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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1846-1855

Articles taken from Trewman's Exeter Flying Post

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs:

Names included: Ackrell; Adams; Aldham; Aldrich; Alford; Allen(2); Ambrose; Ansell; Arberry; Ash; Ashton; Austin; Avery(2); Babb; Bailey; Baker(6); Balkwell; Ball; Bamsey; Barter; Bartlett(2); Bartram; Baskerville; Bassett; Bastin; Bealey; Beer(2); Bennett; Bentley; Berry; Bickford(2); Bidlake; Binney; Bird; Blake; Blanchford; Board; Bond; Blackmore; Bradford(3); Bradridge; Brailey; Branscombe; Bridges; Bright; Brimson; Brooks; Brown(5); Browning(2); Browse; Bruce; Bull; Bulley(2); Bunker; Burns; Burridge(2); Butchers; Callard; Carpenter; Carswell; Cater; Cawsey; Challice; Channing; Chaplin; Chapman; Chappell; Chase; Chope; Clark(2); Clarke(2); Clement; Clinton; Cockram; Coles; Connett; Cook; Coombe(2); Cornow; Cotton; Couldridge; Craggs; Craig; Craigie; Crispin; Crocker; Croft; Croker; Cross; Cruse; Currie; Curtis(2); Darke; Dart(2); Davey(3); Davidge; Davis; Davy; Day; Denham; Dennis(3); Densham; Discombe; Dockett; Dodd; Dolbear; Drake(2); Duffy; Dunsford; Durant; Dymond; Earle; Ebbels; Elliott(2); Ellis(3); Elston(2); Ettery; Evans(4); Eveleigh; Ewins; Fairchild; Fay; Fenwick; Fewings(2); Finch; Finnimore; Fisher; Fleming; Flood; Foley; Follett; Foote; Ford(3); Fowler(2); Franklin; French; Friendship(3); Frost(3); Fry; Fugall; Gale; Geldin; Gelding; Gibbons; Gibbs; Gibson; Giffey; Gilbert; Giles; Gill(3); Gillard; Gilley; Gilpin; Glanville(2); Glass; Gliddon; Godfree; Godfrey; Goldsworthy; Gorrell; Goslin; Gothering; Grafton; Grant; Green; Greenslade; Griffin; Grigg; Groves; Guscott; Hallett; Ham; Hambling; Hancock(2); Hanford; Harford; Harper; Harrap; Harris(4); Hart; Havill(2); Hawkins(3); Haydon; Hayman; Hayne; Haywood; Heath; Hele; Hellet; Henton; Hext; Hexter; Hill(4); Hine; Hiscox; Hodge; Holman; Hooker; Hooper; Horwell; Howard(2); Howe(2); Howse; Hutchings; Huxtable; Irish; Isaac; Isaacs; Isherwood; Jackman; Jarvis; Johns; Jones(6); Jordan; Kelland; Kemp; Kempe; Kennard; Kenton; Kerridge; Kingwill; Knapman; Knight; Lammacraft; Landray; Lane; Lang(2); Larkworthy; Laskey; Laurence; Leach; Lear(2); Lee(4); Leg; Lego; Leigh; Ley; Lidstone; Lock; Lockyer; Long; Lucas; Lyddon; Lyne(2); Lyons; Madge; Madrick(2); Manley(2); Mann(2); Marks; Martin(2); Matthew; Matthews; Maunder; May(3); Mayo; Melhuish; Merivale; Merrifield; Miller(2); Millman; Mitchell(2); Mogridge; Morris; Morrish; Morro; Mortimer(2); Mortimore; Moss; Mudge; Munro; Newcombe(2); Nicholls; Norman(2); Northcote(2); Norton; Oatway; Oke; Oldridge; Organ; Packer; Page(2); Parker; Parkhouse; Parks; Parr; Parsons; Passmore; Payne(2); Paynter; Pearse; Penn; Penreath; Pepperell(2); Perriam(2); Perriman; Perry(2); Petherbridge; Pethybridge; Pidsley; Pike; Polhill; Pollard(2); Ponsford; Pook; Poore; Popham; Poslet; Potter; Powning; Pratt; Preston; Prince; Prior; Prouser; Pugsley; Quick; Radford; Red; Reece; Reed; Reeves; Rendell; Reynolds; Rich; Richards(3); Richardson; Ridgway(2); Ripley; Risdon; Roberts(2); Robinson; Rook; Row; Rowe; Rudd; Rumson; Salter(3); Sambells; Sampson; Samson; Sanders(3); Sandford; Satchel; Satterly(2); Scott; Screech; Seldon; Sellick; Sercombe; Seymour; Shapland; Shapley; Shapter; Sheehan; Sheppard(2); Sills; Simmons; Sincombe; Skinner; Skivens; Slade; Smallacombe; Smallridge; Smeath; Smith(4); Snell; Snow(2); Sobey; Soper(2); Southard; Southcott; Sowton; Squire; Squires; Stabb; Stacey; Staddon; Stall; Stanbury; Stancombe; Stevens; Stokes(2); Stone(2); Stoneman(3); Straw; Street; Sussex; Sydenham; Symons; Tapscott; Tapson; Taylor(4); Teesdale; Thomas(2); Thompson; Thorne; Tidball; Tobey; Tolley; Tozer; Trist; Trueman; Trump(2); Tucker(4); Turner(3); Underhill; Upcott; Vicary(2); Vigers; Vincent; Viney; Vinnicombe(2); Vodden; Wakeham; Walling; Wannel; Wannell; Ware(3); Warmington; Warren; Way; Webber(2); Wedlock; West; Westacott; Westaway; White(3); Whiteway; Widden; Widdicombe; Wilcocks(3); Williams(2); Wills; Wilmets; Wilson; Wood(2); Woodland; Worth; Wright(3); Yelverton;

Thursday, 29 January 1846, Issue 4179 – Gale Document No. Y3200676202
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Friday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Mitchell's Poltimore Inn, Sidwell-street, on the body of JOHN VICARY, who was found dead that morning. The deceased had for a short time been the brewer at Mr Mitchell's, and was so engaged on the preceding night It appeared however, that he had been subject to fits, and it is imagined that in an attack of this kind he fell head foremost by which his face became immersed in a small quantity of liquid in a vessel on the floor of the Brewhouse, and no one being near he was suffocated. He jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was about 30 years of age, - a married man, and has left a widow and one child.

FATAL ACCIDENT. – On Monday last an accident happened to ROBERT VINNICOMBE, a joiner, in the employ of Mr Mason, builder, working about the alterations going on at the Bishop's palace, who fell off a scaffold only 9 feet height, pitching on his head. The poor fellow was quickly taken up by his fellow workmen, and removed home. Mr Shaw was quickly in attendance, but, a few hours after the poor fellow expired. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday, at the Sawyer's Arms, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased belongs to the Order of Odd Fellows, has borne an excellent character and was highly respected by his master, whom he had been with 12 years.

Thursday, 5 February 1846, Issue 4180 – Gale Document No. Y3200676240
A man by the name of WILLIAM SOPER, in the employ of Mr John Cobley, Lower North-street, being sent to Shillingford yesterday, on business, on his return in the Evening, dropped down senseless on Alphington road, he was speedily conveyed to his home in South-street, by two men, and surgical aid was promptly there, but life soon became extinct. The poor fellow was a steady and respectable man, and has left a wife and seven children to lament their bereavement, he was 49 years of age. A Coroner's Inquest is now being held at Carter's Black Lions Inn, South Street.

Thursday, 5 February 1846, Issue 4180 – Gale Document No. Y3200676238
HENNOCK. - A young woman named ANN DISCOMBE, was committed from this village, last week, on a charge of murdering her new-born infant child. The Inquest was held before J. Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, and a respectable Jury.

Thursday, 5 February 1846, Issue 4180 – Gale Document No. Y3200676245
NORTH DEVON. - Bideford, Fatal Accident. - In the Afternoon of the 26th ult. JOHN BINNEY, a lad aged 10 years, only son of MR JOHN BINNEY of the Commercial Inn, in this town, while at play at the lower end of the Quay with several other children, in attempting to jump from the Quay on board a lighter which floated alongside, slipped his foot and sunk between the lighter and the Quay to rise no more. Means were immediately resorted to, to find the body, but it was not found until the lapse of about half an hour, when it was discovered that life was extinct. An Inquest was held on the body by T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the following day when the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

ILFRACOMBE. - An Inquest was held in this town, on the 29th ult. before John Henry Toller, Esq., deputy coroner, on view of the body of an aged woman named JANE STANBURY, whose death was occasioned by her accidentally setting her clothes on fire. It appeared in evidence, that deceased who lived with another aged woman, was sitting by the fire, when the other left the house to fetch some water, and was not absent more than ten minutes, when on her return she was horrified at meeting her companion rushing out of the house, all in flames. Two other neighbours were soon on the spot, who succeeded in putting out the fire. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 12 February 1846, Issue 4181 – Gale Document No. Y3200676265
CORONER'S INQUESTS. – On Friday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of JAMES MILLER, hind at Hoopern Farm, who came by his death unde3r the following circumstances. On the Tuesday week preceding his horse fell with him, and he received a compound dislocation of the thumb. For six days he appeared to be doing well, but on the seventh had symptoms and lock-jaw came on; and on the eighth he expired. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 5 March 1846, Issue 4184 – Gale Document No. Y3200676312
CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER. - On Friday last about 5 o'clock in the afternoon, a Jury assembled before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Saunders's Custom House Inn, Quay-gate, to enquire into the circumstances touching the death of ELEANOR BAKER, otherwise SMITH, about 27 years of age, who died that morning about 6 o'clock. This ill-fated woman, it appeared, has for the last 7 or 8 years cohabited with REUBEN SMITH, a porter and labourer, and been living in that part of the city. In this period also she has born him three children, and been recognised by the neighbourhood as his wife. On the afternoon of Sunday the 15th of February screams were heard to issue from their house, and a sister-in-law going in found SMITH drunk, and the deceased bleeding at the nose, from the effects of a severe blow given her in that part, as she said by SMITH; and notwithstanding the endeavours of this woman to pacify them, she threw a plate or saucer at his head, and the quarrel still continued. Nor would the bleeding woman quit the house with her. She however took a child the deceased had in her arms from her. When on the outside she stopped and listened, and heard SMITH say, if you don't put down that knife, I'll throw you into the lake, (which runs near their residence). Some time after, ELEANOR came to the house of this witness, complaining of great pain in the head. Efforts were now made to stop the bleeding, but appear to have be mostly partially successful, and in this state the unfortunate woman continued for a week. On the following Sunday, however, she was so ill as compelled her to take to her bed, and on Monday, the 23rd Mr A. J. Cumming, surgeon, was called in, and continued to attend her to the time of her death. Mr Cumming gave it as his opinion, that the immediate cause of death was compression of the brain, but could not undertake to say that had been a result of external violence. And the Inquest was adjourned in order to a post mortem examination of the body. On Saturday, at 5 in the afternoon, the Jury re-assembled, Mr Cumming, and Mr F. H. Warren, who had assisted in the examination, being present. These gentlemen, after stating appearances of the body, not of a material nature, went on to say, that on dividing the integuments through the scar on the nose, they found the nasal bones fractured, and matter formed underneath. "On removing the skull cap, the dura mater was found tense and dark, as if preternaturally full, and on removing it some watery fluid escaped. The arachnoid membrane, on the front and upper parts of the brain, was, in appearance milky and semiopaque; at the posterior, and under parts of the brain, it was of natural appearance, excepting that there was a watery fluid under its entire surface." The brain was healthy, and there was no fracture of the skull. These gentlemen concurred in opinion "That the deceased died from compression of the brain, and, looking at the fact, that up to the time of receiving the blow on the nose, she was a person in good health, and from that time became ill, - gradually growing worse until her death, - had no doubt that blow, - which must have been a very heavy and violent one, - had led to the unhealthy appearances within the head, and was, therefore, the primary cause of her death." SMITH had been present during the Inquest, in custody, and the Jury returning a verdict of manslaughter, he was immediately committed to the city gaol, for trial at the assizes for this offence. The prisoner is the son of the late MR JAMES SMITH, who some years since kept the Blackamoor's head public house, - afterwards the "Queen Caroline," Preston-street, West-street, in this city.

Thursday, 12 March 1846, Issue 4185 – Gale Document No. Y3200676332
ASHBURTON. - An Inquest was held at the Exeter Inn on Wednesday last, before J. Gribble, Esq., on view of the body of
THOS. IRISH, labourer, aged 32. It appears deceased, who was working at the extensive Slate Quarries at Recca near this town, was descending a shaft with another man in the kibble, when another labourer named Petherbridge very foolishly caught hold of the rope to go down with them when IRISH and his companion were descended 15 feet. Petherbridge on account of the rope being wet and slippery, went down in an instant, and melancholy to relate knocked poor IRISH out of the kibble, who fell 150 feet and was knocked almost to pieces. He has left a wife and six young children destitute. Fortunately IRISH'S companion and Petherbridge held on and were saved. Verdict, accidentally killed. – Petherbridge was cautioned not to attempt it, but to no purpose.

Thursday, 7 May 1846, Issue 4193 – Gale Document No. Y3200676445
SOUTH BOVEY. - An Inquest was held here on the 26th ult., on the body of JOHN SATTERLY, who fell in the Bovey river and was drowned.

BUCKFASTLEIGH. - An Inquest was held here at the Sun Inn, on Tuesday last, before J. Gribble, Esq., on the body of MARY DODD, aged 83 years, who unfortunately fell down a flight of stairs, and was so much injured that she died shortly after. Verdict, accidental death.

Thursday, 28 May 1846, Issue 4196 – Gale Document No. Y3200676494
COMBRALEIGH. - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 13th inst., on the body of MRS LUCHY GODFREE, wife of MR THOS. GODFREE, who, it was reported had come to her death by eating pickles, which had been made in a metal vessel, and contained a very strong solution of copper. The Jury after a short consultation returned a verdict of Natural Death. Great interest was occasioned in the neighbourhood from the fact that MRS GODFREE was only married on the Tuesday before her death, and the uncertainty as to what was the cause of it, had produced considerable excitement, but this was at once allayed by the Inquiry before the Coroner, and the Verdict of the Jury.

Thursday 4 June 1846, Issue 4197 – Gale Document No. Y3200676509
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Cridge's Paper Makers' Arms public house, Exe-street, on the body of WM. PERRY, who was drowned the preceding afternoon, by going to the rescue of a lad who had slipped his foot on the Head Weir and got into the very dangerous situation between that and Blackaller Weir. The deceased who was just turned of 19 years of age, was a native of Woodbury, but had for several years lived in the capacity of a servant in the family of Mr Joseph Wippell, of St. David's hill, by whom he was held in great esteem from the regularity of his conduct and good behaviour. On Wednesday afternoon he was sent with a flasket of clothes to a person keeping a mangle, and having delivered this, said he would go and have a wash at the river. On reaching the Head Weir he saw that a lad in crossing the Weir had slipped and got between the Weirs, and instantly proceeded to his rescue, in which humane purpose he was successful, but paid the forfeit of his meritorious exertions by his own life, for missing his footing, he was at once immersed in deep water, in one of those pits that are so common in this part. Aware of his danger, and unable to swim, his calls were loud and earnest for assistance. On the opposite bank were several men working in the employ of the Commissioners f Improvement, and it is said these cries were heard by them, but that none hastened to his assistance, on the plea that they did not know they should be paid for so doing!! Thus then (if true) in this age of preaching have these men learnt their duty, that no effort is to be made to assist a dying fellow creature, unless there is some guarantee that they shall be paid for it!! It is repeated, that "if true," – since religion fails in its injunctions and inducements, the law ought to be rendered strong enough to make such cold blooded and calculating parties answerable at the bar of public justice for their neglect. This however is but top certain, that the good and Christian-like PERRY lost his life, for when at length a man was got with firmness enough to do this, life must have been extinct. This, it is understood, was a person named Woodgate, who dived after the body and brought it out. Nor is it the first time this man has distinguished himself in this way. The body was taken to the Reception House of the Exeter Humane Society, but too late for the methods in use for restoration to be any avail. The lad saved by the exertions of the unfortunate PERRY is named Red, and it is not a little remarkable that about twelve months since, having got into deep water, animation was restored through use of the means directed by the Humane Society. The Jury, having heard the evidence, returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and at the same time made it a request to the Coroner, that he would represent to the Mayor and Council, the great want that is felt in this city of a proper bathing place; which Mr Warren promised to do.

On Monday evening an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., at Rudall's Cattle Market Inn, in the Bonhay, on the body of JOHN MADRICK, between 9 and 10 years of age, and belonging to the Episcopal Schools, Paul-street, who had lost his life by drowning, between three and four o'clock that afternoon. It appeared that this lad had with others gone to bathe in the river, and being now in this city compelled to do this as it were by stealth, they repaired to a point in the Upper Bonhay, at the mouth of a waste leat from Mr Strong's mills. Just at this spot, however, unfortunately, a quantity of gravel has been taken and a pit formed about six feet in depth; all around it, as also for some distance outwards, it is shallow water, but the poor lad almost immediately on entering the river, became immersed in this pit, and aware of his danger, screamed for help. A companion of the name of Dart saw him go down, and heard his cries, and ran immediately to get the assistance of a bigger boy named Hutchings, who came at once, and getting into the water went down so that he touched the unfortunate MADRICK with his foot, but the depth of waster was such that he became afraid. Murphy, another lad now came, and these assisted by Dart, got a pole and lifted MASDRICK with it from out of the water. Unfortunately, however, - from a false delicacy, - before they proceeded with the body to any house near, they set about dressing themselves, laying the body in the mean time, - with the face downwards, - on the grass. This, however, did not pass unobserved by a man named James Dunn, who was at work in a garden at no great distance, and making his way through the hedge he dashed across the leat and seizing the body ran with it to a Reception House of the Exeter Humane Society, at the back of the Cattle Market Inn. Here every means in use under the direction of this Society was promptly put in exercise, and Mr W. Woodman, one of the surgeons of the Society, was immediately on the spot directing and superintending the proceedings, but without the desired effect. As a last resource, Mr Woodman recommended the performance of some surgical process, but to this the father of the lad, who had by this time arrived, refused to consent, and Mr W. was obliged to desist in his skilful and humane efforts. From what is learnt from the boys there is reason to think life was not extinct when the body was laid on the grass. The Jury having heard all the circumstances of the case and observations of the Coroner, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The father of MADRICK is a sawyer and resides in Gandy-street.

NORTH DEVON. - HOLSWORTHY - An Inquest was held on the 29th ult., before H. A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of BETSY, the wife of GEORGE HANCOCK, of this place, labourer, who met with her death under the following distressing circumstances:- She with her husband was about to change their place of residence; the household goods were carted and were being conveyed to their destination. She was seated upon those goods with an infant in her arms, and a little boy by her side. The cart had just began to descend the hill leading out of this place to the south, when the horse started off, going down the hill at a furious pace. On arriving at the bottom the force of the cart was so suddenly checked by its striking against the bridge, that the three poor creatures were projected over the bridge-side and pitched upon the river's bed, a depth of about thirty-four feet. The woman was picked up apparently lifeless. Consciousness never returned, and she expired on the night of the 27th. The little boy had his head very much cut and his thigh broken; but strange to relate, the infant, although held in its mother's arms, escaped with scarcely any injury. The little creature has many marks upon its skin, which shew the firmness of its mother's grasp for its safety. The carter, although a steady man, had omitted to bring the drag into action, and it is imagined that from such neglect this distressing accident arose. A subscription has been entered into for the enabling the distressed widower to pay the expenses of his deceased wife's funeral. It is hoped that carters generally will take particular notice so as to avoid the neglect which has led to the accident here described.

Thursday, 11 June 1846, Issue 4198 – Gale Document No. Y3200676527
PLYMOUTH, DEVONPORT, &c. - On Saturday last, a labourer named WILLIAM SAMBELLS, employed at the new works, Morice Town, was killed by one of the tram wagons passing over his body. The deceased was engaged in filling up Keyham Lake, when, in attempting to get out of the way of a horse and wagon running on the trams, he fell, and the wagon passed over him. Surgical aid was procured, but the poor fellow expired almost immediately. An Inquest was held on the body before Mr Bone, Coroner, on Monday last, and a verdict returned of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 18 June 1846, Issue 4199 – Gale Document No. Y3200676544
NORTH DEVON. - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday last a young man named WILLIAM REED, a native of Braunton, and an apprenticed to Captain Brewer, of Bideford, went into the river about a quarter of a mile below Crosspark at low water, in company with some of the Crew of the Schooner "Brunswick," which was then lying around close by the stream, in order to bathe. The individuals belonging to the Brunswick it appears left the water first and went on board their vessel where their clothes were left, to dress themselves, leaving MR REED in the water who it seems got out of his depth and unable to swim but little sunk to rise no more. His cries for assistance were heard at a considerable distance and a number of individuals were very soon on the spot but not before it was too late to render him assistance. Strange as it may appear the crew of the Brunswick denied having heard the cries of the poor young man while in distress although he was very near the vessel when he sunk and no doubt might have been rescued from a watery grave with very little exertion on their part. Every means were resorted to, to find the body but without effect, until a period of about an hour and a half had elapsed, when life was quite extinct. The body was conveyed to Bideford and taken to the London Inn where it was deposited. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. We hear that much credit is due to a sailor named Samuel Saunders, who used extraordinary exertions to rescue the poor youth from a watery grave and who is ever foremost to take a part however hazardous, in rendering assistance to his fellow creatures when in perilous circumstances. Such conduct is deserving some public taken of approbation.

Thursday, 25 June 1846, Issue 4200 – Gale Document No. Y3200676558
DEATH BY DROWNING. - A circumstance sad in its nature of this kind has occurred in this city this morning. MRS LETITIA WILLIAMS, a married woman, residing at the entrance to Edmund-street, from the West Quarter, for many years, held the situation of one of the midwives to the Exeter Lying In Charity, and since the death of Mrs Hole, her name has stood first on the list. From this situation it appears on charges of irregularity and being given to tippling, she was some short time since dismissed. This has weighed heavily on her mind, and rendered inveterate a habit of drinking, in order to drown sorrow by the lethal effects of liquor. The loss of her salary and this species of extravagance have also brought their usual concomitants distress and poverty, and it is said, that only in the course of last evening her husband in some two or three instances prevented her from the commission of an act of suicide; and, further, that he being weighed down at length by the over powering influence of sleep, she escaped from his side, and at a very early hour her body was discovered floating in the leat, not far from the wooden-bridge, leading from Sadler's-lane (Exe Island) into the Bonhay, and in the neighbourhood of the cattle-market. MRS WILLIAMS was about 60 years of age, and, before she addicted herself to drink, much respected. An Inquest will be held on the body, at Page's Anchor Inn, Exe Island this (Wednesday) afternoon at 5 o'clock.

CORONERS INQUESTS. - On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene street, on the body of JANE ANN SYMONS, a child about 14 months old, who died that morning in the Hospital, from a severe scald received on Saturday, by inserting its hand in, and over turning a basin containing hot tea. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

On the 17th inst., an Inquest was taken at Sidmouth, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of AUGUSTUS HAYMAN BAKER, 17 years of age, who was drowned on the preceding day while bathing in the sea. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday, 2 July 1846, Issue 4201 – Gale Document No. Y3200676575
Yesterday (Tuesday) an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Elliott's Gold Lion Inn, New Town, on the body of MRS MARY BRIDGES. The deceased had come from the country to visit some friends she had residing at Newtown. She accidentally fell over the stairs and broke her leg, as also sustained such injury from the shock, that death was the consequence, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday, 9 July 1846, Issue 4202 – Gale Document No. Y3200676592
TORQUAY. - An Inquest was held at the King William the Fourth Inn, on Saturday last, before J. Gribble, Esq., County Coroner, on view of the body of EDWIN HAMLYN LAURENCE, aged 22 years. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest, it appears the deceased had been in a desponding state of mind for some time past, and on Thursday morning left his home and proceeded under the Beacon Hill, and after fastening an handkerchief around his waist, to which was a large stone attached, threw himself into the sea. A report spread on the evening of the day that probably the deceased had destroyed himself as he could not be found, and search was made and the body of the unfortunate man was picked up on Friday morning, a lifeless corpse. Verdict – Destroyed himself while in a fit of temporary insanity.

PLYMOUTH, DEVONPORT &c. - An important Coroner's Inquest was held on Friday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., touching the death of MRS ELIZABETH MUNRO, the wife of a superannuated shipwright of the Dock-yard, aged 68 years, who resided in Garden-street, Morice Town. It appeared that she had complained of relaxation of the bowels, and on Saturday week in the evening, Mr Row, druggist, of Morice Town, came to see her. She told him she had a relaxation, but the discharges were not natural, it was a discharge of blood. Mr Row said he would send something, and some pills and a draught was sent in about half an hour afterwards. Both were administered. The following morning Mr Row again visited her, and continued to do so daily until last Sunday. The relaxation had ceased on the Tuesday after she was taken ill. On the next day she became sick, and urged very much. She complained of pain across the pit of her stomach. On Sunday Dr Budd visited the deceased. Dr Budd requested the attendance of Mr May, and an operation was performed by the latter for hernia, the non-discovery of which he believed to evince gross ignorance. Mr Swain and Mr Dansey were both present at the operation. The Jury after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict, that "the deceased died from strangulated hernia, and from natural causes.

Thursday, 20 August 1846, Issue 4208 – Gale Document No. Y3200676694
SILVERTON. - On Tuesday the 10th inst., about two o'clock in the afternoon, a poor man named ROBERT PERRIAM, in the employment of Mr Norrish, a farmer of this parish, unfortunately fell from a hay stack, on which he was at work, to the ground, a distance of between six and seven feet. Though the ground where he fell was comparatively soft, his back was broken by the fall, and it was deemed necessary to convey him at once to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. He survived only until the following day. The poor man has left a wife and eight children to lament their loss. An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Friday evening, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. Decomposition was so rapid, that it was deemed unsafe to remove the body to Silverton.

ITTISHAM NEAR DARTMOUTH. - This village and its neighbourhood has been in a state of excitement during the past fortnight, respecting the death of a young woman named ELIZABETH TUCKER, aged 20 years. It appears from the inquisition, which was held by Mr J. Gribble, county Coroner (at the house where the deceased died), at Campton, on the 5th, 6th and 10th inst., that the deceased complained to her mistress on the Sunday evening that she was ill, and she was desired to go to bed. Tea was given her, but she immediately brought it up again. She was asked several times, if she had taken anything, to which she replied only a little milk. She lingered until the following day, when she expired. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Burroughs, surgeon, and every symptom of her having taken a strong dose of arsenic appeared; but whether she took it herself, or it was given her by any other person, no sufficient evidence appeared to cause the Jury to return any other verdict by that her death was caused by poison.

Thursday, 27 August 1846, Issue 4209 – Gale Document No. Y3200676710
BISHOPSTEIGNTON. – Melancholy Circumstance. – A young woman in the service of Mr Charles Simeon named FANNY TUCKER, aged 28 years, hung herself near this village on Sunday morning last. It appears deceased was accused of taking a pair of stockings, her master's property. On being asked for them she denied it, and claimed them as her property; this preyed upon her mind in such a manner, that she proceeded to a field a short distance off, and hung herself to a tree. When found, she was quite dad. An Inquest was held on the body of Mr J. Gribble, county Coroner, and a verdict accordingly returned.

Thursday, 3 September 1846, Issue 4210 – Gale Document No. Y3200676728
An Inquest has been held on the body of PARKER, the man who died from eating bilberries with which some poisonous fruit had been mixed; and a verdict of "Manslaughter" was returned against Hillard, the countryman who vended the berries, and whose neglect caused the death. – [This person is brother to Mr Parker, Painter and Glazier, of Dawlish, and a native of that place.]

Thursday, 10 September 1846, Issue 4211 – Gale Document No. Y3200676749
NORTH DEVON. - MR GEORGE STONEMAN, tanner, of Torrington, was found drowned on Monday week, near Rothery Bridge, in the vicinity of Torrington. Deceased, who appeared in his usual health on the previous day, attended the Baptist Chapel three times. In the evening he complained of being unwell, and walked out, but not returning as soon as was expected, inquiry was made about him, but he was not found until the following morning, at the place before mentioned. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." It is generally supposed that the unfortunate man committed suicide, but what led him to commit the rash act remains an inexplicable mystery.

Thursday, 17 September 1846, Issue 4212 – Gale Document No. Y3200676767
CREDITON. - A melancholy accident occurred in this neighbourhood on Saturday last, by which an unfortunate man named PARR lost his life. He was engaged at a house called Brandice, in the repairs of a very deep well, and while at the bottom his fellow workmen heard him give the signal to be drawn up, at the same time exclaiming "quick," "make hast;" they immediately commenced hoisting the bucket he was in, but when about half way up the poor fellow must have lost his senses from the foulness of the air, as he fell to the bottom of the well, breaking his neck in the fall; drags were immediately procured, but life was of course quite extinct when he was got up. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Monday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Friday last a Jury was empanelled before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for this city, at Palmer's King's Arms Inn, West-street, t enquire into the circumstances attending the death of HELEN JARVIS, aged one year and nine months, the illegitimate child of a woman named CAROLINE JARVIS, residing in that neighbourhood. It appeared from the statement of the mother, who now cohabits with another man, not the child's father, that she put it to bed, on the floor, about eight o'clock, on Wednesday evening, and remained in the room with it until eleven, and that she then went out to get a candle, leaving it fast asleep. She was absent not more than a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, and, on her return, proceeded to strike a light; but the light of the match she caught sight of the child lying before the fire, but the light went out again before she had time to examine it. She ran out and called her mother and brother, who came to the room with some other persons, and the child was found quite dead – literally roasted to death. Mr Lyddon, a surgeon, was sent form, but of course, could render no assistance. The persons who came into the room when the alarm was given, concurred in saying that there was then no fire in the grate, and, the strong improbability that the absence of the mother was so short as she had represented it, led to the adjournment of the Inquest until Monday. In the meantime, a post mortem examination was made, but nothing was found to indicate ill treatment or violence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found dead by burning, but what means unknown."

Thursday, 24 September 1846, Issue 4213 – Gale Document No. Y3200676785
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Turner's Black Dog public house, North-street, on the body of THOMAS JONES, a man 53 years of age, a pensioner, and by trade a sawyer, who had been found dead in his bed, in that house, the preceding day. The deceased was a married man, and he and his wife, who is a washerwoman, lived with her father, named Gale, near the King's Arms sluice, at the entrance to the canal. His life, however, has been a migratory one, and he had for some time been labouring under a complication of complaints, for medical assistance in which he had at first been an inmate of the Hospital, and at the time of his death, was an out-patient of this benevolent institution. He left his home about ten o'clock in the morning of Thursday last, in order to attend at the Hospital, and did not return to his house again. About 6 o'clock in the evening of that day he came to the Black Dog, enquiring if he could be accommodated with a bed. He was informed he could, and then sat down, calling for a noggin of rum, with water, with which he was furnished. He drank part of the liquor, - gave away the rest, and then retired to bed, taking a pint of cider up with him. On the forenoon of Friday, as he did not appear, now was any thing heard of him, Mr Turner went up into the room when he found him dead in the bed, having apparently been in this state some hours. The cider remained untouched, and there was a small quantity of brandy in a bottle. Upon his person were found 10s. and a few half-pence. Information was immediately given to the police, and Stuckes went down, and found the dress the deceased had worn to answer the description given him on the preceding day by a woman who was making enquiry after her missing husband; accordingly he went to the Haven Banks to acquaint her with what had occurred, and apprised her of the amount of money found upon him. She instantly said there must be more as he was always in the habit of carrying a good deal of money about with him, and when he left home had nine sovereigns. The officer assured her that every part of his dress had been searched, but no more found, and that a medical gentleman had seen the body. She however persisted, and told him that if it was her husband, a girdle would be found round his loins, in which was a puzzle purse, and there, no doubt, the remainder of the money would be found. Accordingly search was made, - it was found precisely as she had stated, and there were eight sovereigns in the purse. A post mortem examination being deemed necessary, an adjournment took place to Monday. The examination was conducted by Mr Harris, surgeon, who on the re-0assembling of the Jury, informed them there was disease of the heart and kidneys, and appearances of congestion of the brain, and he had no doubt the man died from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." It is said a calculous formation was found in the kidneys.

Thursday, 8 October 1846, Issue 4215 – Gale Document No. Y3200676822
NORTH DEVON. - As a man named SAMUEL GREEN, mason, aged 63, was at work at Messrs. Maunders' woollen manufactory, Barnstaple, on Tuesday, he unfortunately fell from the ladder: he never spoke afterwards, and died on the following morning. An Inquest was held on the body before Alfred Drake, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. Deceased was a sober and industrious man, and a free man of the borough.

Thursday, 8 October 1846, Issue 4215 – Gale Document No. Y3200676820
OTTERY ST. MARY.
Determined Act of Suicide. - On Friday 25th day of September last, two young women about 23 and 26 years of age determined on poisoning themselves, and accordingly fetched three-pennyworth of arsenic at Mr Parsons', druggist, of Ottery, on the representation that they wanted it for their mother, who was much pestered with rats; one ounce and half was delivered about half-past 3 p.m., they were observed to leave their work at the Ottery Silk Mill and again shortly return, nothing apparent as if they meditated suicide, but whilst absent they went to a Cider Shop near and asked for some cider, which was given, - they then put in some of the arsenic, and one drank, and then the other washed out the cup and returned to work; one of them was afterwards observed to fetch some water and bring it in under her apron in which some arsenic was put in – they both drank again. They left earlier than the other work people and went home, first asking for the key. In about half an hour another lodger went home and observed one called SMITH very sick, and the other, OLDRIDGE, sitting in a chair, who said she was not very well; SMITH then left and went to her own lodging; OLDRIDGE after became very sick, some warm water and tea was given but she became worse, and declined to have a medical man sent for, saying "I shall be better by and bye." OLDRIDGE'S sister came in and asked her if she had taken anything, which was answered in the negative except a little cider. OLDRIDGE got worse, and a medical man was sent for, but of no use. OLDRIDGE died on the Sunday following, - and SMITH on the Tuesday. A Jury was assembled on Tuesday 29th, at Stone's Commercial Inn, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, when, after many hours investigation, the Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se in the case OLDRIDGE, and the body was interred the same night without the rite of Christian burial. On Friday last the 2nd inst., an Inquest was taken also before Mr Aberdein, on the body of SMITH, and a similar verdict being returned, her remains, likewise, were interred the same night without the forms of Christian burial. The names of these miserable women were MARY ANN OLDRIDGE, about 23 years of age, and JANE SMITH, 26 years of age; and whatever may have been the circumstances that prompted them to this most deliberate and desperate act, they remained quite cool and collected up to the time of their respective deaths. OLDRIDGE could read and write, SMITH cold not. In neither of these had anything like incoherence previously been remarked, nor anything bearing the character of insanity after they had taken the poison, - indeed, quite the contrary. By some of the Jury in these unhappy cases, it was argued, that it was impossible for a sane person to commit suicide. Still they thought neither of these persons insane, but not of a sound state of mind. It was contended that it is impossible to draw a line of distinction as to what is, or what is not insanity, "as every act of vice may upon the same principle be argued to arise from insanity." It was the opinion of some of the Jury, "that to return a verdict of insanity when the facts were otherwise, was a false piece of humanity, and thereby countenancing an act of suicide, which is both condemned by God and man."

DEATH IN A STATE OF INTOXICATION. – On Wednesday last the body of a man named SANDERS, latterly working as a mason's labourer, but bred a butcher, and who had been missing from the preceding Sunday, was found in a ditch in a field between Kenn and Kenton. He had gone from the latter to the former place, and was on his return, and it is imagined he must have fallen backward from a dwarf hedge, in a state of intoxication, and dislocated his neck. From the humid state of the weather, and situation of the place in which he lay, marks of decomposition already appeared. An Inquest was taken on the body on Thursday, and a verdict in accordance with these circumstances returned.

Thursday, 8 October 1846, Issue 4215 – Gale Document No. Y3200676819
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On the morning of Thursday, last a lad named DRAKE, the son of a man residing at Exwick, was proceeding from that place to Exeter to attend his school, when, in order to shorten his walk, he attempted to cross the Head Weir, but his feet unfortunately slipping, he fell, when the strength of the current was such that he was carried on into deep water, and before assistance could be rendered was drowned. The body was taken into St. Thomas, and on the Inquest, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

EXMOUTH. - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on 1st October, on the body of ROBT. GRANT, mariner, aged 37, who came to his death by falling over board, on the evening of the 26th ult., from a vessel called the Donegal, lying in the Exeter Canal, and was drowned. It appears that the deceased was last seen alive about half past seven o'clock and he was then in the act of washing himself, (in the gangway near the mainmast,) before leaving the vessel to go home to Exmouth. On the deceased being enquired after he was found to be missing, and the pilot having seen a man cross the ferry with the lumpers it was concluded it was the deceased and he had gone home. The next evening, hearing that deceased had not been home, the Captain sent to Exeter to ascertain if he had not gone there with the lumpers; finding he had not, he became alarmed and search was made for him in the canal, but to no purpose. On Monday morning another search was made for him, and the body of the deceased was discovered in the water close under the head of the vessel and it was supposed that the deceased had fallen over board. There had been no drinking or quarrelling on board, nor were there any marks of violence on his body or clothes when found. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The deceased was a remarkably sober and steady man.

Thursday, 22 October 1846, Issue 4217 – Gale Document No. Y3200676857
FATAL ACCIDENT. - Early on Thursday morning last, a lad named SAMPSON WALLING, aged 14, in the employ of Mr Southcott, Half Moon, Topsham, fell into a furnace of hot water. The unfortunate sufferer was immediately conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where every attention was paid to him by the medical officers of that excellent institution, but we regret to say the injuries he had received were so severe that he expired in a few hours. On Friday afternoon an Inquest was held on the body before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, when after a full investigation of the circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

HALBERTON. - On the 14th inst. F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of a man named CROSS, a labourer on the Tiverton Branch Line of Railway, who was found drowned in the Canal near Rockway Bridge, in Halberton. There were several bruises in the face of the deceased and strong suspicions are attached to one of the workmen on the line of a reprobate character. However no satisfactory proof could be given at the Inquest, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," but how the deceased got into the water there was no evidence to prove.

On Sunday morning, the person having charge of the Water Works at Engine Bridge, on taking up the hatches to examine them, as usual, discovered the body of a man in the leat. He procured assistance, and took it out with as little delay as possible, but life was quite extinct; subsequent inquiry proved it to be the body of a man named JOHN FAY, residing in Commercial Road, and employed as a carter upon the Railway works in this neighbourhood. It transpired upon the Inquest, which was held on Monday evening, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, that the unfortunate man was last seen alive about half-past seven o'clock on Saturday night, when he left the cider shop at Cowley Bridge with two fellow workmen to return to Exeter. They parted at the entrance to the Railway station, and the deceased proceeded through the fields, the nearest way to his home in the Commercial Road. The night being dark, he must have missed his way, and fallen in, the road at the spot being extremely dangerous. His body had passed, in a great measure, through the grating, and was only prevented passing through completely, by the water filling a nose-bag which he carried in his hand. This is the second accident at this spot within a few days; and the Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," added an expression of their strong desire that the authorities should see if effectually protected.

Thursday, 29 October 1846, Issue 4218 – Gale Document No. Y3200676872
FATAL ACCIDENT - On Thursday last, a child of parents of the name of NEWCOMBE, was burnt to death at Crediton, having caught its clothes on fire, while the mother was taking the dinner to her husband, a labouring man; and, on the Inquest a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday, 19 November 1846, Issue 4221 – Gale Document No. Y3200676922
TIVERTON. - Coroner's Inquest. – F. Mackenzie, Esq. Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of WALTER ETTERY, gamekeeper to __ Edwards, Esq., of Witheridge, on Wednesday last. It appears that the deceased on Tuesday the 10th instant, came to Tiverton market, and put his horse in the White Ball stables. About 8 o'clock that evening he mounted his horse in the yard to return home, and on coming into the street the horse reared and threw the deceased, and fell on him. He was immediately taken up and carried into the White Ball Inn, and medical aid procured, but he expired about an hour afterwards. The Coroner was of opinion that death was occasioned by some important nerves in the belly being forcibly struck by the horse in falling. Verdict "Accidental Death."

MELANCHOLY SUDDEN DEATH. - On Tuesday 17th inst., a man named POOK was coming from Washfield to Tiverton market, and about a mile and half from the town overtook a cart belonging to Mr Tapper of Sampford Peverell. He asked the driver to allow him to ride, who consented, and POOK got into the cart. A few minutes afterwards, the driver, not getting an answer to a question put to POOK, looked into the cart and found him dead. He was taken to the Worth Arms Inn, in Tiverton, to await a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday, 19 November 1846, Issue 4221 – Gale Document No. Y3200676921
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On the 10th inst., before F. Leigh, Esq., a Coroner of Devon, at the Country House, public house on the Topsham road, an Inquest was taken on the body of JOHN PEARSE, a labourer, in the employ of Messrs. Davy and Son, Weir. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, who was a man of very little intelligence, aged between 40 and 50, had been for many years in the employment of Messrs. Davy. He was standing in a cart pitching a load of hay into a tallet, he stooped down and thrust the pick into a bundle which did not take hold of the hay band, and making a vigorous effort to throw it up into the tallet and having no hold on the bundle, he threw himself backward out of the cart, fell on his head, broke his neck and died instantly – before the man who was receiving the hay from him could come down he was dead, as he never breathed or uttered an audible sound. The state of the body having been deposed to by Mr Fox, surgeon, of Topsham, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died of a broken neck.

An Inquest was held at the Bolton Hotel, Brixham, on Thursday last, on the body of a child of the name of GILES. It appears that about a fortnight since, the mother, in placing a teapot filled with boiling water, turned her back to attend to some other matters, during which time the poor child unluckily grasped the tea-pot, and overset it, while the whole of the boiling contents descended upon its person. Medical aid was promptly called and obtained, but, after lingering many days, death put a period to its sufferings. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, caused by the above accident.

An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at the King William the Fourth Inn, in Totnes, by Joseph Gribble, Esq., to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of a man named WILLIAM TOZER, of Totnes, by trade a mason, when the following was elicited, on the evidence of his (TOZER'S) two sons. Their father was working at the Dainton tunnel, in the parish of Ipplepen, on the South Devon Railway, on Monday, on a scaffold about 23 feet from the ground, assisting a fellow workman in holding up a stone whilst he wedged it up; he had driven one wooden wedge, and had turned round to get another wedge, when the stone gave way, struck the support which bore up the scaffold, and precipitated poor TOZER to the ground, who fell head foremost, and so fractured his skull that he died without a single groan; two of his jaw teeth were found by his son on the spot. The Jury, without the least hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death.!

Thursday, 3 December 1846, Issue 4223 – Gale Document No. Y3200676954
NORTH DEVON.
SOUTHMOLTON. - An Inquest was held at the Union Workhouse, on Friday the 20th ult., on the body of one of the inmates named ELIZABETH MANN, aged 46, belonging to the parish of Witheridge. She was admitted into the house with her husband and family about 18 days before, in a weak state; and she had been ill and gradually declining for the four years previous. She went to bed on the night in her usual health, and was heard early on Friday morning breathing loud and with difficulty, by some of the other inmates, but before medical or other assistance could be obtained, she ceased to exist. - Verdict, "Died from natural causes."

ILFRACOMBE. - An Inquest was held at the Packet Hotel, on Wednesday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of WILLIAM WRIGHT, of Plymouth, mate on board the schooner Hero, lying at this port. Deceased was about to make fast the stern chain of his vessel on the preceding Monday night, and on getting into a boat which was lying under the stern, he fell with one leg in the boat and the other in the water; he went to bed and did not get up in the morning, but was supplied with coffee in his berth, and remained till towards noon, when one of the seamen went down to see him and found him in great pain, and he soon after died. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, was called in, but his assistance was unavailing. At the direction of the Coroner, the surgeon made a post mortem examination of the body, which discovered the cause of death to have been congestion of the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday, 10 December 1846, Issue 4224 – Gale Document No. Y3200676971
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of JAMES WILCOCKS, a labourer, of the parish of Kingsteignton, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Wednesday evening last. The deceased was taken ill at his work, on Wednesday, the 25th ult.; on Thursday strangulated hernia had taken place, and he went to bed, but nothing was done on that day; on Friday, his landlady went to a neighbour, to whom she communicated his illness, and who sent him half-a-crown: On Saturday the overseer was sent for, and when he saw him, expressed an opinion that he had the influenza, and said he would call again on Monday. On Monday, the medical officer of the Union, Mr Gillard, of Newton, was sent for, but did not come; on Tuesday he was sent for again, with an intimation that the man's life was considered dangerous, and that Mr Cartwright thought it right he should be taken to the Hospital. Still he did not come on that day, for he said if Mr Cartwright had seen him, and thought he should go to the Hospital, what could be the use of his going over to him? On Wednesday, however, being again sent for, he did come, but when he saw the man, his own opinion concurred in the propriety of removing the man to the Hospital, which was done with the utmost possible care, for he was brought by railway, and in a first-class carriage. A consultation was here held on his case, and an operation performed, but he died the same night. A post mortem examination was made, and an opinion expressed by Mr Harris, who made it, that an operation performed on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Sunday night, might have been successful; but on Monday, when the medical man was first sent for, matters had gone too far. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had died from natural causes, but censured the conduct of the medical officer in not having attended immediately on being sent for.

Thursday, 17 December 1846, Issue 4225 – Gale Document No. Y3200676988
An Inquest was held on Monday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in Magdalen-street, before John Gidley, Esq., acting for the Coroner, on the body of a poor lad, named JAMES GLASS, in the service of Mr Radmore of Thorverton. It appeared that the deceased, on Friday, the 4th inst., was engaged in driving a horse, working a small threshing machine, on Mr Radmore's farm, when by some accident, his leg was caught in the machinery, and so severely injured, that it became necessary to take him to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where every attention was paid him; the shattered limb was amputated, and he seemed likely to do well; unfortunately, however, erysipelas and mortification ensued, and he died on Sunday last. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 14 January 1847, Issue 4229 – Gale Document No. Y3200677053
An Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Inn, in this city, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARTHA HANFORD, a young woman aged 20, who died suddenly on the previous morning. It appears that deceased had lodged somewhere under the "Iron Bridge," in the house f a washerwoman named Warren. She was stated by the woman Warren to have been poorly for some time, - but not so much indisposed as to be confined to her room. Early on Wednesday morning she became worse, and a neighbour was sent for, as well as Mr A. Cumming, one of the surgeons of the Corporation of the Poor. The deceased expired, however, before either of them arrived. The woman Warren manifested great unwillingness to give evidence, and told her story in a very rambling manner. As the cause of death remained a mystery, the Coroner adjourned the Inquest until Saturday at one o'clock, in order that a post mortem examination might be made. The result of the investigation showed that there was a considerable disease of the lungs, and there being no longer any doubt that the woman had died from natural causes, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

An Inquest was held at the Eagle Inn, Bartholomew Street, on Friday, and, by adjournment, on Monday, on the body of MRS CRAIG, the wife of MR CRAIG, a tea-dealer, who had died on Tuesday morning, and respecting whose treatment, certain unpleasant rumours had been in circulation. The poor woman had complained greatly of pain in the back, on Saturday night, became much worse on Sunday, was delivered of a child on Sunday evening, and died as before stated between eight and nine o'clock on Tuesday morning. There was nothing unusual, in the circumstances of the confinement, except that her mind slightly wandered. Her death was quite unlooked for by Mr Lyddon, the Surgeon who attended her, and by those about her. Her husband was absent from home, during her illness, and on receiving a letter from him she said, "the villain kicked me on Thursday night, and left me without money." There was a mark on the hip, which might have been occasioned by a kick, and some marks were on the neck also, but Mr Lyddon and Mr Harris, who had made the post mortem examination, did not connect these at all, with the death of the deceased. The Jury found a Verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday, 18 February 1847, Issue 4234 – Gale Document No. Y3200677140
DEATH FROM CLOTHES CATCHING FIRE. – On Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Tucker's Sawyer's Arms public-house, Preston street, on the body of a child named ISAAC SHEPPARD, three years of age, when from the evidence of MARY SHEPPARD, the mother, it appeared that she, with her husband and four children, occupied two rooms in the attic of a house in that street. Between 9 and 10 o'clock on the preceding Saturday morning she left three of the children in the bed-room, while she went to a yard in Westgate Quarter for a bag of tan for fuel. She was absent but a short time, she thought not beyond a few minutes, and when she returned she found the deceased in the outer room, standing in a corner by the wall, with its clothes nearly burnt off. She made an alarm, and Mr Kingdon, surgeon, soon came, but the unfortunate child was evidently dying, and in about two hours expired. It was much burnt about the legs and thighs, as also about the face, especially the nose and mouth; but from the medical evidence it would appear that death was caused from fright and exhaustion rather than from injury in any vital part, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The father works in the brick-field, and has 8s. a week for the maintenance of himself, wife, and four children.

An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the Red Lion, St. Sidwells, before J. Warren, Esq., on the body of a girl between six and seven years of age, the daughter of MR JAMES SOUTHARD, tailor, St. Sidwells. On the previous Friday, during the temporary absence of the grandmother, with whom she resided, whilst reaching for something on the mantel piece her clothes caught fire. The injuries were so severe that, notwithstanding every medical attention, she expired on Sunday morning. Verdict, Accidental Death.

UPLYME – DREADFUL DEATH. - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on the 6th instant, on the body of a man named HENRY FOWLER, a quarry man aged about 30 years, who was in the employ of Mr Job Fowler, lime burner, here, whose body was discovered on Thursday morning, the 4th inst., by another workman named Bowditch, lying in the middle of the kiln. When Bowditch got to the kiln, the flames were between five and six feet above the top of the kiln, and on looking very earnestly at it, he distinguished the body of a man, lying on his back, with his left leg drawn up. He called assistance, and his body was got out, and was identified by the small portions of the dress, which deceased had on, which were not consumed by the fire, to be the body of the deceased. The body was roasted to a cinder, not a feature of the face could be distinguished, and his left leg was separated at the knee joint, by the action of the fire. The deceased had been drinking at a public-house on the evening of Wednesday, when he left, he went to his master's house, and left there between 8 and 9, he was in liquor, but appeared to be capable of taking care of himself. The lime kiln is about 30 yards from Mr Fowler's house, no noise was heard after deceased left the house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 25 February 1847, Issue 4235 – Gale Document No. Y3200677156
DREADFUL OCCURRENCE AT BIDEFORD QUAY. EIGHT PERSONS DROWNED.
On the evening of the 16th instant, as George Bowden, a common carrier between Bideford and Torrington, was about to leave the former town, with his omnibus full of passengers, nine persons being inside and one on the roof, - the night was dark, and the tide on the level with the Quay when the vehicle was started, - which after moving a short distance the horse became restive, and after making two or three plunges, the shafts of the omnibus snapped saunder, and awful to relate, the vehicle, with the whole of its passengers, was precipitated into the river. The consternation and horror which ensued was indescribable. A woman who was on the roof was fortunately got ashore; and Mr Michael Chappell, a glovemaker of Torrington, by a desperate effort burst open the door of the bus, and swam ashore, assisted by a soldier who bravely jumped in to his rescue. This was the only one of the inside passengers who escaped the watery grave. The vehicle moved slowly down the river, gradually sinking and before any efficient assistance could be rendered went to the bottom, carrying with it the other eight passengers, who were thus suddenly and awfully launched into eternity. Grappling irons were immediately in requisition, and every effort was made to save the victims, but all in vain, - nearly two hours having elapsed before the vehicle was brought up, which bore the corpses of eight human beings, who a brief period before were in the enjoyment of health and life. When the omnibus was opened, the sight was truly horrifying. We leave to the imagination of our readers the fearful spectacle, without attempting to harrow up their feelings by an imperfect description. The names of the unhappy sufferers are as follows:- FANNY FRIENDSHIP, wife of JOHN FRIENDSHIP, of New-street, nail maker, aged about 40, leaving four or five young children; ANN NORMAN, a widow residing in an almshouse, and aged about 65; ELIZABTH FRIENDSHIP, wife of JOHN FRIENDSHIP of Castle-street, ropemaker, and daughter of the last named, aged 35, leaving six young children; MARY ANN FRIENDSHIP, a child of 11 years old, daughter of the last named; ANN PAGE, wife of JOHN PAGE, boot-maker, of South-street, aged 40, no family; JOHN CHAPPELL, (brother to Mr Michael Chappell, who extricated himself,) glove manufacturer and fell monger, a highly respectable man, aged about 65, of Well-street, leaving a wife and grown-up family; JOHN PASSMORE, of South-street, worsted manufacturer, a middle-aged man, leaving a wife, but no family; and ELIZABETH GRIFFEY, aged 60, an unmarried female.
An Inquest was held on the bodies on Wednesday, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, and a respectable Jury. The burthen of the evidence went to prove that the melancholy affair arose from accident alone; for although Bowden, the driver, was charged very strongly with being drunk and incapable of managing the horse at the time, the whole statement was disproved at the Inquest. After a painful and patient Inquiry, which occupied several hours, the Jury returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased were accidentally drowned, and that no negligence or blame was to be imputed to George Bowden, the driver of the omnibus; but the Jury strongly recommended that either by indictment or presentment the insecure state of the Quay he brought before the proper authorities."
The melancholy occurrence has cast a gloom over the towns of Bideford and Torrington, which will take a long time to disperse.

The same evening of the melancholy event above recorded, a man named RICHARD PRINCE, of Clovelly, fell over the Quay, it is supposed when in a state of intoxication, and was picked up the following morning. A considerable sum of money was found in his pocket. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 4 March 1847, Issue 4236 – Gale Document No. Y3200677171
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at the city workhouse, on the body of WM. LYNE, an inmate of the house, subject to attacks of epilepsy. The father and friends of the deceased for many years resided in Magdalen-street, but, from repeated attacks of the nature already spoken of, the unfortunate deceased had lost the use of an arm, and was affected in intellect; and, on the death of his father, was placed in the workhouse. Here great kindness had been shown him by Mr and Mrs Bragg, and he was placed in a room, with a man of good character to attend him. On Friday morning he got up as usual, and when the man left to go to the brick-field, LYNE was seated by the fire reading his Bible. On returning, however, in about a quarter of an hour, the room was filled with smoke, and the deceased, in a kneeling position, close to the fire place, burning, but unable to extricate himself. Medical aid was promptly rendered, but he died the following morning. The probability is that being seized with a fit, he had fallen forward on the fire, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday, 18 March 1847, Issue 4238 – Gale Document No. Y3200677204
Death by Drowning. - A melancholy case of this kind occurred in this city, yesterday (Tuesday). MISS ELIZABETH ISHERWOOD, about 17 years of age, who, it is understood has no parents living, but is in the care of an aunt, was placed from Bath, her previous place of residence, with the Misses Langsford, milliners, 235 High-street, to be instructed in the business. No cause is assigned for such conduct, but yesterday she left the Misses Langsford's house, was seen in her course towards the river, and it is said afterwards seen walking in the fields between Head Weir and the Railway Stations, and in a short time the body was discovered and taken from the water, but the unfortunate young woman was dead. The body now rests at Cridge's Paper Maker's Arms, public house, Exe-street, and an Inquest will be taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at 5 this afternoon.

Thursday, 1 April 1847, Issue 4240 – Gale Document No. Y3200677234
An Inquest was held at Salcombe, on March 22nd, by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner on the body of EMMA CLARK, a child aged about two years old. It appears from the evidence that the mother and child were in the union house at Kingsbridge for some time, and on leaving the union the child was taken ill shortly after, and soon expired, no doubt from being exposed to the cold, and not having a sufficient quantity of food to partake of. A verdict was returned died from inflammation of the bowels.

We have to record, this week, a very melancholy instance of death by drowning. The deceased, a fine lad about eleven and a half years old, was named THOMAS JAMES PRATT, and was the son by a former husband, of a woman of the name of THORNE, residing near the Colleton mews, in the parish of the Holy Trinity. On Sunday morning, about ten o'clock, the lad went into the mews and got into conversation with the servant of Mr Ralph Sanders, who occupies a stable there. There is a pump in the stable yard, common to all the tenants of the mews, and each occupier of a stable has a key – the pump being kept locked. While the lad was conversing with Mr Sanders's man, whose name is Henry Williamson, a woman of the name of Thomas came and requested to have some water and Williamson gave her the key for that purpose; at the same time he gave the deceased a bucket, and requested him to fill it for him, intending himself to fetch it when full. The lad ran on before Mrs Thomas, and reached the pump first; he had no sooner, however, put the bucket down, than a large stone which formed part of the covering of the well gave way, and the deceased fell in, the stone falling in after him – at the same time, a considerable portion of the brick work, on one side of the well, gave way, and fell in upon him, and more than an hour elapsed before he could be extricated from his perilous position; he was then quite dead. An Inquest was held on Monday, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the New Artillery Arms. From the evidence given, the probability appeared to be that a portion of the brickwork, or wood-work, in the lower part of the well, under water, had given way, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 22 April 1847, Issue 4244 – Gale Document No. Y3200677282
An unfortunate and melancholy accident occurred yesterday at Okehampton, at the Town Mills, belonging to Messrs. Lake and Son. A man, of the name of ROBERT BALKWELL, was working at the Mills, - the machinery being out of order, the poor fellow endeavoured to set it right when he was caught by his smock frock and his death was instantaneous. His son arrived at the same moment and was about to assist him, but too late to do so. The deceased has left a wife and five children totally unproved for; he was a most faithful servant, and generally regretted by his employers and all who knew him. An Inquest will be held on the body this day. (Wednesday)

Thursday, 13 May 1847, Issue 4247 – Gale Document No. Y3200677324
Yesterday (Tuesday) an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Gill's Anchor public-house, Paul-street, on the body of EMILY LUCAS, who expired on Sunday at her residence in the same street, when a verdict of Died from natural causes was returned.

ALLEGED MURDER AT DEVONPORT. – An Inquest commenced on Friday last, at the Queen's Head, Devonport, on the body of HENRY HUMPHREY GILBERT, aged 26, formerly clerk in charge of the Avenger steam tender to her Majesty's ship Caledonia, but lately borne upon the books of that ship. Deceased on Wednesday night was in company with Eliza McMinn, a woman of ill fame, at a notorious beer-shop, "The Victory of China," in Pembroke-street, Devonport. Pedler, an attendant on the sick berth on board her Majesty's ship Queen, slept in a separate bed in the same room. On the Thursday morning they were all drinking together, when Pedler handed McMinn a glass of porter, but she being privately informed by another girl, named Eliza Card, that Pedler had taken a white powder from his waistcoat pocket and put some in the glass, tasted and then threw away its contents. Shortly after Pedler gave a glass of porter to GILBERT, who drank it, and soon became insensible. This was between 12 and 1 o'clock, and by half past 8 he expired. The prisoner, Joseph Pedler, was captured about three hours afterwards in Queen-street, and on being conveyed to the station house some morphia was found in one of his pockets. Mr C. Tripe, surgeon, who examined the contents of the stomach of deceased, gave it as his opinion that he died from the effects of morphia. Mr Wm. John Grogan, assistant surgeon of Her Majesty's ship Queen, stated that the prisoner was sick berth attendant on board that ship, and had access to the medicines, among which was hydro-chloride, or muriate of morphia. Kesiah Cook stated that she lived at the Victory of China, and slept on Wednesday night in the same room with deceased. Witness next morning drank two glasses of beer given her by the prisoner. The last part was bitter and hot in the mouth. On accusing Pedler of playing the rogue with her he smiled, but said nothing. Eliza Card said, "Yes, he has." Before drinking the second glass the prisoner said, pointing to deceased, "Do you see that officer there? I'll have a lark with him. I'll set him to sleep." About ten minutes after drinking the second glass witness felt sick, was giddy, and could not stand without holding, and within half an hour vomited and then felt better, but was much swollen. In the evening she experienced an itching of the skin, had a rash on her face and back and a mist before her eyes, all of which symptoms were stated by Mr Tripe to be those exhibited after taking morphia. The Inquest is adjourned until tomorrow (Thursday). The accused Pedler is said to be of unsound mind. He received a good education, and married the daughter of a captain in the royal navy. Having got involved through debt he was imprisoned at Bodmin, but effected his escape after two days' confinement. He was followed by the gaoler and constable through Millbrook and came to Plymouth, where they lost all trace of him. Pedler took passage by a Jersey packet to that island, and thence landed in France. Then he joined some French smugglers, who were detained about 12 months since on a charge of smuggling a large quantity of tobacco in the port of Plymouth. Before the magistrates, by his over-talking, Pedler convicted himself and comrades, and they were all imprisoned six months at Exeter. Subsequently he joined Queen, when his knowledge of reading and writing rendered him useful to attend on the surgeon, and this service appears unhappily to have given him the means of perpetrating without apparent cause, one of the most deliberate and diabolical acts ever committed.

Thursday, 3 June 1847, Issue 4250 – Gale Document No. Y3200677370
An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Half Way House Inn, on the Cowley Bridge road, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE EVANS, who was killed the previous evening. the deceased was in the employ of J. Quicke, Esq., Newton St. Cyres, and was returning from Exeter about 6 o'clock with a wagon, drawn by two horses, without reins. Near the Half Way House he passed a man named Wyatt, in a gig, who observing the horses increasing their speed, also drove on; and on coming to Mr Cross's gate saw the deceased stagger across the road, and immediately be expired. Mr Cumming, surgeon, passed soon after and examined him, and he now gave it as his opinion that he died from injury of the spine, or fracture of the base of the skull, which may have been occasioned by his jumping suddenly from the cart and pitching on his heels or head. He did not think the cart had passed over him, as no marks were visible on the body. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, caused by riding without reins.

On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Edwards' Plume of Feathers Inn, North-street, on the body of ELIZA FROST, a child five months old, daughter of JOHN FROST, a night labourer at the Railway Station; which was found dead in the bed that morning by its mother. This woman had twins, a boy and a girl, and the boy being unwell had been taken by the mother in her arms. At half past 2 o'clock the girl appeared well as usual, and was given the breast, but at half-past 7 was found dead, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday, 17 June 1847, Issue 4253 – Gale Document No. Y3200677402
FATAL ACCIDENT. - Just before six o'clock on the morning of Sunday last, as two lads Henry Hobbs, and a son of Mr P. Cridge, of the Paper-makers arms public house, Exe-street, were walking through the hilly field, at Head Weir, they saw the clothes of a person on the bank, but could not see any one in the water, and thinking an accident might have occurred, young Cridge left to inform his father, whose house is one of the reception houses of the Humane society. Mr Cridge was not yet down stairs, but got up immediately, and directed a messenger to go and request the attendance of W. Stuckes, a police officer, a powerful man, and bold and adventurous diver and swimmer, who came to his assistance, when an immediate search was made by dragging the river. At this time they were joined by John Ewens, in the employ of Messrs. Kingdon, who suggested the borrowing a boat at Mr J. Eyre Kingdon's, the water being exceedingly cold, as also that occasionally smart showers of rain fell, and the water in the part they were searching, was very deep. Ewens, accordingly, went for this purpose, and in about half-an-hour returned with a boat, when the search was re-commenced, and after being thus prosecuted for about half an hour a body was found, which, on being brought up, Stuckes immediately recognised to be that of MR JOHN SANDFORD, of Castle-street, lodging house keeper. Mr Cridge examined the pockets of the clothes on the river's bank. There was, however, no letter or anything of that description, but in the breast pocket of the coat there was a sponge and towel, and it was understood there was a piece of soap on the bank. It was evident the unfortunate man had come to bathe, but what time he left his house for this purpose is matter of uncertainty, no one being known to have seen him, and when the servant got up, which was about a quarter past six, she found the front door had been opened. The body was taken to Mr Cridge's, where, on Monday, an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, and a verdict of "Accidentally drowned" was returned. The place in which the body was found is the most dangerous and deepest part of the river at Head Weir, and is a spot where persons are forbidden from bathing. MR SANDFORD was 68 years of age, sometime a widower, and his family consisted of himself, a niece who has lived with him from her early years, and a female servant. He was comfortable in his worldly circumstances, being possessed of property, and had spent the Saturday evening quite in his usual manner. He was well known, being a man who has frequently taken an active part in public concerns in this city, and was much respected.

CREDITON. - On Wednesday afternoon the mail coach, from Bude, was coming down the town about 5.30 p.m. and at the same time a man named SQUIRE, who was very deaf, was walking in the same direction, but rather inclined to the middle of the road; the coachman, observing this, called loudly to him, but without success; nevertheless, he drove in as close as possible to one side of the street, and had the man remained where he was, no accident could have taken place. It is supposed, however, that he heard something approaching, for, without looking behind him, he moved partly across the street and was knocked down by the leading horse, the wheels of the coach passing over and mutilating him in a shocking manner. Assistance was promptly rendered, and the sufferer taken to an adjacent house, but death released him from his agony in about a quarter of an hour. No blame can be attached to the coachman, (whose name is also Squire,); he was driving very steadily, and did all in his power to prevent the accident. An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Ship Hotel, before F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 1 July 1847, Issue 4255 – Gale Document No. Y3200677436
SUICIDE. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Ager's White Horse Inn, Sidwell street, on the body of MARY BAKER, the cook in the family of Mrs Polson, Southernhay-place, who that forenoon destroyed herself in a small room adjoining the pantry, in her mistress' house, by cutting her throat with a carving knife. The deceased was a widow, having many years since lost her husband, who was found dead in bed by her side, at Chittlehampton, where they resided, and of which place she was a native. This produced a depression of spirits from which she never entirely recovered. Indeed, on the contrary, this very recently was increased by the circumstance of a fellow-servant, with whom she had lived 17 years, being attacked with paralysis, and a medical gentleman had been consulted on her state. On the morning on which this act was committed, the family went from home, and there was no one but the housemaid in the house with her, who missing her about noon, became alarmed, and search being made, she was found dead, as already stated. She had lived in her present service 19 years, and previously lived in the family of a clergyman in the North of Devon, and by these in whose employ she has been, and all who knew her, was greatly respected. The Jury returned a verdict of Destroyed herself while labouring under temporary Insanity. The deceased was from 54 to 55 years of age, and has a daughter who is living in respectable service.

Thursday, 15 July 1847, Issue 4257 – Gale Document No. Y3200677464
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at the Royal Oak, Milk-street, on the body of HYAM ISAACS, between 60 and 70 years of age, who some years ago acquired no small notoriety from being paraded about at religious meetings as a converted jew, and since which he appears to have lived comfortably without following any business; and about three weeks since returned to this city from Southampton. He had invented a means for preventing accidents from collision on railways, and also an improvement of the buffers, but of which – (as has happened to many others before him,) – the world does not appear to have thought so highly as himself. This preyed on his spirits, and under circumstances of excitement on Saturday morning, he swallowed prussic acid with which he had furnished himself, and life was soon extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Destroyed himself while labouring under temporary insanity."

NORTHMOLTON. - Awful Circumstance. - A case of accidental death has occurred in the village during the last week, under circumstances of a distressingly melancholy and awful nature. On Friday night, or early on Saturday morning, a woman in decent circumstances, dressed in disguise, having an empty sack in her hand, made an attempt to enter the corn mill of Mr Ley, miller, situated in the village of Northmolton. She had been seen in the village about eleven o'clock at night, respectably attired; but nothing further appears to be known of her until the next morning (Saturday), soon after five o'clock, when the miller's man entered the mill, and his attention was immediately attracted to a pair of shoes lying by the wheel; on looking more narrowly he was terrified at observing, between the inner wheel of the mill and the wall, a human arm stretched out. In the utmost consternation an alarm he summoned his master and fetched the constable, who came instantly, and found that a body was pressed betwixt the wheel and the wall, but so tightly that it required the assistance of nine men to lift the wheel before the remains could be extricated. The body was at length got out, and proved to be that of a woman named WESTACOTT, aged 55, wife of a decent man in the village, a school-master; her neck was broken, her person fearfully torn and mutilated, and she must have been dead for several hours. It appeared that the miller had latterly missed corn from his mill on several occasions, and had watched a few nights previously, but without detecting the depredators. There is an aperture above the axle of the water-wheel, through which he suspected the entrance must have been made (although apparently too small for any grown up person to get through); and, therefore, on the night in question, he left the mill-wheel slowly turning to prevent access of the thieves. However, through this opening the unfortunate woman ventured to enter, and in the attempt came to her untimely and ignominious end. Deceased was a person of respectable connexions, but her character for honesty had long been suspected. An Inquest was held on the body before John Henry Toller, Esq., Coroner, and an open verdict returned of "Found dead between the wheel and the wall." The occurrence has caused an extraordinary sensation I the parish, and it is hoped that so awful a warning may not be without a salutary influence.

Thursday, 22 July 1847, Issue 4258 – Gale Document No. Y3200677480
DAWLISH. - A man, named SAMUEL SATCHEL, aged 50, met with his death on Thursday morning last, whilst fixing an Iron Pump in a Well at the York Hotel, Dawlish. He was keying up a bearer when the walling fell in burying him underneath. When taken out in the evening life was quite extinct – the position of the poor fellow when found was with his head under a bearer, and one arm around the Pump and the other holding the Ladder. A Coroner's Inquest has since been held and a verdict of Accidental Death returned; - there were no bruises on the body.

Thursday, 29 July 1847, Issue 4259 – Gale Document No. Y3200677498
NEWTON ABBOT. – Distressing Occurrence - A very melancholy and fatal accident occurred on Buckland Barton, near this town, on Saturday last, to MR ELIAS RENDELL, an old and highly respectable agriculturist; he left his residence according to his usual custom, about three o'clock in the afternoon of that day, for the purpose of going over the land and paying his workmen on an adjoining estate, and as the rooks are just now troublesome, and the rabbits very numerous about him, he took with him his gun, to destroy as many as came in his way; not returning to his home at the usual time, search was made over the estate, through that night of most tremendous and awful storm, but without discovering any trace of the unfortunate gentleman, and as it will probably be remembered, some months since, this estate was the scene of a fatal scuffle with poachers, in which one of his labourers lost his life, and that of his brother deliberately attempted, the agonising suspense of the family may be readily imagined. About five o'clock on Sunday morning, the body of MR RENDELL was discovered extended on his face and hands, near the hedge of a field not far from his home, dead, stiff, and cold, pierced through the heart with the contents of his gun, which lay against the hedge. It appears that communication between the field in which the deceased was found and that adjoining is through a gap in the hedge, and, as MR RENDELL was aged, though not infirm, it is supposed that, endeavouring to steady himself with the gun, the trigger either caught in a twig or placing it too sharply on the ground, the lock being remarkably easy, it exploded, the contents entering the pit of the stomach and passing through the back. The deceased was highly respected in his neighbourhood, and as an old and esteemed tenant of his landlord Sir Walter Carew, Bart., and from his long experience as a practical agriculturist, and his sterling English yeomanlike character, was regarded throughout his district as one of the "right good sort." An Inquest was held on Monday by Mr Cockey, deputy Coroner, of Ashburton, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The body of this ill-fated gentleman was found by his son.

Thursday, 26 August 1847, Issue 4263 – Gale Document No. Y3200677566
INQUESTS. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Sanders' Custom House Inn, on the Quay before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRY NICHOLLS, who was found drowned in the river, near the ferry, on the morning of that day. The deceased appeared to have been last seen alive on Tuesday night, shortly after twelve o'clock, by a person of the name of Charles Gardner. Gardner was at that time, in a boat on the river, near the ferry, fishing for eels; the deceased with whom he was well acquainted came to the edge of the quay, sat upon a mooring post, hailed the boat, and asked Gardener "What sport?" – Gardner replied "very bad, I shall soon give it up;" deceased said "don't' give it up, I'm going down to come out," by which Gardner understood that he was going to get a boat belonging to his master, Mr Ebbells, and to come out and join him on the river; Gardner, who thought, from his voice, that he had been drinking freely, advised him to go home; and told him he did not think him in a fit state to be in a boat by himself; Gardener shortly afterwards, dropped down the river with the current, and saw the deceased no more; he left him sitting on a heap of stones close to the water's edge. It transpired in the course of the Enquiry that the deceased had been on the river, the greater part of the day; that he drank three half pints of beer, in the company of his master (Ebbells) shortly before dusk,; that he supped at his fath3er's house at nine o'clock; that he then went to the Fountain Inn, and remained there drinking until a quarter after eleven; that he then returned to his father's house, with a person named Leon Coster, a lodger; that, after staying at home about ten minutes, he said he must go out fishing all night, but he would rather not do it; that Coster advised him to remain at home, but that he said he must go. and left the house for that purpose. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of JOHN MORTIMORE, a labourer, lately residing in the parish of Tedburn St. Mary. It appeared that, about three weeks since, the deceased was at work in the fields, harvesting vetches and unfortunately fell from the top of the cart to the ground, and broke his leg. He was taken on the same day to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where the fractured limb was amputated, but lock-jaw ensued, which ultimately caused his death – Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday, 9 September 1847, Issue 4265 – Gale Document No. Y3200677600
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Friday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Collings' Black Horse Inn, Longbrook-street, on the body of MRS JANE STOKES, 75 years of age, a widow, who came by her death in consequence of her clothes catching fire on the preceding night. From what transpired in the course f the Enquiry into this sad affair, it appeared that MRS STOKES, who was the widow of a person of that name some years since carrying on the business of a baker and confectioner, near the King's Arms Inn, Sidwell-street, - was a pe3rson in easy circumstances, residing alone in a house in Poltimore Terrace, Longbrook-street. On the preceding day (Thursday) MRS STOKES spent the afternoon and took tea at the house of Mr Sandford, a friend residing in Summerland Crescent, Paris-street, whose servant saw her home, saw her light the candle, and for a few minutes sat down with her, then wished her good night, and left. Some time afterwards Mr Matthews, (who keeps a lodging house, next door) thought there was a smell of fire proceeding from the house of MRS STOKES, and becoming alarmed, endeavoured to arouse her, and failing in this, at length effected an entrance by forcing a window, when, in the passage there was presented the shocking spectacle of the unfortunate woman burnt to death. It was a truly sad and humiliating sight, as with the exception of the shoes, there was not a vestige of clothing on the body, which had been so fearfully operated upon by the fire as scarcely to resemble anything human! Just around where the body lay there were marks of the action of the fire, but, fortunately for the neighbourhood, this had not extended itself. It is supposed the deceased must have set fire to some part of her clothing with the candle, when in the act of proceeding to bed, and falling, was unable to raise or assist herself to extinguish it, or call for help, and thus lost her lift. the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 16 September 1847, Issue 4266 – Gale Document No. Y3200677615
NORTH DEVON. Mysterious Case Of Poisoning.
CRUWYS MORCHARD. - On Wednesday, the 1st instant, a Jury was empanelled before F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, at Stubborn Farm, in Cruwys Morchard, to investigate the circumstances connected with the death of RICHARD FISHER. The Jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was entered into.
Mr Philip Furneaux Haley, surgeon, was first sworn. He said he had known RICHARD FISHER 14 years previous to his deceased, - on Saturday morning last, about 7 o'clock, he was sent for to see the deceased, who was stated to be ill, and who resided about 5 miles from Witheridge, but that he could not go at that time, having an engagement to go to Coplestone, but he would come from that place as soon as possible. He went as he promised and arrived there bout quarter before 11 o'clock, and on his arrival he found that FISHER was dead. He saw ANN, the widow of the deceased, and her sister, Mary Hodge, - e3nquired what time he died – Mary Hodge answered "about half past 6 o'clock in the morning." Enquired how he died – the widow looked to her sister for an answer, and she (the sister) said "very quietly." Enquired into his state the previous day, and how long he had been ill – the widow said "he was as well yesterday morning as I have seen him for some time, but had been looking rather poorly for a week or more," – that he went to Witheridge yesterday morning, but what about she did not know. After he came home and sat down for a short time he went in the harvest field, where he staid some time, but became poorly and went in the house; at his desire she made him some herb tea, which he had been in the habit of drinking when he had taken cold. Witness desired to see some of the herbs, and when brought found them to be marshmallows; he then went to look at the body, and examined it, but did not see any marks or symptoms which led him to suppose that FISHER died from any violent means, but was not satisfied as to the immediate cause of death, - was struck with the degree of coldness in which he found the body.
The witness was here asked how long a time he thought it would take for a body to cool to so low a degree of temperature as when he first saw the body of the deceased, to which he replied about 8 hours, when from the time he died to that of witness's being present was only about 4 ½ hours.
William Hawks examined. - I am brother of the widow, - on Saturday morning, (the28th ult.) about 2 o'clock, at her desire, I went to the Black Dog Inn, in Washford Pyne, to fetch her sister, Mary Hodge, and to say that RICHARD FISHER was very ill; when I returned about half past 6 o'clock, I was desired by my sister to fetch Mr Haley – I went to Mr Haley's house, and found he had to go to Coplestone, but he would come to Stubborn from that place: when I was returning and near Henciford Moor, I met Elizabeth Hodge coming to meet me, saying "that the Doctor was of no use, for he was gone." - We staid there a minute or two, thinking whether it would not be better to inform Mr Haley of his death, but we at last determined that he should come to Stubborn. We then returned.
This witness on being questioned by some of the Jurors, stated that the widow and himself rode as far as Stretchdown (which is three quarters of a mile from Witheridge) in a cart, when she went to Woodford, and he went for Mr Haley. The Coroner here observed that it was wrong for a wife to leave her husband in his dying moments, to the care of strangers.
Miss Partridge examined. - I live at Woodford, in Thelbridge – the deceased was for many years my servant, - about 8 months age he married ANN LEE, and went to reside at Stubborn Farm, I then owed him about £5 for wages, - he left it in my hands with some other things, - on Friday morning last he came to my house to ask me not to let anything belonging to him go out of my possession to any person, - on the following morning about half past 6 o'clock, ANN, the widow of the deceased, came to my house, stating that RICHARD FISHER was very ill, and she wanted his wages, - I refused to pay her or let her have anything belonging to him.
Thomas Comins examined. - I am clerk of the parish church of Witheridge – on Friday morning last RICHARD FISHER came to my house very early, I asked him what brought him there at that time in the morning – he said "there has been some difference between my wife and me, and she has left me and taken away my pocket book and all my papers, and should she call on you to ask your opinion about the matter, detain the papers and the pocket book and send for me;" he then wished me a good morning and left, - he was in his shirt sleeves and appeared in good health, - on the following day I heard of his death.
The Coroner then said, I believe gentlemen we have evidence before us to conclude at this time that the deceased did not die a natural death, - evidence that will warrant us to proceed to a post mortem examination, - to which the Jury assented, - but the foreman of the Jury (Mr Smale, of Chapple) was heard to remark that the deceased was as fair a corpse as he ever saw and that he did not see any occasion for a post mortem examination.
Mr Haley and Mr Mackenzie (The Corone3 for the borough of Tiverton) surgeons, then proceeded to open the body. The examination was then adjourned until the 9th September.
ADJOURNED INQUEST. - On Thursday, the 9th inst., the Enquiry respecting the death of RICHARD FISHER was resumed at Stubborn, in Cruwys Morchard, before the Coroner and the Jury previously empanelled. The Coroner having adverted to what had been done at the previous meeting of the Jury, proceeded to call the following evidence.
William Hawks, re-examined. - On Thursday, the 26th ult., Thomas Leach came to Stubborn, - the deceased had requested he might help cut the corn. Evidence of a similar purport to that sworn before the Coroner in his first examination, was only adduced from the witness.
Mary Hodge examined. - I am sister of the widow, and live at the Black Dog Inn, in Washford Pyne: - on Saturday morning, the 28th ult., I was sent for by my sister to come to Stubborn, for that RICHARD FISHER was very ill, - I arrived there about 4 o'clock in the morning, - soon after I came I went up to see the deceased, - my sister had previously told me "that there was some tea made in a half-pint cup for MR FISHER when he wanted to drink." Just afterwards I heard him groan, - I went up stairs and offered him some of the tea to drink, - he could not drink because the rattle in his throat, - he died in about 2 or 3 minutes afterwards. MRS FISHER was gone to Woodford, she had previously told me "that MR FISHER had told her to go there for some money that was due to him for wages," – after she came back she said "that Miss Partridge would not pay her." After MR FISHER died, me and MRS FISHER washed over the room because it was very dusty, - we did not use any scrubbing brush, but it was with some flannel and a bucket of cold water. I observed it was not a proper thing, - we finished before the surgeon came. About 4 o'clock on the Saturday evening we sent for the undertaker.
This witness on being asked by the Coroner what was done with the remainder of the tea which was left in the half-pint cup, replied "it was thrown in the pig's bucket."
ANN FISHER (after having been duly cautioned) stated, - I am widow of the deceased, - on Thursday the 26th ult., my late husband went harvesting in our field, - he appeared very well and was very merry. In the evening he came in about 10 minutes before the rest, - he told me to go to the field and ask the men whether they could cut the rest of the corn, - there were working in the field Wm. Hawks, Thos. Leach, and Richd. Hodge. I went and asked as desired by my husband, - they could not cut the corn, - when I came back the deceased stood at the gate washing himself, - I then went up the road. Thos. Leach followed me, and my husband was very angry and said Thomas Leach had been kissing me. Don't remember whether or not he did kiss me, - my husband came in a very bad temper, and would not have any supper with the harvest folks, but went to bed, - Thos. Leach, my brother, and Richd. Hodge, went to supper together, - after supper they sat drinking cider until about 2 o'clock on Friday morning, - I sat up with them, - they were not tipsy, - about that time (2 o'clock) my brother drove Thos. Leach, Richd. Hodge, and myself, to the Black Dog Inn, - my husband was, as I believe, in bed, - I was the only person who cooked the meat and other things, - on Friday night deceased went to bed very unwell, - he put some herbs in the skillet, and I poured some water on them, - about 1 o'clock on Saturday morning I got out of bed, in consequence of his urging and coughing; I went down stairs and made him some tea, - he drank part of a cup, - I then called my brother and told him to fetch my sister, Mary Hodge, - after my sister came, I went to Woodford, - when I was returning, I met a messenger informing me that my husband was dead, - I have not been at Tiverton for some time, it was about 4 or 5 weeks since I was there, - I never went in any druggist's shop. I am sure my husband never brought anything here to destroy rats, - after my husband's death, Me and Mary Hodge washed the room with hot water because it was dirty, - my husband had vomited a little.
Mr Samuel Wood examined. - I am a druggist, residing at Tiverton, - about the last Tuesday in July, or first Tuesday in August, two females came in my shop to purchase some white arsenic; they asked me "if I could spare some poison to poison rats." I said yes; I then sold them ½ an oz., I delivered it to the stoutest of them, and she paid me, - I wrote in large letters on the packet, Poison, - I have seen the widow since I came at Stubborn, and I believe that is the woman to whom I sold the arsenic – she said to me, "Are you Mr Pinkstone," I answered "no, don't you know me," she said "no," I said, "were you not in my shop about a month ago," she said "I never was in your shop in my life, what did I buy at your shop," I answered "I should tell the Jury what you bought," she said "you are come to swear away my life," and said she had not been in Tiverton for 2 months.
Mr P. F. Haley stated in addition to his evidence t the first Inquest:- On Saturday, the 28th ult., I went to Stubborn, on going up stairs, I remarked to the widow and her sister, "have you been washing the room," and answering the question myself, said "I suppose it was after death," and one of them said "yes;" I then asked if the deceased had been vomiting or purging. I was told "no." I , in conjunction with Mr Fred. Mackenzie, opened the body of the deceased. The exterior appearances of the body did not denote any departure from a healthy state, excepting the presence of a hernia tumour of the left side, but on a subsequent examination, the tumour was found to be free from stricture, and marks of inflammatory action and death could not be attributed to that circumstance. On examining the stomach, I saw extensive marks of inflammation; also a yellow as well as a white deposit on the internal coat. We removed the stomach, a portion of the intestines, and the gullet, with their contents, for further inspection and analysis, - the stomach, intestines and the gullet, were put in one bottle, the fluid contents into another; both were sealed with wax and impressed with Mr Mackenzie's seal, the possession of which I had, Mr Mackenzie taking the bottles. On the following day, I met Mr Mackenzie at his house in Tiverton, and applied the usual tests for poison, - the result of the examination was, we both believed the presence of white arsenic to be clearly indicated. I believe the quantity found to be sufficient to cause death. I account for the comparative emptiness of the bowels, by supposing that vomiting and urging must have taken place. My opinion is, that the deceased did lose his life by poison, and that poison was arsenic.
Mr F. Mackenzie, surgeon, examined. I have been present during the whole time of Mr Healey's examination, and I fully concur in what he has stated, so far as relates to the post mortem examination of the body, and the analysis of the contents of the stomach.
The Coroner then proceeded to sum up the evidence, and the Jury after a short deliberation, returned the following unsatisfactory verdict. – "That the deceased, RICHARD FISHER, died of poison taken in his stomach and bowels, but by whom administered there is no evidence to show."

Thursday, 23 September 1847, Issue 4267 – Gale Document No. Y3200677629
MELANCHOLY SUICIDE. - A very melancholy case of suicide took place on Wednesday morning last week, on the premises of the tannery, belonging to Mr Charles Tanner, Tavistock-road, Plymouth. The individual who committed the rash act, was named PHILIP BRANSCOMBE, a cashier in the above establishment, and he was about 33 years of age. He appeared to have something on his mind, which he did not like to divulge. About noon on Wednesday, he was discovered suspended by a piece of rope fastened to a ladder, which was across the beam of the hay-loft, his feet being about four feet from the ground. He was instantly cut down, but was then dead and cold. On the Inquest, which took place before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner, on Wednesday and Thursday evenings, Mr Tanner stated that the deceased had been some years in his service; he was his senior cashier, and had the control of about £100 per week. He placed every confidence in him, as he believed him to be an honest man. He (Mr Tanner) left Plymouth on the 31st August, and the deceased knew that he was to return on Wednesday. Since his return that morning he had investigated his books; there was nothing regularly entered since 2nd September, and he never saw them in such a confused and deranged state since deceased had had the control of them. He believed there was a deficiency of several pounds not accounted for by the deceased.

Thursday, 7 October 1847, Issue 4269 – Gale Document No. Y3200677661
TIVERTON. - On the 4th instant, an Inquest was held at Tiverton, before Frederick Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM WESTAWAY, of this town, draper, who was found dead in his bed on the 2nd instant. The Jury adjourned to await the evidence of the Medical Gentleman of a post mortem examination. It appeared that MR WESTAWAY, during the last 15 years, had laboured under a disease of the heart. The Jury returned their verdict – "That the deceased did labour under a grievous disease of the heart, and that he died by the Visitation of God."

CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Herberts Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of WILLIAM CARPENTER, a little boy, two years and nine months old, whose parents reside at Countess Weir, near this city. The child having died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Sunday morning, from fracture of the skull. The first witness was ELIZABETH CARPENTER, the mother of the deceased, who stated that she resides at Countess Weir, near Mr Harris's paper-manufactory. On the morning of Wednesday, the 22nd of September, she gave the deceased, with her two other children, - (one older and the other younger) – their breakfast, and the deceased having taken his, went down stairs: at this time he was healthy and well. Shortly afterwards she heard of an accident which had befallen him, but did not see him again until Friday morning, when she saw him in the Hospital – Jane Broom is 11 years old, and the sister of ELIZABETH CARPENTER: her father and mother work at the paper-mills, and on the morning of the 22nd of September were gone to work. Soon after 9 o'clock, she (witness) went out with an infant, intending to go to a field of Mr R. Davy's for the purpose of gathering blackberries. Her little nephew (the deceased) saw her, and cried to go also, an she took him. The field she went to is not a path field, but in order to cut off a corner in getting to the road, the persons of the village do go that way, as being nearer. There was a horse near the middle of this field. She pick'd some blackberries, and gave part of these to WILLIAM CARPENTER. She then went to the hedge to pick more, but presently looking round saw the horse walking away from the little boy, and saw that his head was bleeding; as also that there was a wound in his head. She then cried out and ran down the field, and Humphrey Govier, a tailor, heard her. She told him what had happened, and he went to the field to the child, whom he gave to a woman, and it was conveyed to the Hospital. There was no proof of the horse having kicked it, but the skull was fractured over the right side of the forehead. The child lived to the time already stated; and Mr Harris, the surgeon, in whose care the unfortunate little fellow had been, stated this injury to have been the cause of death; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 14 October 1847, Issue 4270 – Gale Document No. Y3200677676
KINGSTEIGNTON. - An accident of an awful and fatal nature, occurred in this parish on Thursday last, to MR SAMUEL WHITEWAY, a partner in the Newton and Teignmouth Bank. At the Inquest which was held at the King's Arms, on the following day, before Mr W. A. Cockey, Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, it was proved that the deceased, Mr Wm. Watts, and Mr Whidborne, were shooting in Preston Woods, on Thursday afternoon; that the deceased, , after firing two or three shots from the right barrel of his gun, in reloading it, the left barrel, which he had not discharged for the day, by some means went off, and the contents entered his left cheek & lodged in the unfortunate gentleman's head, causing instantaneous death; the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. MR WHITEWAY was 37 years of age, - his untimely death has cast a deep gloom over the parish and neighbourhood, where he was highly respected.

Thursday, 21 October 1847, Issue 4271 – Gale Document No. Y3200677692
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On the 9th inst., an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Page's Anchor public house, Exe Island, on the body of SAMUEL RUMSON the younger, five years old last month, who died on the night preceding, from the shock the system received in consequence of scald. The mother of the deceased, it appears, resides in a room at the head of Hicks's Court, in the Island, and has another child about three years old. On the Friday morning soon after six o'clock, she got up, and having lit her fire, put some potatoes over it, in a sauce pan, in order to these being boiled for breakfast. A young woman named Mary Ann Routley, whose parents reside in the same house, sleeps with RUMSON, and was at this time in the room. The deceased, in his night clothes, was sitting in a chair, in front of the fire. the mother now went out into the Island to procure some milk, and had scarcely left, when the mother of Routley called for her daughter to come to her, which she did, but had scarcely quitted the room when she was recalled to it by the screeches of the child SAMUEL, whom, when she got to the place, she found in the middle of the room, which his hands to his face, and his night clothes in a blaze about him. These she tried to pull from off his body, but her mother following her closely, took the child and wrapped it in her own gown, by which the fire was extinguished; and presently the unfortunate mother arrived. The little fellow was asked how this had occurred, when he said he was going to take a potatoe from the sauce pan, and his clothes caught fire. About 9 o'clock in the morning, the child being evidently very ill, Mr Arthur Cumming, surgeon, was sent for, and immediately attended, giving all such directions as he considered necessary; and saw the child again two or three times in the course of the day. The last time he saw it was about 9 at night, and the child was then evidently dying, and expired about half past ten the same night. The unfortunate child was scalded on the chest, belly, arms and legs; but Mr Cumming said the whole of these injuries were slight, and death had been caused by the shock or fright the system received. The Coroner concurred in this, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

The Late MR JAMES BLANCHFORD. - The mysterious disappearance of MR BLANCHFORD, of Hill Farm, Tedburn St. Mary, on the night of the 8th inst., in this city, was stated by us last week. The efforts to ascertain what had been his fate were continued unceasingly up to Saturday, without effect. This forenoon, however, a dredge was put in use of such a nature as completely to sweep the bed of the river, and at about a quarter to one o'clock this accumulation was brought with such force against the upper part of Trew's weir, in St Leonard's that the body of the unfortunate man was forced up, and carried by the current over the weir, over which a hat had been seen to float a few minutes before. Persons immediately followed in a boat, and took the body into it about Bellisle. There were no marks of violence on his person: his dress generally uninjured: and the articles in his pockets in the state in which it might be supposed he had himself placed them there, with the exception of a couple of razors, which he had brought with him in the morning to have set, and which in all probability had dropped from the pocket. He had no watch, which had been left at home; but in his pockets were a sovereign, 17s. in silver, 3 ¼d. copper money; and also his spectacles and case, and two receipts for money he had paid. The upper part of the head, and forehead were clean, from which it is inferred that his hat had remained on his head until within a short time of the body being found. The lower part of the face was begrimed with dirt. As to how he came to this part in all probability will never be known, but it is conjectured he must have got into a lane immediately on the outside of the Town Walls, leading from West-gate to the back of the Custom House and quay. Here is an exceedingly dangerous place, for some distance there being no fence to the leat & the water of some depth, as also that the bank from which he would have fallen is high. It was within a few yards of this place (in Quay-lane) the horse was found. The body was removed to Southcott's Moreton Inn, Cowick-street, St. Thomas, where on Monday an Inquest was taken before F. Leigh, Esq., a Coroner for Devon, when a verdict of "Found Drowned but by what means the deceased came into the water there is no evidence to show," was returned. All suspicion, however, of death having been occasioned by violent means is removed. MR BLANCHFORD was about 60 years of age, has been a widower three years, and has left a family of four sons and four daughters, but all grown up. On Tuesday morning the body was removed for interment at Tedburn.

Thursday, 18 November 1847, Issue 4275 – Gale Document No. Y3200677756
DISTRESSING AND FATAL ACCIDENT FROM FIREWORKS.
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Friday evening, an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in Magdalen-street, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS RISDON, son of MR THOMAS RISDON, of Milk-street, in St. Mary Arches, furniture broker, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, under the following painful circumstances:- The deceased who had but just turned 18 years of age, was an apprentice to Mr Avent, jeweller, About one o'clock on Friday, the 5th of November, he had his dinner in his father's house, and left shortly afterwards with the intention of going to his work. About 4 o'clock, the same afternoon, he went to the house of a young man named James Tucker, a shoemaker, living in Rack-street, with whom he appears to have been upon terms of intimate acquaintance; from that time until half-past eight, they occupied themselves in loading rockets, and then went straight to the Cathedral yard; they had four rockets each, and the deceased carried two in each of his trousers pockets; they let off one each in St. Mary's yard, and then went on to Catherine-street, where they purchased some cigars; they returned again to the Cathedral yard, letting off a rocket each close by the Exeter Bank: as they went on towards Broadgate, they found that there was some person behind them "squibbing" them; they stopped a moment expecting that the person would pass on, but he did not, and finding that they were still "squibbed", Tucker turned round to see if he could make out who it was; as the instant RISDON cried out "I'm on fire." - Tucker turned round, and saw that his trousers were in a blaze, and immediately the rocket in his right hand pocket burst; the rocket in his left hand pocket was on fire, but Tucker pulled it out before it burst and burnt his hand in doing so. Deceased, at his own request was immediately carried to the Hospital, where he lingered in great agony, until the following Thursday, shortly before two o'clock. His abdomen, thighs, and hands were frightfully burnt and he appears from the first to have been sensible that there was no chance of his recovery. He repeatedly said it was an accident, and entreated his young companions who came to see him, to profit by the awful lesson. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and many of them expressed a very strong opinion, that the authorities should interfere peremptorily and put a stop to a practice which had led in many instances to serious accidents, and in this, to so fatal a result. The poor youth was in the habit of using very inflammable materials in his work, and it is presumed the sparks from the squib ignited his trousers, and caused the accident.

Thursday, 25 November 1847, Issue 4276 – Gale Document No. Y3200677773
On Friday an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH ANN MANLEY, aged about three years, and the daughter of a gardener living in Colleton Grove. It appeared that on Wednesday, the deceased's mother went out of door to take in some clothes lines, and left the child with a brother about five years old. There was a fire in the room. In a few minutes she heard the deceased scream, and on going back, found her enveloped in flames. A female neighbour, who had rushed into the room before, put out the fire with her apron, and it was found that the child was so dreadfully burnt that immediate remedies were necessary. She was conveyed to the hospital, where she died on Thursday morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TORQUAY. - Mysterious Death of al Mother and Infant. - The following startling occurrence has created the most painful sensation in this neighbourhood. A Coroner's Inquest relating to it was held on the 16th instant, and the subjoined facts are gathered from the evidence of the witnesses examined. On Monday morning, between one and two o'clock, Mr Rowe, a surgeon, was called upon to visit a MRS PAGE, the widow of a chemist and druggist, who carried on business in the Strand. On reaching the residence, he was informed by Mr White, the assistant in the shop, that she was in a sinking state and that he thought she was in the pains of labour. On Mr Rowe entering the bed-room, he found her almost insensible. He questioned her as to whether she was in pain, and she replied "Yes." He then endeavoured to ascertain if what had been told him was correct, which she resisted. Restoratives were immediately applied, but she gradually sunk and died shortly afterwards. He then made the usual inquiries of the servant girl, who assured him that she knew nothing of her mistress being in the condition supposed. The apartment was then searched and, about seven or eight feet from the bed, he discovered the body of a full grown female child, wrapped in a quilt, which had apparently been dead two or three hours. There were marks on the throat which gave rise to the suspicion of violence having been used. It was stated, however, that they might have been caused during the birth, and that it was possible that the mother might have placed the infant where it was found. It appeared that the husband of the deceased had been dead upwards of twelve months, and, according to the testimony of Susan Tress, she went to her bed-room shortly after six o'clock on Sunday evening. About eight o'clock she called Tress and complained of being faint. At ten she seemed better. Between ten and eleven the assistant, who had been out during the day, came home and the girl informed him of her indisposition, and asked him to see her. He enquired of the deceased if he should send for a doctor, and she replied there was nothing the matter, only that she was a little faint. Tress remained with her till twelve o'clock, and finding her worse she sent for a surgeon. The girl observed that she had never suspected her mistress being in the family way until her sister accused her of it on the previous Saturday, which she denied. Mr Sulley, the surgeon, said that he believed the mother had died of exhaustion, consequent on want of proper medical aid, and that the death of the child was occasioned by neglect immediately after its birth. A most careful inquiry having been gone through, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony as to the cause of death.

Thursday, 20 January 1848, Issue 4284 – Gale Document No. Y3200677897
SIDMOUTH. - On Friday, the 14th instant, at the New Inn, Sidmouth, a Coroner's Inquest was held, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, over the body of JOHN PONSFORD, of the above place, gardener. Witnesses being called the following circumstance appeared:- On Wednesday last, as a little girl, named Elizabeth Bolt, aged 10 years, was picking up sticks on the beach in the parish of Salcombe Regis, about a mile from the town of Sidmouth, she saw deceased fall from a cliff which is about three hundred feet in height; deceased fell with his head in a bed of clay, which had rushed down; witness ran and saw a young man, named William Radford, who was working near the Preventive Guard House, and who, upon receiving the information hastened to the spot, and found deceased lying on his back, senseless and speechless, but not dead. By the assistance of other people who came from the town upon the alarm being raised, the unfortunate man was moved in a handbarrow to a boat, and subsequently brought to the Commercial Inn, where he expired on Thursday morning, 13th instant, at five o'clock. He remained insensible to the last. It is supposed that deceased was rabbiting, from the circumstance of a rabbit net and a ferret being found in his pocket; the ferret was dead in a bag, and must have been likewise killed by the fall. Deceased was about 30 years of age, and has left a wife and three children to deplore his loss. There being no fracture, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by concussion of the brain, caused by the fall."

The Death of MRS ELIZA MARTIN, of South Street, by Drowning.
We last week stated that the body of this unfortunate woman had been taken from the canal, and that an Inquest was to be held before F. Leigh, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, that (Wednesday) afternoon, at the Haven Banks Inn, St. Thomas. And this took place accordingly, when James Gale, an old man who has charge of the drawbridge at the entrance to the canal, from the quay, stated discovering the body floating at the mouth of the canal, and within a few yards of the Haven Banks, about half-past seven o'clock on Tuesday morning. With assistance he got it out; the body was cold, and there was froth about the mouth. It was conveyed to the Haven Banks Inn. Mistress Prudence Jones, the daughter of Gale, and residing with her father in a house on the bank, near the entrance to the canal, told up a ridiculous story of a wonderful dram she had had, in which murder formed a principal part. John Arscott, a brewer, had seen a woman of the dress and appearance of the deceased at 6 o'clock on Tuesday morning, come from the direction of the Cathedral-yard towards the Hospital, on Southernhay, and then turning to the left, proceeded in the direction of the London Inn.
All this tending to nothing, however, beyond the bare fact that the woman was dead, and her body had been taken from the water, the Coroner adjourned the Inquest to the following Saturday, when the Inquiry was resumed at Hex's White Hart Inn, Alphington-street, St. Thomas. And here it came out that a man named J. Perry, has, since the death of her husband, lived with the deceased, conducting the business of a cheese and bacon factor. It also appeared that the deceased left her house on the Monday evening at half past six o'clock, asking a little girl in the shop for two half-pence from the till, and that she never returned to it again. Within ten minutes of seven o'clock she was seen in Fore-street, near the Western-market, by Mr Mallett, a young man, clerk in the office of Mr Wreford, of this city, solicitor. This witness knew her, and noticed that she had a very wild and agitated appearance, and he never recollected her conversation being so bewildered before. Between 7 and 8 o'clock that evening she called at the house of Mr John Davidge, cheese and bacon factor and cattle dealer, in Milk-street, to see his wife, who was ill; and from this time there is no certain trace of the deceased, until her body was found on the following morning.
John Carter is a dairyman and seedsman, residing in Market-street. His cows are kept in Barley-park, St. Thomas; and at about quarter past 6 o'clock on the morning of Tuesday the 11th was going to milk them. In passing underneath the railway in Cowick-street, saw an apparently respectable woman in conversation with three men. I heard her say, "well I've kissed the young man before now." I (Carter) said, "have you? then kiss me." She turned round quickly, and seeing the cans, said "have you any rum? – if you have give me some." I replied "come and see." She repeated what she had just said, and I my answer. She followed me about half the length of this room. The men in company with her were rather short than tall, and wore corduroy or fustian dresses, or dresses composed of both these materials. Unless evidence should come out, that she could not have been there, I shall always think it was the deceased.
It was endeavoured to be elicited, if possible, how Perry was occupied during this night; and it appeared that at 9 o'clock, when John partridge, the errand boy, retired to rest, he left him in the house; at half past 9, he was at the Black Horse public-house, Mr Peter Bond's, in South-street, just opposite his own residence, where he remained until half past 12. He then went with Mr Bond, to Mr Woosley's, in George's-square, Stopcote-hill, where Mrs Bond was at a Christmas party, and where it was thought probable the deceased might also be. But she was not there. Here Perry remained until one o'clock, when they left with Mr John Davis, a pork butcher, residing near the Black Horse, and his wife; and at whose house Perry remained until nearly 4 o'clock, when he went to his own on the opposite side of the street. His stay there, however, could have been but short, as at four o'clock he knocked up Mr Wm. Gay, glover, in the High-street, to enquire if she were there, or he had seen the deceased. He appeared also to have expressed surprise that she had not returned home.
John Partridge, the errand boy said, it being market morning, I got up on Tuesday, at five o'clock, and found Mr Perry sitting in a chair. He said, it was very strange, MRS MARTIN, had not been home for the night. I had not lately heard any quarrel between my master and mistress. I was never sent down the banks on any previous occasion to look for MRS MARTIN. On this occasion Mr Perry did not go to look for her. The constable came to the shop at ten o'clock in the forenoon to say she had been found in the water, but before that time Mr Perry had heard something about it, and had gone to see if it were true. - When MRS MARTIN went out she was dressed as she usually did to go out. She frequently went out of an evening after tea, and used t return at nine o'clock, or just after the shop was shut.
Emma Holmes was the servant girl living with deceased and Perry, - she said, Mr Perry did not usually go out with the deceased, because he had to mind the shop. While I lived with them they had words once or twice, because he dirtied things, and she complained of it. I never knew Mr Perry put her to door at night. I never heard her threaten to drown herself. Mr Perry never went after her to see where she went, nor did he ever say he had followed her down to the Banks to see what she was about. I was never sent out to see for her any where. She always came home about the time of shutting shop. On Tuesday morning I did not get up until seven o'clock. When I came down, master was walking about the shop. He had not been to bed that night. MRS MARTIN and Mr Perry slept together. Their bed had not been slept in on Monday night. Immediately as I came down, he came into the kitchen, and said, did your mistress tell you where she was going? I said, no sir. He then said, I don't know where she is gone, - she has not been home for the night! He also said, he had been all night looking for her at every place he could think. Here there was another story of a dream Perry having fallen asleep in the middle of the day, amidst his cheese and bacon, and dreamt that MRS MARTIN was drowned! This be also told to Mrs Davis and other persons. He was at home when a person told him a body was found: he took off his apron and went away. He did not say where he was going, but told the boy not to leave the shop.
Eliza Symmons knew the deceased, and also knows Perry. I have seen quarrel s between the deceased and Perry, just as between others, but MRS MARTIN was very passionate. I think every one quarrels more or less. I never saw any violet quarrels between them: a few words would take place respecting business, but not blows passed. I knew they were not married. If I heard they ever slept together, I should be very much surprised. I lived in the house about a year and half after MR MARTIN died. I never knew that they slept together. I never saw any familiarity between them. On my oath I don't know that, whilst I was in the house, the slept together. They occupied separate beds in separate rooms, to my certain knowledge. The deceased was a respectable moral woman. she never said she was going down the banks to meet any gentleman, and I never knew her receive private notes from gentlemen.
Mr James Lyddon, surgeon, made a post mortem examination of the body, - could find nothing in the stomach injurious to its functions, - nor, by the nose, detect any thing offensive. The appearances of the face were those of drowning. Should think the body had been in the water some hours, from the manner in which the hands were soaked.
Mr F. G. Farrant, surgeon, was present at the examination of the body, and agreed with Mr Lyddon.
Dr Budd is a physician in Exeter, and in April last attended the deceased in conjunction with Mr Edye, surgeon. Her disorder was an excited state of the brain, and she was then in a state bordering on insanity, - so much so that we contemplated the probability of its ending in a case for the Asylum. Had with the surgeons examined the state of the intestines, and was of opinion there were no signs of the presence of, - and that it was perfectly conclusive she had not taken poison.
Mr Robert Wreford is a solicitor in Exeter, and was the professional adviser of the deceased. In may last, just as she was recovering from illness, I made her will. She was then in a very highly excited state, and exceedingly nervous. She made what I conceive to be a very rational will, therein making some provision for Mr Perry. She expressed a great desire to act justly towards Mr Perry. She told me, as I had about that time otherwise been informed, that Mr Perry left his situation in Honiton to come and take care of her business, and therefore felt bound to make some provision for him in case of her death: it being her wish to supply him with the means to carry on the business.
The proceedings on this Inquest were thus continued until Monday afternoon last at half past four o'clock, when a further adjournment took placer to Monday next, at eleven o'clock.

Thursday, 27 January 1848, Issue 4285 – Gale Document No. Y3200677915
An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier, on Monday, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a lad named SAMPSON, a farm servant of Uffculme, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, in consequence of injuries received from the kicking of a horse. The poor boy was in the stable for some purpose, and the horse kicked at him and fractured his skull, making a complete hole. He lived in the Hospital a fortnight. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Yesterday morning an Inquest was held at the King Alfred, on Fore-street hill, on a woman named "Susan," a traveller, 64 years of age, who had died suddenly on Sunday, in a lodging-house, in King-street. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Termination Of The Proceedings on the Inquest of the Body of MRS ELIZA MARTIN, of South-Street.
On Monday last, at 11 o'clock in the forenoon, the Jury empanelled in this case re-assembled before Frederick Leigh, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Hex's White Hart Inn, Alphington-street, St. Thomas. When the Coroner addressed them, saying Gentlemen, it appears to me that we may sit here for a month without elucidating anything further relative to the manner of death of this person. It seems that we are in a very bad company, and it strikes me that house of Powlesland's is a very bad house, and I would do all I could to take the licence from it. I don't know whether there are any witnesses to be brought before us this morning, but if there are not any other than those we have already had, it really does appear to me useless for us to continue sitting here. The only point, as far as I can see it is, where this woman was between 9 o'clock at night on Monday the 10th and 7 in the morning of the 11th of Jan. Now upon this point, the evidence as it stands at present is –
Mr R. Wreford, solicitor – Mr Coroner, I beg pardon, but as the names of Mr Mallett and Mr Perry have been much mixed up with this affair, I think in justice to them, before these proceedings close, an opportunity should be afforded them of exculpating themselves, - as I feel satisfied they can do, - from anything like blame in this matter. As to Mr Mallett, he sleeps in my house, and the servant is here to state the hour at which he came in that night. He was quite prepared to do this on the former occasion, but was dissuaded from adopting that course by myself, as I thought it would be rather an insult on his own character than otherwise to offer evidence n defence of it.
Mr Leigh: I do not entertain any doubts as to the perfect propriety of the conduct of Mr Mallet, or of the respectability of his character – This I assure you.
Mr Wreford: I am glad to hear this, for as to Mallett, I assure you he is a first-rate fellow, and I should as soon suspect the worthy Coroner himself, or any of the respectable citizens of Exeter, of being mixed up in this affair as Mr Mallett.
Mr Leigh: I beg to repeat, that I entertain no doubt of the propriety of Mr Mallett's conduct.
Mr Wreford: Then I will not call the witnesses. Mr Wreford now adverted to reports injurious to Mr Perry, to which circulation have been given, and assured the Coroner and the Court, that so far from Mr Perry having profited by MRS MARTIN'S death, he had rather been prejudiced by it than otherwise. Her will had been drawn by himself (Mr Wreford) and the chief part of her property was bequeathed to her nephew and niece, and father and mother. Mr Perry would have matters to discharge in consequence of her death, and might perhaps benefit to the amount of something about £150 by it. Mr Wreford asked whether Mr Perry had been called?
Mr Leigh: No – We trace him to Bond's, and thence to Worsley's; and then, at forty minutes past 3 o'clock on the morning of Tuesday, Thomas Merrified, a policeman sees him go into his own house.
Mr Wreford: Pardon me, sir, but something has been said relative to a letter. Now this was a letter from Mr Perry to Mr Mallett, announcing that MRS MARTIN had been absent from home all night, and requesting him to call It is wished by both that every thing relative to them in this matter should be cleared up, in order to remove impressions that may be entertained by any from reading the account of this Inquest in the Western Times of Saturday last.
Mr Leigh: I do not suspect Mr Perry at all. I only speak for myself. There is nothing in the evidence to lead any one to suspect them at all.
Mr Wreford now bowed, and took his leave.
The Coroner then proceeded to speak of the evidence – he would read it through to the Jury if they thought fit, or at all wished it. The Jury, however, signified that they did not consider this necessary. And the Coroner then proceeded briefly to take a review of it. He said there was the evidence of John Arscott, who saw, or supposed he saw, MRS MARTIN at five minutes past six o'clock, on the morning of Tuesday the 11th, come from the direction of the Cathedral-yard to Southernhay. And then there was that of John Carter, who, at a quarter past six, saw, or supposed he saw her near the railway in St. Thomas. Now the evidence of these persons was quite irreconcilable with each other, the periods spoken of being only ten minutes apart.
Mr Wm. Lemon, of Cowick street, St. Thomas, trunk maker, one of the Jury, said he thought he could throw some light on this, and show that Carter was mistaken. Since last they met there, he had learnt that a neighbour, living near the railway, had a party of friends that night, who kept it up until about the hour spoken of next morning, when they broke up. A tall female, dressed pretty much as Carter had described, was of the party, together with a young man who keeps her company. Some other young man had kissed this female, at which her beau was rather jealous; and this had been reconciled, on explanation, when leaving, and the little difference made up with a kiss!
A Juryman thought the evidence of Arscott and Carter, both, should be struck out entirely; both could not be correct.
The Coroner then proceeded – There was the evidence of John Davidge, but this only went to MRS MARTIN having called at his house in Milk-street, and being just before the Falmouth Mail passed up Fore-street, enabled him to fix the time at about eight o'clock on Monday night. Prudence Jones saw the body taken from the Canal about half past seen o'clock on Tuesday morning. Now, said the Coroner, whatever suspicion there may be as to the manner in which this woman came to her death, we have no evidence upon it whatever.
Wm. Ratcliffe, a constable in St. Thomas, now produced the watch of the deceased.
And at this instant a woman, dressed in mourning, entered the room, who, it came out, is a sister of the deceased, named MARY ANN HOLDGE, the wife of RICHARD HODGE, a native of Truro; - by trade a brazier, and now residing in the Commercial Road, Exeter. The Coroner asked her if she had anything to offer to the Jury. – She said, she had been informed that Mrs Langmead (residing at Spring Gardens, on the Haven Banks,) could testify to MRS MARTIN having been at Mrs Bishop's, the tea house in the field, that night.
Ratcliffe, however, and some of the jury, had seen Mrs Langmead, and it appeared Mrs Hodge had been misinformed.
Wm. Ratcliffe was then sworn, in order to his evidence being taken. He first saw the body of the deceased about eight o'clock on the Tuesday morning, at the Haven Banks Inn. It had not then been undressed, nor searched. Prudence Jones searched it and took the things from her pocket, and delivered them to me; and I then searched the pockets again. Around the neck of the deceased was suspended this watch, - pointing to the watch he had already lain on the table. In her pockets were two half-pence and a veil. These were in the same pocket. There was also a small bit f paper, a note, with, it was understood, some pencil marks on it. This the Coroner directed to be handed to the Jury, - saying if you can make anything of it, but it appeared this could not be done.
Ratcliffe's examination resumed: - I opened the watch, and saw the name, "D. Ross, Exeter." It was a gold watch, and still going. I went to Mr Ross's, in High street, with it, and he told me it belonged to MRS ELIZA MARTIN. The deceased had a black velvet bonnet, and there were gloves on her hands. I saw no ring. It appeared a ring that was on the finger, was afterwards taken by Mrs Eliza Symmons. Mention was also made of her having a purse, containing money when at Mr Davidge's.
Mrs Hodge now repeated what she had before said.
Mr Leigh said, I do assure it is my wish, and I am sure it is equally the wish of the Jury, that everything relative to the death of MRS MARTIN should be sitted to the utmost, and if you have any evidence to produce, we will hear it; or if you can tell us where anything of this nature is to be found, we will obtain it, but with mere hearsay only, we may sit here for a month, or for two months, and not be advanced one step from where we are at present. You see it amounts to this, that Tom said to Dick, and Dick said to Harry. But I am sure you must see this is not evidence, nor can I take it as such. You say you are told that a Mrs Langmead can testify to MRS MARTIN having been at Mrs Bishop's. Now Ratcliffe the constable, and some of the gentlemen of the Jury, have seen these persons, and Mrs Bishop declares to them that MRS MARTIN was not there.
Mr Thomas Gould, of Alphington-street, glazier, one of the Jury, aid, Mrs Bishop told him she could not have accommodated any one, as her house was full, - she having her daughter Mrs Lambett and three children with her.
Mr Leigh: If you wish it, gentlemen, - or it will be at all satisfactory to you, I will send for these persons. The Jury however, intimated that they had no desire this should be done, as not believing that anything could result from it.
Mr Leigh now aid to the Jury, - in coming to a conclusion on this matter, there was a point for their consideration, and this was whether this woman was dead or alive when the body got into the water. Upon the first part they were all in darkness, but upon the second they were in safer hands, because they were in the hands f the medical men, and from this there were strong reasons for believing she was alive when she got into the water. There was the goose-skin, - the foam at the mouth, - the half opened mouth, and eye, - the protruding tongue, and these evidences that bespoke the act of drowning. But supposing they went along with him in this, then came the questions – first, whether she got into the water of her own act, or was this the act of another, or others? These were questions it was important they should well consider. There was the evidence of medial men who knew the deceased well, who had attended her professionally under circumstances of illness, and they certainly did speak of a state of mind leading almost to the belief that she was a person not unlikely to commit suicide. Dr Budd had spoken of another medial gentleman and himself having contemplated the probability of its becoming necessary to send her to a Lunatic Asylum: and f the deceased having had frequent returns of considerable cerebral disturbance. Therefore she was not an unlikely person to commit suicide. If then this fatal act was an act of her own, what was the state of her mind at that moment? They were bound to regard this strictly according to the tenor of their oaths, and decide to the best of their ability according to the circumstances of the case, not shrinking from their duty, but yet not subjecting her body to any ignominious treatment or testimony, such as the law required in such cases, unless they were enabled to see some strong and conclusive ground for it. He by no means intended or desired to dictate to them. His remarks were intended as explanatory only, but this he might say, that viewing the whole case on their oaths, and considering the great paucity of evidence, perhaps their safer course would be to confine their verdict to the simple fact that she was found dead in the river, but by what means she came to her death, there has no evidence come before you.
The Jury said his was in conformance with the view they themselves had entertained, and returned a verdict accordingly.
The Coroner added. This is quite in unison with my own view of this matter. I have had an earnest desire to sift it out if we could, and I am quite sure you have gone along with me in the wish I entertained. I think the verdict you have returned is the proper one under the circumstances of the case.
A Juryman: It is an open verdict Sir, if anything should e brought to light hereafter.
The Coroner: We can't hold another Inquest, but should anything in this matter, more than is now known, be brought to light, the law can be let loose on the party. This has happened in one case already in which I held an Inquest.
Juryman: You refer Sir perhaps to the Cruwys Morchard case?
Coroner: I do.
The Inquisition was now prepared, and having the required signatures attached, the business terminated.
The deceased ELIZA MARTIN, the widow of the late JOSEPH MARTIN, of South-street, in this city, cheese and bacon factor, was 41 years of age, and had lived in Exeter some fifteen or sixteen years. She was a native of the parish of Egloskerry, near Launceston, Cornwall, where her parents now reside.
The body of MRS ELIZA MARTIN, under warrant from the Coroner, was interred in the New Cemetery by the Rev. G. H. Shield, Rector of Trinity, at nine in the morning of Sunday, the 16th instant.

Thursday, 3 February 1848, Issue 4286 – Gale Document No. Y3200677933
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene street, on the body of HENRY WILCOCKS, a little boy three years of age, who died on the Thursday preceding in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The parents of the deceased are labouring people residing near the Sandy Gate turnpike in the parish of Heavitree, and on the first of January quitted home to attend to their work, leaving their child HENRY with his brothers and sister. By some accident his clothes caught fire and the injuries were such as to render removal to the Hospital necessary. Here every means that medical skill could devise were made use of, but without avail, and he lingered until the 27th when he died. Under these circumstances the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Yesterday (Tuesday) before Mr Warren, at the same house, on the body of SARAH TAYLOR, 6 years and 8 months old, the daughter of labouring people, residing in Cowick-street, St. Thomas. The parents were out at work on the morning of Saturday last, but the father saw his daughter not exceeding ten minutes before the sad and fatal accident occurred in the house with another child; and the girl was seen not two minutes before this occurred, when she was engaged in blowing the fire. At this time, however, the neighbours were alarmed by shrieks, and her clothes were found in a blaze. She was most seriously injured before the fire could be extinguished, and being removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, lingered until Monday, when she expired. And a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

This (Wednesday) morning, also before Mr Warren, at the Red Lion Inn, Sidwell-street, on the body of CHARLOTTE MATTHEWS, an aged maiden woman, of rather eccentric habits, who lived alone in a room in Exon Court in that street. Not having been seen for several days, and the neighbours unable to obtain admittance, they forced the door, when MRS MATTHEWS was found dead. It would appear she must have sat on her bed, and fallen back upon it, as her feet nearly touched the floor, while the upper part of the body rested on the bed. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

Thursday, 10 February 1848, Issue 4287 – Gale Document No. Y3200677951
GITTISHAM. - An Inquest was held on the 2nd inst., at Gittisham, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on JOHN MOSS, aged about 50, who was found dead in a tallett. The deceased was last seen alive in the neighbourhood where his body was found, on the 24th of January last; he was then begging. The body was found on the morning of the 2nd inst., by a servant of Mr John Ashford's, who observed it among some reed, with the legs protruding, and supposing it to be a man asleep, he went and informed his master. On searching his pockets, there was found a knife, clothes brush, a clean neckerchief, one shilling in silver, and fifteen pence in coppers, also a letter, dated Ottery St. Mary, 23rd January, 1842, signed ELIZABETH MOSS, (which led to his identity). Deceased had been an inmate of Axminster Union, and formerly residing at Shute. On the day he was last seen in Gittisham, he was relieved by the Rev. J. T. Marker, Miss Putt, and other persons with money and food, and from the evidence of the surgeon (Mr Devenish) it is supposed that deceased must have died soon after that time from exposure to the cold, as there was no mark of violence on his body The surgeon supposed, from the appearance of the body, that it had been dead a week or 10 days at least. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

NORTHMOLTON. - An Inquest was held at Northmolton, on Monday, before J. H. Toller, Esq. deputy-coroner, on the body of WILLIAM SHAPLAND, who was found dead in a hay loft on the 28th inst. It appeared by the evidence of R. Ley, Esq., surgeon, that death was occasioned by strangulated hernia, no marks of violence being visible on his person. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

COMBMARTIN. - An Inquiry was made at Combmartin, on Thursday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, into the cause of the death of WILLIAM DART, the child of a labourer of that parish, whose death was occasioned by his clothes catching fire on the previous day, by which he sustained such serious injuries as to occasion death a few hours after. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EAST PRAWLE. - An Inquest was held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner of Ashburton, on the body of REBECCA WOOD, aged 49 years. It appeared from the evidence that her son, a young man, had borrowed a gun of a neighbour to shoot some small birds; he loaded the gun in his mother's kitchen, and whilst in the act of putting a cap on the nipple, the gun went off, and lodged the contents in his mother's abdomen: the poor woman lingered about two hours and expired. What makes the affair more distressing is, that her son was very affectionate and dutiful, and had only returned from sea the previous Friday after a long absence, and at the time she was shot she was in the act of preparing her dinner, expecting two or three relations to partake of it, and welcome her son's return. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

ASHBURTON. - An Old Miser named JOHN RICH, well known in various parishes in South Devon, as a purchaser of old rags &c., and who, during the last 23 years, has resided in a kitchen, in one of the alleys near the Market-place, in this town, died on Monday last. It has been known for some years past, that from his very eccentric habits he had amassed some considerable sums of money; and about 15 years ago, he was robbed of £20 by a female whom he had invited to his hovel. He was found dead on his bed of rags, and a Jury returned a verdict of Apoplexy. Under his head was found an old pair of breeches with 40 sovereigns sewed in different part of them. There was also discovered a book, stating that there was placed, about the year 1820, the sum of £60 in the Exeter Savings Bank, and writings for £200 in the late Totnes Bank, and £63 in the Western District Bank, &c. It is stated that he was worth several hundred pounds which have not yet been discovered. The old miser at one time kept two bullocks in his kitchen alongside his bed. He was his own cook for the little victuals he made use of, and from the time of the robbery was very cautious of allowing any of the fair sex in his house.

On Thursday, the 27th ultimo a melancholy accident, which has since terminated fatal, occurred to a man named THOMAS CHOPE, carpenter, of Huntshaw, in attending the funeral of Mr Tout, who lately died at Wear Gifford, when proceeding to Ringsash for interment. It being a very cold day, as the mournful procession was passing by the Ebberley Arms Inn, in Highbickington, several of the party on horseback alighted, and went into the house for something to drink, to warm themselves; and Mr William Gabriel (farrier and blacksmith, of Bideford), as soon as he had partaken of threepennyworth of gin, mounted his pony, and rode off the first; but being soon overtaken by Henry Isaac (a young man, servant to Mr E. Tout, of Wear Gifford), riding a mare, the property of Mr John Tout (of Ashreigney) at a rapid pace, caused Gabriel's pony to break into al gallop, which continued until they arrived in sight of CHOPE, who was walking on before in the middle of the road, when Gabriel endeavoured to stop his pony, and called to Isaac to take care of the poor old TOM CHOPE. Gabriel was riding on the offside of the road, and Isaac about the middle of the road, until they came nearly up with CHOPE, when Isaac endeavoured to get on the near side of the road to pass him. Just at this time, Gabriel observed CHOPE turn round his head, who, seeing the two horses coming at a rapid pace, and which were both got in as near the hedge on each side of the road as they could ride, continued his course a few steps, and then made a jump to the near side of the road, when coming in contact with the mare that Isaac was riding, it struck CHOPE against a stone fence, which caused many contused wounds on his face and a fracture on the frontal bone of the skull, over the left eye, and Isaac was thrown to the ground slightly bruised. Mr Gabriel stopped his pony as soon as possible, and went back to render assistance, when he found CHOPE bleeding profusely, and surrounded by Mr William Ward (yeoman, of Great Torrington), Mr Joseph Brownscombe (of Huntshaw, yeoman), and others. Gabriel immediately got off his pony, and took his pocket handkerchief and bound round the wounds, and with Isaac and the rest assisted him to a cothouse close by, occupied by Joseph Hammett, when a doctor was sent for, and during the interval of his arrival, Gabriel washed the wounds with a sponge and warm water, and put a bandage round his head and put him to bed, and remained with him until the doctor (C. H. Jones, Esq., Highbickington) came, who, on examining and cleaning and dressing the wounds, took out twenty-three small pieces of the fractured skull, that was driven in and pressed on the brain, and also a small stone. CHOPE lived eight days after the accident, during which time he was sensible, but gradually sunk, till death put an end to his sufferings on Friday last. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was 67 years of age, and was buried at Huntshaw on Monday last.

Thursday, 24 February 1848, Issue 4289 – Gale Document No. Y3200677988
On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at the Woodman Inn, King-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN PENTREATH, who died from injuries received by falling from a wharf in Baker'[s place, on to the side of a boat, and from thence into the water. Verdict "Accidental Death."

CHILD BURNT. – On Monday an Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., upon the body of a child, aged three years and a half, named WILLIAM HISCOX. On Saturday she was left with three other children, the eldest but eight years old, in a room at play, and whilst there his dress caught on fire. Shrieks were heard in the street, and Mr Joseph Golesworthy, who was passing, immediately ran to the house, when he saw the clothes of the deceased in flames, which he extinguished as quickly as possible by rolling the child on the floor, and by which he himself got slightly burnt. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The Coroner severely reprimanded the persons under whose care the child was, observing that its death had arisen, as in many other instances, from neglect.

FATAL CONSEQUENCES OF LARKING. - Last night, about ten o'clock, MR JOHN BRADFORD of Sidwell-street, in this city, butcher, entered a room at Ware's Red Lion Inn, in the same street, and called for a glass of grog, with which he was served. At this time, among the company present, were a Scotsman travelling in the drapery line, named, as we learn, William Dunning, and a man of the name of Wright. Previous to BRADFORD entering, Dunning and Wright had in play, and perfectly friendly manner, been, as it is termed, showing each other a toe, and wrestling. BRADFORD had not sat down, but stood with his back to the fire-place, and in his turn commenced showing Dunning a toe. The Scotsman is a tall and powerful man, about 5 feet 10 inches in height. BRADFORD was strongly built, but about 5 feet 5 inches in height. All was in the same playful spirit as before but a struggle for the fall commencing they closed and presently both went down together, BRADFORD under, and rather on his side. Dunning quickly regained his feet, but poor BRADFORD turned over on his back, threw out his hands, and said "help me up." He was instantly assisted, and placed in a seat, being supposed faint It was, however, quickly apparent that something much more serious was the matter, and Mr Wm. Land, surgeon, also residing in Sidwell-st., was desired without delay to see him. With the utmost promptitude Mr Land attended, but saw at once that medical aid was of no avail, and in a short time life was extinct; and, under direction of the surgeon, the body was removed to MR BRADFORD'S house. It is imagined there was previously disease of the heart, the result of which was thus unfortunately accelerated by the fall. MR BRADFORD was about 36 years of age, a native of Pinhoe, and had been in business in this city several years. He has left a widow and three children (the eldest about 14 and youngest from 6 to 7 years of age,) to lament this sad event. An Inquest before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, will be held this (Wednesday) afternoon, at four o'clock, at Lisson's Acland Arms Inn.

Thursday, 2 March 1848, Issue 4290 – Gale Document No. Y3200678003
Inquest on the Body of MR JOHN BRADFORD. - The unfortunate circumstance which led to the death of MR JOHN BRADFORD, of St. Sidwell, in this City, butcher, was stated in our last; and the Jury, on the Inquest, having adjourned to Thursday, in order to a post mortem examination, returned a verdict, that death in this instance had been occasioned by apoplexy, accelerated by the struggle in which the deceased had been engaged.

Thursday, 16 March 1848, Issue 4292 – Gale Document No. Y3200678035
DISTRESSING ACCIDENT. - On Thursday last MR BARTER, blacksmith of Buckfastleigh, left in the morning and proceeded towards Dartmoor, after a cart load of peat, accompanied by another person, also with a cart. Returning home loaded, the hills being enveloped with a deep fog. MR BARTER in going across with his cart over a bog, it upset, and the horse fell on him; on his companion coming forward, melancholy to relate, the poor man was found to be quite dead. An Inquest was held before Mr W. A. Cockey, deputy Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned. MR BARTER has left a wife and twelve children, - he was a kind husband and father, and a man much respected.

Thursday, 6 April 1848, Issue 4295 – Gale Document No. Y3200678077
TIVERTON. - Inquest. Last week, an Inquest was held before F. Mackenzie, Esq., on the body of JAMES BRIMSON, a tailor of Cullompton, who was found drowned the previous Tuesday, in the Grand Western Canal. Deceased was identified by his wife. James Hall, a labourer, deposed, that he was going to work about six in the morning, and discovering a hat on the towing path, went for assistance, and found deceased in the water; he was taken out and conveyed to the Union House. James Hooper, saw the deceased he day previous, and entered into conversation, and considered him tipsy; he took him by the arm, and went to the Queen's Head, where they partook of some ale; they afterwards wet to the Rising Sun, and remained about three quarters of an hour. He first saw him about 7 o'clock, and talked of going home, but he persuaded him not to do so, and offered him a bed in his house which he refused, saying he would sleep at a friend's house in Elmore. It was then about a quarter after 8 o'clock, he left his house, and heard no more of him until the accident. - Verdict, found drowned.

FATAL ACCIDENT. - On the 25th ult., as GEORGE SNOW, a young man, the eldest son of MR WM. SNOW, miller, of the Town Mills, Millbrook, Moretonhampstead, was engaged in an adjustment of the machinery while the mill was in operation, he unfortunately fell forward, and being caught by the gear was so crushed that death ensued. An Inquest was taken on the body before W. A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, on the following Monday, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 6 April 1848, Issue 4295 – Gale Document No. Y3200678085
MELANCHOLY SUICIDE AT PLYMOUTH. - On Tuesday evening an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before John Edmonds Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS HENRY HOOKER, who had died suddenly from the effects of poison, on the previous night, at his residence in Clarence Street. - After certain witnesses had been examined the Enquiry was adjourned to Thursday, at six o'clock p.m., to give time for the post mortem examination f the body, and for the production of other evidence. The Jury then, after sitting for three hours, came to the conclusion that the deceased had poisoned himself while in a state of temporary insanity – a verdict which they arrived at from the following facts:-
Deceased had been a clerk in the employ of Mr Nettleton, Whimple Street, Bookseller, and had been frequently irregular in his conduct, being unfortunately addicted to drinking. In consequence of these irregularities he had sometimes been discharged on the Saturday night but his fellow clerks had persuaded him to return on the Monday morning, in the belief that Mr Nettleton would overlook the offence, and allow him to continue in his situation. This had several times been repeated, and Mr Nettleton had with commendable forbearance and kindness f heart, re-instated him in his employ. On Saturday night last, however, deceased had again by similar conduct provoked his employer to discharge him. Even then he had been urged by the young men in the office to rely upon Mr Nettleton's forgiving disposition and to present himself, as he had before done, at the shop on Monday. Deceased, however, was very dejected, and was stated by one of the witnesses to be even then suffering from delirium tremens, consequent upon his excesses; he also said he must make away with himself, but as he had before made similar threats in a jocose manner, not much attention was paid to the present. On Sunday morning he was proved to have purchased a quantity of white arsenic, at Mr Denton's of Old Town Street, chemist, at whose shop he was a well-known customer, on the pretence that he wanted it to destroy some cats, which annoyed him at home. Some hours after he again presented himself at the shop and asked the assistant to mix a little opium with the arsenic, as he said it would be a more humane way of killing the animals, and would shorten their sufferings. This request, as it seemed a natural one, and no unusual symptoms were observed in the deceased's conduct, was complied with, and a dram of opium, (sufficient in itself to destroy life,) was mixed with the poison he had before been served with. On Monday morning the evidence showed that deceased went to Mrs Easton's landlady of the Three Crowns, on the Parade, to see a party who had appointed to meet him there. The person he seemed to have expected was not, however, present, and deceased left, returning again in the afternoon. He then seemed most dejected, and told Mrs Easton, (to whom he was well known,) that he should soon be without employ, and with no means of support. She asked him to draw up for her an advertisement respecting the letting of some premises, which she wished to have inserted in the newspapers: and he complied, but his mind seemed wandering, and he made so many errors in it, that he had to write three times, and even then it was not entirely correct. He said he had been drinking hard the night before, and that this had an effect upon him. During this time he had some gin, which he drank; he afterwards requested to be allowed to lay down upon a bed up-stairs, as he was very unwell. He did so for about an hour and a half, when he came down stairs, very pale, and after a little while asked if Mrs Easton would let him le upon the sofa for a little while. He continued there until about eight o'clock, and had some more gin taken to him. He then asked Mrs Easton to let him have a bed for the night, which she declined to do, as her beds were engaged. He afterwards, it seemed, went home, and got into bed; where he was found by MRS HOOKER, cold and insensible. Mr Square, the surgeon, was called, but he was then in a dying state, and expired shortly after. On a post mortem examination of the body, sufficient arsenic was found in the intestines to have poisoned half-a-dozen people.
In the pocket of the deceased was found the following affecting document, which was no doubt written at Mrs Easton's, whilst his mind was yet wavering and undetermined as to the commission of the rash act. The writing was in a bold and firm hand, and the characters were not only legible, but even elegant. It appeared to have been dashed off at different intervals, and affords a vivid picture of the deceased's feelings. The last sentence f course must have reference to his final determination to take the fatal draught, and to put a period to an existence, which he then, in his unsettled thoughts, felt to be so grievous a burden:-
"I wish I could write the music of the dead march in Saul!*** I would say God bless my dear wife, but I am afraid that as everything goes wrong with me that might be also reversed, considering that it would come from so polluted a person."
Then followed the particulars of several sums of money which a memorandum stated he had "faithfully promised to settle this month," amounting to £96 10s.: and the paragraph ended with the sentence – "and not a sous to pay."
"Altho' I hardly dare to say God bless my wife I think God's justice must, without my invocation – that is, if any person ever deserved to be blessed.
"She is at this moment fretting her life out, because of my absence. Fate! what is Fate?"
"Here goes!"

Thursday, 13 April 1848, Issue 4296 – Gale Document No. Y3200678095
On Wednesday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of ROBERT EWINS, about four years of age, who in the absence of his parents, (residing in Exon Court, St. Sidwells) – on the preceding day, he fell into the fire, and was so burnt that though immediately removed to the Hospital, medical aid was of no avail, death terminating his sufferings that morning, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 27 April 1848, Issue 4298 – Gale Document No. Y3200678123
Distressing Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Thursday afternoon, at the School-room, Plymouth Citadel, before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM ROBINSON, a colour-sergeant in the 35th Regiment. The deceased had risen that morning at gun-fire, and called the roll of his company. A private soldier, about six o'clock, went to the privy at the sergeant's mess, and there saw the deceased on his knees. He at first thought it was a soldier, who, after being intoxicated the night previous, had repaired there for the purposes of nature! and, acting on that conviction, he said to the deceased. "Come, come, you have been long enough here." The soldier, after remaining there a short time, saw deceased's braces were round his neck; and on a closer examination, he found that he was suspended from the door. He immediately gave information of the circumstance, and the deceased was afterwards cut down. A towel had been fastened over the door, and a pair of braces communicated from the towel to the deceased's neck, and he then hung on his knees. The deceased, while in the Mauritius, attempted suicide by cutting his throat, the mark occasioned by the at being perceptible on his neck. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday, 4 May 1848, Issue 4299 – Gale Document No. Y3200678134
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken before John Gidley, Esq., acting for the Coroner of this city, on the body of CHARLES HENRY PARSONS, 19 years of age, who was drowned in the river Exe, near the Quay, on the preceding evening. The deceased who was of weak intellect, had been at work on board the Fleece, a vessel lying in the basin, the cabin boy belonging to which he had taken across, and landed at the quay. On his return however, standing on the thwart and sculling the boat, it took al sudden lurch and he was precipitated into the river. Several persons witnessed this, and prompt assistance was rendered, but he did not rise t the surface, and when got out was quite dead. And a verdict of Accidental Death was returned accordingly.

Thursday, 11 May 1848, Issue 4300 – Gale Document No. Y3200678149
On Wednesday last an Inquest was taken before J. Gidley, Esq., at Ash's George and Dragon public house, Black boy-road, St. Sidwells, on the body of MAQRY ANN GRAFTON, a little girl, daughter of a shoemaker residing in that road, - who some weeks before while sitting at tea with her parents, suddenly seized the tea pot, the contents of which were in a boiling state and in her eagerness, poured this over her neck and breast, by which she was so dreadfully scalded, that after lingering in great agony, death at length terminated her sufferings; and the Jury returned a verdict of this being the result of accident accordingly.

On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the Six Bells Public-house, Moretonhampstead, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM SOPER, aged 33, who was found dead in his lodgings on the day previous, - Verdict apoplexy.

Thursday, 18 May 1848, Issue 4301 – Gale Document No. Y3200678167
Death by Burning. – About a quarter before nine o'clock on the night of Thursday last, Miss P. Cragg, of No. 6, Verney-place, St. Sidwell's, in this city, sent ANN CLARK, her servant, about 16 years of age, to bed, not permitting her to take a candle, which she did not allow being taken into the servant's bed-room. ANN CLARK, however, was neither unprovided with this, nor the means of lighting it, and from what remains it would appear she must have contrived to fasten her candle by means of a bit of cap wire, and then, most foolishly and dangerously, in such a situation, applied herself to work; the marks of grease which had dropped down being visible next morning. Falling asleep, however, about half-past 12 o'clock, her mistress was alarmed by violent shrieks, and coming out into the stairs, saw the unfortunate servant rushing over them, with the lighter parts of her clothing in flames; the remains of the candle had fallen down while she slept and caught her clothes on fire; and she only awoke to become too sensible of her peril. Miss Cragg followed the unfortunate woman who ran into the parlour, where Miss C. immediately wrapped her in an hearth rug, in order to extinguish the fire. Her cries had alarmed James Budd, a policeman, who being admitted, conducted himself in the most meritorious manner. Mr John Sparks, a beadle of the Corporation of the Poor and Mr R. Pentecost, painter and glazier, who live near Miss Cragg, also came to her assistance. The body of poor CLARK was protected by her stays, but the whole of her clothes otherwise were gone from her person, and she was dreadfully burnt on the face, legs, arms and hands. The attendance of Mr Samuel J. Perkins, surgeon was immediately requested, and most promptly complied with, but the instant he saw the unfortunate sufferer, he advised an immediate removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where the poor girl was attended by Mr Edye, who directed what should be done. Death, however, rendered unavailing all skill and attention, as being received into the Hospital about 1 o'clock, she died at four! An Inquest was taken on the body on Friday, before John Gidley, Esq., at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 25 May 1848, Issue 4302 – Gale Document No. Y3200678185
HONITON. - Coroner's Inquest. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Union in this town, on the body of a woman called SEYMOUR, who died in the Union the previous day, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, and a highly respectable Jury. Many rumours were afloat as to the cause of death, and some suspicion, the almost inevitable consequence of the rumours, was excited. An examination of the body took place, and after evidence had been given, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from natural causes."

KINGSBRIDGE. - Death by Drowning. An Inquest was held on Saturday the 13th, (and which was adjourned severally to the morning and evening of the following day) at the King of Prussia Hotel, Dodbrooke, before E. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of EDWARD GRIGG, who been discovered at Highhouse point, in the estuary. From the particulars adduced at the Inquest we subjoin the following:- Deceased was second in command of a small trading barque, and at half-past eight, p.m. on the 11th inst., the captain retired to his cabin and gave deceased orders to call him at 11, as the tide would then be favourable for the ship to go down the river. Shortly after this deceased must have fallen overboard and owing to his clothes having become entangled around his body he was prevented from swimming; and owing to the late hour of the night could not possibly have obtained any assistance. At about 1 o'clock, a.m., the captain awoke, and found the deceased was gone from the ship, with the assistance of another of the men he made every search on board, but all was fruitless, they then concluded he must have fallen overboard. Early on the same morning men were engaged in dredging the river for the body, but it was not found until 30 hours after he was missed. Verdict – "Found drowned, but how deceased came into the water the Jury could not determine."

Thursday, 15 June 1848, Issue 4305 – Gale Document No. Y3200678232
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Cridge's Paper Makers Arms, public house, Exe-street, o the body of JAMES AUGUSTUS COULDRIDGE, 10 years and 9 months old, son of a painter living in Albert-street, New Town, St. Sidwells, who was drowned on the preceding Saturday afternoon. The deceased it appeared left his home with a boy named Wm. Spencer, a year or two older than himself, and proceeding to the Head Weir, they crossed the river by the temporary bridge erected for that purpose in the summer months. The deceased was unable to swim, but undressed himself and descended the bank to the water's edge. From the heavy rain we have had, and especially the preceding day, the bank was become slippery, and his feet becoming coated with the red clay, he was playing with them on the surface of the water, with a view to its removal when slipping he became at once immersed in water of the depth of about five feet, and disappeared. An alarm was raised and Mr Cridge, who keeps a reception house of the Humane Society immediately hastened to the spot, when he threw in a groper which was at once successful in reaching and bringing the body to the surface. It was landed after having been in the water about a quarter of an hour, and every means used with a view to resuscitation, but life was extinct; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

DEATH BY DROWNING. - A very sad, most distressing, and fatal accident occurred on our river on Monday night. It being Whitmonday, the gardens and grounds at Salmon Pool were crowded with company. Among those who were there were MR SAMUEL PIKE, Mr Staddon, his partner, (tailors, &c. Goldsmith-street;) and two young men named Ewens, residing on David's-hill, - their friends. The afternoon and evening has passed pleasantly, and about 11 o'clock the party on the grounds generally, began to break up in order to return to Exeter, from which Salmon Pool is scarcely more than a mile distant. The nearest way to the city is by immediately crossing the river and passing up the fields to Trew's weir, and the bottom of the Friars, or by the Topsham-road, which is soon gained from the north side o the river. For this purpose a boat is kept at Salmon Pool, which is caused to traverse by means of a rope carried across and secured at either bank. Towards this boat a number of persons hastened, and it is supposed upwards of twenty succeeded in getting into it, - (too large a number it is imagined for safety,) – the boat moved off, Mr Pike being the only one who sat down, all the others remaining standing. As the boat progressed, some one most incautiously and reprehensibly commencing rocking it, and no one will feel surprised that so laden, and the majority of those on board in such a position, it was soon upset, and the whole party thrown into the water, which is here of considerable depth, from its being ponded back by means of James's weir, which crossed the river just below. A scream of horror was immediately raised by those who remained on the southern bank awaiting the return of the boat, and every effort was made to rescue those who were in the water. Mr Staddon, a good swimmer, it is understood, by perseverance and powerful efforts rescued and bore to the shore two or three. Mrs Quick and her family ere anxiously giving every attention to those who gained, and were brought on shore, and those in whom animation appeared suspended were placed in warm beds. Among these was one of the Ewens's, who having recently been in ill health, was for a time bereft of animation from being thus plunged into the river. A good deal of confusion naturally prevailed, but it was supposed all were got out of the water, including two females who were in the boat. Mrs Quick, however, was most watchful over her suffering inmates, and giving attention to those who had not needed so great a degree of care, and being by the bed side of Ewens as recollection returned, his first anxious enquiries were for PIKE. No such name however was answered to, and it was immediately and but too correctly judged that he must still be in the river. The search was renewed and continued through the night, but it was not until between 5 and 6 o'clock on Tuesday afternoon that the body was found, and removed to the Port Royal Inn, St. Leonard's, to await the Coroner's Inquest. The deceased was the third son of MR THOMAS PIKE, of Paul-street, tailor, and attained his 26th year last month. He was a man of the most orderly habits an steady conduct, - and respectable and industrious tradesman, and beloved and esteemed by all who knew him; indeed this is to his parents and relatives a sad and most distressing bereavement; and what perhaps renders it the more remarkable is that he was an expert swimmer. It is imagined that being sitting at the time the boat upset, he was borne down by the weight of some of those who were standing, and thus deprived of that power of action which otherwise he would have used. The time of the accident seems determined by the watch of Ewens, which stopped at 5 minutes to 11 o'clock.

Thursday, 22 June 1848, Issue 4306 – Gale Document No. Y3200678246
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before F. Leigh, Esq., a Coroner for Devon, at the Port Royal Inn, St. Leonard's, adjoining this city, on the body of MR SAMUEL PIKE, the particulars of whose death by drowning were given in our last, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Ager's White Horse Inn, Sidwell-street, on the body of RICHARD FINNIMORE, 64 years of age, a driver in the employ of Mr Bastin, of Exmouth, innkeeper. It appeared that FINNIMORE came with a post chaise, bringing Capt. Holden to Exeter, on the preceding Saturday afternoon: arriving at the London Inn about half past two o'clock. He went to the stables of the inn with his horses, when the ostlers noticed his manner, and thought he had drank, as he rambled in his walk and at length fell on his knees. They desired him to go into one of the stables and lie down, giving him a bundle of straw for that purpose, and when he had lain down, threw a couple of rugs over him. This, as near as can be collected, was about 4 o'clock in the afternoon. He was deemed to be in a state of stupefaction from drunkenness, and Mr Basin, jun., coming to Exeter in the course of the afternoon, saw him, and although it was to him inexplicable how he had obtained, or where he drank the liquor, yet he appeared impelled to the same conclusion. FINNIMORE was seen in the course of the evening, and about half-past eight o'clock was lifted up by one of the men, but still no speech could be obtained from him. At about ten o'clock he appeared to be breathing strongly, and being concluded to be in a sound sleep, was left for the night. About 5 on Sunday morning, however, on the ostlers' entering the stable, he was found to be dead. Some of the men, however, instantly ran for Mr W. Land, surgeon, who returned with them to the stable. Of course medical aid could be of no avail, and Mr Land gave it as his opinion the man had died from apoplexy, or the rupture of some vessel. Previous to the Inquest it had been ascertained that FINNIMORE had before suffered from attack of paralysis, and that all the liquor he had taken in the course of Saturday morning, was a half-pint of beer. Under these circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God;" but at the same time several of the Jury expressed a strong opinion that there had been a want of proper care of the unfortunate man by the stable men, who ought not to have left him in such a state without assistance.

ASHBURTON. - An Inquest was held on the body of the REV. HENRY BRADRIDGE, aged 62 years, residing at Sampson, in Torbryan, who drowned himself at Broadhempston, on Friday last. He had been out of his mind for the last five years, and had been attended by a man who seldom or ever lost sight of him, but on the day named he left his residence unobserved and was found the following day in a quarry-pit with six feet of water; when taken up a rope was round his neck with a large stone attached to it. An Inquest was held on Monday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., and the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased drowned himself whilst labouring under insanity.

Thursday, 29 June 1848, Issue 4307 – Gale Document No. Y3200678257
CORONER'S INQUEST. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, the 24th instant, by Mr Fredk. Leigh, at Rull Farm, in the parish of Thorverton, on the body of HENRY HAWKINS, 45 years of age, who lived as a servant with his brother, MR THOMAS HAWKINS, and who was accidentally killed by a horse running away with a cart laden with hurdles, on Friday last. Samuel Stevens, servant to Mr Thomas Hawkins, was fastening the gate the field, after deceased had gone out with the horse and cart, when he saw the horse move on faster, and finally he galloped. The hurdles were laid down flat upon the cart, and tied with a rope to prevent their slipping. Stevens could see some way down the road until a turn in it. He saw the deceased on his legs as far as the turn, holding the horse by the head, trying to stop him. Following the cart, he got up to where deceased had fallen in the road. His brother, Mr Thos. Hawkins, had by that time come up and raised him in a sitting position. Mr Thos. Hawkins was in a field waiting for his brother with the hurdles. Hearing the cart come down faster than it ought to considering the hill, he ran to the gate of the field, and on getting into the road discovered his brother lying on his face; but he did not see the horse and cart, which had gone on. He raised his brother against the hedge; whose lower limbs appeared quite paralysed. Deceased spoke to his brother; but did not say how the accident happened. He died about an hour after he was taken home. He had a severe wound on the back of his skull, his spine was also much injured, which appeared to the surgeon to have been the chief cause of death.

On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of SHADRACH KEMP, about 30 years of age, the particulars of whose sad accident by falling into a vat of nearly boiling liquor were detailed by us on the 15th inst., and who in consequence of the injuries thus sustained, had died in the Hospital. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Sudden Death of DR. PAYNE. - Our obituary of this week contains an announcement of the death of the above gentleman, theological tutor of the Western Dissenting College at Eldad, near Plymouth, which took place on Sunday last, under the following circumstances:- The deceased gentleman had, it appeared, been labouring under indisposition for some time, and on the evening of the day in question, after preaching at Mount Street Chapel, Devonport, he had returned to his residence at Wyndham Place, and retired to bed at ten. He previously complained of being unwell, and said he felt as he had never felt before, but would not, however, have a medical man sent for. Between two and three in the morning, MISS FRANCES PAYNE, daughter of the deceased, hearing, as she fancied, a noise in his bed-room, went in, but found him, as she thought, asleep. At eight o'clock, she went in again and soon after found him to be quite dead. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, before J. Edmonds, Esq., the Coroner, when the Jury, after hearing the evidence submitted to them, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." The deceased had filled the situation of tutor, which he occupied at his death, since 1828. He came t this town from Blackburn, in Yorkshire, where he occupied a similar situation, and was, we believe, originally educated at Edinburgh.

Thursday, 6 July 1848, Issue 4308 – Gale Document No. Y3200678172
KINGSBRIDGE. - On Monday last an Inquest was held on the body of a child named STRAW, aged 7 ½ years, who was found in a pond on the grounds of John Gillard, Esq., of Well House, Dodbrook. It appears the child was missed about noon on Friday, and every search was made during the afternoon and evening, but to no effect. On the following morning, a boy in the employ of Mr Gillard, on entering the gate leading to Well House, saw a frock floating on the water. He directly called his mother who lived close by, when it was found to be the body of the unfortunate child. It is generally supposed he must have been in search of flowers, of which he was particularly fond, and owing to the pond having been covered with something green, he must have walked therein, and from his imbecility, (with which he has been afflicted since his birth) could not call for assistance. Verdict, "Accidental death."

Thursday, 20 July 1848, Issue 4310 – Gale Document No. Y3200678306
A man named HENRY BANFIELD TAPSCOTT, committed suicide at the Red Lion Inn, in the parish of Broadhembury, on Sunday morning week. He had slept in the house, on the preceding night, and at six o'clock on Sunday morning was seen by the servant man to come out of the stable into the yard. The man had some conversation with him about the weather, and then left him to look after his horses, and on returning about half an hour afterwards, saw TAPSCOTT sitting upright in the stable, and as he thought asleep. He did not disturb him, but went a milking and then took his breakfast. After breakfast he went out into the stable for the purpose of waking TAPSCOTT, whom he found in the same posture, but his lips were black. the innkeeper was called, and it was found that the unfortunate man had hung himself and was quite dead. The deceased, who was once well to do in the world, had been of late years a great drunkard, and in his pocket was a county court summons for 7s. 6d. On Monday an Inquest was held on the body before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH, DEVONPORT &c., - Melancholy Death.
An Inquest was held on Monday at the Freemason's Arms, Cattedown, near Plymouth, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN WIDDICOMBE, 75, a superannuated cooper, from the old Victualling office, who was a passenger on board the Duke of Cornwall, steamer, from London to Plymouth. Whilst the vessel was off Dover on Saturday, deceased was sitting by the side of the fore hatch, when the vessel suddenly gave a lurch, and he fell from the upper deck to the bottom of the hold, a depth of 25 feet, and instantly broke his neck. – Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 31 August 1848, Issue 4316 – Gale Document No. Y3200678432
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - An Inquest was taken on Tuesday, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at the City Workhouse, on the body of HARRIET NORTHCOTE, who died there on the preceding day; and under circumstances which gave rise to rumours unfavourable to JOHN NORTHCOTE, her husband; but were removed by the Inquiry which took place. It appeared that NORTHCOTE and his wife who were vendors of fish, lived in an up-stair room at the bottom of Smythen-street, the under apartment being occupied by a female named Emma Pearce. About 11 o'clock on the night of Thursday, the 17th of August, they came home, and Mrs Pearce had reason to think they were intoxicated. She heard angry words and by and by a heavy footstep move quickly across the room, which she judged to be the husband, and then something fell heavily on the floor, when she heard a female voice exclaim "oh my –" "oh my -," some latter expression not seeming to reach her. Presently everything became quiet, and the next morning early NORTHCOTE went out. Mrs Pearce judged both had gone out about their business, but between 4 and 5 in the afternoon, hearing some one moving upstairs, she went up, when she found HARRIET NORTHCOTE there, complaining of a severe pain of the head, and saying her husband had struck her on the preceding night, and knocked her down, when she fell with her head against the dresser, and had injured the back part of her head. Mrs Pearce sent for Mr Arthur Kempe, surgeon, who promptly attended, but hearing the story, and judging intoxication had something to do with the present suffering, he ordered such remedies as he judged advisable, directing that if she got worse, they would send for him again. He did not see her again till the following Monday morning, when he prescribed for her, and visiting her again on Tuesday morning, he found the husband also ill in bed. The scene was one of the wretchedness, - bed it could not be called, and this such as it was, on the floor. In a spirit of humanity he recommended them to go to the workhouse, they consented, and into that asylum were received the same afternoon. They received every attention from Mr and Mrs Bragg, and passed into the medical care of Mr F. Warren. As the woman still complained, Mr Warren had her head shaved, when there were found the marks of five or six old injuries, but nothing recent; there were no marks of violence on the body, and she said not one word against her husband. She however gradually sunk, and died on Monday afternoon. The Jury, after a full consideration of the mass of evidence which had been brought forward, and hearing the opinions of the medical gentlemen, returned a verdict "that she died from apoplexy brought on by intemperance." She is supposed to be 42 or 43 years of age, and understood to be a native of Exeter.

Thursday, 7 September 1848, Issue 4317 – Gale Document No. Y3200678465
DEATH BY DROWNING. - On the afternoon of Saturday last two little boys, the youngest about 6 ½ years old, children of MR G. BURRIDGE, of Bartholomew-street (West) in this city, shoemaker, left home for the purpose of going into the country and gathering blackberries. This it would seem they had done and were returning home, but unfortunately went to the river side at the dung field, near the end of Okehampton-street, and there fell into the water. An alarm was given and a man jumped in and took out the eldest of the children, not being aware there was another in the water; of which indeed, the by-standers were only informed when the child, beginning to recover from the effects of the immersion, said his little brother was in the water. At this time a man named Mason was near, celebrated as a diver, and who in the recovery of persons from the river has conducted himself most heroically on several occasions; and indeed was now on the river's bank with a view to the recovery from the water of the body of Philip Stocker, who death by drowning was stated by us last week, and which had not up to this time been found. Mason hearing what had just occurred, immediately jumped into the water, and dived, but did not succeed in finding the body. A boat was then procured from the opposite (City) bank of the river, in which was a man named Baker, and he plunging into the river, the body was found within three feet of the bank on the Devon side. The body was taken to the reception house of the Exeter Humane Society in Okehampton-street, and medical aid rendered, but without effect, life being extinct. And on the Inquest a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday, 28 September 1848, Issue 4320 – Gale Document No. Y3200678560
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Wednesday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MATILDA DENNIS, 5 years of age, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital the preceding night. It appeared the parents of the deceased keep a dairy, and reside near the Alphington-turnpike gate, in St. Thomas. On Tuesday morning about 10 o'clock the mother left home to come into Exeter, five children besides the deceased, being at the time at play in front of the house; and an infant sleeping in a cradle. Over the kitchen fire was a large boiler, in meddling with which the deceased's clothes caught fire. Hearing the screams of the children, a servant of Mr Brown, who lives near, went to ascertain the cause, and others rendered their assistance, in the midst of which the mother arrived, and the sufferer was taken to the Hospital, where Mr Prater, promptly rendered medical aid, but in vain, the child expiring about half-past 9 at night. And the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

On Monday, at the same inn, also before Mr Warren, on the body of SAMUEL SHAPTER, a quarryman, who died on Sunday morning in the Hospital. It appeared that on Friday last, at from 11 to 12 o'clock in the forenoon, SHAPTER was at work on the lime rocks on the Haldon side, and in the parish of Chudleigh. He, together with a man named John Elson, had charged and blown a part of the rock, but not sufficiently large for their purpose, and therefore set about charging a second time, using now from 5 lbs. to 6 lbs. of gunpowder. When all was ready, SHAPTER took his flint & steel, and stuck a light, with which he lighted his touch-paper. He was at this time within three or four feet of the fuse, and told Elson to go, the fuse being in that state as was thought to ensure his (SHAPTER'S) own safety in enabling him to retreat in time and before the explosion could take place. Elson, however, had scarcely turned himself for an instant when he heard a report, and looking back could not at first see any thing from the great quantity of smoke. When this however cleared he saw his unfortunate companion laying in the bottom. He went to him and found his head bleeding, and right hand and arm injured. He got assistance and SHAPTER was taken to his own house, about half-a-mile from the place where the accident occurred; and about an hour or so afterwards he assisted him into a cart, in which he was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Here he was immediately attended by Mr James, a surgeon of that excellent establishment, and whose pupil Mr Woodman, gave evidence on the case before the Coroner. It appeared that the left side of the head was broken in, and a depression of the bone on the brain. The right hand and arm were injured; and on the left side a rib fractured, and the kidney on that side very much bruised. The hair of the deceased also was singed and smutty. The injuries were sufficient to occasion death; and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death accordingly. The deceased was 36 years of age in June last, and has left a widow and six children.

Thursday, 5 October 1848, Issue 4321 – Gale Document No. Y3200678595
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Friday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Stuckes' Hour Glass public house, Melbourne-street, on the body of GEORGE HENRY THOMAS, a young man between 17 and 18 years of age, who came to his death under the following circumstances. The deceased belonged to the "Friends" of Exeter, Captain Litton, from Sunderland to this port, with a cargo of coal. The Captain left Sunderland on the 21st of September, and about 8 o'clock at night on the 22nd, - at sea, and a considerable distance from land, having reason to apprehend a squall was coming on, he gave orders for taking in sail. The night was very dark, and for the purpose of furling the sail, an able seaman and the deceased went aloft. The captain was at this time at the helm; and it appears from the seaman that they had nearly completed their task, when THOMAS missed his footing and fell on the deck. There was no seeing objects, but being replaced at the helm, Captain Litton immediately went to the part of the deck on which he had heard something heavy fall, and found the unfortunate young man lying on his back, and apparently dead. With the assistance of the mate, who came to him, they carried the body below, and used such means as were in their power to restore animation, but in vain, he being, as it afterwards proved, past all human skill. They then removed the body to the mate's cabin, where it remained until the vessel reached this place on Friday, when immediate information to the Coroner was given. After so many days, in such a situation, and under such circumstances, the body presented a painful and humiliating spectacle, but being examined by Mr F. H. Warren, surgeon, it was ascertained there was a dislocation of the neck; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned accordingly. The friends of the deceased were resident in Exeter.

On Monday, also before Mr Warren, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene street, on the body of HENRY ALDRICH, about 16 years of age, an apprentice to Mr J. Davey, of Martin-street, boot and shoemaker, who had died on the morning of that day in the Devon and Exeter Hospital; - and whose death had been occasioned by the following unfortunate and melancholy circumstances. Some weeks since a troop of equestrians performing in St. Thomas by way of additional attraction, sent up a paper balloon, and ALDRICH, was among those who deemed themselves fortunate to pick it up when it fell. From an examination he conceived the idea of doing something in this way himself, and in order to the requisite preparation, had provided himself with a phial bottle of turpentine, which he had put into his trowsers pocket. On coming to his master's shop, however, he was directed to do what was necessary with a boot which had been blocked, and while so engaged, the bottle broke, and his clothes became saturated with the liquid. Most unfortunately while in this state he came in contact with a light and instant ignition of his clothing was the consequence. Mr Davey at this time was not at home, but the cries of Mrs Davey, (who was endeavouring to extinguish the flames,) brought Mr John Reed, Mr Shorto, and others who were near, to her assistance. Mr Visick, of High-street, chemist, was also sent for, and immediately came, and recommended an immediate removal of the sufferer to the Hospital, where Mr De-la-Garde directed all those remedies which the case called for. ALDRICH was dreadfully burnt, his clothes being for no small part reduced to tinder, and after lingering in great agony until Monday, death released him from his suffering; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned by the Jury. The master spoke highly of the deceased as a good apprentice.

Thursday, 12 October 1848, Issue 4322 – Gale Document No. Y3200678624
COLYTON. - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 5th instant, on view of the body of WILLIAM POTTER, aged 7 years only, who was killed on the previous day by the top part of a sand pit falling on him. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest, it appeared that the deceased was at play with another little boy, on the edge of the pit, and after playing there some time he took up a pick axe and began digging, when he was cautioned of the danger and desired to go home, but he would not listen to what was said to him, and continued digging; within two minutes after, between 5 and 6 tons weight of sand fell in upon him. Assistance was immediately rendered, but it was full half an hour before the body could be got out. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Page's Anchor Inn, Exe Island, on the body of a married woman named SUSAN JACKMAN, about 30 years of age, who with her husband resided near that house. The husband is a labourer, and has been a marine, for his services in which corps he was granted a smart ticket entitling him to a small sum for two years. The deceased had laboured under illness for a long time, and during a short absence of the husband on the preceding evening, a neighbour heard something fall in their room; and on the return of the husband the wife was found extended on the floor. In the chamber utensil there was found about half a pint of blood, and in the fall her face was bruised. It is supposed she had ruptured a blood vessel, and expired a few minutes after thus found; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 19 October 1848, Issue 4323 – Gale Document No. Y3200678671
TOPSHAM. - Inquest. – An Inquest was held in this town on Monday, upon the body of JOSEPH ORGAN, who it appeared had been confined in the lock-up on the night of Saturday last, the 14th October, having been taken in charge for some trifling misdemeanour. The evidence went to show that the unfortunate man had been for some time in a desponding state of mind, and that he had on one occasion threatened to drown himself, when he was restrained by his wife. From the examination of the constable, John West, it was quite clear ORGAN was not aware how he had rendered himself liable to be taken into custody, his mind being much impaired. The Jury, after a patient investigation returned the following verdict, - that the deceased hung himself during a fit of temporary insanity.

Thursday, 2 November 1848, Issue 4325 – Gale Document No. Y3200678720
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - Oct. 24, before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Esworthy's Ring of Bells public-house, West-street, on the body of MARTHA RICHARDSON, 76 years of age, who died almost suddenly the preceding day. With an elderly female named May, the deceased occupied an apartment in West-street, and left home with intention of calling on a humane and charitable lady at Heavitree, who allowed her 1s. per week. She was seen to pass over quay-hill, and to set down at the door of the Royal George public-house, near the quay, unable to proceed further. She was assisted back to her room, which exhibited appearances denoting great distress and destitution, and shortly expired. The Jury returned a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God."

On Thursday last, before the same gentleman, at Mrs Snow's Belmont, St. David's, on the body of HARRIET DAY, 38 years of age, who died almost suddenly on the preceding day. The deceased was the cook at Mrs Snow's, in whose service she had been for a year and nine months. She was on this morning engaged in preparing for dinner, and reaching to take something from a shelf instantly complained of great illness. Mr Edye, surgeon, was immediately sent for, but before that gentleman could reach Belmont, she had expired. An affection of the heart was supposed to have been the cause, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 9 November 1848, Issue 4326 – Gale Document No. Y3200678775
ASHBURTON. - Fatal Accident - A labourer named PRESTON was unfortunately killed on Saturday evening last, at Broadhempston. It appears he was driving a horse and cart, laden with flour ,and in getting on the shaft, the horse kicked, threw him down, when the wheel passed over his chest; he lingered a few hours and expired in great agony. An Inquest was held on the body before Mr W. A. Cockey, at Wolston Green, on Tuesday, and a verdict of "Accidental death" returned.

Plymouth, Devonport &c. - Last week an Inquest was held at the Breakwater Inn, Fareham place, on the body of WYATT PASSINGHAM POLHILL, 19, a mariner, lately residing in Hoe-street. He was observed walking towards Catte-down about noon on the same day, reading, when there appeared to be something strange in his manner, and in about an hour afterwards he was found at the bottom of Catte-down quarry, the back part of his head entirely cut off, and his brains scattered about. Supposing him to have committed suicide, the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary insanity."

Thursday, 16 November 1848, Issue 4327 – Gale Document No. Y3200678791
FATAL ACCIDENT - On Friday evening, as MRS MARGARET WAKEHAM, wife of MR ARTHUR WILLIAM WAKEHAM, farmer of Capton, in the parish of Dittisham and their son EDWARD, a lad fourteen years of age, were returning from Dartmouth market, riding in the front of their cart, a gig passed by them, and frightened the horse so that it started rapidly off The poor lad fell, and the wheel of the cart passed over his head and killed him on the spot. An Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned. MRS WAKEHAM also was thrown off and was considerably bruised.

Thursday, 23 November 1848, Issue 4328 – Gale Document No. Y3200678822
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Morton's Cattle Market Inn, in the Bonhay, an Inquest was taken on the body of JOHN DENNIS, 30 years old in March next, by trade a millwright and carpenter and a native of Plympton, who died under the following circumstances. He had worked on the South Devon line of railway, until the atmospheric mode of propulsion was stopt, when he was discharged. He had a wife and three children, - the eldest about 7 years, and youngest about 6 months old. He was out of work five weeks, and suffered great privation and distress. About a month since he got employ from Mr Alfred Bodley, of the Commercial Road, in this city, ironfounder, as a labourer. His wages were 9s. per week, but was permitted to make seven days a week, and thus brought it up to 10s. 6d. From the evidence of ELIZA DENNIS, his wife, it appeared he came home on Saturday night last, at 8 o'clock, and took a small bit of bread and cheese, which was as much, and all they could afford, for his supper, and went to bed about 10 o'clock. About 2 in the morning, the eldest boy was taken ill, the father got out to assist him; but at length complaining of being shivered, returned to bed. He was still cold, and his wife got more clothes and lay over him. This induced warmth, and procured sleep, - the wife watching by her husband and child. The wife subsequently sent to Mr Lyddon, requesting he would see her husband, but this gentleman was unable to attend, and before the messenger returned, which was about 3 o'clock, poor DENNIS was dead! Mr Arthur J. Cumming, of this city, surgeon, saw the body after death, but was unable from any outward appearance to speak of the cause of death. The Jury wished for a post mortem examination, and in order to this an adjournment took place to the following day (Tuesday), when Mr Cumming stated having opened and examined the body; the only circumstance remarkable in which was the entire absence of any remains of food. In the stomach was a small quantity of fluid, from its smell denoting the remains of the elder tea the unfortunate man had drank; and the Jury returned a verdict that death in this case had been produced by natural causes.

FOUND DROWNED. - On Tuesday morning, about seven o'clock, when the persons in the employ of Messrs. worthy, woollen-manufacturers, Exe Island, in this city, were about to resume work, they had, as preparatory to this, for the introduction of water in order to setting the machinery in motion, to lift the fender. They, however, discovered there was something that impeded this, and proceeding to examine, found the dead body of a man laying close against the grating. This being taken out, it was recognised to be that of a man named JOHN FROST, about 63 years of age, by trade a shoe-maker. According t the statement of the wife, they had latterly no home, nor had she seen him since Thursday last. An Inquest will be held on the body this day, but up to this morning there is an absence of evidence as to where he has been since.

Thursday, 30 November 1848, Issue 4329 – Gale Document No. Y3200678867
Another Awful Instance of the Careless Management of Poison. - On Monday, the 20th inst., at Lakes, a farm occupied by Mr Charles Brown, in the parish of Holsworthy, John Dymond, one of Mr Brown's servants was passing from one part of the farm to another part of it to join some other workpeople at dinner. In crossing a hedge he chanced to meet with a quart bottle containing some liquid; he carried it on with him; upon his reaching the persons with whom he was about to dine, he, not thinking the bottle contained anything which might do harm, asked a boy called WILLIAM REECE, to drink. The boy being thirsty, and not thinking of danger, immediately drank. Very shortly afterwards he commenced vomiting violently, so as to alarm the whole present, causing them to fear lest the bottle contained anything unfit to be drunk. Mr Brown coming to them soon after this, and finding what had taken place, discovered that the bottle contained a solution of Corrosive Sublimate, some of which he a long time before had used about his sheep, and had quite forgotten that he had hid away the remainder in the hedge. The poor boy, REECE, went directly for medical aid to the town of Holsworthy; he continued ill, however, up to Saturday last, at which time he died. An Inquest was held on the 28th before H. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, which occupied many hours, and resulted in Dymond being committed for Manslaughter. The state of mental suffering of poor Dymond can be better imagined than described.

Thursday, 30 November 1848, Issue 4329 – Gale Document No. Y3200678854
SOWTON. - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 27th inst., on the body of a man named THOMAS PERRY, who was found hanging in a linhay of Mr Westcott's, of Honiton's Clist, on Sunday morning. From the evidence, it appears that the deceased, on Saturday evening, between five and six o'clock, went into the Cat and Fiddle Inn, in Sowton, and asked for a glass of beer, with which he was served; he sat down by the fire, and remained there about ten minutes; whilst he was there he complained of being very poorly, and appeared to be in pain. When he was out of the house he paused, as if he was uncertain which way he was about to go, but he took the road to Sidmouth, and nothing more was seen or heard of him until his body was found on Sunday morning A pocket-book was found in one of his pockets, containing his name, which led to his identity, and it turned out that the witness who found the body had seen the deceased about 13 months since, and then walked some distance with him towards Sidmouth, where the deceased was going, and where he stated he had some relations living; he told witness that his name was PERRY, and that he then came from Bath, and, on the deceased's name being mentioned, witness at once identified the body and also some part of his wearing apparel, which he had on, as being the same which he was wearing when he saw him about 13 months since. Information having been sent to Sidmouth, on Sunday evening two of the deceased's brothers arrived and identified the body as that of their brother THOMAS PERRY, and stated the deceased had been living in Bath, and that he had a wife and five children. In his pockets were found 20s. wrapped in paper and 8s. 6 ½d. loose, a silk handkerchief, and the pocket-book before mentioned. The linhay is situation about 40 yards from the Cat and Fiddle Inn, on the Sidmouth road. The deceased must have got on some rails which were there to fasten the cord to the rafter, and, having put it round his neck must have swung off. The Jury, after some consideration, returned a verdict of temporary insanity.

The verdict on the Inquest in the case of JOHN FROST, the shoemaker, as stated in our last, was "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 7 December 1848, Issue 4330 – Gale Document No. Y3200678885
DREADFUL MURDER. - The appalling news of a murder in this neighbourhood reached this city on the forenoon of Sunday last, and Mr Steel, our Superintendent, immediately put the police on the alert. We regret, however, to be obliged to add that up to Tuesday night no clue whatever had been afforded as to the diabolical perpetrators of this most horrid act; the particulars of which we now proceed to recite. About a quarter of a mile beyond the village and turnpike-gate at Taphouse, in the parish of Tedburn St. Mary, and on the Okehampton or Great Western Road, at a place called Westwater – in a dell, and most retired spot, at a short distance from, and on the left of the road from Exeter, is a cottage, having two dwellings under the same roof, in one of which resided MRS GRACE HOLMAN, - as will be seen in our report, 80 years of age, a woman greatly respected, and many years a servant in the family of the late Colonel Fulford, of Great Fulford, which is about two miles from this place, and in which family she was greatly esteemed. Here MRS HOLMAN lived alone, the adjoining tenement being occupied by a man named Wm. Collins and his wife. MRS HOLMAN, who was known to be a person in easy circumstances, was last seen alive on Saturday evening. On the following morning she was found to have been murdered in her bed; the house too having been rifled of all easily moveable valuable articles. The entrance to the premises it appears clear was effected in this manner. The murderers, for there is no doubt there were two persons engaged in it, having secured Collins's door by inserting a gimlet firmly in the door post, and running a cord or small rope thence through the guard of the latch, which rope or cord was securely fastened, so as to prevent persons within, - without at least great difficulty, from coming out, - proceeded to endeavour to reach the eastern chamber window, being that of the room in which this aged matron slept, by means of a plum tree which grows against the wall of the house; and it would seem succeeded in reaching the window, but were checked in their project of entering here, from the casement being small, as also that in the centre on the inside, as well as to the two lights of glass of the window, there were firm oak bars or studs. Foiled thus they appear to have descended, and from the garden or orchard immediately in front of the cottage, taken a fir pole, which had been used as a prop for an apple tree, and the upper part of which had been sawn off fair, so as to form a resting place or the foot. This they placed against the house underneath the western window of it, being that of a room in which there is a bed, but not then in use, and known as a "spare room." The casement here is of larger size than the other, and there is no stud or post in it. To this then an ascent was effected, and a pane of glass being taken out, the hand was readily admitted, and the casement opened, and although on the outside there is a little ornamental woodwork for holding evergreens and pans of flowers, yet all was surmounted and access to the room gained.
There is reasons to suppose that the entrance by this method was effected by one person only, and that he then descended the stairs to the kitchen, and admitted his accomplice by unlocking the door. The dreadful act of murder was then committed, in the manner, doubtless, as described by the witnesses on the Inquest, as hereafter given, and silver tea spoons, known to be more than twelve in number, of an old plain pattern, and having engraved on them "G. W." in plain letters; and two pair of silver sugar tongs, the one plain, and the other twisted; together with what money there was in the house; and a dark shawl, as hereafter more particularly described, carried off. The footmarks let leave no doubt that one of the men wore shoes or boots nailed with small hobs, and the other a narrow and apparently new pair, with a scute on the heel.
On the discovery on the murder, on Sunday morning, information was immediately given to Baldwin Fulford, Esq., a Magistrate of Devon, at his seat, Great Fulford, who came at once to the spot, and instituted an Inquiry into the circumstances of this dreadful case. Mr Fulford also gave information of what had occurred to Mr Steel, superintendent of the police in this city; as also to the police at other places; and dispatched a messenger to |Mr Leigh, the Coroner, at Cullompton.
Mr Leigh, accordingly, on Tuesday, about noon, commenced the proceedings of the Inquest at Marchant's Red Lion Inn, in the village of Taphouse, Tedburn St. Mary. These proceedings we attended, and not only the room, but the house was filled, such was the sensation which this foul outrage on humanity had occasioned. In the Inquest room we noticed B. Fulford, Esq., M. W. Harvey, Esq. (Moreton), H. B. Holman, Esq. (Crediton), &c., &*c.
The following were sworn of the Jury:- Messrs. John Stanbury, Middle Hill Farm, Foreman:- Wm. Wills, John Marchant, John Phillips, Richard Davie, Andrew Preston, John Laskey, William Morrish, George Hodge, Henry Preston, Wm. Lethbridge, Samuel Trigg, Daniel Marchant; and this done the Coroner, B. Fulford, Esq., and the Jury, proceeded to the cottage to acquaint themselves with the state of things there, and view the body.
The situation and state of the cottage, and manner of entrance have been already described. The body of the unfortunate woman was in the bed, lying on her left side, with her face to the window, and left hand in the direction of the head, precisely as found on Sunday morning. The face, neck, and chest, and also the hands, with the fingers, were of a dark hue, approaching to blackness; the tongue protruded, and blood was escaping from the nostrils.
Having satisfied themselves as to the appearances and state of things both without and within doors, the Jury returned to the Inn; and the Coroner having taken his seat, the first witness called was
Wm. Collins: lives at Tedburn St. Mary; am a husbandman; live next door to the deceased, but under the same roof. I did not hear deceased going to bed, but went to bed myself about 8 o'clock on Saturday night. Had seen her at about a quarter to five o'clock; this was the last time I saw her at the door of her own house; there is no other door; she appeared then in her usual health – her usual good health. I have known her more than 40 years. She has not always lived in that house; she lived before at Great Fulford, as a servant. I was awoke between 12 and 1, and heard the hatch of our door as if something came against it - the hatch appeared to be knocked or pressed up against the door as if some animal had pressed up against it; heard nothing else in the night. On Sunday morning I got up about half-past 7; I was not the first person down stairs, my wife was down before me; I understood before I came down that I could not go out of door, as my wife had told me somebody had done something to the door, and she could not get out. We saw a girl in the opposite field, who was pulling turnips, and asked her to come and undo the door; she did so, and we got out. the door w3as tied to a gimlet fastened in the dern, and a rope passed from one to the other I went into the deceased's house about 8 o'clock, in company with Nathaniel Beer, and proceeded up stairs: we went into the bedroom where GRACE HOLMAN lay. The first thing I saw was the boxes and drawers drawn out, - the drawers had been opened, - and the boxes; then looked in at the foot of the bed, and saw a box and chair laying on MRS HOLMAN; the box was immediately on the body, and the chair on the box; the upper part of the back of the chair rested on the box. Mr Beer took these off, and turning the clothes down which covered the head, we discovered that MRS HOLMAN was dead; she was lying on her left side, with her hand to her head; we did not move her at all; the hand was a little under her head. The door of the house was not locked.
Elizabeth Ball was called to on Sunday morning last by Collins's wife, Grace Collins, to come and see if I cou'd open the door; I went over, and found it fastened on the outside – a cord was tied to the guard o the latch of the door with a gimlet; they could not have come out without that being taken off. I took the gimlet out and gave it to Grace Collins, and saw her give it to her husband.
Wm. Orchard: I am a thatcher, living at Tedburn; I knew the deceased; saw her on Saturday evening a little after six o'clock; that was the last time I saw her alive; I had been sitting with her, and let her at that time; as I left I heard her lock her door.
Question by Mr Fulford: Had either you or she used a lantern in her house that evening? – Nop, Sir.
Nathaniel Beer: I have been sworn a constable, for the purpose of the present investigation. On Sunday morning I was coming down from Taphouse towards Westwater, a little after eight o'clock, when I met Wm. Collins, he told me what had taken place, that some one had been trying the windows and tied his door. We went together to his house – I looked and saw a pane of glass had been taken from the casement of the spare room in MRS HOLMAN'S house. Collins or his wife then called MRS HOLMAN as they had been used, - they both called and knocked at the door, and getting no answer I went for a ladder. I went up to her bed-room window to wake her. I rattled the window but could get no answer. I found the casement fastened, with a stone outside in a situation in which she could not have put it. I am a carpenter. - I opened the small casement and looked in. There is a wooden (an oak) bar to that window. I looked in but could not see anything, the window curtains were drawn. I saw the candle, tinder-box, and things in the window. The room looked in disorder, - the drawers drawn out as far as I could see. I did not see the boxes. I came down and took the ladder and put it against the other window, underneath which stood a pole. This was the window of the spare room. I know the house well. I found a square of glass out and the window fastened by an iron button – I opened it and went directly in. I had on the shoes I wore on the preceding day, there are hob nails in them. As soon as I got in to put back the curtains, I saw the drawers of a chest immediately opposite were drawn out and that there was a dirty foot mark on the floor. the drawers had been opened by violence. It was evident some one had been through the room with dirty shoes, and I afterwards shewed these marks to Mr Fulford. The dirt from the shoe marks was of the same kind as the dirt of the turnpike road. I did not at the time observe anything else. Before I went in at the window I had seen a post placed against the house. It is a fir pole, and had been used as a prop to an apple tree. (Mr Fulford: I let MRS HOLMAN have it for that purpose myself.) - I went through the spare room and looked into MRS HOLMAN'S bed room and saw a chair and box on her bed, and the room in disorder. I directly went down stairs to open the door to let Wm. Collins in. When I came down stairs I put my hand to the key but found the door was not locked, the key was in the door. I lifted the latch and let in Wm. Collins. We both then proceeded up stairs. The upper part of the drawers in MRS HOLMAN'S bed room is what is called a hanging-press, the doors of which were also open. I have weighed the box found placed on the deceased, it is 14 ¾ lbs. The upper rail of the back of the chair was over the top of the box. The lower part of the chair rested on that part of the bed where there was no part of the body. I said to Collins we must observe how this is, and having taken the chair and box off, and then turned down the clothes and saw the deceased. The bed clothes were over the head of the deceased – down close as these could be pressed. I felt the body, it was not quite cold. We replaced the clothes as these were before, and then came down stairs, locked the door of the house, and proceeded to Great Fulford-house, the residence of Mr Fulford.
By Mr Fulford: The box that was on the body was open, whether recently forced or not, I don't know.
The box was now produced, and it was found it had been forced. The staple of the hatch was forced off, - and it appeared evident force must been used. The box contained linen and caps, *c. only.
Mr Fulford returned to the house of the deceased with me.
Baldwin Fulford, Esq.: - I am a Magistrate of the County of Devon: I knew the deceased very well: she had been a servant in my father's family for many years. On Sunday morning, Nathaniel Beer came to me at Great Fulford, and in consequence of the information he gave me, I returned with him to the residence of the deceased. My brother, Capt. Fulford, came with me. It was then about 11 o'clock in the forenoon. I proceeded up stairs, and Mr Collins uncovered the body, which was laying as has been described. I was shown this box: I knew it perfectly well: it was kept in her bedroom: she kept what money she had in it: it was always locked. I have reason to believe she had in it at the time of her death between £5 and £6. I know also that she had more than a dozen old plain silver tea spoons, marked G. W., her maiden name, and two pair of silver sugar tongs, one of them plain with a little sprig mark round the top, the other twisted. – Hele, of Alphington, constable, produced a tea spoon, which he had from the niece of the deceased.
Mr Fulford: The spoons and sugar tongs were usually kept in a little cupboard in the kitchen. The general state of the room was as the preceding witnesses have described it. I then went into the spare room and was shown the foot marks described by Beer. I traced them from close by the window, across the room, and down two or three of the stairs, as if the person had been going down the stairs to the kitchen. Probably the person was going down to open the door to some accomplice. The marks were as of a new shoe, neatly made, the impression was sharp, about 10 ½ inches in length, and the heel had a scute upon it. I made a pattern on paper f the impression. The scute mark was very sharp: I could not trace the middle part of the foot as distinctly; also particularly so of the second and third step – (pattern produced). In that room I saw the remains of two common Lucifer matches, which had been lit. I then search'd over the whole house, and did not find any money, except a sixpence, in one of the drawers, in spare room, and a pair of silver mounted spectacles and a few pence in the window seat in her own room. Knew of no articles of clothing missing except an old small black shawl with a sprig. The spectacles were in her Bible in the kitchen.
A niece said the deceased had the shawl before she was married.
Mr Fulford took charge of all papers, which he keeps for her son; then took examinations of witnesses, and sent information to the police of different towns. In the larder, which had been entered, nothing appeared to have been touched, except a lantern, which was usually hung up, but was now on the table. I had frequently desired her not to continue to live alone, but to come to Great Fulford; and had offered to pay a person to live with her, but she constantly refused both. Behind the entrance door of the kitchen, I found a small quantity of soot wrapped up in a piece of brown paper. MRS HOLMAN was remarkably neat about her house, and not at all likely to have been placed there by her. I think it not improbably it might have been used to blacken the face, or for purposes of disguise. MRS HOLMAN was well known here to be a person living on her own means; that she had a certain income. I looked very narrowly at the staircase leading up to a third room, but no one had been up there; the stairs were clean. There was a piece of candle in the lantern, which had been lit, but whether recently or not I cannot say. The fir pole has been latterly lying near the gate leading into the orchard. I also saw in the path of the garden the impression of a small hob-nail shoe on the outside, but not so as to admit the impression being taken up. This was in the direction leading up from the house to the turnpike-road. I examined the dirt from the foot-marks in the room, and found it to be precisely similar to the dirt in the turnpike-road. I also saw a black dirt mark on the pillow, close to the deceased's head, which I believe to be from the pole under the spare room window.
Jane Langdon: I am no relation of deceased, but frequented her house from a child, and frequently assisted her; don't think an interval of a week elapsed without visiting her. I knew she kept the spoons and one pair of sugar-tongs in a cupboard in the kitchen, near the window. – (Mr Fulford: I think the other pair were kept up stairs.) – Langdon spoke as to the shawl, and also thought a handkerchief was missing. I had cleaned the spoons and sugar-tongs frequently. The handkerchief was a very showy pattern – a great deal of white and red in it.
Herman Boerhaave Holman: I am a surgeon t Crediton: have attended the deceased occasionally since October, 1839. By the Coroner: Do you know her age? - I do not. (Mr Fulford: She is just about 80 years of age.) She was very infirm; I saw her after her death. About 11 o'clock on Sunday forenoon she was lying on her left side with her left hand a little raised towards her left cheek; her position was precisely that of a person asleep; the face was very much distorted, swollen and discoloured. On examining her it appeared to me that a very heavy pressure had been applied across the neck, there was an indented mark across the neck, which led me to think some heavy weight had been applied; it appeared to be pressed down and flattened. It appeared to me death had been occasioned by a pressure preventing the passage of air through the wind-pipe.; I should say the death was occasioned by suffocation or strangulation. It is my opinion the pressure of a box, such as this, with the addition of the weight of a person on it, would produce death, she being laying in the position in which she was. I think this sufficient to cause death; I have no doubt about it; the deceased had a difficulty in breathing at all times, and a slight pressure would have killed her. The tongue protruded.
Wm. Torrington keeps the turnpike gate at Taphouse. I person passed at 25 minutes to 1 o'clock on Sunday morning, on horseback. He passed up between 11 and 12 o'clock on Saturday morning towards Exeter. He was a stranger to me. I saw no other person pass.
Elizabeth Marchant, wife of John Marchant, of Tedburn: I live near the turnpike gate, and heard two men pass on Saturday night just before 12, they went down the road towards Westwater.
Nathaniel beer produced the chair that was on the bed. It is a wooden common bed-room chair. My attention was called to a dirt mark similar to the dirt marks in the other room.
This closed the evidence as far as it can at present be carried in the case. And the Coroner addressing the Jury said, it was impossible at present that a verdict could be returned in it. It became his duty therefore to adjourn the Inquest to a future day, and under present circumstances he thought he could not say less than a fortnight. The Inquest therefore stood adjourned to that day fortnight, the 19th of December, at the same place and it was his duty to take their recognizances to appear.
Mr Fulford also kindly said that he would communicate to the persons of the public press if any other arrangement should take place, and when the proceedings would be resumed, as further adjournment from the time specified might become necessary.
These proceedings terminated about half-past 5 o'clock. The venerable and deceased MRS HOLMAN, thus cruelly deprived of existence, we have already said was greatly respected. She had been twice married, - in the first instance to MR HETHERTON (as the name was understood), by whom she had one son, in the building line, and now residing in London. She secondly married MR HOLMAN, a farmer, by whom she had one son, now a builder in London; and two daughters, married to respectable farmers; and one of these daughters died about four years since. The cottage in which MRS HOLMAN resided, was her own property, as also other property near. Every means is using to discover the perpetrators of this dark and horrible deed, and every one will wish that these may be attended with a successful result.

Thursday, 7 December 1848, Issue 4330 – Gale Document No. Y3200678883
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Martin's Eagle Tavern, in the barrack-road, on the body of JOHN HARFORD, in the 50th year of his age, many years in the service of the Exeter Water Company, and residing with his wife in the house near the reservoir which it was part of his duty to attend to. On Friday evening between 8 and 9 o'clock, he came home very wet, and pulled off his hat, coat, neckerchief, and shoes. His wife asked him if he was going to turn off the water? To which he replied, no, he should not turn it off to night. He had drank a little freely, but was not so much the worse for this as she had seen him, and went up to bed. She then went out and turn'd off the water herself. When, however, she returned into her house, she found his clothes, which had been placed before the fire to dry, - were gone. Mrs Lee, of the White Ball public house, Mary Arches-street, has for some time slept at HARFORD'S house, as a particularly salubrious spot, and for the benefit of her health. Mrs Lee was at this time in bed, and MRS HARFORD called up to her and asked her if she knew where HARFORD was. Mrs Lee replied that he had gone out. MRS HARFORD then came into the city, and went to Callaway's, a turncock in the service of the Water Company, residing in Waterbeer-street, enquiring if he could give her any account of her husband. He could not, but went with her to two or three public houses to see if they could find, or hear of him, and failing in this, Callaway with another person returned with MRS HARFORD to the reservoir, and looking at the surface of the water at the south east end of the basin, about two feet from the bank, saw the back and head of a human being, as if laying on his face in the water. Callaway leant down on the bank, and caught the arm of the person, and pulling the body in, secured it with rope, and dragged it on the bank. It was the body of poor HARFORD, who was completely dressed, and his boots laced, but quite dead. It was now about half-past ten o'clock at night. Mrs Lee, after HARFORD, had gone out, heard a sound as of two suppressed screeches, but imaging this proceeded from the road, and hearing nothing more, she took no notice of it. The water at this part of the reservoir was 17 feet in depth, and the wall or bank perpendicular, so that it is almost impossible a person can escape drowning who is so unfortunate as to fall into it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

On Friday an Inquest was taken before F. Leigh, Esq., a Coroner for Devon, at the St. Thomas Union Workhouse, on the body of an illegitimate child named MARY MAUNDER, to which SARAH MAUNDER, an inmate of the house for the last four or five months, gave birth on the 10th of November last. The child had died in the course of the night, and the Jury returned a verdict that this had resulted from natural causes.

Thursday, 14 December 1848, Issue 4331 – Gale Document No. Y3200678916
DREWSTEIGNTON. - On Wednesday, the 6th inst., at the Sandy-Park Inn, H. A. Vallack, Esq., one of the Coroners for the County of Devon, held an Inquest on the body of JAMES GOLDSWORTHY, who was the engine worker at the Wheal St. Ann's copper and tin mine, Drewsteignton. Two witnesses proved the deceased was much intoxicated last Sabbath morning, when he came to the mine, and soon after threw off his coat and precipitated himself into the mine's shaft, at the depth of 33 fathoms; when assistance reached him, he could speak, but soon after died. Verdict, "That the deceased, in a temporary state of insanity, caused by drunkenness, destroyed himself."

Thursday, 14 December 1848, Issue 4331 – Gale Document No. Y3200678927
PLYMOUTH, DEVONPORT &c. - Coroner's Inquests. - Three female convicts have died during the week on board the Cadet, convict ship, in the Sound. It is satisfactory to state, however, that in neither case was death caused by cholera (as was reported.) In the case of SARAH PROUSER, 32, on whom an Inquest was held, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, the verdict returned was – "Died from effusion of the brain, consequent on active fever, subsequent to Malignant Cholera."

Thursday, 21 December 1848, Issue 4332 – Gale Document No. Y3200678949
INQUEST OF THE LATE MRS GRACE HOLMAN. - In this case, which is still wrapped in mystery, F. Leigh, Esq. the Coroner; and jury, met again yesterday (Tuesday) at Marchant's Red Lion Inn, Taphouse, Tedburn St. Mary. There was no new evidence produced, with the exception of finding the money in the cushion of one of her chairs, as stated in another column, and the Coroner having summed up, and addressed them, the Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against persons unknown. The police in this city, as in the neighbourhood are pursuing their enquiries, and it is to be hoped will be successful in tracing out the murderers.

Thursday, 11 January 1849, Issue 4336 – Gale Document No. Y3200679045
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Saturday last, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, an Inquest was taken on the body of MARY JANE LYNE, a little girl about 5 years old, who died on the preceding Thursday in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. It appeared that the parents of the deceased reside in a Courtlage in West Street, and on the 28th of December, the mother went out to purchase a loaf, leaving her daughter MARY JANE, and three younger children in the room. Shortly afterwards, Mary Bright, a neighbour, was alarmed by screams issuing from LYNE'S apartment, and going there, found the clothes of the eldest in flames. She endeavoured to with her gown to extinguish the fire, but this was effected by George Trump, a neighbour, who also came in, and seeing how severely the child was burnt, took it directly to the Hospital, where, notwithstanding every medical assistance was rendered, it lingered until the 4th inst., when death released it from its sufferings; and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

On Monday, an Inquest was held, also before Mr Warren, at Roach's Bull Inn, Goldsmith-street, on the body of JOHN THORNE, a prisoner in the City Gaol, who was found dead in his cell, on the turnkey going to unlock it on Sunday morning. The deceased was under sentence as a rogue and vagabond to one month hard labour; when committed having only been out of prison eight days from a former conviction, and 14 days hard labour. On the preceding day he appeared in his ordinary state of health; but it was learnt that some time since, when working on the South Devon Railway, he had a seizure, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 1 February 1849, Issue 4339 – Gale Document No. Y3200679148
HONITON. - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday, the 23rd inst., an Inquest was held at the London Inn, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR HUGH SYDENHAM, who has held the office of bell-ringer for upwards of half a century, and who met with an accident the previous week, while passing the High-street, by a large door falling on him, (and another man, named Joslin, but who was not hurt). The old man lingered about a week, when death put an end to his sufferings, and hence the present Inquest. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death." On Monday his remains were followed to the grave by a large concourse of friends and relations, on which occasion a knell was rung from the bells of the new church.

An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Union House, Torrington, before Mr T. J. Toller, (deputy Coroner for this district) on the body of JOHN BIRD, aged 5 months, the illegitimate child of a woman of that name, who died a few days after it was admitted into the house, at which time it was in a lifeless state from the want of nourishing food. The evidence adduced detailed the sufferings and privations that had been endured by the infant and its wretched mother, , literally bordering on starvation, and, the surgeon, Mr R. B. Rouse, who examined the body gave it as his opinion that congestion of the lungs from the want of food was the immediate cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from congestion of the lungs." We understand the mother has also since died.

Thursday, 8 February 1849, Issue 4340 – Gale Document No. Y3200679163
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken before John Gidley, Esq., deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene Street, on the body of ELIZABETH BERRY, about 4 years of age. The deceased was the daughter of JOHN BERRY, a fly driver, residing in Brunswick-place, Paris Street. On Thursday morning, the mother left home with her husband's breakfast, locking the door, and leaving this child, and a little boy about two years old in the room. While absent a woman residing in an upper room, heard screeches, and going down, saw through the window that the hapless girl's clothes were in a blaze. The door was burst open, and the flames extinguished, but so serious had been the injury that the child being taken to the Hospital, died on Friday morning. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday, 15 February 1849, Issue 4341 – Gale Document No. Y3200679196
ROSE ASH. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held before R. B. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the Barnstaple District, at North Grendon Farm, in this parish, on the body of JOHN BOND, son of MR THOMAS BOND, farmer, of that place. The deceased had not been well for some days previous to his death, and on the preceding Tuesday was at work with his elder brother in the barn. It appears that he had eaten a hearty dinner a short time before he resumed his thrashing. On a post mortem examination being made by Mr P. F. Haley, assisted by his pupil Mr T. W. Coster, it was ascertained that apoplexy was the cause of death, and the Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday, 22 February 1849, Issue 4342 – Gale Document No. Y3200679240
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Friday, an Inquest was taken before John Gidley, Esq., deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Cridge's Paper Maker's Arms public-house, Exe-street, on the body of JOHN TRIST, in his eleventh year, son of MR JOHN TRIST, of Edmund-street, hairdresser, which had been taken from the leat, just above Engine-bridge, that morning. It appeared that the deceased and a brother, were scholars at the British school, Coombe-street. On Thursday his father missed a penknife, and thinking his son JOHN had taken it, directed that he should bring it home when he returned from school in the afternoon. The lad took his dinner, washed himself, and left, as was supposed, for school. On the return of the brother, however, he informed his parents that JOHN had not been to school. This rendered them exceedingly uneasy, but still they indulged an idea that he would return home at dark; in the mean time however, making enquiries for him in the neighbourhood, but without effect. Night at length closed in, and he did not return, when the anxiety and distress of the parents became extreme, and repairing to the station-house, it was made a request to the police if they saw such a youth they would detain and see him home, or otherwise apprise the parents. The night, however, passed without any tidings of him. About half-past 11 o'clock on Friday forenoon, James Martin, a youngster, son of Mr Martin, (Martin and Toby, iron-founders, Engine-bridge) being in the foundry, saw through an aperture in the flooring what appeared to be a human body in the water beneath, and Jacob Channing, a moulder, getting down to it, found the missing lad TRIST, with his arm crooked round one of the bars of a grating. He was quite dead: and the body was removed to Mr Cridge's. The Jury under these circumstances, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but no evidence has come before us to show how the deceased came into the water."

Thursday, 1March 1849, Issue 4343 – Gale Document No. Y3200679257
DREWSTEIGNTON. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last on the body of WILLIAM BROWNING, aged 63, of Netherton in the above parish, labourer, by H. Vallack, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, who committed suicide the day previous by hanging himself with a small rope, in an outhouse near his dwelling, belonging to Edwd. Pitts, Esq. The deceased was observed to be labouring under great depression of spirits for some days previous to his committing the rash act occasioned as is supposed from sickness of himself and family. - Verdict, "Temporary Insanity.

Thursday, 8 March 1849, Issue 4344 – Gale Document No. Y3200679301
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Thursday last, before J. Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, for Exeter, at Mr Wheaton's, Harford-place, Bartholomew yard, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH MAY, 65 years of age, a widow, in independent circumstances, who was residing in this house. In the course of the preceding evening she was heard by her neighbours as if suffering from severe illness, and going to her it was found the power of breathing and speaking was nearly gone. Some gin and water was given her, and Mr Kingdon, surgeon, sent for, but before that gentleman could arrive, she had expired. And the Jury returned a verdict, "Death produced by natural causes."

On the same day, before Mr Gidley, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MR HENRY SILLS, electrician, and medical galvanist practitioner, 50 years of age, who came to his death under the following circumstances. MR SELLS lodged with Mrs Mary May, boot and shoe-maker, 37, South-street, and would have completed the sixth year of his residence with her, in May next. The state of his mind, however, from pecuniary difficulties and embarrassments, was become such that he was about to leave, and that day return to his mother and sister, who reside in the neighbourhood. On that morning he had appeared in a state of great excitement, and Mr Isaac Noke, also a lodger at Mrs May's passing his door, saw MR SILLS apparently lying on the floor, and thinking him ill, called the attention of the servant to him. The state in which Harriet Joslin, the servant, found him, led to Mr George Pike, a neighbour, being called, who found the door of MR SILLS'S room a little open, and the unfortunate man suspended by the neck to the handle of the door, - having for this purpose a small cord. He had his spectacles as was his custom to wear these, and had also his stock on, but was quite dead. He (witness) had considered MR SILLS'S mind to be disordered and this from having no employment, and having contracted debts which he had himself said he should never be able to pay. Mr Arthur Kempe, surgeon, had attended MR SILLS, and noticed the state of despondence into which he was getting; such indeed as had led him to suggest his being placed in a lunatic asylum. And, under these circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict, that the deceased destroyed himself while labouring under insanity.

On Friday, also before Mr Gidley, at the same Inn, on the body of HUGH DUFFY, an itinerant vendor of brushes, who died on the preceding morning in the Hospital. It appeared that soon after 10 o'clock, on Wednesday morning, DUFFY was found, having fallen down in the road, near the Artillery Barracks, Topsham road. He was senseless and had not spoken from the time he was picked up. He was married, and it appeared had before suffered from an attack of apoplectic character; and the Jury returned a verdict of died from apoplexy.

Thursday, 22 March 1849, Issue 4346 – Gale Document No. Y3200679354
TAVISTOCK – FATAL ACCIDENT. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday, the 13th instant, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at Sandyparks Farm House, near Tavistock, on the body of WILLIAM SQUIRES, aged 40 years, late in the employ of Mr Thomas Chubb, and on whose estate the deceased was about to reside as hind, Mr Chubb having lent him his wagon to remove his goods from Whitchurch, and the wagon being at Kilworthy, the deceased went on Saturday, the 10th inst., to get it, with a horse belonging to Mr Chubb. On arriving t Kilworthy, he found the wagon loaded, and it was promised to be sent to him, and on returning with the horse in the Kilworthy road, he met a man named Barnacott, leading a horse colt, and a young man riding it, and another behind Barnacott being about to pass SQUIRES, he called out to SQUIRES to keep near the hedge, and pass on quickly. Instead of doing so, SQUIRES stopped to look at the colt, on perceiving which, Barnacott called out, "For God's sake go on, or else the colt will kick you." Barnacott had no sooner said the words, than the colt kicked at the horse, and struck SQUIRES on the head. The blow threw him against the hedge, and he was removed insensible and died the following day. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded by the Jury. the deceased was married, and has left a wife and three children.

Thursday, 19 April 1849, Issue 4350 – Gale Document No. Y3200679465
TORQUAY – Melancholy Accident. – On Thursday, an Inquest was held at the Exeter Inn, on the bodies of THOS. DENSHAM, and MARY, his wife, who met with their deaths on Warren Hill, Melville-street, under these circumstances:- On Wednesday last, about half-past 11, MRS DENSHAM was in her wash-house, adjoining her house, washing, her husband reading the newspaper to her, when suddenly a wall about 35 feet long, by 20 feet high, behind the wash-house, gave way, breaking down the wash-house, and buying them both beneath the ruins, where they remained until about seven o'clock, when the neighbours, finding them missing, searched under the ruins, and found both dead. Mr Smerdon is building a house above the wall, and has been making a drain, which it is thought was the cause of the sad accident. The Jury returned a verdict "That the parties met with their death in consequence of the falling of the wall."

BUDLEIGH SALTERTON. – An Inquest was held before Robert H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 9th inst., on view of the body of GEORGE ELSTON, aged 24, a labouring man, in the employ of Mr Morris, of that town, innkeeper – and from the evidence given at the Inquest, it appeared that on the 5th inst., the deceased had been sent by his master to Exeter with a wagon and horse to fetch some wine and ale. The deceased had gone to Exeter, and was on his return; he was driving at a trot, and sitting on the foreboard of the wagon, and in crossing a brook of water in Yettington village, the deceased was jolted off, and the near hind wheel passed over his body. He was immediately taken to a house close by, and the wagon and horse taken on to Salterton, by a person named Burrough, who was riding with him at the time of the accident. A fly was sent to take the deceased home, and medical assistance was procured. The deceased complained of severe pain in the abdomen, and lingered until about eight o'clock on Friday night, when he died. there were no external marks, and from the symptoms under which the deceased laboured, the medical gentleman who attended him was of opinion that some of the deceased's intestines were ruptured by the wheel passing over him, which was the cause of death. Verdict – Accidental Death.

CORONER'S INQUESTS. – On Friday last an Inquest was taken before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, at Ash's George and Dragon public-house, in the Black Boy-road, St. Sidwells, on the body of CHARLOTTE CHANNING, about 28 or 29 years of age, who died on the preceding afternoon. There was something peculiarly distressing and mournful in this case, the deceased having been married only on the Monday preceding. She had previously been a servant in a highly respectable family residing in the suburbs of this city; her husband being a servant to a family residing at Heavitree, and they had taken a house, or apartments, at Lion's Holt, St. Sidwells. On Thursday afternoon she left home for the purpose of meeting her husband who was coming from Heavitree. On her way she passed a boy with a wheelbarrow, and accidentally knocked herself. She however proceeded onwards, but felt the part she had knocked tedious and sore. She saw her husband and they walked homewards together. She told him what had occurred, and that the part was tedious, and shortly after that said she felt damp in her feet. This was presently succeeded by the expression of a feeling of faintness, and that she believed she should faint if he did not hold her up. All this very much alarmed her husband, and still more so when presently she dropped on her knees. He raised her up as well as in his agitation he was enabled to do, and called for assistance, as also intreated that some one would go and obtain the instant attendance of a medical man. They had now arrived just by Belmont-place, and Mr S. Perkins immediately attended to the request made him and hastened to the spot. He found that the veins of the leg of the sufferer were in a varicose state, and that having struck against the barrow, the effect had been as if a puncture had been made, and that the unfortunate woman had bled most profusely, quantities of coagulated blood falling from her as he removed the garter or ligature which had been drawn tightly round the leg, just below the knee, and cut down the stocking, so as to free the limb, and enable him to ascertain the full amount of mischief which had been done. The husband also now recollected that she had faintly said "unlace my stays." Mr Perkins directed the immediate use of restoratives, and that with gentleness and the utmost care she should be taken to her home, from which she was now comparatively but a short distance. The loss of blood, however, had been such – (it being computed that there was at least two pounds weight of coagulated blood taken from her, besides which there was at the place where she sunk down a spot of ground of about two feet square, literally dyed with blood) – that she expired by the way, and the Jury, on a consideration of all the circumstances, and the opinion expressed that the fatal consequences had resulted from the loss of blood, returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

On Saturday an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of HARRIET ANN SMEATH, a girl five years old, and a fine child, who died on the preceding day in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. It appeared that the father of the deceased is in the service of the Rev. Dr. Collyns, at Farringdon, and on Thursday was directed to cut the wreath in the lawn, and this being of no value it was ordered that it should be burnt. Accordingly SMEATH did so by drawing it to a heap and setting fire to it. this naturally attracted the children of the neighbourhood, and the deceased among the number. The heap of material being, as SMEATH judged, burnt out, and all, as he though secure, he left the spot, the children being still playing round the embers. He had not, however, got to the top of the field, when looking round he was horror struck at seeing that the clothes of his daughter were on fire. He ran back with all his speed to the spot, and laying the child down, got down also himself, in order by means of his hands, and rolling her, to extinguish the fire, and in this manner so burnt his own hands that these at the Inquest presented a more frightful appearance than even the parts of the body of his daughter with which the fire had come in contact. the unfortunate girl was immediately brought to the hospital, where she was received into the care of Mr Edye, one of the surgeons of that establishment, but notwithstanding every medical aid was afforded, such had been the injury, and such a shock the system had received, that she died on the following day, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 26 April 1849, Issue 4351 – Gale Document No. Y3200679509
WEAR GIFFORD – Melancholy Accident. - On Monday last as three little boys were playing together on a bridge over the mill leat, they got on the railing and one of them named WARE fell into the water, and was washed down the stream a considerable distance before he was taken out, when life was found to be extinct. An Inquest was held next day and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Awful Death - An aged man named ALFORD, of High Bickington, met his death in returning from Barnstaple market with his son in a cart on Friday last. It appears they were both the worse for liquor, and on the road, the old man fell out f the cart, and it is supposed dislocated his neck, a person passing by helped the old man into the cart, and as it was considered he was suffering under the effects of intoxication, the son drove on to Atherington Town, where he stopped to have more drink, when it was discovered that his father was dead. An Inquest was held next day, by Mr Toller, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday, 10 May 1849, Issue 4353 – Gale Document No. Y3200679565
CORONER'S INQUEST. – On Monday last, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, an Inquest was taken at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of WILLIAM MAYO, a labouring man, who died that morning in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. MAYO resided at Halberton, but on Wednesday, the 2nd inst., together with his son LEVI MAYO, in his 20th year, and three others, was at work collecting bark on an estate called Coombs, in the parish of Willand. About 5 in the afternoon, MAYO and a man named John Lake were on the top of an oak pollard, engaged in cutting off the limbs, which the others were catching below; and at the time the accident occurred MAYO and Lake were cutting a limb with a cross cut saw. The weight of this limb caused it to break off rather quicker than they had expected, and the limb swinging suddenly round, struck MAYO, and knocked him off the tree. His son and the others were nearly under, and the former considers that his father reached the ground before the limb; and pitched on his head. He was immediately lifted up, and was not senseless, but they bore him at once to the nearest house, and sent for a surgeon. This gentleman promptly attended, but as soon as he saw him directed that at once, with all care, he should be taken to the Hospital at Exeter. In order to this he was removed to the Tiverton-road station of the Bristol and Exeter Railway, and thence to Exeter, where they arrived by the half-past 9 train. A fly was procured, and he reached the Hospital about half-past ten. Mr Harris, one of the surgeons of this valuable institution, was instantly sent for, and continued to attend the unfortunate man till he died, which was at one o'clock on Monday morning. the facts were spoken to by MAYO'S son, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 7 June 1849, Issue 4357 – Gale Document No. Y3200679728
A man of respectable appearance was drowned in the Exeter Canal, a short distance above the Double Lock, on the evening of Thursday last. He had been seen near the spot as early as half-past 5 in the morning, and at intervals during the whole of the day. About seven o'clock in the evening, a woman heard a noise in the water, and observed a hat and coat on the bank of the canal. The drags were immediately procured, and in half an hour the poor fellow was taken out, but life was extinct. He appears to have been about 70 years of age, and from letters found in his pockets, his name was ascertained to be JAS THOMPSON, of Ottery St. Mary, by trade a silk weaver. The body was taken to Perryman's Inn, and the verdict on the Inquest was "found Drowned."

Thursday, 21 June 1849, Issue 4359 – Gale Document No. Y3200679793
BRAMPFORD SPEKE. - A distressing and fatal accident happened to a poor man of the name of BAMSEY, an inhabitant of this place, on Friday last. He was at work with his son, a lad of about 17 years of age, at Netherexe Barton, sawing timer, and having descended into the sawpit for the purpose of adjusting it, he unfortunately moved the piece of timber forward, when it fell on his neck and across his shoulders, crushing him to the ground. He never spoke nor moved afterwards, but died instantly. An Inquest was held on Monday by Fred. Leigh, Esq., and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The Jury kindly handed over their fees to the clergyman of the parish for the widow, who is left in a great state of poverty, and has eight fatherless children to support.

CORONER'S INQUEST. – On Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MARY MATTHEW, the wife of HENRY MATTHEW, a gardener residing in the village of Whipton, in the parish of Heavitree, who came to her death under the following circumstances. From the statement made by the husband, it was learnt that from 8 to half-past 8 o'clock on the morning of Saturday last, he and his wife, and a little grandchild that lived with them took breakfast together, and he left his wife who was in her 70th year, seated in a chair and finishing her meal by the side of the fire, his grand-daughter going with him. About ten o'clock the grand-child returned to the house, when she found her grand-mother laying on the floor close by the grate. The chair on which she had sat was remaining in its proper place, so that there was no doubt but that she must have fallen from it. The little girl ran to a neighbour's house and called a woman named Mary Ireland, who instantly rendered assistance, and hove up the unfortunate woman as well as she could, as also got her back from the fire place, when she discovered that her right arm and shoulder were much burnt, and also the right side down to the hip. She was alive, but quite insensible. With assistance she was got up stairs to the bed-room, and the burnt garments taken off. Mr Madden, of Heavitree, surgeon, was also sent for, and promptly attended, but when he saw the patient and injuries she had sustained, he recommended that she should be removed to the Hospital in this city, which was done. Here she received every care from Mr De-law-Garde, surgeon of that establishment, but died on that (Monday) morning. It appeared that she had experienced previous attacks of paralysis, and a verdict was returned of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 5 July 1849, Issue 4361 – Gale Document No. Y3200679851
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Sampson's Turk Head Inn, High-street, on the body of GEORGE HAYNE, a young man about 20 years of age, a labourer, who died about 2 o'clock that morning at his lodgings in a house in Waterbeer-street, just at the back of the inn. It appeared that the deceased HAYNE, and a young man named Robert Vaughan, about 22 years of age, in some branch of the coachmaking business, working in Frog-lane, were related, and on intimate and most friendly terms. They were also acquainted with a female named Wood, otherwise Potter, who occupied a room in a house in Sun-street. Vaughan and this female on Wednesday last went to Alphington Fair in company. He returned home, and, as is understood, remained with her. In the course of Thursday afternoon Vaughan went to the Black Dog public-house in North-street, and calling HAYNE out, who was there, said if he would go with him he'd give him some brandy and bitters. HAYNE accompanied his relative to the room of the female Wood, and there was produced a champaigne bottle containing liquor, the history of which was this. The occupier and sub-letter of the house prepares a medicine for the cure of gout. It is composed of the best brandy in which is steeped a root, which we heard called by various names. It is very powerful, and a few drops taken in some liquid, is a dose. This bottle unfortunately had been left with a number of empty bottles in a cupboard in the room taken by the female Wood, and she having Vaughan with her, in their explorations found it, - tasted it, and pronounced it to be brandy and bitters. With such a prize as this Vaughan hastens after his relative HAYNE, and the three between them pretty well cleared the bottle. How much the female drank, or what state she was in, was not known, but on Friday, HAYNE and Vaughan were both very ill, and it is said that Vaughan having by this time his misgivings, as to the nature of the liquor they had drank, carried the bottle with the dregs to Mr Stone, chemist and druggist,, who at once told him it was poison! HAYNE in the course of Friday was again at the Black Dog, and dreadfully sick and ill, and returning to his lodgings, on Saturday morning Mr A. Cumming, surgeon, was sent for. That gentleman administered such remedies as the case called for, but the unfortunate man sank, and expired at 2 o'clock on Monday morning. The Jury being desirous of fuller information, as also that if possible the woman should be before them, wished for an adjournment, and the Coroner accordingly adjourned the Inquest to Thursday. It was said the owner of the bottle valued the medicine that was in it at 10s. Vaughan, the man spoken of, is alive but continues very ill.

Thursday, 12 July 1849, Issue 4362 – Gale Document No. Y3200679893
FATAL ACCIDENT. – On Sunday afternoon last, EMANUEL ELLIOTT, a young man 21 years of age, in the employ of Mr James Moxon, of the Globe Hotel, in this city, in the capacity of under ostler, and formerly a pot-boy at Keeth's Three Tuns Inn, went to see his brother, William, in the service of Mr Mugford, of Millbrook Farm, near Northbrook, in the parish of Heavitree. While here he accompanied his brother to the field for the purpose of milking the cows. At the edge of this field on the South, runs a leat, commonly known as Duck's Leat, being water thus turned off from the river Exe by James's Weir, at Old Abbey and Salmon Pool, and is the water supplying the paper manufactory of Messrs. Harris and Co. at Countess Weir. The water in this leat is in many parts deep, and the bottom most uncertain. EMANUEL ELLIOTT having assisted his brother by milking two of the cows, said he would go and have a bathe, - or have a wash, - it is not certain which, and proceeded towards the water for this purpose. This was the last time he was seen alive. About two hours after this, a person in the employ of Messrs. Harris, being on the bank of the leat, discovered a man's clothes, and it immediately suggested itself to him that the owner must have been drowned. An immediate search was therefore instituted, - at first however without success, but some drags being procured, the body was found, quite dead, having now been in the water three hours. In the meantime the deceased's brother WILLIAM had finished milking four cows, which thus came to his share, and returned to his master's house where he cleaned himself, - changed his clothes, and came out thinking to join his brother. Scarcely however was he got into the grounds, when he heard that a young man had been drowned, and immediately became apprehensive that it was his brother, which was but too soon confirmed. On the body being taken up it was placed in a boat and thus conveyed up the river. It was thence removed to a cart, and taken to the house of his father, a stocking weaver, in Upper Paul-street. On Monday an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq. Coroner for Exeter, at Roach's Bull Inn, Goldsmith-street, and these facts having been stated in evidence, the Jury returned a Verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 9 August 1849, Issue 4366 – Gale Document No. Y3200680059
CORONER'S INQUEST. – An Inquest was taken on the 31st ult. before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of JOHN JORDAN, a lad 12 years of age, who died that day in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. It appeared the deceased had been working in the brick-field at the workhouse, and on the 19th of July was attending the machine for grinding clay, for making tiles. In doing this he interfered with the gear while the machine moved on, and his hand became jammed between the machine and some boarding immediately contiguous. From this he received such injury that a finer was obliged to be taken off. This however was not sufficient, the injury received, and the shock to the system was such that having lingered in the Hospital, (to which institution he was taken) to the morning of the 31st , he died; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday, 16 August 1849, Issue 4367 – Gale Document No. Y3200680086
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Palmer's King's Arms Inn, West-street, on the body of JOSEPH ELLIOTT, about 50 years of age, an itinerant vender of books. The deceased was understood to be a native of London, but had long regarded Dulverton as his home and may be said principally to have resided there. On the preceding Monday, in his journeying, he came to Dunn's lodgings, West-street, to which he had been accustomed, and where he was well known. He complained of being affected by sore throat, which he attributed to having sat in a window the day before where a part of the glass was broken. From Monday onwards he went out about his business several times, continuing this to between 5 and 6 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon. He now complained that he was labouring, and state he was in; and at his request Elizabeth Best, Mrs Dunn's daughter, got for him, at Mr Pates', druggist, half an ounce of castor oil, which he took. She also prepared a poultice of vinegar and bran, which was applied to his throat, and he went to bed. About two o'clock the following morning, he was heard to go to the night-stool, and after this a noise being heard as if from a person in distress, the persons of Mrs Dunn's family hastened to him, when they found him suffering severely from great difficulty in breathing, and immediately sent to request the attendance of Mr Kempe, surgeon, which was promptly rendered, but no sooner sae the patient than he saw that an operation on the windpipe was necessary, and returned in all haste to his house for his instruments for that purpose. Mr F. H. Warren also was sent for. Mr Kempe was not wanting above ten minutes, and in the mean time they had got the unfortunate sufferer into bed; but when Mr Kempe returned ELLIOTT was dead. Mr Kempe said it was a case of croup, - a complaint of very rare occurrence in old persons; and had Mrs Dunn's family been aware of his state, and he (Mr Kempe) been called an hour or two earlier, he thought, by an incision into the windpipe, he might have saved his life. The Jury returned a verdict that he died from Natural Causes. ELLIOTT was possessed of property, and the Coroner stated that a Savings' Bank Book, and such other property as he had about him, had been given up to him (the Coroner) by Elizabeth Best, and he should see that all was sent to the proper parties at Dulverton.

On Monday, also before Mr Warren, at Roach's Bull Inn, Goldsmith street, on the body of JOHN WAY, 34 years of age, a brewer and porter. The deceased was a son of the late MR WAY, for many years landlord of the Crediton Inn, Paul-street. He has been some time in ill health, and occasionally under medical treatment, having ruptured a blood vessel. On Monday morning in Queen-street, he again ruptured a blood vessel, under the effects of which he in a short time expired. The Coroner addressed the Jury, saying had he been earlier made acquainted with these particulars, or had an opportunity earlier of seeing his son, he would not have troubled them to come there. There was nothing in the case at all calling for inquiry, and therefore without further detaining, he thanked and discharged them.

Thursday, 23 August 1849, Issue 4368 – Gale Document No. Y3200680136
FATAL ACCIDENT. – On Thursday last, as JOHN HENTON, aged 10 years, son of a labourer, was riding on a load of wheat, in a field in Westwoods, Broadclist, some of the sheaves upon which the boy was sitting gave way, when he was precipitated to the ground; having at the time a pitchfork in his hand, upon which he fell, the prongs perforated his chest, causing almost immediate death. His father and brother were with him at the time. Mr Merry, surgeon, of Broadclist, was in immediate attendance, but his assistance was of no avail. An Inquest was held on Friday by F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday, 30 August 1849, Issue 4369 – Gale Document No. Y3200680161
We deeply regret to have to record the death of MR JOSEPH FRANCIS MERIVALE, son of the late JOHN HERMAN MERIVALE, Esq., which occurred on Sunday afternoon last, at Budleigh Salterton, which salubrious part of our coast he had visited, with Mr T. C. Sanders, Mr John Harris, and others of this city. It appears that about four o'clock MR MERIVALE went to bathe in the river at the top of the beach, by himself, being unable to swim. Mr sanders and Mr Harris were on the beach, nearly half a mile distant, and MR MERIVALE was seen, from time to time, by them in the water; at length, some time elapsed, and Mr Sanders not being able to see him, noticed it to Mr Harris, and they became alarmed, and made signal by a handkerchief, when a preventive boat put out, and also a fishing-boat. Mr Harris going off to the spot where MR MERIVALE had been seen, in the former. The young gentleman was not visible, and the most active search being made, the body was found in about ten minutes, and taken up, when every means which medical skill could devise were resorted to by Mr Harris, to restore animation, but in vain, for the vital spark had fled, to the deep grief of that gentleman and Mr Sanders. The body was removed to a house, at the Lime Kilns, to await the Coroner's Inquest. It is supposed that MR MERIVALE was attacked with apoplexy or cramp, but whether he got out of his depth or not, is doubtful. He was serving his articles with Mr Kitson, (Sanders and Kitson, solicitors, of this city)(, and gave promise of more than ordinary ability; he was about twenty years of age, and greatly esteemed by a large circle of friends by whom, as well as by his bereaved family, his premature death is much lamented.

Thursday, 13 September 1849, Issue 4371 – Gale Document No. Y3200680254
The body of a young man named HENRY WANNELL, about 19 years of age, under boots at the Star Hotel, in this city, who has been missing for the last seven or eight days, having absconded on a charge of misappropriation of money, the property of his employers, was on Wednesday morning taken from the river between Gaylor's Red Cow, and Connett's Half Way Inn, on the Crediton Road, and carried to the latter, where an Inquest was held the same afternoon He appeared to have been dead some days.

Thursday, 13 September 1849, Issue 4371 – Gale Document No. Y3200680257
HONITON. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at the Golden Lion Inn, in this town, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD SALTER, aged 18, who died on Friday last in consequence of a wound he received from a piece of red-hot iron on the 25th of August last, which was thrown at him by a smith named Goss, with whom he worked at Mr Ward's coach manufactory. A deposition of the deceased was taken by two of the borough Magistrates, viz., Capt. Basleigh, Mayor, and J. H. Townsend, Esq., several days previous to his death, Goss being present, who was taken into custody, but afterwards admitted to bail. From the evidence it appeared that Goss, deceased, and a youth named Materface, had been amusing themselves with throwing a broom, iron bolt tools, and a poker, to each other. Goss, who was at the forge preparing a rod of iron for making a holdfast, took it from the fire and pitched it at deceased, a distance of 22 feet, which entered the higher and posterior part of the arm, separating the main artery and nerve, taking an upward direction of four inches, opposite the first rib. The haemorrhage was great, and wrists pulseless, and after reaction the pulsation did not return to the wounded arm. Two or three days before his death, the medical gentleman who attended him allowed him to sit up in his room, thinking him better, but on Friday last eh haemorrhage returned, after which he did not survive one hour. The Coroner having explained the nature of the evidence to the Jury, and the law as applicable in the case, they immediately returned a verdict of "Chance-medly." Goss was again taken before the Magistrates on Saturday last, and committed to take his trial at the next Assizes, but after the verdict given above he was admitted to bail upon finding two sureties in £20 each and himself in £40.

Thursday, 20 September 1849, Issue 4372 – Gale Document No. Y3200680295
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On the afternoon of Wednesday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner at Exeter, at Gaylor's Red Cow Inn, St. David's, on the body of HARRY WANNELL, the boots at the Star Hotel, which, as stated by us last week, had been taken that morning from the river Exe, about half way between Gaylor's and Connett's Half Way House, on the Crediton Road. From the evidence brought forward in this Inquiry it appeared that between one and two o'clock in the day of the Thursday preceding, a commercial traveller at the Star, named Hux, gave in charge to Wannell £45 in cash with which he was to go to one of the banks to get notes. He left the Star for this purpose, but did not return. Richard Jordan, who drives a fly for Mrs Lott, stated seeing the deceased on this day, who asked him to drive him out as far as Connett's. To this Jordan assented, when WANNELL got up with him outside, and in doing so Jordan discovered that he had been drinking freely. As they passed on the road WANNELL took from his pocket some papers, which he told Jordan were three five pound notes; and these had that appearance. He (Jordan) desired him to take care of them. They went on to Connet5t's, where WANNELL asked Jordan if he would have a glass of brandy, and took a glass of brandy himself. Jordan however, preferred a glass of beer. WANNELL then told him he was going off by the train to Tiverton, - that he had leave for two days to do so. He asked him, however, to drive on as far as Cowley Bridge, and then come back in time for the train. While at Cowley Bridge they each had a glass of brandy and water. They then returned towards Exeter but when got a little inside the turnpike gate WANNELL asked him to turn and drive him to Connett's a second time. Here they remained some time and WANNELL drank. He took out is money, and there were sovereigns that fell about the floor and underneath the table. Jordan picked up 25 sovereigns, but seeing the state his young companion was in, he desired Mrs Connett to take care of him and of his money, and he (Jordan) would make haste to Exeter to see and apprise WANNELL'S friends. He saw his mother, and found the young man had been missed and that a search after him was commenced. The mother and a woman with her immediately left in a fly; on reaching the Red Cow village, however, they stopped at the door of Hutching's Railway Inn, and then saw the young man they were in search of near the turnpike gate. The driver called to him, and he came up to them, but looking into the fly and seeing his mother, he ran off as fast as he could in the direction of Cowley Bridge. Wm. Camden, a fly driver who was there, ran after him, - saw him get over a hedge and followed him, when he found him in a linhay lying on his back. The mother came up with the flyman and carriage, and Camden lifted WANNELL up, when his mother asked him where the money was? He took out a halfpenny and said that was all the money he had. His mother endeavoured to persuade him to come into the fly with her, and return home but he would not, and at length, she with Jordan returned to Mr Connett's to get the money, which had been left there. Wm. Camden also came out into the road, and looking back in the direction he had come, saw WANNELL running on the line of railway in the direction of Connett's, which he imagined he was endeavouring to reach by the shortest way. This was the last time he was seen alive. The next morning, a boy called William Parr, picked up a hat in the deep water opposite old Duryard Lodge, which turns out to be a hat WANNELL bought at Bisney's hat warehouse, on the Thursday, where he left his cap. The search after the body, however, at this part of the river proved fruitless, and nothing more was heard until Wednesday morning, when Joseph Carter, a smith, being on the Exwick side of the river, saw something in the deep water opposite, which he imagined to be a human body, and swimming across found it to be the missing body of WANNELL, which was taken out, and as already stated, carried to Gaylor's. On stripping the body it was suggested there might be money about it, and from the left boot a sovereign dropped, which was given to his friends, and it was said in the Inquest room, that about £1 19s. of the whole sum entrusted to him only was missing. The deceased was stated to be 18 years of age in March last; and though young he had sometime held his situation, and up to this occurrence maintained the character of an honest and trustworthy person. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

On Friday, an Inquest was taken before the same Gentleman at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene Street, on the body of a female child five years old, named REBECCA AUSTIN. It appeared that on the preceding day after dinner, she left her father's house to attend the school in Magdalene street. A man named Thomas Richards, who drives a coal cart for Mr Hawkins, was coming round the corner by the Topsham Inn, with an empty cart. He had reins and was sitting in the front. He here saw a wagon coming in the opposite direction, and crossed the road in order to get to his proper side. He at this time saw a little girl standing just in front of the kerb, and pulled in on the near side in order to let the wagon pass. The child ran against the shaft and the horses, and it is imagined must have now fallen, and, sad to relate, the near wheel of Richards's cart went over her. She had not been ten minutes out of her father's house when this fatal accident happened. Being taken up, a brother carried her to the Hospital, but though every medical aid was afforded, it was in vain, the injuries were such that she died on the following morning, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 27 September 1849, Issue 4373 – Gale Document No. Y3200680317
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Saturday an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Mitchell's Poltimore Inn, Sidwell-street, on the body of a child two years and five months old, named FREDERICK CHARLES RUDD, the son of MR WM. RUDD, auctioneer's assistant, residing in Union-terrace, St. Sidwell's. The child was missed on Friday, and search and enquiries made for it in every direction; in which too the police, under the direction of the Superintendent, kindly lent their assistance; but all without producing any intelligence concerning it; and as the day began to close the distress of the parents became extreme. At length, by some one going to the spot, - or it suggesting itself to examine this place, - it was found that the boarded covering of a well in front of the houses in Union-terrace, was broken in, and examination being made, the body of the unfortunate child, - evidently dead a considerable time, - was taken from the well! From the statements made before the Coroner, it appeared that the houses in this terrace are the property of 13 landlords, and that this well and pump connected with it are in common for the use of the whole tenantry of the place; the repair, it seems, resting with the proprietors of the houses. In process of time the boarding over the well had become in a rotten and dangerous state, - (described by a person present as inch and quarter stuff,) – and representations had been made to the owners in consequence. They, however, it would appear, did not agree about the repair, as was stated, eleven agreeing to share the necessary expense, and two, - said to be Mr Willey and Mr Hewett, - dissenting from it. In consequence of this nothing was done, and loss of life at length has resulted from it. It is imagined the unfortunate child was at play on this boarding, when from its state of rottenness it gave way, and the child was precipitated into the well, having fallen a depth of 50 feet before it came to any water. The Jury were very strong in their animadversions of this conduct; begging most especially that the Press would take notice of it; as also that the Coroner would write to these parties; and regretting the law did not give them a power to inflict some fine on them themselves. Powerless in this respect as they found they were, however, their verdict in the cased was that of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 4 October 1849, Issue 4374 – Gale Document No. Y3200680369
PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT. - Important Inquest. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little girl named ELLEN ROBERTS, aged five years, said to have died from the effects of a poisonous vapour emitted from the Arsenic Works at Cox-side belonging to Mr Balkwill. Mr A. Pain, the manager of the works, was present, and Mr Rooker, solicitor, attended as his legal adviser. After a long investigation, in the course of which Dr Budd stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and had thought it right to send the stomach, lungs and portions of the other viscera, to Mr Herepath of Bristol, for analysation, the Inquest was adjourned till this day, when the chemical report was to be made. Mr Pain, on the suggestion of the Coroner, stated that the works should be closed till the Inquiry was concluded.

Thursday, 18 October 1849, Issue 4376 – Gale Document No. Y3200680434
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Herbert's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene-street, on the body of MARGARET HILL, nearly 75 years of age, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. It was understood this aged female had resided in the neighbourhood of Newton St. Cyres, and a fire taking place in a cottage in which her daughter dwelt, she went in, in order to get out a corner cupboard, when the roof fell in. She was extricated from her perilous situation, but so much burnt and injured that it became necessary to remove her to the Hospital, where she received every attention, but sunk under the injuries and shock the system had sustained, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday, 8 November 1849, Issue 4379 – Gale Document No. Y3200680534
A man named COOMBE, in the employ of Mr Stong, timber-carrier, of the Commercial-road, was drowned about one o'clock, on Sunday morning, in the Exe, just below the bridge, where horses are generally led for watering. It appeared that the deceased and another man had returned about midnight from a journey, with timber, and having put up the carriage, they proceeded with their horses to the river, when COOMBE was thrown off from the horse on which he was, the animal having sunk down in a pit. His cries were heard by some persons in the neighbourhood, but before assistance could be afforded he was drowned: the other man, who was also pulled forward, both horses being attached by a chain, could not afford the poor fellow any help. Verdict on the Inquest. – "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 15 November 1849, Issue 4380 – Gale Document No. Y3200680587
BRIXHAM. - A young man named JOHN BENTLEY, 18 years of age, an apprentice to Mr George Knight, was drowned on Friday evening last; the body was picked up near the Pier Head on Sunday morning, and a Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday, at Mills's London Inn. It appears that the deceased, with a few other of his comrades, had boarded foreign vessels laying in the bay, and obtained from them some spirit, and of which they partook too freely, and no doubt this was the cause of the present unfortunate occurrence. The only statement made before the Jury was by a lad of the name of Petherbridge (commonly called Whiskers), whose evidence on cross-examination was so conflicting, as not to be relied on. Inquest adjourned until Friday next.

MORETONHAMPSTEAD. – On Saturday last an Inquest was taken before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Devon, at the Golden Lion Inn, in this town, on the body of ANN SCOTT, 29 years of age, who was found on the preceding morning drowned in a pool of water on the roadside leading to Tavistock, nearly half a mile from Moreton. From the evidence adduced, it appeared the deceased lived with her father, John Scott, a labourer, who is a widower; - with a younger sister and brother, at the east end of Cross-street. The deceased had been subject to fits nearly twenty years, and on the Thursday night when the brother returned from his work, he found the house in darkness, and called to his sister ANN, saying where is Lizzey, meaning the younger sister. ANN replied she did not know, and he proceeded to light a candle, and while doing so, unperceived by him, ANN left the house. She did not return, and in a few minutes, becoming uneasy he went to the neighbours to enquire for her, but could get no account of any one having seen her. An immediate search was made for her, which was continued through the night as well in the town, as the roads around it, but without any intelligence of the unfortunate woman until discovered as before described. It would appear she must have gone further on the Dartmoor road as her apron was picked up about a quarter of a mile beyond where the body was found. N reason can be assigned by her friends for her leaving the house in the manner she did, as she had always been treated with great kindness; and it is somewhat remarkable that she had not been known to go scarcely five yards from her father's house for a considerable time before. It was not thought that she wilfully drowned herself, but supposed that from the night being very dark, she walked into this place, and from the shock on stepping into the water, was seized with a fit; and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday, 13 December 1849, Issue 4384 – Gale Document No. Y3200680730
HONITON. - On Friday last, the morning was ushered in with one of the heaviest rains that has been witnessed in this place for a long time past, and continued the greater part of the day. The river Otter had swollen to an alarming height, overflowing its banks for several miles, and doing much injury to the low lands; the small streams and rivulets, likewise, rose very high. The waters began to decrease in the course of the afternoon, and all danger appeared over; but we regret to state that it was attended with loss of life. On the following morning, (Saturday) a body was found at the back of Mr Woodland's, shoeing smith, &c., in the river Gisage, the waters of which had rose considerably on the previous day. The body was immediately taken to the Anchor Inn, and medical aid called in, but proved to have been dead a number of hours; it was identified as that of a man named JOSEPH HOWSE, an inmate of the Union. On Monday, a Coroner's Inquest was held upon the body, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, when the verdict of "Found Drowned," was returned.

Thursday, 13 December 1849, Issue 4384 – Gale Document No. Y3200680732
PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT. - Determined Suicide. On Monday, an Inquest was held at Devonport, on the body of WILLIAM CURRIE, aged 49, who had suffocated himself in the fumes of charcoal. It appeared that he had been 20 years in one employ as a glass-cutter, but was discharged about fifteen months ago, and had sine earned a precarious subsistence by selling earthenware,. He was a sober man, with five children, but was involved in difficulties, which he was afraid to meet. The verdict was "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday, 20 December 1849, Issue 4385 – Gale Document No. Y3200680763
SAMPFORD COURTENAY. - This Parish has been suddenly thrown into a state of the deepest gloom, in consequence of the awful and melancholy death of one of its most respectable inhabitants, MR JOHN KELLAND, of Folland. It appeared at the Inquest held on the body, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, that the deceased left home on Monday, the 10th inst., at two o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of shooting some wood pigeons, known to frequent a certain field on his farm. His not returning for the night, created no alarm in the minds of his family at home, as he was often wont to extend his shooting excursions further than he at first intended; and calling on a friend by the way, would stay the night. Nothing more was therefore heard of him till the next day, when his lifeless body was discovered by a neighbouring farmer in the same field where he had gone, as above stated – it was laying against the hedge, completely covered with blood. The gun, discharged, lay at his feet, his right hand remained fixe din his pocket, and, dreadful to relate, a quantity of brain mixed with blood oozing from a gun shot wound, on the lower part of the face. It seems probable, that not finding the birds when he came, he had sat himself down on the hedge, to await their coming, when by some means the piece accidentally going off, produced the sad catastrophe. The deceased was 44 years of age, and unmarried. This deplorable event has caused intense grief to his numerous friends and relations, and has made such a void in the social circle which he moved in, as will not soon be filled up.

Thursday, 27 December 1849, Issue 4386 – Gale Document No. 3200680804
EXETER. – The Missing Female. - This young woman, LEACH, whose disappearance we recorded last week, was picked up near Trew's weir on Sunday last, and immediately conveyed to her father's residence, in Okehampton street. The face of this unfortunate young woman, we understand, bears marks of violence and her dress is in great disorder, and from the fact of half the pocket of her dress being either torn or cut off, it is rumoured she must have been attacked and plundered by some person or other on her way from her father's house, by the side of the water to her sister's, at Mount Radford, and that the parties so attacking her must have thrown her into the water, and which statement is gaining credence in the immediate neighbourhood of her parents' residence, in consequence of a statement being circulated that the toes of her cloth boots show evident signs of the body having been dragged some distance. It is also stated that the marks on the face must have been done before death. The mystery at present thrown over this affair, might we think, be thus explained; for possibly, the deceased might have fell, near the edge of the water and struck her face, and becoming insensible have rolled into the water. The fact of the boots being rubbed, might be caused by the body being washed along the bottom of the river, and the clothes torn by its going over the weir. With respect to the pocket, it is not known (as she only that day came from Broadclist, where she had been in service) whether she might have cut it off herself, or being worn out had not repaired it. An Inquest is being held on the body, this day, by F. Leigh, Esq., of Cullompton, the Coroner for the District.


Thursday
27 December 1849, Issue 4386 – Gale Document No. Y3200680783

INQUESTS. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held by John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier, Magdalen street, on the body of GEO. WILLIAMS, groom to J. Garratt, Esq., of Sowton. The deceased was airing a pair of his master's horses on the previous day, in the turnpike road between Sowton and Heavitree, and when near the former place, by some means or other, the horse he was riding threw him with great force with his head against a thorn tree, which slightly fractured his skull. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he expired during the night. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental death.

An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the Bishop Blaze, Westgate, on the body of EDWIN BARTLETT, aged 40, a porter on the Quay, who died suddenly the same morning. The deceased, who was a married man but without a family, left his home about 8 o'clock in the morning, to attend to his work on the Quay. On his arriving there he was suddenly taken ill and dropped down, and before he reached his home, which he had scarcely left one hour, he expired. The Jury returned a Verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 3 January 1850, Issue 4387 – Gale Document No. Y3200680841
NORTH DEVON. - Fatal Accident. On the evening of the 24th inst. as MR ELIAS ASHTON, of Eastbeare Farm, in the parish of Merton, was riding out a horse for the purpose of exercising it, when near Little Potheridge, the animal took fright, throwing MR ASHTON, who was almost immediately picked up quite dead, which must have been instantaneous. The deceased is the son of MRS ASHTON, of Dunsbere Farm, in the same parish, and had been but a short time in business. An Inquest has been held and a verdict of Accidental death returned.

Thursday, 17 January 1850, Issue 4389 – Gale Document No. Y3200680909
EXETER. - Inquests. – On Thursday last an Inquest was held at Hogg's Three Horse Shoes, public house, before F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of JOHN WILLS, a fine young man, about 21 years of age, a corporal in the 9th Foot regiment, who was found drowned on Wednesday morning, in the river under Cowley house. The deceased left his father's house, situate near Cowley bridge, the previous morning, in good health and spirits, and dined with a relative near at hand named Shorland, after which he spent some time there playing at cards He left their house and attended a dance at Pitt's public house, Upton Pyne, where he appeared to enjoy himself very much, not leaving until a late hour, when he proceeded in company with several persons towards his father's home. After passing over Pynes bridge he left his companions, wishing them good bye, saying they would never see him again, at the same time giving one of them a letter for his father, and returned as if to go back to Upton Pynes, the others proceeding on, nothing being thought of this strange conduct of his. He was afterwards seen walking to and fro the bridge by some person who was passing, and a little after sitting on the railings close by, and on the following morning his body was found as described above. The letter to his father assigned no reason for his committal of so rash an act, and after stating where they might find his body, concluded by requesting to be buried by the side of his mother in Upton Pynes churchyard. The Jury under these circumstances returned a verdict of Felo de Se, and he was accordingly interred where he requested, at midnight.

On Friday an Inquest was held on the body of a woman named WEST, who accidentally fell into the leat at Trew's weir the previous day and was drowned, and a verdict returned accordingly.

On Monday an Inquest was held by John Warren, Esq., Coroner of this city, and a respectable Jury, at Moore's London Ale House, Mary Arches-street, on the body of an old lady or property named KENTON, who died that morning from injuries received by burning. The old lady who was 90 years of age has been for some time past confined to her house, and on Friday last, during the temporary absence of her servant to the butcher's, accidentally caught her dress on fire as she was passing the fire place. Assistance was speedily obtained and the fire extinguished but not until her right side and arm was much burnt, she lingered until Monday morning when she expired. Verdict, Accidental Death by Burning.

Thursday, 24 January 1850, Issue 4390 – Gale Document No. Y3200680950
INQUEST. - An Inquest was taken on Tuesday at the Old Golden Lion, Market-street, before J. Warren, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a man named RICHARD SOBEY, aged about 50, a pensioner, formerly in the Sappers and Miners. Deceased, who had been latterly employed by Mr Foweracre, cutler, of South-street, to turn the wheel of the lathe, lived with a man named Sellick, in Guinea-street, where he was taken ill with a giddiness in his head, (which he has been much troubled with of late) on Sunday last and fell down, when he was put to bed but recovered in the afternoon, and on Monday went to his work as usual. He was head moving about in his room on Tuesday morning about 6 o'clock, but not making his appearance by 10 o'clock Mr Sellick went to his bedroom where he found the deceased stretched on the floor with his clothes on, and his head resting on the bar of the chair underneath the seat. A post mortem examination of the body was made by Mr A. Kempe, who gave it as his opinion that the deceased died of apoplexy, and a verdict was turned accordingly.

MORETONHAMPSTEAD. – Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the Union Inn, in this town, before __Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH EARLE, 19 years of age, an apprentice of Mr Moses Woolland, late of Sloncombe Farm, in this parish, who poisoned herself the Tuesday previous, by taking corrosive sublimate. Verdict – Temporary Insanity.

FATAL ACCIDENT. – On Friday evening last, as an elderly man named FINCH, wheelwright, &c. of Upton Pyne, was returning home in his cart, driven by his man, he accidentally fell over the side near Upton Pyne bridge and broke his neck. It is supposed the old man had been drinking during the day at Exeter, and having no control over himself was probably the cause of the accident. The man must have been in pretty much the same state, not having discovered the loss of his master until he got some distance from where FINCH was found. An Inquest was held on the body, at Hogg's Three Horse Shoes on the Crediton Road, On Monday, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday, 24 January 1850, Issue 4390 – Gale Document No. Y3200680935
On Friday morning last, the body of a young man, aged 30, named CHALICE, a native of Lapford, was found drowned in the Basin of the Exeter Canal. The water, with the exception of the end where the deceased was found, was frozen over very hard, and his walking stick was on the ice close by; his hat had caught by the edge of the ice, and frozen to it immediately above where the body was found. The deceased had in his pockets a sum of money amounting to £1 4s. 6d. and the duplicates of two pawnbroker's tickets for coats pledged. CHALLICE, some short time since, became possessed of above one husband pounds, and for some time he had been staying about in the neighbourhood of Crediton, but had been in Exeter for the last week. An Inquest was held on the body the following day, when a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday, 31 January 1850, Issue 4391 – Gale Document No. Y3200680976
INQUEST. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the White Hart Inn South-street, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a woman named ELIZABETH HEXTER, wife of SAMUEL HEXTER, a porter, who formerly kept the Duke of Clarence public-house, at the bottom of Preston-street. The deceased who has been for some time under the care of the surgeons at the Dispensary for some internal complaint, aggravated by her frequent acts of intemperance, had lately been employed selling yeast at the entrance to the higher market. On the Thursday previous she felt very poorly, and on the Friday morning she was much worse. One of her neighbours very kindly went to her assistance and made her a cup of tea which she drank; but continuing to get worse, about 11 o'clock that same morning, Mr Shaw, surgeon, of Palace-street, was called in, who sent her some medicine, but by 12 o'clock, one hour after he had visited her she was a corpse. The Jury after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of Natural Death accelerated by intemperance.

Thursday, 7 February 1850, Issue 4392 – Gale Document No. Y3200681034
TIVERTON. - Inquest. – On Monday, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., an Inquest was held on the body of a male child, named FOWLER, who was found in Coombe's Mill Leat, the Saturday previous. This is the second which has been drowned there within the last four months, through the carelessness of the landlord, Mr Williams. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", with a request to the Coroner to forward Mr Williams a letter on the necessity of erecting a proper fence.

Thursday, 7 February 1850, Issue 4392 – Gale Document No. Y3200681017
APPALLING TRAGEDY. - Considerable excitement was occasioned in this city on Sunday morning, by a rumour that a married woman, named ELIZABETH BRADFORD, aged 43, on the previous evening had thrown three of her children into the canal, two being drowned and the other rescued from the water. On Monday the accuracy of the statement was confirmed, and in the forenoon the Guildhall was thronged by numbers who had been drawn thither by its being understood the perpetrator of the deed would be brought before the City Magistrates. The offence being committed in the County of Devon, the Bench decided that the prisoner should be transferred to the County Magistrates, and she was accordingly by the proper authorities lodged in the Devon Gaol, for examination on this day (Wednesday). She is the wife of JAMES BRADFORD, a joiner, living with a family of five children, in Wood's-buildings, Summerland-street, St. Sidwell's. It is said she has been in a distressed state of mind recently, - indeed has shown symptoms of insanity for more than six weeks. The husband and wife have returned from London about a year and a half, - they have never been distressed. The principal cause of trouble is said to be some family differences existing between the wife and her brother, MR JOSEPH GANDY, fruiterer, High-street, and also a letter carrier in the Exeter Post Office, whose conduct, according to the statement of the husband and wife, has on frequent occasions been harsh; indeed they both express themselves about him in strong terms of disapprobation.
Information having been sent to F. Leigh, Esq., Cullompton, Coroner for the district, that gentleman directed a Jury to be summoned and an Inquest to be held on Monday morning, at half-past eleven, at Bragg's Seven Stars Inn, St. Thomas. At the appointed time the Coroner and Jury, Mr James Lyddon, surgeon, &c., met, and then proceeded to view the bodies of the two children, lying at the Reception House, near Trew's Weir. they were fine children, and had all the appearance of having been in excellent health, nor was there the slightest approach to any symptoms of that of emaciation which would indicate they had lived in a state of privation, or had been neglected, as has been rumoured. There were no marks of violence, and there were apparent only the usual appearances resulting from death by drowning, and remaining some hours in the water. The features of one particularly seemed just as if life had suddenly become extinct whilst the little sufferer was weeping, and that the icy hand of death had set a rigid stamp upon those lineaments of that face which had displayed its infantile sorrow in the last fleeting moments of existence. It was a sorrowful sight to witness two young females thus sadly and unhappily snatched from this world by an untimely fate. Their names are ELIZA BRADFORD, aged nine years, and HARRIET BRADFORD, aged seven years. The Jury, &c., having returned, the Coroner commenced the proceedings. Mr Walter Friend, solicitor, Gandy-st., attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the husband and relatives. The first witness was:
Sarah Curry, lives in Castle-St. St. Lawrence, Exeter. The name of the mother of the children is ELIZABETH BRADFORD, her husband is JAMES BRADFORD, a joiner by trade, who lives in Summerland-street, St. Sidwell's. Witness had the children between 3 and 4 on Saturday afternoon. Witness took tea with ELIZABETH BRADFORD, who asked her to take home three children for a few hours. She kept them until about a quarter before 6, when the mother came for them; she seemed agitated and flurried and looked very worried – like a woman lost For the last six weeks she has been much agitated; she looked like a person a little lost or out of her mind - like a person affected by grief. She did not stay with witness more than five minutes, and then left with the children. Witness has known BRADFORD for 40 years – always appeared very fond of her children, and did so that afternoon. Had known her before she was married. She was a dear mother, there could not be a better. She said she had a few errands to do, but witness could not exactly collect what she said, but thought she was going home with the children. Witness had had all the children before repeatedly; when the mother used to fetch and take them home. Witness saw her about ten on Saturday night, at Mr Titherley's hatter, Fore-street. Had heard the children were lost, but did not know how. BRADFORD was then in a worse state than when she saw her previously. Witness said "Where are your children MRS BRADFORD"; she said "I don't know, I haven't any children." I replied "Yes you have – those that were with me"; she seemed very agitated and said "I haven't any children." I then declined to ask her any more questions. I sat by her side and looked at her with astonishment. I thought she was too much agitated to give any replies. I then went home with her, it was between 11 and 12 when I came home from Mr Titherley's with MR and MRS BRADFORD to their house, Summerland-street. Her mind was so agitated that I declined to ask any more questions. I stayed there with her; I sat by her bedside all night. I did not send for a medical man; I did not think it bodily illness, I thought her mind was affected and was lost. It was three children left with me, ELIZA and HARRIET BRADFORD, being the two deceased, and another child, a boy called THOMAS. There are five children altogether. Witness went on to say that BRADFORD said that wretch of a brother treated her bad, and that she was sometimes troubled about money. Asked her once or twice "Where are your children"; her answer was always "I have none," – talked to herself in such words as "Mr Bishop is going to send in the bailiffs to take my goods," I said "No, Mr Bishop wont do such a thing." She said also "My wretch of a brother have ruined me." I did not ask her upon that because I knew her meaning. She did not say anything else. I left her between 6 and 7 on Sunday morning; she was then getting up when the police officers came. Mrs Titherley had asked me to oblige her by setting up with BRADFORD that night. None of the children slept in that room; one was in the house and another on David's Hill.
By Mr Friend – Witness had lately appeared quite lost, quite agitated; she lost both in mind and body; within the last six weeks had seen a considerable alteration; had never made any remark, because it was well known; she was almost a skeleton when undressed.
Edmund Palmer lives at Marsh Barton, Alphington. As he was proceeding home on Saturday evening about 8 o'clock, he heard a noise in the water near the draw-bridge, at the end of the basin, in St. Thomas. It was very dark. Just as he came to the middle part of the bridge he heard the voice of a child crying and making a noise – a sort of scream, as if in distress; looked over the bridge and saw something floating, which he thought to be a child, and immediately made an alarm, saying, "A child in the water." A woman came towards him whom he did not know, and said "Oh, my child, my child." Proceeded to the inn on the Haven Banks and the other houses, to have a light, and came back, - this occupied about a minute and a half. He then saw the child floating on the water; he had an umbrella which he stretched out and the child caught hold of it, and he dragged the child out, and gave it to Mrs Powlesland near him, who keeps the inn. The woman who first spoke to him, and said "Oh, my child," was still standing on the banks. She did not make any observation until she came into the house occupied by Mr Gill. He enquired of her how the child came into the water; she said she didn't know. He asked what her business was there; the reply was the same. He asked her name; she said ELIZABETH BRADFORD; what her husband was, - no reply; for whom he worked, - she said for any one. He asked if there were any persons with her; she said two, but they are gone. The child he took out was a boy; he thought the child was about three years of age (it was stated the age was four). He did not think the woman was incoherent. Afterwards thought it could not be an accident from the answers that were given him; she manifested an indifference about the child being saved.
At this stage of the proceedings a conversation ensued between the Coroner and Mr Friend, as to eligibility of the evidence of Sarah Lang, who was ultimately examined at Mr Friend's particular request.
Sarah Lang saw the two drowned children taken out on Sunday. She lives at Mr Gill's, her father. The witness gave an account of the child being taken out of the water on Saturday, as above stated. The woman came in cool and collected, but after some time became quite excited, and talked about her brother and family having injured her Witness remarked that she seemed like a woman quite deranged. She said several times, "Where are my other children, I took three children, I wish some one would go and look for them." She said she didn't know where they were gone, they must have strayed away. Witness said, "Did you bring the children down here with you," she said, "yes." Upon that my father went out to look for them, was absent about ten minutes, but could not see any children. She kept on saying, "Why don't you send for my husband," and "Why don't you put me out of the way." Mrs Powlesland asked where she wanted to be put; she said, "Cant you put me in the water, - the world has been a misery to me for some time past; my wretch of a brother and my wretch of a sister they have despised me, they have spurned me, they have persuaded my husband to leave me and my five children." (It was said she meant her sister-in-law.) She then began to cry and said, "the Lord have mercy upon me, God have mercy upon me," and then wept bitterly. Mrs Powlesland said, "why do you cry;" Witness said, "you had better let the woman give vent to her feelings." Shortly after she was taken away in the custody of Mr Ratcliffe, constable, and Mr Lyddon, the surgeon. Witness and her father kept the child there that night. Witness here stated the finding two children on Sunday morning, by Inspector Stuckes.
Mr Steele, superintendent of police, said Mr Kingdon was called in and saw the bodies; when he hears of Mr Lyddon he (Mr Kingdom) declined to stay. The Coroner said that he had directed Mr Lyddon to be summoned.
Mr Lyddon said two policemen called on him Sunday morning early, and from the information he gave them the policeman knew where to go, the place where the circumstance occurred. After some conversation as to county or city jurisdiction in the case, the evidence was resumed.
Mr James Lyddon is a surgeon in St. Thomas, about 9 on Saturday night was summoned to go to James Gill's on the banks, on account of a child being taken out of the water. Went immediately and found a child, safe in life, but still low in consequence of the previous submersion. The mother was there. Ordered the child to bed and a dose of castor oil to be given, - that was the treatment of the child. Has seen the other two children this day, HARRIET and ELIZA BRADFORD; they appeared to have been taken out of the water Clothes saturated; does not know how long they had been in the water; there were no marks of violence about either of them; they were in good condition; thinks they had not been neglected in any way; their heads were clean; takes it for granted the bodies were drowned, but he must go further; could not swear to it until some internal examination; has no doubt the children were drowned. When I saw the mother she was in a wild state of incoherence; she rose immediately and begged me to cut off her head; she said "I am a broken hearted woman, it is he who has done it – he has persuaded my husband to leave me," and other exclamations of that sort. I learnt that her brother was MR GANDY, High-street – I asked her who she meant by he; she said MR GANDY – I forget whether she said "Fore-street, or High-street – he is my brother." Told the constable to take charge of the woman, and then go and acquaint MR GANDY. Afterwards requested her brother to take care of her for the night as he thought her life not safe in her own keeping, and that insanity might ensue if she was roughly handled.
Inspector Wm. Stuckes, of the Exeter police - In consequence of some information yesterday morning went to the Haven Banks – previous to going went to the reception house, Exeter Lime Kilns, and obtained some drags and a groper for searching. A boat was lent to take police officers Ellicombe, Fulford, Guppy, and myself across the river. When arrived at the other side enquired of Mrs Lang if she had a child that had been taken out of the water; he asked her to show him the spot; she did so, and then looking over the bridge at the end of the basin saw a body floating, that of HARRIET BRADFORD; it was in the canal. Got the drags and took out the child. I said to Fulford you had better leave and take the woman into custody and I'll stay and find the other body. "In about twenty minutes after heard Ellicombe say "Here's the other child." He got into a boat and took the other child out of the water – that was ELIZA BRADFORD; at the mouth of the basin; the body was covered with mud; went and saw the boy, who told him that his two sisters and himself had come down there. He took all across and left the two dead bodies at the reception house.
Mr Fryer said he attended on behalf of the constables of St. Thomas. The woman was first taken by them and then allowed to go on security for her appearance.
Mr Superintendent Steele again entered into an explanation to show that the city authorities were correct. By a recent act, every accused person must be taken before the authorities of the place where he was apprehended and then sent to where the offence was committed.
The Coroner said, he must reprobate constables trying to outreach one the other in such matters – he deprecated such conduct.
Mr Steele offered some remarks to show that no blame rested with him or the officers under him.
The Coroner said, that in this instance both the officers of the city and the constables of St. Thomas had done their duty well.
Joseph Brailey – Last Saturday night was sent for by Mr Ratcliffe, of St. Thomas, to come to his house – he did so, and saw ELIZABETH BRADFORD, mother of the deceased children; did not previously know her. Ratcliffe asked me to take charge of her till he came back again as she was charged with throwing three children into the water, while he went to her friends. Just as he left the woman began saying "Oh the villain, the hard-hearted villain, it's all through his fault I am driven to this distress." He asked her who she meant, as she repeated it several times, did she mean her husband? she said "Oh no, not my husband, I mean that villain of a brother of mine – how he has used me, he has brought me and my family all to poverty and distress, and now he wants to turn us all to doors." She repeated several times "Hasn't he decoyed away the writings of my house, now my husband is decoyed away from me – oh my children, what shall I do now my husband is decoyed away from me." He said where are your children, she said "I don't know where they are, I have been down on the banks." He asked what for, she said "What for, to drown myself." He asked how many children she took with her, she said "Hoe many? Oh why three wasn't it – three to be sure." He said "I heard one was taken out of the water," she replied "water, yes to be sure, little TOMMY, I threw it in and what business had the man to stop me, I should have gone in too." He asked if she knew what had become of the other two children, she said "I don't know where they are, I know nothing about them." Then Ratcliffe and the brother returned, but she would not go with the brother, but went with witness, and when on Exe Bridge she wanted to jump off. She repeatedly told her brother to keep off, she wished to be taken to Mr Titherley's which was done. Enquired for the missing children but could not find them. Thought she was very unsettled and too wild to place any confidence in her statements.
After some deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned in the Ship Canal, but by what means the children came into the water there is no evidence before the Jury to prove." The Jury desired to add, that they child who is living owes its life to the exertions of Edmund Palmer.

Thursday, 14 February 1850, issue 4393 – Gale Document No. Y3200681073
WITHERIDGE. - On Saturday the 9th instant, an Inquest was taken before F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner for this district, on the body of JOHN SOUTHCOTT, a carrier, residing in this place, who had destroyed himself in the hay loft on the previous Thursday, between the hours of 4 and 5 o'clock in the afternoon. From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the deceased who was a quiet and inoffensive man, had been as usual at work during the day, and on coming home, went into the stable. Not again appearing, his wife sent to see where he was, when the boy found him hanging by a rope to one of the beams in the hay loft. He immediately gave the alarm, and the deceased was cut down, being quite warm. Medical assistance was immediately procured in the person of Mr R. S. Coster, but all attempts to restore animation proved fruitless. The deceased had only been absent from the kitchen about a quarter of an hour. Verdict, Temporary Insanity.

Thursday, 4 April 1850, Issue 4400 - Gale Document No. Y3200681294
FELO DE SE. – A wretch, named THOMAS WEDLOCK, pensioner, who resided in Monument-street, Plymouth, Wednesday last, after having attempted an assault of an aggravated nature on a little girl aged 12 years, committed suicide. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday, when a verdict of felt do se was returned He was buried between nine and ten o'clock at night. Deceased was a married man, with a family, and aged about 51.

Thursday, 4 April 1850, Issue 4400 - Gale Document No. Y3200681280
INQUESTS. - At the Valiant Soldier, Magdalen-street, on Saturday by J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, an Inquest was held on the body of MARIA WARE of Ottery, aged 50, who was shockingly mutilated by a thrashing machine, which she was attending on the Wednesday previous, belonging to Mr Marks, of Ottery. She was removed to the Hospital where she lingered until Friday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 18 April 1850, Issue 4402 – Gale Document No. Y3200681371
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday, a Coroner's Inquest was held by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., at the Rising Sun, Stockland, on a man named HUGH BROWN, of Upottery, who had been found in a field the previous day. The deceased had been missing a week, and is supposed to have fallen down from intoxication, and being insensible never rose again. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday, 2 May 1850, Issue 4404 – Gale Document No. Y3200681442
TOTNES - On Sunday morning last WILLIAM STABB, a labourer, in the employ of Mr T. Michelmore, jun., at Berry Pomeroy, destroyed himself whilst labouring under a fit of despondency. Deceased arose t five o'clock and about seven was found suspended by the neck in a linhay, close to his dwelling house quite dead, for some weeks past the poor man had been in a very dejected state. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Sunday evening and verdict returned that deceased destroyed himself in a fit of temporary insanity, he has left a wife but no children.

Thursday, 9 May 1850, Issue 4405 – Gale Document No. Y3200681472
SINGULAR FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Wednesday last as two lads named William Lear and WILLIAM GIBSON were proceeding in a cart through Clay Lane, Alphington, accompanied by the driver, to fetch some hay, the cart in making a sudden turn in the road was unfortunately upset upon a pool of water, bottom upwards, the boys at the time being underneath. The boy Lear was enabled to creep immediately (being uninjured) from beneath the cart, but not so GIBSON, and who before the cart could be removed we regret to add was drowned in the water. The boy was immediately conveyed to Alphington and Mr Lyddon surgeon sent for, but his skill was of no avail, the vital spark having fled. A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday, 16 May 1850, Issue 4406 – Gale Document No. Y3200681509
TIVERTON. - Inquest. Monday last, an Inquest was held before F. Mackenzie, Esq., on the body of a boy called VINNICOMBE, the son of a labouring man residing in Westexe. It appeared the boy had been absent about an hour, when the body was found in Coombe's Mill Leat. This is the fourth that has met a watery grave in this leat within the last twelve months. Verdict – "Found Drowned." - [Are proper precautions taken to prevent accidents?]

Thursday, 23 May 1850, Issue 4407 – Gale Document No. Y3200681541
INQUEST. – On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier, South-street, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a labouring man named THOMAS HOWARD, who died at the Hospital having been brought there in consequence of serious injuries received by him by a chimney falling on him. The deceased belonged to the neighbourhood of Crediton. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 30 May 1850, Issue 4408 – Gale Document No. Y3200681575
SUICIDE OF MR HELE, Resident Dispenser at the Queen Street Dispensary. - On Tuesday afternoon an Inquest was taken by J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, at the above Dispensary, on view of the body of MR SAMUEL HELE, the resident dispenser of the institution, who committed suicide that morning by taking prussic acid.
The deceased, who has been connected with this institution we believe since its foundation in 1818, enjoyed the full confidence of the subscribers, and was highly respected by the inhabitants of Exeter up to the time of his death. For some time past MR HELE has been suffering from a depression of spirits, and it will be recollected that very recently he attempted self destruction by stabbing himself with a pen knife, and has since been watched by his friends; but as he never showed any decided symptoms of insanity, so strict a surveillance was not kept over him as otherwise would have been the case. The evidence, however, shows that his friends anticipated he might suddenly put an end to his existence, and it is to be regretted, to say the least of it, that precautionary measures were not adopted, whereby his life might have been spared.
The Jury having assembled in a lower room proceeded to the library, where they found the deceased who had on his usual dress lying on the floor on his back: he had evidently taken the same trouble to dress and clean himself on this as on other days, from the fact of his having shaved himself that morning.
The first witness called was Dr Granger, who stated he had known the deceased between twenty and thirty years: witness was sent for that morning, and came about 10 minutes after 8 to see the deceased, and on his arrival he found him lying in the medical library room dead. The friends of the deceased imagined he had swallowed prussic acid, from the fact of a large bottle being on the end of the table, near which he was lying on the floor: the bottle is kept down stairs in the dispensing room. The body presents the appearance of persons who die from taking prussic acid, very little change having taken place: during the last 12 months he has been in a very dejected state of mind, and attempted once before to destroy himself by stabbing, - the pen knife breaking off in the ribs. This occurred about six or eight months since. He has of late also been in a very dejected state of mind, and that was the complaint under which he suffered. There was no smell from the mouth of his having taken the poison: the body did not present the usual appearance of death from apoplexy.
MRS ANNE HELE, the wife of the deceased was next called, the Jury having first adjourned to a lower room. She deposed that the deceased, who was in his 48th year, had got up and dressed himself earlier that morning than usual, shaving himself at six o'clock; from that time occasionally to near 8 o'clock returning to the bedroom where she was lying in bed, as was customary with him in his walk to and from the large room; hearing the deceased run quickly down and up over the stairs, witness immediately got out of bed, and without staying to dress herself followed him into the library, and saw him fall on his knees beside a chair; she asked him what the matter was with him, but he never spoke; he had a bottle in his hand which he placed on the book-case as he walked into the room; Dr Granger was immediately sent for, and he was shown the bottle she saw her husband with; the deceased had been low spirited since Christmas and she had found it necessary to watch him for some time past. The deceased must have drank the acid on his way up the stairs, as she saw him with the bottle in his hand when on the top of the stairs and before getting into the library.
The Coroner said there could be no doubt but the deceased had been for a long period, in a low state of mind; and it was in evidence, that he had once before attempted his life. Under these circumstances, it appeared there could be no doubt but that the deceased destroyed himself – the question then arose as to what was the state of his mind at the time?
Mr Tozer asked – Was it clear the deceased died of apoplexy, or of the prussic acid? There was no positive proof how he destroyed himself, no one seeing him take any of the prussic acid.
The Coroner thought there could be no doubt he had taken the bottle from the surgery and drank from it.
Mr Lemon, Mr Marks, and the foreman, also, thought there could be no doubt how he destroyed himself; but they considered sufficient evidence had not been produced to warrant them to come to a verdict.
MISS HELE, the daughter of the deceased, about 16 years of age, was then called in; but she could give no account of the transaction.
Mr Truscott, the Treasurer of the Institution, handed the Coroner a written statement, from which it appeared that on Saturday last the deceased sent for him, and paid him over £48 12s. subscriptions, and £10 10s. donations, he had received from the institution. In the course of his conversation with him, he betrayed a hurried manner, and talked of resigning his situation, handing him an unsigned letter to that effect; but at a subsequent part of the conversation requested him not to say anything about it: he also spoke of the progress of the institution, and that he had done all he could for it, and hoped his conduct had given satisfaction: he spoke of his health, as being affected by fatigue he suffered during the late visitation of the cholera, adverting to the death of his first wife and child during its visit here in 1832. His manner showed him (Mr Truscott) that it was not improbable he would make a second attempt on his life, and, in consequence, he called on Dr Granger, and he found it had not escaped the notice of his friends.
The Jury considering a post mortem examination of the body should take place, the Enquiry was accordingly adjourned until this evening (Wednesday) 5 o'clock.

Thursday, 30 May 1850, Issue 4408 – Gale Document No. Y3200681561
FATAL ACCIDENT FROM CLOTHES TAKING FIRE. – An Inquest was held last Saturday, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before J. Warren, Esq., on the body of a little boy, named JAMES JONES, three years and a half old, son of MR JONES, Preston-street, whose clothes caught fire on Wednesday evening last, in the absence of his mother, by which he was severely burnt; he was removed to the Hospital where he died on Saturday morning. Verdict, Accidental Death.

FATAL ACCIDENT AT POWDERHAM SAW MILLS. – On Thursday last, during the temporary absence of the workman engaged at the above Mills, in the occupation of Mr Wolland, a little boy, 9 years of age, named ROBERT STADDON, took up a hook and placed it against the grindstone, which is worked by a water-wheel, when, unfortunately, his apron became entangled in the shaft, and in one minute he was a mangled corpse. On Friday an Inquest was held on the body before F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, at the Devon Arms, Kenton, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned. No blame whatever is attached to Mr Wolland, the proprietor of the Mills, who has adopted the suggestion of the Coroner, and had the grindstone fenced round, whereby a repetition of such an unfortunate occurrence is prevented.

Thursday, 6 June 1850, Issue 4409 – Gale Document No. Y3200681607
FATAL ACCIDENT BY DROWNING. - On Sunday morning two of the sons of MR PIDSLEY, farmer, of St. Mary's Clist, accompanied by a servant man, left home for the purpose of bathing. The three had been in the water near Newcourt, and were dressing to return home, when the younger of the two PIDSLEYS, a youth about 14 years of age, returned for "another dip". He had not been in long when getting out of his depth, he called for help, but his companions thinking he was joking unfortunately took no notice, and in a very short time the poor boy sank to rise no more. An Inquest was held on Monday, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

INQUEST ON MR HELE. - On Wednesday evening the Coroner and Jury resumed their Enquiry relative to the death of the above gentleman, a post mortem examination of the body having first been made by Dr Granger and Mr Warren. On undressing the deceased a small phial was found on him which had contained prussic acid, and on opening the body the smell of the acid was almost overpowering. The Jury returned a verdict, that the deceased destroyed himself in a fit of temporary insanity.

Thursday, 13 June 1850, Issue 4410 – Gale Document No. Y3200681645
INQUESTS. - On Monday last, an Inquest was taken at Bragg's Seven Stars, St. Thomas, by F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little boy, named JONES, who was accidentally drowned by slipping of Trew's Weir, on to which he had got for the purpose of fishing. the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

On Tuesday evening an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Holloway-street, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man, named GEORGE GILL, a labourer, who died in the Hospital, from injuries he received from the kick of a horse at Dunchideock, a few days previously. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 20 June 1850, Issue 4411 – Gale Document No. Y3200681670
SUICIDE OF COLONEL CRAIGIE. - On Saturday morning last an Inquest was held by F. Leigh, Esq. Coroner, at the Horse and Groom, Heavitree, on the body of the above gentleman, who committed suicide the previous morning at his residence Victoria Terrace, Mount Radford. The Jury, of which Lieut. Col. Harding was the foreman, was composed of the gentlemen residing in the immediate neighbourhood of the deceased. Col. Craigie was about 67 years of age, and had served 27 years in India in the H.E.I.C. service.
The first witness called was Isaac Tamlyn, coachman to the deceased. On Friday morning hearing his mistress and the maid servants screaming, he ran up stairs, asking what was the matter, when MRS CRAIGIE desired him to burst open the door of the deceased's dressing room, as the Colonel was fainting: on doing so he saw a great quantity of blood about the dressing table and room. The Colonel was sitting on the floor with his elbow on the sofa, with the marks of recent cuts on his right leg. He appeared to be attempting to rise himself on the sofa; witness desired assistance to be sent for, and, on his return into the room he took him round the body to lift him up, when he moved his head round a little, and lips, and then he saw he had cut his throat; deceased did not speak being incapable of doing so. Immediately on perceiving that his master's throat was cut he dropped the body and ran for the Rev. Dr. Haines, a neighbour and friend of the deceased's, in whose care he left him whilst he fetched Dr Caird and Dr. Barnes. Deceased breathed his last as Dr Barnes entered the room.
By Mr Venn: Master has looked very low spirited and in trouble during the last fortnight, to what he had been formerly.
By the Foreman: He saw a razor covered with blood on the table when he entered, and a pair of scizzors, but he did not know where the pen-knife was found.
By the Coroner: A fortnight since, on witness's return from visiting his father who was ill, the deceased asked him how his father was, and he replied he had seen him for the last time; the deceased immediately rejoined, "Oh, poor man, I shall not be long after him."
By a Juror: There was no person in the room but deceased when he burst open the door; it had been fastened by a small bolt. The deceased was about 65 or 67 years of age.
Rev. Dr. Hayne, the next door neighbour of the deceased, deposed that he had known him about 3 months as a neighbour: his habits were very retired, and he heard that his health was bad – out of spirits; but he did not appear physically ill: witness had never particularly remarked anything in his manner. On being called by the servant, and entering the room, he found the deceased on the floor with his head resting against the sofa, and a wound in his throat from which a great quantity of blood was flowing. Witness was instantly struck with the wound in the neck, not for the moment seeing the wounds in the leg; he immediately sent for the medical gentlemen (Dr Elliott, Dr Caird and Dr Norris), witness in the mean time putting a folded towel round the deceased's throat, to staunch the blood; he did not think the deceased recognised him; he moved his lips but was unable to speak, and his eyes were protruding; after applying the towel to the deceased's neck he perceived two deep gashes in the right leg, and one in the thigh, as well as a punctured wound in the pit of the stomach; the deceased was in his night dress with one slipper on. Witness should think he did not die for near one hour after he was called in; he recovered a little after the surgeons arrived. Witness had never seen anything in his manner from not being acquainted personally with him to infer that such a catastrophe would happen. There was a razor on the dressing table and a pen knife on the wash-stand, both covered with blood; the wash-stand, drawers, and a chair in the room were sprinkled with blood, and some on the floor.
Dr Elliott deposed that he found the deceased lying in the dressing-room on his back; he observed two deep gashes on the leg, and a deep jagged gash, 6 inches in length, across the throat. the one on the thigh was at the back by the knee across the ham strings. Bleeding at this time had ceased from all the cuts; the pupils of the eyes were greatly dilated, and there was no pulse; the countenance was flushed. He gave him some sherry wine with a tea spoon which revived him for a time, and a very slight return of the bleeding occurred, and a very slight degree of apparent consciousness for a few minutes was perceptible; he then relapsed, and in about three quarters of an hour after entering the room he died from the exhaustion of the blood and the shock to the system. There were no large arteries divided, but only muscular branches. There were three punctures about the pit of the stomach, which appeared to have been made with the pen-knife, afterwards found covered with blood on the wash-stand; the wounds there could be no doubt were self inflicted, judging from the whole of the appearances; he should have imagined that the deceased first made the punctured wounds, then the cuts on the leg, and last on the throat. Witness had been in the habit of exchanging visits with the deceased, but he never perceived anything peculiar about him; he always appeared a nervous agitated man. Witness attended him four years since, when he swallowed laudanum by mistake – having placed it by the side of a black draught which he got out of bed and swallowed; witness believed it was a mistake then, and had ever been of that opinion, and there had been no reason for any control being placed over him. the wounds were inflicted intentionally to destroy life, there could be no doubt, and at the moment of the committal of the act he must have been insane.
Mr William Caird, surgeon, deposed having attended the deceased professionally for the last six years. He concurred in the evidence given by Dr Elliott, and with respect to his general health it had been very good until within the last nine months, during which time it had been gradually declining, his mind certainly weak – at times forgetful. The last time he attended him, about a month since, he complained of great debility, &c., and that his mind had been in a very unhappy state for some time, from the absence of his two children, a son and daughter, one of whom was in India and the other in Scotland. He suffered also from an affection of the liver, the result of living in a hot climate, which made trifles appear more frightful than they really are, causing depression of spirits and an apprehension beyond what was necessary A change of residence and air had been recommended, and he was about to go to the North of England in a month.
The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased destroyed himself whilst labouring under a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday, 18 July 1850, Issue 4415 – Gale Document No. Y3200681771
BROADCLIST – FATAL ACCIDENT. – An Inquest was held by F. Leigh, Esq., on Friday last, at the Red Lion Inn, on the body of ANTHONY TAYLOR, a labourer in the employ of Mr Harris, of Countess Weir rope mills, who met with his death under the following circumstances. It appeared in evidence, that on Tuesday evening, July 2nd, having the charge of a timber carriage, in endeavouring to get up on the shafts to ride, his foot slipped and he fell, the wheel passing over his body and fracturing several ribs, and also fracturing the skull. He was taken into a cottage bleeding from the mouth and ear. Dr Merry, of Broadclist, was in immediate attendance, he was also seen by Messrs Land and Hunt, surgeons of Exeter.

Thursday, 18 July 1850, Issue 4415 – Gale Document No. Y3200681790
INQUEST. – On Saturday last an Inquest was taken by J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, at Fletcher's Black Lions Inn, South Street, and by adjournment to Monday, on the body of MR WIM. POWNING, a resident of South street, who was found drowned near the Salmon Pool. The deceased was missed on Tuesday week last, and after some search, the deceased was found in the stream of water near Ducks Bridge. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 1 August 1850, Issue 4417 – Gale Document No. Y3200681843
MALANCHOLY SUICIDE. - On Wednesday evening last, an Inquest was held at Biggs' Ship Inn, Heavitree, by F. Leigh, Esq., on the body of a man named HENRY BULL, who resided at Wonford. The deceased, who was a widower, having six grown-up children, but neither of whom lived with him, worked on the roads. About thirteen years since, he attempted his life, since which time he has been rather taciturn in his manner. He was last seen alive on the Monday previous, and from his not being observed by any of the neighbours to come out or go into his house the door was burst open, when he was found on his back on the floor, with his head nearly severed from his body. Mr Williams was immediately called in, but he gave it as his opinion that the deceased had been dead about six hours, and from his position, and a bloody razor resting on the window bench, near a looking-glass, that the deceased committed the act himself whilst looking in the glass. So effectually had he perpetrated the act, that he had divided both carotids, the trachea and oesophagus. The Jury returned a verdict, that Deceased destroyed himself whilst in a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday, 8 August 1850, Issue 4418 – Gale Document No. Y3200681883
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Friday morning, an Inquest was held at Lisson's Acland Arms, before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the city, on the body of a female infant, named LOUISA THOMAS HARRAP, the illegitimate child of ELIZA HARRAP, wife of SAMUEL HARRAP, the Post-Office clerk, who was transported some time since for robbery. The child had been placed, by the mother, with Mrs Griffin, a widow, residing at Lyon's Holt, to be dry-nursed, and died there on Thursday. Rumours were quickly in circulation, in the neighbourhood, that the child had been greatly neglected and ill-treated by the nurse and her daughter, through which death had been caused or accelerated; and this led to the Inquiry being instituted. Jane Hole, who lives opposite the nurse, deposed that she had frequently heard the child moaning and crying in the day time, and that she had seen it on two occasions, at the window, when it appeared to be in a very dirty and neglected state; she said Mrs Griffin and her daughter were in the habit of leaving their house about nine o'clock in the evening, and not returning again till twelve or one, during which time the poor child remained alone, without any one to attend to it, and frequently moaned and cried a great deal. The mother of the child was examined, and she stated that she paid 3s. a week for the nursing of the child; she had often visited it, and did not think Mrs Griffin had neglected it. It being the opinion of the Jury, that an examination of the body, by a medical gentleman, was necessary, the Inquest was adjourned till seven o'clock, to afford time for W. W. James, Esq., to make a post mortem examination. On the re-assembling of the Jury, Mr James stated that he had examined the body, in accordance with the directions of the Coroner and Jury. He was of opinion that the death of the child resulted from two causes – that inanition contributed in some measure to its death, but that death, in the greatest measure, resulted from the inflammation of the left lung; bad diet, ill-treatment, and imperfect ventilation, would produce such diseases, but he could not possibly say that the child had become diseased by such means. The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict, "Died from Natural Causes," but through their foreman, Mr W. B. Hill, desired to express a strong opinion that the child had been greatly neglected by the nurse and her daughter, whose conduct had been so reprehensible that they hoped a severe censure would be passed upon them by the Coroner, before they were allowed to leave. Mrs Griffin and her daughter were then called in, and received a very proper reprimand and caution from Mr Gidley.

Thursday, 8 August 1850, Issue 4418 – Gale Document No. Y3200681886
TIVERTON. - Sunday morning last, as three young men were bathing in the River Exe, opposite Ivy House, one of them named LOCK, was seized with cramp, and sank into a pit about 8 feet in depth. His companions were so alarmed as to be unable to render him any assistance. About a quarter of an hour elapsed, when Mr George Parkhouse, an expert swimmer, brought the unfortunate lad to the bank, but he was dead. An Inquest was held on the body the following evening, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., and a verdict of Accidental Death pronounced. From a question from the Coroner to Mr Parkhouse, it appears this is the tenth person he has taken from the water, seven of whom revived. His praiseworthy conduct deserves the notice of the public.

Thursday, 15 August 1850, Issue 4419 – Gale Document No. Y3200681903
TAVISTOCK. - On Wednesday last, as Mr Wm. Minhinnitt, farrier, and MR GEORGE MERRIFIELD, both of this town, were returning from Whitchurch Down race-course, after passing Hawking Shop turnpike-gate, they rode very fast towards Vigo Bridge, at the eastern part of the town; by some cause Minhinnett's horse struck its shoulder against the parapet wall of the bridge, and fell. MERRIFIELD'S horse, which was close behind, shied at the fallen horse, and lept over the parapet wall of the bridge with its rider, and both were precipitated to the bottom, a distance of about 30 feet. The horse was killed on the spot. MR MERRIFIELD'S skull was dreadfully fractured, with an arm, shoulder, and thigh broken; he lingered until the noon of the following day, when death terminated his sufferings, leaving a wife and three children to deplore his loss. It was afterwards discovered that Minhinnett's horse had broken its shoulder; it has since died. An Inquest was held on the body of MERRIFIELD, on Saturday last, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, at the Golden Lion Inn. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 22 August 1850, Issue 4420 – Gale Document No. Y3200681951
NORTH DEVON. - Fatal Accident - On Friday a shocking accident occurred to a lad named JAMES TURNER, about 15 or 16 years of age, farm servant to Mr John Cole, West Elscott, Burrington. As the poor fellow was returning from Bideford, with a cart load of lime, drawn by one horse, in company with his master's son and another lad, the former driving a wagon and two horses and the latter a cart and one horse, also laden with lime, the lad TURNER being between them, on descending the steep hill near Huntshaw water, the breechin part of his horse's harness broke, and the cart was impelled forward on the horse, which had thus been deprived of the support of a most essential part in descending with a load, and stepping on the heel of the lad, who was walking by his side, threw him down on his face. The wheel passed over his back and head, which was literally crushed, the brain being forced through his ears, and causing instant death. The remains of the unfortunate lad presented a shocking spectacle. An Inquest was held next day, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday, 5 September 1850, Issue 4422 – Gale Document No. Y3200682013
INQUEST. – On Thursday last, an Inquest was held by F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner, at the Port Royal Inn, near the Lime Kilns, St. Leonard, on the body of FRANCES DAVIS, an aged female belonging to St. Sidwells, whose body was taken from the river early that morning. She was supposed to have fallen into the river accidentally, and the Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 5 September 1850, Issue 4422 – Gale Document No. Y3200682015
PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT. - An Inquest was held at the Devonport Workhouse, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday on the body of a new born male child of an unmarried woman named SARAH CLINTON, resident in Boot-lane. It appeared from the evidence that the child was found dead in the mother's arms, and as it was necessary to have additional evidence to ascertain whether the child was born alive, the Enquiry was adjourned.

Thursday, 19 September 1850, Issue 4424 – Gale Document No. Y3200682061
On Thursday, as a labourer named WILLIAM JONES, in the employ of Mr Mortimer, carrier, of Coombe-street, in this city, was in the yard in the act of stooping, he fell prostrate; and before medical assistance could be obtained he had expired. An Inquest was held on the following morning, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." - The statements which have been extensively circulated as to the drunken character of the deceased, are totally unfounded.

Thursday, 19 September 1850, Issue 4424 – Gale Document No. Y3200682064
NORTH DEVON. – An awful instance of sudden death occurred at Stockleigh Pomeroy, on Friday last; it appears that while MR WEBBER, a farmer of that parish, was going over his grounds to examine his flock of sheep, he fell suddenly to the ground and expired; the deceased was much respected, and his sudden death has caused great regret. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God," was returned at the Coroner's Inquest.

TIVERTON – Fatal Accident. – On Thursday last as labouring man named PERRIAM, between 50 and 60 years of age, in the employ of the Rev. W. Rayer, of Tidcombe Rectory, was conveying a quantity of reed on a slide for thatching ricks, to a field a short distance from the house, he had to pass a declivity of about 20 feet, when, passing too close, it appears the slide unfortunately got over the precipice; deceased at the time was on the horse, and both, from the sudden jerk, were precipitated to the bottom. It was not discovered for an hour afterwards, when both man and horse were taken out dead. In the evening an Inquest was held before F. Mackenzie, Esq., on the body of the unfortunate man, and a verdict of "Found Dead" returned.

Thursday, 26 September 1850, Issue 4425 – Gale Document No. Y3200682095
Suicide by a Horse-Stealer. - ROBT. TUCKER, who was apprehended, on Saturday, by inspector Stuckes, one of the City Police, on a charge of stealing a horse and saddle, at Rewe, and lodge din the county gaol, to be brought before the magistrates for examination, was found dead in his cell, on Monday morning, having strangled himself with a handkerchief. It appears that the deceased had been in the employ of Mrs Sparks, at Rewe, as a hind, to manage her farm, but was dismissed about seven weeks since, on account of suspicions against him; a horse was afterwards lost from the farm, and at the same time a saddle had been carried off from the stable of Mr Carthew, of Upexe mill, in the same parish. The horse was afterwards found, at Barnstaple, having been "swapped" for another and a sum of money, with Mr Carthew's saddle; from a description of the person who swapped the horse, no doubt was entertained that the prisoner was the man, and search was made for him, when he was captured in Exe-lane, on Saturday. The Inquest was proceeding when we went to press.

Thursday, 26 September 1850, Issue 4425 – Gale Document No. Y3200682097
WOODBURY – Charge of Neglect Against A Medical Gentleman.
On Monday the 23rd inst., an Inquest was held at the Globe Inn, Woodbury, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child aged 2 years and 5 months, named SAMUEL SPILLER MARKS, who it was alleged had died from the neglect of Dr Brent, the medical attendant.
It was rumoured in the neighbourhood that the investigation was caused by Mr W. Sanders, tanner, &c., of Woodbury, from motives of revenge against the Dr., with whom he had been on unfriendly terms for some two or three years past. However, this Mr Sanders stoutly denied, and just previous to the conclusion of the Enquiry a bitterness of feeling between Mr Sanders and one of the jurymen was exhibited, which it would have been better had it not occurred.
The following gentlemen comprised the Jury:-Mr James Ashford, foreman; Messrs John Salter, John Hallett, John White, J. S. Lindsey, William Salter, Richard Dagworthy, William Tapscott, John Calway, William Chapple, Francis Nicks, Saml. Lindsey and James Symonds.
The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner briefly charged them, remarking that they had been called together to examine into the death of the deceased from some apprehension of neglect attributable to the medical man who had charge of the child. He had brought with him a surgeon quite unacquainted with the parties here, and whose evidence he should call before them at a subsequent period of the investigation to enable them to form a correct opinion of the cause of death.
The Coroner and Jury then retired to view the body, and on their return the Coroner enquired of Mr Sanders who he understood had required this Inquest to be holden, if he was prepared to give any evidence himself.
Mr Sanders said that he had requested this Inquest to be holden, but that he had nothing to state.
Mr Laidman, who appeared for Dr Brent said, that Mr Sanders having called this Inquest, he should be examined.
The Coroner thought not, as he could give no evidence on the matter.
EDWARD MARKS, the father of the deceased, was then called and stated on oath, that he worked for Mr W. Sanders, tanner, of Woodbury, and that the deceased SAMUEL SPILLER MARKS was his youngest child, being 2 years and 5 months old; the deceased always appeared healthy until Sunday 15th, when he was taken ill, and continued until Monday, when not getting better Dr Brent was sent for. Witness did not see Dr Brent on the Monday, but on Tuesday witness went to his house, but found he was not home; this was between 11 and 12 o'clock at night; the servant said the doctor was not home, but that as soon as he arrived he should come to witness's house; Dr Brent did not come that night but was at the house on Wednesday morning between 6 and 7 o'clock; the doctor was the parish surgeon, and since he had been so witness had never paid him for his attendances, but he had before he obtained that appointment; witness had no medical order from the overseer nor the relieving officer for his attendance on the child; Dr Brent's conduct to his family had previous to this "been very attentive and kind in coming to him, but still, had he come and seen the child on Tuesday evening, as promised, it would have been more satisfactory;" the child died about half-past one o'clock Tuesday night.
Cross-examined by Mr Laidman – Dr Brent had attended witness's family ever since his coming into the parish: he had never had any cause to complain of him: this Inquiry had taken place without his request or wish: Mr Lindsey, deputy registrar, called on him on Friday last, and he told Mr Lindsey he did not know if there was any occasion for any Inquest being held. Witness thought it was not nearer 10 than 11 o'clock that he called at Dr Brent's on Tuesday night.
MARY ANN MARKS, mother of the deceased, deposed that the child first became ill on Saturday night, the 14th inst., and on Sunday morning after he was dressed, and had gone out with his sister, he became sick; and during the day brought off everything he took in: witness got some spearmint with which she made tea to alleviate the sickness, and which she gave him two or three times that day. On Monday morning, about 9 o'clock, she went to Dr Brent's and asked for some medicine, first describing the symptoms, conceiving the child was suffering from worms, having brought one off from the nose the week previous, requesting that he would call and see him in the course of the day. Dr Brent gave her six powders, one to be taken every four hours, which were given to the child; the last being given to him on Tuesday morning, about 5 o'clock. Dr Brent called on Monday afternoon and saw the child, but did not then say what complaint he was labouring under; the child was very feverish, with much moisture on the skin, and which continued from the time he was taken ill until he died. Witness sent her daughter about 9 o'clock on Tuesday morning to Dr Brent to say the medicine was all gone, and she brought back four papers of powders, one to be taken every six hours; one was given to the child immediately but his throat being so bad he could only take part of it; a second was given him at the proper time, but the child could only take part of that, his throat appearing to get worse and worse, and in consequence she did not "torment him with any more." Sometimes the child swallowed a little gruel that day, but at other times he could not; she did not herself go to Dr Brent's house on Tuesday as he promised on Monday he would call that day. On Wednesday morning between 6 and 7 o'clock Dr Brent called, but the child was dead, when the doctor said the child had died of a violent attack of scarlatina; he did not examine the deceased then nor had he since. She had no order from either of the parish officers for Dr Brent, but she went to him as the parish doctor. She had always found Dr Brent, when he had previously attended her family, very kind & attentive.
Cross-examined – The message she sent on Tuesday morning was that the child was still very ill, but she did not add if he thought it was necessary to send more medicine he was to do so. Her residence was almost opposite the doctor's. She had always said he had been very kind to her, and since what happened she wished he had called on the Tuesday. On Wednesday morning after questioning her he left instructions to be informed immediately if either of the other children were taken ill. On Friday last Mr Lindsey called, with Dr Brent and Mrs Littin, when the doctor asked if she had made any complaint against him, she replied "complaint, none whatever, quite the contrary, he had always attended her family with the greatest attention – she had nothing to complain of before;" and whether Dr Brent replied, and "why are you going to have an Inquest" she could not recollect, but there was something said about bringing it before the Board of Guardians, when she might have said "it was not her doing nor her wish, she knew nothing about it." She did not say it was Mr Sanders's doing. Dr Brent wished her husband to be sent for, which was done, and he said "he could not say the child died from Dr Brent's neglect, for he might have died with the doctor being present; but he wished he had come and seen it on Tuesday." She could not recollect if the doctor said "well, let Mr Sanders have an Inquiry, he (Dr Brent) was not afraid of it."
SARAH ANN MARKS, daughter of the above, about 16 years of age, deposed going to Dr Brent's on Tuesday morning, between nine and ten o'clock: having informed him that her brother was continually sick, and what he brought off was nothing but water and as green as grass she asked him if he required more medicine, when the doctor replied "Oh yes, wait a minute, and I'll give him some more." He then gave her four powders, with directions that one should be taken every six hours in a little tea: the doctor did not say that he would call and see him that day: she called at Dr Brent's house the same evening about 9 o'clock, and she was told that he was not at home: she left word with the servant to send him over to the deceased when he came home, which was promised.
Cross-examined – When she told him what the child had thrown up, she did not recollect his saying he was glad of that as it would relieve the stomach: the second lot of powders were different from the first: she also said to the doctor that "if he thought the child required more medicine, to sent it:" he said, "certainly:" but she did not recollect that he said by giving them every six hours it would not distress the child so much, though the child was worse, her mother did not desire her to ask the doctor to call on Tuesday.
Mrs Elizabeth Littin saw the child on Tuesday night, and was there when it died: the child was very bad, but she had never seen either of hers like it: she did not think the child could swallow: the throat was swollen.
This being the whole of the evidence in support of the charge, Mr Laidman said that he was anxious that the fullest possible Enquiry should take place, and he would call Dr Brent to state on oath the appearance and symptoms under which the child laboured, and the treatment adopted; and he would submit it fearlessly to any medical gentleman, being satisfied that the treatment resorted to was the ordinary treatment adopted by every medical gentleman in such a case as this. It was unfortunate that the doctor's other avocations took him away from home that day, and that he did not see the child that same night, after his return home about half-past 12 o'clock, as he intended to have done; but being persuaded by a friend, who was at his house, to go to bed and not disturb the deceased's family – conceiving that if the child was dangerously ill they would send for him again – and which he did, and with the determination to see the child early in the morning, not anticipating, from the symptoms he had seen and heard of the child, and having administered the usual remedies, it would result fatally, but that it would go through its various stages in the usual manner. He though that this Inquiry might have been spared; and he did not hesitate to say, according to his instructions, that this investigation did not emanate from a desire to have an Inquiry into the cause of death, and he would call witnesses –
The Coroner here remarked that it would be better to spare attributing or imputing motives to any person.
Mr Laidman – To show that the gentleman who had thought proper to institute this Inquiry had been on bad terms with Dr Brent for some years, and although it was unpleasant to attribute motives to any one, yet he had evidence that would satisfy their minds that it emanated more from a revengeful and jealous feeling, than a desire to serve the ends of justice. He would produce an individual to whom Mr Sanders had said, "I have been looking out for Dr Brent for two years, and now I have got him." He thought that when the witness state that, and he called Mr Lindsey, one of the jurymen, to corroborate what the parents had that day admitted.
The Coroner again interfered saying, that suppose he (Mr Laidman) did call witness to prove what he had stated, it would not bear on the present Inquiry, which was, whether Dr Brent was criminally answerable to the laws of his country. If he were so it mattered not who originated the Enquiry, as that would not affect the guilt or innocence of Dr Brent.
Mr Laidman said, that to charge Dr Brent with being amenable for the death of the child originated in malice with the party who caused the investigation, and he stated this because Dr Brent as a public man had a character to sustain, having attained as high honours as any man in the profession an attain, and who bore as good a character for humanity as any medical man in the county, and to have such a charge as this brought against him rendered it necessary it should be dispelled by every means in his power.
Dr Brent was then sworn:- He was a doctor of medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh: he had been between 6 and 7 years in practice, and about 5 years in this parish: he had attended many thousands of cases at hospitals in private practice and as officer to the Union; he first attended the deceased on Monday last. The mother called previous and stated the child had been sick, drowsy, and appeared very ill; from the symptoms described he considered it the prevailing epidemic scarlatina, having had 20 cases within the last two months, none of which had proved fatal; he gave the mother some medicine, desiring her to give it in something thick, and that he would see the child in the course of the day. The powder consisted of 1 grain calomel, 3 grain jalap, with 2 grains of soda in each powder; the same he had applied in the cases he above alluded to, varying according to age; that was a proper remedy; he also gave the mother directions as to her care of the child. He saw the child about 6 o'clock on Monday evening; the child was on the mother's lap; it had a rash on it which was the primary cause of the complaint. He directed her what to do and continued his treatment; the door was open, and he remonstrated with the child being so exposed and in a draft, as in most cases if the rash went in it was fatal; she was to inform him the following morning how the child was, and he would see it again, but did not say he would do so on the Tuesday; on Tuesday morning the daughter called on him saying the medicine was all gone, and that the child was no better, but had been sick, he inquired of her what it was which she stated, and asked if it was necessary to send any more medicine, to which he replied certainly, and sent 4 other powders composed of 5 grains pot. nitras, 1 grain pul. doveri, and 1 grain of scammni, to be taken in liquid; that was given in consequence of the girl's description of the child's vomiting, &c.; after giving the medicine he left home to attend to other business, returning the same night about half-past 12 o'clock; his servant told him he was required at MARK'S and another place, whither he intended to have gone after taking refreshment; Rev. W. Bagnell was at his house at the time and he put on his coat after being in the house a quarter of an hour with the intention of visiting the child; Mr Bagnell said that he thought he had better not go out that night but leave it till the morning, and from enquiry made of his servant, that it was 10 o'clock they came to his house, that if the child was worse he would have been sent for again; he went to bed determined to call early in the morning; feeling satisfied from the statement made to him by the girl that the child was progressing in the usual way. On calling on Wednesday morning between 6 and 7 o'clock he found the child was dead; he had no idea of such a fatal termination.
Mr Laidman then proposed called Mr Foster, to repeat the conversation he had had with Mr Sanders, with reference to having caught Dr Brent.
The Coroner said he would rather not have Mr Foster called. He did not wish to have any motives, or imputed motives, for holding this Inquiry, as it would not weigh with the Jury, who had to judge according to the evidence bearing on the charge.
Mr Laidman said, then he should call him on some other occasion.
Mr Sanders then rose, and said he denied the whole of what Mr Laidman had stated. He was ready to swear he never said the words to any mortal man.
The Coroner said that having had Mr Laidman's statement and Mr Sanders'[ contradiction, they had better not go further into it.
Mr Sanders rose, and with great excitement exclaimed, "There was never a bigger lie told by mortal man."
Mr Tapscott, one of the Jury, rose and was about to speak, when
The Coroner said he would not enter further on this subject.
Mr Sanders, with great excitement, said he acknowledged he was not on friendly terms with Dr Brent, who had grossly insulted him; but, God forbid, that he should charge any man as had been stated. What he had now done was for the public good.
Mr Tapscott again rose, and wished to be sworn to the truth of Mr Laidman's statement, with reference to Mr Sanders saying he had caught the doctor.
The Coroner said he thought the Jury should not enter into any altercation between the parties, but if they wished him to call Foster he would do it, but it would not bear on the subject matter they had to deal with.
The Jury coinciding with his ideas.
The Coroner then called Mr Devenish, surgeon, &c., of Honiton, who, on being sworn, said he had been in practice 18 years: he had never seen Dr Brent before this day: he had examined the body of the child externally, and the throat so far as he could through the mouth: from that examination he could not say how the child died: there was only evidence of ulceration and inflammation of the throat, the appearances observed about the child were consistent with its having had an attack of scarlatina: in this district he believed scarlatina was considered by the public to be a lighter complaint than scarlet fever, but medically they were the same: assuming the complain to be scarlatina, the treatment adopted by Dr Brent was very judicious, and the remedies were of that class.
By the Coroner – Supposing the child had been seen on Tuesday were there any remedies that could be suggested likely to prolong life? Most probably not; it was difficult to give an opinion that way: from his experience whenever scarlatina became epidemic, so that the cases were numerous, some would be observed in which the disease ran a fatal course with unusual rapidity, and that such cases very frequently take the medical attendant by surprise, however careful he might be: he knew no means by which such cases could be distinguished in their early stages from such as took a milder course.
The Coroner then summed up the evidence to the Jury, having first explained to them the law of the case, and after a few minutes deliberation they returned a verdict "That the child met his death from Natural Causes."

Thursday, 3 October 1850, Issue 4426 – Gale Document No. Y3200682139
INQUESTS. - On Friday last an Inquest was held by John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the Sawyers Arms, Preston-street, on the body of an infant 5 months old, the daughter of a person named STALL, found dead that morning by its mother's side. Verdict – "Died from Natural Causes."

On Saturday, before J. Warren,. Esq., at the Valiant Soldier, on the body of a boy named GODFREY, 15 years of age, who died at the Hospital from injuries received from falling on a knife on Fore-street Hill, and which we published at the time of the accident. Verdict – "Accidental death."

Thursday, 24 October 1850, Issue 4429 – Gale Document No. Y3200682234
INQUEST. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the New Inn, Catherine-street, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, touching the death of WALTER HENRY TAYLOR, who died suddenly on Thursday morning, and concerning which there were various rumours afloat. Some person having gone so far as to address an anonymous letter to the Coroner, hinting that the deceased had not died from natural causes. The first witness called was his wife, who deposed that her husband had been unwell for some time, suffering from rheumatic: that he went out on Wednesday afternoon, and did not return until 12 o'clock at night; he slept soundly from that time until 8 o'clock on Thursday morning, when she got up and went to her workroom, and did not see him again until about 12 o'clock that day, when he appeared very ill and was sick and vomiting very much. Mr J. B. Parker was immediately sent for, and he saw him as he lay on the floor; he was then put to bed with difficulty; and Mr Parker's directions attended to; about an hour after that he died. MRS TAYLOR said that in consequence of the rumours which were circulated in the neighbourhood she wished the deceased to be opened. Mr Parker deposed that he found the deceased lying on the floor of the parlour on Thursday about a quarter to one o'clock, complaining of pains in the stomach and bowels, and vomiting very much a greenish, yellow, bilious fluid; he desired him to be put to bed, and his bowels well rubbed; he sent him an opiate to quiet the stomach; about 20 minutes after he left him he was called again, when he found him in a state of collapse, and too far gone to be able to produce a re-action: there could be no doubt but that intemperate habits had caused death. To this many of the Jury dissented, the deceased having been well known to many of them. The Coroner said that under all the circumstances it would be better to have a post mortem examination of the body, and one of the Jury suggested that Mr Edye be called in to assist Mr Parker. The latter gentleman objected to meet Mr Edye. There were also several other professional gentleman who had thought proper to cut him, because he advocated the truths of mesmerism, and who could not be convinced until a mountebank came to show them; and therefore he could not meet them. After some time being spent in discussing who Mr Parker would meet, and who he would not, it was arranged that Mr A. J. Cumming be called in, and the Enquiry was adjourned to six o'clock. On the reassembling of the Jury, Mr Parker stated that he had examined the body; he found the stomach and intestines in a healthy condition and nothing in them to indicate the deceased had been drinking. The veins on the upper surface of the brain was found to be congested with blood, which could be produced from anxiety, and were sufficient to cause death. Mr Cumming coincided with Mr Parker's opinion and a verdict was returned accordingly. It was stated that the deceased who had a family, had been out of employ for two years.

Thursday, 24 October 1850, Issue 4429 – Gale Document No. Y3200682235
TORQUAY. – Coroner's Inquest. - The body of NICHOLAS PEPPERELL, who was drowned a week or two since whilst returning from fishing, was picked up by Joseph White, a fisherman, on Thursday. The body was in no way mutilated: and on Friday an Inquest was held before A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of – Found Drowned.

Thursday, 14 November 1850, Issue 4432 – Gale Document No. Y3200682334
INQUEST. – On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the Buller's Arms, St. Sidwells, before J. Warren, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a man named JOHN HAWKINS, who dropped down dead in the stable of the above premises the previous day. The deceased had for some time been suffering from a diseased heart, and of which it appeared he died. A verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday, 5 December 1850, Issue 4435 – Gale Document No. Y3200682410
A man named EBBELS, whose leg was accidentally broken about a month since, by a cart passing over it in Bartholomew-street, died on Sunday last, in the Hospital, from the injuries he so received. An Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

The body of GEORGE BULLEY, late postboy to Mr Pratt, who was drowned on Tuesday night last, in the river Exe, was found on Sunday afternoon last, in one of the gravel pits just below Exe Bridge. An Inquest has since been held on the body, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" returned.

Thursday, 12 December 1850, Issue 4436 – Gale Document No. Y3200682455
INQUESTS. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier, Magdalen-street, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a woman, 67 years of age, named BOARD, who resided in King-street, who dropped down dead on the day previous, near Mr Kennaway's house in the Barnfield. A verdict was returned accordingly.

An Inquest was also held, at the same place, on Tuesday, on the body of a female, named RICHARDS, who accidentally fell from the roof of a house in Albert-place, Rack-street, in July last. She was immediately conveyed to the Hospital, where she has remained ever since, but the nature of the accident was such that medical skill could do her no good, and she lingered until Monday last, when she expired. A verdict in accordance with the above facts was returned.

Thursday, 12 December 1850, Issue 4436 – Gale Document No. Y3200682456
PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT. - Charge of Murder. - William Thomas, Benjamin Head, and William Wyatt, bargemen, having been apprehended on suspicion of having been concerned in the violent assault committed in Stonehouse lane, on WM. AMBROSE, from which he died, underwent an examination; the two latter were discharged, but Thomas detained in custody to await further inquiry. An Inquest has since been held, which occupied a considerable time, the result of which was, that Mr Wills, the foreman, read the verdict as follows:- "The Jury find a verdict of Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown, and beg the Coroner to append the following to the same:- The Jury deeply regret that public-houses should be open after the usual hour allowed by law, and as during the progress of this painful investigation, it clearly appears that the Earl Howe, in Stonehouse-lane, was opened after twelve o'clock on Saturday night, the 16th of November last, and until an early hour on the Sunday morning, and wine and spirits supplied to the deceased and William Thomas, the latter of whom was then tipsy, they trust the magistrates will, by every means in their power, endeavour to prevent such evils in future."

Thursday, 19 December 1850, Issue 4437 – Gale Document No. Y3200682485
FALMOUTH – Shocking Neglect of a Youth. - An Inquest was held on Friday, the 6th inst., touching the death of a young seaman, named WILLIAM CHAPLIN, a native of Exeter, aged 16. It appeared that the deceased was brought to Mrs Price's lodging house, on the previous Sunday, by three seamen, one of whom described himself as Captain Charles Parker, of the schooner Albion, of Exeter; he said that the young man, while on his passage to Swansea, off this port, fell from the yard of the vessel to the deck, and had much injured himself; the poor lad seemed to be in great pain, and unable to speak, and she sent for Mr Brougham, surgeon, who attended him. The Captain called on her the next day, to enquire after the youth, and she asked him, as she heard he was going to sea, what provision he would make for the boy, when he coolly replied, that he owed the boy nothing, and she must apply to the parish officers. On the surgeon remonstrating with him, he gave the nurse half-a-crown (!) and refused to do anything more than to hand her, a note with the address of the lad's friends, "Mr Chaplin, post-office, Eade, (we presume Ide,) near Exeter." The next day the captain came again, and brought a bottle of rum, but the poor boy was in a dying state, and he left, taking the rum with him! The youth did not afterwards open his eyes or speak, and expired next day, the captain having left the port! Mr Brougham stated that after death he carefully examined the body, and found many scars and bruises, but how caused he could not give any opinion. The Inquest was adjourned in order to obtain further evidence from the captain and others, as to the scars and bruises on the body.

Thursday, 19 December 1850, Issue 4437 – Gale Document No. Y3200682486
TEIGNMOUTH. - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday the 11th instant, a most distressing accident by fire occurred in this town, to a young girl named SARAH RIDGWAY, aged 15 years, servant to Mr Palk, butcher, an which resulted in her death. – On Friday last an Inquest was held on the body by Alexander Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, at the London Hotel, when it appeared from the evidence of a man named Andrew Wedger, that at the time of the accident deceased and himself were sitting by the fire in Mr Palk's kitchen. After some time Wedger fell asleep, and was awoke by deceased, who said "Look here" when he perceived that her clothes were on fire. He immediately endeavoured to extinguish the flames but without success. On finding his efforts unavailing he ran for some water and was followed by the deceased into the passage completely enveloped in flames. Mrs Palk and her sister then came out of the parlour and the latter threw a coat and a mat around the girl who fell to the ground, when the flames were extinguished. Wedger took her up and carried her in the parlour, when Mr Sullock attended her to the time of her death. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from the effects of the burn and shock to the nervous system, "the Coroner remarking that that was no less than the fifth Inquest he had recently held on persons whose deaths had been similarly occasioned."

Thursday, 2 January 1851, Issue 4439 – Gale Document No. Y3200682532
SHOCKING ACCIDENT. – An Inquest was held on Friday at the Buller's Arms, Exwick, on the body of J. ROBERTS, a gardener of that place, by __ Leigh, jun., Esq., in the absence of his father, prevented by illness. The deceased with his brothers and some others were out shooting rabbits, and seeing a rabbit seeing, he asked his brother to hand the gun to him from the other side of thicket; the brother took the precaution of uncocking the gun, but in pulling it towards him, with the muzzle in front, the cock must have been forced back by a spray and suddenly falling the gun went off, and lodged the entire of its contents in the left side of the deceased, which caused his death instantaneously. The act was witnessed by two or three persons, and the verdict returned was "Accidentally Shot."

INQUEST, - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Soldier's Arms, Preston-street, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child four months old, registered in the name of WILLIAM HENRY DENNIS, but not baptised, which had been found dead in bed in White's-court, Preston-street, that morning, by its dry nurse, who slept with it. It was the opinion of Mr Kempe, surgeon, that the woman had overlaid the infant in the night, and so suffocated it The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 16 January 1851, Issue 4441 – Gale Document No. Y3200682636
BARNSTAPLE. - Two Inquests were held on Thursday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq. Borough Coroner, the first on the body of WILLIAM FEWINGS, aged 72. Deceased had been a farmer, residing at Swimbridge, but had failed. On Wednesday last he was brought before the Magistrates on a summons, to show cause why he neglected to support his wife, it appearing he had the means It seems the wife had for some years lived with him as servant, and a long arrear of wages were due to her, to settle which the old man married her, and took the debt as her marriage portion. As might be supposed such a marriage was not productive of much happiness, and for the last six months they have lived apart. At the hearing of the case before the Magistrates, the deceased was informed, that unless he contributed towards the support of his wife he must go to gaol. From the evidence taken before the Coroner, it appeared that deceased had for some time past been suffering from dropsy, but was sufficiently well to attend before the Magistrates, and declared he had not the means to support his wife, and on being told he must pay 1s. per week or go to gaol, he appeared to be greatly affected, and on going to a public-house near was taken ill and died. The Jury returned the following very ridiculous verdict, that the deceased died suddenly, and at the time of his death was suffering from dropsy; and that from the evidence now produced, the Jury are of opinion that his death was accelerated by a certain expression used at the county magistrates office, yesterday, to the following effect – "you must either pay a shilling a week or go to gaol."

The same Jury then proceeded to Pilton, where an Enquiry was instituted into the death of MARY JONES, aged 70, an inmate of the Pilton Poor-house. Deceased had been in the establishment for 40 years, and had been suffering for many years from a bad leg, and had always refused medical assistance. She was found dead in her bed, at half-past 6, on the morning of the Enquiry, Verdict, "Sudden Death, from Natural Causes."

TORRINGTON. – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on the 3rd inst., at Wear Gifford, by J. H Toller, Esq., deputy Coroner, o the body of a labouring man named THOS. BEER, in the employ of Mr J. Balsdon, Wear Barton, who was taken ill while at work in a barn the day before and died. A post mortem examination of the body was made by Messrs. Rouse and Owen, surgeons, of this town, whose opinion was that death resulted from natural causes, and a verdict was returned accordingly. The deceased has left a wife but no children.

Thursday, 23 January 1851, Issue 4442 – Gale Document No. Y3200682647
CREDITON - Inquest
On Thursday last an inquest was held before A. Leigh, junr., Esq., deputy coroner, and a highly respectable jury, Mr Michael Rice being foreman, at the Ship Inn, on the body of a child named HUTCHINGS, who was killed a few days previously by a cart passing over it, in East Town. The parties who witnessed the accident having been examined, the jury returned a verdict of "accidental death". The jury then retired to the bar, and on the deputy coroner coming into the room to speak to a gentleman, he was accosted by Michael, who being of opinion that a cobbler might go beyond his last, said that he had been requested by his brother jurymen to mention a circumstance, and as it related to his worthy father, he presumed it would not be objectionable to his hearing. It was, that the first inquest Mr Leigh, senr., held in Crediton, was on the grandfather of the child, who was at that time a carter in the employ of the late Mr Hippisley, and was killed by the wagon passing over him, and he (Michael) was on the jury. On that occasion, it being Mr Leigh's first visit to Crediton, the jury, as he (Michael) was then doing, politely asked him to "stand sam," and which he readily did. As Mr Leigh, junr., could not do better than walk in the footsteps of such an estimable gentleman as his father, he hoped, this being his first visit to Crediton, he would do the same. Mr Leigh, jun., under the circumstances, complied with the request.

Thursday, 23 January 1851, Issue 4442 – Gale Document No. Y3200682652
ST. THOMAS - Sudden Death. - On Friday last an Inquest was held by F. Leigh, Esq., Coroner on the body of MISS CURTIS, daughter of the late MR CURTIS silversmith, of this city, who resided in one of the houses in Cowick Terrace. It appeared that the charwoman, who visited the house at certain periods, was there on Saturday, and left MISS CURTIS who resides alone, in her usual health. On Sunday morning the outer window shutters were not opened, which attracted but little notice and they remained so until Wednesday, when, on the charwoman going as usual, she could not gain admittance. After some difficulty an entrance was effected, when MISS CURTIS was found in the parlour, seated in a chair near the fire-place, and quite dead. The window-sash was raised and the bolt of the shutter lifted; it is therefore supposed that she had commenced to open the shutters on Monday morning, but that on finding herself ill she had taken a seat where she was found, so that she must have been dead three days before the body was discovered. The Jury returned a verdict of died by "The Visitation of God."

Thursday, 30 January 1851, Issue 4442 – Gale Document No. Y3200682690
INQUEST. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held by J. Warren, Esq., at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of a boy named WILLIAM DRAKE, nine years of age, who met with a serious accident to his leg on Sloncombe farm, Moretonhampstead, on the 8th inst. The injury was of so serious a nature that the boy was brought to our Hospital, but being unable to suffer the pain of amputation, he died from loss of blood. Verdict, Accidental Death.

INQUEST. – Caution to Parents. – An Inquest was held on Saturday, by John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little girl about two years of age, named JESSIE SNOW, daughter of MR SNOW, shopkeeper, Magdalen-street, who met her death from drinking tea nearly in a boiling state, from a tea-pot on the table. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 30 January 1851, Issue 4442 – Gale Document No. Y3200682709
TORRINGTON. – Inquest. - On Monday, an Inquest was held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of a male child, son of THOMAS WRIGHT, shoemaker, of this town, who died in the night of Friday last from the effects of burning. It appeared by the evidence, that on Friday morning the father left the house about the space of an hour, the wife being ill in bed, leaving the deceased in care of a little girl about 7 ½ years old, when, according to the statement of the latter, the child in lighting a straw, set its clothes on fire, when the girl ran immediately into a neighbour's house and told the circumstance, and a young woman of the name of Jane Green instantly came, and found the child enveloped in flames, and most shockingly burnt, so that in about 12 hours after death put an end to its sufferings. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, from the above cause. The Coroner, at the same time, charged the father as to the necessity of his adopting better precautionary measures for his children's future safety.

Thursday, 6 February 1851, Issue 4443 – Gale Document No. Y3200682744
INQUEST – Fatal Accident. - A carter, named JOHN CROCKER, servant to Mr Matthews, paper manufacturer, of Huxham, met with a fatal accident on Friday afternoon, beyond Elm-field gate, on the north road. He had been riding on the shaft of the cart, when the horse trotted on at an unusual rate, upon which he jumped off for the purpose of taking the horse by the head, when he fell, and the wheel passing over part of his breast and the neck, he was killed on the spot. He was a very steady man, having been in the employ of his late master nearly twenty years, and he has left a wife and 6 children. An Inquest was held on Saturday, on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 6 February 1851, Issue 4443 – Gale Document No. Y3200682746
NEWTON ABBOT. - Coroner's Inquest. – On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the Passage House Inn, Newton Quay, on the body of a man named PETHYBRIDGE, of Manaton, a relative (we believe brother-in-law) to Hambling, the farmer, who was committed the other day, for sheep-stealing. It appears that on the morning of Hambling's apprehension the deceased was found missing, (having been told that the officers were in pursuit of his brother-in-law) and no traces could be obtained of him until Friday, when his body was picked up in the canal, near Jetty Marsh Land. The hat of the deceased was picked up on the morning of the 17th instant, by a person named Mitchell, of Kingsteignton, who had worn it ever since. The deceased was considered a sober, steady, industrious person, and the estate rented by Hambling belongs to him. It is much to be feared that the circumstance of his brother-in-law's apprehension was the cause of his committing the rash act. The Jury returned a verdict of – Found Drowned.

CORONER'S INQUEST. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH KINGWELL. The Enquiry was held at Ashill, near Stover, the residence of the deceased; and from the evidence it appeared that on the Monday previous she had a fit and fell into the fire, sustaining frightful injury, and after lingering for a very short time death terminated her sufferings. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

Thursday, 20 February 1851, Issue 4445 – Gale Document No. Y3200682812
INQUEST. – On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, by J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child, two years old, named ELIZABETH HOWARD, of Sowton, who accidentally caught herself on fire and was severely burnt the previous Tuesday. The child had been left home with other children whilst the mother was at work the day the accident occurred. She was immediately conveyed to the Hospital, but died the following day. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday, 27 February 1851, Issue 4446 – Gale Document No. Y3200682848
NEWTON ABBOT. – Coroner's Inquest - On Friday last a poor woman named FOLLETT, fell down dead in the market-place, where she resided. On the following day an Inquest was held on the body at the Bradley Inn, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, which was adjourned, the husband being from home.

PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT – Suicide. - On Tuesday afternoon a man named COOK, destroyed himself by cutting his throat, at his residence, in the Old Excise Office, Notte Street. An Inquest was held on his remains on Wednesday, by the Coroner, J. Edmonds Esq., when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday, 27 February 1851, Issue 4446 – Gale Document No. Y3200682831
WOODBURY. - An Inquest was held at Lindsey's Globe Inn, on Wednesday, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little boy, three years old, son of MR FRANKLIN, miller, whose death was occasioned by drinking boiling water from a tea-kettle, on the previous Sunday. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday, 6 March 1851, Issue 4447 – Gale Document No. Y3200682882
NEWTON ABBOT – Coroner's Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of ELIZABETH PAYNE, alias FOLLETT, was resumed before W. A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, on Tuesday, when the following evidence was adduced: - Sarah Hitt said she knew deceased very well, and always thought she was JOHN FOLLETT'S wife. She had one child by him, and he had two other children previous to their cohabiting. They were very poor, but witness did not think they were so bad as they were until she saw deceased on the Friday before her death, when she remarked to witness that she had been almost starved this winter, and having sold all her things she had got nothing, and did not care what became of her. Witness never heard her say anything about poisoning herself, but had heard that such a report had been in circulation. Deceased said she had received parish relief, and witness advised her to apply for more. Was not aware she was subject to fits. Used to see her every day. She often said FOLLETT behaved very kind to her, but that he said he could not maintain her and the children. FOLLETT got his living by cockle selling, but could not say what he earned a week. Witness first saw deceased alive between 4 and 5 o'clock on the afternoon she was found dead: she did not complain then of being ill. - Maria Greenslade state that on Friday last FOLLETT'S boy had the baby in his arms when she saw him, and was crying. He said his mother had fallen on the floor, and witness went into the house, when she found the deceased lying with her head under the bed. Witness ran for assistance, and another person came in and helped her to take up deceased. She was quite dead. Never heard of her attempting to poison herself. - Dr Radley stated that he was called in to see the deceased: she was under the bed. He examined the body, and found bruises and marks on the right side of the head, and the cheek was broken by a heavy blow. On Saturday, at the request of the Jury, he examined the body again, and ascertained that she had not been sick previous to her death, but had complained of pains. From the examination, he was convinced she died of a fainting fit, brought on from exhaustion caused by the want of sufficient food. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence. FOLLETT was called in, and asked if he was married to the deceased. He said he was not.

ASHBURTON. - An Inquest was held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., at Lemonford Mills, on Thursday last, on view of the body of MR EDWIN GILLEY, miller, aged 39 years. Deceased whilst returning from Newton market on the previous night, his cart unfortunately overturned at Knighton Cross, and he was killed on the spot. He was a man much respected, and has left a wife and 6 children to lament his untimely end. The road between Newton and Ashburton is very narrow in some places, and the trustees should attend to its immediate improvement.

Thursday, 20 March 1851, Issue 4449 – Gale Document No. BA3200682968
Horrible Murder Near Plymouth. - In our last publication we briefly stated that intelligence had reached this city, of a very horrid murder having been perpetrated at Brixton, near Plymouth, on a lad 17 years of age, named JOHN BUNKER, servant to Mr Henry Rowe. It appears that in the village of Brixton, about four miles from Plymouth, there is a farm known as Halwell, occupied by Mr Henry Rowe and his grown up children. Among his servants was a lad, JOHN BUNKER aged seventeen years. M

Thursday, 20 March 1851, Issue 4449 – Gale Document No. BA3200682944
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Sunday afternoon a distressing occurrence took place, nearly opposite the Exeter Ferry, by which two lives were lost. A small punt, belonging to Mr Mitchell, was in the river, near the bank, into which two young men, from Creedy and Crediton, named JOHN WOODLAND and JOSEPH GROVES, got for the purpose of amusing themselves on the water; having moved the boat off from the shore, they upset the little craft, and, sad to relate, were both drowned before assistance was at hand. An Inquest has been held on the bodies, before the County Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" returned.

SUICIDE. - A young man named SAMUEL BAKER, who has been in the employ of Mrs Buckland, on Fore-street-hill, was found hanging, in the back cellar of the house, on Saturday morning, quite dead. An Inquest was held on the body, by J. Warren, Esq., Coroner when it appeared, from the evidence, that the deceased, who had an attack of illness five years ago, from which he became deranged, had since been of weak mind, but a very honest and trustworthy workman; he was about to leave his situation, on account of Mrs Buckland having declined business, and had been observed to be in an unusually melancholy state during the past week. The Jury returned a verdict, "That the deceased hung himself when in a state of temporary insanity."

Thursday, 27 March 1851, Issue 4450 – Gale Document No. Y3200682992
DREADFUL OCCURRENCE. - On Thursday afternoon, a man aged fifty-one, named CHARLES BROOKS, who was employed in Mr Worthy's woollen factory, in the Exe Island, got entangled in the belt that works the large machine called a scribbler: the poor fellow was drawn round the drum and crushed in a most dreadful manner between it and the ceiling and died in about an hour after. An Inquest was held on the body at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Friday, by John Warren, Esq., city Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 10 April 1851, Issue 4451 – Gale Document No. Y3200683076
BARNSTAPLE. – Extraordinary Case Of Suicide By a Boy.
An Inquest was held on Monday, on view of the body of WM. OATWAY, a boy about fifteen years and a half old, who was found hanging to a crook in the kitchen, at the residence of his mother, in Gaydon-street, under circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Thomas Curtis, mason, deposed - The deceased has been with me for the last two years, as an apprentice. I have always found him to be a very quiet industrious boy, he was in the receipt of 4s. per week, wages, which he regularly gave to his mother, who is a widow, and keeps a baker's shop in Gaydon-street: the father f the deceased died about twelve months since: the boy had always been exceedingly kind to his mother, and was in the habit of saving every penny he obtained that he give it her: had never observed any symptoms of derangement in him: saw him last alive on Saturday night, when he expressed his intention to be at his work on Monday morning.
John Ireland (pensioner) – The deceased is my nephew: I called at his mother's house on Sunday: the family were all together, and appeared very happy: I sat and read the Bible for some time, when the mother and sister of deceased left the house, to go as far as Newport, soon after which I left: it was then about half past three: deceased at that time appeared in his ordinary health and spirits: I had not heard him make any complaint, or observed anything extraordinary in his conduct: at the time I left the house he was in the act of cleaning himself.
Elizabeth Dunn - I am a servant, living at Miss May, in Bear-street, Barnstaple: I called at MRS OATWAY'S at half-past three on Sunday: met John Ireland coming out of the house; on going in, saw WM. OATWAY, who told me his mother and sister were gone to Newport, and directed me how I might go the nearest way to over-take them: at that time he was washing himself, and had nothing on but his trousers, stockings and shoes: I did not at that time observe anything strange in his manner, or had any reason to believe that he intended to commit suicide: when I came out I closed the door, which fastened with a drop latch inside.
William Minor - I reside in Gaydon-street: on Sunday evening, between five and six o'clock, hearing an alarm and cries of murder, I ran out as far as MRS OATWAY'S: some one told me to go into the kitchen: was not at that time aware what had happened: found deceased hanging from a crook in the ceiling, and, assisted by John Jones, at once but him down: at the time of doing so, found that he had two pair of candlesticks tied to his feet: he had nothing on at the time but a clean shirt and pair of stockings: on carrying the body up stairs, found that there was a piece of candle tied to a piece of packthread, and fastened round the neck.
John Jones, Brickmaker - I reside in Gaydon-street: hearing an alarm on Sunday evening, between five and six o'clock, I went out: accompanied the last witness to MRS OATWAY'S kitchen, and assisted in cutting down the body: the rope and piece of candle now produced are the same I saw about the neck at that time: the body was not quite cold: Mr Joce, surgeon, was in attendance within ten minutes, and used every means in his power to restore animation, and applied the galvanic battery, but to no purpose.
Mrs Land, a relative, deposed – That deceased had, within the last few days, exhibited symptoms of melancholy, which she believed was caused by a very heavy bill, which had been sent in to his mother lately for medical attendance, during the lifetime of his father: the amount of the bill was £14; and deceased was afraid his mother would never be able to pay it, and he feared she would have to go to prison.
This being the whole of the evidence, the Jury retired to consider whether they should adjourn, to give time for a post mortem examination of the body, which, however, was not thought necessary; and, after mature deliberation, returned the following verdict;- "That the deceased, WM. OATWAY, committed suicide by hanging himself, but in what state of mind he was at the time there is no evidence to show."
Deceased was a very quiet, unoffending boy, and the circumstance of his committing suicide has caused very considerable consternation in the neighbourhood; where it is generally believed the heavy bill alluded to had driven him out of his mind.
At the close of the inquest, the whole of the jurors very generously gave the fees which had been allowed them by the Coroner, towards providing a decent funeral for the deceased, as the mother is known to be in very reduced circumstances.

Thursday, 10 April 1851, Issue 4451 – Gale Document No. Y3200683052
BRADNINCH. - On Thursday an Inquest was held before R. R. Crosse, Esq., deputy Coroner, at the North Devon factory, in this parish, on the body of a child four years old, named WM. JAMES GOTHERINGE. His parents worked at the factory, which belongs to Mr William Upcott, of Cullompton. The poor child was found by his mother drowned in the factory pond, but there was no evidence to show how the deceased came in the water. The verdict of the Jury was "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 17 April 1851, Issue 4452 – Gale Document No. Y3200683112
NEWTON ABBOT. - Suicide. - A melancholy occurrence took place in this town on Friday last. About six o'clock a.m. the neighbourhood were alarmed by the shrieks of a poor woman named TRUEMAN, and on assistance being rendered it was found that her husband had destroyed himself by suspension to a staple in the kitchen. The body was immediately cut down but life was found to be extinct. On the same day a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Bradley Inn, before A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned. The deceased was a fellmonger by trade, and in his 70th year, leaving a wife and 3 children behind him.

Thursday, 8 May 1851, Issue 4455 – Gale Document No. Y3200683205
TOPSHAM. – Fatal Accident. - On Thursday an Inquest was held before Mr Reed, deputy Coroner, at the Select Vestry-room, in this town, on the body of a boy named DANIEL BROWN, nine years of age. It appeared by the evidence, that he had been swinging in a chain swing suspended from a crane in the shop of Mr A. Moore, chain maker, when the end slipped off, and fell on him. After receiving the injury, he walked home, and complained much. He was put to bed, and die dearly the next morning. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday, 8 May 1851, Issue 4455 – Gale Document No. Y3200683217
SUDDEN DEATH - An Inquest was held at the Bear Inn, on Thursday last, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM GIBBS, cabinet-maker, aged 64 years. The deceased had been suffering from a slight disease of the heart, and it is generally supposed that he died from its effects. The Jury returned a verdict of – "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 22 May 1851, Issue 4457 – Gale Document No. Y3200683269
ST. THOMAS. - Mr Crosse held an Inquest, on Thursday, at the Swan Inn, on the body of a labouring man named WILLIAM LEIGH. The deceased was employed in the Rack-field, St. Thomas, excavating earth for the purpose of drainage, on Wednesday, when a quantity of earth fell upon him. A man named Joseph Anning, who was working with him, saw the occurrence, and immediately tried to get him out. In about ten minutes he succeeded, with the assistance of others, in doing so, but the poor fellow was quite dead. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 29 May 1851, Issue 4458 – Gale Document No. Y3200683324
Lamentable and Fatal Occurrence.
On Monday evening, the inhabitants of the village of Heavitree, were thrown into a state of great excitement, from a report which prevailed that a boy named Henry Channon, aged 11 years, the son of a labourer, had shot another boy named WILLIAM JOB EVELEIGH, who resided with a man called Golsworthy, a shoemaker, living in Oakfield-place, Heavitree, and that portion of the report which refers to the unfortunate death of EVELEIGH, has unhappily proved true. From information which we have been enabled to glean, it appears that a man named Dennis is in the occupation of a spot of ground, in which is a linhay, situate near the path fields leading from the Barrack-lane in the direction of Wonford, and which ground he had planted with potatoes, and being much troubled with rooks, he had taken his gun with him with which to destroy some f the birds. Having occasion to leave the field, he was noticed by Channon and the deceased to place his gun (which was loaded) in a particular part of the linhay, and as soon as he was out of sight, they repaired to the spot, ad possessed themselves of the gun, when shortly after the fatal accident alluded to occurred. Whether Channon presented the gun at the deceased, or whether they were both meddling with it, and by accident it was discharged, we are unable to state, from Channon having made contradictory statements as to the occurrence probably from fright at having seen his youthful companion so suddenly deprived of life. Immediately on the discharge of the gun Channon ran off, and the deceased was shortly after taken up by a man in the employ of Mr Stewart, of Stafford Terrace, and conveyed to his home, when Mr Madden, surgeon, &c., was sent for, and promptly attended. On examining the body, he found that death was caused instantaneously, the charge having entered the head just by the side of the right ear, taking an oblique direction, carrying away the top of the skull, and scattering the boy's brain in every direction. At the request of Mr Madden the constable was sent for, and Channon taken into custody, and brought before C. Gordon, Esq., who having heard as much evidence as could then be produced, ordered the boy to be detained in custody until such time as an Inquest could be held on the body, and which is being proceeded with this day (Wednesday), by Mr Crosse, at the Ship Inn, Heavitree.

Thursday, 29 May 1851, Issue 4458 – Gale Document No. Y3200683326
WASHFORD PYNE. - A man named WILLIAM TOLLEY was found dead on Thursday last. It appears that the deceased went to work as usual in the morning and had but and bound two faggots of furze, when in the act of pulling off his coat he fell forward on the furze and expired An Inquest was held on Saturday last before R. Crosse, Esq., deputy Coroner, when a verdict was returned that the deceased died by the "Visitation of God."

Thursday, 5 June 1851, Issue 4459 – Gale Document No. Y3200683345
Exeter – Death from Drowning. - On Monday evening an Inquest was held by J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the Bishop Blaise, Commercial Road, on the body of a child named DANIEL LEG, about 3 years old, who accidentally fell into the stream from the bridge which leads from the Commercial-road to Ewing's lane, and was drowned. The jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of Accidental Death by drowning; and expressed themselves strongly on the disgraceful and dangerous state of this bridge, which is so much used by the inhabitants of the neighbourhood. Numbers of children are continually falling into the water from this spot, which, were it not for the timely assistance rendered, would lead to more fatal results than have been already recorded.

Thursday, 5 June 1851, Issue 4459 – Gale Document No. Y3200683353
The Late Fatal Accident at Heavitree.
On Wednesday last an Inquest was held at Biggs's Ship Inn, Heavitree, by R. R. Crosse, Esq., deputy Coroner, and a highly respectable jury, to Inquire into the death of WILLIAM JOB EVELEIGH, a boy who was shot the Monday previous by George Henry Channon, a boy 11 years of age.
The Jury having been sworn and viewed the body, several witnesses were examined as to the finding of the body, &c., and Richards, the constable, deposed to going with Woodbury, the other constable, and the boy Channon, to where the accident occurred: he having stated that he and the deceased were out picking rabbit's meat, and that the boy was shot by two men, who he saw run off, both being dressed in black trousers and caps, and in their shirt sleeves, one having a pistol in his hand, the other a bag round his waist. When they came to the linhay where Dennis, the owner of the gun, left it, Channon looked up to some timber overhead, saying, "There's the gun, Mr Woodbury;" but at that time it was out of sight. The constables did not give credence to the statement Channon made as to who shot the deceased, but he persisted in his statement from the time of his being taken into custody on Monday evening until the morning of the Inquest.
When the lad George Henry Channon was introduced into the Inquest room, he walked up to the table and answered the questions put to him with great readiness; and in his answers, he showed an amount of low cunning and sagacity which has been entertained of him for some time past by those inhabitants of the village who have had an o0pportunity of knowing his general habits and actions. The boy stated himself to be under 11 years of age; but which the Deputy Coroner and the Jury doubted, from his appearance, and the father was sent for, who stated his son to be about 11 years and 5 months old, which was of importance, in consideration of the position hereafter of the boy in reference to ulterior proceedings.
The Coroner then cautioned him, and asked him if he knew the nature of an oath, or could read, to which he replied he could not: he stated that he believed persons who told untruths went to hell, and on that he was sworn. He said he did not try to do it: the deceased ran before the gun when he held it up. It was 20 minutes past 3 o'clock when he left his house on Monday afternoon last with the deceased, and went to Mr Kenshole's fields to gather dashels for rabbits: they went down the field to the sawpit, when deceased said he knew a bird's nest in the thatch of the linhay, with nine eggs in it. Deceased climbed up to look for it, when he found the gun on the planks, and slipped it into the cart, which was underneath, when he came down from the linhay, took up the gun and ran after witness, who started off and jumped into Mr Kenshole's sawpit, near at hand. The deceased then went up the field, when witness followed him and took away the gun. He did not know the gun was loaded, although he put the ramrod into the barrel. Witness pointed the gun at a sparrow, and as he pulled the trigger, deceased ran before the muzzle of the gun, to catch the sparrow, when he shot him (The gun was put into the witnesses' hand, to show the jury how he held it, and from the manner in which he shouldered it, and half cocked it, he appeared to understand something of its management.) Witness and deceased had not quarrelled. When he saw the deceased fall, he ran to his mother and told her what had occurred: his reason for not telling her the same story he had the Jury was, that he was afraid they would "go tanning him," as Golsworthy had on a former occasion, when "he took deceased home drunk from Batten's." Witness, after he had shot the deceased, "put the gun back, extinguished the fire which was in his cap, and put it in the hedge." The gun was "all cocked vitty" when he took it from the deceased. He stated to Mr Rewe that the deceased shot himself.
The Coroner then summed up the evidence to the Jury, and remarked, that they would have to determine whether the deceased died from a gunshot wound, and by whom it was inflicted, and if the party was capable of understanding what he had done. From the age of seven to fourteen the law considered an infant incapable of committing crime, but this presumption may be rebutted by strong and pregnant evidence of mischievous discretion Guilt, however, was not to be measured by the years of a party, so much as by their intelligence, understanding and judgment.
The Jury having consulted a few moments, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" at the same time censuring Dennis, the owner of the gun, for leaving it as he had, loaded, in the linhay, and within reach of any person.

Thursday, 12 June 1851, Issue 4460 – Gale Document No. Y3200683389
BRIXHAM. - Coroner's Inquest – A Brixham Verdict. - An Inquest was held on the 3rd of June instant, at the London Inn, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, on the body of CONSTANCE REEVES, who met with her death under peculiar circumstances. The Jury having chosen their foreman, proceeded to the house of the deceased to view the body, after which witnesses were called, who deposed to the deceased complaining of illness on Friday last, whilst she was packing fish and lifting it in the carts, as was her usual practice. Finding that she got worse a medical man was called in, who paid her every attention up to the time of her death. During his attendance on the deceased he ordered injections to be used, which not having the effect on her that one of her friends thought was right, she without any directions from the medical man, made an injection of an ounce of tobacco soaked in half a pint of water, and administered it to the deceased, after which she became worse, and ultimately died. In consequence of this rash act, on the part f the person alluded to, the medical man caused the present Enquiry, and from these statements made on oath, the Coroner wished to have a post mortem examination of the body as to the real cause of death, but which he permitted the Jury to overrule, they not wishing to get the woman, who administered the tobacco injection into a scrape. The Coroner having recapitulated the evidence to the Jury, they returned the following verdict:- "Us have come to the conclusion that deceas'd died of a rupture of the guts by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 12 June 1851, Issue 4460 – Gale Document No. Y3200683378
MELANCHOLY SUICIDE. - On Tuesday, about mid-day, the inhabitants of the lower part of Paris-street were painfully excited by the fact that MR LASKEY, baker, &c., had committed suicide by cutting his throat. Dr Shapter, who happened to be passing at the time, and Mr Elliott, who was sent for, rendered all the assistance in their power to save the life of the unfortunate man, but so effectually had he perpetrate the act that he died almost immediately. The deceased has, we understand, of late been in a very desponding state of mind, and fears were entertained by his friends that he would destroy himself, having attempted it by poison but last week; but in order to prevent such a catastrophe, a relative had that day gone to one of the Lunatic Asylums to make arrangements for his admission into it as a patient. In the evening an Inquest was held on the body before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, when it was proved clearly to the Jury that the deceased was in an unsound state of mind, and that his despondency appeared to be a dread of becoming an inmate of the workhouse, but of which there was no present prospect, he being in what might be considered easy circumstances, with the probability of doing very well. The deceased cut his throat with a dinner knife. The Jury returned a verdict of "Insanity."

Thursday, 19 June 1851, Issue 4461 – Gale Document No. Y3200683438
An Inquest was held at the Paper Maker's Arms Inn, Exe Lane, on Saturday last, before J. Warren, Esq., on the body of GEORGE BRUCE, a little boy aged six years, who had accidentally fallen from the bridge into the water at Head Weir, the previous evening. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SOUTH DEVON.
Accident – A boy, named WANNEL, of Newton-Bushel, was thrown from a horse, in the parish of Ipplepen, on Friday last, and killed on the spot. An Inquest was held at the Wellington Inn, when a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 26 June 1851, Issue 4462 – Gale Document No. Y3200683478
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A DROVER. – On Wednesday evening last, a poor man named BABB, a drover, was conducting a drove of bullocks through the Fore-street, and just as the animals passed the crossing of North-street, one of them attempted to get upon one near, when he struck it with his stick; the bullock in regaining its legs slipped and fell upon BABB, crushing his leg between its body and the curb of the flag-pavement so completely that the splintered bone protruded through his clothes several inches. He was immediately taken to the Hospital, where it was found that the amputation of the limb must immediately take place. The operation was skilfully performed, but the poor fellow expired on Saturday. An Inquest has been held, and a verdict of "Accident Death" returned.

COLYTON. - On the morning of Saturday last, an old man, named JOHN HAM, hung himself to an apple tree, in the garden at the back of his cottage, at Colyford. An Inquest was held on Monday, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., when it appeared that the deceased was drinking at the Swan on Friday, until eight o'clock p.m., when he proceeded towards his house, and was never afterwards seen alive. He had served through the Peninsular war, had been twice wounded, and was in the receipt of a shilling a day pension.

Thursday, 26 June 1851, Issue 4462 – Gale Document No. Y3200683479
SOUTH DEVON. - A very lamentable accident occurred on Monday forenoon, on the South Devon line. As the express train was coming from Plymouth to Exeter, and near Harberton Ford, about two miles from Totnes station, MR CHRISTOPHER BIDLAKE was lying on the line, and his head was severed from his body. The unfortunate gentleman, who was about 70 years of age, was subject to fits, and it is supposed that he had one of these sad attacks when this distressing event occurred. He has been in a very desponding state for some time. He was unmarried, was respectably connected, and has left numerous friends to lament his melancholy death. We are happy to be able to state, from authority, that not the least blame is attached to those who had the management of the engine. The alarm was given, and so loud and continuous that it was noticed by several persons at a great distance. An Inquest is being held at Harberton. This sad catastrophe has caused a great gloom in the neighbourhood.

Thursday, 3 July 1851, Issue 4463 – Gale Document No. Y3200683517
TORQUAY. - Coroner's Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Monday evening, before A. Cockey, Esq., on the body of a young man named CURTIS, recently in the employ of Messrs. Narracott, grocers, of the Strand. It is presumed that the young man had gone into the water to bathe near Tor Abbey Sands, and by some means got drowned. The clothes were seen by two young men, who carried them to the house of policeman Gale, and an alarm was given. This was on Sunday morning, but the body was not found until the following day. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

NORTH DEVON. – Barnstaple.
Death from Excessive Drinking. - A man named JAMES POPHAM, a scavenger, residing in Myrtle-place, has during the last month been drinking to great excess, and taking but a small quantity of food, has fallen victim to his intemperate appetite. On Thursday morning last information reached the Borough Coroner that the man had died after taking a dose of medicine administered by an itinerant quack doctor. The Coroner thereupon ordered a Jury to be empanneled, and an Inquest was held at the Railway Hotel, Boutport-street, on Thursday at 1 o'clock, when after hearing the evidence of William Walters, who had lodged in the same house with deceased, who stated that he had been drinking very hard for several weeks, and on Tuesday complained of illness and a quack doctor whom he met at the Horse and Groom public-house, had given him some medicine, and had since given him a powder to take at going to bed – this latter powder he took late on Wednesday night, and soon after, in witness's own words, went raving mad. He had talked very incoherently for two or three days, exhibiting during that time all the symptoms of "delirium tremens." At four o'clock in the morning of Thursday he died, and a very general belief existed that death had been accelerated by the medicine which the quack had administered. The Inquest was therefore adjourned, to give time to make a post mortem examination of the body. At the adjourned Inquest, on Friday evening, Mr Morgan, surgeon, stated in evidence, that assisted by Mr Cooke, he had made the post mortem examination of the body, - on removing the scalp he found the brain gored with blood, sufficient to cause compression; the general appearance of the brain was such as would be expected in a person who had been long addicted to habits of intemperance. On further examination he found the lungs and liver very much diseased, indeed sufficient to cause death at no distant period. From what he had heard from the witness Walters, he was of opinion that death was the result of "delirium tremens," caused by excessive drinking. The Jury thereupon returned a verdict to that effect.

Thursday, 10 July 1851, Issue 4464 – Gale Document No. Y3200683554
PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT. - RICHARD LANE, a shoemaker, residing in Geake's Alley, Devonport, committed suicide on Wednesday morning, by hanging himself. It is supposed he committed the rash act under the effects of drunkenness the previous evening. Deceased's brother committed suicide by cutting his throat a short time since at Stoke. An Inquest has been since held on the body, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned.

Thursday, 10 July 1851, Issue 4464 – Gale Document No. Y3200683535
CORONER'S INQUEST. – On Tuesday, an Inquest was held by J. Warren, Esq., at the King's Arms, Coombe-street, on the body of a fine healthy child, three years of age, named NICHOLAS GEORGE TRUMP, who died that morning suddenly. On a post mortem examination of the body, it was found that the child died from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict of 2Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 17 July 1851, Issue 4465 – Gale Document No. Y3200683571
SUICIDE – This (Wednesday) morning, an Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, on view of the body of JOHN HARRIS, who terminated his existence by hanging himself on Monday, near to St. Paul's Church. It appears that the deceased, who was fifty-two years of age, and a bricklayer, left his home, in Paul-street, early on Monday morning, and did not return again. The last time he was seen alive was about eight o'clock the same morning. In consequence of his absence a search was made for him, and on Tuesday afternoon he was found hanging to a nail fixed in the wall of the small burial-ground, behind the vestry of St. Paul's Church, of which Church he was the clerk. He appeared to have been dead for some time. Close to his feet was a chair, which belonged to the vestry, upon which one of his legs was resting. Evidence was adduced to show that for some time past the deceased had been strange in his manner, and evinced symptoms of insanity, - upon which the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Derangement."

SUDDEN DEATH. - An Inquest was held at the Globe Inn, New Town, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of
GEORGE CRAGGS, aged 47. The deceased was a gardener, of respectable family, and had been in business in the city. For some time, however, he had been in distressed circumstances, and for a year and half had been working for Mr Arthur Bustard, of New Town, who had employed him from motives of charity, and had given him his victuals, and the chance of earning money from occasional jobs of work. He slept in an unfurnished house, near the Workhouse, as it appeared very comfortably; and on Friday evening, he took his supper with Bustard's family as usual, and went home to bed. About six o'clock the next morning he called Bustard, saying, in a cheerful tone, "Are you going to lie there all day." A man named Isaac, was standing under the window with him, and immediately after having said this Isaac called to Bustard, "Mr Bustard, CRAGGS is in a fit;" Bustard hastened down and found the deceased sitting on the ground supported by Isaac. He "foamed to the mouth, drew several breaths," and then lay motionless. Mr S. S. Perkins was for, but deceased was quite dead when he arrived. Mr Perkins said the cause of death was apoplexy. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 24 July 1851, Issue 4466 – Gale Document No. Y3200683632
ROBOROUGH. – Fatal Accident. – On Wednesday afternoon, as WILLIAM NEWCOMBE, about 65 years of age, of this parish, a thatcher by trade, was engaged in thatching a rick of hay, on the parsonage farm, and whilst in the act of removing the ladder on which he was standing to another position, with a boy, who was on the ground, the ladder fell with NEWCOMBE, throwing him with great violence a distance of twenty five feet. The rev. Mr. Gurney instantly attended, and afforded the utmost assistance, and sent or medical aid, which was promptly rendered by Mr Risdon, of Dolton, but the injuries the poor man had received were of such a serious nature, that their kind and humane exertions were unavailing, for he lingered until the next morning, when he expired, about 8 o'clock. An Inquest was held on the body, on Friday, by J. H. Toller, Esq., when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was a quiet, steady man, and much respected.

Thursday, 31 July 1851, Issue 4467 – Gale Document No. Y3200683646
NORTH DEVON - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday, a young man named JOHN BENNETT, about 19 years of age, farm servant to Mr Reddaway, Buckland Filleigh, met his death near Annery lime kilns, whither he was going for lime in Monkleigh, between Torrington and Bideford. He was driving a wagon and two horses, in company with another young man with a wagon, and were said to be going rather fast, when they met a wagon coming against them, in passing which BENNETT was thrown out in the road, and the wheels of one of the vehicles passing over him he received such serious injuries, that on being taken to Ellis' Hunter Inn, he expired within a few minutes. An Inquest was held on Monday, which proved it to be the result of careless, but not wilful, accident, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday, 31 July 1851, Issue 4467 – Gale Document No. Y3200683667
The man BASTIN, who fell from the building in Queen-street, on Wednesday last, and was removed to the Hospital, lingered on till the following morning, when death put an end to his sufferings. On the same day, an Inquest was held before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 7 August 1851, Issue 4468 – Gale Document No. Y3200683700
TEIGNMOUTH. – CORONER'S INQUEST. - An Inquest was held at Burgoyne's New Quay Inn, on Tuesday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., deputy Coroner, on the body of a fisherman named EDWD. HORWELL, who was found drowned in the river Teign, on Monday the 4th inst. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased belonged to a fishing sloop of this port, and on Sunday morning borrowed an oar of Mr Burgoyne's servant to scull himself the sloop. The same morning the oar was found on the point and the boat adrift on the river. Suspecting that an accident had happened to the deceased a search was made, and about four o'clock a.m., on Monday, the deceased was picked up in the river, a short distance from the New Quay Inn. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

Thursday, 14 August 1851, Issue 4469 – Gale Document No. Y3200683716
An Inquest was held at the White Hart Inn, South-street, on Saturday last, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of
EPHRAIM KENNARD, a boy 13 years of age, who, in the morning, was crossing the river Exe in a boat, and overbalanced himself, by which he fell into the water, and was shortly after taken out dead. Verdict, Accidental Death.

On Monday last an Inquest was held before H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of the illegitimate child of
MARY ANN SMALLACOMBE, at Bridestowe. This case caused very great excitement in the neighbourhood, in consequence of various reports being in circulation tending to create strong suspicion that the child (6 months old) had died from violence from the father. The body had been privately interred a fortnight, and was exhumed by order of the Coroner, for the inspection of himself and Jury. Dr Budd, of North-tawton, was summoned, and made a most careful post mortem examination, and afterwards gave so decided and clear testimony, that the Jury, after a long investigation, the Coroner having summoned a number of witnesses, found that the child's death was not caused by the violence suspected, but that the cause of death, so long after interment, could not be satisfactorily ascertained: it was a very suspicious case. The resident magistrate, Mr Hamlyn, attended the Inquest, and was thanked by the Coroner for his valuable assistance.

Thursday, 4 September 1851, Issue 4472 – Gale Document No. Y3200683827
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - On Wednesday an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT ARBERRY, son of a waterman, at Exmouth. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased went into a loft with some other boys, for the purpose of playing, and had not been there long before he fell from the entrance door and received a compound fracture of the right leg. He was immediately taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Monday. – Verdict, "Accidental Death."

An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Paper Makers' Arms, in Exe Lane, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN WEBBER, about 18 years of age, of weak intellect, who went into the river to bathe, just above Head Weir, on Wednesday afternoon. After being in the water some considerable time he got out of his depth, and not being able to swim he was drowned. His body was in the water from two o'clock until seven, when he was found and taken to the Paper Makers' Arms. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 11 September 1851, Issue 4473 – Gale Document No. Y3200683865
MELANCHOLY CATASTROPHE – Two Lives Lost.
Yesterday (Tuesday) morning, the inhabitants of St. Sidwell's were painfully excited by a rumour that two men, in descending a well at the back of the King's Arms, St. Sidwell's, had lost their lives, and which, unfortunately, proved too true. It appears that Mr Routley, about a month since, had the well thoroughly cleaned out and repaired, as well as the pump, and in consequence of some defect in the latter, he on the above morning complained of the circumstance to Mr R. Rouse, plumber, &c., of Paris-street, who thought it would be better to shorten the suction pipe, and accordingly went across the street to his workshops and fetched his apprentice, ROBERT RED – a fine young man, about 20 years of age, son of MR RED, slater, &c., of North-street – and JOSEPH TURNER, a labourer – a married man, with 4 children – to make the necessary alteration. On arriving at the well, the deceased ROBERT RED, was lowered into it by the other deceased, TURNER, with a rope, and when about 15 or 20 feet down, he complained of the air being foul, on which Mr Rouse requested him to be drawn up immediately, which was done to within 10 feet of the top, when he observed his face presented the appearance of being in a perspiration; the deceased, TURNER, remarking "it was very bad, no doubt," and seeing the danger he was in, went down the same rope to assist him, but before he got down 7 feet, the carbonic acid gas took effect on him, and the two fell to the bottom of the well: TURNER entered the well voluntarily. Seeing the danger, and conceiving the men might be saved, Mr Rouse fastened a rope round the body of a man named Davy, and lowered him down the well, and (suspecting the two deceased fell from the effects of the foul air) when he was lowered a short distance, Mr Rouse called to him, but receiving no answer, he was pulled up immediately, when he was found to be senseless; but shortly after coming to the surface he recovered. Another man who was present volunteered to descend the well, and the rope was tied round his body and he lowered into the well and down to the water; but the carbonic acid gas being still so strong, he became faint, and in pulling him up his head got entangled between the rongs of the ladder, which had been lowered into the well for the men to stand on whilst repairing the pump, and both came up together.
Finding it was impossible that any person could descend the well, to bring the two unfortunate individuals to the surface, recourse was had to drags, and it was not until more than an hour had transpired that their lifeless bodies were taken from the well.
In the evening an Inquest was held on the bodies on the above premises, by John Warren, Esq., Coroner, when the above facts having been deposed to, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday, 11 September 1851, Issue 4473 – Gale Document No. Y3200683864
FATAL ACCIDENT. – On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the Royal Oak, Dunsford, before Mr Crosse, deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of MR RICHARD ASH, of Langley Farm, Dunsford, who met with his death on the Friday night previous, by the upsetting of his horse and cart, as he was returning from Exeter market. The deceased was found by Mr Crispin, wheelwright, &c., lying in the road, between the front of the cart and the horse, quite dead, near the late Mr Froom's residence, at the top of Dunsford town. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 18 September 1851, Issue 4474 – Gale Document No. Y3200683919
SUDDEN DEATH. – Yesterday (Tuesday) evening an Inquest was held by John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the Acland Arms, St. Sidwells, on the body of al female named CROKER, about 19 years of age, and who resided with her parents at York-street, St. Sidwell's. The deceased, who is the daughter of the woman who keeps a stall for the sale of coffee, mornings, at the top of High-street, has been subject for some time past to pains in the head, and on Monday she complained very much of her suffering, and appeared to be worse than on former occasions. The deceased continuing to get worse, her mother gave her some brandy and water in the evening, and other things at a later period of the night, but which did her no good. About 11 o'clock her mother retired to rest, and was awoke about 2 o'clock by her daughter's groans, and on going to her she saw a great change in her appearance, and spoke to her, but the deceased was unable to answer; she then removed her to her own bed, where she rapidly sunk and died in about one hour after. The Jury very properly, on these facts being deposed to, declined agreeing to a verdict until a post mortem examination of the body had taken place, reports of an unpleasant nature, with reference to the deceased's conduct with a young man in the neighbourhood, having been circulated during the day. The parents are much to be blamed, seeing the state their daughter was in, in not calling in a medical gentleman, especially when it is remembered Mr Farrant resides within a few doors of them; and it was only when Mr Farrant, who accidentally heard of the girl's death, about 10 o'clock in the morning, and went to the house, that she was seen by a medical gentleman; but from her appearance, and the symptoms as described by the mother, it was impossible for him to say what was the cause of death. The Inquest was adjourned to 5 o'clock this evening, for a post mortem examination of the body.

Thursday, 25 September 1851, Issue 4475 – Gale Document No. Y3200683935
TORRINGTON – Fatal Poisoning Case. - On Friday last a young man named HENRY HOOPER, about 21 years of age, son of MR JOHN HOOPER, of Scottington, in Roborough, met his death from the effects of poison. It appears he had been frequently unwell of late, and had occasionally taken medicine, and on the above day whilst engaged in his work on Rumsley farm, in the parish of Beaford, where he resided with his sister, managing the farm for his father, he had a basin of broth about dinner time and mixed some arsenic in it, (but whether from accident or design is not known,) and partook of it and resumed his work, until his groans alarmed the man who was at work in the same field with him, and on the man informing his sister, she went immediately for assistance, and medical aid was soon obtained, when it was discovered that he had taken poison, being a portion of some arsenic which had been purchased several years since by his father when he bought the farm, for the purpose of destroying rats – all attempts to save the unfortunate young man's life, proved ineffectual, and he expired after suffering great agonies the same afternoon. A post mortem examination was made the following day and on Monday an Inquest was held on the body, but we have not heard the results. The deceased was a member of a respectable family, and much respected, and the melancholy event has caused a great sensation in the neighbourhood.

Thursday, 2 October 1851, Issue 4476 – Gale Document No. Y3200683969
BEAFORD – An Inquest was held on Monday, 22nd ult., before R. Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on view of the body of HENRY HOO0PER, whose death we noticed last week, at Rumsley, in this parish. Several persons were examined by the Coroner, but nothing was elicited to attach blame to any party in connection with this melancholy affair, which gave rise to various rumours in the neighbourhood. The principal evidence was Mr John Oliver Rouse, surgeon, of Great Torrington, who attended the deceased soon after the accident occurred, when he found deceased in a highly convulsed state, and as he was informed by his sister that he had been in the habit of taking effervescent draughts, he imagined he was labouring under its effects; he used every available means at hand, but the deceased shortly afterwards expired. At that time nothing was said about poison, but subsequently it came out that some arsenic, kept on the premises for killing rats, had been recently disturbed, and suspicion arose that young HOOPER had taken a portion of it. Mr Rouse then made a post mortem examination of the body, when the stomach appeared much inflamed; the contents of which, on being tested, discovered a quantity of arsenic sufficient to destroy life; and in this instance, from the length of time that had elapsed after it was taken, before medical aid could be afforded, and from the quantity taken, it was impossible that he could be expected to recover. The Coroner, in summing up remarked on the careless manner in which poisonous articles were kept, the experience of every day shewed that it deserved a greater share of the public attention than was bestowed on it, and to this end a remedy had been wisely provided by the legislature, as regards the dealing in arsenic. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 30 October 1851, Issue 4480 – Gale Document No. Y3200684082
A man named CONNETT, of Torrington, a labourer, who had been on a visit to his friends in this town, fell down in the Church path, leading from Newton Abbot to Woolborough Church, on Monday evening last. A man named King, who had been almost close behind, came up and found the poor man to be dead. the body was taken to the nearest inn, the Turk's Head, to await a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday, 6 November 1851, Issue 4481 – Gale Document No. Y3200684114
TEIGNMOUTH - On Wednesday night last, between twelve and one o'clock, JAMES PERRIMAN, a sailor belonging to the Arrow schooner, of this port, was unfortunately drowned. On the Coroner's Inquest held on Saturday, Richard Cornish stated that he and the deceased had been in company together, that they were about returning to their vessel, and that he Cornish left the deceased standing on the quay, while he went to the Edith, lying alongside, to borrow an oar, during that time PERRIMAN fell into the water and Charles Marsh, the mate of the Edith, heard the splash and looked over the side of his vessel with a light and not seeing any one took no further notice, (and Cornish unfortunately was too much intoxicated to do so) had he used any exertion the poor man might have been saved, the water being between two and three feet deep only at the time the accident happened. The Coroner and Jury severely reprimanded him for his want of common humanity.
The body was found next morning at the spot where he fell, by a man named Tomlinson.

Thursday, 6 November 1851, Issue 4481 – Gale Document No. Y3200684118
An Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Inn, North-street, on Saturday Nov. 1st, before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy-Coroner, on the body of CHARLES WHITE, a resident for many years in Atwell's almshouses, Northernhay. On the previous evening deceased had retired to a closet at the back of the house, and having been absent a considerable time, alarm was felt by his family, and enquiry made. The door of the privy was found secured on the inside, and, no answer having been returned by him, when called on, the door was forced open, and the deceased was found lying on the floor dead. Mr Warren who was in attendance stated it as his opinion that the deceased had probably been attacked by apoplexy and that having fallen forwards on his face he was suffocated. Verdict, accordingly.

Another Inquest was held on the same day, and before the same gentleman, at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, on the body of MRS SUSAN SALTER, wife of MR JAMES SALTER, flour and corn-factor, Paul-street; from the evidence it appeared that the deceased was suddenly taken ill, about nine o'clock on Thursday evening, having enjoyed good health up to that moment. Mr Warren who was quickly in attendance prescribed such means as were suitable to the case, but on visiting her after an interval of an hour, he found her in a dying state, and she expired in great agony, a few hours after. An examination of the body was ordered by the Jury, and the Inquest adjourned to Monday morning Nov. 3, having been resumed, Mr Warren stated that he had examined the body of the deceased, and that in the course of the examination he had found an immense quantity of blood effused into the cavity of the abdomen, which he discovered had proceeded from the rupture of an internal organ. Verdict accordingly – Natural Death.

Thursday, 13 November 1851, Issue 4482 – Gale Document No. Y3200684150
INQUEST. – On Saturday last an Inquest was held by J. Gidley, Esq., deputy Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier, on the body of SAMUEL BURRIDGE, age 15 years, who died, in the hospital, from injuries he received on the night of the 5th of November, owing to rockets, which he had about his person, exploding. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

A fatal accident occurred at Exminster on Monday. A man named JOSEPH GOSLIN, whilst enjoying himself in his favourite sport of rabbit shooting, fell from a cliff, and when taken up was found to be so seriously injured that he was immediately conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where death put an end to his sufferings the same day. An Inquest was held on Tuesday, and a verdict returned accordingly.

Thursday, 13 November 1851, Issue 4482 – Gale Document No. Y3200684146
BARNSTAPLE. – Suicide. - On Saturday evening, the body of a woman named LEE, whose husband carries on the business of fancy-wood turner at Bradiford, in this borough, was found in the river Yeo, near Pilton Bridge. Life was quite extinct, although every exertion was used to restore animation. Deceased had for some time been in a desponding state, and had previously made an attempt at self-destruction. An Inquest was held on the body, on Monday, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" recorded.

BIDEFORD. - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday last, a child named ROBERT EVANS, about six years of age, was burnt to death by being incautiously left with another and younger child in a room where there was a fire. The children began to play with the fire, and the clothes of deceased becoming ignited, he was burnt in a horrible manner. The screams of the poor children brought some neighbours to their assistance; but the unfortunate little sufferer was so dreadfully burnt as to occasion his death in about two hours after. A Coroner's Jury, under the direction and Inquiry of T. Pridham, Esq., returned a verdict in accordance with the facts above recited.

Thursday, 27 November 1851, Issue 4484 – Gale Document No. Y3200684218
Another Death From The Doings On The Fifth of November.
An Inquest was held on Saturday, before J. Gidley, Esq., at the Valiant Soldier, Magdalen-street, on the body of a lad, WILLIAM FENWICK, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Friday last, from injuries received in the Cathedral-yard, on the night of the 5th of November inst.
Evidence was given that the deceased had been struck by a rocket, thrown by an unknown hand.
Mr P. De-la-Garde, surgeon to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, found the boy FENWICK with a small, circumscribed, but intense bruise on the belly, as if from a tremendous blow, which had quite killed the skin. It was just such an injury as was described as resulting from a spent ball. About 34 hours after the accident, violent inflammation of the bowels came on; about 48 hours afterwards here was a swelling of the skin on the left side, which was punctured to allow the wind, causing it to pass off, and the wind resulted from the gases of the bowels, which were ruptured; an abscess was formed, and a sloughing brought off the dead skin and part of the bowels, leaving an entrance, through which the motions passed off up to the time of his death, and to that circumstance was to be attributed the deceased surviving no longer. He gradually sank until he died.
Mr Gidley was very sorry to notice this was the second case of death resulting from fireworks this month. What he had said on a former occasion he repeated, the letting off these fireworks was an unlawful act, and those who did it did it at the risk of being called to answer for their misconduct, if death was caused thereby. In this instance it did not appear by whom the rocket was thrown, or if thrown by any one, but it was clear, from the evidence of the boy's brother, that when thrown on the ground it was driven by the force of the powder against this boy, and killed him. Whatever amusements were sanctioned, they ought to be of a much more innocent and less dangerous character, and perhaps the Jury would express their opinion on the subject, and all the attention of the Magistrates to it. This great loss of life, and the numerous accidents from the same cause, were very sad, and ought to be put a stop to be all reasonable and legal means.
The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, adding to their presentment the following:-
"The Jury upon the Inquest on the body of WILLIAM FENWICK, who came to his death by the explosion of a rocket upon the 5th day of November inst., beg to represent to the Mayor and Magistrates of the City of Exeter, the lamentable consequences which result from the dangerous practice of allowing rockets and fireworks to be let off in the Cathedral Yard of this City, whereby death is occasioned in one or more cases as invariably as the practice is observed. This is the second death that has happened from the discharge of rockets in the Cathedral yard in the present year, and the Jury respectfully request the Mayor and Magistrates not to permit this illegal and dangerous practice to be carried on in future."

CHILD MURDER. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the White Ball public-house, Mary Arches Street, before John Gidley, Esq., deputy Coroner, touching the death of a male child, of which a young unmarried woman, about 22 years of age, calling herself SARAH POLLARD, was delivered on the previous Thursday afternoon.
It appears that the female above named is the illegitimate daughter of a woman who is now married to a man named Frost, residing at North Bovey, but formerly of Hartland, and previous to Christmas last POLLARD was in the service of the Rev. __Rowe of St Mary Arches, leaving him at that time. Since then she applied to be taken back, but was refused, and report states that latterly she has been endeavouring to obtain a situation by fictitious characters, but had been unsuccessful in her attempts.
The first witness called was an elderly woman named Sarah Baker, who deposed that she was a widow woman residing in the house adjoining the White Ball, and that on Tuesday the 4th of November, SARAH POLLARD, whom she did not then know, came to me to lodge for two days, prior, as she said, to her going to service, but she had remained up to this time. Soon after she came to me I charged her with being in the family way, but she always denied it. On Thursday last, the 20th, in consequence of her complaining of illness, I gave her some broth about half-past twelve o'clock, which she eat, and I then left. On my return, at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I found the door locked, I knocked, but no one answered, when I went to my neighbour and complained, and afterwards came to the door again, which I then found open, and saw the young woman sitting by the fire holding her head. I said if you are poorly you had better go to bed, giving her after a pint of organ tea. I then went away and returned about half-past five o'clock, and found her out of bed, and from my suspicions of what occurred at the time of my putting her to bed, and from what I saw on my return, I searched and found the body of a child under the bed, tied up in a cloth. Mr Arthur Cumming, surgeon, was then sent for.
By the Jury – I never saw her making any baby-linen, and when she was axed with being in the family way she denied it. I said to her "if you go on like that you are like to be hanged," for she ought to have some linen ready. I also told her if "you deceive me you do not know the consequences.
The Deputy Coroner here remarked that it was much to be lamented that this witness, with the evidence she had of the state of the young woman, had not recourse to the proper authorities, as POLLARD would then have been properly taken care of, and this Inquiry would not have been needed.
Mrs Jane Taylor deposed that on the 3rd of November, as I was coming home, I met the young woman above named, in Mary Arches Street; she said she had lately been in the service of the Rev. __Rowe, and her fellow servant had recommended her to a Mrs Walrond, in that street, to sleep for a couple of nights before she went to another situation. Not being able to find the person, and her appearance being respectable, I agreed, my husband being from home, that she should sleep with me that night, which she did, and from that I accused her of being in the family way, but she stoutly denied it, and threatened to trounce me if I stated so. I did tell my neighbours of my suspicion. The following day she went with the last witness.
Mr A. J. Cumming, surgeon to the Corporation of the Poor, deposed that he was called t POLLARD on the above evening, whom he found sitting by the fire; she denied having been confined; in a plaid cloth, under the bed, he found the body of a full-grown male child, on whose body there were no marks of violence. His opinion was, from the pallid appearance of the body, and the effusion of blood on the cloth, that the child was born alive Mr Cumming then entered into detailed statement of the appearance f the body and other matters connected with it, giving it as his opinion that the child died from bleeding, in consequence of where the mother had separated the umbilical cord with a pen knife.
The learned Deputy Coroner in summing up to the Jury, said there could be very little doubt how the child came to his death. No preparation was made by the mother for the birth of the child, and when she was taxed with the condition she was in she continually denied it, and it was equally clear from the evidence that the child came to his death from the act of the mother. He could not, therefore, lay down the law to them on this evidence otherwise than that the act of the mother amounted to wilful murder. These were very painful cases to enquire into, and having done so they must deal with them according to the law.
The Jury consulted for some time, when the foreman asked whether the surgeon could form a more positive opinion as to the child being born alive from a post mortem examination, to which he replied, only by trying whether the lungs would float in water, when the Jury said they thought it would be better for such to be made but on the learned Deputy Coroner questioning him that that was not an infallible test, nor would it convey to his mind such an unexceptionable proof that the child was born alive as its palidity, the Jury did not persist in the examination taking place.
After some further conference, the Jury returned reluctantly a verdict of WILFUL MURDER; but considered that the woman must have been in an excited state of mind at the time, and ignorant of the consequences of the act.
The learned Deputy Coroner said that to the Inquisition he would append a paper containing their explanation.
The prisoner stands committed for trial at the next assizes on the Coroner's inquisition; and the duty of prosecuting in these cases now, since the passing of the recent act of parliament for the protection of children, occasioned by the cases of the Birds and Sloanes devolves on the guardians of the poor.

Thursday, 4 December 1851, Issue 4485 – Gale Document No. Y3200684254
On Tuesday an Inquest was held before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of AMELIA CARSWELL, who has been living for some time, as a servant, with Mr Maunder, eating house keeper, Milk-street. It appeared that she had been poorly for some days, and had been taking medicine, which she sent for to the shop of a chemist in the neighbourhood, but had declined to have medical advice, not deeming herself seriously ill. At three o'clock she tapped at the partition which separated her bed room from that of another female member of the family, and expressed a wish to drink and to have some of Mr Maunder's cough medicine. Her wish was complied with, although Mr Maunder advised her not to take the medicine, as it contained acid, which might not agree with her. Whether she took any or not did not appear; but she was found dead in her bed at half-past six. A post mortem examination made by Mr F. G. Farrant, showed that she had died from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday, 11 December 1851, Issue 4486 – Gale Document No. Y3200684287
NORTH DEVON - Barnstaple. – Self Destruction by a Female.
On Saturday last, Mr A. Drake, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Mr Baker's, the Hollow Tree public-house, Newport, touching the death of a female called MARY BAKER, aged 22, who had committed self-destruction by throwing herself into the river Taw. The circumstances connected with this lamentable affair appear to be these:- On Wednesday morning, Mrs John Law, who resides in the Square, and with whom the deceased had been living but a short time, had her suspicions aroused that she had been robbed, and therefore sent for Mr Aldham, superintendent of police, to act in the matter. On becoming acquainted with the particulars, Mr Aldham inquired of Mrs Law, (who had fully satisfied him that the deceased was the thief,) whether he should take her servant into custody; but she seemed rather reluctant to take any legal proceedings against the deceased, her desire being to obtain her lost property and discharge the girl. The missing articles consisted of a vinaigerette, worth about twenty or thirty shillings, and other property, which Mrs Law put great value upon. The deceased eventually left, and Mr Aldham recommended that a warrant be obtained for the purpose of his searching her boxes at her mother's house; but this suggestion did not meet with Mrs Law's approbation. After being absent a short time, the deceased was seen by Mr Aldham to call at Mr Thorne's, who resides in the Square, to whom she was about engaging herself as servant. Thinking that she might be offering some of the stolen articles in pledge, Mr Aldham watched her movements, and "dodged" her from the Square along one or two streets, when she went in the direction of her mother's house, which is situated a short distance through Newport. Arrived near Mr Willshire's iron foundry, deceased observed Mr Aldham, and suspecting that his intention was to apprehend her, on a charge of felony, she turned down a lane near the lime-kilns, and it was here where he missed her. In her way home she passed across the "marsh" and was observed making some haste by a boy named Hartnoll, who was fishing in the river at the time; this being the last occasion which deceased was seen alive. The unfortunate girl not arriving at her mother's house in reasonable time, and her absence being of long duration, fears were entertained that she had committed self-destruction; and but too truly were those fears realized, for on dragging the river on Saturday, the body of the unfortunate girl was found a short distance from where she had been seen by the boy Hartnoll. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned". No doubt can be entertained that the deceased committed the above rash act, from a fear that Mr Aldham intended to apprehend her for stealing the property of her mistress.

Thursday, 25 December 1851, Issue 4487 – Gale Document No. Y3200684354
NORTH DEVON - Barnstaple.
Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquiry, before Alfred Drake, Esq. Borough Coroner, took place at the North Devon Infirmary, on Monday last, concerning the death of a young man named JOHN WIDDEN, who, it will be remembered, received a serious injury from the explosion of a gun, about three weeks ago, at Paracombe. After the amputation of the arm, which was found to be necessary, the patient, by generous diet and other judicious treatment, so far rallied that great hopes were entertained of his ultimate recovery; the gangrene, however, having extended so far into the system occasioning an extraordinary suppuration of the parts so far exhausted his strength, that he gradually sunk during the last week, and died on Friday the 19th instant. The evidence of the cause of the accident, and other concurrent circumstances, having been fully gone into, the Jury agreed in a verdict that the deceased met with his death by means of the accidental explosion of a gun; and they could not separate without expressing their regret that Mr Clarke, of Lynton, surgeon, had not rendered more prompt attention to the case, when application was made to him immediately after the accident occurred. [Mr Clarke, who gave evidence at the Inquest, assigned, as a reason for the delay which had been occasioned in his attendance on deceased, that he had just before attended to some other cases, and was so very much fatigued, besides suffering under severe indisposition himself, as to be unable to render his assistance at an earlier period than he did.]

Thursday, 1 January 1852, Issue 4488 – Gale Document No. Y3200684391
PLYMOUTH & DEVONPORT.
Death of a Child Three Years Old. - On Monday se'nnight, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, by J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of MARY MARGARET SALTER, aged 3 years; - when it appeared from the evidence, that shortly after four o'clock on Monday afternoon, SALTER, the father of the child, was in Bilbury-street with a hand cart, with potatoes and apples in it; he put the deceased in the cart, which stood outside the fruit shop door. While he was in the shop he heard a noise, and on going out, he saw two timber wagons coming down, he tried to turn his hand cart round, but before he had power to do so, it was struck by the timber wagon and capsized; the wagon then passed on. He picked up the deceased, who died almost immediately from the effects of the blow she received. He saw Rowse, the driver, holding the horses by the head, and doing the best he could to control them. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 15 January 1852, Issue 4490 – Gale Document No. Y3200684459
TIVERTON. – Inquest. – Caution to Mothers.
On Monday lat an Inquest was held by F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a male child, five weeks old, the grandson of MRS LYONS, of the Cross Keys, who died from the administration of syrup of poppies. The mother of the child is the daughter of MRS LYONS, and was on a visit to her mother,. The child was restless on Monday morning and she gave it a small quantity of the syrup, which, to her great sorrow and surprise, proved fatal. A verdict was returned of "Died from the administration of syrup of poppies the mother being ignorant of its effects."

PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT. - Melancholy Suicide.
We regret to have to record the suicide of MR ROW, jeweller, Fore-street, Devonport, who blew out his brains with an air-gun, in his shop, on Monday evening, at eight o'clock. Verdict – Temporary Derangement.

Thursday, 29 January 1852, Issue 4492 – Gale Document No. Y3200684525
TORRINGTON. – A melancholy event occurred on Sunday last, to a young lady, MISS EMMA STONEMAN, about 21 years of age, daughter of the late MR GEORGE STONEMAN of this town, who was found dead in a well of water in the garden behind the house of a friend at Bideford, where she had been residing about six weeks. The young lady has been for some time suffering from a derangement of the nervous system which seriously affected her at times, and change of air and society was recommended by her friends, but the removal did not appear to benefit her. An Inquest was held on Monday, when it was clearly proved she must have fallen into the water whilst labouring under a sudden and violent paroxysm, and a verdict of temporary insanity was returned.

Thursday, 29 January 1852, Issue 4492 – Gale Document No. Y3200684580
TORQUAY. – A Coroner's Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Wolfinden's London Hotel, on the body of a man named ROOK, who had been found drowned in the Basin the preceding day. There being no evidence to show how the deceased got into the water, a verdict was returned of "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 5 February 1852, Issue 4493 – Gale Document No. Y3200684611
FATAL ACCIDENT. – An Inquest was held on Friday, at the Valliant Soldier Inn, in Magdalen-street, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for the City of Exeter, on the body of a man named BENJAMIN GREENSLADE, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Saturday under the following circumstances. The deceased was a labourer, residing in the parish of Shillingford, and was employed on Saturday morning in pulling down an old cob wall, belonging to Mr Brown, of the mills, Alphington. While so engaged, the wall, being undermined, fell upon him and completely buried him. Mr Brown and his men came promptly to his assistance, and he was extricated almost immediately; but the internal injuries which he had sustained were so severe, that he died within four hours of his removal to the hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The poor fellow, who was thirty five years of age, has left a wife and family to lament his premature death.

SUICIDE. – A man named GEORGE HAVILL, 22 years of age, was found suspended from an apple tree, in an orchard occupied by Mr Leatt, at Postlake, in the parish of Woodbury, on Friday last, and an Inquest was held on Saturday, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner. The deceased had evidently committed suicide, and that in the most determined manner, for the limb of the tree, to which he was attached by his handkerchief, not being sufficiently high to enable him to accomplish his purpose by hanging, he had forced his body into a stooping posture and so had violent strangled himself. His parents, it appeared, were labouring people, residing in the parish of Aylesbeare, but the deceased, who had been for a short time in the Army, had not been home for three months, and had, apparently, been leading a kind of wandering life. His mother, however, on Monday, the 20th, on her way from Aylesbeare to Topsham, passing near the spot at which the body was afterwards found, heard his voice calling "Mother," and turning round, saw him in the road, and had a conversation with him. She gathered from him that he had had no work, and he did not know what to do, and as he had evidently, when found, been several days dead, it was, probably, not long after this conversation that he committed the fatal act.

Thursday, 4 March 1852, Issue 4497 – Gale Document No. Y3200684736
BRIXHAM. – On Monday week an Inquest was held before A. Cockey, Esq., at the Commercial Inn, on the body of AGNES CRUSE. The Jury returned a verdict, "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 11 March 1852, Issue 4498 – Gale Document No. Y3200684771
BARNSTAPLE – Inquest. - An Inquiry took place on Friday last, before a Jury presided over by Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of MR JOHN DAVY, carpenter, who died suddenly on the previous evening, between the hours of seven and eight o'clock. The medical evidence went to prove that deceased had suffered from an attack of apoplexy, which ended in death; and a verdict in accordance w2as returned by the Jury.

Thursday, 11 March 1852, Issue 4498 – Gale Document No. Y3200684770
ST. MARY CHURCH.
ALLEGED CHILD MURDER. - On Saturday last the inhabitants of this place were painfully excited by a report that a child about two years of age had been killed by its stepfather, a man named WILLIAM GELDING, a carpenter by trade. The child now dead is the illegitimate offspring of his wife, to whom he was married a short time since. From the time f his marriage up to the present, his treatment of the child has been most brutal, and to such an extent, from the child's face and other parts being discoloured, as to attract the attention and indignation of the neighbours, whilst on the other hand the mother has been most kind and attentive to her child on every occasion that she could. #The reason assigned by rumour for the commission of this act by GELDING was to obtain possession of certain money left for the maintenance of the child.
Yesterday (Tuesday), an Inquest was held at the Palk Arms, when the following evidence was taken: - Agnes Jerman, who resides near the GELDINGS, deposed that on Friday afternoon in the absence of MRS GELDING, she was called in by the husband to attend the deceased. She found the child in great pain. It groaned loudly and vomited once or twice, and she observed that blood was issuing from its ears and mouth. The child's head and shoulders were much bruised; GELDING accounted for this injuries by stating that the child had fallen down stairs. When MRS GELDING returned home she was acquainted with the state of the child, when she exclaimed "Oh! that I should have gone away – if I had not this would not have happened;" to which her husband replied, "What's the use of talking in that way, you ought to have been here sooner." It was attempted to give the child medicine, but the mouth could not be opened.
Mr Appleton, surgeon, deposed that when he was called in the child was in a dying state, quite incurable, cold, and with scarcely any pulsation. He observed marks of violence on the face. The husband accompanied him to his house for some medicine for the child, and on his way he said "he did not like to call in assistance when his child was unwell because he thought he should be disturbing his neighbours." Mr Appleton was unable to give a decided opinion of the cause of death, not having made a post mortem examination of the body.
The Inquest was adjourned to this day (Thursday) for that purpose.
We understand that notwithstanding the strong suspicion attached to GELDING of his being the murderer of this child, no precautions have been taken to prevent his escaping.

PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT. - An Inquest was held on Monday by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES LEGO, aged 39 years, who was found drowned in a pond near Tothill. Verdict – Drowned himself in a fit of Lunacy.

Thursday, 18 March 1852, Issue 4499 – Gale Document No. Y3200684823
MORETONHAMPSTEAD. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the Ring of Bells, by W. A. Cockey, Esq., on the body of GEORGE DOLBEAR, of that place, farm labourer, who hung himself the Wednesday previous, and when found was quite dead. He had been in a depressed state for the last fortnight past. Verdict Temporary Insanity. The deceased was a married man, and has left a widow and several children.

Thursday, 18 March 1852, Issue 4499 – Gale Document No. Y3200684800
The Late Mysterious Death of a Child at ST. MARY CHURCH. – Verdict of Manslaughter.
On Thursday, the adjourned Inquest upon the body of JOHN THOMAS, a child about two years of age, and the illegitimate son of ANN GELDIN, wife of a carpenter named WILLIAM GELDIN, who was supposed to have caused the death of the deceased, took place at the Palk Arms, St. Mary Church, before Mr Cockey, deputy-Coroner. The adjournment of the Inquiry from the Monday previous had taken place for the purpose of giving Mr Appleton, surgeon, an opportunity of making a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and for giving time for the production of evidence connected with the case, of a clearer nature than had been given on the first named occasion.
It will be seen from the subjoined evidence that WM. GELDIN, to whom strong suspicion was attached, that he had killed the child, has been committed on the charge of manslaughter.
Mr Cockey (the Deputy Coroner) opened the proceedings of the Inquiry, by briefly alluding to the necessity there had been for an adjournment, to give time for a post mortem examination of the body being made by Mr Appleton, surgeon, and for the production of clearer evidence than had been adduced on the previous Monday.
Previous to the examination of witnesses, WILLIAM GELDIN asked permission to be present at the Inquiry, to which no objection was offered, and he was accordingly admitted into the room. He is a young man, about 30 years of age, and treated the whole affair with the greatest indifference, until the verdict of the Jury was announced to him, when he appeared rather confused, and seemed surprised at the decision which had been come to.
The first witness examined was a respectable widow lady named Mrs Rose Steer, who said – I live at Dartmouth, but am now on a visit at Torquay. I know MRS GELDIN, who lived with me 14 or 15 years previous to her marriage. She left my service about two years, in consequence of her being pregnant. When she left my service she went to live with her sister, until after her confinement. The offspring was a boy. By living in my service so long, I felt a deep interest in MRS GELDIN, and do so now. I was perfectly aware when she was married to GELDIN; the child was then alive, but I do not know whether GELDIN received any money for its maintenance. After the marriage, she knew he did not. I have been on a visit a fortnight last Saturday, but during that time I have only been at MRS GELDIN'S once, which was on Friday last. I went about four o'clock in the afternoon, and stayed until near seven. GELDIN came home about half an hour previous to my leaving, and MRS GELDIN fried him his supper and gave it to him, after which she accompanied me part of my way to Torquay. During my visit to MRS GELDIN'S, I noticed the child, and conversed with him. I observed it had a black mark under one of its eyes. I perceived no other marks; and the mother did not point out any to me; neither did she refer to any on the child's person. I asked MRS GELDIN how the mark had been caused, and she replied that the child had fallen against a stool. She appeared very much confused when I put the question: GELDIN was not present during the conversation. The child was put to bed by the mother apparently quite healthy and well; I did not see her administer anything to it, or hear her make any remark about its health. MRS GELDIN did not say she sent for any medical advice, after the child fell over the stool.
By the Foreman - I carried a cake and some buns up-stairs, and gave a small portion of them to the child whilst it was in bed, and which it seemed to enjoy. I cannot say that MRS GELDIN appeared to think it was a painful subject, and did not like to enter upon the matter, when I spoke to her about the black mark under the child's eye. It was about three-quarters of an hour before I left that the child was put to bed; it was quite sufficient time, in my opinion, to allow it to get asleep. It was previous to GELDIN'S coming home that the child was put to bed. There was no conversation about the child in his presence.
It was thought necessary to hear what MRS GELDIN knew about the unfortunate affair, and a wish was expressed that she should be fetched, if she was capable of attending.
GELDIN – (hastily) – Then she is not able to come, and if you want to see her you may go to her.
The Coroner here desired Parsons to summon MRS GELDIN.
GELDIN said she was not fit to appear.
Mr Appleton was sent to see in what state she was.
Mary Grant – I live next door to MR GELDIN; I knew the deceased; I saw him on Friday morning at his father's door, apparently well; I have heard MRS GELDIN say, several time, that her husband did not use the child well, but I never saw him touch it; three months ago she showed me the child when I went into GELDIN'S house; she took his clothes off and showed me his person; his legs, thighs and abdomen were black and red all over; I asked how it came, and she said she did not know: it never met with any accident beyond falling over a stool; since that she has told me that she believed her husband did it.
Mr Appleton returned and said MRS GELDIN was in a high state of excitement, and being advanced in pregnancy, her being brought here might bring on premature confinement.
Mr Appleton, surgeon, deposed – I have made a post mortem examination of the deceased's head, and found a large clot of coagulated blood lying on the right temporal muscle. There was no fracture of the skull. On removing the skull cap, there was nothing particular to be seen, but on removing the external covering of the brain, I found a large quantity of coagulated blood lying on the side of the right hemisphere. The brain itself was perfectly healthy, both externally and internally. On staking out the brain I minutely examined the skull, I found an internal fracture at the base of the brain. In my opinion the child died of extravasation of blood on the side of the right hemisphere of the brain. The discolorations of the face were of some days standing, but that over the right ear was of recent origin. The discolorations on the side of the head seemed to have been caused by direct violence. I am of opinion that the external marks on the right side of the head caused the internal injuries, of which the child died.
By a Juryman – The bed was eighteen inches from the ground and the child could not have received such injuries by falling out of bed. If the child's head had come in contact with a pan the skin would have been cut.
By the Foreman – Falling down stairs would not have produced such injuries as the child sustained.
By the Coroner – My decided opinion is that the injuries were caused by some direct force applied to the head.
Mary Distin, a neighbour, had seen black marks on the deceased's childs face; knew nothing of the general treatment of the child.
WILLIAM GELDIN, after having been cautioned, made the following statement:- I do not want a caution, I am innocent: I was at work at Mr Cogswell's last Friday week, and came home for tools that I had not got in the course of the afternoon; I asked my mistress where JOHNNY was, she said he was in bed; when I came home in the evening my elder boy said – "JOHNNY has been to bed without a dinner today;" and I asked my wife how that was – she did not like to tell me; the next morning I saw marks on him; he was down stairs sat on the stool, and I asked my wife how the marks came on JOHNNY'S face: she said she was up doing her work, and the child fell down over the stairs. I did not see the child again until Sunday, when he was sitting on a stool.; he was poorly, and would not eat his dinner, and my wife said she thought there was something the matter with his head; I saw a mark on his forehead. I did not see the child again until Friday evening, when I was left in the house with him and my little boy; I was at work, and my little boy said JOHNNY is making a noise. I went up stairs and found him lying on the bed on his face and hands; the dirt was under him, and he was sighing and groaning; I did not call any assistance for some time: I thought he might have eaten too much as Mrs Steer had been to see him; I went for Mr Appleton, and got some medicine, but he died the next morning.
The Coroner having summed up.
The Jury retired for about half an hour; and on returning the Foreman said the Jury were unanimous in a verdict of MANSLAUGHTER against WILLIAM GELDIN. He was accordingly taken in custody by the policeman, and afterwards committed for trial on the Coroner's warrant.

Thursday, 25 March 1852, Issue 4500 – Gale Document No. Y3200684857
TORRINGTON. – Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - As MR PHILIP FRY, veterinary surgeon, was returning from a journey on horseback, on Monday night, the 15th instant, in company with two gentlemen of this neighbourhood, and were arrived within a few miles of the town, in the parish of Petrockstow, when a young man named George Steer passed them riding at a rapid pace, and in the darkness of the night came against MR FRY'S horse, by which he was thrown off, and dislocated his neck, causing instant death. MR FRY'S friends, who were rather in advance of him, on finding his horse come up to them without its rider, secured the animal and returned to MR FRY, whom they found lifeless, and supported by the young man, who had stopped and was rendering all the assistance he could. The young man having many miles to go gave his name. An Inquest was held by Mr Toller, deputy Coroner, on the following day, but in consequence of a belief that it was the result of wilful negligence on the part of the young man, the Coroner thought it necessary to adjourn the examination until Monday to procure the attendance of Steer, who appeared this day, but as there was nothing adduced in evidence against him to show that he even came in contact with MR FRY; but Steer admitted that he had struck against something, and fancied he heard a hat fall off, it being very dark, he stopped his horse and alighted, and found MR FRY lying on the ground, he assisted him up, when his friends came back and took charge of him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." MR FRY was universally respected, and his untimely end is regretted by all who knew him.

Thursday, 1 April 1852, Issue 4501 – Gale Document No. Y3200684879
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident Occasioned By Furious Driving.
On Friday evening last, an agricultural servant named HENRY BEER, who had been living with Mr Graddon, of Brightleigh Barton, in the parish of Chittlehampton, was returning from Barnstaple Market with his master's wagon drawn by two horses, on arriving near New Bridge, he was observed to be urging on the horses at a rapid rate, when he suddenly lost his equilibrium and was precipitated with great violence into the road. On being taken up he was perfectly insensible, and was conveyed to the nearest place to obtain medical assistance, which was procured with every possible dispatch, but too late to be of any service, for life must have become extinct almost instantaneously, as the vertebrae of the neck were dislocated, and a severe injury inflicted on the head. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body and a verdict in accordance with the facts related was returned. We are sorry to add that deceased was reported to have been in a state of intoxication when the accident happened.

Thursday, 15 April 1852, Issue 4503 – Gale Document No. Y3200684949
NORTHMOLTON - On Sunday, a shoemaker, named WM. HOWE, of this parish, drank a large quantity of raw whiskey, and on Monday was found dead in his bed. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict in accordance with the above facts was returned.

FATAL ACCIDENT FROM SMOKING. – On Saturday last an old man named WM. VODDEN, of Beaford, met with his death in a shocking manner; he had been employed by Mr Leverton in picking stones, on Woolley Barton, and it is supposed on that day, after having indulged in smoking, he laid himself down in a careless manner, on some straw, in the mow-stead, and fell asleep, and when roused from his lethargy he was enveloped in flames. His cries brought a carpenter, who was at work near, to his assistance, and he succeeded in extinguishing the fire, but the old man was so much burnt, being literally roasted, that on conveying him to his home he expired on the way. It was with considerable difficulty the fire was extinguished, without communicating to the large corn mows on the spot, which were in imminent danger of being consumed, and would thereby have entailed a very heavy loss on Mr Leverton. An Inquest was held on the body, by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Monday, when the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. We understand Mr Leverton is determined not to employ any person who may be found smoking on his farm in future, and to such an extent is this baneful practice followed by labourers, much good would undoubtedly result from a general adoption of such a wise example.

BARNSTAPLE. – Accidental Death - On Wednesday last, as a porter named MORRIS, in the employ of Messrs. Pridham and Lake, coach and van proprietors, was in the act of removing a piano-forte case from a wagon into a cart, in Joy-street, the cart suddenly moved off as the package was being deposited on it, and the poor man was thrown with great violence on the curb stones, where he received a severe contusion of the head and the whole weight of the piano and case fell on his chest. The injuries he received were so serious that the unfortunate man was removed to the North Devon Infirmary without delay; but, notwithstanding the most prompt and humane assistance was rendered which the case could require, the patient survived but a few hours, and a Coroner's Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts stated, without any blame whatever being attached to any party.

Thursday, 22 April 1852, Issue 4504 – Gale Document No. Y3200684990
BARNSTAPLE. -
DEATH BY BURNING - On Wednesday last, as a girl named LOUISA STONEMAN, about sixteen years of age, in the employ of Mr Doble, chief-clerk in the office of the Inland Revenue in this town, was reaching after something over the mantle piece, her dress accidentally caught on fire, and no one being in the room but one of Mr Doble's children, the flames made fearful progress, and the poor girl, as is too often the case, instead of throwing herself on the floor and rolling about to extinguish the fire, ran towards the front door, where the current of air served to fan the devouring element, and almost every article of dress the girl had on her person was burnt to tinder. Mr Stanbury, auctioneer, and Mr James Chapple, mason, happened to be passing through Boutport-street at the time, and succeeded in putting out the fire, but not until they had burnt their hands most severely; the latter in particular has suffered so dreadfully that it is not expected he will be able to follow his work for several weeks to come. As soon as the fire had been extinguished, the girl had sufficient fortitude to go up-stairs to her mistress, who was confined to her bedroom by illness at the time, and requested her not to be alarmed. It was found on medical examination that the unfortunate girl had been fearfully burnt about the bosom and abdomen, and it was thought advisable to remove her to the North Devon Infirmary, where she received every attention and assistance which humanity or skill could suggest. It was at first hoped that she would survive the injuries, but on Friday morning unfavourable symptoms presented themselves, and she expired in the forenoon of that day. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Friday afternoon, before A. Drake, Esq., the Borough Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Thursday, 29 April 1852, Issue 4505 – Gale Document No. Y3200685043
EXETER. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday, before Mr Warren, on the body of GEORGE VIGERS, a miller of Ottery St. Mary. The deceased met his death in the following manner:- He was employed on the 2nd April, by John Greenslade to take some malt to Exeter in his own cart. John Greenslade came as far as the Crown and Sceptre, and appointed to meet him again to go home. They met accordingly, between eight and nine p.m., and, when they were between Exeter and Heavitree, the deceased who was driving, fell suddenly out. He was picked up by a flyman named Price, who states that he was lying on his belly with his head under his chest, he was quite insensible, Greenslade was in the cart and did not render any assistance, deceased was put in the cart again and a police constable took them both in the cart to the station house, not aware that deceased had fallen out, but supposing both to be drunk. Mr Steel, not aware that deceased had received any injury, ordered them to be kept in the station house, and not to be removed to the cells, the only thing he could learn from the deceased being, that he came to Exeter without any breakfast, and had been drinking. When it was known deceased had fallen from the cart, Mr Warren, surgeon, was sent for, who found the deceased at the station house lying on his back; the whole of his body was paralyzed; he said he felt a slight pain in the back, he was removed to the Turk's Head and the 5th of April to the hospital, where he died on the 25th, about 10 minutes before 7 o'clock; he was sensible up to the last day. It was found by a post mortem examination of the body, that one of the bones of the spinal column was dislocated backwards, which was quite sufficient to cause death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 6 May 1852, Issue 4506 – Gale Document No. Y3200685066
TORRINGTON. – Death By Excessive Drinking. - On Tuesday evening last, great excitement was occasioned in New-street by two men named Christopher Richards and GEO. STACEY being conveyed upon a wheelbarrow, apparently in a lifeless state, from intoxication, to their homes; the latter of whom died within a few hours after, despite the efforts made by Mr Hole, surgeon, who was called in to attend him; but the other recovered. On Thursday, an Inquest was held by Mr Toller, deputy Coroner, on the body of GEORGE STACEY, when from the evidence adduced it appeared the deceased had been sent to the shop of Mr Edwin Bangham, glove manufacturer, with a note, and Mr Bangham gave him a glass of brandy (which was described as a beer glass, about six to the pint,) without being diluted with water; the deceased drank it off at one draught, and a second was given him, when Mr Bangham left the shop for about half-an-hour, leaving STACEY with Richards, (who was employed there about some fixtures,) and on his return he found Richards drunk upon the floor, and STACEY sitting in a chair, with a rummer in his hand, containing brandy, (which it was urged he must have taken himself,) and scarcely able to keep himself up. Mr Bangham then directed his workmen to take them home, when one of them of the name of Western procured a wheelbarrow, and placing Richards in it first, with his back towards the handles, and the other poor fellow with his head facing the wheel, and, assisted by a man of the name of Lockyear, they were taken home. Mr Hole, with the assistance of Mr J. Oliver Rouse, surgeon, made a post mortem examination of the body, and described the cause of death was congestion of the brain, produced no doubt by having made use of an excessive quantity of undiluted brandy. Mr Hole added that the deceased had been under his care about six weeks, of slight fever, and though apparently perfectly healthy, his stomach was not so capable of resisting the effects of liquor, as it otherwise might have been. The Inquiry occupied nearly the whole of the day, and the only parties that were able to throw any light upon the subject were Mr Banham's own workmen, who were proved by their own admissions, not to have been sober at the time. The Jury finally returned a verdict, "That GEORGE STACEY died from congestion of the brain, accelerated by the excessive use of undiluted brandy."

Thursday, 10 June 1852, Issue 4511 – Gale Document No. Y3200685263
WOODBURY SALTERTON. – Mr Aberdein held an Inquest in this village, on Wednesday last, on the body of MR JOHN WARE, jun., a farmer's son, who had been missing from home since Sunday the 23rd of May, and was found on Monday the s31st in the river Clyst, near Clyst Bridge, about 2 1/1 miles above Topsham, by George Glanville, a fisherman of Exeter. Found Drowned.

AXMINSTER. – An Inquest was held at Axminster, on Tuesday last, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner for the Eastern District of Devon, on the body of WILLIAM BROWSE, aged about 60, a tailor by trade, and an inmate of the Union Workhouse, who hung himself with his handkerchief. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

COLYTON. – An Inquest was held here, on Tuesday, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN LOCKYER, a lad of eleven years of age, in the service of Clifford Shirreff, Esq., of Yardbury House. The deceased was employed in looking after the farm horses, and on Friday week, while cleaning one of them, it kicked him severely; he was removed into the house, where every attention was paid to him, and, ultimately, at his parents' request, was taken home. It was evident, however, that he had sustained severe internal injury; and, after lingering in great agony until the Sunday, he expired. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 17 June 1852, Issue 4512 – Gale Document No. Y3200685299
EXETER. - A WIFE KILLED BY HER HUSBAND. – For some days past the inhabitants of Rack-street, in this city, have been painfully excited, in consequence f the brutal treatment of ELIZABETH HEATH, by her husband, on Monday the 7th instant, and which resulted in death, on Monday evening. The deceased, who is about 40 years of age, was the second wife of a man named ABRAHAM HEATH, about 50 years of age, a shoemaker by trade, residing in one of the courts leading out of Rack-street. HEATH is a drunken, worthless character, and the consequence has been continual bickering and fightings between them since their marriage, from his spending at the public-house what ought to have gone to the support of the deceased and her two children, aged respectively about fourteen months and four years. On Monday, the 7th inst., a quarrel arose between them respecting his letting the deceased have some money, which ended in his cruelly ill-treating her, by striking her on the head with a poker, according to the deceased's statements and partially corroborated by other witnesses. From that time the deceased became ill, and on Thursday, the 10th, the attention of the beadle to the corporation of the poor was called to the case. He provided her with a medical officer and such necessaries as she required, and had the husband taken before the magistrates and remanded until such time as it was thought the wife might be able to attend, to give evidence against him for the assault, as will be seen from our police report. Unfortunately she died on Monday night last, and an Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) at the Sawyers' Arms, Rack-street, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner.
Eliza Frost, widow, an inmate of the workhouse, who acts as a nurse, deposed that on Thursday evening last she was sent to attend the deceased. She continued with her from that time to the time of her death, about 8 o'clock last night. On Friday the deceased expressed her fears that "she should never get over it." The deceased had the mark of a blow on the left side of her head, which she said was caused by her husband striking her the previous Monday with a poker. After witness was in attendance on her the deceased occasionally wandered in her mind, which gradually got worse up to the time of her death.
Mr Kempe, surgeon, deposed that he first saw the deceased on Thursday morning, the 10th inst., and found her suffering from slow fever. she pointed out a mark on the left side of her head, near the eye; and one on her right arm, which was not of any consequence. She said the blows were inflicted by her husband, but did not say how. He had seen her every day from that time to the day of her death. The blow on the head had occasioned a small abscess about the size of a hazel nut, which burst on Thursday evening. He thought her in danger that evening, and the following morning from the fever and weakness, but on the evening of Friday she was much better, and on his subsequent visits he had reason to believe she would recover. To his astonishment on Monday morning he found her worse, and evidently dying. He heard from the nurse she was much worse on the Sunday night. He attributed death to the illness she suffered from, and not from the blow in the head. If she had been suffering from fever previous to receiving the blows, that would have aggravated it. He attributed her death to fever, which produced an effusion of water on the brain. An examination of the head would enable him, without doubt, to say if the blow on the head had anything to do with her death. He had attended her ten or eleven years as a pauper patient, and always considered her a very ailing woman, - often complaining, and often seriously ill.
Dinah Goss, who resides near the deceased, deposed that she had repeatedly seen deceased's husband strike her with a poker. On Monday morning, the 7th, about 11 o'clock, she was attracted to deceased's room in consequence of hearing her shriek, and call murder, when she saw the husband with a poker in his hand, which he lifted, but from the scuffle between them and the children she could not say if he struck her. deceased had a child in her arms, and a little girl four or five years of age clinging to her clothes crying. The deceased would then run to the other side of the room, and HEATH would fetch her out. As she was leaving the house HEATH came down over the stairs, on which she told him what a shame it was for him to serve his wife as he had done. He replied it was no business of hers, and he would serve her the same. She saw HEATH go up the street and into the Sun public house. Deceased shortly after came into the street with her children crying, and witness saw blood running down the side of her face. There was continual quarrelling between them the remainder of the day, and at 11 o'clock at night the deceased and her children were in the street crying, and asking to be admitted to the house, which the husband refused. HEATH has repeatedly taken the kettle from the fire with water in it, and saucepans, and thrown at his wife. On the Tuesday he repeated his conduct to his wife, and on witness remonstrating with him he ran out into the street with a shoemaker's knife, and threatened to rip her up. Deceased was not a quarrelsome woman. She had repeatedly seen HEATH strike her, but it was invariably with a poker, a pair of bellows, or a weapon of that kind. HEATH was not sober for the week. His conduct to his wife generally was brutal in the extreme. When he was told on Thursday evening, the 10th, that his wife was dying, he replied, "is the ___ not dead yet; she has been dying ever since 3 o'clock this morning."
Elizabeth Darke, also residing near the deceased's deposed that when she returned home on Monday the 7th, about 12 o'clock in the day, she saw the deceased at her window, bleeding very much from the side of the head. HEATH was standing by the side of her. She called to witness, saying "this is what he (meaning her husband) has done with the poker, because I spoke for my own:" he replied, with an oath, "you w---, I'll be your butcher." Witness told him he ought to be ashamed of himself to serve his wife in such a manner; deceased held up the bellows she had in her hand to ward off as it were, a blow from her husband. The conversation and the deceased's action were momentarily. On Thursday last, after his wife was in bed, when he was spoken to by the neighbours respecting his conduct towards her, he replied – "Isn't she dead yet. I don't care going to the scaffold for her." Deceased's dress was covered with blood.
Mrs Sprague, another neighbour, deposed that she went to HEATH'S apartments at the request of the neighbours, who said he was murdering his wife. She found the deceased with her children in her room, the blood streaming from her temple, which she was catching with a piece of rag. Deceased said her husband had been beating her with a poker. HEATH was then in a room above. Deceased was telling her that the quarrel arose in consequence of her wanting some money from her husband for food, and how he had used her – when he called down, "it would have served the __ right if she had been murdered."
The Jury then adjourned for Mr Kempe to make an examination of the deceased's head. On the re-assembling of the Jury.
Mr Kempe added to his information that HEATH told him on Thursday morning, he struck his wife with a stick, and that if he (Mr Kempe) had behaved to him as his wife had he would have served him the same. Since giving his evidence he had, in the presence of Mr Warren, made an examination of the body.
Mr Warren, surgeon, deposed that he had made an examination of the body of the deceased. He found two marks, one of violence on the arm, the other on the temple, which was a small scar: there was no discolouration about it: on lifting the integument he found a small round opening, not so large as a pea in circumference, extending inwards towards the bone in a horizontal direction: on examining further he found the temporal bone pierced through which, from the brain, exuded about a table spoonful of water: the upperpart of the skull was then removed, when he found the coverings of the brain in an inflamed state. He found the hole, from the scar on the temple, leading into the substance of the brain. (The piece of bone was produced by Mr Kempe, and the hole presented the appearance of having been caused by great force. It was about the size of a pea, and clean cut out as a piece of leather when cut with a punch.) He had no doubt death was caused from the injury thus done to the brain. The poker shown him in the deceased's room could not have produced such a hole as that found in the skull. It must have been done by a thrust, or with a stick having a nail in it – he though it impossible it could have been done by a blow from a poker. Some few days might elapse from the infliction of such a blow and a person dying, - he thought a person could not live more than six or seven days after receiving such injuries.
Mr Kempe said he concurred in Mr Warren's evidence.
The Jury wished the husband's tools to be examined, to see if there was any blood on them, or any other marks from which it might appear how the injury was inflicted on the deceased, but the Coroner thought it unnecessary.
Mrs Turner, a neighbour, saw the deceased on Thursday, when she dropped down in the stairs. She assisted her to bed. Deceased told witness on Monday, the 7th instant, that the wound in the head, and which was bleeding, was inflicted by her husband. On the Thursday deceased said, in Mr Kempe's presence, that it was done by her husband with a poker. the husband was not present when the deceased made these statements. Deceased objected to witness washing and attending to the wound, that the people might see how her husband had ill used her.
Mr Shears, beadle to the corporation, has known deceased and her husband for some years. The husband has been repeatedly committed to prison for his brutal conduct to the deceased. She was not in a fit state for him to speak to when he saw her on Thursday, and sent for Mr Kempe. After Me Kempe had examined the deceased, he heard HEATH say "he would serve her (his wife) the same if she did it again." Witness complained to the magistrates, and had him taken into custody.
The Coroner said, that from the evidence of the Surgeons the deceased came to her death by violence, and the question for them to decide was, by whom that violence was inflicted. The evidence of Mrs Goss and Mrs Clarke went to show the conduct of the husband to the deceased on Monday, the 7th, when she was bleeding, and her stating it was done by him, and his replying, in the presence of Mrs Sprague, that it served her right. Under the circumstances it was for them to say if the husband inflicted the wound they had heard described. If in the constant quarrellings of these parties the husband struck a fatal blow, the crime amounted to manslaughter and not murder.
The Jury, after considering a few minutes, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against the husband.

Thursday, 24 June 1852, Issue 4513 – Gale Document No. Y3200685322
BARNSTAPLE. – Inquest – An Enquiry took place at the North Devon Infirmary, on Monday last, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of a boy, aged about 13 years, who died on the previous day in consequence of a fall from a ladder on Wednesday last, by which he received such injury in the head as to occasion death. The lad's name was JAMES HILL: he was in the service of Capt. Hughes of Castle House, when the accident occurred. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 1 July 1852, Issue 4514 – Gale Document No. Y3200685375
MORETONHEAMPSTEAD. – On Tuesday, last week, an Inquest was held at the White Hart Inn, before W A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JONAS GALE, turnpike gate keeper, who is stated to have died in consequence of injuries received from being knocked down either by the horse or cart belonging to Mr Henry Hooper, of Chagford, and, from the evidence produced at the Inquest, a verdict of manslaughter was returned against Mr Hooper, who was immediately admitted to bail. But as no evidence in answer to the charge is admitted at an Inquest, we refrain from entering into particulars, or to prejudge the case, which will be tried before a Jury, who will, of course, have all the facts on each side before them at the next Assizes.

Thursday, 8 July 1852, Issue 4515 – Gale Document No. Y3200685406
EXETER. – Melancholy Accident. - We are sorry to announce that MR FREDERICK DAVIDGE, a promising young man 23 years of age, and brother of MR DAVIDGE, cheese dealer, of this city, met with his death at Head Weir, on Thursday afternoon. An Inquest was held on the body the following day at the Paper Makers' Arms Inn, Exe Lane, before J. Warren, Esq., and a respectable Jury, when, from the evidence adduced, there appeared to be no doubt that, in the deceased's attempt to reach the opposite bank, he was overtaken either by exhaustion or cramp and perished. The latter is supposed to be the most probable cause, as his brother stated that he was much subject to cramp on his going into the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

OTTERY ST. MARY. – A woman named SMITH has been committed to take her trial at the next assizes, on a charge of concealing the birth of her illegitimate child by throwing it into the river, in the immediate neighbourhood of this town. The prisoner is a married woman, but her husband was transported several years ago for horse stealing, and she has already had one illegitimate child since his separation from her. When the child was taken out of the water, suspicions at once attached to her as she was believed to have been pregnant, but she at first positively denied it. Afterwards, however, and when before the Coroner, she admitted that she had been delivered of a still born child – that she had kept the body in the house for upwards of a week – and that she had then disposed of it by throwing it into the river, about half a mile from the spot at which this body was bound. The surgeon, who was examined, was of opinion that the child had been born alive, and had died from suffocation, but not from drowning. The Jury, after several hours' deliberation, returned an open verdict; and the magistrates, thereupon, taking up the matter, investigated it most fully, and the result was the committal of the prisoner for concealment, as we have already intimated.

Thursday, 15 July 1852, Issue 4516 – Gale Document No. Y3200685428
BARNSTAPLE. – A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday morning before Incledon Bencraft Esq., on the body of a lad named EDWIN MILLMAN, about 14 years of age, who was drowned on the previous day while bathing in the river Taw, above Barnstaple bridge. A verdict of Accidental Death was recorded.

TORRINGTON – Fatal Accident By Drowning. - On Sunday afternoon a young man named ROBERT VICARY, of Torrington, about 18 years of age, who was living as farm servant with Mr G. H. Hackwill, East Collacott, in Langtree, went into a pond to bathe, which was about ten feet deep in water, with several other youngsters, who, like himself, were unable to swim, and most of them shortly afterwards sunk, but they were all rescued alive except VICARY, who sunk instantly, and on being taken out half-an-hour afterwards life was found to be extinct. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the following day, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

TIVERTON. – Inquest. - Wednesdays last an Inquest was held before F. Mackenzie, Esq., on the body of HENRY HILL, about 8 years of age, who with his companion went to bathe the evening previous in the river Exe. In attempting to cross the river, without shoes, the current being strong at the time, he was washed off his legs, and carried by the stream into Tomswill Pitt, where, during the night, every exertion was made to extricate him, but without success. The following morning he was found by a person named Upton. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday, 22 July 1852, Issue 4517 – Gale Document No. Y3200685456
SOUTHMOLTON – Melancholy Death By Drowning. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held on the body of THOMAS KNIGHT, a wheelwright, who resided at a small village called Clappery Mills, near this town, who came to his death under the following circumstances: - On Friday last his child attempted to drink at the river which runs through the village, and in doing so fell into the stream. The deceased, who was working close by, on hearing of the accident immediately rushed to the water and plunged in, but from some unaccountable means he did not succeed in getting at the child. It is supposed from the sudden fright, that he must have died the instant he got into the water. However, some neighbours soon rescued the child, and on looking for the man, KNIGHT, who, in the confusion, was not thought of, they, to their horror, found him in the water, and, on taking him out, he was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 29 July 1852, Issue 4518 – Gale Document No. Y3200685489
BARNSTAPLE – Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on Friday last, on the body of a youth named WILLIAM SHEPPARD, who was drowned on the previous evening, while bathing in the river Taw near Black Rock. A witness named Edwards saw deceased floundering about in the water, and thought he was attempting to swim; soon after he saw his hands held up, and before assistance could be rendered sunk to rise no more. Another witness gave similar testimony, and a verdict was recorded in accordance with the above fact. The unfortunate young man was apprenticed to Mr Petter, saddler, and was much respected by his master and all who were acquainted with him.

Thursday, 12 August 1852, Issue 4520 – Gale Document No. Y3200685582
PLYMOUTH & DEVONPORT. – Distressing Accident. – On Tuesday evening, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of PETER WILLIAM LAWSON MAY, a boy ten years of age, who came by his death under the following circumstances:- It appeared the deceased, with three other children, went into a boat to witness a launch that was taking place at Mr Banks's yard, and on passing a mooring buoy, the deceased wished to get on it; he did so, and on the other boys going away from him he was observed laughing. The boys went back to take him in the boat in a few minutes, but he had disappeared. It is supposed the lad being very young could not keep his hold on the buoy and slipped off. His body was not recovered until the following morning. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday, 19 August 1852, Issue 4521 – Gale Document No. Y3200685603
EXETER. – Fatal Accidents – On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier, before Mr Warren, Coroner, on the body of WARWICK COOMBE, aged about 41, who met his death under the following circumstances:- It appears that the deceased was engaged on Friday morning in pulling down a portion of a house which was s30 feet high at the corner of West-street, when the rope broke and he fell over into the street, and pitched upon his head and back. He was immediately conveyed to the hospital, where, soon after his arrival, he expired. Death is supposed to have been caused by concussion of the brain; the unfortunate deceased has left a wife and five children. Verdict "Accidental Death."

An Inquest was held at the Paper Maker's Arms, on the body of a boy, named REYNOLDS. It appears that he fell into the water at Head Weir; as the water was high, he was carried over both weirs, and when picked up (near Mr Bodley's Iron Foundry) life was found to be extinct. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 26 August 1852, Issue 4522 – Gale Document No. Y3200685634
BARNSTAPLE – Accident. - On Tuesday last, as MR THOMAS RICHARDS, of Kentisbury, yeoman, was returning from Bratton Fair, he was accidentally thrown from his horse, and falling on his head the vertebrae of the neck became dislocated and he died on the spot. Deceased was a very heavy man and nearly 80 years of age. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on the following day and a verdict in accordance with the above facts returned.

Thursday, 26 August 1852, Issue 4522 – Gale Document No. Y3200685637
EXETER – Death by Drowning. – A lad, named MADRICK, about 11 years old, was accidentally drowned whilst bathing on Wednesday, in the river Exe. It appeared that the unfortunate lad, on coming out of school, had gone across the temporary bridge, at Head Weir, and ventured into the river, which was much swollen by the late rains. He was driven off by the current, and sunk before assistance could be afforded. An Inquest was held before J. Crosse, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the Union Inn, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 2 September 1852, Issue 4523 – Gale Document No. Y3200685683
EXETER – Death by Drowning. - On Saturday evening, a boat containing three men capsized in the river behind Mr Hamilton's, near Topsham. the men were immersed, and, unfortunately, one of them – SIMON WILSON – was drowned. Mr Henry Hamilton, hearing of the accident, rendered prompt assistance; whilst search was being made for the missing man, he had hot baths prepared, and other restoratives provided. He also procured the prompt attention of two medical me. The remains of the poor fellow were not, however, recovered for four hours. An Inquest was held on Monday, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 2 September 1852, Issue 4523 – Gale Document No. Y3200685669
PLYMOUTH & DEVONPORT - Distressing Occurrence. - It is with feelings of unfeigned regret, that we have to record an event which has plunged a most respectable family in this town into deep distress, by the untimely demise of one of its members, under circumstances of a peculiarly painful nature. It appears that for some time past the state of health of MISS HARRIET HINE, daughter of MR T. C. HINE, dissenting minister, has been such as to cause much anxiety among her friends and symptoms of temporary derangement manifested themselves, which resulted in her wandering from home on Thursday evening, and although enquiries were made in every direction, no tidings were hard of her until the following morning, when she was found by a labourer suspended to a tree in a field near Weston Mills. Several religious tracts were in her pocket. The remains of the unfortunate lady were removed to a house in the neighbourhood, and an Inquest has been held before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner for Devonport. The verdict, of course, was "Temporary Derangement."

An Inquest was held on Monday, the 23rd inst., at the Guildhall, Plymouth, at 12 a.m., on the body of WILLIAM PENN, dairyman, of Tavistock-road. It appears that on Thursday, the 19th inst., deceased bought a young French horse, 5 years old, and asked a man named Moles, to go with him to Mutley Plain to try the horse, in an empty cart, which they did at about half-past 2, and when near the late turnpike gate, Sir J. Yarde Buller's coach and four horses were coming behind them towards Plymouth, and the rattle made by its approach caused deceased's horse to run off, Moles and the deceased both having hold of his head. The horse ran close to the wall, and the deceased, being near the wall and to escape injury, attempted to get under the cart, and in so doing was struck with great force on the head by the shaft, which knocked him down, and the wheel ran over his leg. He was immediately taken to the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, where he was attended by Mr Fox, surgeon, and it was discovered his skull was fractured, and that he had a compound fracture in the leg. He lingered until Saturday, the 21st, when he died at 11 p.m. Deceased never spoke from the time of the accident. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday, 9 September 1852, Issue 4524 – Gale Document No. Y3200685708
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquests – Melancholy Death By Drowning. - On Monday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held before John H. Toller, Esq., on the body of MR SAMUEL COTTON, a young man about 20 years of age, and son of J. K. COTTON, Esq., alderman and magistrate for the borough of Barnstaple. It appeared that deceased went to bathe with another young man named Prole, on Saturday last, on the sea coast near the village of Croyde. They swam about together for some time, when Mr Prole struck out into the channel and swam some considerable distance, and on his return he became alarmed at not seeing his companion. He immediately gave an alarm and procured assistance to search for the body, which after a short time was found, but not until life was totally extinct. Several marks were observed on the forehead of the unfortunate young man, supposed to have been occasioned by his striking against some rocks. A verdict in accordance with the facts narrated was returned.

Another serious accident occurred on the same day, which unhappily terminated in death, in the parish of Tawstock. A lad named JOHN SMALLRIDGE, the only son of MR JAMES SMALLRIDGE, a respectable yeoman of that parish, was riding a pony belonging to his father, at a moderate pace, when a pig which had been allowed to graze near the spot suddenly ran across the path, and getting between the legs of the pony, it fell and threw the rider on his head. We are sorry to hear that the contusions were so severe, that notwithstanding the best medical assistance that could be procured was immediately in requisition, the unfortunate sufferer expired the following day. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 30 September 1852, Issue 4526 – Gale Document No. Y3200685817
AXMINSTER – R. H. Aberdein, Esq., held an Inquest on Wednesday, particulars of which are as follows:- On Monday last the overseer of the parish, having been informed that something of a suspicious nature had been observed in connection with a woman of the name of SARAH STREET, living with her parents in South-street, a warrant was procured and Mr Charles Hallett, surgeon, was requested to proceed to the house to inquire touching the supposed birth of a child, which, being at first denied, was ultimately admitted, and the body found in a bucket under the bed, quite dead, and where it was stated to have been for the last twelve hours, the mother affirming that it was still-born. The question for the Jury to consider (no marks of violence being found on the body) was whether it was born alive or not; and after viewing the body and hearing the evidence produced, the Jury gave it as their opinion that the child was born alive, and died from want of the proper care and attention of the mother, but that the evidence did not warrant a verdict of wilful murder. The matter will now be taken up by the magistrates with regard to the concealment of birth.

MANATON – On Monday, a young man, named THOMAS CORNOW, 22 years old, accompanied by two of his comrades, each with guns, went into the forest in pursuit of rabbits. In the afternoon a shower of rain fell, and they repaired to a hedge for shelter: while here, they lit their pipes, and held the mouths of their guns, which were loaded, towards the ground, one of the guns accidentally went off, and the whole contents entered the calf of the leg of CORNOW; he bled profusely, and after much suffering, he expired the same evening. He was a very steady young man, and much respected by his brother workmen at the Head Land Tin Mines. A verdict of Accidentally Shot was returned at the Inquest, which was held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., on Wednesday.

Thursday, 7 October 1852, Issue 4527 – Gale Document No. Y3200685852
EXETER – Caution to Mothers. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday, by J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM NICHOLLS POLLARD, aged five years and four months, who came by his death under the following circumstances:- It appears that deceased's father and mother keep a clothes shop in Coombe-street, and also rent a cellar adjoining. On the 23rd of September inst. about seven o'clock in the morning, she had occasion to go to the cellar, and left him in a room behind the shop, in which was a fire, with nothing but his night clothes on, with his brother, aged two years, telling deceased to go into the shop and put on his boots. She had scarcely reached the cellar before she heard him cry out; she immediately ran back and met him in the shop with his clothes in a blaze. As soon as the flames were extinguished, he was taken to the hospital, and died Sunday morning about half-past one o'clock from the injuries received. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 21 October 1852, Issue 4529 – Gale Document No. Y3200685952
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a seaman named JESSE PARKS, belonging to the schooner Dora, now discharging tallow at the quay. The deceased was drinking at one or two public houses on Friday night, with a woman of the town, and they parted at the Sawyer's Arms, after eleven o'clock. He was never seen alive afterwards; and on Saturday morning was taken out of the water, between the vessel and the quay, quite dead. There was no doubt that he had missed his footing, in endeavouring to get on board, being in a state of intoxication. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The deceased was shipped on board the Dora, at Seaham, in the county of Durham, only last July, and the Captain scarcely knew his name. His ticket of registry was granted at the Custom House, Hull, in January 1851, and bears the name given above, stating him also have been born at Wellinghall, in the county of Stafford, in January 1830.

Thursday, 28 October 1852, Issue 4530 – Gale Document No. Y3200685989
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young woman, named MARY ELIZABETH EVANS, who came by her death in the following manner: - The deceased, who was subject to fits, was living with her mother, at Ottery St. Mary, and on Friday, the 10th instant, both rose at an early hour; deceased went into the dairy with a lighted candle in her hand, leaving her mother in a room adjoining; the mother, a short time after, heard her in a fit, and immediately went to her; she found her in a fit on the floor and her clothes in a flame; she extinguished the flames, and she was taken to the Hospital, where she died on Thursday last. verdict – "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 28 October 1852, Issue 4530 – Gale Document No. Y3200685970
TORRINGTON – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at Shebbear, on Saturday, before R. Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on view of the body of MR JOHN LEY, a respectable yeoman, of Durpley, in that parish, who was found dead in his bed on Thursday evening. He had complained of pain in his stomach, and partook of some tea previous to retiring to rest, and saying, if he felt worse he would ring, and shortly afterwards on his daughter going to his room, was greatly alarmed at finding her father a corpse. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Messrs. Cowdry and Holmes, the medical gentleman, who had made a post mortem examination of the body, returned a verdict of "Died from an eruption caused by ulceration in the stomach." The deceased was beloved and respected by all who knew him. He was a constant frequenter of our market, which he attended the Saturday, and also at Bideford, on Tuesday, previous to his death.

Thursday, 4 November 1852, Issue 4531 – Gale Document No. Y3200686005
NEWTON ABBOT – Sudden Death. – On Tuesday morning last, a person named JOHN BROWN, who had been carrier between Newton and Bovey, for a great number of years, was discovered dead in the kitchen. An Inquest was held on the body, and the Jury brought in a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 4 November 1852, Issue 4531 – Gale Document No. Y3200686009
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Tuesday morning, at eleven o'clock, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of a man named GEORGE HAYWOOD, servant to the Rev. W. H. Howard, of St. Thomas, who came by his death under the following circumstances:- On or about the 1st of October last, deceased had driven his master in his carriage to Mount Radford, and, on going through Coombe-street, on his return, the horse took fright, and ran off, coming in contact with Johnson's fly, on which was a man named James Jones, who was jerked off his seat, but he escaped with a few bruises. the deceased was not so fortunate, he was thrown to a great distance from the carriage, by a jerk, and was picked up insensible; he was immediately taken to the hospital, where he died on Monday morning. He has left a wife and five children. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 4 November 1852, Issue 4531 – Gale Document No. Y3200686013
TOPSHAM – Fire and Loss of Life. – On Monday last this town was thrown into a state of excitement from the breaking out of a fire in Higher Passage Lane, which was attended with melancholy and fatal results, in that the life of an old woman, eighty years of age, named PEGGY WARREN, was sacrificed. The house in which the fire originated, as well as the adjoining one, which was entirely consumed, was the property of D. B. Davy, Esq., and in the occupation of his groom, named Burrows, with his wife and child, and also of the deceased and her husband, who is ninety-two years of age, and totally blind. The fire was discovered about two o'clock in the morning, through the crying of Burrows' child, which awoke its father, who immediately gave the alarm. The Topsham engine was speedily in attendance, and a messenger dispatched to the fire stations in Exeter, when the West of England and Sun engines were promptly on the spot, but the fire had raged to some extent before their arrival. Great credit is due to a smith named Toby, and his son, residing near the spot, through whose exertions the occupants of the houses, with the exception of the deceased, were rescued from burning. Immediately on haring the alarm they procured a ladder and assisted in getting out the inmates by a window, but on coming to the deceased, who was on a table near one of the windows, ready to escape, she made an attempt to seize the ladder, but, unfortunately, failed, and fell back into the flames, when all hopes of saving her were vain. On searching the ruins after the fire was extinguished, her remains, which were with difficulty recognised, being literally burnt to a cinder, were discovered lying across a beam which supported a room in the second story, where she must have fallen after her unsuccessful attempt to grasp the ladder. Portions of the body were afterwards discovered in different parts of the ruins, and they were all collected in a box and removed to the Nelson Inn, where an Inquest was held on the following day (Tuesday), and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The fire is supposed to have been caused by a spark from a candle, which had fallen amongst some shavings, the deceased being in the habit of going, previous to retiring to rest, to the place where they were kept, for the purpose of taking some to light her fire in the morning. The premises destroyed are near the residence of D. B. Davy, Esq., who was active in his exertions to aid the unfortunate inmates.

Thursday, 18 November 1852, Issue 4533 – Gale Document No. Y3200686077
NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident. – On Saturday night week, an accident, which ended fatally, occurred to MR JOHN STONE, butcher, of Bovey Tracey. The circumstances connected with it appear to be these:- On Saturday afternoon, the deceased went to Lustleigh and Hennock, with a horse and cart, to sell meat and after transacting his day's business, he left the latter place about eleven o'clock at night to go home, being at the time intoxicated, but yet apparently able to drive. After he had got some distance on the road, the cart was overturned by some unexplained cause; and on the following morning the deceased was found lying dead on the road, near Stickwick, with some part of the cart resting on one of his legs. The general opinion is that he was suffocated, from the position in which he was found; and great blame is said to attach to certain parties for their negligence on the occasion. We forbear, however, mentioning names, as the evidence produced at the Inquest does not justify us in doing so. On Monday, W. A. Cockey, Esq., held an Inquest on the body, and a verdict of "Found Dead" was returned. The deceased, who was thirty-three years of age, was much respected.

Thursday, 18 November 1852, Issue 4533 – Gale Document No. Y3200686080
Sudden Death of a Female – A post mortem examination of the body of MARY ANN HOWE, whose death we noticed in our last, showed that deceased died from natural causes, and a verdict to that effect returned.

The Murder at Buckland Monachorum. – The adjourned Inquest on the body of MARY WHITE, who was found in her bed, on the morning of the 1st of November, with her throat cut, was remanded and closed on Saturday the 13th inst., at the village of Milton, in the parish of Buckland Monachorum, near Tavistock. Mr Bone, the Coroner, examined several witnesses, and the investigation was continued for several hours, and was watched by Mr W. Eastlake, the crown solicitor of Plymouth. Nothing was elicited to lessen the mystery in which this most barbarous deed is enveloped; except, indeed, it be that MR JOHN WHITE, the son of the deceased, towards whom suspicion was pointed was examined; and his aunt and others who were in the house with him on the night of the murder, and he was proved to have gone to bed at half-past eight o'clock and not to have left his room until seven the next morning; while the deceased was seen alive at 11 at night, and was found to have been murdered by 7 o'clock in the morning. The general impression is that MRS WHITE had a considerable sum of money, she having had a sum of £50 at her husband's death, and being of saving habits, and in the way of getting her living and more by her shop since she had lived alone. The verdict of the Jury was "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown." Fifty pounds reward has been offered by the parish for the discovery and apprehension of the murderer, and no doubt now that the Inquest is closed, a similar sum will be added by the government. Application has been made to the Home Secretary.

Thursday, 25 November 1852, Issue 45334 – Gale Document No. Y3200686119
TORQUAY – Lamentable Accident. – On Thursday last an accident, unhappily attended by fatal consequences, occurred to a joined named JOHN BULLEY, residing near Lower Union-lane. It appears that he was fixing flooring joists, three stories high, in a house that is being erected by Mr Peake, near Meadfoot-crescent, when he stepped on an unsecured joist, by which he was precipitated to the bottom of the building, striking, in his descent, the joists of the second and lowest story, and rolling into a well pit five feet deep, but which had little or no water in it at the time. He was immediately taken up in an almost lifeless state, and conveyed home, when it was found that several of his ribs were broken, besides having received some serious internal injuries. He lingered in great agony until the following day, when death put an end to his sufferings. The deceased was a married man, but had no family. An Inquest was held on the body, at the Half Moon Inn, on Monday afternoon, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., when, after evidence had been adduced, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Killed."

Thursday, 25 November 1852, Issue 45334 – Gale Document No. Y3200686123
EXETER – Inquests. – An Inquest was held at five o'clock on Thursday last at the Royal George Inn, near the Quay, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a boy named BARTRAM, who came by his death in the following manner. On Wednesday afternoon he got into a boat, and soon afterwards he was seen in the water, but before assistance could be obtained he sank. His body was picked up on the following morning. He belonged to a ship from Jersey, laden with apples. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, at three o'clock, on a young man named PARKHOUSE, a carpenter. Deceased was working on the 15th October at Halberton, on the top of a house, and instead of coming down by the ladder, he jumped into a bucket, the cord of which slipped and he was precipitated to the ground. He was taken to the Hospital, and died on Thursday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 9 December 1852, Issue 45336 – Gale Document No. Y3200686192
SILVERTON – Child Murder. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at Silverton Park Farm, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a new-born infant, of which LOUISA SANDERS, servant to Mr Barrington, was alleged to be the mother. It appeared, from the evidence, that the girl was for some time suspected by the family of being enceinte, and, having been accused of it, had strenuously denied it on several occasions. On Wednesday morning her mistress (Mrs Barrington) went into her bed-room, when she complained of indisposition, saying that she had a sick-headache, and pain in her side. About an hour after, Mrs Barrington went into the bed-room again, and, from certain appearances, was led to believe that the girl had been delivered of a child. On being taxed with this, she denied it as before; but, on searching the room, Mrs Barrington discovered an infant, between the sacking and the mattress of the bed. Mrs Barrington then said to the girl – "You wretch, how could you do this?" to which she made no reply. The child was living, and having placed it on the bed, she went down stairs to send for a neighbour to come to her. On returning to the bed-room the infant was nowhere to be found, nor could she learn from the girl what she had done with it – she refused to answer any questions. Shortly afterwards, Mrs Barrington, from marks on the floor, traced the infant to a spare bed-room, which was not often used. She there found the infant, still living, between the mattress and the feather bed, and at once took it out, and sent for Mr J. Puddicombe, surgeon, of Dartmouth (who happened to be on a visit to Silverton). On examination he found that the bones of the head had been severely injured by which it was impossible that the child could survive but a few hours. It shortly afterwards died. On the arrival of the Coroner, on the following day, Mr Puddicombe made a post mortem examination, and found all the bones of the head broken in pieces, and the whole space between the scalp and the skull gorged with coagulated blood and brains, which he stated in evidence must have resulted from violent external injuries. the Jury found a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against LOUISA SANDERS, and she now stands committed to take her trial for that offence.

Thursday, 23 December 1852, Issue 4538 – Gale Document No. Y3200686288
EXETER – St. Thomas. – An Inquest was held at Crook's Swan Inn, before R. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner for the Eastern District, (Mr Crosse, the deputy-Coroner for this district, being indisposed) on the body of a male child named JOHN LEE, aged seven weeks. It appears that the mother, who resides in Cowick-street, on awaking found her child dead in her arms. After a short but strict investigation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally overlaid, whilst in bed, by its mother."

Thursday, 23 December 1852, Issue 4538 – Gale Document No. Y3200686272
EXETER – Inquest. – On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before J. Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of an old man named MARTIN MILLER. It appeared that the deceased was crossing the road from Palace-street, to Coombe Street, when a fly was being driven up South-street. The driver called to the deceased when he was but a few yards from the horse, but not being able to pull up at so short a notice, the unfortunate man was knocked down and the wheels passed over him, breaking nearly all his ribs and fracturing both collar bones. He was removed to the hospital and received every assistance from Mr Edye, one of the surgeons to that institution, but survived only for a short time. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Distressing Accident – A melancholy accident occurred to a young woman named MARY WOOD, an inmate of the Exeter Workhouse, on Tuesday se'nnight, which resulted in death. The deceased is about 20 years of age, and was employed in the washhouse with several other inmates. It appears that a cistern is erected in the washhouse for the purpose of supplying the furnaces used for boiling the clothes with water, to attain which it is necessary to pass over them. The unfortunate deceased had made a practice of taking water from the cistern to avoid the extra labour of going to the pump, as was the usual custom: and had been frequently cautioned as to the danger of the practice. On the day of the accident, one of the furnaces was in use for boiling clothes, and the deceased, in passing over it, uncausiously stepped on the covers, which, unfortunately slipped asunder, and she was precipitated into the boiling water. She was immediately extricated, and removed to the ward, where every assistance was rendered by the master and matron, but she lingered until Saturday night last when death terminated her sufferings. The deceased has left an infant 6 months old. A Coroner's Inquest was being held on the body as we went to press.

Thursday, 23 December 1852, Issue 4538 – Gale Document No. Y3200686267
TORQUAY – Death by Accident. – A few weeks ago we gave the particulars of an accident, which occurred at a building in course of erection on Waldon Hill, by which one or two persons were severely injured. Amongst the unfortunate individuals was a young man named SINCOMBE, who, since the accident gradually grew worse from his injuries, and ultimately expired. An Inquest was held on the body at the house of Mr Wakeham, Torquay Inn, on Monday last, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The deceased who was only 19 years of age, was greatly respected amongst his fellow workmen.

Thursday, 30 December 1852, Issue 4539 – Gale Document No. Y3200686305
SOUTHMOLTON – On Tuesday the 21st an Inquest was held at the Poltimore Arms, in Northmolton, on the body of MR JOHN AVERY, late of the "Poltimore Arms Inn." The Jury were engaged nine hours, and in the course of their investigation it appeared that on Saturday the 18th, he purchased at Mr Attwater's (druggist), three ounces of oil of vitriol, which he took home with him, and about six o'clock the same evening he swallowed the whole of it. He lingered on in the most awful agonies until about the same hour on Sunday, when he expired. A post mortem examination was made, the result of which plainly showed that the deceased had died from the effects of the poison. It appeared that he had been in a desponding state of mind for some time past; but his friends had no idea that he contemplated such an act. The Jury returned a verdict – "That the deceased died from the effects of drinking oil of vitriol, while in a state of temporary insanity."

Thursday, 6 January 1853, Issue 4540 – Gale Document No. Y3200686346
BUCKLAND FILLEIGH – A Coroner's Inquest was held here on Thursday last, on the body of MR WARMINGTON, a farmer, who several days previous had fallen from a tree and received a hurt. MR WARMINGTON had climbed a tree to cut down some superfluous branches, and trusting to a "dead limb" which broke, he fell and received such injuries in the head and spine of the back as to cause the fatal result. He remained conscious and fully described to many persons how the accident happened.

Thursday, 6 January 1853 – Gale Document No. Y3200686347
STARCROSS – Death by Drowning – Disgraceful Affair. - On Thursday, an Inquest was held at Starcross, before Mr R. R. Crosse, deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM DAVEY, a young man, who was drowned in the river. It appeared from the evidence that DAVEY left Starcross to return to Exmouth in a boat by himself, at 7 o'clock on Sunday evening. He was seen when he started by two Exmouth boatmen, named Ballman and Tommy Neale, the former speaking to him, asking him if he meant to put up sail. Mr Blackmore a baker, soon afterwards heard cries of distress from the water, and immediately gave the alarm to Mr Geo. Timewell, the police officer, who also heard the cries opposite the railway station. Blackmore heard the cries for about a quarter of an hour, but ceased to hear them on running to get assistance from the quay, which was to windward of the spot whence the cries proceeded. Timewell ran for assistance to the house of a boatman living close by, named William Rackley. He told him there was a man drowning, and begged him to come and help; Rackley said he had no boat. Timewell said he would get him one. Rackley made no answer, and Timewell ran off, leaving the boatman by his fireside. Timewell ran to two public houses and thence to the pier, where he found Rackley and another boatman, William Gray. He begged them to render help, but they would nt. Another witness proved that two men on the pier offered Rackley and Gray 2s. to go out, and one of these men, a carpenter, named Rabjohns, offered to go himself if any of the boatmen would go with him, but they would not go. After leaving Rackley, the policeman ran to the boatman Ballman, who was sitting in his boat ready to return to Exmouth, and besought him to render assistance to the drowning man. Ballman said the cries came from Tommy Neale and it was all right. It was, however, given in evidence that this man saw DAVEY leave, and that he knew Neale was not gone out. And so the man was drowned, just opposite Starcross, and close to shore, without an effort being made to save him. The witnesses Blackmore, Creasy, Timewell and Ugler, a boatman, proved that although the wind was high, there was no danger to a boatman going out at that time. There was not, in fact, much wind at 7 o'clock on Sunday evening, although there was plenty afterwards, and the danger in that sheltered harbour would appear to have been trivial. Ballman and others crossed to Exmouth after the catastrophe. The poor fellow was clumsy and probably went overboard while hoisting the sail. It would appear from the evidence of Blackmore and Timewell that he struggled for life for a long time. His body was found on the sand just opposite Starcross, about half a mile from the shore. A boatman named Ugler found it, and recognized him; and was thus able to save the Jury from a painful scene, in calling the heart broken father to identify the body. The Coroner, in summing up, highly praised the exertions of Timewell, the police officer, and observed, that in the whole course of his experience he had never met with a case showing such a disgusting amount of cruelty and hard-heartedness as the present one. The Jury accompanied their verdict of "Found Drowned" with a strong expression of censure on the boatmen. A story was told at the Inquest of one of the above worthies who not only declined to help a drowning man who had tumbled overboard, but refused to lend his boat to another boatman for that purpose; whereupon the other boatman, by name William Garnsworthy, knocked him down, took his craft by force, and saved the drowning man.

TORQUAY – Inquest. – Mr W. A. Cockey held an Inquest on Wednesday last, at Mr Hex's, Commercial Inn, on the body of a little girl named FUGALL, who came by her death by being severely burnt some three months ago. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday, 13 January 1853, Issue 4541 – Gale Document No. Y3200686401
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Valiant Soldier, on the body of a child aged 6 ½ years, named MARY ANN QUICK, who came by her death in the following manner:- The deceased and her mother lived at Crediton, and on Wednesday last, the mother left the deceased, accompanied only by a child younger than herself in a room in which there was a fire. Cries were heard proceeding from the room shortly afterwards, and on entering deceased's clothes were on fire and blazing around her. As soon as the flame was put out it was ascertained that the child had received some severe injuries. She was immediately taken to the Hospital in this city, where she died on Friday from the injuries received. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 20 January 1853, Issue 4542 – Gale Document No. Y3200686420
NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident. - On Friday an Inquest was held on the body of WM. ELLIS, a servant to the Rev. F. S. Wall's, of Bradley-house. Deceased attended to the out-door work, and on Thursday was seen about two o'clock driving a cart with reins, standing in the cart. Something must have occurred to throw him from the cart, as within a quarter of an hour he was found on the road in a state of insensibility from injuries received. He died very shortly. The surgeon called in to attend him found severe fractures in the head, especially over the right eye – the latter one sufficient to account for his death. The injuries might have been occasioned by the kick of a horse. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased has left a widow and one child – the former Mr Walls intends to take into the house, - the latter, who is unfortunately deaf and dumb, that benevolent gentleman intends to send to the Deaf and Dumb Institution.

STARCROSS – Distressing Accident. – On Saturday, an Inquest was held at the Courtenay Arms, before Mr Cross, deputy-Coroner on view of the body of FRANCES JOHANNA STOKES, a young woman, about twenty-three years of age, who met with her death by suffocation. She was the daughter of a widow who keeps a shop at Starcross. On Thursday afternoon, MRS STOKES went to Dawlish to visit her son, - not intending to return till the following day. Mr Rossiter, uncle of the deceased, lives in the house, and he went to bed on Thursday evening about eight o'clock, leaving deceased and female companion in the house. Shortly before eleven o'clock the companion left, and Mr Rossiter heard his niece enter her bedroom. At seven o'clock the next morning, two labourers, named Barrett and Bond, were passing the house, and saw smoke issuing from the bedroom window. They knocked at the door, but receiving no answer, Barrett climbed to the top of the shop window, and raising the bedroom window felt a gush of smoke, and immediately saw the bed in flames. He jumped down, and the door below was forced open. The noise thus occasioned awoke Mr Rossiter, who was carried into an adjoining house. The tide being in, an abundance of water was obtained, and the fire extinguished, when the unfortunate deceased was found laying on the floor quite dead. A candlestick was found close to the bed, containing about three inches of wick (the tallow having been melted); and it is supposed that the deceased, being somewhat timid, had in the absence of her mother left the candle lighted when she got into bed, and some of the furniture or bed clothes coming in contact with the flame had become ignited, and smouldered till the current of air rushed in at the window when opened by Barrett. The room is a very small one, without the slightest aperture for ventilation; and as no alarm was given by deceased, it is conjectured that she perished by suffocation. Her right leg was dreadfully burnt. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" and commended the conduct of James Barrett, Charles Bond, Charles Anning, John Churchill, George Davey, and Frederick Ash, through whose exertions much property was saved, and the adjoining houses preserved from destruction.

Thursday, 3 February 1853, Issue 4544 – Gale Document No. Y3200686494
CREDITON – An Inquest was held before R. R. Crosse, Esq., deputy Coroner, at the Red Lion Inn, Shobrook, near Crediton, on the body of MARY FLEMING, an old woman, aged 85 years who was burnt to death. It appeared that she was left alone, and going too near the fire, her clothes caught, and she was so dreadfully burnt that she survived but a few hours. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday, February 10, 1853; Issue 4545 – Gale Document Number Y3200686530
Frightful Murder at Clayhidon
Great consternation was caused in this parish on Sunday morning by the announcement of the fact that MR WILLIAM BLACKMORE, of Clayhidon Mills, had been found savagely murdered within a short distance of his own house, and that three men, named George Sparks, Edmund Sparks, and James Hitchcock, who were the last persons known to have been in his company, had been taken into custody on suspicion of having perpetrated the crime. The facts of the case will be best learnt from the evidence subjoined. It is only necessary to say, by way of introduction, that the deceased, who was engaged extensively as a land surveyor, and in other matters, had been out on Saturday collecting taxes on the southern side of the parish; and that, in the evening about half-past eight, he called at the White Horse, a beer-shop in Clayhidon, where he remained until one o'clock; he left the house with the three persons above named; was seen in their company afterwards, but never reached his home. His family becoming alarmed at his absence, his son and a labourer went in search of him, and found his body in the road, with marks of savage violence upon it, under the circumstances explained below. Before daylight the three men were in custody. The deceased was 52 years of age. The inquest was opened on Monday at the Half Moon Inn, in the parish of Clayhidon, by R H Aberdein, Esq., one of the Coroners for the county, and the following evidence was adduced.
James Howe said: I knew deceased; I saw him last on Saturday, and on Sunday morning I went with his son, and found his body two or three hundred yards from his house; I had a candle and lantern with me; I found him on the right side of the road as you go towards Mr Bolley's; he was lying with his heels across the middle of the road on his back; his hat was two or three yards from him, towards his own house; there was much blood about his head and in the road; after we had removed him, we discovered wounds on the head; there was a deep wound on his left side; we picked up his purse by his side; there were two £5 notes in it; we removed the body to his house, and then found other wounds about the head and face.
Thomas Redwood said: I am a labourer; I keep a licensed beer-house, the White Horse, in this parish; I knew the deceased, WILLIAM BLACKMORE; I saw him at my house on Saturday night, about half-past nine; he was sitting in the chimney corner in the kitchen; he was drinking a pint of beer; George Sparks, Edmund Sparks, and James Hitchcock were with him; I have known them for several years; they are labouring men, living near Mr Blackmore; deceased lived about two miles from my house; he played to cards at my house until nearly eleven o'clock with George Sparks; they played for three pints, and MR BLACKMORE won; MR BLACKMORE paid for some ale after that, and tendered half a crown; they all left together about one o'clock; they seemed on good terms with each other; MR BLACKMORE said, before they went out, that they would drink up what they had and go up over the hill together; they remained some time after he said that; I did not see MR BLACKMORE with a purse; I did not see him show any more money than the half crown; I did not hear him say what he had been about during the day; he was not in liquor when he left my house; he was quite sensible, and able to walk; neither of the Sparks's were in liquor, nor was Hitchcock; a little after twelve o'clock, after they had done playing cards, I saw George Sparks make signs to James Hitchcock, and I believe they both went out of the front door; they came back in about half a minute, Hitchcock first, and Sparks afterwards.
The constable here produced a piece of iron, which was found in the river, about a quarter of a mile from the spot where deceased was found dead; a piece corresponding with that found in the river was found in an unoccupied house, next to the White Horse.
The Coroner asked whether witness knew the pieces of iron (parts of a heavy pair of tongs), which were produced. Witness replied that he never saw them that he knew of.
Examination continued: The cards that were played with were mine.
Ann Redwood, wife of the last witness, said: I knew MR BLACKMORE; he came into our house about half past seven o'clock on Saturday evening; the two Sparks and Hitchcock were there, besides two other men; before Mr Blackmore came in they had about two quarts of cider; when Mr Blackmore came in, there was a man named John Fenniton, and a lodger of mine, Joseph Summers, in the room; Fenniton left a few minutes after MR BLACKMORE came in; Summers went to bed shortly after my husband came home; before MR BLACKMORE came in I heard some one go across my court to the privy; George Sparks then went out, and, after a minute or two, came in again; I asked him who it was, and he said MR BLACKMORE; I asked if he was tipsy, and he said, "I think he have drinked;" MR BLACKMORE came in soon after, and went to the candle, and took out a piece of a letter and broke a piece off, which he afterwards put in his pocket again; he then said he was not very well, he had been to Mr Warren's, and had had some ale, which he thought was very good at first, but it had made him feel as if the devil was in him; he had a pint of ale, and said it was better than Mr Warren's; he had three pints altogether, and took out half a crown to pay for them, and then Hitchcock asked him to give then a quart, and he shook his pockets, and said, "dang the job, I can't give you a quart; this is all the money I have in the world;" Hitchcock said he had a penny, and MR BLACKMORE said "I'll give a penny towards the quart of cider;" I then said I dare say MR BLACKMORE will give the odd half-penny, and he did so; I gave them the cider; my two boys, aged nine and eight were playing at cards; the youngest did not know the way, and George Sparks took the cards and shoed him the way; some one said very likely MR BLACKMORE would play for a pint; George Sparks didn't like to ask, and I asked, and MR BLACKMORE said he didn't mind much; they then played, and MR BLACKMORE won three pints altogether; George Sparks said he could not pay for it then, he would owe for it; they afterwards had two quarts of ale with some brandy in it; Mr Blackmore paid me about 1s 9d altogether; Geo. Sparks paid for some of the ale, and James Hitchcock paid for the last; MR BLACKMORE when he took out the half-crown said it was all he had in the world; James Hitchcock said "we won't rob you, master," and Geo. Sparks said "Master isn't afraid of us;" MR BLACKMORE answered "no, by gums;" MR BLACKMORE then said, we will have one cup more, and all go up the hill together; before they drank the last quart Hitchcock and George Sparks went out of the front door and in a few minutes returned; I did not see them bring in anything; in a linhay adjoining our house I have since found a part of a pair of tongs; a person going from our front door can easily get to it; a farmer named Hartnoll used to occupy the linhay, and when he went away he left some old iron; in consequence of what I heard I gave the part of the tongs to Moore, which corresponded with the part found in the river.
James Marks: I am a labourer living at Clayhidon, I know the deceased MR BLACKMORE; I know George and Edmund Sparks, and James Hitchcock; about two o'clock on Sunday morning I was going home, and I met MR BLACKMORE and the three prisoners about 300 yards from the White Horse; they were going towards MR BLACKMORE'S house. MR BLACKMORE and Edmund Sparks were in front, and James Hitchcock and George Sparks were about 10 yards behind; I spoke to them all and said "Late order." Hitchcock made answer and said "I don't care a b......" I then proceeded on to my house; MR BLACKMORE seemed to have had plenty, but he could walk very well; I did not see any stick or any iron, I did not take particular notice; they seemed on good terms with each other.
George Braddick, one of the constables of the parish of Clayhidon said - In consequence of the information I received yesterday morning, I apprehended George Sparks just as it was light; I found him in bed at his brother William's house, where he lodged; it was about half a mile from Clayhidon Mills, where the deceased lived, and about 300 yards from the place where the body was found - the body was found between the Mills and Sparks's house; I told George Sparks that he was my prisoner; that MR BLACKMORE was murdered last night, and that he and Hitchcock, and his brother were the last who saw him; he said he knew nothing about it; he wished MR BLACKMORE good night at the French Nut Tree, and then went straight home; I knocked at the door and he came down stairs with his trowsers on; I asked him to let me see his hands, and I found that they were dirty, I could not seem them very well it was not light enough; I took him into custody, and told him he must put on the same dress as he had on last night, and then go with me.
(The waistcoat which prisoner wore was here produced and several spots of blood congealed were found on one corner.)
Examination continued: - I searched George Sparks and found 1s 4 ½ d. on him. On searching the house I found ten sovereigns and half wrapped up in a rag, on a shelf near the staircase; I told George Sparks I had found the money, but I don't know what he made any answer to it; I asked him but a few questions, but several persons were talking to the prisoner; he said "It's no use to care any more about it, I would as soon tell the whole if it as anything else." ~He then got up from his seat and took up a pair of tongs, and showed the position in which he stood, and said, "I think I struck him back-handed and killed him the first blow, I struck him twice afterwards." He said he did it with part of a pair of tongs which he took from the White Horse, which he afterwards threw into the river at Bridge-house; he told us the exact place and there we found it. I apprehended James Hitchcock at his house, after I had apprehended George Sparks; I halloed to him and he came to the window, he said, "Mr Braddick, I see," he came down and opened the door; I asked him if he had the same clothes on as he had on yesterday, and he replied yes, except his great coat; I told him MR BLACKMORE was murdered, and he seemed quite surprised; I told him he was my prisoner: he said he came with deceased as far at the French Nut Tree, and never saw him afterwards; I found a sixpence on him and a knife; on his great coat was a spot of blood. I apprehended Edmund Sparks about an hour afterwards; I told him Mr Blackmore was murdered and that he had been seen with him and his brother and Mr Hitchcock: he said he went as far as the top of the hill with them and then left them.
Mr Buncombe, surgeon, of Wellington, said: I examined deceased's body yesterday; I found a large contused wound on the left temple extending from the middle of the forehead to the margin of the hair, about four inches in length, and above that a smaller one in the same direction. The lower portion of the left ear was cut in two places, and on the left cheek there was a contusion, and a slight abrasion of the skin. The lower jaw was very much fractured, two or three of the upper teeth were missing, and several of the lower ones were displaced and found in his body. On removing the scalp I found effused blood. The skull was fractured over the left temple; a triangular piece came out, it was much shattered and depressed. About an inch of the scull of the left temple was driven in, and a large fracture extending from the orbit of the eye to the base of the skull. The injuries received were sufficient to cause instant death. The injuries might have been inflicted by the part of the tongs now produced.
George Sparks made a full confession to the coroner, exonerating every body but himself. The jury, however, thought that, as Hitchcock's shoes were traced to near where the body was found, he must have been present aiding and abetting Sparks. They returned, therefore, a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against George Sparks and James Hitchcock, who have according been committed to take their trial at the assizes.

Thursday, 10 February 1853, Issue 4545 – Gale Document No. Y3200686526
ASHBURTON – Distressing Case. – On Saturday last a miner, named HEXT, met with his death at Viddaford Mine, about three miles from this town. The unfortunate deceased was in the act of descending the shaft, when, losing his hold, he was precipitated to the bottom, and, on being taken up, life was extinct. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidentally Killed" was returned. The deceased has left a wife and nine young children in a distressed condition, and a subscription has been entered into on their behalf.

BUCKFASTLEIGH – An Inquest was held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., at Voce's Waterman's Arms Inn, on Thursday last, on view of the body of THOMAS SAMUEL GILL, aged 22 years, a native of Dartmouth, whose death appears to have taken place from his having taken a quantity of laudanum. A bottle, with the label on it, was found under his pillow. The young man had been living at Chudleigh recently, in respectable service, but was out of a situation.

Thursday, 17 February 1853, Issue 4546 – Gale Document No. Y3200686563
NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident. – JOHN ELLIS, in the employ of Mr Vicary, tanner, fell into a tan-pit last week, and in his descent, his forehead struck against the edge of the pit, by which he received some serious injuries, and expired soon after the accident. An Inquest was held on the body and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday, 17 February 1853, Issue 4546 – Gale Document No. Y3200686572
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Monday last at the Barnstaple Inn, before J. Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a little child, about one year and ten months old, named WALTER JAMES KNAPMAN. From the evidence adduced it appeared that on the 19th of January last, a wagon, belonging to Mr Daniel Tebury, miller of Budleigh, and driven by a man named Charles Bridle, was proceeding over Lower Northernhay, towards North Street, when the deceased, who was standing at his father's door, ran out into the road, and before the driver could pull up he was knocked down under the horses' feet and severely injured. On being taken up it was bleeding very much from the head, and was instantly removed to the Dispensary and thence to the Hospital, where it was attended by Mr Edye, who found the deceased in a dangerous state. The child remained in the Hospital up to the 10th of February last, when the parents insisted on removing it, notwithstanding the imminent danger it was then in, and the remonstrance of the medical gentleman; and it died within two days after its removal. Mr Samuel Steel Perkins attended the child after he had been taken from the Hospital, and considered that death resulted from exhaustion, proceeding from the wound inflicted at the time of the accident. The Jury, after some deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 7 April 1853, Issue 4553 – Gale Document No. Y3200686820
EXETER – Suicide. – A melancholy case of suicide occurred on Wednesday. A young man named Charles Chilcott was passing by the slaughter-house of Mr Smith, the successor to Mr England, butcher, of St. Sidwells, when he observed in the yard the body of a man, with the head placed between two casks and the throat cut. He made an alarm, and in consequence a workman of Mr Smith's went to the spot; and, on examination, found just under the right hand a pocket knife covered with blood, and with which the fatal deed appears to have been committed. The body, which was identified as that of WILLIAM LEE, a carpenter, of about 62 years of age, residing in St. Sidwell's, was removed to the Acland Arms, where on Thursday an Inquest was held on it, before J. Warren, Esq., and a respectable Jury. It then appeared in evidence that about nine weeks since deceased fell from a scaffold, and that he has since been unable to work, and has consequently been in poor circumstances. He also laboured under mental delusions, fancying that there were great numbers of persons in the room with him when there were none; and sometimes exclaiming that his time was come, and that he must be gone. In consequence of the state he was in, his wife, on the evening before the unhappy occurrence, put away his razors. On Wednesday morning he appeared to be in a worse state than usual, and walked about the room, throwing about his hands, an saying that he must "go out of it." The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased destroyed himself while in an unsound state of mind.

Thursday, 14 April 1853, Issue 4554 – Gale Document No. Y3200686854
YARNSCOMBE – An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of ISAAC PETHERBRIDGE, who was found dead in his bed the previous day, on which day he arose in the morning and went to his work, but returned in the forenoon, complaining of violent pain in his stomach, and going into bed, he was shortly after discovered there dead. PETHERBRIDGE was an old man, and it appeared lived on unhappy terms with his wife and son, which gave rise to a report that he was poisoned. Messrs. Cowdry and Jones, of Torrington, made a post mortem examination of the body, but could trace no poison; whereupon the Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday, 5 May 1853, Issue 4557 – Gale Document No. Y3200686949
SOUTHMOLTON – Sudden Death. - On Wednesday, MR GEORGE CRISPIN, of this town, carpenter, was going to his work at Ley farm, when he fell and immediately expired. A Coroner's Inquest was held before J. Flexman, Esq., and a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God returned.

Thursday, 5 May 1853, Issue 4557 – Gale Document No. Y3200686950
OTTERY ST. MARY - On Tuesday last an Inquest was held at the Red Lion Inn, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of EMMA ADAMS, who came by her death under the following distressing circumstances:- It appears that the unfortunate deceased, who is a native of Cullompton, had been working at the factory here, where she became acquainted with a young man named Hearn, by whom she became enceinte. On the Saturday before her death she was persuaded by a girl named Hitchcock to take a mixture of cider and treacle, with rusty iron boiled in it. The latter the young man Hearn provided her with. The consequence was, that immediately after taking it she became violently sick, and continued to get worse. Mr Hayman, surgeon, was called in, to whom she told what she had been taking, and that gentleman, with Mr Davey, surgeon, used every means to save the poor creature; but so strong was the inflammation, that it was found impossible to get the stomach-pump down the throat. She lingered in great agony until Monday morning, when death put an end to her sufferings. At the Inquest the girl Hitchcock was closely questioned by the Coroner as to the purpose for which the mixture was recommended, and stated that it was for a cold, and that she herself had taken the same sort about three years since, and that she told the deceased if she was in the family way she was not to take it; which statement was corroborated by Hearn and a sister of the deceased. The Coroner summed up with his usual ability, and the Jury returned a verdict – "That the deceased came by her death by taking the above ingredients, without knowing the effects it would produce."

Thursday, 19 May 1853, Issue 4559 – Gale Document No. Y3200687019
BARNSTAPLE – Death from Excessive Drinking. - On Friday last a foolish bet was made between two parties at the Newington Inn, that a man named DUNSFORD, an operative in Mr Miller's lace factory, should drink half-a-gallon of beer in eight minutes. The man had already drank more than sufficient for any moderate person, or in all probability he would not have permitted himself to be ensnared in so foolish an undertaking. However, the brutish task was entered upon and completed in 7 ½ minutes. The man went home and, instead of going to his bed, remained on the stairs during the night, and on the following morning he was found to be a corpse. An Inquest was held before a Jury, over whom Incledon Bencraft, Esq., the Borough Coroner, presided, when a verdict in accordance with the facts narrated was returned.

Thursday, 9 June 1853, Issue 4562 – Gale Document No. Y3200687140
ROCKBEARE – On Monday week, R. H. Aberdein, Esq., held an Inquest on the body of a boy named HENRY HAVILL, who was found hanged on the previous day. Deceased was in the employment of the Rev. J. Elliott, and left his father's house to go to work on Friday, but did not return. On enquiry being made he was found on Saturday suspended from the branch of an elm tree. It appears that about sixteen months ago a brother to deceased hanged himself at Woodbury. A verdict was returned in accordance with these facts.

Thursday, 16 June 1853, Issue 4563 – Gale Document No. Y3200687163
Melancholy Death – A serious accident, resulting in the instant death of JOHN SOWTON, the foreman at the Heavitree Quarry, took place on Monday. Deceased was at work on a ledge of rock in the side of the Quarry, about seven or eight feet wide, and about 60 feet from the bottom, to which he had gone in order to fill a hole which had been bored and to fire it, for the purpose of blowing the rock. There were other men employed in different parts of the quarry. Geo. Norman and William Ballsom were below just under the deceased, and William Cavill was on another ledge, a few feet from the bottom. About ten o'clock in the morning, Norman heard some one screaming "oh", and on looking up saw SOWTON falling. He ran off to escape being fallen on, and the unfortunate man fell just by the side of Ballsom. The body was frightfully smashed and death at once ensued. It is supposed that deceased had occasion to go near the edge to obtain some rubble to put into the mouth of the hole, and lost his balance. An Inquest was held at the Ship Inn, Heavitree, on Tuesday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 23 June 1853, Issue 4564 – Gale Document No. Y3200687192
Fatal Accident – On Tuesday night the 14th instant, a boat accident occurred which occasioned the death of SAMUEL CAWSEY, a sawyer, in the employ of Mr Ward, timber merchant. On that afternoon deceased went with some of his fellow workmen to Perriman's Double Lock Inn, where they amused themselves at skittles. They returned at about half past eleven, & took the boat near the bank below the timberyard. One of them then landed, and the other three stood at the same time on one side which caused the boat upset, throwing them into the water. Deceased was drowned; but the two others escaped. On Thursday an Inquest was held on the body, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday, 7 July 1853, Issue 4565 – Gale Document No. Y3200687270
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – On Wednesday a fatal accident occurred at the Barracks, to JOSEPH WHITE, a private in the 3rd Dragoons. A comrade named Mathew Dupy was standing near the entrance, when he heard a noise as if of some one coming down stairs, he went to the foot of the stairs and there saw deceased, lying on his back. Two or three other persons were called, and the unfortunate fellow was washed and removed. He bled profusely and so intense were the injuries received that he never spoke afterwards. He lingered till next morning and then died. On Thursday an Inquest was held before J. Warren, Esq., when after an investigation, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Jury expressed their opinion that the stairs at the barracks are unsafe and that they ought to be at least two inches deeper.

DUNSFORD – Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last an Inquest was held before F. Crosse, Esq., at Farrance, in this parish, on the body of MR GEORGE MAY, yeoman, who terminated his existence the day previous, about eight o'clock in the morning, by literally blowing off the upper part of his skull with his gun, charged with powder only. Mrs Harding, the deceased's sister, was up stairs, and being alarmed at the report of a gun, called to the servant girl in the yard who immediately went into the house and found her master lying on the floor, in the kitchen, in the manner above stated, the whole of his brain being scattered on the floor around him. Deceased had been in a desponding state for the last fortnight, and from the evidence given at the Inquest by Mr Nosworthy, of Moreton, surgeon, and Mr Samuel Day, of Culver House, there could be no doubt as to the deceased being of unsound mind at the time he committed the act, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity was accordingly returned. It was intended to have placed MR MAY in some lunatic asylum in the course of the present week.

Thursday, 14 July 1853, Issue 4567 – Gale Document No. Y3200687305
TEIGNMOUTH – Fatal Accident. – On Saturday an Inquest was held at Davey's Railway Hotel, on the body of JOHN HAYDON, a servant in the employ of Mr Brimage, of Holcombe, who, on the day previous, was killed from the wheels of a cart, laden with hay, which he was driving, passing over his body. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday, 14 July 1853, Issue 4567 – Gale Document No. Y3200687309
A Coroner's Inquest was held at Lindsay's Globe Inn, Woodbury, on Wednesday last, on a child named SAMUEL TOBEY, son of JOHN TOBEY, a labourer. It appeared, that about a month since, the child being left alone in the house, fell against the fire-place, and was severely burnt, - that the parents never applied for medical aid, or made known the accident, and that death was to all appearances, occasioned thereby. The Coroner strongly censured the mother for having left the child in so dangerous position; and that, knowing the injuries the child had sustained, she neglected calling in a surgeon. The Jury returned the verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 21 July 1853, Issue 4568 – Gale Document No. Y3200687334
NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident on the South Devon Railway. – On Tuesday afternoon last an accident resulting in almost instantaneous death, occurred on the above line of railway, at Stoneycombe. The facts of this melancholy affair are these:- The train leaving Torquay at 4.35 had arrived within a short distance of the Torquay and Plymouth junction, when the stoker (George Little ) observed a man on the Plymouth line, and saw he was about to cross to the Torquay line. the whistles were loudly sounded, but the man took no notice – the engine driver and the guard endeavoured to bring up the train, but it was too late. The engine struck the unfortunate man, and his death must have been instantaneous, as he was not see to move afterwards. The train was stopped, after proceeding a short distance, when Dr Miller, one of the railway directors, W. Carr, Esq., the secretary, and F. P. Cockshott, Esq., the chief superintendent, who happened to be in the train at the time, alighted from their carriage, and went back to where the poor fellow was laid; and the passengers were conveyed to Newton station. The engine, with an empty carriage attached, returned immediately to the scene of the accident, and the body of the man was placed in the carriage, and taken to the station, from whence it was removed to Mr Heely's, the railway hotel, there to await a Coroner's Inquest. The body, as may be supposed, was in a sadly mutilated state, and his head and arms presented a most shocking appearance. The unfortunate man, it was ascertained, was WILLIAM TAYLOR, of Bishopsteignton, mason; and it appears that one of his sons having a contract on the line under the head contractor, he had been to see him about some work, and was returning to Bishopsteignton for some tools. We are informed that he was warned once or twice on the previous day not to walk on the line. He was between 60 and 70 years of age, and has left a large family. W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Wednesday, when, after the evidence had been adduced, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" but that there was no evidence before them that the deceased, who, it appeared, was an entire stranger to that part of the line where the accident occurred, was aware of the hours of the passing to and fro of the various trains on the Torquay and Plymouth side of the Newton station; and the deceased being suddenly warned by the whistles of the engine behind him, was, in all probability, unconscious as to whether the train was coming on the Plymouth or on the Torquay line, but erroneously stepped upon the latter, and the fatal circumstances instantly ensued. Therefore the Jury respectfully and earnestly recommend that the directors of the South Devon Railway do impose a duty upon one of their officers at each of their stations, or adopt such other effectual means, by placards or otherwise, at their various stations, and on boards at numerous conspicuous places on the line stating the hours of the arrival and departure of trains, and warning workmen and others against walking, crossing, or walking thereon fifteen minutes at the least previous to the train being due at the nearest station, and until such train so becoming due had passed them."

Thursday, 4 August 1853, Issue 4560 – Gale Document No. Y3200687420
EXETER – Distressing Suicide. – On Monday morning WILLIAM PORTMAN TRUMP, a shoemaker, residing in Exe Island, committed self destruction by cutting his throat. On the preceding night he went to bed at about 10 o'clock, after having partaken of supper as usual. In the morning about half-past seven, his eldest daughter had occasion to go to his room for some matches, and observing that blood was flowing over the floor, she alarmed her mother, and they went to the room together. Deceased was sitting undressed on the floor, at the foot of the bed, with his throat cut and his shoemakers' knife covered with blood near him. His wife took up his shirt and endeavoured to stay the bleeding with it, when he struggled and apparently attempted to speak, but could not. Assistance was called, but in a few minutes he died. About twelve years since the deceased made an attempt to destroy his life and that of his wife, in consequence of which he was put into St. Thomas' Asylum, and kept there for about three months. Since that his mind has been considered to be in an unsound state. He has also suffered from a nervous complaint, for which he has been for a long time under medical treatment, but without avail. Of late he has been particularly melancholy, and has said that his life is a burden to him; and that he hated self destruction but could not bear what he was suffering under. On Monday evening an Inquest on the body was held at the Anchor Inn, Exe Island, before J. Warren, Esq., and a respectable Jury of fourteen persons. A verdict was returned that deceased destroyed himself while in an unsound state of mind.

Thursday, 11 August 1853, Issue 4561 – Gale Document No. Y3200687439
HATHERLEIGH – A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday the 1st inst. at Esworthy farm, on the body of MR RICHARD DARKE, farmer, who was found drowned in the river Looe, adjoining his farm, the Saturday night previous. The old man has been in a desponding state of mind for some time past, but on that day nothing particular was observed by the family. He attained the age of fourscore last Christmas, and up to the time of his unfortunate death was a very strong and active person. The verdict was – "Found Drowned, there being no evidence to show how he came in the water."

Thursday, 11 August 1853, Issue 4561 – Gale Document No. Y3200687442
EXETER – Inquest. – On Saturday afternoon there was an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before John Warren, Esq., on the body of JAMES STONE. A verdict was returned of "Accidental Death." Deceased was hind to Mr Palmer of Newton St. Cyres, and on the 25th of July was employed in carrying hay. While he was on the top of a wagon the horse moved suddenly and jerked him off. He fell on his head and shoulders, and two bones of the spinal column were dislocated. The medical evidence however went to show that this was not of itself sufficient to cause death. He was removed to the Hospital and died there on Friday in a state of delirium tremens, brought on by his previous habits.

Melancholy Death – On Monday an accident occurred at Coleford to WILLIAM BROWN, a workman, about 25 years of age, employed by Mr Jones, the contractor for the North Devon Railway. The deceased was engaged in the afternoon in driving over some temporary rails a truck, drawn by one horse, and laden with soil, to be used in forming an embankment. The horse was trotting on, and he was running by its side, when he fell down across the rail. He made an effort to get himself off, but was unable to do so, and the truck passed over him, completely crushing his thighs. Mr Warren, a medical man, who happened to be in the village, administered some stimulants to him, and directed that he should be taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. He was accordingly conveyed there on a cart; but on his arriving it was at once seen that the case was hopeless, and, although ever effort was used, he died in about three quarters of an hour. The deceased was in the habit of running along on the rails while driving, and it is thought probably that he was doing this at the time of the accident, and that his foot slipped in consequence. A police-officer, employed at Coleford, John Hockford, states that he has only known one man beside the deceased who was accustomed to run on the rails, and that he was killed. On Tuesday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, when after hearing the above facts, the Jury at once returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 1 September 1853, Issue 4563 – Gale Document No. Y3200687545
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – On Monday evening last, Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary, on the body of JOHN ROWE, a lad about 14 years of age, whose death arose under the following circumstances:- From the evidence we gathered that the deceased was that morning employed at a building belonging to Mr Gribble, in Cross-street. Shortly after breakfast the unfortunate lad went up into one of the upper rooms, but, instead of descending by the same route, it is thought that he preferred going out of the window on to a scaffolding, thence down by a ladder. His attempt to get on the scaffold proved ineffectual, and the poor fellow fell from a height of 28 feet. He was speedily conveyed to the Infirmary, but on his arrival the pulsation (with the exception of a little at the heart) had entirely ceased. The house-surgeon stated that there were two distinct fractures of the skull, one of which was very extensive. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday, 1 September 1853, Issue 4563 – Gale Document No. Y3200687544
ASHBURTON – An Inquest was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on Sunday last, at Buckfastleigh, on view of the body of MRS CALLARD, who hung herself on the previous Thursday

On Saturday, at Ashburton, on view of the body of JOHN ELLIS, a labourer, aged 27 years, whose death was occasioned by the rupture of a blood vessel.

Thursday, 8 September 1853, Issue 4564 – Gale Document No. Y3200687581
EXETER – Supposed Suicide of A Soldier. – On Thursday an Inquest was held at Perriman's Double Locks Inn, on the body of JOHN CATON BRIGHT, a serjeant in the 9th Foot, who was found dead in the canal on the preceding day. The deceased, together with a corporal and private of the same regiment has been stationed in this city on recruiting service for about eighteen months past. He was about 26 years of age, and has cohabited with a woman named Fanny Loosemoore in North-street. He has been for several weeks in low spirits. On the evening of Wednesday, Aug. 24, he was in company with the corporal of his regiment, and observed to him that he should not be at their usual place of meeting the next day. The following morning after breakfast, he kissed his child, wished his mistress good morning and went out. He was observed several times walking up and down the banks of the canal. Nothing was afterwards seen of him till Wednesday last when the body was found in the canal, near the Double Locks, by William Langmead, a gardener residing on the Haven Banks. The Jury returned a verdict "Found Dead in the Water."

Distressing Suicide of a Boy – On Monday a lad about fifteen years of age, named EDWARD MORTIMER committed self-destruction by hanging himself. He resided with his father and mother-in-law in Paul-street. On Monday morning his father, who is a brush-0maker, before going to his workshop, gave him 1s. 1d. to pay the milkwoman for three weeks' milk; and when he returned to breakfast, deceased told him he had paid the woman and she said it was all right. Shortly afterwards his mother in law found he had 4 ½d. with him, and asked him how he came by it. He appeared confused for some time and then said that the milkwoman had told him there was only a fortnight's milk owing. His mother in law said to him that if this was not correct the truth would be known next morning. He then went to clean the court. He did not return to the shop at his usual hour, but his mother in law supposed that he was up stairs brushing his Sunday's clothes as usual; after waiting for a considerable time, she went to his room to see what detained him, and on entering she found him hung to the post of the bed by a black silk handkerchief which he had worn that morning. She cut the handkerchief and held him in her arms till his father came in. Medical aid was at once sent for, but no signs of life were manifested. The deceased has never been a healthy boy. Some time since he had the small-pox, and since then he has been worse than before, and, to use his father's words, has not appeared so bright as the other children. An Inquest was held at Gill's Anchor Inn, Paul-street, on Monday afternoon, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, when evidence to the above effect was given, and a verdict was returned that deceased destroyed himself while in an unsound state of mind.

Thursday, 15 September 1853, Issue 4565 – Gale Document No. Y3200687616
EXETER – Inquest. – On Tuesday, the 6th instant, an Inquest was held at the Saint Thomas Union Workhouse, on the body of a newly-born infant. It appeared from the evidence that on Sunday a young woman, named MANLEY, who resides with her father at Exwick, was walking towards this city, and while passing through the fields was taken ill. She went into a pig-stye, where she was delivered before assistance could be procured. A woman who was passing by, sent for Mr Lyddon, surgeon, but on his arrival the child was dead. Mr Lyddon gave evidence to the effect that in his opinion the child was born alive, but had died from cold. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday, 29 September 1853, Issue 4567 – Gale Document No. Y3200687681
TORQUAY – Inquest. – On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at Babbicombe by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a person named BAKER, a superannuated coast-guard, of Shaldon, which was picked up near the Thatcher-rock, on the previous Saturday. Verdict, - "Found Drowned." BAKER was one of the men drowned a short time since, on returning from Sidmouth in a boat, during a heavy gale, where they had been with a fare from Shaldon.

Thursday, 6 October 1853, Issue 4568 – Gale Document No. Y3200687720
MERTON – An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on view of the body of MRS ANN FORD, between 50 and 60 years of age, the wife of MR JOHN FORD, of Ford farm in this parish, who died the previous Sunday. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was ill in bed the preceding Wednesday, and desired her daughter, a girl about 17 years of age, to mix some medicine for her; when the girl mixed a powder called sublimate, in mistake, which the deceased took, and shortly after found that she had taken poison. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Arthur Owen, Esq., surgeon, Black Torrington, the medical attendant of the family, returned a verdict "That the deceased died from diseased lungs, her death being accelerated by taking poison."

Thursday, 6 October 1853, Issue 4568 – Gale Document No. Y3200687718
NEWTON ABBOT – Inquest. – W. A. Cockey, Esq. Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday last, at the Commercial Inn, on the body of a poor man named BICKFORD, who whilst going up stairs with a bed on his back, was seized with giddiness in the head, and fell from the top to the bottom, breaking his neck in the fall. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 13 October 1853, Issue 4568 – Gale Document No. Y3200687765
EXETER – Inquest. – Mr Warren held an Inquest at the Paper Maker's Arms, Exe-lane, on Tuesday afternoon, on the body of ELIZABETH SCREECH. The deceased, who was 78 years of age, lived with her son-in-law, ROBERT SCANES, in Exe-lane. She usually slept in the kitchen, and a granddaughter slept in another bed in the same room. On Tuesday morning, on her grandson entering the room to light the fire, he thought from her appearance that she was dead, and called his brother, when it appeared that his supposition was too correct. Evidence was given by Mr A. J. Cumming, surgeon, of this city, who said he had been in the habit of attending her for some years. She was insane, and he had often found her in a state of insensibility, occasioned by congestion of the brain. He had no doubt that death arose from this cause. Verdict – "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday, 3 November 1853, Issue 4571 – Gale Document No. Y3200687883
TIVERTON – Distressing Case. – During the early part of last week the locality of St. Andrew-street, situate at the southern part of the town, has been in a state of considerable excitement in consequence of the disappearance of MR CHARLES RADFORD, who for some time past been labouring under a severe nervous weakness. On the Monday evening, about six o'clock, he left his home with the intention of seeing his medical adviser, and notwithstanding every steps that could be taken, together with a reward issued by the family, he was not seen until the following Friday, when he was discovered by a lad suspended from an oak bough, not two gun shots from his home, by a rope attached to a handkerchief. A Coroner's Inquest was held the same evening, when a verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Thursday, 10 November 1853, Issue 4572 – Gale Document No. Y3200687938
EXETER – Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Friday afternoon, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the Workhouse, on the body of MARY HUNT ANSELL, a young woman about 23 years of age. The deceased, who had been an inmate of the Workhouse between eight and nine months, was subject to epileptic fits. On Saturday morning she went to pick oakum, and, while at work, a fit seized her, and she fell of her stool. In a few minutes she died. Verdict – "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 10 November 1853, Issue 4572 – Gale Document No. Y3200687924
BISHOPS TAWTON – During the past week, this little village (which is about two miles from Barnstaple) has been the scene of a lamentable catastrophe, of a melancholy accident, which terminated fatally. It appears that MR GEORGE FAIRCHILD, of West Buckland, has recently received a letter from a son in America. This epistle contained some instructions to a younger brother, who is said to be about to embark to the "true land of liberty," but is at present residing with Mr Moore, of Week Farm, Tawstock. On the above morning, MRS FAIRCHILD left her home in a cart for the purpose of seeing her son upon the subject; and a little girl, about thirteen years of age, accompanied her mother. All went smoothly till they came to Coddon Hill, in descending which the horse took fright and proceeded rapidly for some distance. At length the vehicle, from coming in contact with a large stone, was completely upset, and the unfortunate occupants were thrown with considerable violence into the road. The injury thus inflicted was so severe as to break the neck of MRS FAIRCHILD, whose death must have been instantaneous, whilst the daughter received several severe bruises and a concussion. Two or three minutes only had elapsed before a person came to the scene of the calamity, but he found that in the poor woman's case the vital spark had fled. The girl soon recovered; but, on being told of her mother's death, she swooned and lay in an unconscious state for a considerable time. The body of MRS FAIRCHILD was removed to the Three Pigeons' public-house in the village, where an Inquest was held the same evening by the Deputy Coroner, J. H. Toller, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The girl was taken to a friend's house in the village, where she was attended by Mr T. S. Law. The injury she received was rather severe; but she has since so far recovered as to warrant her removal to her father's residence.

Thursday, 17 November 1853, Issue 4573 – Gale Document No. Y3200687957
FATAL ACCIDENTS. – On Monday afternoon an Inquest was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, at the house of Mr Dowdell, Globe Inn, Tor, on the body of a quarryman named ROBERT RICHARDS, aged 38, who met with his death on the previous Friday, under the following circumstances:- He and a person named James Brown were employed in blasting rock on the Braddons, and clearing away stone for the foundation of some houses which are about to be erected by Mr Pope, builder. On the morning in question they had bored two holes in the rock, about two yards apart, and they were charged in the usual way with powder, and a piece of "touch paper" was placed near the holes, to communicate fire to the powder. All being prepared for the operation, and everything appearing quite safe, Brown lighted his paper, and deceased instantly cried out "fire," at the same time putting a light to the train at his hole. Brown went a short distance from the spot, to avoid any accident, and, whilst his back was turned, he heard a loud explosion, and on looking round he saw the deceased hurled over a quantity of stones, to a distance of about 25 feet. Several persons who witnessed the accident ran to the spot, although he warned them not to do so, as the second explosion had not taken place. Almost immediately after, however, the rock was blasted, and no injury was sustained by any other person. He and some other men immediately hastened to the deceased, whom they found much shattered, and had him conveyed to the Infirmary on a door, where his injuries were attended to, but he gradually grew worse and died about half-past seven in the evening. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. -

At the conclusion of the above Inquiry, the Coroner and Jury proceeded to investigate the circumstances connected with the death of GEORGE SHAPLEY, who met with an accident on Friday morning, which terminated fatally. It appears from the evidence that the deceased, who is a foreman to Mr Wm. Godfrey, shipowner and coal merchant, went on board the schooner Vigilant, which was discharging coals at the Quay, during the absence of the men at dinner, and, whilst looking down the hold, slipped and fell to the bottom, a distance of about 15 feet, and pitched on his head. A short time after the accident, a man named James Bridgman, who was assisting in discharging the vessel, went on board, and, hearing some person groan, he looked into the hold, and laid at the bottom he saw the deceased, apparently lifeless. An alarm was immediately raised, and assistance was soon procured, and the unfortunate man was hoisted on to the quay in an arm chair, and conveyed to the Infirmary, where he died from the injuries he had received, between seven and eight o'clock on the following morning. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 17 November 1853, Issue 4573 – Gale Document No. Y3200687961
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – A melancholy accident occurred on Friday morning to HENRY GILLARD, a boy employed by Messrs Rookes, of Paris-street. He was riding a horse up Paris-street, and on coming into High-street, the horse turned the corner sharply and threw him off, occasioning his instant death. An Inquest was held at the Valiant soldier, on Saturday morning, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

KENN – An Inquest was held at the Palk's Arms, Kenn, on Saturday, before R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named JEREMIAH HELLET. On the previous day, he was working on the road, for the parish of Exminster, and at the usual time he left work. He went towards his home, at Kenn, and had to cross a narrow bridge over a small stream. While crossing the bridge, he slipped, and fell into the water, which was about nine inches deep. He fell on his face and hands, and, not being able to get up, he was consequently drowned, and was found by a man, soon afterwards, dead in the water. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday, 1 December 1853, Issue 4575 – Gale Document No. Y3200688054
EXETER – Death From an Explosion of Gunpowder. – On Friday an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before J. Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JESSE TURNER. The deceased was at work in a blacksmith's shop, at Down St. Mary, on the 7th November. There was a large quantity of gunpowder in the shop, and a spark accidentally caught it, creating an explosion. The unfortunate fellow who was much burnt, was taken to the Hospital, where he died a few days ago. There had been a much larger quantity of powder in the shop but a portion had been removed; and it had been stated by deceased that he had given directions that the whole should be taken away. The Jury were of opinion that the person to whom these directions were given was highly culpable, but not being in a position to ascertain who this was, they merely returned the verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 8 December 1853, Issue 4576 – Gale Document No. Y3200688086
EXETER - Death From an Accident. – On Monday morning last, GEORGE HODDER died at the Hospital from injuries sustained from an accident some weeks since. He was at work at Halberton, and unfortunately broke his thigh. The whole of the following night he was allowed to lie under a hay rick, and next morning was taken to the Hospital, where every effort was used for his recovery, but without success. An Inquest is to be held today (Wednesday) at the Valiant Soldier Inn.

Thursday, 8 December 1853, Issue 4576 – Gale Document No. Y3200688074
EXETER – Death from Scalding. – On Monday an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before J. Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of CHARLOTTE SATTERLY, a child eighteen months old. On Friday last her mother, who lives in Holloway-street, gave her some coffee, and put the coffee pot on the hob of the grate. The child had been standing by the fire, and on her removing from that position, the coffee-pot with the hot coffee, fell on her bosom, and scalded her in a frightful manner. She was taken to the Hospital, where she died on Saturday, from the effects of the scald. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 15 December 1853, Issue 4577 – Gale Document No. Y3200688106
BARNSTAPLE – Melancholy Event. – Another instance of the uncertainty of life occurred in this town on Thursday last. Whilst HENRY BROWNING, an apprentice to Mr Petter, saddle and harness-maker, was pursuing his work in his master's establishment, he became suddenly indisposed and asked for water. Some brandy, however, was supplied to the poor fellow, who was conveyed to his home. This was between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; but at six in the evening, death had placed his icy hand upon the youth, and he had ceased to be among those who "live and move and have their being." The Coroner, Incledon Bencraft, Esq., held an Inquest on the following day, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned. According to the medical testimony the deceased, who was 17 years of age, laboured under disease of the heart.

Thursday, 29 December 1853, Issue 4579 – Gale Document No. Y3200688185
BARNSTAPLE – Inquest. – Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at the Union Inn, on Saturday evening last, on view of the body of ELIZABETH, the wife of WILLIAM WORTH, a shoemaker, residing at Pilton. The deceased was in her usual state of health in the morning, and was engaged in washing the breakfast things, when it was discovered that blood was flowing from her leg, and she died before medical attendance was procured. It appears that the poor woman, who has left several young children, had an ulcer in the leg, and it broke without her knowledge – hence the copious effusion of blood. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Melancholy Suicide – Under this head we briefly announced last week that a report was circulated in Barnstaple to the effect that the wife of MR JAMES MARTIN, of Heanton Court Barton, had on Tuesday committed suicide by drowning herself. The report, however, proved to be well founded. It appears that the unfortunate deceased has, from time to time, for years past, been labouring under some mental delusion, and had frequently hinted at self-destruction. Lately, however, it would seem, that she had become more hypochondriacal than ever. This necessitated the most complete watchfulness, and although almost every precaution was taken to prevent the dreadful act of suicide from being consummated, yet the cunning eye of insanity was open to its purpose, and succeeding in finding an opportunity of carrying out its intent. Notwithstanding that a servant woman slept with MRS MARTIN, and another person occupied the same dormitory, she contrived to leave the house unobserved and betook herself to the river, into which she plunged. About five o'clock in the morning the servant woke from her sleep and found her mistress had left the bed. A light was quickly procured, and it was ascertained that she had gone out at the front door. She had on nothing at the time but a pair of lamb's wool stockings and her night dress. Search was immediately commenced, and the unhappy creature was traced to the river. In consequence of the "fresh" that was running at the time, it was at first conjectured that the body would not be found, but fortunately it was discovered between nine and ten o'clock on the same morning. Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest on the same day, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The remains were interred on Saturday last at Barnstaple.

Dreadful Accident – An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on Saturday last, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the bodies of JOHN HUXTABLE and SAMUEL MITCHELL, who have for some time past been employed in blowing out the rock by the side of Sticklepath Hill; which is contiguous to the Barnstaple Station of the North Devon Railway. About one o'clock on Thursday last, the poor fellows were in the act of putting some gunpowder into a hole, when it suddenly exploded, and both men were thrown down the cliff with considerable violence. They fell from a height of between thirty and forty feet, which was in itself almost enough to cause death. It was thought at first that HUXTABLE was dead, but he was conveyed on boards to the Infirmary. The neckerchief and the bosom of the shirt of MITCHELL were found to be on fire, and his whole appearance was of the most distressing and pitiful character. He was put on a platform similar to the other poor unfortunate, and was borne to the Infirmary on the shoulders of his comrades. He was placed in a sitting position and another man was on the platform to keep the sufferer in that posture. On passing up Litchdon-street the poor fellow's groans were sometimes appalling, and "the fruitful river was in the eye" of many who witnessed the scene. The hole which they had made was in a sloping position, and it is supposed that MITCHELL was incautiously poking down the powder with a "tamping bar," (which is tipped with steel) without having first places some straw or hay into the hole. It is inferred that this bar came in contact with a flint, and a spark having been generated the explosion followed. Mr Forester, the house surgeon, stated that HUXTABLE was in a perfectly insensible state when brought to the Infirmary, and was never conscious at all. He had a lacerated wound on the head, but the skull was not fractured, and his general symptoms showed that he was suffering under compression of the brain from some cause or other. His case was hopeless from the first, and he died at ten minutes past two o'clock on Friday morning. On a post mortem examination it was found that there had been a rupture of a large vessel on the brain, which produced an effusion of blood and was the cause of insensibility. Several ribs on the left side were fractured, and a small bone on the left arm. MITCHELL was in a semi-conscious state – only sufficient to feel pain. His face was very much charred, and his hands were burnt. He died at half-past eleven on Friday morning. The burning of the face was quite sufficient to cause death, but it was not expected that he would have died as soon as he did. It was found at the post mortem examination that there had been a rupture of one of the intestines, and an intense inflammation had set in. The most important injury, however, was the elision of the left kidney. The Inquiry lasted for nearly three hours, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Jury desired that the men engaged in the work should be cautioned as to their present dangerous practice, and recommended that wooden rammers should be provided for the purpose of putting down straw or hay into the holes. MITCHELL was from Torrington, and he has left a wife and four young children. HUXTABLE lived at Rawleigh, and has left a wife and eight children – four of whom, however, are grown up. The Jury left their fee in the hands of Mr Forester to be by that gentleman divided equally amongst the widows. Mr Kay, who was on the Jury, recommended that a penny subscription be entered into, in order to soothe, if possible, the woe of the afflicted. It is hoped that the proposition of Mr Kay's will be carried into effect.

Thursday, 5 January 1854, Issue 4580 – Gale Document No. Y3200688235
EXETER – Death from Burning. – On Thursday afternoon, the Deputy Coroner (J. Gidley, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of ELIZABETH POORE, a child eight years old, the daughter of a fish seller residing in Exe Lane. On Monday night the parents went to spend the evening with some friends, leaving the deceased alone in the house, and desiring a neighbour to look in now and then and see that all was right. About an hour after they had gone the little girl attempting to reach something from the hob, and her clothes ignited. She ran out, and the neighbours speedily extinguished the flames, but not till she had been dreadfully burnt about the arms and upper part of the body. Mr Cumming, surgeon, was called in, and the child was subsequently taken to the Hospital, where she died on Thursday morning from the injuries received. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned, but the Coroner and Jury strongly recommended the more general use of fire guards in cases where children are left by their parents.

Death by Suffocation. – A labourer, named RICHARD BICKFORD, residing at Chudleigh, has come by his death under the following melancholy circumstances: - The deceased was in the employ of Mr J. Oldham, and, in the absence of that gentleman's family, he was requested to sleep in a room over the coach-house, which is a neat building detached from the dwelling house, in order that he might be on the spot if assistance was required. Previous to retiring to rest he was cautioned by the gardener as to the danger of burning charcoal in the bedroom, and was told that it might cause suffocation. From what subsequently occurred, however, it appeared that he took no notice of the caution. On the following morning, not finding him up, the servants knocked at the door. Receiving no answer, they forced it open, when they found BICKFORD in be quite dead. From the appearance of the room it would seem that he must have been suffocated shortly after he went into bed. His lantern and a box of Lucifer matches were near the head of the bed on the floor; while in the opposite corner of the room was an iron fire-basket, used for burning charcoal, which contained a quantity of ashes. Two medical gentlemen were called in, but life was extinct; and at the Coroner's Inquest the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 5 January 1854, Issue 4580 – Gale Document No. Y3200688215
TORQUAY – A little boy, about six years of age, named FRED. PEPPERELL, son of a greengrocer, of Lower Union-street, met his death on Monday morning, through his night-dress taking fire as he was endeavouring to take something from the mantle-piece. An Inquest was held on Friday, a verdict of Accidental death returned.

Thursday, 12 January 1854, Issue 4581 – Gale Document No. Y3200688270
EXETER – Death from Drowning. – We regret to have to record the death – attended by most melancholy and painful circumstances, of MR MATTHEW MADGE, the son of a highly respectable farmer, residing at Pinhoe. On Saturday morning at six o'clock the deceased left his father's house, in company with a servant named Edmonds, for the purpose of bringing a load of manure from the Exeter gas works. On arriving near the basin they were met by Leonard Gary, a man employed at the works, and who had just left his labour. Being ignorant of the road they asked him which way they must take; and he directed them, and told them that there was a lamp at the entrance to the works. They turned towards the Basin – agreeably to his directions; but there being no lamps in that part it was extremely dark; and it is thought probable that they supposed one of the lamps on the other side of the water to be that referred to by Gary. After they had proceeded a little way MR MADGE walked on before the wagon, for the purpose f ascertaining in which direction the gas works lay. He returned to the wagon, and, telling the servant that he believed they were down the way he had been going, requested him to follow. They had not gone far when Edmonds heard a splash and a scream. They had been passing towards the edge of the Basin and MR MADGE had fallen in. The ground was extremely slippery, and Edmonds had some difficulty in saving himself from the same fate. He at once ran to the Buller's Arms to obtain assistance; and in the bar-room he found Gary, and four or five other men. Having given the alarm Gary went to his assistance; but the others were sufficiently inhuman to remain quietly over their pipes and cups. They found it impossible to do anything without more aid, and, driving the wagon on to the gas-works, they acquainted the foreman with the circumstance which had transpired. He at once went to obtain further help; but before he had succeeded in doing so it was half-past seven o'clock. The assistance of George Radford and James Galpin was then secured, and a search was instituted for the body. A great part of the Basin was frozen over, and they discovered the place where the unfortunate young man fell in from the ice being broken. So slippery was the edge of the Basin at the time, that in dredging for the body it was found necessary to take the precaution of securing the man who worked the dredge by means of a rope. About half-past eight o'clock the body was taken from the water, stiff and lifeless. A Coroner's Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, Alphington-street, on Monday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, when the above facts were deposed to. The Coroner remarked that the conduct of the men at the Buller's Arms were extremely disgraceful and unfeeling and intimated that had aid been more promptly given, life might have been preserved. A Juryman having suggested that a chain ought to be placed at the edge of the Basin, in order to prevent the occurrence of such accidents. The Coroner said that it had often been suggested that this would be a great advantage; but there were some parties who had objections, which were perhaps better known to the inhabitants of Exeter than to himself, as it was considered that great inconvenience would be incurred in unloading shipping. The Jurors expressed a strong opinion that there ought to be a chain carried along near the water's edge, in order that if parties should fall in they might have an opportunity of rescuing themselves. There were also some severe, and we must say, just reflections, cast on the authorities, who were said to be the St. Thomas' Lighting Commissioners, for allowing so dangerous a spot to remain without lamps.

Thursday, 12 January 1854, Issue 4581 – Gale Document No. Y3200688252
TIVERTON – Fatal Accident. – On Friday last CHARLES VINEY, a lad about 16 years of age, having spent a portion of the day in shooting, returned to Collipriest Cottage, where he very incautiously placed a loaded gun in a laurel bush to avoid suspicion. On his return it appears he caught hold of the barrel to pull it out of the bush, when the gun went off, and lodged the whole of the contents in his head. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at the Inquest.

Thursday, 26 January 1854, Issue 4583 – Gale Document No. Y3200688329
BARNSTAPLE – Inquest. – Mr Incledon Bencraft, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday week last, at the North Devon Infirmary, on the remains of ROBERT BLAKE, who was in the employ of Mrs Mary Ford, a miller, of Bishopstawton. On the evening of Friday week the deceased was returning from Barnstaple with a wagon, in which were between twenty and thirty bushels of wheat. About five minutes after leaving the Hollow Tree Inn, Newport, the poor fellow was discovered lying in the road, nearly opposite Slimly-lane. He was almost speechless, but groaned a good deal. He made several ineffectual attempts to get up, but was at length lifted into the wagon and conveyed to Tawton. Subsequently, however, he was taken to the Infirmary; and it appears from the evidence of Mr Henry Forrester, the house surgeon, that the deceased was brought to the institution about half-past ten o'clock the same night. He was then very much intoxicated, and was in a state of collapse. With the exception of a small abrasion on the left shoulder, there were no external marks to denote that a wheel had passed over the deceased, or that he had received any serious injury. An emetic was administered, which had the effect of clearing the stomach of three pints of fluid – apparently beer. On being asked how he came on the ground, the deceased said that he believed he fell off when attempting to get into his wagon, and that one of the wheels of the vehicle passed over him, but he lifted the other over himself. This only shows what a sorry state the poor fellow was in, as what he spoke of was an impossibility. The deceased continued to get worse, and died on the following Sunday morning. On an internal post mortem examination of the body it was found that the left side of the chest contained a quantity of blood, which had arisen from a slight rupture of the left lung. There was also a coagulum of blood just above the rupture, and on its removal it was discovered that three ribs had been displaced, which must have ruptured the lung. This shows that the deceased must have received a severe blow on the left side, near the spinal column, but there was not the slightest mark externally to denote the same. Mrs Ashton stated that she saw the deceased leave the Hollow Tree, and afterwards observed that a dog-cart passed the wagon. There were two ladies in it, and a gentleman driving. She believed that it was Mr Bankes' dog-cart, but she could not swear to it. After hearing further evidence, and it appearing to the Jury that the deceased might have received the injury by a passing vehicle, the Inquiry was adjourned till Wednesday evening. During the interval a highly improper report was circulated to the effect that the deceased was knocked down by Mr Bankes's dog-cart; but such a rumour is without the slightest foundation in truth. Accordingly on Wednesday evening the Jury again assembled, and the evidence of Mr J. F. Bankes, of Bishopstawton, was taken. This gentleman's testimony was very clear, and was consequently satisfactory to the Jury. He remembered the evening very well indeed, and he stated that he did not see a single vehicle of any kind on the road. He said that it was impossible for him to have knocked down any person without his knowledge, as he was driving only at a moderate trot. Mr Bankes was thanked by the Coroner for the readiness with which he had attended, and on leaving Mr Bankes desired that the fee might be placed in the box at the Infirmary. After the Coroner had commented on the evidence the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased, whilst driving a horse and wagon, and being intoxicated, accidentally received a very violent blow in his back, which caused his death, but by what means there is no evidence to prove.

Thursday, 26 January 1854, Issue 4583 – Gale Document No. Y3200688333
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held this morning before Henry Wilcocks Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES SMITH, of Holloway-street, who was found dead in his bed on Tuesday morning. He was in health when he retired to rest on the previous evening. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 9 February 1854, Issue 4585 – Gale Document No. Y3200688415
EXETER – Death From Burning. – On Saturday an Inquest was held before Henry Wilcocks Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of GEORGE GLIDDON, a child four years of age. On Friday morning the father of the deceased, who is a lighterman residing at Countess Weir, went to his work leaving the child with an elder brother. Soon after his brother went out also. The mother, who was upstairs, had her attention attracted by screams below, and, on running down found the poor infant in flames. She caught him round the body, extinguished the fire, and threw flour over him. He was then sent to the Hospital where he died at about midnight. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Melancholy Suicide – JANE, the wife of MR WM. SKINNER, of Burrough, Drewsteignton, died at the residence of Mr Jarvis, St. David's hill, on Sunday last. Her sudden and melancholy death, caused by her own act, was the result of temporary insanity. For the last three months she has suffered much from mental depression; she selected the hour of midnight for leaving the house, while the family were asleep, and although sleeping in a double bedded room, the servant, who slept in the other bed by her (MRS SKINNER'S) own desire, did not find her missing until daybreak, when the consternation of the family can be better imagined than described, on finding her lifeless body suspended in the garden. An Inquest was held on the remains of the deceased yesterday, before H. W. Hooper, Coroner for this city, when evidence in accordance with the above, was tendered, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned. The deceased, we may add, was in her 61st year.

Thursday, 23 February 1854, Issue 4587 – Gale Document No. Y3200688487
EXETER – Deaths of Children From Burning. – An Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner for this city, on Monday last at twelve o'clock, to enquire into the cause of death of ALBERT HENRY FLOOD, son of MR JOHN FLOOD, boot and shoe maker, Brook Green, St. Sidwells. The deceased, who was three years and a half old, was left in the kitchen with another child, on the 24th of January. His father was at work in an upper room, and at about half past twelve o'clock hearing screams below, he ran down stairs and found the child enveloped in flames. He at once extinguished the fire and remedies were applied. Some days after, a recommendation having been obtained, the child was admitted a patient of the Dispensary, and, from that time to his death, which took place on Saturday last, he was attended by Mr Webb. In reply to a Juror, Mr Webb said, that patients were admitted without a recommendation, in such cases as the present. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

On the same day at 2 o'clock, Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of GEORGE GLANVILLE, a child two years and two months old, the son of RICHARD GLANVILLE, labourer of Poltimore. On Saturday afternoon the mother of the deceased, went into the garden to work, leaving him in company with a brother about five and a half years old. She took out the fire but did not wait till it had been quite extinguished. When she had been in the garden about an hour and a half, the elder boy ran out screaming, and said that his brother was in flames. The fire was, of course, at once stifled, but the poor child was frightfully burnt. The floor of the kitchen was found strewed with old thatch which it was supposed the children had carried in, and which had fallen from the roof of a neighbouring house. Mr Merry, surgeon of Broadclist, was sent for, and the same afternoon the child was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital where he died within a few hours of his arrival. The Coroner observed that it was highly necessary that every precaution should be taken by parents when they left their children. This was the third Inquest which he had held on children who had died from the same cause within a month. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 9 March 1854, Issue 4589 – Gale Document No. Y3200688552
TORRINGTON – Sudden Death. – On Thursday a melancholy instance of the uncertainty of human life occurred in the case of JANE SUSSEX, an unmarried woman of this town. The deceased, who was 67 years of age, had partaken of her dinner as usual, apparently in perfect health; but on rising from dinner she complained of giddiness in her head, and immediately expired. Mr Tapley, surgeon, was called in, and considered she died of apoplexy. Mr Toller, Deputy Coroner, attended on Saturday to make enquiries, but from the evidence adduced he said that a Coroner's Inquest was unnecessary.

Thursday, 9 March 1854, Issue 4589 – Gale Document No. Y3200688557
Fatal Accident – An Inquest was held on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., at the Mount Pleasant Inn, St. Sidwell's, on the body of ROBERT BURNS, a lad about seven years of age, who lived in Clifton-place with his great uncle, MR HELLINGS, the minister of Grosvenor chapel. The death of the deceased was occasioned by his falling from an attic window to the ground, a distance of thirty feet. He was left alone by the servant, and it is supposed that he over-balanced himself in looking out of the window. A verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 16 March 1854, Issue 4590 – Gale Document No. Y3200688594
Inquest – An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday week, on the body of SUSAN GIBBONS, the illegitimate child of LOUISA SELLICK, wife of WILLIAM SELLICK, a labourer of Westhill, near Ottery. It was reported that the deceased had died from neglect, and the Coroner ordered a post mortem examination. It appeared from the evidence of Mr Hayman, surgeon, that death was occasioned by the diseased state of the intestines, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

EXETER – Child Burnt to Death. – An Inquest was held by H. W. Hooper, Esq., on Saturday, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of ELIZABETH LYDDON, a girl eight years of age. The deceased lived with her parents at Clist St. Mary. On the 18th February her mother went to work in a turnip field, about a quarter of a mile from the house, leaving her in company with her two sisters, one eleven, the other thirteen years of age. She attempted to take a needle out of a curtain which was hanging over the fire place, and, in doing so, caught her apron. A neighbour, living under the same roof, was attracted by her screams, and, coming in, found her enveloped in flames. The poor child was frightfully burnt, and having been taken to the Hospital, died there on Thursday. – Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 30 March 1854, Issue 4592 – Gale Document No. Y3200688646
BARNSTAPLE – Coroner's Inquest. – On Saturday last, Mr Incledon Bencraft held an inquisition on the body of JANE BASSETT, a baby five months old. The Inquiry took place at the house of JOHN BASSETT, in Belle-alley, in this borough. About half past ten o'clock that morning, the mother put the sleeping child into the middle of a bed on its side – a thing which she had frequently done, - and on going to it between twelve and one, she found that it had moved, but was still apparently sleeping. On a closer examination, the mother discovered that the child's face was slightly discoloured, and she became alarmed thereat. The child was immediately placed into a warm bath, and a messenger was dispatched for Dr Bignell. That gentleman was quickly in attendance, but he declared the child to be dead. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was accidentally suffocated whilst in bed.

Thursday, 30 March 1854, Issue 4592 – Gale Document No. Y3200688647
Inquests Before R. H. Aberdein, Esq. – On Monday, the 20th inst., an Inquest was held at Upottery, on the body of ELIZABETH GILLARD. The deceased was a servant to Mr Pope, of Court Moor farm, and 31 years of age. On Friday, the 17th, her master desired her to carry some warm water to a cow which had calved. He went to the house of a neighbour and, on returning, was informed by his wife that deceased could not be found. A search was made, and the body was discovered in the hay house, hanging by a rope from a joist. The end of the rope was made into a noose, and was only two feet from the ground, the body being in a stooping position. No cause for the commission of the act could be assigned, and nothing unusual had been observed in her manner. The Jury returned a verdict of felo de se, and the body was privately interred in Upottery churchyard the same night.

On Tuesday, the 21st, Mr Aberdein held an Inquest at the Talbot Arms, Uplyme, on GEORGE BAILEY, a labourer, employed by Messrs. Frean and Co., lessees of the Blue Lias limestone quarries at Lyme Regis. The deceased was engaged in getting out stone at the cliffs, at Lyme, on the 8th instant, and while blasting a quantity of marl fell on him and broke his right leg. Medical assistance was procured; the bone, which protruded several inches through the skin, was sawed off, and the leg set. For some time the deceased seemed to go on favourably; but on the 17th inst., he complained of soreness in his throat, and on the 19th symptoms of lock-jaw appeared, of which he died the following day. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday, 6 April 1854, Issue 4593 – Gale Document No. Y3200688699
EXETER - Fatal Mill Accident – A shocking accident occurred on Wednesday, at Mr Carthew's Mills, at Crediton. A boy, named HENRY DART, who was engaged at the mills, was caught in by the shaft and drawn under the beam. His body was frightfully mutilated. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he has since died. An Inquest has been held this (Wednesday) morning at the Valiant Soldier Inn, and a verdict returned in accordance with the circumstances.

Sudden Death – On Saturday afternoon, an Inquest was held before Henry Wilcocks Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Windmill Inn, Holloway Street, on the body of MR WILLIAM DURANT, son of MR GEORGE DURANT, wine and spirit dealer, of Colleton Terrace. The deceased who was 26 years of age, was at his father's place of business in George Street, on Friday evening. He left between nine and ten o'clock, and passed down South Street, carrying with him a small box of corn. A labourer named Broom followed him, and came up with him near Trinity Church, when he fell down as if in a fit. Broom caught him in his arms and untied his neckcloth. He was conveyed to his home, and Mr C. K. Webb, the medical attendant of the family was sent for, but the unfortunate deceased never spoke a word afterwards. Medical evidence was taken as to the cause of death, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 13 April 1854, Issue 4594 – Gale Document No. Y3200688725
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – On Monday an Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary by Mr Incledon Bencraft, on the body of JOHN PUGSLEY, a shoemaker, of Fremington. On the preceding Monday the deceased went to the quay at Fremington Pile, for the purpose of assisting to get off Capt. Tinker's vessel. A ladder was placed horizontally from the quay to the vessel, and while he was walking across the ladder gave way, precipitating him to the bottom, a depth of about eight feet. There were about three feet of water at the time. He was taken up by his companions, and was sufficiently well to walk home; but he gradually grew worse, and on Saturday he died. Mr Forester, the house surgeon, attributed death to violent inflammation of the lungs, brought on by the immersion and subsequent exposure to cold. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 13 April 1854, Issue 4594 – Gale Document No. Y3200688723
BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – MRS ALDHAM, wife of the respected Police Superintendent, died suddenly on Wednesday evening. About 9 o'clock on that evening before going on night duty, MR ALDHAM saw his wife in her usual health. At one o'clock he went home, and found her on the floor of her bedroom partially undressed. Assistance was at once procured, and a medical gentleman gave it as his opinion that she had been dead some time: the cause being either disease of the heart or apoplexy. An Inquest was held before I. Bencraft, Esq. The Jury did not think a post mortem examination necessary, and returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 20 April 1854, Issue 4595 – Gale Document No. Y3200688778
EXETER – Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Saturday morning, at the White Hart Inn, South-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of GEORGE HENRY BRAILEY, a child about three months old. On the preceding Wednesday night the deceased was put to bed as usual, and next morning was found by the mother lying on its face, close to her side, and quite dead. Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, attributed death to suffocation, arising from the child being accidentally pressed on the bed clothes. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Caution to Fly Drivers – Mr H. W. Hooper, the Coroner for this city, held an Inquest on Thursday, at the Pack Horse Inn, St. David's Hill, on the body of MRS JANE RIPLEY. From the evidence it appeared that on the 22nd March, William Cann, a boy employed as fly driver by Mr James Johnson, was driving a carriage along Queen Street, MRS RIPLEY attempted to pass, and in doing so was struck by the shaft, and knocked down, the fore wheel passing over her leg. The boy backed the horses and the wheel passed over the same leg again. The accident was observed by a son of the deceased, who is a shopman at Messrs. Joslin and Quick's, and assistance was rendered by him and by some other parties who were near the spot. The deceased died on Tuesday night. Several of the Jurors remarked on the impropriety of allowing boys of the age of Cann, who is about fourteen, to be intrusted by fly proprietors with their carriages; and the Coroner was requested to draw up a recommendation on the subject, to be submitted to the Council. A verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 20 April 1854, Issue 4595 – Gale Document No. Y3200688757
TORQUAY – Gun Accident. – W. A. Cockey, Esq., held an Inquest on Monday week, at the Torbay Infirmary on the body of ROBERT STANCOMBE, a labourer, who met with his death from the explosion of a gun. The deceased was employed with other workmen in widening the South Devon Railway between Newton and Totnes, and was in the habit of carrying a gun with him. The men left work on the evening of Monday the 3rd inst., at about seven o'clock; and the deceased was observed in a stooping posture, as if secreting the barrel of the gun about his person. Whilst so doing, the gun exploded. Immediate assistance was rendered, and he was taken to the Torbay Infirmary, where he died the following Wednesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 20 April 1854, Issue 4595 – Gale Document No. Y3200688756
ST. GILES – In consequence of reports being in circulation of ill treatment towards a girl named SARAH CLARKE by two boys of the name of Bennett of Roborough, which we alluded to last week, the body was exhumed on Monday, and an Inquest held before R. Bremridge, Esq., and a Jury, which resulted in a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday, 27 April 1854, Issue 4596 – Gale Document No. Y3200688815
EXETER - Accidental Death – On Tuesday morning, Mr H. W. Hooper, the Coroner for the city, held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of JOHN MORRISH, of Sandford, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Sunday. The deceased was a labourer, and was employed on the 7th April, by Mr James Powell, to blast the roots of some trees. One of the charges went off unexpectedly, in consequence of which a finger of his right hand was broken and he sustained a slight wound in the forehead. He went back to Sandford and had his finger set, and the same evening he walked to Crediton, from whence he took the train to Exeter, and went to the Hospital. He was there attended by Mr Edye, and went on favourably till Tuesday, when symptoms of lock-jaw set in, of which he died. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Suicide – A man, named KEMPE, employed by Mrs Bidwill, of Alphington-street, hung himself on Tuesday afternoon. As late as four o'clock he was seen riding up Fore-street, and within an hour or two afterwards his body was found suspended in the stable. An Inquest will be held tomorrow (Thursday) at the Plymouth Inn.

Thursday, 27 April 1854, Issue 4596 – Gale Document No. Y3200688792
CHITTLEHAMPTON – Accident. – A lad named JOHN HART, living with Mr John Mills, of Bradbury Farm, on Tuesday last was taking his pair of horses from a field, when the hindermost horse hit the leading one, which caused the leader to kick violently, and unfortunately the poor little fellow in attendance met with a severe blow in the abdomen. Dr Riccard was soon in attendance, but the injury proved fatal, and on Friday an Inquest was held on the body, by R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when a verdict was returned in accordance with the circumstance above detailed.

Thursday, 27 April 1854, Issue 4596 – Gale Document No. Y3200688791
PAINGTON – On Thursday an Inquest was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., on the body of a boy thirteen years of age, a son of MR MUDGE, of the Victoria Inn. The house was destroyed by fire on Tuesday last, and the deceased attempted to escape through a window, in doing which he was frightfully burnt. In the course of the afternoon he died. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 11 May 1854, Issue 4598 – Gale Document No. Y3200688878
IDE – JOHN AVERY, a pensioner living at Ide, committed suicide on Monday, by hanging himself near the stairs in his house. He was discovered by his wife. The deceased has frequently shown symptoms of derangement, and thoughts have been entertained of sending him to the asylum. The Coroner for the district was, of course, at once communicated with; but we understand that the Inquest does not take place till tomorrow (Thursday).

Thursday, 18 May 1854, Issue 4599 – Gale Document No. Y3200688902
EXETER – Inquest. – On Tuesday morning an Inquest was held by H. W. Hooper, Esq., at the George and Dragon Inn, Black-boy-road, on the body of SARAH JANE LAMMACRAFT, a child ten weeks old whose parents are labourers, living in Clarence Place. On Monday morning the child was left in bed by the mother, and appeared to be as well as usual. A fit appears to have come on in her absence, and on returning to the room in about half an hour she found her infant dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 1 June 1854, Issue 4600 – Gale Document No. Y3200688975
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest on Monday last the Lamb Inn, in this town, on the body of MR WILLIAM JONES, a farmer, residing at West Buckland. It appears that the deceased, who is 65 years of age, was on his way to the Barnstaple market on Friday last, with a horse and cart, and on passing a timber wagon near Mr Incledon's lodge, which is about a mile and a half from this town, the horse became somewhat unmanageable. The cart had passed the wagon, but the horse still exhibited freshness, and ultimately one of the wheels went up over the hedge. The deceased was thrown from the cart, and the other wheel passed over him. He was immediately taken up and conveyed to a neighbouring cottage, but was eventually removed to the Lamb Inn. The deceased was attended by Dr Budd, but the serious injuries he had received rendered medical skill unavailable, and he died on Sunday night. No blame seems to be attached to anyone, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY – Supposed Suicide. – On Friday afternoon HARRIET SNELL, a woman residing at Tor died, it is supposed, from the effects of arsenic. She purchased arsenic from Mr Murch, chemist, of Tor, on Thursday evening, which she said was for the purpose of destroying rats. Early the next morning she was taken with violent vomiting, and continued to be very ill till the afternoon, when she died. An Inquest was commenced on Monday afternoon, and adjourned for the production of further evidence.

Thursday, 1 June 1854, Issue 4600 – Gale Document No. Y3200688981
EXETER – Melancholy and Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Old Teignmouth Inn, in the Wet Quarter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM FEWINGS, who had met his death under the following circumstances. It appears that the deceased, who is 33 years of age, was in the employ of Mr Northam, who has a mill, which is worked by water power, in Ewing's Lane. The work he had to perform was grinding charcoal, and the place where he had to stand was several yards from the spot where the accident occurred, and where he was found by a man named Wingfield, who had been attracted by his cries for help. When this witness arrived the unfortunate man was found to be entangled in the machinery which was going at a fearful rate and grinding the poor fellow in a frightful manner. All his efforts to stop it were unavailing, and it was several minutes before he received any assistance. A man named Langworthy then came in, by whose aid the mill was stopped, and the deceased was extricated, when he was found to be quite dead. The circumstance of his being in that place cannot be accounted for, except on the supposition, that he incautiously attempted to alter some of the works, while the mill was in motion, and, slipping his foot was dragged in by the wheels. This is a most distressing case, and deserves the consideration of the benevolent, the deceased having left a wife and three young children totally unprovided for. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Charge of Manslaughter. – On Monday evening, the Coroner for this city, H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, Coombe-street, on the body of ELIZABETH GULLY BEALEY, a girl four years old, who was driven over in Coombe-street, on the preceding Monday, and died on Saturday from the injuries sustained. Mr Willesford attended to watch the case. On the day of the accident, the deceased returned from school at five o'clock and went out into the street shortly after in company with two cousins, one of whom was a little older than herself, and the other younger. At about half-past five, Samuel Godbear, a fish dealer, employed by Mr Sprague, of Crediton, drove a cart down the street. He had reins and was said to be driving at the rate of about eight miles an hour. The three little girls attempted to cross the road. One of them passed over, and another was pulled back by a woman who was passing by, but the deceased, who was the middle one, was knocked down on her back, by the fore legs of the horse. She was then turned over on her face by the hind legs, and one of the wheels of the cart passed over the lower part of her head. She was taken up insensible by Mr Ackland, bookbinder, of Coombe-street, who carried her home. Godbear attempted to pull up his horse before he came up to the children, but could not do so. He stopped a minute or two after the child had been taken up, and then drove on again. It was stated by one of the witnesses that he was half drunk. About an hour afterwards he went to the police station, and was then evidently in a state of intoxication. He asked Mr Steel some questions about the Militia; and on giving his name, Mr Steel told him that he had sent a policeman after him as he had driven over a child in Coombe-street. He said, "I did see a child in Coombe-street, and the wheels passed very near it; but whether they went over it I do not know." Mr Steel then said he was driving at a furious rate, and he said he was not; he was only going at a smart trot. Mr Steel told him he was the worse for liquor; but he said he was quite sober, and had only taken three half pints. He was detained in custody. In the mean time the assistance of Mr John S. Perkins, , surgeon, was obtained, who attended the deceased till her death. For a day or two she recovered her consciousness, but on Friday she became much worse; convulsions supervened, and on the following day she died. Mr Perkins made a post mortem examination of the head, and observed among other injuries that there was an oblique fracture of the temporal bone, extending about two inches backwards to the parietal bone and dividing an artery, and that the sutures of the os frontis and sphenoid bone were entirely separated. He attributed death to a fracture of the sides and base of the skull. The Coroner lucidly summed up the evidence and pointed out the law relating to the case. If the driver of a cart or carriage, drove over and killed another – if he saw, and had timely notice of the danger but yet drove on it was murder, if he might have seen but neglected to look around him or before him, it was manslaughter for want of due care and circumspection; but if an accident happened, and no want of care could be imputed to the driver, it was accidental death, and the man would be excused. The question for the Jury was, whether or not there was due care exercised; and he was bound to tell them that he did not think there had been proper care taken. It was pretty evident that the man was in a state in which he was quite unfit to be entrusted with the driving of a cart, and eight miles an hour was a rate at which he was not justified in passing through a crowded street. If it was their opinion that there was a want of due care and circumspection, it would be their duty to find a verdict of manslaughter; but if not their verdict must be accidental death. The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Godbear, and the Coroner issued his warrant of committal to the Assizes.

Thursday, 8 June 1854, Issue 4601 – Gale Document No. Y3200689038
EXETER – Accident on the North Devon Railway. – On Thursday afternoon the Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of RICHARD DOCKETT, a labourer living at Lapford. The deceased was employed by the contractors for the North Devon Railway, and on the 9th May, was filling some trucks in a cutting. While standing near one of the trucks a quantity of soil fell on him driving him with his back against one of the wheels. There were 12 other men at work near him, who narrowly escaped. He was conveyed to the Hospital, where he died on Wednesday morning. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Edye, who found that the lower part of the back was broken. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Sudden Death – Mr Hooper, held an Inquest on Saturday morning at the Barnstaple Inn, North Street, on ELIZABETH LANDRAY, an old woman, 78 years of age, who occupied one of the almshouses in Northernhay Street. It appeared that she had a fancy to live alone, and would not allow even her grand-children to be with her, although her son had repeatedly desired that one of them might remain there to take care of her. On Friday at about one o'clock she called on a neighbour, named Butt, and asked her to take her pay, stating that she was going to bed. The next morning shortly after eight o'clock Butt heard the noise of a fall, in her house, and on going outside to see what was the matter, found that the window shutters were up and the doors locked. She looked through the key hole, and saw the deceased lying on the floor. In the meantime, a number of persons collected, but some doubt was entertained whether they were justified in breaking open the door, and they waited till about nine o'clock, when Mr W. Rawling passed by, and having obtained a poker effected a forcible entrance. The old woman was quite dead, and a basket of sticks was lying by her side, with which it was supposed she was about to light the fire. Mr Warren, surgeon, attributed death to apoplexy. Verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

Frightful Accident – A shocking accident occurred on Thursday, occasioning the instant death of a boy named JAMES TAPSON, employed by Mr Hitchcock, carrier, of this city. One of Mr Hitchcock's men, named Channing, was driving a wagon from the railway station between twelve and one o'clock, containing two cases of glass for Mr Thoms, oil and colourman, of High-street. The cases, which were about six feet high by eight in length, and weighed together more than two tons, were placed one on each side of the wagon, and were roped over several times, tied together at the top and roped to keep them steady. TAPSON was sitting in the back of the wagon. Just after passing the corner, on St. David's Hill, leading into the New North Road, the wagon turned over. The poor boy screamed out, and a man named Northam, who was driving a wagon behind, ran up and caught hold of him, but was unable to rescue him. He was thrown to the ground, and one of the cases fell on him, covering his head, and a great part of his body. The head was completely crushed, and the ribs and collar bones broken. He was taken to the Hospital, but life was extinct. On Friday morning an Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., at the Valiant Soldier Inn, when the Jury unanimously expressed their opinion that every precaution had been taken, and found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Inquest – On Saturday morning an Inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner, J. Gidley, Esq., at the Valiant Soldier Inn, to enquire into the death of JAMES TIDBALL, a waggoner, employed by Mr Manley, miller of Exwick. The deceased was driving a wagon laden with wheat on the 7th April, and sitting on the shafts. In attempting to jump off to attend to the horses he fell, and the wheels passed over his legs, one of which was broken, and the other seriously hurt. He was taken to the Hospital where he died. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Melancholy and Fatal Accident – On Saturday afternoon, JOHN TUCKER, a pupil at the Exeter Grammar School, was drowned near Double Lock. He was taking a walk with three schoolfellows along the banks of the Canal; near Double Lock there was a small Portuguese vessel passing up the Canal, and they turned back some distance for the purpose of seeing the vessel pass the drawbridge. After it had passed they were desired to assist in shutting the bridge, and the deceased with two of his companions commenced pushing it vigorously, while the other worked at the handle. The bridge moved more quickly than they appeared to expect, and the deceased lost his footing and fell into the water. A boat was sent out by the vessel, and every effort was made to save him but without success. Drags were then procured, and the body was taken up perfectly dead. An Inquest was held on Monday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday, 22 June 1854, Issue 4603 – Gale Document No. Y3200689119
Caution to Farm Labourers – A frightful accident, which terminated fatally, occurred to GEORGE PACKER, a lad 16 years of age, who was in the employ of Mr Samuel Daw, farmer, of Cadbury, on Saturday last. The deceased, who had been rolling one of his master's fields with two horses, stopped near the hedge opposite the gate to clear the roller; and in doing so he got between the horses, which were working side by side, and the roller, when the animals, which were rather spirited, ran off at a furious pace down a narrow road towards the farm. The poor lad was dragged upwards of a quarter of a mile. The horses ultimately freed themselves, when PACKER was left on the road in a very mutilated state. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he expired in a few hours. On Tuesday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday, 29 June 1854, Issue 4604 – Gale Document No. Y3200689151
Fatal Accident – On Tuesday morning, a girl, named LANG, of Coleridge, about thirteen years of age, died at the Hospital, from the effects of an accident which happened on the 9th inst. It appears that a gun had been placed in a corner of a room in which the deceased was, and which was loaded with a somewhat singular charge – a marble. By some accident, the gun fell, and the marble was lodged in her foot. An Inquest was appointed to be held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, today.

Thursday, 6 July 1854, Issue 4605 – Gale Document No. Y3200689199
Inquest – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Thursday, before H. D. Barton, Esq., in the absence of the Coroner, on the body of ELIZA MOGRIDGE, a woman 36 years of age. The deceased resided at Crediton, and on Sunday last as she was about to place something on the fire, she was seized with a fit, to attacks of which she has been subjected for many years. She fell over the grate was burnt in a frightful manner. She was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital where she expired on Tuesday morning. – Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 13 July 1854, Issue 4606 – Gale Document No. Y3200689236
Inquest – On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Topsham barracks, on the body of a man named MORRO, who died suddenly. The evidence tended to show that death was occasioned by apoplexy, and a verdict was returned accordingly. The funeral took place at Heavitree on Monday, with military honours.

Thursday, 13 July 1854, Issue 4606 – Gale Document No. Y3200689215
TORQUAY – Inquest. – On Tuesday evening last an Inquest was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., at the Golden Lion Inn, on the body of a boy named NORTHCOTE, who met with an accident while at play in Temperance-street last week. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 20 July 1854, Issue 4607 – Gale Document No. Y3200689276
WELLS – Manslaughter. – We are sorry to say that a deplorable case of this nature has taken place in this city. It appears that on Thursday last, JOHN KERRIDGE, a workman employed by Mr G. Bevan, cabinet maker, and who formerly carried on business at Exeter, had been absent from his workshop for some time, and on returning found that a hole had been cut in his straw hat. There were two workmen and an apprentice boy, named Brooks, present at the time; and on the circumstance being mentioned, the boy laughed. This led KERRIDGE to suppose that he had done the mischief, and the boy being standing on his bench he pushed him away. The boy fell, but immediately got up and threw a large piece of mahogany at KERRIDGE, striking him a tremendous blow in the temples. Surgical aid was called in, but the unfortunate man never spoke again, and died in the course of the evening. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday before Bridges Fry, Esq., and the Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against William Henry Brooks, who was committed under the Coroner's warrant to the county gaol, to await the next Wells assizes. The deceased bore a very peaceable and quiet character, and has left at Exeter a widow and four children to lament his untimely end.

Thursday, 20 July 1854, Issue 4607 – Gale Document No. Y3200689257
BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – A Coroner's inquisition was held on Wednesday last by Mr Incledon Bencraft, on the body of MRS HODGE, who died suddenly that morning. It appears that the deceased, who was forty years of age, left her residence in Cross-street, in this borough, at half-past six o'clock in the morning, for the purpose of getting some corn ground. She carried her infant with her, and was accompanied by a servant. At the expiration of half-an-hour the unfortunate woman returned, and she then complained of a pain in her heart. Her appearance altogether created some apprehensions, and a surgeon was instantly sent for; but, although the medical gentleman was quickly in attendance, he was too late to be of any avail. Apoplexy was thought to be the cause of death, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday, 27 July 1854, Issue 4608 – Gale Document No. Y3200689309
EXETER – On Tuesday, ROBERT ALLEN, a boy about fourteen years of age, the son of MR J. ALLEN, of St. George's Place, Black Boy Road, was drowned in the river, near the railway station. He attended Hele's School, and after leaving there in the morning, went to bathe with five other boys. Unhappily he got out of his depth and sank. A man standing by, but being unable to swim, did not attempt to rescue him. The body was taken from the water dead, and removed to the Red Cow Inn, to await an Inquest.

Thursday, 27 July 1854, Issue 4608 – Gale Document No. Y3200689291
TIVERTON – Fatal Accident. – On Monday last, as a labouring man named JOHNS, between 60 and 70 years of age, was engaged at work, on a roof at Warnicombe House, about two miles from the town, he suddenly fell to the ground, about thirty feet in height, and dislocated his neck. The poor fellow instantly expired; and was conveyed to his home to await a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday, 3 August 1854, Issue 4608 – Gale Document No. Y3200689337
TIVERTON – Fatal Accident. – On Wednesday last an Inquest was held on the body of JAMES JOHNS, a labouring man employed at Higher Warnicombe. It appeared that on the previous Monday deceased was employed in carrying slates to the workmen at the top of the roof, and when at the third batten of the roof he attempted to change position and catch the fifth batten, which he unfortunately missed, and fell off the height of 21 feet, causing dislocation of the neck. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday, 24 August 1854, Issue 4611 – Gale Document No. Y3200689495
EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. – On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Greyhound Inn, Paris-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of an infant, of which a young woman, named ELIZABETH PAYNTER, a servant to Mrs Pizey, of Regent's Park, Heavitree, was the mother. It appeared that PAYNTER was confined on Wednesday morning; when Mrs Pizey came down, she complained of being unwell, and said that she should like to see a doctor, as she had a pain in her side. Her mistress recommended her to do so, and she put on her shawl and got ready. When she came down stairs, she confessed that she had had a miscarriage in the night. Her mistress then paid her her wages, and she walked to Exeter, where she stayed at the house of a friend in Paris-street. She was visited by M. Warren and Mr Webb, surgeons, who found her in an extremely weak state from having walked so far. The Coroner strongly condemned the conduct of Mrs Pizey, in allowing the girl to walk to Exeter, after having been told that she had been confined. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Thursday, 24 August 1854, Issue 4611 – Gale Document No. Y3200689474
TORQUAY – Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Friday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a newly-born female child, the illegitimate offspring of LYDIA RIDGWAY, a servant to Mrs Jullien, of Cary Parade. Jane Turner, a fellow servant, stated that on the 11st instant, RIDGWAY appeared poorly on going to bed, and she asked whether she should send for a doctor, or call Mrs Jullien; but RIDGWAY would not consent to her doing so. On going down stairs witness thought she heard a child crying, and called Mrs Jullien, who went into the room and found that RIDGWAY had been delivered. She had mentioned a week before that she was enceinte; but the witness could not think from her appearance that she would be delivered so soon. The body of the child was found in the room. The Jury found a verdict that the child was born alive, and came to its death from want of proper treatment.

HONITON – On Thursday evening last, as MR LONG, baker of this town, was returning from Wellington, by way of Offwell, he was thrown from his horse and fractured his skull. Mr Mansfield of Honiton, happened to pass soon after the accident occurred, saw him lying on his back, senseless, in the middle of the road, bleeding profusely. He immediately procured assistance and took him to an Inn at Offwell, a short distance; he died before medical aid could arrive. An Inquest was held the day following, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 7 September 1854, Issue 4613 – Gale Document No. Y3200689560
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – On Sunday, a lad named DENHAM, residing in St. Thomas, was drowned while bathing in the river Exe, near the railway station. The body was conveyed to the Lamb Inn, Exwick, where an Inquest has been held and a verdict returned in accordance with the circumstances.

Thursday, 14 September 1854, Issue 5613 – Gale Document No. Y3200689610
EXETER – Inquest. – On Thursday an Inquest was held by H. W. Hooper, Esq., at the Acland Arms Inn, St. Sidwell's, on the body of THOMAS LEAR, a child two years of age. The father of the deceased is a workman employed by Mr James Rew, tanner, of Lion's Holt, and on Wednesday afternoon he observed the child at about five o'clock, walking in the yard, near some of the tan pits. An hour afterwards he was found drowned in one of the pits. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 21 September 1854, Issue 5614 – Gale Document No. Y3200689630
BIDEFORD – Coroner's Inquest. – On Wednesday, the 13th instant, an Inquest was held at the Torridge Inn, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM DAVEY, a youth aged about 18 years, who was found drowned in the river. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday, 28 September 1854, Issue 5615 – Gale Document No. Y3200689664
EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn this morning, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of SAMUEL GILPIN, a servant employed by Mr Barber, of Ashton, who, while opening a gage, about a fortnight since, ran a nail into his knee. At first he appeared not to be much injured, but after the lapse of a day or two it was found necessary to remove him to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday, 5 October 1854, Issue 6615 – Gale Document No. Y3200689701
EXETER – Sudden Death. – The Coroner for this city, H. W. Hooper, Esq., held at Inquest at the Globe Inn, Newtown, on Monday afternoon, to inquire into the death of CHARLES SKIVENS, a man sixty two years of age, who lived in Clifton street. On Sunday the deceased was in good health, attended St. Sidwell's church twice and ate a hearty dinner. He went to bed at about ten o'clock, and within a few minutes afterwards his wife heard him groaning heavily. She asked him what was the matter, but he made no reply. He was then lifted up in bed and assistance was obtained; but before 11 o'clock he died. The deceased had an attack of paralysis some years ago. A verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 19 October 1854, Issue 5618 – Gale Document No. Y3200689769
Melancholy Death – An Inquest was held on Saturday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CLEMENT GRIFFIN, a young man about 17 years of age, who was found dead on Friday morning on board the "Thetis," a collier, belonging to Mr Hawkins, of St. Thomas, lying at the Exeter Basin. On Thursday night the vessel was fumigated for the purpose of destroying rats, and in consequence the men slept on shore. The deceased was an apprentice on board another vessel, belonging to Mr Hawkins – the "Rachel," – and had been informed of the circumstance. It is supposed that he forgot the caution, and for some reason went on board the vessel for a night's rest. – Verdict, "Found Dead."

Thursday, 9 November 1854, Issue 5621 – Gale Document No. Y3200689873
TOTNES – Fatal Accident.- On Saturday morning last, about 7 o'clock, as the down goods train was passing the incline near Littlehempston, the engine driver perceived a man, called THOMAS HAWKINS, one of the workmen, on the line of rails on which the train was running; he blew his whistle, but before the train could be stopped, the engine caught the head of the man, and nearly smashed it to pieces. The body was taken to Littlehempston, and an Inquest was held the same day before W. A. Cockey, Esq., when it was adjourned until Thursday next, to obtain the evidence of the engine driver and stoker.

Thursday, 16 November 1854, Issue 5622 – Gale Document No. Y3200689925
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – The Coroner of this city H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest on Friday at the King Alfred Inn, on the person of a child four years old, named JAMES GEORGE GILL, the son of a mason in Smythen Street. The child was at play with some other boys on the 10th October. He returned home with his face cut, and said that a boy named Troake had pushed him down. At first the injury was not thought very serious; but in two or three weeks it assumed a more alarming aspect; and medical aid was called in, but without avail. A play fellow of the deceased said, that Troake went to lie down on a grating, for the purpose of picking something up, GILL ran towards him to see what he was taking, and fell over his legs on his face and hands, striking his forehead. The verdict was "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 23 November 1854, Issue 54623 – Gale Document No. Y3200689946
Shocking Suicide – A young man named WILLIAM FORD, second son of MR GEORGE FORD, of Afton Farm, Berry Pomeroy, near Totnes, committed suicide under very distressing circumstances a few days ago. It appeared that he carried on business in conjunction with his brother, and that latterly he had been much depressed in spirits. He was consequently humoured in every way by his mother and brother, who did everything that a mother and brother's love could devise. He was closely watched, as it was feared he might lay violent hands on himself. He got up on Saturday morning and went downstairs with his brother, when they arranged what each one's work should be for the day. The deceased went into the dairy, and shortly afterwards his brother was shocked at hearing the report of a gun. On going to the spot he found his brother weltering in his blood. From the position of the body and the gun, it is believed that the deceased had placed the butt-end against the wall and reached forward to push the trigger; so that, the muzzle of the gun having been placed against his breast, the contents were driven with terrific force through the chest, thereby causing instant death. An Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Thursday, 7 December 1854, Issue 5625 – Gale Document No. BC3200690026
EXETER – Inquest. – On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young man named WILLIAM PRIOR, who whilst working at the residence of the Rev. Mr Arundell, at Brampford Speke on Friday, the 24th of November, accidentally fell from a ladder and injured the spine of his back, and from which he died on Sunday last. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Sudden Death – On Tuesday, JUDITH ACKRELL, a cook employed by Major Huish, of Mount Radford, died in a very sudden manner. She was in her usual health on the morning of that day. An Inquest was being held by H. W. Hooper, Esq., when we went to press.

Thursday, 7 December 1854, Issue 5625 – Gale Document No. BC3200690022
ASHBURTON – A most distressing case occurred on Tuesday last, about three o'clock in the afternoon. In Cad-lane an old woman resided in a room by herself, and on a neighbour opening the door the room was full of smoke. An alarm was made; and on entering, near the fireplace the poor old creature was found to be on fire, and quite dead, lying on the floor. Her name was SARAH CATER. An Inquest will be held on the remains. She was seen about two o'clock, all well, sitting by the fire.

Thursday, 14 December 1854, Issue 5626 – Gale Document No. Y3200690060
Death from Drowning – We stated, two or three weeks since, that a person named LEE, a tripe boiler, of Exe-street, had been missed from his house. He went to Exwick on Friday, the 10th November, and was there observed in a state of great intoxication. the following Sunday his basket was found in the river and his hat was also subsequently found. The search was continued till Friday last when the body was discovered in the Exe, near the Bonhay. On the same day, an Inquest was commenced at the Paper Maker's Arms Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., which was adjourned till Saturday. There were two lacerated wounds in the head; but the surgeon, Mr Warren, satisfactorily explained that they were occasioned after death. In one of his pockets were a purse and a few pence. The verdict was "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 21 December 1854, Issue 4627 – Gale Document No. BC3200690085
EXETER – Sudden Death. – Mr Hooper, the Coroner for this city, held an Inquest at the Fireman's Arms Inn, West-street, on Monday evening, to inquire into the circumstances of the death of SARAH SIMMONS, an old woman of Preston-street. The deceased who was 71 years of age, was found in her room, lying dead on her face and hands, on Sunday night, at about eight o'clock. She was previously to all appearances in tolerable health. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 28 December 1854, Issue 4628 – Gale Document No. Y3200690125
EXETER – Inquest. – We mentioned last week that a lad, named HILL, had met with his death in consequence of an accident which happened to him in taking a horse belonging to Mr Bartrum, to a field, near his father's house in St. Thomas. An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Wednesday afternoon, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., when, from the evidence of JAMES HILL, the father of the deceased, it appeared that he went in search of his son at about twelve o'clock on Thursday night, and that he called up Discombe, the keeper of the turnpike-gate at St. Thomas, for the purpose of making enquiries; but the latter said he had heard nothing pass, and commenced abusing him and using expressions of the most disgusting kind. The Coroner very strongly condemned Discombe's conduct, as most reprehensible and unfeeling; and observed that the horse having ran away on Exe Bridge he ought to have known at what time it passed the gate. the Jury expressed their entire concurrence in the remark. The verdict was "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 4 January 1855, Issue 4629 – Gale Document No. Y3200690162
OTTERY ST. MARY – Melancholy Accident. – It is with feelings of deep regret that we have this week to record the death of MR JAS. YELVERTON, of Nutcombe, near Ottery, under circumstances of a very distressing nature. It appears that on Monday morning he intended to join a party of friends in rabbit shooting, and whilst breakfast was preparing, he took his double-barrelled gun to the front of the house to discharge it, as was his custom when it had not been used for some days. The report of a gun was heard, but no immediate notice was taken of that: in a very short time, however, he was found by his servant lying on the ground before the door quite motionless. An alarm was at once given, and it was found that MR YELVERTON was dead. Shot from the gun carried away one side of the face, and passed directly through the head; so that his death must have been instantaneous. As no one witnessed this sad accident, the real cause of it must ever remain a mystery; it is, however, very probable that on bringing the butt end of the gun suddenly and with some force to the ground, an explosion of the contents of one of the barrels took place. This sad event has occasioned great distress of mind to the relatives and immediate friends of the deceased, particularly his brother, MR YELVERTON, of Venn Ottery, as between the two there always existed the strongest affection. It has also cast a gloom over the whole neighbourhood, for the deceased was well known in this part of the county and universally respected. At the Inquest held on Tuesday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday, 4 January 1855, Issue 4629 – Gale Document No. Y3200690165
EXETER – Melancholy Death. – On Wednesday, an Inquest was held at the Stowey Arms Inn, Exminster, on the body of a man named GLANVILLE. The deceased was a poacher, and formerly lived in West-street. He was found dead on Sunday in the Exminster lime kilns, where he is supposed to have gone for the purpose of sleeping. The verdict was "Found Dead."

Thursday, 18 January 1855, Issue 4631 – Gale Document No. Y3200690232
BIDEFORD – A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday, the 15th inst., before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHRISTOPHER GORRELL, who died from injuries sustained, on Friday morning last, whilst working on the Bideford extension railway. From the evidence of Henry Knight, a workman on the line, the deceased was driving a horse with two wagons to the trip, where Knight was unloading, when, on coming near the wagon at which witness was working, instead of leading his horse off the line before unhooking it from the wagon, he got between the buffers and was caught in the lower part of the bowels. From the medical testimony produced, it appeared that deceased died from the injuries sustained. A verdict was given of "Accidental Death". Deceased was about 53 years of age.

Thursday, 18 January 1855, Issue 4631 – Gale Document No. Y3200690233
TORQUAY – Coroner's Inquest. – An Inquest was held at Wolfinden's London Inn, on Saturday last, on the body of a child named JOHN VINCENT, about three years of age, whose death was caused by a kick from a horse about a week previously. It appears the parents of the deceased live in Swan-street; deceased was in the street at play when a horse belonging to Mr Abbot, a butcher, was passing on its way to the stable, when deceased touched him and received the kick which caused his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time stating the accident would not probably have occurred had proper care been taken by Mr Abbot, in taking the horse to the stable.

Thursday, 18 January 1855, Issue 4631 – Gale Document No. Y3200690236
EXETER – Child Burnt to Death. – On Tuesday the Coroner for this city, H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on a child four years of age named HANNAH EVANS. The deceased lived with her parents, who are labourers, on the Blackboy-road; and on Monday morning she was left by her mother in charge of a sister eight years old. The latter went upstairs for a few minutes, and, on her coming down, the deceased was standing close to the bars of the grate, with her clothes in flames. Assistance was called, and the fire was put out; but the poor child was frightfully burnt. When her mother returned the neighbours were conveying her to the Hospital, where she soon after died. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 22 February 1855, Issue 4636 – Gale Document No. Y3200690426
EXETER – Melancholy Death. – An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Black Horse Inn, Longbrook-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM ALLEN, a shoemaker, aged 63, who resided in Waterloo-place. It appeared that the deceased lodged with his son, and had lately had but little work. Last Sunday he said to his son – "Harry, I had but a poor Saturday night; I only earned a shilling, and that I was disappointed in receiving." His son assisted him as well as he could, but the poor man evidently had suffered great privations. On Wednesday morning he was found dead in bed, and Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, stated that, in his opinion, the deceased had died "of an apoplectic fit,, aided, no doubt, by want of sufficient nourishment and the extreme inclemency of the weather." A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday, 22 February 1855, Issue 4636 – Gale Document No. Y3200690412
ASHBURTON – An Inquest was held at Buckfastleigh, on Friday last, on the body of THOMAS WILCOCKS, carrier, who met his death by taking a loaded gun out of his wagon very incautiously. It went off and lodged the contents in his thigh. – Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 22 February 1855, Issue 4636 – Gale Document No. Y3200690415
EXETER – Inquest. – At the King's Arms, on Wednesday, before H. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, an Inquest was held on the body of ANN HARPER, 77 years of age, who died suddenly on the day previous. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Thursday, 1 March 1855, Issue 4637 – Gale Document No. Y3200690444
TIVERTON – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Thursday on the body of a labourer, named JAMES FRENCH. The deceased, with several others, was felling timber on an estate belonging to A. Brewer, Esq., when a lofty tree fell on him and killed him on the spot. Verdict "Accidental Death."

THELBRIDGE – Mysterious Death. – An Inquest was held at the Rising Sun Inn, in this parish, on the 19th inst., before R. R. Crosse, Esq., on the body of a labourer named COLES. On the previous evening the deceased attended a timber sale at the Rising Sun, where he drank some ale and some gin and ale, but he was not tipsy. About nine he left with the intention of going home; but he was not again seen till the following morning, when he was found quite dead and frozen to the ice, by the side of a hedge in the highway leading from Oakford to Witheridge. It appeared from marks in the snow, on which some blood was visible, that a scuffle had taken place, but no other footmarks than those of the deceased could be seen. Verdict "Found Dead."

Thursday, 8 March 1855, Issue 4638 – Gale Document No. Y3200690490
BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – On Monday, at Hearson's Court, an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN CLEMENT, shoemaker, aged 84 years. The deceased went to bed in perfect health on Sunday night, and the following morning was found by his wife quite dead. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

TORRINGTON – Fatal Accident. – On Saturday night a labouring man, of St. Giles, named JAMES ISAAC, about 44 years of age, while cutting off a limb from a tree, fell to the ground, and was so much injured that several hours elapsed before he was discovered; he was removed to his home, and medical aid obtained, but he expired on Monday morning. An Inquest is being held on the body.

Thursday, 15 March 1855, Issue 4639 – Gale Document No. Y3200690522
BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Red Lion Inn, in this town, on Monday last, before I. Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR J. D. R. WILMETS, a solicitor's clerk, aged 25 years. The deceased, who was lodging at the above inn, had been indisposed for some time; but on Saturday evening last he felt worse, and after taking some medicine, retired to bed. Nothing more was heard of him until three o'clock in the morning, when he aroused the landlord, who, according to his request, went to fetch a relative of his, who resided in the town. On their return they found the deceased lying on his back in his room quite dead. Mr Morgan, surgeon, considered that the deceased died from natural causes, and a verdict to that effect was accordingly given.

Thursday, 29 March 1855, Issue 4641 – Gale Document No. Y3200690584
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Thursday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS HARRIS, aged 63, a resident of the Red Cow village. The deceased, who had worked for Mrs Snow, at Belmont, for twenty years as gardener, attended his parish church, St. David's, on Wednesday, and appeared in good health during the day; but, on the following morning, symptoms of illness manifested themselves, and, before his wife could procure a doctor, he was a corpse. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 5 April 1855, Issue 4642 – Gale Document No. Y3200690606
EXETER – Suicide. – An Inquest was held at the Coach and Horses, St. Sidwells, on Wednesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARIA FOOTE, aged 48. The deceased had been for many years in the employ of Mr Blatch, a gentleman, recently deceased. At his death he left her £50; and a fellow servant, who had gone into his service only a few days before, £150. This disparity in the two legacies produced a great impression upon her, and she became much depressed. On Monday last, she took lodgings in the house of Mrs Fulford, of Twigg's court, St. Sidwell's, and it was arranged that she should sleep with a blind woman, Mrs Fulford's mother. She was seen preparing to go to bed, but on the family being roused by the blind woman's calling out "cook is not come to bed," they found that the unfortunate woman had hung herself with a handkerchief, which was suspended from a nail near the bed. Verdict "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday, 12 April 1855, Issue 4643 – Gale Document No. Y3200690643
EXETER – Death from Burning. – An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, at the Teignmouth Inn, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SARAH JANE BARTLETT, a child aged 5 years. The mother of the child, who resides in Cricklepit-street, Saint Mary Steps, on the 29th March last had left the house for a few minutes to fetch some water, and on her return found the child's clothes in flames, and her body much burnt, about the chest and arms. She was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she remained until the 6th April, and was then removed home by her parents, and died on the morning of Saturday the 7th. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Sad History of a Baby. – An Inquest was held at the Bull Inn, Goldsmith-street, before H. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday last, on the body of an emaciated infant, named JOHN NORMAN, the son of a cook who had come from Lidford. He was born at the house of Sarah Seward, of Heavitree, and afterwards confided to the care of a wet nurse, named Humphries, of the same place. He was subsequently taken to a woman named Escott, of Melbourne-street, who, after nursing him some time, declined to keep him any longer, as she could not get paid. He was very ill, and was taken to the house of Mrs Vile, of Westgate, who took care of him for a week, during which time Mr Calver, a surgeon, was called in; but Mrs Vile, not liking to become answerable to him for the payment of his bill, he discontinued his visits. He was then confided to the care of a woman named Whiting, who gave up her charge at a week's end, as she could see no prospect of being paid. He was next taken to a lodging-house, kept by a woman named Heard by his mother, who stayed there two days, and who, after complaining of being almost mad and quite penniless, was excused from paying her rent, and proceeded with him to the house of a Mrs Pottinger, in Paul-street, where he was left, and where he died on Tuesday the 3rd instant, of (in the opinion of Mr Cumming, surgeon) disease brought on by neglect. The mother had disappeared a day or two before her son's death, and has not since been heard of. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from natural causes; but expressed an opinion that the mother had been guilty of great culpable neglect.

Thursday, 3 May 1855, Issue 4646 – Gale Document No. Y3200690750
NEWTON ABBOT – Suicide. – On Wednesday an Inquest was held before A. Cockey, Esq., on the body of a woman named STEVENS, who committed suicide on Monday, in East-street, by hanging herself to a nail in her bedroom. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

ASHBURTON – Inquest. – On Thursday last, an Inquest was held, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., on the body of a young man named WILLIAM BUTCHERS, son of MR W. BUTCHERS, formerly of the Duke's Head Inn, who was drowned in the river Dart on the previous Tuesday. The deceased had gone to fish in the river, and it is supposed that he was seized with a fit, to which he was subject, and fell in the water. He was found under an archway of Holne-bridge. Verdict – "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 10 May 1855, Issue 4647 – Gale Document No. Y3200690786
BARNSTAPLE – An Inquest on the body of GEORGE COCKRAM, a child aged 4 years, was held by J. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the Union Public House, Derby, in this town, on Monday the 7th inst. From the evidence it appeared that in a garden belonging to Mr Miller, at the bottom of Princes'-street, Derby, there is a clay pit containing a quantity of stagnant water; this, of course is very offensive to the inhabitants, who are not a few, residing in that locality; but this is not all, as the pit, until very recently, has been very dangerous to children playing around and near it, from the fact of there being no fence. It also appeared from witnesses that a general dread was created in the breasts of parents both as regards their own health from such a nuisance and the danger it threatened to their children. And it really appeared they were quite justified, as the poor little fellow above-named was the seventh that had fallen into it within a comparatively short space of time, but, fortunately, the only one whose life was sacrificed. This fine little fellow, the son of poor parents, was seen in the water by a little girl on Sunday afternoon, about two o'clock, when she alarmed the nearest neighbour, Charles Ellis, who immediately went in and took the child out, but it was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The foreman then addressed the Coroner, and said that it was the unanimous opinion of the Jury that Mr Miller was not free from censure, as more than once representations had been made to him both as to the danger of the pit and the unhealthiness of its contents. Those complaints Mr Miller had but little heeded; for as to the fence it was literally nothing, being only about two feet high, and as to purify the water nothing had been done till the day after the accident, when some lime was thrown in and some tar put about the rails, a sufficient proof that the complaints, though coming from poor people, were but too well grounded.

Thursday, 10 May 1855, Issue 4647 – Gale Document No. Y3200690769
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held last evening at the Sawyer's Arms Inn, Preston-street, before Henry Wilcocks Hooper Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD LEAR, a labourer, residing in Preston-street. The deceased retired to rest about 12 o'clock on Saturday evening; shortly after which he groaned heavily, and before his wife could obtain assistance, he had ceased to exist. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 17 May 1855, Issue 4648 – Gale Document No. Y3200690821
BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – Distressing Suicide Of A Medical Assistant. – On Tuesday, the 8th inst., an Inquest was held at the Rolle's Arms Inn, in this town, before Robert Henry Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, to enquire as to the cause of death of FREDERICK JOHN SHEEHAN, a medical assistant, aged 33 years. The deceased was an assistant to Mr Walker, surgeon, of this town, and only came to him from London on the 27th April last; whilst with him he conducted himself in a very sober and steady manner, was diligent and attentive to his duties, and appeared to have given satisfaction to Mr Walker. On Sunday last, however, Mr Walker saw the deceased in his surgery between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and observing something peculiar in his manner, different from what he had before seen in him, he suspected the deceased had been drinking, but on asking what ailed him, he replied "Nothing." Mr Walker insisted upon the deceased going to bed, and he went upstairs, where he was found at about ten o'clock at night by Mr Walker's man, quite dead and cold. His face was of a deep purple colour, and froth was issuing from his mouth, but he had not been sick. From a strong smell of laudanum in the room, and coming also from the mouth of the deceased, Mr Walker, who had been called by the servant, suspected the deceased had destroyed himself, and immediately proceeded to his surgery, when he found the quantity of laudanum kept there slightly diminished. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased had destroyed himself by taking narcotic poison whilst in a fit of temporary insanity. The unfortunate man appears to have been in a very distressed circumstances previous to engaging with Mr Walker, and was barely supplied with clothing. On his person were found 3s. in money, and three pawnbrokers' duplicates for articles he had pledged in London.

Thursday, 24 May 1855, Issue 4649 – Gale Document No. Y3200690839
EXETER – Sudden Death of a Young Woman. – On Wednesday and Thursday last an Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., in the Black Horse Inn, Longbrook-street, on the body of a young woman, aged 23 years, named ELEANOR COSWAY CLARKE, who died somewhat suddenly after a miscarriage a day or two previously. A post mortem examination of the body was made by Mr J. S. Perkins, when it was found that she had died from internal inflammation, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death" accordingly. In the course of the investigation it came out that the female attendant of the deceased was not in the habit of informing the registrar of the birth of any still-born child, a practice which the Coroner and Jury censured, as unsafe and objectionable. the foreman of the Jury also took occasion to state his opinion, founded on personal observation, that the Coroner held no Inquest which was not warranted and necessary.

INQUEST AT EXWICK. – On Saturday an Inquest was held in the Buller's Arms, Exwick, before the County Coroner, on the body of a child about nine years of age, alleged to have died in consequence of injuries received by the wheels of a wagon passing over it about ten weeks since. It appears that on the day of the accident a number of farm labourers were returning from Stoke Canon, in charge of wagon loads of turnips; on their way they commenced making fun or joking one with the other after their own fashion; one of them, Stead, to call the attention of the father of the child, SANDERS, was in the act of touching him with his whip doubled, when it caught, or was caught by the child who was in the wagon with his father, causing him to over balance and fall beneath the wheels of the vehicle. From that time the child gradually sunk till the period of his death, with the Jury were unanimous in considering as Accidental.

Thursday, 7 June 1855, Issue 4651 – Gale Document No. Y3200690928
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday, the 4th inst., on the body of GEORGE SELDON, ostler at the Golden Lion Hotel, in this town. The deceased was in the stables on Sunday evening last; attending to his duties, when he received a kick in the side from one of the horses; another man in the stables then laid him on some straw and sent for Mr A. Dene, surgeon, who was immediately on the spot, but the injuries received had caused almost instantaneous death.

Thursday, 14 June 1855, Issue 4652 – Gale Document No. Y3200690944
EXETER – Sudden Death of a Child. – An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the Fountain Inn, on the Quay, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of GEORGE THOMAS PILLAR NORTON, a child aged about 8 months. The deceased had been put to bed in good health on Saturday night, but was found dead on the following morning, having been suddenly seized with spasm of the heart. – Verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 21 June 1855, Issue 4653 – Gale Document No. Y3200690988
EXETER – Awfully Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Monday at the Turk's Head Inn, High-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of JOHN SERCOMBE, brewer, Pancras-lane, in this city. The deceased, a man about fifty years of age, after partaking of a hearty supper on Sunday evening, was sitting by his fireside smoking a pipe, when, not a minute after he had spoken to one of his children, who were retiring to bed, the pipe was observed to fall from his mouth, and he fell back in his chair as a dead man. Mr F. H. Warren, surgeon, was immediately sent for, and arrived as the pulse ceased to beat – the cause of death being disease of the hart, to which the deceased was known to be liable. The Jury, in accordance with the facts, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

The body of the unfortunate lad, ALFRED MELHUISH, who was drowned last week at Trew's Weir, has, after a lengthened search, been recovered. The accident having occurred beyond the bounds of city, the Inquest takes place before the County Coroner.

Thursday, 28 June 1855, Issue 4654 – Gale Document No. Y3200691013
EXETER – The Late Accident at Trew's Weir. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday evening last, at the Artillery Inn, Holloway-street, on the body of the lad, MELHUISH, who met his death by drowning on Tuesday week. The accident having occurred beyond the bounds of the city, the Inquest, by proper rights, should have been held before the County Coroner, but the body having been carried into the city by mistake, the investigation took place before Mr Hooper. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, while fishing at Trew's weir, attempted to cross the weir, the water at the time running rapidly down, but when about midway over was carried off his feet, rolled into the river, and soon sunk in deep water. Mr Middleweek, baker, who was on the weir at the time, observed the accident, but from the depth and rapidity of the current was unable to render the poor lad any assistance. Mr Ebbles, who was not far distant, having his attention drawn to the boy's cap floating past, jumped in after it, but the body of the lad could not be seen, and was not found till the following Sunday, when it was discovered by a man named Dennis near the Old Abbey. A full investigation of the circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and entirely exonerated Mr Middleweek from any blame in the matter, he having done all that was possible to prevent the sad contingency.

Thursday, 19 July 1855, Issue 4657 – Gale Document No. Y3200691138
TIVERTON – An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, on Thursday, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a boy named FRANK POSLET, who met his death on the previous day by falling into a pit filled with muddy water. The pit in question was situated in a yard belonging to Mr John Davey, butcher, a portion of it only being railed off. The gate leading to the yard being open, the child, who was about 22 months old, strayed in, fell into the pit and was drowned. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday, 19 July 1855, Issue 4657 – Gale Document No. Y3200691128
EXETER – Suicide. – An elderly resident of Garden-square, North-street, named MATTHEW FROST, who cut his throat on Monday week, died on Saturday last. The deceased had been in a weak state of health for some time. An Inquest will be held today (Wednesday) before the city Coroner.

Thursday, 26 July 1855, Issue 4658 – Gale Document No. BC3200691163
ASHBURTON – An Inquest was held at Stretchaford Farm, Staverton, last week, on the body of THOMAS LIDSTONE, of Buckfastleigh, who met his death by the upsetting of a cart. The deceased was riding in a cart on the road, midway between Totnes and Ashburton, when the horse attached to it took fright and ran away. The cart came in contact with another cart and was upset; hence the accident. Verdict – "Accidental Death." The deceased has left a wife and three children.

Thursday
26 July 1855, Issue 4658 – Gale Document No. BC3200691153
EXETER – At the Inquest last week on the body of MATTHEW FROST, cabinet maker, the verdict was that the deceased had died from disease of the brain accelerated by the wound inflicted on himself whilst out of his mind and delirious.

Thursday, 9 August 1855, Issue 4660 – Gale Document No. Y3200691239
BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – Manslaughter. – An Inquest was held in this town on Wednesday last, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a woman named SUSAN MANN. It appeared that on the preceding Saturday the deceased, who was much respected in the neighbourhood, and who acted as charwoman, was working at Captain Reed's house, when she received a blow in the side from one of the Captain's domestic servants, a girl named Eliza Moggeridge, who was intoxicated at the time. The blow at first produced insensibility, and, notwithstanding every attention was shown her, the unfortunate woman died on the subsequent Monday. The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Moggeridge, and she has been lodged in the county gaol to await her trial at the forthcoming assizes.

Thursday, 9 August 1855, Issue 4660 – Gale Document No. Y3200691237
Shocking Case of Wife Murder in North Devon.
The scene of the present tragedy is the parish of Northam, situate about two and twelve miles respectively from the seaports of Bideford and Barnstaple; the victim, a middle-aged married woman; and the culprit, her own husband, a labouring man named ROBERT HANCOCK, who now lies a prisoner in the County Jail to await his trial for the crime of Wilful Murder at the next Assizes. From what transpired at an Inquest held upon the body of the murdered woman on Friday last before the local Coroner, R. Bremridge, Esq., and according to the story told by the misguided man – for he has already made a full confession of his guilt – it appears that the parties, who were both about forty years of age, had been married for a period of fifteen years, during which time they had up till recently lived happily together; the change in the conduct of the husband taking rise from a feeling of jealousy, for which, however, the neighbours say, there were not the slightest grounds. Their family, consisting of two children, a boy and a girl, being both in service, the deceased and her murderer were, consequently, of late the sole occupants of the house in which they resided, save a little girl about two years of age, to whom they acted the part of guardians. And to this child it is that the early discovery of the murder is due. Hearing it crying unceasingly for some hours on the forenoon of Thursday, a woman living in the immediate neighbourhood proceeded to the house, when she found the little creature the only visible inmate. Supposing, however, that one or other might be in the upper parts of the premises, she called the deceased by name, but, for the best of reasons, received no answer, and on proceeding upstairs she was horrified by the spectacle of her inanimate and mutilated body lying stretched upon the bed. Making her way down stairs as she was best able, she communicated an immediate alarm of the circumstances to others of the neighbours, who, on accompanying her to the bedroom, found the body lying as she had described, in a pool of blood which had oozed forth from wounds in the head, and a frightful gash across the throat. Satiated with the sickening scene, their first thought was to seek to apprise the husband with what they had beheld, but nowhere could he be found; and it was not until the assistance of the parish constable and the superintendent of the Bideford police had been obtained, that he was discovered secreted in a barn at no great distance from the scene of the atrocity. Offering no resistance, he was taken into custody on suspicion, and after some questioning, freely confessed himself the murderer, stating, as his version of the circumstances under which the foul deed was committed, that on the evening previous – Wednesday, the 1st inst., - both he and the deceased, after returning fatigued from Appledore, where they had been making purchases for one of their children, were about to retire for the night, when some angry words passed, eventuating in deceased telling him that he should not come to bed. She persisting in saying so, he went down stairs again, lit his pipe, and for some time stood smoking and talking to one of his acquaintances. On his return up stairs, he again asked his wife, who had by that time retired, if he was to be allowed his rest, but she again answered – No. Proceeding a second time down stairs he returned with a hammer and a razor, and going to the bed struck the deceased a slight blow on the head with the hammer. Upon that she implored him not to kill her, promising never to behave so again; but, as he says, seeing some blood coming from the wound, he thought "that having gone so far, he might as well finish her." He accordingly gave her a second and harder blow with the hammer upon the head, and with the razor cut her throat. Quitting the house for a short time, he returned, and striking a light, went up stairs, and looked upon the horrifying spectacle, again leaving with the intention of committing self-destruction, but his heart failing him, he concealed himself in the barn where he was found.
It is feared that the deed was not altogether so unpremeditated as the murderer's narration of the circumstances would lead one to suppose; he having several times threatened, in his fits of jealousy, to take the life of the deceased, who was a powerful woman, and who, when advised to leave him, said she was not afraid of the fulfilment of his threats unless he took the advantage at any time when she might be asleep. Indeed, it is supposed that this is what he has done; and that the deceased never spoke after the first blow; her head, which, when she was found, rested upon her hand, presenting a large hole as if inflicted by a spike or some similar instrument; the razor-cut in the throat extending from ear to ear. As evidence of his having for some time entertained intentions of violence towards the deceased, it is said that during a recent visit of his daughter to the house, he told her that would be the last time she should see her mother alive; when she next came home it would be as a witness of her funeral. He confesses being prompted on to the commission of the act by jealousy, says he is sorry for what he has done; and that he knows he shall be hanged for it unless he die before, as he hopes he may.
For many years past he had, it seems, been in the employ of Mr Williams, tallow-chandler, of Appledore, but latterly his employment during the summer had been that of a stevedore, or discharger of vessels freighted with limestone, in which occupation he was frequently assisted by his wife.

Thursday, 9 August 1855, Issue 4660 – Gale Document No. Y3200691217
EXETER – Sudden Death – On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Honiton Inn, Paris-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of EDITH HARRIS, aged 63, residing in Paris-street. It appeared that the deceased had gone out on Thursday last to purchase something for her supper, and on coming out of a baker's shop she was suddenly seized with a fit of apoplexy, and died in the course of the same evening. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

Thursday, 16 August 1855, Issue 4661 – Gale Document No. Y3200691260
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – At an Inquest held at the Exeter Workhouse, on Friday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES LANG, aged 30, it appeared that the deceased, while at work in the brickfield, on Wednesday last, accidentally fell from an embankment about seven feet high, and in consequence received severe injuries to his head; he was taken up insensible, and although Mr Warren, the medical officer to the Workhouse, was immediately sent for, and rendered every assistance, he died the same evening, from concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 23 August 1855, Issue 4662 – Gale Document No. Y3200691300
EXETER – Shocking Case of Mutilation by Machinery. – On Wednesday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL DAVEY, a lad nine years of age. The boy's parents reside at Crediton, and on Tuesday afternoon it appears he went to a farm belonging to Mr Hall, of that town, known as Lower Westwood, where, outside the barn, is a wheel for turning the threshing machine, driven by horses. The duty of superintending these animals was confided to a boy 11 years of age, and during his absence the deceased lad seems to have taken his place, and while so engaged to have become entangled in the cog wheel, which was unenclosed, when he was carried round until he was frightfully mangled. His cries attracting a farm servant, the machine was immediately stopped, the poor lad rescued from his dangerous position, and a conveyance obtained for his removal to his father's house, and subsequently the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where Mr A. Kempe, one of the surgeons in that institution, found the right limb of the unfortunate sufferer, consisting of the leg and thigh, torn from the body; the left thigh bone was also broken, the soft parts being much lacerated, and it was nearly torn from the body, being only connected by the outer muscle. Mr Kempe tied the vessels to prevent haemorrhage, and gave the patient some stimulants, and remained with him till half past 10 o'clock when he died. A more frightful spectacle is said to have been scarcely ever witnessed in the institution. The Coroner, in his remarks to the Jury, commented upon the impropriety of machinery being allowed to remain open without a necessary fence, and stated that several similar cases had recently occurred in the county. The Jury, expressing their complete concurrence in his remarks, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 20 September 1855, Issue 4666 – Gale Document No. Y3200691458
TEIGNMOUTH – On Thursday last an Inquest was held on the body of a boy named HAYMAN. It appears that the deceased in passing before a company of the Rifle Corps, as they were firing on the Den on Friday week, was struck by a blank cartridge, and, notwithstanding every attention was paid to him by the resident surgeon of the Dispensary, to which institution he was removed, he died from the effects of the wound inflicted by the wadding on the following morning. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The member of the rifle corps, who defrayed the expenses of the funeral, followed the body of the deceased to its last resting place.

Thursday, 27 September 1855, Issue 4667 – Gale Document No. Y3200691486
EXETER – Suicide. – A distressing case of suicide occurred yesterday morning, MR WRIGHT, a respectable baker of Paul-street, having terminated his existence by hanging. For some time past he had been in a low desponding way, and once before, we believe, attempted his life. This caused great anxiety to his family, who watched him somewhat closely. On Tuesday morning, about eleven o'clock, MRS WRIGHT was called into the shop and, after attending the customer, which did not occupy more than three or four minutes, she returned to the room where her husband had been seated, and found he was gone. She called, but received no answer, and, on going up stairs, was horrified at beholding him suspended from a beam in the wareroom. In an instant the alarm was given, and the poor fellow was cut down. Mr Pates, surgeon, passing at the time, was called in, and he at once pronounced life to be extinct. An examination of the place leads to the inference that WRIGHT, after making the sad preparations for self destruction, had resolved upon not being foiled in his attempt, as he evidently got upon a portion of a sack of flour, and jumped therefrom; this, doubtless caused dislocation of vertebrae, and consequently almost instant death. An Inquest is being held on the body at the time of our going to press.

Thursday, 27 September 1855, Issue 4667 – Gale Document No. Y3200691488
TORQUAY – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, at Mogridge's Union Hotel, on the body of a man named JOHN CHAPMAN. The deceased was a painter, while white-washing the larger of Mr Smith, of Montpellier Terrace, on Thursday last, fell off the steps on which he had been standing, and received such injuries as ultimately caused his death. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 4 October 1855, Issue 4668 – Gale Document No. Y3200691511
EXETER – The Inquest on the body of MR WILLIAM WRIGHT, who committed suicide by hanging himself on the morning of Tuesday week, was held on the following day, at Leach's North Devon Inn, Paul-street, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Fatal Accident – On Thursday last an inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of HUGH OKE, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the day previous. It appears that the deceased, a widower, aged 54, while driving a wagon from Exeter to Bradworthy, and when near the residence of J. Buller, Esq., on the Crediton road, slipped from the shafts of the vehicle, and fell under its wheels, which, passing over him, broke two of his ribs. He was conveyed in Mr Buller's carriage to the Crediton station, and thence to the Hospital, where, despite the assiduous attention of Mr Biggs, the house surgeon, he died as before stated. On a post mortem examination being made it was discovered that his death had been caused by one of the broken ribs injuring his kidneys. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 11 October 1855, Issue 4669 – Gale Document No. Y3200691535
EXETER – Fatal Accident at Turf. – On Saturday morning, Mr Lewis, the lock-keeper, observing something floating in the lock, took immediate steps to ascertain what it was, and discovered it to be the dead body of an old woman which had evidently been in the water some hours. It proved to be the body of MRS LARKWORTHY, formerly a resident of Kenton, but who for some time past had lived in Exeter. She was spoken to on the banks late the previous evening, and was then on her road to Powderham. It is supposed, the night being very dark, that she mistook the path across the locks and thus met with her death. No cries were hard by the inmates of the Turf Inn during the night of the accident, nor were there any marks of violence distinguishable either on the body or the clothes of the deceased. An Inquest was held on Tuesday, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday, 18 October 1855, Issue 4670 – Gale Document No. Y3200691586
TOTNES – Fatal Accident. – JAMES HAMBLING, a little boy about seven years old, son of MR WILLIAM HAMBLING, gunsmith, was found drowned in the Dart, near the Bowling Green Quay, on Tuesday morning. He left home after dinner on the previous day to go to school; but instead of doing so, it is supposed that he went to pick chestnuts in the new walk, and accidentally met his death by falling into the river. At the Inquest a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday, 25 October 1855, Issue 4671 – Gale Document No. Y3200691607
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Fireman's Arms, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM MORTIMER, a labourer, 60 years of age, who had been working at some alterations in the Baths on Southernhay. On Tuesday the deceased had taken up a pipe from a cess-pit where there were some noxious vapours, and in the afternoon of the same day fell down on Southernhay, appearing at the time to be intoxicated. He was taken home and Mr J. S. Perkins attended him, but could not detect that he had been drinking, or that he had inhaled any poisonous air. His opinion was that the man had been attacked with serious apoplexy, which caused his death on the following day. The Jury found a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday, 1 November 1855, Issue 4672 – Gale Document No. Y3200691651
CREDITON – A Child Poisoned by Mistake. – A melancholy and distressing accident, resulting in the death of the youngest child of MR WILLIAM UNDERHILL, occurred here on Friday week. It appears that the child, who was about a year and a half old, had been previously poorly, and that some castor oil had been purchased for it. The bottle in which the oil was bought seems to have been placed among other bottles, one of which contained a quantity of oil of vitriol. On Friday the father took a bottle from the cupboard, believing it to be the one filled with castor oil, and having filled a tablespoon with the liquid he handed it to his wife, by whom it was administered to the child. The mistake was almost instantaneously discovered, and Mr Edwards, surgeon, was sent for, but the child died on the following morning. An Inquest was held on the succeeding Tuesday before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday, 8 November 1855, Issue 4673 – Gale Document No. Y3200691688
BIDEFORD – On Monday week JAMES SLADE, hind on the farm of Mrs Harding, of Littleham, and who, having come into the town to witness the opening of the Bideford Extension Railway, got himself intoxicated, fell over the Quay into the river and was drowned. At a Coroner's Inquest subsequently held, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

TORRINGTON – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Hunters Inn, before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on view of the body of MR JOHN BROWN, dairyman, &c., of this town. The deceased, about 71 years of age, left his house the preceding day for the purpose of going to a field about half a mile from the town, to let a bullock drink, when he was seen to fall, by Mr Bere, who was looking through a telescope in that direction; Mr Bere with others ran to the field, when life was found to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Thursday, 8 November 1855, Issue 4673 – Gale Document No. Y3200691670
EXETER – At the Inquest held on Thursday last on the body of JOSEPH FOLLEY, the brewer at the Black Dog Inn, who died in consequence of injuries he received by falling into a vat of hot table beer, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the evidence being in accordance therewith.

Thursday, 15 November 1855, Issue 4674 – Gale Document No. Y3200691706
EXETER – Death From Burning. – An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before Henry W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH CROFT, aged 56. It appeared from the evidence of JOHN CROFT, the husband of the deceased, that he was a labourer, and resided at End Oak, in the parish of Cullompton. His wife was subject to fits, and on the 7th of April last while he was at work he was fetched by a man named Edward Tucker, who told him that while taking her breakfast she had fallen into the fire in a fit and was almost burned to death. The injuries the deceased had sustained being of a very serious nature she was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she died after great suffering on Wednesday last. The Jury, after hearing medical and other evidence returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 29 November 1855, Issue 4676 – Gale Document No. Y3200691784
BIDEFORD – An Inquest has been held before T. L. Pridham, Esq., on the body of an old man named HENRY BALL, who dropped down dead in Mill-street, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" returned.

Thursday, 29 November 1855, Issue 4676 – Gale Document No. Y3200691770
EXETER – ON Tuesday last an Inquest before H. W. Hooper, Esq., was held at the Round Tree Inn, Frog-street, on the body of a widow woman named MARY CHASE, who had been found dead in her bed. The evidence went to show that deceased had been suffering from a wound in the back part of her head, and the Jury required medical evidence to show what was the nature of it. Dr Harris, who had known CHASE many years, was accordingly called in and deposed that the bones of her head were diseased. The Jury thereupon returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Fatal Accident – On Friday an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN BASKERVILLE, a chid four years old, who met her death by fire on the previous day. It seems that during the absence of the mother, who resides in Frog street, the deceased had gone into the house of a neighbour, with whose children she was in the habit of associating. While there, her clothes by some means or other became ignited, on observing which the poor thing rushed into the street, where she was caught by the person in whose house she had been, and who exerted herself in every way to extinguish the flames, and alleviate her sufferings until her subsequent removal to the Hospital. There every attention was given her, but without avail, death ensuing in the course of the following day. The Jury having heard the evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 6 December 1855, Issue 4677 – Gale Document No. Y3200691822
AXMINSTER – Last week an Inquest was held on the body of MR SAMSON, who met his death by endeavouring to jump out of a gig which was being drawn from Axminster to Lyme by a fractious horse some time since, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. Objections having been raised against the holding of this Inquest, the Coroner stated, in a preliminary address to the Jury, that had the body been buried he should have had it disinterred, for the law required that an Inquest should be held on any person who should meet with an accident and die from the effects thereof within a year and a day.

Thursday, 13 December 1855, Issue 4678 – Gale Document No. Y3200691861
TORRINGTON – Fatal Accident. – On Tuesday the 4th instant, JAMES DYMOND, a lad in the employ of Mr Martin, Torrington Mill, was going his usual round, collecting grists, when near Holam, in the parish of Little Torrington, the cart capsized and the poor boy was found by a man named Hancock, quite dead. An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before R. Bremridge, Esq., when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday, 20 December 1855, Issue 4679 – Gale Document No. Y3200691892
EXMOUTH – Suicide. – Last week an Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on the body of MR EDWARD HARRIS, a ship-owner and coal merchant, who met his death from the effects of a wound inflicted on his throat. The deceased, who carried on business at this port, and who had for some time been in a low desponding state of mind, requested his wife at three o'clock in the morning of the 5th inst. to get him a cup of tea, and she was proceeding to do so in a lower room, when, hearing something fall heavily on the floor above, she ran up, saw her husband stretched along, and blood flowing profusely from his throat. She immediately procured the assistance of two medical gentlemen, who discovered that the throat of the unfortunate man had been cut, and treated him accordingly; but despite their attentions he died on the 10th. The Jury came to the conclusion that the deceased destroyed himself while labouring under a fit of insanity.

Thursday, 27 December 1855, Issue 4680 – Gale Document No. Y3200691927
EXETER – On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn on the body of a little girl named FORD, who, on the previous Thursday, in the absence of her mother, who resides in Frog-street, accidentally caught her clothes on fire and received fatal injuries. Verdict, Accidental Death.

An Inquest was held at the Coach and Horses Inn, St. Sidwell's, on Monday, on the body of MR HENRY TEESDALE, a gentleman lately residing in Park-place, Longbrook-street. It having been proved that death was occasioned by paralysis, a verdict to that effect was returned.

Fatal Accidents. – On Wednesday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of a man named WILLIAM UPCOTT, who met his death while at work at the Downes Mills, on the Monday previous, by being caught in the machinery. One of the poor man's legs was frightfully crushed, and had it not been for the presence of mind shown by a boy present, who immediately turned off the water, the whole body would have been mutilated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

On Thursday the Coroner held an Inquest at the same place on the body of WILLIAM ELSTON, who, according to the evidence of Dr Biggs, the house-surgeon of the Hospital, died from the effects of a blow which it seemed he had lately sustained on the head by a fall. This fall the deceased had met with while attempting to stop a horse which had taken fright and was galloping through the streets of Crediton; the animal unfortunately knocking him back, bringing his head in sever contact with the curb. In this case also the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday, 27 December 1855, Issue 4680 – Gale Document No. Y3200691925
PLYMOUTH & DEVONPORT – Another Case of Suspected Poisoning. – An Inquest was held at the Three Tuns Inn, Catherine-street, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of LOUISA MITCHELL, alias HALLETT, living as the wife of MR JOHN HALLETT, druggist, of James-street, but commonly known as DR HALLETT. It appeared that the deceased had lived with DR HALLETT upwards of seven years as his wife, and, from the evidence of several witnesses, they had lived in a state of discomfort, and had quarrelled frequently. The deceased had been ill several months. At the Inquest a great deal of irrelevant evidence was given. The medical witness stated that deceased died from congestion of the lungs, not arising from natural causes. The Jury here pressed the witness to give an opinion whether poison had been administered; and he replied that it was his opinion that something of a deleterious nature had been administered, but he was unable to say what. The Inquest was adjourned to Monday, the 31st instant, to give time to have the contents of the stomach analysed.

Thursday, 27 December 1855, Issue 4680 – Gale Document No. Y3200691913
Determined Suicide in the County Gaol. - JOSIAS ROWE GUSCOTT, of Cheriton Bishop, a farmer well-known throughout the county, whom we last week reported to have been brought before the magistrates, at the Castle, on a charge of stealing twelve sheep from his neighbour, Mr Bolt, committed suicide in a most determined manner, on Wednesday last, in his cell in the County Gaol. Previous to this last, and, as it proved, successful attempt upon his life, he had twice since taken into custody sought self-destruction: first by stabbing himself in the throat with a knife which he had concealed under the bed-clothes, on the night of his apprehension at Plymouth, by Ratcliffe, the St. Thomas constable; and a second time by attempting to leap from the train by which he was brought to Exeter, when between the Starcross and St. Thomas stations. On the second occasion it seems he was sitting opposite the officer, when, at a moment when the latter was searching for the tickets, he suddenly sprung forward towards one of the windows, forced himself out notwithstanding his handcuffs, and had all but escaped, with the certainty of sustaining serious injury had he done so, when he was caught by the leg by the officer, and held fast until others in the carriage came to his assistance. In spite of their united efforts, however, they were unable to pull him in, and were obliged to proceed with him as he was – suspended in a most dangerous posture from the window; his whole body and one of his legs being outside the carriage, and hanging down towards the wheels. Luckily, on arriving at St. Thomas, he was found unhurt, and was immediately conveyed to the gaol, whence he was to have been removed on Thursday for examination before the magistrates. By that time, however, he had anticipated the law by effectually putting himself beyond its reach. The last time he was seen alive was at dinner-time on Wednesday, when he appeared to the head-warder to be in his usual state. In half-an-hour afterwards his cell was again visited, when it was found that he had succeeded in committing suicide by hanging himself by his neckerchief from a bell-handle, which is only about four feet from the ground. Previous to committing the act it seems he had taken off his boots, placed the pillow of his bed under his knees, and, having done so, bent forward with the neckerchief passed round the neck and made fast above, till by the weight of his body and the utmost exertions he succeeded in strangling himself. An Inquest was held at the prison on the following evening, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict was returned that the deceased destroyed himself in a fit of temporary insanity. The prisoner, it is said, had a life interest in the estate occupied by him at Cheriton Bishop to the amount of £3,000, and was also possessed of a piece of land and a house at Cheriton, all of which he had mortgaged. Great part of the money thus obtained, however, he had squandered in dissipation, so that latterly he was fast approaching a state of abject poverty.

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