circumstances, and cannot be prevented. From the first time I saw her in the Workhouse, I considered her in a dying state, and expressed my surprise that she lived so long. I ordered some calomel on the 3rd, but as she could not swallow medicine, I ordered injections proper in such a case. I never saw her recovered from a state of stupor before death. I never saw her health improved. I never thought she could recover. It is impossible to say positively that she died of apoplexy without an examination. I gave the husband a certificate of his wife's death, in order to his drawing a sum of money from a club (it was understood at Chittlehampton). I did not at first put down the cause of death, but on his mentioning this, I did so, writing, of 'Apoplexy,' I believe.
An adjournment now took place to Saturday morning, in order to a post mortem examination.
Accordingly, on Saturday morning at 9 o'clock the investigation was resumed; the first witness being
[Long description of the medical findings follows]
… The evidence was brought to a close, and the jury having retired for a few minutes, returned a verdict, that the deceased "died from Pulmonary Apoplexy."

Thursday 16 March 1843, Issue 4032 – Gale Document No. Y3200673737
North Devon.
Chappel Park Culm Mines. - Another distressing Accident occurred at these mines last week, a young man named HARRIS, son of FARMER HARRIS, of Wear Gifford, had driven his horses and cart to load Culm at Chappel Park Mines, he slipped his foot from the shaft and fell down to the bottom of the mines, broke both his legs, and received in the fall other severe injuries in the body, he was as carefully as possible raised out of the pit, and removed to his father's house at Wear Gifford, where he lingered in great agonies for two days and died. A Coroner's Inquest was held upon the Body, who after a short deliberation, recorded their verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 13 April 1843, Issue 4035 – Gale Document No. Y3200673796
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was taken before James Partridge, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Herring's Horse and Groom Inn, Heavitree, on the body of JANE BOWER, which had been found the preceding evening, in a branch of the river Exe, near Old Abbey. The deceased was a servant in the family of Capt. Brutton, residing in Albert's Terrace, St. Leonards, with whom, however, she had only been but a few weeks. On Monday evening, at her request, and on her own business, she and leave to go to Exeter, and after calling at several places, took some refreshment at the house f a friend residing somewhere about West-gate. This it appears she left about half past 8 o'clock, a little boy accompanying her as far as the alms houses in Magdalene-street; she then saying she could find her way home. She was then at a great distance from the river, nor did her direct route at all approach it. From this time, however, nothing whatever is known of her, until the body was thus discovered near the marshes, by Mr Robert Rookes, jun., who was out on his father's grounds. She had her basket with a few little articles she had bought, in it; and a small sum of money she had received in change, was in her pocket. There were no marks of violence on her person save such as might naturally have been expected, supposing the body to have been washed over Trew's Weir. But how, or from what cause she came near the river at all, is a mystery. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned, but how or by what means she came into the water, no evidence has come before the jurors. The deceased was 54 years of age, has lived in respectable service, and had an excellent character from her last place.

ASHBURTON. – An Inquest was held by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner of this town, on the 1st inst., at Throwley, on MARY ANN HILL, aged 8 years, who was accidentally burnt so much by her clothes igniting, that she lingered a short time and expired. Verdict accidentally burnt.

On the 3rd inst., at Daccombe near Shaldon, on ELIZABETH VOWDEN, aged 71 years, who died suddenly, "Verdict Accordingly."

At Union House, Okehampton, on JOHN CROOT, aged 89 years, who was found dead in his bed, Verdict as above.

Thursday 27 April 1843, Issue 4037 – Gale Document No. Y3200673827
The Late MISS RICHARDS. - The body of the unfortunate MISS MARY ANN RICHARDS, (as stated by us at the time,) missed and supposed to have been accidentally drowned on the 7th inst., was discovered and taken from underneath the arch of Exe Bridge, on the city side, on the afternoon of Sunday last, having thus floated down the river for about a mile. It was removed to the house of her uncle and aunt, Mr and Mrs Tarrant, the Red Cow Inn, Red Cow Village, St. David's, and on Monday an Inquest was taken on the body before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter. It will be remembered that about half past one o'clock on the afternoon of Friday the 7th she left the house of her uncle, having a bucket in her hand, to draw water from the river, which runs near, and was not afterwards seen, until thus discovered on Sunday. The river at the time was much swollen, and the bank, which is steep, was slippery. It is imagined she missed her footing, fell in and was carried off b y the stream. It was only the Thursday afternoon, as was deposed at the Inquest, that she engaged herself with a respectable family of this city, but whose house of residence is at Heavitree, in the capacity of a housemaid. The Jury returned a Verdict of Death by Accidental Drowning. MISS RICHARDS has just attained her 21st year and was beloved and greatly respected by those who knew her.

Thursday 20 July 1843, Issue 4049 – Gale Document No. Y3200674023
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On the 10th inst. at Northmolton, before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN SHAPLAND, aged two years, infant son of MR SHAPLAND, yeoman, who, on the preceding day, was attacked by epileptic fits, of which he died. Verdict – "Visitation of God."

Before Henry Vallack, Esq., at Broadwoodkelly, on Friday week, on the body of JOHN PEARCE, labourer and sexton of the parish, who had committed suicide on the day preceding. Deceased had for some weeks been in a desponding state, and had made attempts at suicide previously – one of which was, by essaying to throw himself off from the tower, in which he was prevented by the height of the parapet; on Thursday morning, however, during the temporary absence of his wife, while he was in bed he obtained his razor, with which he cut his throat so effectually as nearly to sever his head from his body, and on his wife's return she found him quite dead. Verdict – "Temporary Insanity."

The inhabitants of Winkleigh, at an early hour on Thursday morning, were greatly excited and alarmed at finding the body of a female in a field called Bennett's Park, a short distance north of the town on the road to Torrington, supposed to have been murdered. Being fair time, the town was full of strangers, and hundreds flew towards the spot to ascertain who was the unfortunate victim, when it proved to be a young woman, a native of Winkleigh, named ELIZABETH MITCHELL. An Inquisition was held on the body at the Clotworthy Arms, on Friday, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., and the Court was crowded to excess. It was clearly proved that the deceased and a man of that place had for many years been in each other's company at various public houses, and were seen together at midnight very near and approaching the spot where the woman was found, and that the man returned shortly afterwards alone. The case during the Enquiry took a most suspicious turn, the man having asserted to the Court that he had not gone towards the spot with the woman. No marks of violence were perceptible, but the Coroner, under the mysterious circumstances and suspicion, directed Mr Dingley, surgeon, of Winkleigh, to make a post mortem examination, the result of which was that death ensued from extravasation of blood on the brain. The Enquiry lasted the whole day, and created the most intense interest, when the Jury returned a special verdict, leaving the matter open for investigation by the Magistrates, should any further evidence arise.

Thursday 28 September 1843, Issue 4059 – Gale Document No. Y3200674210
CORONER'S INQUESTS. –
CASE OF DROWNING. – On Thursday last, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Barker's New Artillery Arms public-house, Lower Melbourne-street, on the body of SARAH MARY ALFORD, 20 years old on the 9th of March last, and daughter of __ ALFORD, a tailor, residing in Bear-street, - who threw herself into the river Exe, just at the point of junction of Exeter with St. Leonard's, in the county of Devon, on the preceding evening, and was drowned, - the body being then lying at Wyburn's Reception House, Colleton Buildings. In this case it was learnt that father, mother and daughter, who worked together as tailors, - some times steadily, - and then having a "break out" until the means were exhausted, were together at the Ship public-house, Goldsmith-street, on the preceding day, where they spent several hours. After this the deceased joined company with a soldier of the 37th regt. of foot, named George Scarman, in which regiment he has served twelve years, and received an honorary mark of distinction for good conduct, - but is now in this city on the recruiting service, - with whom she walked down to the river side, near the lime kilns in St. Leonard's. This man's account of what there occurred, being as follows: - Last night about nine o'clock, myself and the deceased were walking by the water side; - we were walking upwards in the direction of the quay: in passing the posts at the end of the quay, where it is narrow, I got in front, and looking round I saw ALFORD turn towards the river, and throw herself into the water. I was so much shocked at what she had done that I had not power to render any assistance to rescue her from her perilous situation. As soon, however, as my self possession returned, I called to some boatmen not far off, telling them a woman was in the water, and pointing out the spot to them when they came to the place. I staid myself until the body was taken up, and saw it carried to the reception house. - Sarah Barrett, resides under the Walls, in St. Mary Steps, and on Wednesday had been engaged in ironing, at a laundress's, at Trew's Weir. About a quarter past nine o'clock she was returning home, and when near Capt. Perriam's house, near the lime kilns, heard footsteps behind her. My intention had been to pass the posts and go over the ballast quay, as by much my nearest way home, and hearing footsteps I thought these persons might be going that way also. I stopped, and a soldier and a female passed me; they were then walking side by side: I followed them to the posts, when my heart failed me and I thought I would take the further way round by Colleton Crescent. While I thus paused, the woman and the soldier had got a few feet ahead of me, and I saw the former turn towards the water, stretch out her arms, and deliberately plunge into the river. The soldier was at this time in front of the female, and did not touch her. I called to some fishermen who were near and told them what had happened. I saw the woman raise to the surface, and heard a cry of oh! but no other sound. Charles Ebbells is lessee of the salmon fishery in the Exe, within the jurisdiction of the Council of Exeter, and was in his boat engaged in fishing, on the preceding (Wednesday) night. Heart a cry from the shore, that a woman was in the water, and together with Fagan, similarly engaged, rowed towards the spot. They searched for the body, but did not find it until grapnels were procured from the reception house; by these means the lady was got up, and taken to that house. The means, however, used for restoration were vain. Henry Esworthy, a lad 13 years of age, on Wednesday evening between 7 and half past 7 o'clock, was in St. Mary's yard, when he saw the deceased and her mother quarrelling, and the deceased threatened, saying "I'll go and put an end to myself before the night is out." The mother appeared to this witness to be drunk: she rambled about, and swore a good deal. The daughter also appeared to be a little tipsy. Several other witnesses were examined, but to similar effect. Several of the Jury wished to [?] in their verdict, a censure on the mode of life of the parents: but were told this was inconsistent with the forms usual on these occasions. And at length returned a verdict, that the deceased threw herself into the water, and thus was suffocated and died, but as to what state of mind she was in at the time she committed this act, no evidence had come before the Jurors.

DEATH UNDER SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES.
On Monday afternoon at four o'clock a Jury assembled, before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Taylor's Star Hotel, Fore-street, to enquire into the circumstances touching the death of GEORGE CARTER CLAPP. Mr Roberts (Terrell and Roberts, solicitors) attended to watch the proceedings, (as was understood) on the part of persons supposed to be implicated in this matter, which had occasioned a great sensation in that part of the city, - and numbers were congregated round the Inn to hear the issue.
The Jury being impannelled and having viewed the body, laying at the residence of the grandmother of the deceased, in a house at the lower part of the Butcherow; - and returned to the Inn, - the Coroner called
SUSAN CARTER, who said I am the wife of WILLIAM CARTER, a labourer, residing in the parish of St. George. The deceased GEORGE CARTER CLAPP was my grandson, - the son of my daughter and in his 21st year. He was an apprentice to Mr Godfery, the printer. My grandson lived with me. I saw him on Saturday night, I believe between 8 and 9 or about 9 o'clock, - He came home from his work and brought me 2s. part of his wages. He then went out again, telling me he would be home in less than an hour, but I did not see him again that night. At this time he did not stay in my house ten minutes, and I saw no more of him until the following morning, when a person came to me and said come down stairs MRS CARTER, for here is GEORGE CLAPP at the stop of door dead. I could not go, I was so hurried. As nigh as I could guess this was about 6 o'clock, and I desired two young men who lodge with me, John and Edmund Tout, to go down to the door and bring him up stairs. They did so, and when they brought him into the room, I went to him, when he said, my back is broke, and my arm is broke,. I have been knocked down and kicked. He could not stand, and they threw him down on the bed. I asked him who had done it, - he said, I don't know. I asked him this several times – who had done it, and he always answered, that he did not know. When he was brought in the morning, I thought he was in liquor, - as soon as I thought him worse I sent for a doctor – I think I sent for Mr Kempe between 5 and 6 o'clock in the afternoon. Mr Kempe saw him several times. During the day, GEORGE CLAPP, said to my Granny, I have not had any thing to eat since Saturday dinner time, and now it is Monday. I then thought he was light in his head, and did not know what he was saying of, - I then thought he was very ill and sent for the doctor. – Mr Kempe came immediately, and saw him several times in the course of the evening. He was at last obliged to go away, and said he would come again, which he did, but they told him as he came up the stairs that my grandson was dead. - He died about half-past one o'clock this (Monday) morning. – I am 75 years old – Questioned by Mr Roberts. - GEORGE CLAPP is my grandson, was never subject to fits.
Quest. – Was he apt to come home in liquor? - He has done so – several times I daresay.
Quest. – Was he in liquor the night before? He was a little in liquor: I think he had drank, but he ate his supper.
Quest. – What time did he come home on Friday night? It might be from 9 to 10 o'clock.
Quest. – Did he complain of falling out of bed that night? He did, - I think it was on Friday night. There were two youngsters with him and Edmund Tout slept together and GEORGE CLAPP tumbled out of bed. He said "Ned, thee's a drow'd me out of bed." He did not complain to me that he had hurt himself by this, and went to work as usual next day.
Quest. – Did he not point out a mark in his temple where he had hurt himself by falling out of bed? He never shewed it to me. I did not see any mark. - I occupy two rooms, - a large and small one, on the second floor of the house, at 18d. a week. Mrs Manning and Mrs Knott, and their sons occupy the other parts of the house. When he tumbled out of bed, he burst into a laugh.
By a Juror. - GEORG CLAPP had in his pockets on Sunday morning, a farthing, a knife and his keys. His wages were 7s. 6d. a week I believe.
Elizabeth Raymond is the wife of William Raymond who keeps the Golden Fleece public-house in the Butcherow. I knew GEORGE CLAPP, the deceased; I have known him three or four months; I saw him on Saturday night last. I think it was about half past 11 o'clock that night when first I saw him; it was just at the time the lower market is locked up. There was him and four or five others. I saw him again also on Sunday morning between one and two o'clock. I will not swear it might not be after two o'clock. The two Master Mannings were with him: the others I am not certain about, - there were four or five, all young men. I knew the two Master Mannings. They had two quarts and a pint of beer, and might stay an hour or hour and half. they all went away except the eldest of the brothers of the Mannings, and CLAPP, and they stopt together. Young CLAPP told those who went away that he was going to have a bed there (in my house) and was going to stay for the night. They might remain for a quarter of an hour or 20 minutes, and then a young man named Hooper, who was also there, and they went away together, and I saw nothing more of them afterwards. I heard no row in the street that night.
Questioned by Mr Roberts. - They appeared quite friendly when at my house. CLAPP did not order a bed of me.
Quest. – Was he in the habit of frequenting your house? No, I had not seen him for some time. I don't know whether it was later than one o'clock or not when they left, I rather think it might be later than earlier. These were the last persons in my house. I remained up all night – my husband is ill, and it was necessary a person should be there to attend him. I heard no noise in the street that night. I don't that GEORGE CLAPP had been in my house above twice for the last three months. They came the Saturday evening before, and I refused them any thing. Two other young men who were there are called Hooper and Salter. The elder Manning went out alone. Hooper and Salter were the persons who went out with CLAPP.
Question by a Juryman – The deceased appeared to have money: - he owed me for one quart of beer, which he paid: and he paid for another. He had half-a-noggin of rum, but never drank it. They had two quarts of beer porter and then had a pint mixed. The deceased had silver when in my house.
Samuel Belworthy: I am a dairyman, and take in lodgers. I live in the Butcherow, two doors above the Golden Fleece public-house, on the same side. On Sunday morning last just before four o'clock, I heard a great noise in the street, above the Golden Fleece. I looked out at my window and saw three men: two of these appeared full grown men, the other appeared a youngster. I am positive this was just before four o'clock, as I heard a church clock strike that hour afterwards. My window is on the third story of the house. I heard one of the three persuading one of his companions to come home. I knew the deceased, but not by name: I knew him by sight, by seeing him pass the Butcherow. One was persuading another to go home, and took him by the collar. I heard one called Charley, or some thing like that name. The one was taken by the collar said, "if you drag me, I'll strike you." The two men seemed much intoxicated, - that is the man that is dead and the other, - not the youngster. One of them seemed to me to be the same man I have today seen dead at Mrs Carter's. There was a light from the gas lamp, and I could see distinctly only that I was at a good height. The deceased and one of the others appeared to be very much intoxicated in liquor. One of the two desired the other to go home. He said, come along, - you shall come along, - Charley, I think he called him. The one who was thus spoken to appeared to be obstreperous and would not go home. I never heard the youngster speak at all. One of the two who had hold of each other said, "If you are going for that, wee'l be at it." They then pulled off their coats or jackets and went to fighting. They fought I suppose for a minute and half, and then one of them fell in the gutter. I think he was knocked down. I saw no blows while he was to ground. In about a minute he was got up again, and then one of them said "hit away, - hit away as fast as you can" – They beat one another a great deal, then the man, I think the man that is dead, fell right back upon his back, and I thought he was dead. The youngster went to help him up, and I think the other man did so also. I heard the man who had been knocked down say, - "My feet and my legs are of no use to me," and fell back again straight on his back, with his head on the stones: I heard it. They then went to lift him again, and sat him up on his breech. Then the watchman came, and said what is doing here? They cried out, the young man is in a fit. The watchman said, he has got his friend with him, and they'll take him home. There were two watchmen came up the Butcherow at the same time. I knew them to be watchmen by the stripes on their arms. A navigator also came up just after them. These all went on, and I fastened my window and went into bed.
Mr S. H. Warren, solicitor, who was in the room, said there was some discrepancy as to the evidence about the two watchmen, which he thought would by and by be cleared up.
Long description from various witnesses followed:
The Jury were then for some time engaged in deliberation, but at length agreed to a verdict, in substance as follows: - That the said John Manning and GEORGE CARTER CLAPP had a fight in the parish of St. George, on the 24th of September last, and that on the 25th the said GEORGE CARTER CLAPP, died, but whether from an inflammatory state of the brain, or from the fight, no evidence came before the said jurors.
Thus terminating the proceedings which had again occupied several hours.

Thursday 28 September 1843, Issue 4059 – Gale Document No. Y3200674212
Plymouth, Devonport &c.
A Coroner's Inquest was held on Wednesday evening at the Devonport Workhouse, on the body of a girl about 15 years of age, the daughter of MR BATE, baker, Market-street, who was found on the previous day lying in the mud, at the back of the New-passage brewery. It appears that the unhappy girl having been admonished by her mother for some neglect of duty, left her home about ½ past 11 o'clock on Tuesday morning and was not again heard of until found in the evening, lying on her face in the mud, by a boy who was looking for works for fishing. The body had already suffered from the attacks of crabs or other fish, but according to the testimony of the surgeon, Mr J. Little, it was in a perfectly healthy state except only some parts which were in a state of congestion, arising from suffocation. The deceased was subject to fits, and it was at times believed that her mind was affected. "Found Drowned" was the verdict returned by the Jury.

Thursday 12 October 1843, Issue 4060 – Gale Document No. Y3200674252
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - Ottery. – An Inquest was held on the 5th inst., before R. H. Aberdein, Esq. Coroner, on the body of JOHN BAILEY, lately residing at Bow, near Crediton, who was found dead in the river Otter, near Gosford Bridge, in the parish of Ottery St. Mary. As reports were in circulation that the deceased had come to his death by violence – which reports were strengthened by the fact of no money being found on him, and the pockets of his trowsers being turned inside out, when the body was taken out of the water; and as it was alleged there were bruises of a recent date on his arms and hand, and on the back of his neck, some interest was excited. On examining, it appeared some wearing apparel, and other articles, were found in the road, not in a bundle, but scattered here and there, over a space of about twenty or thirty feet. There were no footsteps as if any struggle had taken place, but the clothes were very near the spot at which the body was shortly afterwards found. The deceased was in the habit of carrying his dirty clothes with him in his pockets, and his pulling out the articles which were found in the road, accounts for his pockets being turned inside out. The body was identified by William Bailey, of Exmouth, as being that of his father; he stated the age of deceased to be from 48 to 50 years, and said that he had for many years travelled the country repairing pianos and organs. The mistress of the public-house at Alphington also identified the body, as that of a person who slept at her house on the previous nights of Saturday, Sunday and Monday, and who at the time appeared destitute of money, not even paying for his bed. The landlord of the Fair Mile Inn, also swore to it, as the body of a man who left his house on the Tuesday night, between nine and ten o'clock and who appeared almost destitute of money, and very low in spirits. The body was examined by a medical gentleman, who stated the bruises on the arms and hand of the deceased not to be of recent date, and only mere skin bruises; the appearance on the back of the neck was not a bruise, but arose from extravasated blood; there had been evidently no struggle in dying, the hands being open and extended, and, in his opinion, the death of the deceased was caused by drowning. The Jury, after a lengthened investigation, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Luppitt. - An Inquest was held on the 6th inst., at Mohun's Ottery Barton, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH DARKE, aged 12 years, who was in the service of Mr James Bishop, and whose death was caused by her clothes catching fire, on the 26th ult. whilst she was in the act of sliding a boiler over the fire. Assistance was immediately rendered, for the purpose of extinguishing the flames, but the deceased was very much burnt before it could be effected. A medical gentleman was sent for, who attended her up the 4thinst., on which day she died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 9 November 1843, Issue 4063 – Gale Document No. Y3200674324
ACCIDENT. – A shocking accident happened on Sunday last, at the Mills, Dawlish. A boy, named STONEMAN, living with the proprietor, Mr Bussell, fell between the wheel and wall, which jammed him so completely that he could not be extricated until part of the wheel was sawn off; his awful shrieks soon brought many to his assistance, among whom was a medical gentleman, but the poor sufferer died within a few minutes after being taken out The Mils were not going at the time. An Inquest was held on the following day, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 30 November 1843, Issue 4065 – Gale Document No. Y3200674376
IDEFORD. – An Inquest was held here before J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, November 21st, on the body of PHILIP UNDERHAY, aged 8 years, who died suddenly from the croup. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 7 December 1843, Issue 4066 – Gale Document No. Y3200674395
A SERIOUS AFFRAY. - On Saturday night last a dispute arose between some young men, who were drinking at a public-house, in the village of Meeth, near Hatherleigh, blows at length ensued, and MR JOHN REED, the landlord, interfering, was struck several times by John Vanstone, a young man of the same village. MR REED expired on the following morning, and the young man was taken into custody. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday last, on MR REED, who is an elderly person, and very much respected in this neighbourhood. A post mortem examination of the head was made by Wm. Risdon, Esq., Medical Practitioner, at Dolton, who gave his evidence that the deceased came to his death from a contused wound, received in the back part of the head, that deceased had also several external marks on the forehead, arm, and thighs. The investigation occupied upwards of six hours, when every means used to elicit the truth failed, by the vague and contradictory evidence given. The Coroner. H. A. Vallack, Esq., in his address to the Jury, observed, he had never in any Court before heard so much perjury, and was sorry the evidence given would not warrant a verdict it deserved; he would wish to remind the gentlemen of the Jury that if they knew of any evidence which ought to be brought forward, or if any future evidence should be obtained, they were in duty bound to notice it, and he should not forget his duty. He would, therefore, suggest to them a Verdict that deceased died from a mortal wound, received in the back part of the head, but how or by what means there was not sufficient evidence to prove – which Verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 21 December 1843, Issue 4068 – Gale Document No. Y3200674425
CORONER'S INQUESTS.
Before S. H. Warren, Esq. Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Moore's Gold Ball public house, Mary Arches-street, on the body of RICHARD LAWRENCE, between 55 and 56 years of age, a manufacturer and itinerant vendor of liquid blacking, and also a pensioner from the army. It appeared from the evidence of his sister and others, that the deceased rented and occupied a room in the large old house in Mary Arches-street known as the Blue Maid's Hospital. In this house the sister also rented and occupied a room, but a separate apartment from that of her brother About 8 o'clock on the Saturday evening, the deceased had some coffee of his sister, and between 8 and 9 o'clock, went to Cox's, a person living near, to order some coal for himself. He was heard to ascend the stairs, in the direction of his own room about half past 10 o'clock. About 11 o'clock, however, as she thinks, a woman named Mary Lammacraft, also residing in this house, heard him knock at her door. He said, are you all gone to bed; she replied yes, and heard him go to his room again. From this time he was seen or heard no more of until between 8 and 9 o'clock on Sunday morning, when his sister, as usual, carrying some coffee to him, at first knocked at the door, and receiving no answer, opened it, when, on entering the room, she found her brother dead and the body quite cold, lying on his left side on the floor. A round table was upset, and a cup which had contained treacle, thrown down with it, the treacle being spread out on the floor. There were spots of candle grease on the floor, and a candle LAWRENCE had used, was under his body. His sister did not think he had been in bed, but he frequently lay down in the afternoon, and the bed had the appearance of having thus been laid on. He was subject to cough and asthma, and it appeared that in some attack of this nature, being alone, apoplexy had supervened, and death ensued. - Verdict – Died by the Visitation of God.

Before John Warren, Esq. at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of JOHN MILDON, a lad, whose father resides in Mary Arches-street, in this city. The deceased was in the service of Mr T. Melhuish, of Cheriton Fitzpaine, and having been sent from his master's house to drive home the cows, a bull that was in the same field, tossed and injured him. He was immediately removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but died from the injury. Verdict – Accidental Death.

On Friday last, before John Warren, Esq. at Gill's Anchor public house, Paul-street, on the body of JOHN THOMAS CHAPMAN, who died on the morning of that day in the city prison. The deceased was well known both in Exeter and Devon, and had repeatedly been an inmate of the prisons of both jurisdictions. He was 23 years of age, and of weak mind, and regarded as an incorrigible vagrant, living by begging when out of gaol, imposing on the public by pretended sanctity, and the frequent singing of hymns and psalms. It may be recollected that having emerged from gaol on the preceding day, on the 17th ult. he was committed for three months to hard labour. At the end of a fortnight, however, he complained of illness, and was taken off work, and on the following day there was strong evidence of disordered intellect. A communication was made from the authorities here to the Secretary of State, and the case was attentively watched by Mr Walkey, the Surgeon, of the prison. Death, however, soon rendered all further care unnecessary, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

At Braunton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of ROBERT DUMMETT, 70 years of age, who committed suicide by hanging himself with a halter from an apple tree in the orchard of Mr John Hunt. – Verdict – Insanity.

At Berrynarbor, on the body of WM. LEWORTHY, 7 years old, son of a blacksmith at that place. It appeared that two miners having been permitted to leave their horns of powder in his father's house, the little fellow got at it, and put some of it in his pockets, and lighting a touch paper the powder became ignited, and exploding, such injuries ensued as caused death in a few hours; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned accordingly.

Thursday 11 January 1844, Issue 4071 – Gale Document No. Y3200674473
Morley near TOTNES, An Inquest was taken before J. Gribble, Esq. of Ashburton, on view of the body of JOHN EVANS HOCKINGS, a little child, who was found dead by the side of his mother, verdict, died by the Visitation of God.

At Salcombe, on view of the body of PETER POUND. It appears deceased was engaged at work on a scaffold, and by some means gave way by which he was precipitated to the ground, and received such injuries that he shortly expired, verdict accordingly.

At Chudleigh, on the body of EDWARD LANGALLER, aged 83 years, who was the town crier of the above town, was going his usual circuit, engaged in his important situation, when he was observed to fall and shortly after expired. Verdict, Visitation of God.

January 5th, at the Dartmouth Inn, Newton, on LOUISA FOSTER, aged 21 years, who expired almost suddenly, Verdict, Visitation of God.

Thursday 25 January 1844, Issue 4079 – Gale Document No. Y3200674507
INQUESTS. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of SARAH HANNAFORD, aged sixty-three years, who had come by her death under the following circumstances. On the Friday week previous, she was in the beer-house of Mr Kerswell, in St. Sidwell's. A young carpenter present, named Kerslake, was in the act of blowing the fire, and was kneeling on one knee, when the deceased came behind him and pulled him backwards, falling under him. He assisted her to get up, when she cried out that her leg was broken, which proved to be the case, and she was ultimately taken to the hospital, where she died on Sunday last. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

An Inquest was also held at the Valiant Soldier on the same day, on the body of ELLEN TOLLY, aged five years, the daughter of Irish parents, residing in Bear-street, in this city, who had died about half-past two that morning, from the effects of burns, in consequence of her clothes catching fire on the previous day. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

This (Wednesday) morning, as we prepare for press, before the Coroner, at Gill's Anchor public house, Paul-street, an Inquest is being taken on the body of an old man called JOSEPH BERRY NEALE, otherwise Dartmouth Joe, a well-known character and incorrigible rogue and vagrant, who died in the city gaol, yesterday (Tuesday) morning, where he was once more undergoing imprisonment, on conviction for acts of vagrancy.

NEWTON ABBOT. - INQUESTS. - On the 16th inst. on the body of MARY WEATHERDON, aged 72 years. The deceased had been found dead in bed, she was the daughter of the late MR WEATHERDON, who formerly carried on a very extensive boarding school at Newton. For some time previously to her death she had been subsisting on the charity of a few friends who had known her in better days. Verdict – died of apoplexy.

On the same day on WILLIAM JAMES TRISCOTT, who had accidentally received a scald which caused his death. Verdict, accidental death.

TOTNES. - On the 13th inst. a pauper named THOMAS BERRY, was brought to the Union Workhouse in this town, from Brixham, by order of Mr Webber, overseer of Brixham. It was about nine o'clock at night when BERRY arrived: he seemed very ill, and care was taken of him by the matron: he was put to bed, but died a few hours after. The following facts were elicited on the 16th, at an Inquest held before J. Gribble, Esq. John Winsor, porter of the Union Workhouse, stated that deceased was brought to the house on Saturday evening, at a quarter before nine, by Worth, the carrier from Brixham, who helped him out of the cart and he walked by himself to the waiting hall. We assisted him the to the sick ward, and gave him some warm tea. The medical man (Mr Derry) was in the house at the same time. I received an order from the overseer (Mr Webber) of Brixham, to bring the deceased here. The order was not signed by any other person. The deceased appeared very ill at the time he came.
Stuart Macdonald – I am an inmate of the house, and recollect BERRY being brought here on Saturday. I was desired by Mrs White, (the matron) to get up and look after him during the night. Mr Derry gave me a bottle of medicine, which he ordered me to give him every three hours; I slept in the same room, and gave him the medicine at the time directed by the doctor. At a quarter before four, when I gave him his medicine, he told me that he was very bad, and should not live long; I asked him to have some tea, which he refused. I then called another man to stay up with him. He expired about four o'clock, a.m.
John Worth, Brixham carrier, took the man up last Saturday at the Globe Inn, Brixham, about quarter past five, in a cart. He told me he had an order from Mr Webber, overseer, to take him to the Union house. I said first I could not take him that night; I perceived he was very ill, and I hesitated to take him. He was unwell all the way. He got into the cart by himself willingly; he took a pint of beer at Collaton, but did not appear better afterwards. I brought him here about a quarter past nine, p.m., and delivered him to the porter. I did not know if he was dangerously ill, I was not pressed to take him from Brixham, and was told by him that he had 3s. 6d. in his pocket. He paid for his beer at Collaton.
Mr W. F. Windeatt, clerk to the Union, here produced Mr Bowden's (medical officer for Brixham,) weekly report as delivered on the 12th inst., in which THOS. BERRY'S name appears, as being ill with inflammation of the lungs.
Mr J. Derry, medical officer of the Union house – I was informed that there was a man named BERRY ill, I saw him as soon after as I could, in about half an hour. He was in the man's infirmary, in bed. As soon as I saw him, I found he was dying, he had scarcely any pulse. I immediately gave him a stimulant, to endeavour to revive him; I soon after left and gave directions for the night, did not see him afterwards alive. The case was too far gone to judge of the disease. It was very improper for him to have been out on such a night. The Jury consulted some time, and then returned a verdict "Died a Natural Death", and added, "The Jury are of opinion, that no pauper from any parish in the Union, who is under the care of a medical man, should be removed without that medical man's knowledge and consent."

An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of MARGARET BARTLETT, who it appears was subject to fits, and met her death under the following circumstances. Harriet Tucker and Mary Ash, inmates of this Union, being sworn, stated deceased had been in the house about a fortnight, and was with child; she complained very much of great pain in her back and difficulty in breathing; she was attended by the Medical Officer during the week, and between 8 and 9 o'clock on Friday morning Mary Ash saw her sitting on the second flight of steps; shortly after she was perceived in a fit, and before medical assistance came she expired. Verdict, Died suddenly of a fit.

Thursday 1 February 1844, Issue 4080 – Gale Document No. Y3200674522
CORONER'S INQUESTS. – The verdict of the Jury, on the Inquest on the body of JOSEPH BERRY NEALE, otherwise Dartmouth Joe, 70 years of age, - (as stated in our last) – was that the deceased died from natural causes, but desired to express their opinion, that the dietary of the prison generally, did not appear to them to be hardly sufficient.

Thursday 8 February 1844, Issue 4081 – Gale Document No. Y3200674536
An Inquest was taken yesterday (Tuesday) by H. Vallack, Esq., at Great Torrington, on the body of JOHN HARPER, aged 58 years, who was found dead in his bed. The deceased was a most respectable inhabitant, and by his death the town has lost the valuable services of a most trustworthy and honest man: he was master of the Blue School, and besides various other offices, was for many years the parish clerk, in his attention and duties of which he gave most unqualified satisfaction. His loss will be deplored by all who knew him for many a year to come, and especially by his wife and five young children. - Verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 29 February 1844, Issue 4084 – Gale Document No. Y3200674583
An Inquest was held at Frogmore, near Kingsbridge, before J. Gribble, Esq. Coroner, on the body of CATHERINE JARVIS, who died suddenly in child birth. – Verdict, Accordingly.

Thursday 7 March 1844, Issue 4086 – Gale Document No. Y3200674598
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was holden before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Elliott's Country House public house, Sandford-street, New Town, St. Sidwells, in this city, on the body of MR J. BABB, 66 years of age, who came by his death by hanging himself in the course of the preceding night. MR BABB, who was a widower, formerly kept the Exeter Inn, at Teignmouth, and afterwards the Country Hotel, or Half Way House between this city and Honiton. Latterly, however, he has been out of business, and it is said had to sell a portion of his property, receiving an annuity of 8s. a week. He had been lodging at Elliott's about three weeks, was crippled and otherwise suffering from illness: his mind also being evidently affected, as he said to the landlady the day before his death, that he wished she would cut his head off, or get some surgeon to do it. He was last seen alive at 12 o'clock on Friday night, when Mrs Elliott went to him as usual the last thing before she retired to rest herself, to know if he wanted any thing, or wished any thing more to be done for him that night. He replied that he did not, and leaving a light in the room she [?]tted him. To assist or pull himself up in bed MR BABB had two ropes, and a person entering his room at half past 6 o'clock on Saturday morning, found he had suspended himself by the neck, by one of them, and was dead. A medical gentleman was immediately called in, but who at once said he could afford no aid, the unfortunate man having been dead some hours, and the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased destroyed himself while labouring under temporary insanity. It is not a little singular that the officer in summoning the Jury, summoned a nephew of the deceased to attend, who, until thus apprised, was not aware of his uncle's death.

Thursday 14 March 1844, Issue 4087 – Gale Document No. Y3200674619
On Wednesday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at the City Workhouse, on the body of an elderly man named JOHN BARNES, who that morning dropped down in the office of the Corporation of the Poor, and died almost immediately. A verdict was returned that he died of attack of apoplexy.

Thursday 4 April 1844, Issue 4090 – Gale Document No. Y3200674655
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken at Kenton, on the body of GEORGE PADDON, who was found dead in a field in the occupation of Mr Wm. French, of Kenton Mills. It appeared that the deceased had been employed by Mr French, in working on a hedge and making faggots, &c. His wife accompanied by two of their grand children went to the field to see how he was getting on. The children reached the spot first, and returned towards their grandmother to tell her they thought their grandfather was ill, for he did not speak to them. On his wife's getting to the place, however, she found her husband sitting on a faggot by the hedge, quite dead. And a verdict was returned accordingly.

MANSLAUGHTER AT TIVERTON.
This Town has been in a state of great excitement during the past week, in consequence of a man having been found murdered at the door of the Red Lion, a small public-house at the end of Barrington-street. A great number of persons were drawn to the Inn to view the body, which was recognised as that of a young man of about 28, named FRANCIS PERRY, a farm labourer, in the service of Mr Beedell, of Southwood. A large pool of blood was found in the middle of Fore-street, and a crowd collected round the spot, which was supposed to be the scene of the murder. An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before F. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner for the Borough. From the evidence which was elicited, it appeared that on the evening of the 24th ult., deceased was in company with a labourer, named James Leatt, at the Red Lion Inn. They staid there three hours, and drank three pints of beer each. They came out at eleven o'clock and went up Gold-street, near the head of which they met a man named Tozer, a hostler of Meshaw, near Southmolton, who asked Leatt to find him a bed, which he engaged to do. They went in company through Westexe to the Golden Lion, and other public houses, to find a lodging, but not having succeeded, returned. As they came through Fore-street to the Phoenix Inn Court, two men crossed the road to them, and one (a short man known to Leatt by the name of Thomas Acland,) said they would see them out of town. Leatt asked why, and the sort man answered that "They were constables and would have no noise kept up." - Deceased said they were no constables, and he had made up his mind that they should not see them out of the Town. The short man then struck deceased on the face with his fist, knocked him down, and kicked him; the other, at the same time giving Leatt a blow in the mouth; Leatt caught the skirt of his coat and tore it. Acland then left deceased and also set upon Leatt; they threw him down and ran up the passage by the Market, with the hats of deceased and Leatt. Leatt ran after them, and they knocked him down and stunned him. When he came to himself he found his hat in the Street. He found deceased lying speechless on the ground, bleeding at the mouth and ear. He left him in the care of Tozer, and ran to call constable Bidgood, whom, however, he did not succeed in rousing. He then called a man named Richard Lethbridge, who came and helped him down to the Red Lion, where they placed him leaning against the door step, and tried to get up the landlord, Mr Hill. They could not make him hear, and deceased was left there till morning. Mr Harwood, the carrier, was asked to let him be taken into his stable, but he refused, thinking that the man was merely drunk. At half-past five, Henry Grant, the hostler, found deceased at the door, with a person called Wills, who said the man was drunk. He was quite dead, and they took him into the house. Mr J. F. Quick, Surgeon, was called by constable Radford to see the body. The skin was not abraided on the face, and there was no contused wound on the head. Considerable extravasation of blood was found, on removing the scalp, between the parietal bones and over the occupit; the ventricles of the brain and the dura matter were gorged with bloody serum; but the only laceration was in the left lobe of the cerebellum, corresponding with the external wound. Mr Quick gave it as his opinion that deceased might have been struck to the ground, but there was no such mark as would be caused by a kick in the head. The Inquest was adjourned to Wednesday, when evidence was brought which tended to implicate a man named James Winsborough, a mason's labourer, living with his wife and children. It was stated by Mrs Chattey, landlady of the Half Moon, & Elizabeth Grant, her servant, that Winsborough had been there with Acland that evening, and that they left not much the worse for drink, about eight o'clock in the evening. Winsborough and Acland had been apprehended on Monday, and the former voluntarily admitted to Radford, the constable, that he had been in company with Acland, that they met Tozer alone, and Acland took away his hat and umbrella for a "spree", but restored it at the request of Winsborough. They went about the streets till they met Tozer with Leatt and deceased. Acland said he would have another lark with them, and insisted in going up to them in spite of the persuasions of Winsborough. The clothes which Acland wore were produced, and his waistcoat exhibited spots of blood. These facts having been stated in evidence, the Coroner recapitulated them to the Jury, and left it to them to say whether under the circumstances, they could find that the persons in custody killed the deceased, and whether, if so, it had been the result of a premeditated malice, of momentary anger, or merely the accidental effect of a blow given without any expectation of the consequence. The Jury (the foreman of which was Mr B. J. Cannon) after three hours' deliberation, found a verdict of manslaughter against Acland, who is in custody, as well as Winsborough. The former is a young man of 20, and was in the employ of a respectable smith, of Tiverton.

TORQUAY. - On the morning of Monday last, a man named ROLSTONE, who had formerly been servant to Sir Lawrence Palk, died after a few hours illness, and it was reported that he had taken poison; consequently a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, by J. Gribble, Esq., when it was deemed prudent to have a post mortem examination. The contents of the stomach were examined by Mr Havil, chemist, of the Strand, and in the absence of any thing like poison to produce death, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." It appears deceased had been subject to fevers, which at times produced mental aberration, in which state it is supposed the deceased was at the time of death.

Thursday 16 May 1844, Issue 4096 – Gale Document No. Y3200674760
On Monday an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner, for Exeter at [?] New Artillery Arms, Lower Melbourne-street, on the body of JOHN ELLARD, a little boy 6 ½ years old, whose parents reside in Mary Arches-streets, and who was drowned the preceding afternoon.
[Very faint and difficult to read]
Verdict – "Accidentally Drowned".

HENNOCK, NEAR CHUDLEIGH – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Palks Arms here, before J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, on Monday last, on view of the body of WILLIAM RADMORE, aged 21 years, who met his death on the previous Saturday. It appears deceased was employed in the Ten Acre Iron Mine, and while working under ground, by some unknown means the hole in the rock which he had fired, immediately exploded, deceased was found shortly after, quite dead, having received great injuries in his head by the rock. Verdict – Accidentally Killed.

Thursday 30 May 1844, Issue 4098 – Gale Document No. Y3200674798
NEWTON. - An Inquest was held here on Saturday last, before J. Gribble, Esq. Coroner, on view of the body of WILLIAM RENDLE, aged 3 years, who by some means fell in a well of water near his parents Residence, on the previous evening and when found life was gone. - Verdict accidentally drowned.

Thursday 20 June 1844, Issue 4120 – Gale Document No. Y3200674851
On Friday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of WILLIAM GOSLING, three years of age, who came by his death in consequence of his clothes accidentally catching fire, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 27 June 1844, Issue 4103 – Gale Document No. Y3200674867
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On the morning of Sunday last, MR CHARLES PARKHOUSE, 23 years of age, by trade a tailor, residing with his brother-in-law, Mr John Sharland, Sidwell-street, and in the employ of Messrs Sampson and Wyllie, of this city, - together with a person named Broom, also a tailor, went to the mill leat below Old Abbey to bathe. Having arrived near the spot where Duck's bridge formerly stood, although neither of them could swim, they got into the water and were soon in a deep pit, and out of their depth. Broom succeeded in extricating himself from his perilous situation, but seeing the state of jeopardy in which his companion was placed, generously returned to his assistance and got hold of him; in this effort, however, he again lost his footing, and to save his own life was compelled to leave PARKHOUSE to his fate, who soon sank, without having uttered a word. Broom gave the alarm at Old Abbey, but it was an hour and half before the body was got out, and it can be scarcely necessary to say life was extinct. An Inquest was taken on the body on Monday, before J. Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Lisson's Acland Arms Inn, Sidwell-street, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned. The deceased is understood to have been a native of Tiverton, and respectably connected.

Thursday 11 July 1844, Issue 4105 – Gale Document No. Y3200674902
Inquests held by J. Gribble, Esq. Coroner:- July 3rd, on the body of MARY HEWS, who accidentally fell into a well and before assistance came, expired. Verdict, accidentally drowned.

July 4, at Torquay, on the body of ROBERT PAGET, aged fifteen years, while bathing at Livermead, was drowned. Verdict, accidentally drowned.

On the same day at Coombinteignhead on the body of WILLIAM HONYWILL, who died almost suddenly from an inward complaint. Verdict accordingly.

July 6th at Kingswear, on the body of ABRAHAM EALES, who was found drowned;

and on the same day at Staverton, on the body of RICHARD REDDICLIFF, who was killed at Penn Quarry by a large butt falling on his head. Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday 18 July 1844, Issue 4106 – Gale Document No. Y3200674925
Plymouth, Devonport, &c.
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, by John Edmonds, Esq., on the body of a male infant found secreted in a box, in a lodging house, 44 King-street, which on investigation, was discovered to be the child of an unmarried female named ELIZABETH PERRING, who had been living in the town, about 7 or 8 weeks. It appeared that she had been charged with being enceinte by her relatives, which she strenuously denied. Mr Eales, surgeon, deposed that the child was born alive, but died shortly afterwards from not having proper care taken of it. A verdict to that effect was returned, the facts not justifying the jury to return a verdict of "concealment of birth."

On the following day an Inquest was held on the body of LOUISA ANN PRIOR MAY, aged 36, who died suddenly at her residence, 49 Richmond-street, and a verdict of "Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday 8 August 1844, Issue 4109 – Gale Document No. Y3200674982
A fatal accident lately occurred to MR PHILIP MARRACK, Supervisor of Excise, stationed at Crediton, who was picked up on the road near Bow by two Farmers returning home from Exeter Fair, in an insensible state and bleeding behind the head, occasioned by his falling off his horse, through 'tis supposed fatigue and excessive heat of the weather. The horse was a most docile animal, and was standing by its rider's side when found. A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

FATAL ACCIDENTS. - On the 26th ult, as ELIAS BOLT, a lad about 13 years of age, in the employ of Mr William Pyne, of East Budleigh, - in company with Mr Pyne's son, - was coming from Branscombe to Woodbury, with a wagon laden with lime, in descending a hill, the lad [?] and became entangled with the wheels. Young Pyne instantly stopped the wagon, and with all possible [?] extricated the unfortunate youth, whom he conveyed to his father's, a labourer. He had, however, been so cruelly and suffered such serious injury, that he expired in an hour. Verdict on the Inquest, Accidental Death: a deodand of 1s. on the wheel.

On the same day, a lad named THOMAS ARBERY, a lad 11 years of age, while engaged in drawing [?] from the Common to Otterton, fell, and a wheel of the v[?] passing over his head, he was killed on the spot. – Verdict – Accidental Death, with a deodand of 6d. on the wheel.

Thursday 15 August 1844, Issue 4110 – Gale Document No. Y3200675001
SOUTH TAWTON. - Accident.
A lad named JAMES PINE, aged 6 years, met his death on Wednesday last. It appears he went to Mr Fewins' Mills and ascended up to the loft, when by some means he fell down through the trap door, and received such injuries, that he died shortly after; an Inquest was held by J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday 22 August 1844, Issue 4111 – Gale Document No. Y3200675020
On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. coroner for Exeter, at Moore's London Alehouse, Mary Arches-street, on the body of JOHN BACK, advanced in years, and by trade a joiner. The deceased had previously experienced attacks of an apoplectic character, but retired to rest apparently in his usual health on the preceding evening. In the morning, however, he was discovered dead in his bed. The Jury returned a verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 29 August 1844, Issue 4112 – Gale Document No. Y3200675040
On the 15th inst., an Inquest was taken at Colyton, before R. H. Aberdein, Esqr., Coroner, on the body of SARAH BERRY, 20 years of age, who died on the 12th., - her death being occasioned, as was rumoured, by taking medicines for the purpose of causing abortion. The Jury adjourned to the following day in order to receiving the evidence of medical gentlemen engaged in the post mortem examination, - and this done, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died of effusion on the chest. – expressing at the same time both surprise and regret that the parents of the deceased had not sooner availed themselves of medical assistance.

Thursday 3 October 1844, Issue 4117 – Gale Document No. Y3200675125
CORONER'S INQUEST - On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at the New London Inn, on the body of a young woman, a servant to Mrs Harvey, a lady, temporarily residing at lodgings on Southernhay, who was found dead in her bed that morning. The name of the deceased was MARIA SPILSBURY, and it appeared she had been labouring under illness, - supposed to be an affection of the heart, - previous to her arrival in Exeter. There was no doubt as to this being the cause of death, and a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God, was returned accordingly.

DISTRESSING AND FATAL ACCIDENT. – In the forenoon of yesterday, (Tuesday) a most distressing and fatal accident occurred in North-street, in this city. In this street Messrs Wilson & Co. timber merchants, have a yard, in which quantities of timber are piled. The entrance doors during the day remain open for the convenience of business, and the children of the neighbourhood have been in the habit or resorting to it for the purpose of play. In this way yesterday, - their parents being resident in a Courtlage just below, - there were assembled here, Elizabeth Devenish, 9 years of age, having in her arms an infant four months old; William Devenish, 2 ½ years old (these three being members of the same family); and ELLEN ELIZA CLAPP, in the fourth year of her age. These children were seated on some deals , amusing themselves by playing at schooling, when, fearful to relate, a quantity of deals that were piled up behind them suddenly gave way, and the unfortunate children were crushed beneath the mass. An alarm was instantly given and as speedily as possible the superincumbent timber removed, when it was found the head of ELLEN CLAPP was literally smashed, -0 portions of the brain adhering to the timber – and her death must have been instantaneous. Elizabeth Devenish sustained severe injury in her back; William Devenish injured in the thigh; and the infant much bruised about the head and face: but the three are considered likely to recover. They were removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where Elizabeth remains, but the little boy and infant, on their injuries having been attended to, were returned to their parents. In the afternoon, an Inquest was taken before Mr Warren, at Tucker's Crown and Sceptre Inn, North Bridge, on the body of the unfortunate ELLEN CLAPP, when a verdict of Accidental death was returned.

Thursday 3 October 1844, Issue 4117 – Gale Document No. Y3200675127
NORTH DEVON.
MELANCHOLY AND FATAL ACCIDENT. – An Inquest was held on Friday week, at Blatchford, in the parish of Sherwill, before Richard Bremridge, Esq. Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM LOVERING, of Combmartin, yeoman. The deceased had been at Barnstaple Fair the day before, and left between seven and eight o'clock, in company with three neighbours, all on horseback; he had drunk freely, and about a mile and half out of town rode off from his companions, and galloped furiously down the hill towards Blatchford, close by which he was met by the van of John Pugsley, the Ilfracombe carrier, which was driven by his son, who heard the deceased approaching at a very rapid rate, and called out to him, but had scarcely spoken when his horse came in contact with the horse of the van, on which deceased's horse sprang off towards the hedge, and in so doing the point of the shaft caught deceased in the leg, and he instantly fell under the horse in the van, and his own horse ran away. Deceased got up, and exclaimed, "Oh my God! I am murdered!" and staggered to the hedge, and reclined against it. By this time one of his companions had come up, and found him bleeding most profusely from the thigh, and instantly sent back to the town for a surgeon. Mr Torr was very quickly on the spot, but deceased had expired before his arrival. He ordered the body to be removed to the adjoining house of Mr Smith where he examined it, and found a dreadful wound in the thigh, five inches long and of the same depth, which had divided the femoral artery, and extended into the abdomen. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death;" and the foreman requested the Coroner to admonish the driver of the van against the practice too common with such vehicles of keeping out into the middle of the road instead of by the proper side. It is a singular fact that deceased was born on the 19th September (Barnstaple Fair day) married on that day, and killed on the 45th anniversary of his birth-day.

Thursday 10 October 1844, Issue 4118 – Gale Document No. Y3200675149
ASHBURTON. - An Inquest was held before J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday last, on view f the body of SAMUEL LEAR, who was found drowned in the river Teign on the previous day. Verdict – "Found Drowned."

Thursday 10 October 1844, Issue 4118 – Gale Document No. Y3200675152
NORTH DEVON. - Melancholy Accident.
An Inquest was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Combmartin, on Monday, on the body of SARAH GIBBS, aged 16 years whose death occurred under the following circumstances:- It appears that the deceased had gone to the house of John Saunders, innkeeper, on the forenoon of Sunday, to enquire after his grand-daughter, Mary Ann Saunders, who was ill in bed; deceased went up stairs to see her, and was accompanied by John Saunders, brother of the sick person, aged about 8 years; after having enquired how she felt, she sat down by the side of the bed, and had not remained above five minutes, when the boy John Saunders took up a gun which was in the corner of the room to show it to the deceased, and by some accident, as he had the gun across his shoulder, and was going to put it in its place, the piece discharged, and the contents lodged in the forehead of deceased, who uttered a loud shriek and fell to the ground. Persons came up stairs to her assistance, and found the blood flowing most profusely from two dreadful wounds in her forehead. The resident surgeon did not happen to be home, and the presence of Mr Stoneham, of Ilfracombe, was very quickly obtained, but, on his arrival, life was almost extinct, and she expired within ten minutes afterwards. Verdict – "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 1s. on the gun.

An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Bishops-nympton, on the body of WILLIAM SPARKES, of that parish, labourer, aged 36, who went to his work the day before, digging stones in North Pillavin Quarry. A boy passing by the place in the forenoon, saw a coat lying, and a quantity of rubbish which appeared to have newly fallen in, and conjecturing that some one must have been buried, he gave an alarm. Two men immediately came, and having removed the rubbish, to the amount of about three tons, found deceased underneath quite dead, and with his head and body much mutilated. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH, DEVONPORT, &c.
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Monday afternoon, a party, consisting of MR FOWLER, cabinet maker, and his wife, MR KNOWLES, shoemaker, MISS RYDER, and MRS MORGAN, whose husband is a mason, all from the neighbourhood of William-street, Plymouth, hired a boat at Richmond-walk, and proceeded on board her Majesty's ship "Queen," recently arrived from Portsmouth, and now in Plymouth Sound. After spending a little time with MRS MORGAN'S brother, who is a seaman belonging to the ship, and between whom and MISS RYDER an attachment was said to exist, the party left for Cawsand, where they had some refreshment and remained until about six o'clock in the evening. At that hour they left, and unfortunately on nearing Redding point, Mount Edgcumbe, they kept too close to the shore; the boat struck on a sunken rock, capsized, and all on board perished. There was no boatman in her, but the weather was very mild, and the sails not set; and it is supposed that the timidity of the women induced the two men, who were rowing, to go too near the point, off which are a number of dangerous rocks. The bodies were found shortly after in very shallow water under the Huntsman's Lodge, and the boat was close by, bottom up. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held on the bodies before A. B. Bone, Esq., when the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but by what means they came by their death there is no evidence to shew." - FOWLER has left a family of three children, KNOWLES a wife and two children who are at present in Jersey, and MORGAN a husband and two children.

Thursday 17 October 1844, Issue 4119 – Gale Document No. Y3200675169
ASHBURTON. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Wellington Inn, Ipplepen, before Mr W. A. Cockey, Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of a man named KING, who was accidentally killed the previous day at Bow Hill, by a wagon going over him. Verdict – "Accidentally killed."

Thursday 21 November 1844, Issue 4124 – Gale Document No. Y3200675252
NORTH DEVON. - Death by Burning.
An Inquest was held at Heanton Punchardon, on Monday, before Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM MOLLAND, aged two years and nine months, son of a labourer of that place, who was left in his grandfather's house alone, on the Saturday preceding, and soon afterwards a person came in and saw the little fellow in flames, trying to brush the fire from his face. A girl came in, and wrapped him in her shawl, by which the flames were extinguished; but the little sufferer languished until the next day, when he died. Verdict – "Accidental Death by burning."

Thursday 28 November 1844, Issue 4125 – Gale Document No. Y3200675264
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, for Exeter, at Cridge's paper-maker's Arms public-house, Exe-lane, on the body of JOHN FLETCHER, found on the preceding morning in the engine stream. It was learnt that FLETCHER together with James Goddard, were sawyers, in the employ of Mr Finch, timber dealer, at Upton Pyne, and came to Exeter on Saturday afternoon or towards evening. About 7 o'clock in the evening they went to Venn's Fountain public house, on the Quay steps, and called for beer, which was served them. FLETCHER was rather the worse for liquor. About half past 7 o'clock Goddard went out, saying, he should return again in about ten minutes. He did not, however, do so, and a glass being broken by FLETCHER, about the payment for which he made some difficulty, the landlord told him, that but for his companion, he would not have drawn him any beer in the first place. Subsequently however, FLETCHER paid for the glass, and about 8 o'clock left the house. A man whose appearance corresponded with that of the deceased was seen about this time to pass the Commercial road: and also by another person to pass the Powhay Mills, in the Bonhay, but from that time no trace can be learnt of FLETCHER. About 4 o'clock on Sunday morning the water was let out of the leat running by the old engine house and engine bridge, in order to the repair of a mill situate on that stream and soon after day commenced, a little boy named James Townsend, son of Mr Townsend, flock manufacturer, at engine bridge, saw the body of a man, lying in about a foot of water, with the head and one arm inserted in an opening in the grating on the upper side of the mill, caused by one of the rails having given way. He called to Edward Moore, of St. Thomas, who chanced to be passing, and these obtaining the assistance of a young man a navigator, who was at Cridge's, the body was taken out and conveyed to that house. The unfortunate man had been long dead, and it is imagined that intending to return home by the way of head weir and the railway station, he had fallen into the stream and been drowned. It was evident he must have got into the water when the stream was at the full, as the force of the water alone would account for his head and part of his body having become thus inserted in the broken part of the grating. In the pockets of the deceased were 10d. in money, and a bundle of letters very carefully tied up. These were found to be from his wife, who resides at Wellington. the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." Goddard got safe home, and being asked why he did not return and make enquiry about his companion, said he went to the Labour in Vain beer house, Preston street, and did not appear to have thought any more about him.

TIVERTON. - Fatal Accident. An Inquest was held at Butterleigh, near Tiverton, on the 21st inst. on the body of HENRY QUICK, miller, who came to his death by having accidentally become entangled in the machinery of the mill. The deceased has left a wife and family.

Thursday 12 December 1844, Issue 4127 – Gale Document No. Y3200675291
FATAL ACCIDENT. - Between 6 and 7 o'clock on Monday evening last, a man in the employ of Mr John Carter, seedsman, &c., market-street, in this city, was returning home with a light cart, when near Heavitree Bridge, his attention was arrested by what appeared a low moan from a human being, and stopping, he found a gentleman laying in the hedge senseless, and a man appearing to be a servant, also in a senseless state, in the middle of the road. He immediately sought to get assistance, and a respectable tradesman of this city, in a fly, coming up assisted in rendering it. The bodies were removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where medical aid was instantly rendered, but the gentleman expired about half six o'clock the following (Tuesday) morning. An Inquest was held, before John Warren, Esq. Coroner, the same day at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, when a verdict of accidental death was returned. The unfortunate gentleman was MR EMPSON, of Budleigh Salterton, where he was engaged in business with Mr R. Morris. It is understood he had just arrived in this city, by railway, and was proceeding to Budleigh Salterton, in a gig accompanied by a servant, when the horse taking fright, became uncontrollable, and they were thrown into the road. The gig was much damaged, and the horse stopped near Sandy Gate. It is said MR EMPSON had on his person the sum of about £900 when this sad accident occurred to him. The servant still lies in a dangerous state.

NORTH DEVON. - Accidents by Burning.
An Inquest was held before J. H. Toller, Esq., on the 4th inst. at Berrynarbor, on the body of RACHEL BAMENT, aged three years, daughter of GEORGE BAMENT, a labourer, who was in her father's kitchen on the afternoon of the 3rd, in company with an elder sister, when she went to the fire, and took up a piece of coal with the tongs, by which her clothes became ignited and so severely was she burnt that she expired the next morning. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 23 January 1845, Issue 4133 – Gale Document No. Y3200675378
On Friday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Ireland's Barnstaple Inn, North-street, on the body of MR WM. GEARY, who fell over the stairs in the house in which he resided near the North Bridge, and fractured his skull, of which injury he died; and a verdict was returned accordingly. The deceased was in his 87th year, - by trade a dyer, and formerly foreman to Mr James Worthy, of this city.

On Thursday last, MRS KEETH, mother of MR WM. KEETH, of the Three Tuns Inn, High-street, in this city; with whom she resided, was found dead in her bed. She had attained the age of 71; a rupture of one of the vessels was the cause of death; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 30 January 1845 , Issue 4134 – Gale Document No. Y3200675395
The elderly female named JENNINGS, who was dreadfully burnt from her clothes accidentally catching fire, as stated in our last, died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Sunday morning. The Inquest was taken before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on Monday at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, when a verdict accordingly was returned.

STAVERTON. - An Inquest was held at Wolson Green yesterday, by J. Gribble, Esq. on view of the body of GEORGE BURNELL, who while engaged at work in a loft at Barkadon Farm, on the previous day, fell down through, and received such injuries in his head that he died shortly after. Verdict, Accidentally killed.

IPPLEPEN. - Fatal Accident. - A young man named JOHN GORNAN, aged 24, died in this village on Wednesday last. It appears that a short time since, while engaged on the works of the South Devon Railway, he descended one of the shafts at Daignton Tunnel in a bucket, when by some means the rope broke, and he fell to the bottom, a depth of 40 feet, by which means he received such injuries that he died on the above day. An Inquest was held on the body before J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday 6 February 1845, Issue 4135 – Gale Document No. Y3200675414
On Saturday last an Inquest was held by John Warren, gent., Coroner, at the Black Lions Inn, South-street, on the body of
MR PHILLIP RANGER, of Brenchley, Kent. The deceased had been unwell for some time, but not of such a character as to prevent his attendance on business, to which he was engaged in this City not two hours before his lamentable death, which took place at the above Inn on Friday afternoon, at four o'clock; he had just come in the house and retired to a room and ordered some broth. One of the servants had occasion to pass through the room and spoke to him and returned the same way in less than ten minutes, and then found him prostrate on the floor - she instantly called for assistance, which was as promptly rendered. Surgical aid, within a few minutes, was on the spot, and it was pronounced that life was quite extinct. The Jury, after a short investigation, returned a Verdict (on the evidence of Mr Edye, who had attended the deceased several years,) of "Died by the Visitation of God." MR RANGER was 55 years of age, and had been in the habit of visiting Exeter for the last 25 years, and during that long period always put up at the Black Lions Inn; he was very much respected by a numerous circle of dealers and friends – and a highly respectable Hop Merchant from Brenchley, Kent. His remains are taken to his native place for interment.

NORTH DEVON. - On Friday last, at Chulmleigh, an awful visitation occurred, shewing the great uncertainty of life. A woman about 60 years of age, named ELIZABETH BIRD, dropped down and almost immediately expired; she was in her usual good health, and just returned from a shop where she had been to purchase some little article. An Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God returned.

Thursday 13 February 1845, issue 4136 – Gale Document No. Y3200675429
On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken at Inwardleigh, by H. A. Vallack, Esq. Coroner for Devon, on the body of THOMAS YEO, aged 52 years, a respectable farmer, who on his return from Northtawton in a wagon (and it is feared in a state of intoxication) was overturned and killed on the spot. – "Accidental Death."

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