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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1856-1860

Articles taken from Trewman's Exeter Flying Post

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs:

Names Included:- Abbott; Adams; Aggett; Aldridge; Alford; Allen; Allin; Annis; Arscott; Ashton; Austin; Babbage; Baker; Bale; Balson; Bament; Bardons; Barnes; Barton(2); Bastin; Bater; Bates; Bayley; Bazley; Beer(4); Bending; Benmore; Berry(2); Bidgood(3); Binding; Blackmore; Blake; Blight; Bodley; Bolt; Bond(2); Born(2); Borne; Bowden(2); Bray; Brice; Brimblecombe; Bromfield; Brooks; Brown; Buckland; Bull(2); Bullied; Bunstow; Burman; Burn; Butland; Cade; Cahill; Cann(2); Carlisle; Carnell; Carter; Caseley; Chamberlain(2); Channing; Cheriton; Chown; Churchward; Clark; Clarke(2); Clements; Cleverdon; Coates; Codner; Coleman; Collings; Coombes; Cooper; Copp; Corbet; Cordeux; Cose; Couch; Courtenay; Courtney; Cox; Crawley; Creedy; Crocker; Dann; Darby; Darch; Davey; Davis; Dawe; Demenish; Dennis; Densumbe; Derges; Dewdney; Dicken; Doble; Dormont; Dowdle; Drewe; Duncan; Dunn; Durke; Dymond(2); Edwards; Ellis; Elson; Elston; Endicott; Evans(2); Eveleigh; Fare; Farr; Fetherstone; Fishley; Flay; Flood; Ford; Fowles; Fox; Fraine; Friendship(2); Gale; Gay; Gayton; Germon; Gibbs; Gibson; Gilbert(2); Gill; Glanvill; Godwin; Goer; Goldsworthy; Good; Gooding(2); Goodyear; Goulds; Govier; Gregory(2); Guard; Hamblin; Hambling; Hancock; Handcock; Handford; Hannaford; Harding; Harris(4); Hartnell; Haviland; Hawkesley; Hawkins; Haywood(2); Hazlewood; Heddon; Hempson; Heywod; Hill(4); Hitchcock; Hole; Holisgrove; Holland; Holman; Holmes; Honeywill; Honslow; Honywell; Hookway(2); Hooper(3); Hunt(2); Hutchings; Hutchison; Huxtable; Ivey; James; Jeffery; Jefford; Jennings; Jewell; Joce; Johnson; Jones(3); Kerswell; Kibell; King; Knapman; Lake; Lamble; Lane(2); Lang; Lawton; Lenden; Leonard; Lethbridge; Lewis(2); Ley; Litten; Lock(2); Lockyer; Long; Loram; Lott; Lovering; Luke; Luscombe; Lyne; Male; Manley; Marlow; Marsh; Marshall; Martin(2); Mason; Maunder; May(2); Mayne(2); McKevitt; Merrifield; Metherell; Middlewick; Mills; Mitchamore; Mitchell(2); Mock; Moore; Morey; Morrill; Morrish; Moss; Mudge; Mugford; Murphy; Myers; Newberry(2); Nickolls; Nutt; O'Costello; O'Neil; Osborne; Otton; Palmer; Parkin; Partridge; Passmore; Patterson; Pavey; Payne(2); Pearse; Peckins; Pedrick; Percy; Perkins; Perrin; Perry; Petherbridge; Phillips(2); Pike(3); Pile(2); Pine; Pitfield; Pomeroy; Ponsford; Poole; Pope; Popham; Portbury; Porter; Prin; Pring; Prowse; Pullen; Purrington; Rennels; Rewe; Rice; Richards; Ridge; Ridgway; Ridmore; Rippon; Robins; Rockey; Rousell; Rowe(2); Rowsell; Rudd; Sage; Salter(2); Sanders(2); Sarah; Satterley; Saunders; Scanes; Scott; Seward; Shaddick; Shapcott; Sharpe; Shears; Shelson; Shepherd; Shore; Smale; Smalldon; Smith(5); Smyth; Snow; Southwood; Stabback; Stamp; Stanley; Stanton; Steed; Steer; Steward; Stone(4); Strong; Stump; Tamlyn; Tapp; Taylor(3); Thomas; Toll; Tothill; Tregascis; Trew; Tucker; Tuckett; Vaughan; Vellacott; Vicary(2); Vickery; Vinnacombe; Ware; Warren(2); Wash; Watts; Webber(3); Welland; Westacott; Western; Wheaton; White(2); Whitfield(2); Wilcocks; Wilkey; Wilkins; Willey; Williams(7); Wills; Wilson; Woodgate; Woodley; Wyatt; Yates; Yole; Youldon

Thursday 10 January 1856, Issue 4682 – Gale Document No. Y3200691994
OTTERY ST. MARY – Last week an Inquest was held on the body of CHRISTOPHER CLEMENTS, who was drowned in the Factory Leat, and a verdict of Found Drowned was returned by the Jury, who at the same time made a presentation to the effect that the mill-stream was highly dangerous to human life, the banks being without fences.

PLYMOUTH & DEVONPORT – Manslaughter. – On the 14th ult. a woman, named LOUISA MITCHELL, who was living with DR HALLETT, an apothecary – practising as a doctor in James-street, Devonport – expired under circumstances that led to an Inquiry before Mr Bone and a Jury. There was a suspicion that foul play by poison had been used to produce the woman's death, and the Inquest was adjourned for the stomach and its contents to be analysed by Mr Herepath, of Bristol. On Monday week the Inquest was resumed, when Mr Herepath stated his belief that the deceased had died from congestion of the lungs, and not from any known poison. The evidence, however, went to show that the woman had been grossly neglected while ill; and that no surgeon was called to attend her until she was dead, and the Jury returned the following verdict – "That deceased died from congestion of the lungs, and that the death was accelerated by the gross ignorance and negligence of JOHN HALLETT, and therefore we find a verdict of Manslaughter against him."

Thursday 10 January 1856, Issue 4682 – Gale Document No. Y3200691980
EXETER – Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named WILLIAM SALTER, who died from injuries he received by the kick of a horse. It appeared that the deceased was in the employ of Mr Sclater, nurseryman, and had been sent by him, on Saturday, the 8th of December, to Harpford, near Sidmouth, with a horse and wagon. On returning home the horse became restive, and kicked. Through the want of the necessary harness, which the deceased had neglected to put on, he received a kick just above the ankle, causing a compound fracture of the large bone of the leg. He was taken to the Hospital, where his case was immediately attended to, but he gradually sunk and died on Thursday evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 17 January 1856 – Gale Document No. Y3200692014
MORETONHAMPSTEAD. – An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the White Hart Inn, in this town, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WM. MOREY, agricultural labourer. The deceased was missed on the Saturday previous. Several men went in search of him, but were unsuccessful; and on the Sunday morning his body was found suspended by the neck, in a linhay not far from the town. After the examination of one or two witnesses, the Inquest was adjourned, to afford time for Inquiry. It was resumed on Saturday, when the Jury found that deceased met with his death by his own hand, being at the time Temporarily Insane.

Deaths by Drowning. – On Tuesday an Inquest was held at the Port Royal Inn, in the parish of St. Leonard's, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., on the body of a man named WILLIAM DORMONT, an agricultural labourer belonging to Christow. The deceased, who was a man about 54 years of age, was found drowned in the river at no great distance from the inn in question on the morning of Sunday last. There were no marks on the body, nor any injury done to his apparel, such as would indicate any violence having been used prior to his immersion in the water; nor was there anything known of his movements on the evening on which the accident must have happened. From the evidence before the Coroner, however, it would appear that he had been in the habit for some time of saving a little money, and coming into the city to have a "spree" on the strength of the same; and, as he was not known to have had any business in Exeter, it is supposed this was the case on the present occasion. The Jury, accordingly, returned an Open Verdict.

Thursday 31 January 1856, Issue 4685 – Gale Document No. Y3200692103
KINGSBRIDGE – Inquest At The Union House. – On Monday week an Inquest was held by J. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of a newly-born child that was found under one of the beds in the union house. After the Jury had examined the body, Mr Cornish, the surgeon, stated that the mother of the child, ELLEN MITCHAMORE, was not in a fit state to attend, and would not be for ten days to come. The Inquest was then adjourned to the 4th of February. the mother of the child has not been outside the house for more than two years.

Thursday 7 February 1856, Issue 4687 – Gale Document No. Y3200692140
CREDITON – An Inquest was held at the Star Inn, on Tuesday week, on the body of a child, two and a half years old, named JOHN CHAMBERLAIN, who died very suddenly, and it was feared from unfair means. The Jury, however, after hearing the evidence, concluded that deceased died from spasms of the heart.

Thursday 7 February 1856, Issue 4687 – Gale Document No. Y3200692123
EXETER – Suicide in the City Prison. – On Wednesday night last a young sailor, named CHARLES ROWE, committed suicide in a most determined manner in the city prison. ROWE, along with another young man, was, on Wednesday, apprehended by a city policeman, on a charge of stealing a copper funnel, and was lodged in the city prison, preparatory to his being taken before a county magistrate. He was last seen alive about seven o'clock in the evening, when the gaoler locked him up for the night in a cell in the receiving ward. At daybreak the following morning his corpse, stiff and cold, was found suspended from one of the iron bars of the cell window by his comforter. The prisoner must have strangled himself by main force, as the bar is only five feet high. At an Inquest held on Thursday before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 14 February 1856, Issue 4688 – Gale Document No. Y3200692175
HALBERTON – In last week's Flying Post we gave an account of an accident which took place at Halberton, by a part of the church falling down, thereby injuring some of the workmen. We are sorry to state that since that time one of the poor men (JOHN LAKE) has expired from the injuries he then sustained. At an Inquest subsequently held a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMPTREE – Fatal Gun Accident. – On the 4th of February an Inquest was held here, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on the body of a lad aged 15, named WILLIAM BRICE, who died from the effects of a gun shot wound. The deceased, accompanied by three other boys – one of whom was about his own age, the others two or three years his junior – the sons of C. Harvard, Esq., of Hayne House, went out on a shooting excursion. On the route the elder Harvard, who carried a double barrel gun, had occasion to leave the party for a short time, and his piece was consigned to the keeping of his younger brother, who was subsequently drawing it from under his coat – where he had put it to keep it dry – when it went off, and its contents were lodged in the legs of poor BRICE, who, notwithstanding that he received prompt medical assistance, died from the haemorrhage that ensued. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 14 February 1856, Issue 4688 – Gale Document No. Y3200692178
BARNSTAPLE – Accidental Death. – A melancholy casualty occurred in the river Taw on Sunday morning. The Darby Ellen, of Topsham, was proceeding on her voyage to Milford with a cargo of navy timber. The captain (MR MASON) and one of the crew were in the boat; and on nearing a place called Strand Houses, the pilot directed that the "kedge" anchor should be lowered. This order was forthwith obeyed; but in the hurry the captain got his foot into the coil, and could not extricate himself. The other man in the boat instantly seized hold of the master: the boat began to fill, and ultimately the unfortunate man desired to be released. No other assistance could be rendered, and the poor fellow was drawn into the water. On the ebbing of the tide the body was found near where the accident happened, the rope being still tightly coiled round the ankle of the deceased. The following day Mr Incledon Bencraft held a Coroner's Inquisition on the body at the Salutation Inn, and a verdict in accordance with the related facts was returned. The deceased has left a wife and eight children.

Thursday 28 February 1856, Issue 4690 – Gale Document No. Y3200692224
EXETER – Sudden Death. – Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner for this city, held an Inquest last Thursday, on the body of MARY ANN POOLE, a widow, aged 44. It appeared that the deceased had, about a month since, been in the Workhouse, and upon leaving it had gone to reside with her mother, in Russell-street. She went to bed at her usual hour on Tuesday night, and her mother went to her room on Wednesday morning, took her some coffee, and conversed with her. She observed nothing particular then, but on going down stairs she heard a groan, and on returning to her room a minute or two after, found her dead. The Jury, after hearing the medical man, Mr J. S. Perkins, and other witnesses, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 6 March 1856, Issue 4691 – Gale Document No. Y3200692255
EXETER – Determined Suicide. – An Inquest was held at the Pack Horse Inn, St David's Hill, yesterday (Tuesday) before J. Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a single woman, aged 35, named MARY ANN TUCKER. It appeared that the deceased had lived in service at Budleigh Salterton, and that some weeks ago she called on Mr Calder, surgeon, of St Thomas, and asked him to attend her in her approaching confinement. He agreed to do so, and on her application he recommended her to a lodgings near Bystock Terrace, at the house of Mrs Bishop. She came there about a fortnight ago, and was immediately afterwards confined of twins – one of which was still-born, and the other died soon afterwards. Mr Calder duly attended her, and she appeared to be progressing favourably. On Friday morning, the 29th ult., the person with whom she lodged went into her room and found her in a deplorable state. Her head was lying against the wall, and her face and her bedgown were covered with blood. Mr Calder and Mr Johnson Webb were sent for, and they found that she had cut her throat in a most effectual manner; the windpipe being nearly divided. On searching the bed, a small dinner-knife, a pen-knife, and a pair of scissors, covered with blood, were found. Mr Calder believed that she had committed suicide with the small dinner-knife, by stabbing herself with it. She lingered until the preceding evening, when she died. The opinion of the medical men was to the effect that the deceased was labouring under temporary delirium, caused by incipient "milk-fever." The Jury returned a verdict in accordance therewith.

Thursday 6 March 1856, Issue 4691 – Gale Document No. Y3200692269
BARNSTAPLE – Melancholy and Fatal Accident. – The Barnstaple railway station has been the scene of a shocking calamity. MR JOSEPH WILLIAMS, a clerk in the manager's office, has met with his death under singularly distressing circumstances. It seems that on Friday evening last the deceased intended going somewhere by the train; but instead of taking his place at the proper time he stood by the side of the engine talking to the driver. The engine at length began to move off, and WILLIAMS endeavoured to get on it; but unhappily missed his footing and fell beneath the wheels. The poor fellow was speedily taken up, and forthwith removed to the North Devon Infirmary. It was there discovered that the wheels had passed over the lower part of his body, that his left leg had been broken in three places, that his right foot was cut in two, and that his left arm had been fractured, besides the laceration of his person. The recital of these terrible injuries is sufficient to prepare the reader for that which the imagination more quickly supplies – namely, that death must have shortly intervened after so excruciating an infliction. The unfortunate deceased, who was sensible to the last moment of his existence, expired in about three hours after his admission to the institution. Mr Incledon Bencraft held a Coroner's Inquisition on the following day, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The driver has been exonerated from all blame. The deceased was a native of Ireland, and was much respected. His nephew – the only relative he had in this country – was on the engine at the time of the fatal occurrence.

Thursday 13 March 1856, Issue 4692 – Gale Document No. Y3200692287
EXETER – Melancholy Death of a Young Woman by Burning. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Friday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young woman aged 24, named SARAH FANNY PITFIELD. It appeared that the deceased was housekeeper for an old man, named Daniel Stone, at Clyst St. George, by whom she had been brought up. On Tuesday last, in the absence of Mr Stone, the poor woman's clothes caught fire, as she stated, by a lighted stick falling from the grate. Her screams were heard by a neighbour, named Sarah Potter, who, seeing her enveloped in flames, ran for a blanket, which she threw round her, but the fire was not extinguished until the deceased was severely burnt. Every attention was paid her by Mrs Potter, who applied linseed oil to the burns, and put her to bed. Dr Brent was sent for, and he immediately recommended that she should be sent to the Devon and Exeter Hospital; whither she was conveyed the same evening. She lingered until Thursday evening, in great agony, and then died. Mr Reed, a gentleman who attended her in the absence of Mr Biggs, the house surgeon, said that the severe burns and the shock to the system were the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 March 1856, Issue 4692 – Gale Document No. Y3200692302
BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – JOHN COPP, a machine-maker, of this town, aged 64, dropped down on his road home on Monday evening last and died instantly. The deceased had been superintending potatoe planting during the day, and was, apparently, in good health and spirits. An Inquest on the following day resulted in a verdict that the deceased died from Natural Causes.

Thursday 13 March 1856, Issue 4692 – Gale Document No. Y3200692299
CREDITON – Melancholy Death. – An Inquest was held a few days ago by R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN WILCOCKS, who met with his death at the Bell Inn there. Deceased, who was an uncle to the landlord, went to the Bell to spend the evening, with an intention of sleeping there, as was his usual custom about once a month. The Landlord (SAMUEL WREFORD) and the deceased spent the evening together, and drank some beer. Several persons were there drinking, and after all the customers were gone deceased drank four pints of beer, which made him rather worse for liquor. They retired to bed, about twelve o'clock, and Wreford proceeded first with the light and turned round to light deceased up. As soon, however, as he reached the third or fourth stair, he fell backwards down to the floor, from which fall he received such injuries as caused his death. Mr Wreford said the accident did not arise from intoxication. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 March 1856, Issue 4693 – Gale Document No. Y3200692317
EXETER – Melancholy Death by Burning. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier on Saturday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a single woman, aged 53, named SARAH LEY. the deceased had lived as servant with Mr Chadwick, on the Alphington road, and on Thursday night she had been ironing, and sat in a chair by the fire to rest herself. Her niece left her for ten minutes whilst she fetched coals and locked the back doors, and on her return she found her aunt asleep, with half-pint cup containing some gin and water in her hand, and her clothes in flames. The girl awake her, upon which the poor creature rushed out into the court, where the night breeze fanned the flames into a terrific blaze. Mr Crosse, of the West of England Bank, being in the parlour with Mr Chadwick, immediately came to her assistance, and with the door-mat and some water succeeded in quenching the fire. He also fetched Mr Lyddon, the surgeon, who ordered her removal to the Hospital, where she was taken the same night. She was much burnt, and lingered until Friday night, when she died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 27 March 1856, Issue 4694 – Gale Document No. Y3200692362
BARNSTAPLE – Suicide. – HANNAH WATTS, a girl about 17 years of age, has become a victim to her own cupidity. She resided with her brother in the parish of Heanton Punchardon, which is about three miles from Barnstaple. Her conduct was alleged to have been not so exemplary as her friends desired; and on Saturday last the brother read her a lesson upon her behaviour. This appears to have created a feeling of remorse; and some time afterwards she was found in an outhouse suspended from a beam – quite dead. The body was hanging some three feet from the ground; and it is presumed that the deceased must have got upon the beam, tied one end of the halter to it, and the other round her neck, and then have thrown herself off – her neck being dislocated. J. H. Toller, Esq., the deputy County Coroner, held an Inquest on the subsequent Monday, when a verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Thursday 3 April 1856, Issue 4695 – Gale Document No. Y3200692395
NEWTON ABBOT – Death by Drowning. – A child, named BURN, fell into the river Lemon a few days ago, and was drowned. An Inquest was held before Mr Cockey, Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. The Coroner called the attention of the Jury to the insecure state of the embankments and the mill-leat, and recommended that the way-wardens should be called on to repair them.

Thursday 3 April 1856, Issue 4695 – Gale Document No. Y3200692379
EXETER – Death by Burning. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, last Wednesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SIMEON MALE, a boy, aged five years. The deceased, whose parents reside in Bedford-street, was attempting to take from the chimney piece a small money-box, on Monday evening, when his clothes caught fire. He immediately ran into the street, and Mr Pearse, of the livery stables, and the child's father succeeded in extinguishing the flames, but not before the child was dreadfully burnt. He was taken to the Hospital, and on Tuesday evening he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 April 1856, Issue 4696 – Gale Document No. Y3200692429
EXETER - Suspected Murder – It was reported in this city on Monday that a murder had been committed at Clayhidon, near the spot where Mr Blackmore met with his death a few years since. On enquiry we find that an old Irishman, a hawker, named STEPHEN MCKEVITT, was found dead near Churchingford, and not far from the spot where Mr Blackmore was murdered, on Friday morning last. He had a severe wound in his forehead, and there were several cuts and bruises about his person. It appears that the deceased was 56 years of age, and had a wife and family of six or seven children. He was in the habit of stopping at the Oat and Sheaf Inn, in this city, when here on business, and he travelled about the district with drapery goods. On Thursday morning he left his lodgings at Hemyock, having several pounds in his pocket and a good stock of goods, to go to Clayhidon and other villages. In the evening a labourer, about 18 years of age, saw the deceased in the parish of Churchstanton, and he called to him to help his pack on his back, which the young man did. He then appeared to be a "little the worse for liquor," but not drunk. The next morning, about seven o'clock, a labourer, going to his work, found the poor old man lying on his left side in the road, quite dead. The body was covered with dirt, and there were cuts and bruises on the forehead, head, and knees. He appeared to have been robbed, as very little goods or money were found on him. The young man, who saw him the night previous, picked up a piece of trowsering which belonged to deceased, on the Friday, about 53 yards in advance of where the body was found, and which he stated was stuffed behind a gate-post. The body was taken to a farm-house, situated about three miles from Churchingford, where an Inquest was held on Sunday, by Mr Aberdein, Coroner for the district. Mr Hill, a surgeon, stated (as we are informed) that the cuts and bruises on the deceased might have been caused by the fall, and that this, together with exposure to the cold, might have caused death. An opinion, however, appears to prevail in the district that the deceased was murdered and robbed. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Dead." Since the above was written, we have learnt from a gentleman, who was present at the Inquest, that the young labourer, who saw the deceased on the Thursday night, stated that he was leaning against a hedge intoxicated, when he called to him to help on his pack, that there was blood then on his face, as though he had fallen about the road; that the body was found not far from the spot, and that the principal wound on the forehead was evidently produced by a fall on some flint stones, which were in the road. Two sums of 14s. and 5s. were found carefully done up in paper in his pockets. The probability is that death was accidental, but there is still the suspicious fact of the piece of trowsering having been found concealed behind the gate-post, which would lead to the conclusion that the deceased had been robbed.

Thursday 17 April 1856, Issue 4697 – Gale Document No. Y3200692461
BUCKFASTLEIGH – Death From a Fight. – A young man, named JOHN CHURCHWARD, aged 28, died recently; and at an Inquest held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., the Coroner, it was elicited that about a fortnight ago, the deceased was engaged in a fight with some parties, and on going home in the evening he complained of a pain in his head. He did little work afterwards and died a few days ago. As the medical man could not positively say whether death was caused by concussion of the brain, the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Thursday 24 April 1856, Issue 4698 – Gale Document No. Y3200692495
BRADNINCH – Accidental Death By Burning. – An Inquest was held by R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, last Friday, on the body of GEO. THOMAS, aged six years, who was accidentally burnt. The deceased's father put a glue-pot on the fire and left the room, leaving no one there. About two minutes afterwards he returned, and in the passage he met his child in flames, which were, however, speedily extinguished. It appears that deceased went to stir the glue, and the fire caught his apron, which he could not extinguish. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 May 1856, Issue 4699 – Gale Document No. Y3200692532
TORQUAY – Melancholy Death. – An Inquest was held at the Town-hall on Monday last, on the body of GEORGE WHITE, a police officer in this town who died almost suddenly on the previous morning from disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 8 May 1856, Issue 4700 – Gale Document No. Y3200692546
EXETER – Death By Suffocation. – An Inquest was held last Thursday at the Country House Inn, in this city, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRIETTA JANE SNELL CHAMBERLAIN, aged eight months. It appeared that the deceased's parents, who resided at No. 4, North-terrace, St David's, were on the point of leaving the house they occupied, in consequence of which the deceased and her mother slept on Wednesday night at Mr Hearn's, draper, High Street. About half-past seven the following morning the mother awoke, and found the deceased lying on her face and hands by her side, her face being pressed against the pillow. On taking up the child, the mother observed a white mucous froth issuing from her mouth. Mr L. Roberts, surgeon, who was immediately called in, gave as his opinion that the deceased had met her death from suffocation, being turned over on her face and hands; and while so lying must accidentally have been pressed by the mother lying close to her. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 May 1856, Issue 4703 – Gale Document No. Y3200692640
UPLYME – Death By Burning. – An Inquest on the body of DAVID C. JEFFORD, aged six years, son of a labourer, was held a few days ago before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner. It appeared that the deceased, and two younger children, were left by their mother, alone in the house, while she went to Uplyme, a distance of about a mile from her cottage, and whilst away the children seated themselves near the fire-place, and by some means the clothes of the deceased caught fire; the boy ran out of the house screaming; a boy, named Geo. Bailey, who was near and hear the deceased calling for assistance, went to him, but by this time nearly all his clothes were burnt off. Bailey led the poor fellow into the house and ran for assistance. Shortly afterwards the mother returned from Uplyme and put the deceased to bed; on examining the child, it was found that his arm, face, and body were severely burnt, and he died the same night. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 29 May 1856, Issue 4703 – Gale Document No. Y3200692644
EXETER – Shocking Accident. – At the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday, H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM HILL, a farm labourer, aged 38. On Whit-Monday, HILL was leading a powerful entire horse, belonging to Mr Joseph Hole, of Cheriton Fitzpain, along the Dunsford-road, when it took fright at the passing of a phaeton, which was driven by the Rev. J. W. S. Lee, curate of Tedburn St. Mary. He was next seen lying on the road, with a frightful wound in his head, and it would appear that in his endeavour to restrain the animal, he fell, was dragged along the ground, and was either kicked or trod upon by the horse, previous to its making its escape. A day or two after this occurrence the sufferer was taken to the hospital, where it was found that his skull had been fractured and some splinters of bone knocked into his brain. Every thing that science could suggest was done for him, but death terminated his sufferings on Sunday. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Extraordinary Case. – An Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on Saturday afternoon, on the body of SAMUEL COX, a boy aged twelve, who died at the hospital on the previous morning. It appeared that at about noon on the 9th of April last, the boy was returning from the Charity School to his parents' house, in St. Thomas, and had arrived at New Bridge-street, when he ran towards a horse and cart, which belonged to Mr Reynolds, of Creedy Farm, Farringdon, and which was being driven along very steadily by a boy named William Horwood, persisting, despite the warning of the driver, to get up. He was on his knees on the off shaft when the horse became restive, kicked and plunged violently, and started off at a furious rate down the street. COX held on for a short distance, but ultimately fell off, and the wheel ran over his right knee, injuring it severely. Mr Wills, butcher, and several other persons ran to his assistance, and putting him into a cart driven by John Jarman, a carrier of the Commercial-road, sent him to the hospital. Here he was assiduously attended to by Mr Edye, who stated that if the sufferer had been an adult he should have at once amputated his injured limb; but being a youth, he wished to give him "the chance of nature's recovery, as he knew from experience that youth occasionally worked great and almost miraculous cures," and that if a cure was not effected in this instance, he should be able to remove the leg at a future period – an operation technically termed "secondary amputation." All went on well for some time; but on Monday fortnight he saw in the boy a decided change for the worse – inflammation, and a great discharge from the wound having weakened him much. As was the practice in the hospital, in serious cases, he obtained a consultation of the surgeons; and all of them concurred with him that the only chance of saving the patient's life was by taking off his leg. He would here remark that it was a very vulgar error to suppose that surgeons are glad to perform operations, for in truth they always avoid them if possible – the amputation of a limb proving that medical science was powerless to cure the injury under which it was suffering. The state in which matters stood was pointed out to COX'S parents, who are persons of the labouring class; but notwithstanding they were told that recovery was impossible without the operation was performed – notwithstanding that they were given to understand, in the words of one of the surgeons, that they were pronouncing "sentence of death upon their child" if they refused – the mother declined to accede to its being done, asking at the same time "what she should do with a lame child," and the father did likewise, because, said he, "if God has determined to take my boy, he shall take him as he is, not without one of his legs." The child seemed very anxious that the views o the surgeons should be carried out; and several times said to Ann Ford, his nurse, that "if his mother only suffered for half-an-hour what he had been suffering, she would be glad to submit to anything." The medical gentlemen, by the decision of the parents, were rendered powerless, and the poor little sufferer lingered in great agony till Friday morning when he expired. Mr Edye gave it as his decided opinion that, humanly speaking, if the boy's leg had been taken off he would have survived. The Coroner, in summing up, said he should think that if the deceased's parents had the best feeling, they must consider this a serious matter; and he must say that, looking at the evidence, a severe reflection must rest upon them. One of the rules of the Devon and Exeter Hospital laid it down that no amputation or any operation (except in cases of accident or emergency) should be performed without a previous consultation among the surgeons, to which the physicians should be invited to attend and give their opinion. In the case of minors, the consent of the parents must be given before any operation can be performed; where the patient was above 21 his consent was sufficient. He did think that where parents were told that amputation of one of their child's limbs was requisite to save his life, they should submit to its being done, rather than leave him to die; and he had no doubt they would say with him that where parents, in cases of accident, sent their children to the hospital with a view of deriving benefit from so excellent an institution; where the surgeons were such eminent practitioners as those of their hospital; where those surgeons gave their unanimous opinion that amputation was the one thing necessary to save life; and where the sufferer was anxious to have that operation performed; it ill-became them to refuse its being done. He had been conversing a short time before he entered the room with the vice-president of the hospital, and had been told by that gentleman that the deceased's wound was becoming quite offensive to the other inmates of the ward – so offensive in fact, that he had expressed a wish to have him removed; but he was too ill to allow of that course being adopted. The parents would thus see what inconvenience was caused by the refusal. It might be the opinion of the Jury that, if the existing law could be altered in cases of minors, where the opinion of the medical officers was unanimous, the patient should be to a certain degree more under the control of the medical men. If such was their opinion, he should be most happy, as one of the governors of the institution, to submit it to a general court for consideration. He did not see that they could come to any other conclusion than that the death of the deceased was caused by an accident. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death", coincided unanimously with the sentiments expressed by the Coroner, and desired him on their behalf to act on the suggestion he had made.

Thursday 5 June 1856, Issue 4704 – Gale Document No. Y3200692665
EXETER – Distressing Cased of Destitution. – An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the George and Dragon Inn, St. Sidwells, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of MARY WHITFIELD, a woman aged 52, who died on Tuesday last on a heap of rags and in a state of nudity, in a room which is occupied by her daughter, CAROLINE DARBY, and her husband, a paper-hanger, and situated in Reynolds' Court, Blackboy-road. The DARBYS stated that they had been married for twelve or fourteen years, during which time WHITFIELD had, almost without intermission, resided with them. they admitted that their room was quite destitute of furniture, and that they and their children – five in number – slept on straw and shavings, accounting for the same by saying that about two years since the whole family of the WHITFIELDS – mother, son, daughter, and son-in-law – took up their residence with them, and, as each article broke by the undue wear and tare to which it was subjected – the chairs and table being turned into extempore beds, - committed its fragments to the flames that an increase of fire might compensate in some measure for an absence of bedding. Thus their habitation got denuded of its articles of use and ornament; and the pressure of the times and the intrusion of their relatives had since deterred them from refurnishing. One by one their unwelcome visitors left them; but ultimately the mother returned, and, "unable to get rid of her" (as they expressed it), they made a virtue of necessity and bore with her, allowing her to occupy by night the only chair that remained to them, and get warm from the fire when there was any, or how she could when there was none. At the outset, she was able to earn a little money for herself; but latterly she confined her attention solely to the children, and someway, although she had the management of the youngsters' victuals, and was permitted "of the little to take a little," she did not seem to fare so well as previously. Darby began to feel his mother-in-law's constant presence in his home anything but agreeable, and after combing with his wife in persuading her to get relief, and receiving a most positive refusal to do so from her, he tried what effect compelling her to sleep in the stairs would have on her altering her determination. So to the stairs she was consigned. Here she was seen by Mr Beadle Sparkes, who also advised her to apply to the Corporation of the Poor, assuring her that she would be more comfortable in the Workhouse. She refused, however, saying she wanted no help from anyone, and when she did she would ask for it; in the meantime, she begged Mr Sparkes and the rest to mind their own business. The beadle could do no more under the circumstances, and went his way. Shortly afterwards a rumour prevailed that the whole family were starving, and Mr Perkins, surgeon, at the request of J. D. Osborn, Esq., a magistrate, visited Reynolds' Court, and there, he states, in an excessively dirty room, in a house which, it was calculated, contained six families, or thirty souls, he saw WHITFIELD and the children, all deplorably dirty. The children were healthy; but the old woman did not appear so, and he offered to send her some medicine, but she became abusive, and most positively denied being in wasn't of medical or any other assistance. About a fortnight afterwards she was taken ill, the Darbys resigned their "bed" to her, and there she died, as before stated. For some time after WHITFIELD was taken ill she refused to have a medical man sent for, and it was some time before the intelligence of her weakened state was conveyed to Mr Perkins; when he arrived at her bedside she was speechless. Since her death he had made an external examination of her body, which he found in a very dirty condition; but exhibiting no marks of violence. He gave it as his opinion that death was caused by dropsy, accelerated by want of proper nourishment and care. Susan Reynolds and Sarah Lake, neighbours, testified that the Darbys were seldom at home from an early hour in the morning till eleven or twelve o'clock at night, and that they were both much addicted to habits of intoxication. They seldom saw any meat in their room, but they had occasionally seen a pound of bread sent home to be divided between the children and the old woman. They observed that the room and the children were kept in a very dirty state, and they knew that WHITFIELD had not changed or taken off her clothes since Whit-Sunday. Mr Sparkes said the healthiness of the children could be accounted for in some measure by the fact that they begged a good deal. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from dropsy, which had been accelerated by want of proper care and nourishment. They thought that the deceased had caused a great deal of her suffering by refusing the help tendered her by Mr Perkins and Mr Sparkes. They also thought that the Darbys should be admonished against continuing in their present mode of life and spending their money in the public-houses instead of supporting their family with it. The admonition was accordingly given by the Coroner. He also said he considered it right that it should be known that the Corporation had no power to send any person to the Workhouse against his inclination. The Jury thanked the Coroner for the trouble he had taken in bringing this case before the public.

Thursday 5 June 1856, Issue 4704 – Gale Document No. Y3200692682
OTTERY ST MARY – Accident. – On Monday last a lady, named CASELEY, in the employ of Mrs Horsford Buckerell, was in the act of catching a horse in the field, when the animal became restive and violently kicked him in the region of the heart, which caused instantaneous death. An Inquest was held on the following day, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 12 June 1856, Issue 4705 – Gale Document No. Y3200692701
Burglary with Violence – We stated a few weeks since that two men had been committed to the Devon County Gaol for burglary at Awliscombe, and for a violent assault on MR PRING, the occupant of the house; which they were alleged to have broken into. We are informed that MR PRING has recently died, and that a Coroner's Inquest have returned a verdict of "Died from Fever," it having been proved that deceased had recovered from the wounds inflicted on him by the burglars.

Thursday 19 June 1856, Issue 4706 – Gale Document No. Y3200692752
Fatal Accident – On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the Admiral Vernon Inn, at Alphington, on the body of a waggoner, named NICHOLAS WARE, who died on the previous day. It appeared that at a steep part of the road near Alphington he was driving a heavily laden wagon which belonged to his master Mr Way, farmer, when, having occasion to go in front of the horse's head he was knocked by the shaft against the hedge, and in being crushed against it and the wheels of the vehicle, had his ribs broken and sustained such other injuries as caused his instantaneous death. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Fatal Boat Accident – Loss of Two Lives. – A melancholy accident occurred in the Exeter Canal, on Monday. Two lads, named JAMES WILLIAM RIDGE, aged 18, the eldest son of MR RIDGE, tailor, of Castle-street, in this city, and JAMES AUSTIN, aged 14, the eldest son of MR AUSTIN, relieving officer &c., of Broadclist, who was on a visit to his school friend, RIDGE; went for a boating excursion down the canal. They hired a boat, called the "Star of the West," from Mr Edwards, the .lessee of the ferry, and had proceeded in it as far as the Welcome Inn, when they were seen by a young married woman, named Emma Brooks, who resides on the Haven Banks, standing up, apparently in the act of changing positions. In doing so the boat suddenly lurched, and the poor lad, AUSTIN, was plunged into the water. Young RIDGE, in attempting to rescue his companion, also fell out. He struggled for a short time, appeared to be swimming on his back, then suddenly sank, and rose no more. Mrs Brooks did not see AUSTIN rise again after he fell into the water. The poor woman was so terrified at the suddenness of the accident, that she appeared to be deprived of all powers of speech or motion, for she said, before the Coroner, with much feeling "that she was very sorry for it, but she couldn't, to save her own life, give any alarm; she thought however, that if she could have done so, the poor lads might have been saved." A man, named Bickham, who was drinking at the Welcome Inn, on the alarm being given, immediately procured the grappling irons, from the gas house, and the poor lads were soon got out of the water, but they were both dead. The bodies were taken into the Welcome Inn, and rubbed with brandy and salt, and Dr Kingdon was sent for, but all efforts to restore life were unavailing. At an Inquest held on Tuesday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., these facts were proved in evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." It was suggested by one of the Jury that drags &c., should be supplied to the Welcome Inn, as it appeared that there was no provision made for rescuing persons who might fall in the Canal, at any place nearer than the Port Royal Inn, which is on the opposite side of the river. Some of the Jury also complained of the light and dangerous character of the boat which was lent by Mr Edwards, and it was said that experienced persons only wee competent to navigate such a craft. It was stated, however, that young RIDGE had previously hired this boat, and that Mr Edwards believed that he had entrusted it to a competent person. There did not appear to be any just ground of complaint against Mr Edwards.

Thursday 19 June 1856, Issue 4706 – Gale Document No. Y3200692750
TIVERTON – Another Suicide. – Suicides have been very prevalent here lately. Since Christmas last three Coroners' inquests have been held on men who committed self-destruction by hanging themselves. A few days ago an Inquest was held at the Town Hall, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named SAMUEL WARREN, aged 62, who was found by his daughter suspended by a rope attached to a hook in the ceiling of a back house adjoining his kitchen. It appearing that he had evinced no symptoms of insanity, the Jury returned a verdict of felo de se. In accordance with this finding the deceased was buried between nine and twelve o'clock on Tuesday night without funeral rites.

Thursday 19 June 1856, Issue 4706 – Gale Document No. Y3200692751
TORQUAY – Accident. – An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Infirmary, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a lad named GEORGE PECKINS, who met his death the previous day, by falling from the cliff, at Walls Hill Quarry, a height of about 200 feet. It appears that the lad was engaged at work in the quarry, and during the dinner hour, he went to the top of the cliff in search of a bird's nest, and on getting on a stone on the edge of it, it gave way and he was precipitated a depth of about 70 feet, where he struck on a rock and fell about 100 feet further down. He was immediately taken to the Torbay Infirmary, but expired in an hour. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 July 1856, Issue 4708 – Gale Document No. Y3200692820
TIVERTON – An Inquest was held at the Town-hall on Friday, before the Coroner for the borough (F. Mackenzie, Esq.) on the body of a man named PERRY, who met with his end by falling from a wagon laden with hay on the previous Wednesday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 July 1856, Issue 4709 – Gale Document No. Y3200692852
TIVERTON – Child Drowned. – On Thursday last, an Inquest was held before F. Mackenzie, Esq., on the body of a child, five years old, named EBENEZER MORRILL, who was found in the river Exe the night previous. It appeared that in company with other children he was playing near the mill leat on the Exeter road, where there are many holes (which the turnpike trustees ought to repair), though one of which the unfortunate boy fell and was carried down with the current. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and signed a memorial to the trustees, requesting them to put the place in a proper state of repair. This is the second case that has occurred within the last twelve months.

Thursday 10 July 1856, Issue 4709 – Gale Document No. Y3200692838
EXETER – Death by Drowning. – A melancholy and fatal accident, happened on Sunday last, to an old man named JAMES GALE, 88 years of age, who was drowned in the Canal. The deceased was originally employed by the Town Council to tow vessels up and down the Canal, but becoming too old for the work he was pensioned off. His house was situated on the Haven Banks, near the first drawbridge, and on Sunday he was seen at ten minutes past two o'clock standing at his door, and he was not seen alive after; but four lads, who were passing about half an hour after observed the body of the old man in the water, near his residence. They immediately got into the water and took it out, but life was quite extinct. An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Welcome Inn, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 24 July 1856, Issue 4711 – Gale Document No. Y3200692921
OTTERY ST MARY – Fatal Accident. – On Monday week last, a labourer, named JAMES PIKE, in the employ of Mr Channon, of this place, accidentally fell off a load of wood, near Hunter's Lodge, which caused the dislocation of his neck. The poor fellow lingered about a quarter of an hour, when death put an end to his sufferings. An Inquest was held on the following day before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

KINGSBRIDGE – Three Men Drowned. - A fatal accident occurred on the river on Wednesday evening last, by which three men, named FREANCIS GILBERT, aged 38, PHILIP PEDRICK, aged 24, and WM. SHEPHERD, 21, lost their lives. They were masons in the employ of Mr Boon, of Charleton, and were sent in the morning to Ticket Wood quarry, which is on the opposite side of the river, for a boat-load of stones. On returning the boat stuck on the mud, in consequence of being deeply laden. At the flow of the tide in the evening they returned to the boat, intending to proceed to Frogmore, where the stones were to be used for building purposes. They were seen between eight and nine o'clock heaving some of the stones overboard, and the boar appeared then to be very deep in the water. On their not arriving home during the night, search was made for them in the morning, when the hate of GILBERT was found by the river side. During the day the bodies of GILBERT and SHEPHERD were picked up; the boat was also discovered, and at low water she was just visible. The body of PEDRICK was taken up the following day. The latter has left a wife and child, the other two are unmarried. From the appearance of the boat and the mud near, it is supposed that one of the men was out of the boat shoving her along, when suddenly coming into deep water, and being deeply laden at the bow, she went down head foremost. An Inquest has been held on the bodies, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday 24 July 1856, Issue 4711 – Gale Document No. Y3200692905
EXETER – Sudden Death. – We stated last week that a man, named BALSON, who had been a gentleman's servant, was found dead in his bed at a lodging-house, kept by Mrs Riley, in Trinity-street, in this city. An Inquest was held on the body last Wednesday, and was adjourned for a post mortem examination on the following Friday, when it appeared that the deceased died from a disease of the heart of long standing; and a verdict to this effect was returned.

Thursday 31 July 1856, Issue 4712 – Gale Document No. Y3200692938
EXETER – Death from Burns. – An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of JANE LENDEN, a native of Kentisbeare, aged ten years, who died in the Hospital on Friday morning. The poor girl resided with her cousin, ELIZABETH GOFF, the wife of a mason of Rising, near Kentisbeare, and at half-past vie o'clock on the morning of the 11th of June was putting a kettle over a small hearth fire, when she caught her dress on fire. She then, it appears, rushed to the garden where Mrs Goff was working to have it made out, but before that could be done she became enveloped in flames and was dreadfully burnt. She was attended by Mr Harward, Surgeon of Cullompton, up t the 26th of June, when she was conveyed to the Hospital and died there as before stated, after suffering most acutely. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 August 1856, Issue 4713 – Gale Document No. Y3200692985
TIVERTON – An Inquest was held on Monday on the body of MRS BODLEY, of Belmont-terrace, who expired suddenly on the previous day. Verdict, "Dead caused by Apoplexy."

Thursday 7 August 1856, Issue 4713 – Gale Document No. Y3200692965
EXETER – Death From Drowning. – An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Cattle Market inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM SCANES, aged six years. From the evidence of Mrs Tremlett, it appeared that on Saturday last, while she was at her bed-room window, she observed two boys, one apparently much younger than the other, going into the water just below Head Weir to bathe, but soon after the deceased was moving in a peculiar manner, and fearing all was not right she requested her servant to fetch her son to go to the boy's assistance, but before he arrived the deceased had sunk and Mr Tremlett was obliged to dive several times before he could find the body, which he discovered in a gravel pit about six feet deep. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, and at the same time expressing themselves in terms of the highest praise of Mr Tremlett's conduct in endeavouring to rescue the deceased, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Suicide By A Boy. – On Friday last RICHARD BRIMBLECOMBE, (son of JOHN BRIMBLECOMBE) a lad 18 years of age, and who has for some time past resided with John Coniam, Esq., of Way-farm, Chagford, was engaged with the workman, John Jeffery, housing a rick of corn. When taking their luncheon the lad said to Jeffery "I wonder which is the easiest death, shooting or drowning?" Jeffery replied, "I think drowning, but I don't like either of them, it is a dangerous trial." Shortly afterwards the boy left, apparently to engage in his usual duties, but shortly afterwards a report of firearms was heard by Jeffery, who thought that some one had been using the gun to kill rooks, which had been destroying the potatoes and turnips. Finding the boy did not come, he called out for him, but no one replied. He then went up into the tallet, and was horrified to find the lad weltering in his blood. His head was shattered to pieces, and he was quite dead. No cause can be assigned for the rash act, as he had an excellent place, and a kind and good master. An inquest was held on Monday, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 14 August 1856, Issue 4714 – Gale Document No. Y3200693025
BARNSTAPLE – Death by Drowning. – The body of MR HENRY CORDEUX (of whose supposed death reference was made in our last) was found by a shrimp fisherman on the day subsequent to the distressing casualty. The deceased was a son of MR JOHN CORDEUX, linen manufacturer, of Barnsley. The Coroner's inquisition upon the remains of the unfortunate gentleman, who was about 26 years of age, resulted in a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Manslaughter – An Inquest was held by R. Bremridge, Esq., at Ash, in the parish of Petrockstow, on Saturday last, on the body of a man called WILLIAM MITCHELL. It appeared that the deceased, in company with his brother-in-law (JOHN HORRELL) and other parties were returning from Sheepwash on the Thursday previous, when a disturbance took place between the brothers-in-law and a fight followed, which ended in HORRELL kicking MITCHELL in a most brutal manner in the lower part of the abdomen. The poor fellow lingered in indescribable agony till the following evening, when death ensued. A verdict in accordance with the above facts was returned; and HORRELL was committed to take his trial for Manslaughter under the Coroner's warrant.

Thursday 14 August 1856, Issue 4714 – Gale Document No. Y3200693004
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL BENMORE, aged 25 years. The deceased was a travelling cutler, and resided in Coombe-street, in this city. On Monday morning he got up in his usual good health and partook of a hearty breakfast, after which he left home for the purpose of proceeding with his usual avocations. Shortly afterwards he dropped down in the Magdalen-road, and was at once conveyed to the Hospital, where every attention which medical skill could devise was paid him, but he expired about half an hour after his admission. The Enquiry was adjourned till Tuesday evening, when Dr Biggs, the house surgeon of the Hospital, who had in the meantime made a post mortem examination, stated that death resulted from apoplexy, caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain.

Thursday 21 August 1856, Issue 4715 – Gale Document No. Y3200693041
EXETER – Distressing and Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held last Thursday before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a lady, aged 14 years, named WILLIAM HENRY PONSFORD, the son of MR PONSFORD, butcher, of Paris-street, in this city, who met with his death by falling into a large tub, containing "brine." It appeared that the deceased had been afflicted with epileptic fits for several years, and that he was paralysed on one side. On Wednesday morning he went into a back-house where the "pickle-tub" is kept, and was only missed about five minutes. On going to the house in question, he was found lying by the side of the tub, with his head completely immersed in the liquor, quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the circumstances.

Thursday 4 September 1856, Issue 4717 – Gale Document No. Y3200693134
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – JAMES HOLMES, a middle-aged labouring man, has met with a fatal casualty. The deceased was in the employ of Mr W. Ball, of Winsham Farm, Braunton; and on Sunday week last was engaged in making a mow of barley. Whilst thus occupied the poor fellow fell to the ground, and sustained such injuries in the neck as to cause almost instant death. The Coroner's Inquest resulted in a verdict in keeping with the foregoing facts.

Thursday 18 September 1856, Issue 4719 – Gale Document No. Y3200693175
Determined Suicide. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Devon County Gaol, before A. Leigh, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a man named WM. AGGETT. It appeared from the evidence of Mr E. H. Rose, the governor, and Mr Churchward, warder, that the deceased had been committed for trial on a charge of stealing timber, at Prince Town, Dartmoor, on the 16th of August last, and was to have taken his trial at the General Sessions, which commenced yesterday. Since his committal he had behaved in a quiet and orderly manner, and nothing peculiar was observed in his conduct. It appeared, however, that his son was committed for trial a few days ago – it being alleged that the son had stolen the timber, and that the father received it knowing it to have been stolen. Previous to his son's committal, deceased appears to have cherished the hope of an acquittal, and it is considered that when he found that his son was in gaol he despaired of it, and that this, together with some difficulties respecting a loan society, preyed upon his mind, and that under desponding influences he committed suicide. The governor saw him on the previous (Friday) afternoon and he then appeared as usual; but when Mr Churchward went into his cell at eight o'clock the next morning, he found that he had tied his hand (he had only one hand) with a handkerchief across his belly, and had also tied his legs together; and had hung himself to the water pipe, with a piece of tar cord, which he had had to pick into oakum. The neck was not dislocated, but he had, in the most determined manner, effected strangulation, and was quite dead when the warden went to him. Mr Robins, solicitor of Tavistock, to whom his defence at the sessions had been confided, attended to watch the case on behalf of the friends. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 25 September 1856, Issue 4720 – Gale Document No. Y3200693227
TORQUAY – Fatal Accident. – An accident occurred on Monday evening, last week, to a lad named HOLE, an apprentice to Mr William Burt, cabinet-maker. The lad was engaged with another apprentice putting timber into a loft, when they both lost their balance and fell, the lad HOLE pitching on his head. They were both conveyed to the Infirmary, and on Sunday last HOLE died. The other lad is in a fair way or recovery. An Inquest was held on the following day, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

ASHBURTON – Determined Suicide. – An Inquest was held on Saturday last, on the body of MISS GRACE PEARSE, daughter of the late MR JOHN PEARSE, butcher. Deceased, it appears, had been depressed in spirits for some time past, and on Saturday morning she proceeded to an upper room in the house unobserved, and put an end to her existence by hanging herself with a rope to a beam. When found, life was extinct. A verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Thursday 25 September 1856, Issue 4720 – Gale Document No. Y3200693211
EXETER – Melancholy Accident. – A day or two since a little girl, named LOUISA FLOYD PIKE, the daughter of a dairyman living in St James's Street, fell into a pan of boiling milk, and received such injuries from the unfortunate accident that she died soon after. An Inquest was held on the body at the Topsham Inn, on Friday, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Death of an Extraordinary Character. - An Inquest was held at the Devon County Gaol on Saturday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a woman, named BRIDGET O'COSTELLO. Her handwriting was said to be elegant, but her manners were coarse and vulgar. She studiously concealed her origin and she would say nothing of her friends and connexions either to the governor, Mr Rose, or to the Roman Catholic priest of this city, who visited her. She had a mania for stealing bread. On one occasion she ran after a baker's boy and having threatened him with violence with a knife, he dropped his bread and ran away. She was committed to the Devon County Gaol, for stealing the bread, and soon after the term of her imprisonment had expired she committed a similar offence and was again incarcerated in the Devon Gaol. She was in a consumption when she entered and she died on Friday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 2 October 1856, Issue 4721 – Gale Document No. Y3200693267
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – On Friday evening last, as a Bideford lighter was proceeding down the river Taw, one of the crew, named WILLIAM KIBELL, fell overboard and was drowned. An Inquest was held on the following day, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TORRINGTON – Caution to Mothers. – An Inquest was held at Potheridgegate, in the parish of Merton, on Thursday last, before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a girl aged 3 years. The parents, named ROCKEY, reside at Potheridge-gate, and have a family of four children. The mother considering they had worms, gathered a herb called bearsfoot, and gave the children a decoction of it. Shortly afterwards they were taken ill, but before medical aid could be obtained, one of the children died. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The other children, under the skilful treatment of J. O. Rouse, Esq., Surgeon, Torrington, are fast recovering.

Thursday 2 October 1856, Issue 4721 – Gale Document No. Y3200693247
An Inquest was held at South Bovey on Friday last on the body of a woman named DYMOND, who died from injuries she had inflicted on herself by cutting her throat.

Thursday 9 October 1856, Issue 4722 – Gale Document No. Y3200693282
An Inquest was held at Stoke Canon, on Tuesday last, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HILL, aged 69, who hung himself. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was in a field digging on Saturday, the 27th instant, and about two o'clock in the afternoon he went home and complained of being unwell. In about a quarter of an hour after he went out his daughter went in search of him, and found him in an outhouse hanging by the neck, from a beam in the roof, by a trace rope. Deceased was in a desponding state all last summer, having been in the habit of talking to himself and shewing other symptoms of depression. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide by hanging, deceased being in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 23 October 1856, Issue 4724 – Gale Document No. Y3200693347
EXETER – Sudden Death of a Child. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Sawyer's Arms, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child named ELIZABETH MERRIFIELD. From the evidence of the mother it appeared that deceased was born on the 20th Sept. last and up to the time of its death was a very healthy child; but on Wednesday morning last she raised the child for the purpose of giving it food, and in a few minutes she found it dead in her arms. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God.

Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Acland Arms, St Sidwell's, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young man, aged 27, named THOS. CHURCHILL GOVIER. It appeared that deceased lived with a young woman, named Margaret Raddon, in York-street, and was in the employ of Mrs Steer, green grocer. He had complained of pains in his shoulder for the last fortnight, and on Saturday last he came to work, and in answer to Mrs Steer, said "he felt charming," although he had had a bad night, in consequence of his not having had any "baccy." Mrs Steer gave him a penny to get some, and they then proceeded to supply a customer with vegetables. When opposite the Barrack-lane, in Longbrook-street, the deceased had a fit of coughing and threw up a little blood. Mrs Steer hastened him on, and when they arrived in Warren-lane, he had another fit of coughing and vomited blood. They proceeded on towards the residence of Mr Perkins, the surgeon, as deceased appeared very ill. Neither Mr Perkins or Mr Hunt, surgeons, were home. Deceased said to Mrs Steer, "My God, missus, I shall drop," and he immediately fell in the road. Mr Land, surgeon, was soon on the spot, and he had him conveyed to his sister's in a truck. He died twenty minutes afterwards; the cause of death being, as Mr Land stated, pulmonary apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 6 November 1856, Issue 4726 – Gale Document No. Y3200693434
TOTNES – Death of the Gipsy King. – An aged man, named STANLEY, commonly called the King of the Gipsies, was drowned in the Dart on Tuesday night, last week. His body was found in the river on Wednesday, not far from the New London Inn, where it was carried. An Inquest was opened before W. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the same day, but it was adjourned. STANLEY was about 80 years of age, and was well known throughout Devonshire as a horse dealer.

Thursday 13 November 1856, Issue 4727 – Gale Document No. Y3200693461
TOTNES – Suspected Murder. – At an adjourned Inquest held on the 7th instant, on the body of JOSIAS STANLEY, the Gipsy King, the medical man, Mr Hains, was examined, and stated that STANLEY had been strangled and thrown into the water. the Inquest is further adjourned until the 21st inst.

Thursday 20 November 1856, Issue 4728 – Gale Document No. Y3200693497
KENTON – Fatal Accident. – On Thursday last WILLIAM PAYNE, aged 14, the son of a labourer in the employ of Mr E. Saunders, jun., was engaged in driving a horse and cart from a field, laden with mangold wurzel, when he fell out, and the wheel passed over his body. He was taken up by a man called Bambury, and conveyed to the house of his master. Medical aid was sent for, but he had sustained such severe injuries that he only survived a few minutes. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, at the Dolphin Inn, Kenton, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned. Thursday 27 November 1856, Issue 4729 – Gale Document No. Y3200693525
OTTERY ST. MARY – Suicide. – On Tuesday last an Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, at Cadhay Farm, on the body of THOMAS MARSHALL, a farm bailiff, aged 42. It appeared that deceased and two or three of the workmen slept at the dairy house adjoining, and on Tuesday morning the men got up about five o'clock, leaving the deceased in bed. No one entered the house until an hour afterwards, when MR JAMES MARSHALL, of Cadhay Farm, a brother of deceased, went to call him, and finding he did not answer, proceeded to the bedroom, where he found his brother lying on his back in bed, his face covered with blood. The room smelt strongly of gunpowder, and the whole of deceased's scalp was blown away, and the brain scattered over the wall of the room. The deceased is supposed to have placed the muzzle of the gun to his left eye and, whilst laying on his back in bed, by some means discharged it, and the contents passed through the head. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased shot himself, being a Lunatic. A few weeks since deceased underwent a medical examination with a view to his being removed to the Lunatic Asylum at Exeter.

Thursday 27 November 1856, Issue 4729 – Gale Document No. Y3200693530
TORQUAY – Melancholy Suicide. – On Friday a distressing suicide was committed by a man named HENRY BOND, a hackney carriage driver, by hanging himself to the bed-post in his room. Deceased has for some time past been in rather distressed circumstances, and at times appeared melancholy, but nothing unusual was observed in his conduct until Friday morning, when about eleven o'clock his daughter not having seen him went into his bedroom, and discovered him hanging to the bed-post quite dead. Assistance was called, but proved of no avail, deceased having been dead for some hours. An Inquest was held on Saturday, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned.

Thursday 4 December 1856, Issue 4730 – Gale Document No. Y3200693562
EXETER – On Wednesday an Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young woman named HENRIETTA HAMBLIN. It appeared that for some years past the deceased had been suffering from "king's evil," but on the Fifth of November she was very much frightened at hearing the report of a cannon, which was let off near her residence by a boy. She continued to get very ill from that time, and on Sunday last she expired. After hearing medical and other evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 11 December 1856, Issue 4731 – Gale Document No. Y3200693576
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the Windsor Castle Inn, St Sidwells, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM SATTERLEY, aged 79 years, who resided with his son, a dairyman, in Summerland-street. From the evidence it appeared that deceased partook of his supper as usual on Saturday evening, and retired to rest about 12 o'clock in good health, but on his son going to his father's room on Sunday morning, he found him lying on the floor partially dressed, and quite dead. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr Hunt, surgeon, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 18 December 1856, Issue 4732 – Gale Document No. Y3200693612
FOUR MEN DROWNED – Another melancholy catastrophe at sea occurred at Appledore, in this county, last Saturday. It appears that a vessel belonging to Mr Head, of Bideford, was lying in the bay off Barnstaple Bar, which signalled for a pilot. Two boats, each manned by seven men, put off to her assistance. The weather was very rough; there was a heavy sea; and the wind blew N.N.W. On nearing the bar buoy, a breaker struck one of the boats and swamped her. The crew were plunged into the sea, and four of them were drowned. The other bat, being near at hand, rescued the other three men. The bodies of the unfortunate men, who were named DAVID NICKOLLS, WILLIAM JEWELL, JOHN LOCK and THOMAS LOCK, were ultimately picked up, and an Inquest was held on them by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the County, on Monday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. We hear that three of the poor fellows have each left a wife and family.

Thursday 25 December 1856, Issue 4733 – Gale Document No. Y3200693667
EXETER – Sudden Death. – On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the Fireman's Arms Inn, West-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD IVEY. the deceased resided in Sherman's Court, West-street, and was 67 years of age. He had previously been in the army, and was discharged in consequence of having a disease in his chest. Since that time he had been frequently attended by Mr A. Cumming, surgeon. On Wednesday morning, at six o'clock, the wife of the deceased left her husband in bed. She gave him his breakfast, and then went to Stoke Mills, where she worked till three o'clock in the afternoon. She was sent for, and when she arrived home she found her husband dead on the floor. Mr Cumming was immediately sent for, and he examined the body. There were no marks of violence, and he attributed the cause of death to disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of died from "Natural Causes."

Thursday 25 December 1856, Issue 4733 – Gale Document No. Y3200693644
EXETER – Manslaughter. – An Inquest was held last week at the Seven Stars, St. Thomas, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH HANCOCK, who was found dead in her bed a few days previous. The Jury having viewed the body of the deceased, and seeing that a blow remained in the forehead, wished the Coroner to ask the husband of the deceased the cause of it. The Coroner accordingly cautioned him, and told him that he need not answer any questions which he thought might criminate himself. He then asked what was the cause of the blow which the Jury had seen in deceased's forehead? HANCOCK stated that about five or six months ago, whilst living at Kenton, he and his wife quarrelled at the breakfast table, but he could not recollect now the cause of the quarrel. His wife threw a fork and some potatoe skins at him first; and he, in return, threw a cup at his wife, which struck her on the forehead. That was the cause of the wound. The wound had never properly healed: but his wife had repeatedly had medical advice respecting it. The mother of deceased stated that her daughter had suffered a great deal in her head ever since the blow. Mr Lyddon, surgeon, having made a post mortem examination, stated he discovered an abscess about half an inch in the skull, which corresponded with the external injury. There were about two ounces of water in the ventricles; and a considerable concussion about the back part of the scalp. There was no fracture in the skull. There was an aperture, through which fungus was protruding; and it had already protruded through the dura mater, and out of the aperture. The aperture would admit a small crow quill. He could give no account of the forming of the aperture. He believed that the external injury was the cause of the internal abscess, and that the internal abscess was the cause of death. Mr Farrant, surgeon, who had assisted the last witness, stated that he believed the abscess was the cause of death. The Jury, after an hour's deliberation returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the deceased's husband, and he was immediately taken in custody and removed to prison.

Thursday 1 January 1857, Issue 4734 – Gale Document No. Y3200693699
BARNSTAPLE – Death From Drinking Ardent Spirits. – Sometime since BARNEY MURPHY and John MacKivett pledged themselves to become strict followers of Father Matthew – at least for a certain period. The time of prohibition from any alcoholic indulgences arrived on Christmas-eve; and during that night these worthies seem to have partaken of sundry deep potations of "neat" Irish whiskey – their native "element." Returning to their lodgings at the Black Horse Inn, on the Quay, about eleven o'clock, they sat down in a private room, and were seemingly soon lulled into a perfect somniferous state. Three hours subsequently an endeavour was made to get them to bed; but it was then discovered that MURPHY had ceased to live, and MacKivett was entirely insensible. Of course, all human power was found unavailing in the former case: but in the latter, medical aid succeeded in restoring the then almost extinct animation, and the bibulous delinquent is now fast recovering. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest upon the body of MURPHY on the Friday following, and a verdict of "Died from Excessive Drinking of Ardent Spirits" was returned. The deceased was a packman and about 29 years of age.

Thursday 1 January 1857, Issue 4734 – Gale Document No. Y3200693684
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Three Tuns Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM WILLEY, aged 76, an old pensioner, residing in Musgrave's Alley, in this city. It appeared from the evidence that deceased went on Christmas Day to dine with his sister, and partook of a hearty dinner and tea, and returned home between six and seven o'clock in the evening in his usual health, and went to bed, but soon after complained of feeling unwell, and hearing a noise in his head. Before medical attendance could be procured he died. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, who was of opinion that death had been caused by a rupture of one of the blood vessels of the head, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

LOVE AND SUICIDE. – MARY ANN CRAWLEY, a girl of only fifteen years and three months old, committed suicide in a most determined manner on Friday night. She was a boot-binder, and worked for a Mrs Hill. An intimacy seems to have sprung up between deceased and Mrs Hill's son, Henry, a lad of about eighteen. They had however disagreed, and had not spoken for two months until Christmas day, when the intimacy was renewed. Deceased appeared to be jealous of one of her companions named Matilda Skinner. She went out on Friday afternoon, and got her little brother to pledge a frock for two shillings. She then went to the Custom House Inn, where she had some drink, and quarrelled and fought with Emma White; for Mrs Hill saw her outside the public-house in question in the evening with her face scratched, her hair dishevelled, and no bonnet on her head. Mrs Hill asked her what the matter was, and she replied – "Look here how Em White has served me." After that she went to the Jolly Sailor Inn, and here she told a girl that she "loved Harry," wept a good deal and said she would drown herself. Between ten and eleven o'clock she invited Matilda Skinner, of whom she was jealous, to accompany her to the Quay, as she wanted to tell her something. She had been frequently angry with Skinner on account of her intimacy with Henry Hill, and on this occasion she said she might thank her for all of it. They went to the Quay together, and deceased put her arm round her neck and sung a song. Immediately afterwards, when about seven or eight yards from the edge of the Quay, she drew her arm from Skinner's neck, loosened her bonnet, exclaimed "Now you b---- I will do it, " jumped into the river with a loud scream, and was drowned. At the time she did this deceased was sensible but had been drinking. These facts were elicited at a Coroner's Inquest held at the Fireman's Arms on Saturday afternoon before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner. The Coroner addressed the Jury at some length, commenting on the evidence of the various witnesses and the deliberate act of self-destruction which had been committed by the deceased; he considered it to be an unlawful, malicious act which had resulted in her own death. It was necessary, however, that he should state to the Jury that in order to constitute felo de se, the parties should be of years of discretion and in their senses, otherwise it was no crime; and persons were supposed to be of years of discretion at the age of 14. Having lucidly explained the law, the Coroner said it would be for the Jury to say whether they were satisfied from the evidence that at the time the deceased jumped into the river she was a rational and accountable being; if so, they were bound, regardless of the consequences, to return a verdict of felo de se. If, however, on the other hand, they were of opinion that the mind of the deceased had been so disturbed by feelings of jealousy as to render her unconscious of right or wrong, and unaccountable for her actions, they would say so, and return a verdict of "Temporary insanity." The Jury, seventeen in number, after a few minutes consultation, and on the opinion of each being taken by the Coroner, unanimously returned a verdict of felo de se, in which the Coroner expressed his entire concurrence, and issued his order for the burial of the deceased privately between the hours of nine and twelve at night, within twenty four hours from the finding of the Inquisition, in pursuance of the statue, which we have been informed was carried into effect, and the body of the deceased interred in the Cemetery without the rites of Christian burial, about twelve at night.

Thursday 8 January 1857, Issue 4735 – Gale Document No. Y3200693736
EXETER – Suicide. – An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) at the Golden Eagle Inn, Bartholomew-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner and a respectable Jury, on the body of JOHN HILL, aged 68 years, a builder and undertaker, residing in Bartholomew-street, in this city. From the evidence of the widow of the deceased, it appeared that on Sunday evening last she went to chapel, leaving her husband at home reading the Bible; but he had for some time been in a low and desponding state of mind, having at one time been possessed of a good deal of property, which, however, had all been sold; and on his wife returning home, she observed a light in the under part of the house, and on going to see the cause of it she found her husband suspended by a small cord to the cupboard door. She at once cut him down and sent for medical assistance but on whose arrival it was found that deceased was quite dead. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 15 January 1857, Issue 4736 – Gale Document No. Y3200693773
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at the Exeter Cavalry Barracks, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of DAVID PORTER, a private in the 1st King's Dragoon Guards, aged 35 years. It appeared from the statement of a private named McEwen, that on the previous day he was sitting at the table opposite the deceased, who was peeling potatoes, when he observed him suddenly drop on to the floor, and on going to ascertain the cause of it, he found him quite dead. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Dr Jephson, the surgeon to the regiment, who, at the request of the Coroner, had previously made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, found the cause of death to be the rupture of a blood vessel of the hart, and returned a verdict of "Natural Death." He was buried with military hours in St David's churchyard, on Thursday afternoon.

Melancholy Death in The Devon County Gaol. – An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon in the Hospital of the Devon County Gaol, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., on the body of MR HERMAN JAMES LOTT, of Honiton. It appeared from the evidence of Mr E. H. Rose, governor of the gaol, that on Tuesday, the 6th inst., the deceased was committed to the debtors' ward, under a warrant from the County Court at Honiton. He was then in a very excited state, and was evidently labouring under the effects of drink. He went to bed almost immediately, and continued much in the same state, scarcely touching a bit of food, until he died. Mr Webb, the surgeon, was called in, and he received every attention from him, as well as from the officers in attendance, and from the other debtors. The warder of the debtors' prison, Thomas Pennington, stated that when deceased arrived there he was in a very excited state, and appeared to him to be tipsy. He was supplied by his wife with a cup of coffee, as he appeared very thirsty, and went to bed. The next morning he was much in the same state, and drank cold water, which he asked for, and a teacup full of gruel. He asked for the surgeon, and Mr Webb was sent for at nine o'clock on the Wednesday night. Deceased was attended to by Samuel Johns, who has charge of the sick in the debtors' ward, and on Friday night, shortly after nine o'clock, he died: Mr Webb, surgeon, stated that when he first saw the deceased, on Wednesday, he was apparently recovering from drunkenness. Anticipating delirium tremens, he requested him to remain in bed, and prescribed for him accordingly. On Thursday he saw him again, and was then suffering from delirium tremens, but he was sensible. He ordered him medicine, and saw him on Friday, when he appeared much in the same state. At nine o'clock at night he was sent for, and immediately went to the gaol, but found that he had just expired. His opinion was that death was caused from excitement, terminating in convulsions. In answer to a Juror, Mr Webb said the fact of his being brought to the gaol might have increased the excitement under which he was labouring. Mr Rogers, the brother-in-law of the deceased, stated that previous to his committal he had suffered from convulsions; that on the Saturday before his removal he had sold an estate, called Branscombe, as agent for another party, by which a considerable profit had been realised, and he was of opinion that this had greatly excited him, which, with the fact of his having had convulsions previously, would go far to account for the cause of death. The Coroner said that if deceased had died out of the gaol there would have been no necessity for holding the Inquest. He bore testimony to the attention which was paid to the prisoners by the authorities of the gaol, and the satisfactory nature of the evidence which was always given in cases of this sort. The Jury returned a verdict that "Death was caused by Convulsions."

Thursday 15 January 1857, Issue 4736 – Gale Document No. Y3200693775
TORRINGTON – Accident. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Exeter Inn, before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES PASSMORE, aged 3 years. The deceased was left alone in the house on Monday evening, while the mother went to fetch some water, and on her return, she found the poor child enveloped in flames; he lingered until Wednesday, when he died. the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 January 1857, Issue 4736 – Gale Document No. Y3200693771
TIVERTON – MANSLAUGHTER. – An Inquest was held on Friday and Monday before the Borough Coroner (F. Mackenzie, Esq.), on the body of a man named BEER, who, it was alleged, had died from the effects of injuries inflicted on him by John Joyce, a shoe maker, with whom he had quarrelled at a public-house in the town about a fortnight previously. Several witnesses, some of whom proved that Joyce kicked BEER in the leg, and afterwards jumped upon him, having been examined, a verdict of "Manslaughter" against Joyce was returned by the Jury.

Thursday 22 January 1857, Issue 4737 – Gale Document No. Y3200693790
EXETER – Melancholy Accident. – A child, aged fourteen months, named JOHN PINWELL BLAKE, of Kenton, met with his death under melancholy circumstances last week. It appeared that on Monday, his mother had thrown some lime about the floor of a newly-built house for the purpose of drying it. She had placed some lime on the table, and the child climbed upon a chair and pulled down the lime, which fell over his face. The mother washed it off, and gave him something to drink; lime however, being in the poor child's mouth it was carried into the stomach, and on the following day he died. An Inquest was held at the Devon Arms last Friday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Melancholy Death – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a lad, aged 15, named THOMAS GERMON. It appeared from the evidence of Mr Biggs, the house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, that the deceased was driving a horse in a thrashing machine for a farmer at Bickington, and leaned his arm on the wheel, in one of the cogs of which he caught the sleeve of his smock frock, and his arm, being drawn into the wheel, was broken at the elbow joint. He was removed to the hospital, where the limb was amputated, and deceased went on well until a few days ago, when he became worse, and died on Sunday. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Sudden Death – An Inquest was held on Friday last at the Bristol Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD FOX, a fly-driver, residing in Longbrook-street, St Sidwells, aged 50 years. From the evidence of the widow of the deceased, it appeared that in July last her husband was driving a fly to the railway. When near the station he jumped off, in order to adjust the harness, and in doing so he sustained a compound fracture of the leg. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he remained four months, after which he returned home nearly recovered. On Wednesday night, however, he complained of being unwell, and of breathing with difficulty. Mr Hunt, surgeon, was sent for, and deceased died two hours afterwards. Mr Hunt stated that the cause of death was fluid about the heart. Verdict – Natural Death.

Sudden Death of a Child. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at the Acland Arms, St Sidwells, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child aged ten days, the daughter of JOSEPH MARTIN, who had died suddenly, at Lyon's Holt. The peculiarity in the case was that the child was previously healthy, and that there was nothing to account for death excepting a little fluid, a mixture of blood and water, which issued from its nose. Mr Farrant, surgeon, stated that this would result from congested lungs, and that suffocation would result from such congestion, but he could not give any further account of the cause of death, excepting a post mortem examination was made. The Jury, however, believing that there was no suspicion that the child met its death by foul means, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 5 February 1857, Issue 4739 – Gale Document No. Y3200693850
EXETER - Death of an Infant. – On Monday an Inquest was held at the George and Dragon Inn, St Sidwells, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN WHITFIELD, an infant. It appeared that on the 30th January, the child slept with its parents; at midnight it was suckled, and at five o'clock in the morning it was dead. Mr J. S. Perkins gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from being overlaid. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 5 February 1857, Issue 4739 – Gale Document No. Y3200693866
BARNSTAPLE – Inquest. – It was stated last week that the body of a young man had been found in the water under the railway bridge at Fremington Pill. The name of the unfortunate fellow is CHARLES PAVEY, whose friends reside at Bristol. His watch stopped at twenty minutes to seven: it was high tide about that time on the evening when the deceased is supposed to have mistaken his way over the bridge and to have walked into the river. He was spoken of as being very temperate in his habits. The Coroner's Inquisition on the remains resulted in a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 12 February 1857, Issue 4740 – Gale Document No. Y3200693879
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the Windsor Castle Inn, in Summerland-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY WILLIAMS, a single woman aged 52, residing in Codrington-place. St Sidwells, who died suddenly at her residence on Saturday last. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was of an unusually full habit of body, but had not been attended by any medical man for upwards of twelve months. She got up as usual on the morning of her death, and shortly after she was dressed she called to her servant who was near to come to her assistance, and died in a few minutes, in her arms. Mr Johnson Webb, the surgeon who had last attended, was called, and after hearing his evidence which tended to show the cause of death to have arisen from "hypertrophy of the heart," the Jury returned a verdict of Natural Death.

Thursday 19 February 1857, Issue 4741 – Gale Document No. Y3200693924
DAWLISH – Alleged Death of a Child Through Illtreatment by The Father. Considerable excitement has been caused in Dawlish, in consequence of a rumour that a child, aged 14, named JANE NEWBERRY, the daughter of WILLIAM NEWBERRY, a shoemaker of that town, had come by her death though the illtreatment of her father. An Inquest was held last Wednesday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, but it was adjourned for the production of witnesses residing in Exeter, (it appearing that the deceased was living with Mr Fluellin, a dairyman of Mount Radford, at the time when the alleged illtreatment took place) and for Mr Baker, the surgeon who attended the deceased, to make a post mortem examination of the body. The Inquest was re-opened at the Manor Inn, yesterday (Tuesday) before W. A. Cockey, Esq., and a respectable Jury; Mr M. Stickland being the foreman thereof. The room in which the Inquest was held was crowded, and considerable interest was evinced by the spectators throughout the proceedings. Mr Fryer attended to watch the case for the father of deceased. Samuel Fluellin, a dairyman of Mount Radford, Exeter, stated that the deceased lived with him as a servant for about three or four months. There was no agreement as to wages at first, but he was to provide her with everything necessary. At Christmas, she being somewhat dissatisfied, he gave her sixpence per week as wages. Soon afterwards she complained of headache, and his wife requested her to procure some salts and senna, of which, he believed, she partook. On different occasions deceased had expressed a wish to go home to her father and mother, and his wife ultimately wrote to the parents. On Friday, the 23rd of January, the father of deceased came to his house, and scolded her, but what he said he could not say. He struck the child on the side of the head with his hand, but although he was in the room he could not say whether or not he knocked her down. Witness then left the father with the deceased, and went to market. On the 4th of February, deceased complained to him that she had a very "bad headache," and expressed a wish to go home: which he allowed her to do – his wife accompanying her. She seemed better then, and was much more lively. Sarah Taylor, a servant in the employ of Mrs Patch, Mount Radford, Exeter, stated that she was at Fluellen's on Friday three weeks, and on coming out she saw a man, whom she now clearly identified as NEWBERRY, the father. He came up to the deceased, said to her "this is the second time you have brought me here; what do you mean by it?" and then struck her a severe blow on the left side of the head with his fist, and knocked her down. He again struck her after she was on the ground on the headmost unmercifully, and witness begged Mrs Fluellin not to allow him to "beat the girl too unmerciful." Mrs Fluellin remonstrated with him, and NEWBERRY struck her in the face, but he did not appear to know it was her, and begged her pardon. Mrs Fluellin then ordered witness out of the house, and requested her not to interfere, as the deceased was deserving the whole of it. Witness considered the beating was much too severe and she fancied from the father's looks that he would serve deceased very bad. She saw deceased on the following Sunday, and she told Mrs Holmes of the occurrence the day before. Mary Jane Edworthy, a girl of twelve years of age, who resides at Heavitree, stated that she knew the deceased. About three weeks ago she went to see her grandmother, who lives near Mrs Fluellen, who sent her there for some milk. NEWBERRY came, and said to deceased, "This is the second time you have brought me here;" upon which he commenced "bumping her with his fist," knocked her down, and kicked her three or four times in the legs and on the stomach. Mrs Fluellin then told him to take a stick or rope, and NEWBERRY took a stick, but she did not see him beat her with it, as she then left the house. The deceased cried very much. On the following day witness saw deceased, and spoke to her about her father's beating her, and she replied, "It isn't any odds." Mrs Fluellen, a half sister of the deceased, stated that she lived with her about four months, and remained in her service within a few days of her death. The girl was dissatisfied, and said she did not like milking, or washing, or scouring. Witness sent to her father, and informed him of it. He came up and struck deceased several times with his hand. He did not appear very angry; she did not see him knock her down. He said, "This is the second time you have called me up, and recollect that you do not call me here again." The last witness was not in the house at the time. The girl Ebworthy was then recalled, and stated that when Mrs Fluellen left to get her the milk witness went into the kitchen and saw the father beat deceased in the manner described in her previous evidence. The beating lasted ten minutes. Mrs Fluellen further stated that she told her father that she would rather he would beat her with a rope or stick. The Coroner. – What was your motive in making that request? Witness said she had no particular motive. Her father did not beat deceased more severely than she had deserved. She did not complain of headache until three weeks after the beating; and when she took her home she was in good health. Her father received deceased very kindly, and even after the beating he parted with her on good terms and promised to bring her a new pair of boots. She then said, "I' will be a good child, father, and will do what Mrs Fluellen tells me." Mr Baker, surgeon, of Dawlish, who was called in to see deceased on the 6th of February, stated that he found her insensible and in a comatose state. He made a post mortem examination of the body, the result of which was that he found an abscess on the brain, which was in a very diseased state. Death was caused by the diseased or softened state of the brain. The child's death might have been accelerated by the ill-treatment he had heard described, but he did not think that the child would have lived long, or would ever have grown up to womanhood. He further stated that the mother told him that the child was not of very strong intellect – indeed she was what was called "soft." The Coroner in summing up, referred to the ill-treatment which it had been proved the child had received from the father, and to the fact that a medical man was not called in until the eleventh hour. He directed the Jury, that if they believed that the ill-treatment which the child received accelerated her death, they could bring in a verdict of manslaughter. If however, they believed that the child was in that state of health that the treatment by the father did not accelerate the death, then their verdict would be "Died from Natural Causes." The Jury, after some deliberation, returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes," the foreman saying that the Jury desired the Coroner to reprimand the father of the deceased for not having called in medical advice sooner, and also for ill-treatment, in beating his daughter in a manner that was most cruel and unnecessary. The Coroner called in NEWBERRY, and told him that it was quite clear that he had brutally ill-treated his child, and that although the Jury had leaned to the merciful side, still they felt both disgust and abhorrence at the cruelty which he had exhibited towards his daughter. If she was "soft," as had been described, there was the more reason that she should have been treated with paternal kindness and consideration. He intimated to NEWBERRY that he had had a narrow escape, and advised him to be more careful of his conduct for the future. One of the Jury said the case had been very properly brought before them for investigation, and Pearse, the Police offer, deserved credit for having done so.

Thursday 19 February 1857, Issue 4741 – Gale Document No. Y3200693913
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, last Thursday, on the body of JOHN MAYNE, aged 45, a labourer of St Sidwells. The deceased was at work on Tuesday, at Mr Salter's sandpit at Heavitree, with a horse and cart, when a quantity of overhanging earth and stone gave way, and falling, tipped up the cart which came in contact with the deceased's leg, and also caused an injury to his back. He was taken to the hospital, where it was found that his leg was broken. He died soon after, and upon a post mortem examination, by order of the Jury, Dr Biggs, the house surgeon, found that death was caused by a partial displacement of the vertebrae. – Verdict "Accidental Death."

Child Scalded To Death. – An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the Butcher's Arms Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child, named JAMES STRONG, who resided with his parents on Stepcote Hill. It appeared from the evidence of the mother, that on Thursday last, the deceased, while moving his chair towards the fire, upset a saucepan of boiling water over himself, and was so severely scalded, that he died on Saturday morning last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 26 February 1857, Issue 4742 – Gale Document No. Y3200693939
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Bude Haven Hotel, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH HEMPSON, aged 66. Deceased lived alone, in a cottage on Southernhay, and would occasionally lock herself in her room for days together. During the past week she had done so, and the neighbours not hearing her moving on Sunday, got into her room and found her on the floor, dead. Mr Warren, surgeon, said deceased died from suffocation, caused by falling on her face and not having the power to move. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 5 March 1857, Issue 4743 – Gale Document No. Y3200693971
EXETER – Death of a Child. – An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Bristol Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE CUNNINGHAM BINDING, an illegitimate child, aged about three years. The deceased had been placed soon after its birth with a Mrs Hall, residing in Longbrook-street, to keep and nurse, the mother until lately having been in service at Okehampton, but at Christmas last, on leaving her service, she came to lodge in the same house. The child did not appear well, and the mother, from the symptoms exhibited, believed him to be suffering from worms, and obtained some powders from Mr Burge, chemist, but finding the deceased did not improve, on Friday evening she took him to Mr Land, surgeon, who ordered medicines, which were administered, but about four o'clock on Friday morning the child died. Mr Land in his evidence gave it as his opinion that the child's death arose from "Mesenteric disease," upon which the Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 19 March 1857, Issue 4745 – Gale Document No. Y3200694028
EXETER – Another Death in the City Prison. – A man, named SAMUEL JENNINGS, who was incarcerated in this gaol for stealing an umbrella from the Rev. R. Roper, died suddenly from dropsy of the heart last week. An Inquest held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, a verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Sudden Death of a Child. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Golden Lion Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the daughter of MR CARNELL, the landlord of the above inn, a child aged two months. The infant was found dead by the side of its mother, and the Jury after hearing the evidence returned a verdict of Died from Natural Causes.

Thursday 9 April 1857, Issue 4748 – Gale Document No. Y3200694107
EXETER – Death of a Miser. – Yesterday (Tuesday) an Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a rag and bone collector, named RICHARD PARTRIDGE, who had once been a publican at Crediton. The deceased died in a room, belonging to Mrs Berry, for which he paid eightpence per week. He had complained of pains in his head a few days ago, and on the 6th of April he was found dead on a heap of rags, in his room, which was in a filthy and disgusting state. The Coroner, after much trouble, succeeded in taking possession of some papers from Mrs Berry, amongst which was a saving's bank book, which showed a balance in favour of deceased of £33; and a note of hand for £15, which he had lent to Mrs Berry. The Inquest was adjourned until today for a post mortem examination.

Thursday 16 April 1857, Issue 4749 – Gale Document No. Y3200694133
EXETER – Death of a Miser. – We gave last week the particulars of an Inquest which had been held on an old man, named RICHARD PARTRIDGE, who had been found dead in a room which he occupied, in a court opposite the sawyer's Arms in this city. The Inquest was adjourned for Mr A. Cumming, surgeon, to make a post mortem examination of the body, the result of which was that Mr Cumming gave it as his opinion that the deceased died of apoplexy, accelerated by excessive drinking on the previous evening. He also stated that the deceased was covered with vermin from head to foot. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

Thursday 16 April 1857, Issue 4749 – Gale Document No. Y3200694137
TORRINGTON – Suicide of a Young Woman by Poison. – Considerable excitement has prevailed here in consequence of a young woman, named BEER, having committed suicide by taking a large quantity of poison. She was a glove maker in the employ of Mr Lake, of this town, and it appears that she went to dinner on Saturday last, and afterwards took a large quantity of poison. She lingered in the greatest agony until Monday morning when she expired. A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body, the result of which has not yet reached us.

Thursday 23 April 1857, Issue 4750 – Gale Document No. Y3200694166
TORRINGTON – Suicide By a Young Woman. – We briefly stated last week that a young woman, named FANNY BEER, had taken a quantity of poison, from the effects of which she died. At the Coroner's Inquest, which was held before R. Bremridge, Esq., it appeared that on Saturday week she went to work in her usual health. She continued until near two o'clock, and then went to her home and dined. No change whatever was discovered in her manner up to that time. After dinner she went upstairs, her mother, who was going to market, also went up to dress, and found her daughter lying on the bed. Thinking she was asleep she did not speak to her, but went to market and returned in about an hour. On her entering the house she heard her daughter call out, "Mother, mother, come to me." She instantly went upstairs, and found her sitting against the bedroom door, beating with her feet, and in a wretched condition, and the room covered with her vomit. She earnestly desired her mother to send for a doctor, and said that she should be dead before ten o'clock. Her mother told her not to frighten herself, and she cleaned the room. Deceased then urged her to go for the doctor, and said to her, "You don't know what I know." The mother sent her other daughter for the doctor, who did not come directly. The daughter returned home, but the deceased, being in agony, said to her mother, "I would tell you something but I am afraid you will break your heart after I am dead." On which her mother herself ran to the doctor, and told him that she was afraid that her daughter had been taking something. He immediately took his horse and arrived at the house in a few minutes, but he was too late to administer any remedy with effect. She was perfectly sensible. On being asked what she had been taking, she at first denied having taken anything wrong, but afterwards confessed to him that she had taken some corrosive sublimate (enough it is said, to have poisoned twenty men), which she had purchased at Mr Fowler's, druggist, on Saturday. Other doctors saw her and tired the usual remedies in such cases, but they were all of no avail, and after lingering until Monday morning, in a most deplorable condition, she breathed her last. The whole of the evidence clearly proved that deceased had deliberately poisoned herself, and the Jury, after a few minutes consultation came unanimously, although reluctantly, to the following verdict:- "That the Deceased FANNY BEER poison herself with corrosive sublimate, while in a sound state of mind." The deceased was interred the same night, between eleven and twelve o'clock, in the new cemetery, and hundreds of the inhabitants, principally the young, were there to witness the sad spectacle.

Thursday 30 April 1857, Issue 4751 – Gale Document No. Y3200694200
BARNSTAPLE – Death From Burning. – A melancholy case occurred on Monday last, to an old man named THOMAS SMITH, who for some time past has kept the Mare Top toll-car, in this borough. The deceased was subject to fits, and it is presumed that while suffering from one of them, his clothes caught fire in his "sentry box." A servant, on horseback, in the employ of George Brown, Esq., of Roborough, saw him, but instead of dismounting, he rode back half-a-mile to get assistance. As might be expected, by the time he returned the lower part of the poor fellow's body was burnt to a cinder: but life was not quite extinct. He was conveyed to the Infirmary, where he died about six o'clock the same evening. An Inquest was held the following morning, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Our correspondent says:- "There appears to be some mysterious circumstances connected with this affair, which have caused some excitement. There was a quantity of straw in the toll box, scarcely burnt; yet his body was almost reduced to ashes. s Before his death, he asked for his watch and 13s. which he had, but they are now nowhere to be found."

Thursday 7 May 1857, Issue 4752 – Gale Document No. Y3200694232
EXETER – Melancholy Death of an Old Man. – An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN TAYLOR, aged 74 years, who was very deaf, and who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital the day previous from injuries he sustained from being knocked down by a fly and pair of horses near the Heavitree Bridge, on the 3rd of April last. From the evidence of Mrs Tree, of Sowton, it appeared that on the 3rd April last she was returning home about five in the afternoon from the Exeter market, and when about half way down the hill she heard a noise behind her. On looking round she observed a carriage and pair of horses coming very fast (nine or ten miles an hour,) and when near the bottom of the hill she found that the deceased, who was very deaf, and who was returning from his work, had been knocked down and was then being taken out from between the horses' legs and the carriage. The deceased, however, walked home with the assistance of a boy, and Mr Madden, surgeon, of Heavitree, was sent for, who, after doing what was necessary, suggested the deceased being removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on the day stated. The case was adjourned until Saturday morning, at ten o'clock, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 21 May 1857, Issue 4754 – Gale Document No. Y3200694288
Accident – A poor fellow named BRAY, a wheelwright, has died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital this week. It appears that he had for some time suffered from hernia, and that a few days ago he was working at Ashridge Farm, Sandford, when he struck the hernia with an axe with which he was working. He was removed to the Hospital; but the injury was fatal, and the poor fellow soon expired. An Inquest is being held on the body today (Wednesday).

Death From Poison. – An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of GILES TUPMAN MOSS, master of the brig Mary, of Exeter, lying in Sutton Pool. The deceased was found by the mate f the vessel lying in his berth in a state of insensibility, with a bottle of laudanum at his side, which it was supposed he had taken from the medicine chest, to relieve himself of pain. A verdict was returned of "Died from ignorantly administering to himself an over-dose of laudanum." MR MOSS was a native of Exmouth, and leaves a widow, but no children.

EXETER - A Child Drowned. – An Inquest was held at the King's Arms, Coombe Street, on Saturday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a boy, aged five years, named ELIAS ELSTON, the son of a labourer, residing in Tabernacle-court, Coombe-street. The deceased was seen by a boy, named John Walrond, to go down over the steps to the leat, behind the Custom House, to wash his shoes. In stooping down for that purpose, the poor little fellow fell into the leat head-foremost. An alarm was given, but he was dead before he could be taken out of the water. Verdict. – "Accidental Death."

EXETER - A Soldier Drowned. – An Inquest was held at the Paper Maker's Arms, on Monday, before the city Coroner, on the body of JAMES SHARPE, aged twenty, a private in the First Dragoon Guards, now stationed in this city. The deceased left the Barracks on Saturday afternoon about three o'clock, in company with Phillips, Fowler and Freeman, three of his comrades, to bathe at Head-weir. After he had been in the water about half-an-hour he was seen to sink by Phillips who swam towards him, but he was not able to render him any assistance. The poor fellow was taken out in about a quarter of an hour, but life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was buried at St David's with military honours on Monday afternoon.

EXETER – Another Child Drowned. – An Inquest was held at the Sawyer's Arms, on Monday, before the City Coroner, on the body of HENRY TUCKETT, a child of about five years of age. The deceased was the son of EDWARD TUCKETT, a labourer residing in Preston-street. He went in company with two or three other little boys about four o'clock on Saturday afternoon to the mill leat near the quay to play. There is no fence against the leat but one single rail about three feet high. The deceased went under this rail after his marble, slipped his foot and fell in the water. He was taken out of the water by a man named Tuckett, who was working at Mr Hobbs's mill. He was assisted by Geo. Hole, who said he had lived in the neighbourhood for ten years, and during that time he had taken nine children out of the same leat. The Jury were of opinion that the place was very dangerous, and recommended that some better fence should be put there. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 28 May 1857, Issue 4755 – Gale Document No. Y3200694316
EXETER – Sudden Deaths. – Two Inquests were held last Thursday, by H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner. the first was MRS SALTER, the widow of a surgeon, formerly residing at Clysthydon, and who had resided at 27, Dix's Field. It appears that the lady was taken suddenly ill, vomiting, &c., on the morning of the 19th. Mr Roberts, surgeon, was sent for, but before he arrived she had died. Mr Roberts was of opinion that death was caused by the rupture of a large blood vessel about the region of the heart. Verdict "Natural Death."

The second Inquest was held at the Queen's Head Inn, in the West Quarter, upon a married man, named EDWARD DREWE, a moulder, in the employ of Messrs. Huxham and Brown. Deceased, who was 40 years old, on leaving his work on the evening of the 19th, complained of a pain in his side, but did not appear more unwell than usual. He went to bed at the usual hour, and at about four o'clock the following morning he died. Verdict "Natural Death."

Thursday 4 June 1857, Issue 4756 – Gale Document No. Y3200694343
An Inquest was held on Saturday, before R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE COUCH, aged 36, of Newton Bushel, which was found in the Exe on Friday night. No evidence being forthcoming to show how deceased to into the water, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 11 June 1857, Issue 4757 – Gale Document No. Y3200694374
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, on Friday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOSEPH BARTON, a carrier between Starcross and Exeter. On the morning of the 27th of May, the deceased left for Exeter, and on nearing Kenton on his return, the horse started off at full gallop. BARTON, who had been drinking, was not able to restrain the animal, and in turning a corner the horse fell and threw the deceased into the road, breaking his leg in two places. He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Wednesday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 18 June 1857, Issue 4758 – Gale Document No. Y3200694408
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS BORNE, a lad eleven years of age. Deceased worked for Mr May, farmer, of Lapford, and on Sunday, the 24th of May, he was sent to ride a horse to the field. When about half-way, the horse started off at a trot, and threw the boy off, and dragged him for some distance along the road. He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Friday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Sudden Death – An Inquest was held before R. R. Crosse, Coroner, on Thursday, on the body of MR LANSTEN GODWIN. It appeared that the deceased was the son-in-law of Mr Havill, newsvendor, &c., of Fore-street, in this city, and lived with him from 1856 until Thursday, the 4th of June. for sometime past he gave evidence of mental derangement, which was first apparent by violent conduct towards his wife, who was compelled to leave him on two occasions. On Good Friday there was a "scene" at Mr Havill's shop, and a large concourse of persons assembled in front thereof. This it appears was caused by the violence of deceased; on this occasion Mr Havill, his wife, and daughter, attempted to restrain him. Afterwards he went to Mr Rumson, his friend, and complained that he had received ill-treatment from the above named persons; he wept bitterly and exhibited a cut on his face, a scratch on his hand, and a severe bite on his left arm. On Tuesday, the 2nd of June, the deceased became worse, and his mental infirmity more apparent, Mr Rumson attended to him, and on one occasion he put his hand to his head, and exclaimed, "Oh my poor head; Stone struck me on the back of my head on Saturday night, which drove me mad." Mr Stone was the deceased's brother-in-law, and it was satisfactorily proved by a neighbour, named Abraham Godding, that when the deceased attempted to commit violence on Mr Stone's wife – his own sister – her husband endeavoured to restrain him, but used no improper or unnecessary violence, and Mr A. Cumming, surgeon, (who was called in to see deceased, with the view to give a medical certificate, under which he could be removed to an asylum) stated that deceased said that there was nothing the matter with his head. On the 4th of June he was removed to the St Thomas Lunatic Asylum, where every care and attention were paid to him – so much so, that during the Inquiry, the Coroner remarked on the admirable manner in which the deceased was watched and attended to. He was very violent during the whole time he was in the Asylum, and refused to take food. On the Monday following his admission, ten minutes after his being visited by the attendants, he was discovered quite dead. Mr P. Miller, the senior physician to the institution, gave it as his opinion that the death of the deceased was the result of an epileptic fit; and with reference to certain marks on the body, he said he could not of course say whether they were self-inflicted or not. Verdict – "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 25 June 1857, Issue 4759 – Gale Document No. Y3200694436
OTTERY ST MARY – A Man Killed By A Bull. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a poor man named WALTER WHITE, in the employ of Mr J. Priddis, of Bishop's Court Barton. It appear that on the previous Monday evening the poor fellow was in the act of driving a bull, belonging to his master, from the court-yard, when by some means the animal suddenly became infuriated, and rushed upon him, goring the neck and completely severing the windpipe, causing instantaneous death. Dr Hayman was immediately on the spot, but life was extinct; so dreadful were the injuries received that he did not survive two minutes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The poor fellow has left a widow and two children to lament his loss.

Thursday 2 July 1857, Issue 4760 – Gale Document No. Y3200694473
EXETER – Distressing Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, on Tuesday, before the City Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM DARCH. Deceased was a resident of Upexe, and on Saturday last, on returning to work after dinner, carrying hay, he got off the cart, on to the horse's back. He threw the pick with which he had been loading the hay, and stuck the prongs thereof into the ground. He then jumped off from the horse backwards, and about eight inches of the staff of the pick entered his bowels. He was taken home, and a surgeon sent for, who recommended his being taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was conveyed on Sunday. The poor fellow, however, died on the following morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Death By Drowning. – An Inquest was held at the Paper Makers' Arms on Monday, before the City Coroner, on the body of a young man, aged 21, named ROBERT BORN. The deceased was an apprentice to Mr Northam, smith, of Mary Arches-street, in this city, and his term of apprenticeship would have expired in a fortnight. He was a respectable, well-conducted young man, and resided with his parents in Newtown. On Sunday morning he went in company with his younger brother to bathe; they were both good swimmers. the younger brother swam across the river, and when near the bank, he looked back and saw the deceased struggling. he said to him, "What's the matter, Bob; have you got the cramp?" Deceased made no answer and soon afterwards sunk. Some young men on the opposite bank plunged in, and endeavoured to rescue him by diving after him, but their efforts were unsuccessful. Thomas Dymond was one of them, but finding that he could not succeed he with others went to the Paper Makers' Arms and procured the grapnels. A quarter of an hour was spent before these could be used, and after the body had been in the water three quarters of an hour it was recovered, but life of course was hopelessly extinct. Dymond said that a man was standing near the spot where the deceased sunk, and if he had sufficient nerve he might have save him; and he also stated that if he (Dymond) had had a boat and grapnels he was certain he could have saved the poor fellow's life. The Coroner said this was not the first case of the kind which had occurred lately. He did not know how it could be avoided, for in this case it appeared that the young man was able to swim, but was unfortunately seized with the cramp. Dymond said he had taken seven people out of the river at Head Weir, during the present season. The foreman of the Jury, Mr Cox, suggested that a man and a boat should be constantly at Head Weir during the summer months – the expense to be paid out of the borough rate. The amount would be nothing, as compared with the loss of life. The Coroner said he quite agreed with Mr Cox that something ought to be done; he had lately taken some trouble to get the Council to fence off a dangerous leat at the other end of the city, and he would gladly represent the wishes of the Jury to the Town Council. A juror asked if the Humane Society was still in existence? Dymond said that the funds of this society had been much abused, by persons agreeing among themselves for one of them to jump into the water and for the others to rescue him and then go and obtain the reward. After some further discussion a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury requested the Coroner to make a presentment to the Town Council.

An Inquest was held last week, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before the City Coroner, on the body of a man named SEWARD. The deceased was a labourer residing in this city, and on the 16th of May he was working at Dunsford, excavating a road, when the ground gave way, and he fell on his leg and broke it. He was taken to the Hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate his leg. He improved for a few days, then got worse, and on Thursday he died. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, last Friday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT DOBLE. Deceased was a brick maker, and resided at Rockbeare. On Friday, the 20th inst., having finished his day's work at brick-making, he went to help a farmer at hay-making. He was assisting to make the rick, when one corner of it gave way, and the poor fellow fell off, pitched on his head, and fractured the spine. He was perfectly sober at the time. Deceased was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the following day and lingered until Wednesday, when he died. He has left a widow and nine children. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 9 July 1857, Issue 4761 – Gale Document No. Y3200694504
EXETER – Death By Drowning. – An Inquest was held at the Seven Stars Inn, St Thomas, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child, aged seven years, named THOMAS LANG. The deceased resided with his parents at the first lock on the Exeter Canal. He was in a boat, and one of the oars having fallen into the water, the poor lad reached over the boat to take it out, when he overbalanced himself and fell into the canal. He sunk immediately, and never rose again. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 16 July 1857, Issue 4762 – Gale Document No. Y3200694541
Death By Drowning – On Thursday last a young man, named SAMUEL GREGORY, was drowned in the river Taw, near Paige's Pill. The deceased was sergeant in the First Devon Militia, attached to the staff in this city, and had only gone home a few days before to visit his parents and friends, who reside at Fremington. On the day named he joined his father and brother in catching mussels, and while they were so employed he got into the water to bathe. After he had been in some time, the father asked if he should put off the boat to him, when he said "No," and almost immediately went down. He rose once only, and then sank to rise no more, in sight of his distressed father. The body was not found until the following Sunday evening. An Inquest was held before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner for Barnstaple, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. The body presented a socking appearance, being eaten in various parts. The deceased was much respected by his captain and comrades; and a letter to that effect was read by the Coroner at the Inquest. He was only 17 years of age.

Thursday 23 July 1857, Issue 4763 – Gale Document No. Y3200694571
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – JOHN PILE, who is in the employ of G. Brown, Esq., of the Navy Yard, in this town was killed from a blow in the stomach by a piece of timber, with which he was feeding a circular steam saw, on Tuesday week. The poor fellow lingered some hours after the occurrence. An Inquest was held on the body before I. Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, the following day, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" as returned.

Another Death From Drowning. – On Thursday last an Inquest was held on the body of a man, named GEORGE SMYTH, of Pilton, at Lake, near Barnstaple, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the County. The poor fellow, who for some time has been in a very depressed condition arising from pecuniary embarrassment, was found in the water on the previous evening, just above Pill Bridge quite dead; and for the want of further evidence, an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 30 July 1857, Issue 4764 – Gale Document No. Y3200694602
EXETER – Sudden Death. – Last Thursday an Inquest was held at the Red Cow Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SUSAN TOTHILL. The deceased was 69 years of age, and resided at Cheriton Fitzpaine. It appears she had been staying in Exeter, on a visit, and on Wednesday she was about to return home. She proceeded on towards the Cowley-road, at a very rapid rate, endeavouring to overtake the carrier's wagon, when she fell down and expired. Mr Webb, surgeon, attributed the cause of death to the bursting of a blood vessel. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a boy aged 14 years, named THOMAS HOLMAN. The deceased, it appeared, was in the employ of Mr W. Strong, farmer, of Stockleigh Pomeroy, and on Tuesday week last was sent by his master on horseback to Cheriton Fitzpaine for some twine, but soon after he left he was found lying in the road insensible, and bleeding very much from the head and face. He was at once removed to a neighbouring cottage, and subsequently to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he lingered until the following day. The Jury, after having heard evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 August 1857, Issue 4767 – Gale Document No. Y3200694709
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Blue Boar Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD ELSON, aged 22. Deceased, it appeared, was in the employ of Mr Southard, plumber, of St Sidwell's, and on the 5th August last was at work at Ebdon Farm, Sidbury, removing some rubbish which had fallen into a well, and while letting himself down the well by a rope he fell on the piston rod of the pump, which entered his body. Deceased was helped home to his lodgings, and Mr Puller, surgeon, of Sidmouth, sent for, who advised the deceased being removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Wednesday last. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Dr Biggs, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at the Bude Haven, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH COOPER, aged 74 years, who was lodging at Miss Couin's, in St Sidwell's. It appeared from the evidence of Maria Cox, a servant to the deceased, that deceased was the widow of MR PAUL COOPER, late of Bristol, but on Thursday week last she came to Exeter on a visit, apparently in her usual health, and on the day of her death she visited her friends at Mount Radford and Baring-place, but shortly before she retired to bed complained of being unwell, and Mr De la Garde was sent for, but before he arrived life was extinct. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr De la Garde, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Fatal Accident To A Child. – An Inquest was held last Friday on the body of a boy, aged three years, named WILLIAM MAYNE, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier Inn. The deceased was the son of a labourer, and resided in Brinsmead's Court, St David's-hill. On the previous Wednesday evening he ran out into the street just as an omnibus, belonging to Mr Paul Collings, was passing, and got between the wheels of the vehicle, which drove over the upper part of the body, about the chest. The poor child was immediately taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died the same evening from the injuries he had received. No blame whatever is attached to the man, Richard Madge, who drove the omnibus, as he was going at a very steady pace at the time the accident occurred, and the deceased got in between the wheels at the back of the vehicle, unobserved by the driver. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 27 August 1857, Issue 4768 – Gale Document No. Y3200694772
HONITON – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN FLOOD, aged 29. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Woodland, working in a field near the town, on Tuesday the 18th instant, with a horse and cart. The horse became restive, knocked him down, and the wheels passed over his body. He was taken home and medical aid obtained, but death terminated his sufferings on Thursday morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BIDEFORD – Fatal Result of Throwing a Stone, - Verdict of Manslaughter. – We stated a fortnight ago that a boy, named JAMES ELLIS, eleven years of age, of Ridd, in the parish of Monkleigh, near Bideford, had received serious injuries from a stone, thrown at him, and from the effects of which he has since died. A young man, named Thomas Bale, was apprehended a few days ago by Bray, one of the Devon County Constabulary, at Camelford, Cornwall, as the person who threw the stone at deceased, and having been brought before the Magistrates on Thursday last, he was remanded until Tuesday. In the meantime, an Inquest was held on the body on Saturday, at the Hunter's Inn, in the parish of Monkleigh, about three miles from Bideford, before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. The following evidence was adduced:- Charles Colwill Turner said he was a surgeon, residing at Bideford. On the 26th of July last, THOMAS ELLIS came to his house about eleven o'clock at night, and stated that deceased had met with an accident, that his head was cut, that it bled a good deal, that deceased had been insensible, but had vomited before he left home. He also stated that bleeding had ceased, and that a poultice had been applied. Witness gave him some aperient medicine to take home to the child, and requested him to apply warm water dressing. He saw the deceased the following morning, and found that his skull was fractured. He was conscious, and on his asking him how it happened, deceased replied "that it was the tall one with red hair that threw the stone." On carefully examining the head, witness found there was a lacerated wound of the scalp on the left side near the crown, and on passing the probe into the wound he discovered a fracture of the skull, about the size of a five-shilling piece. He last saw the deceased on the 20th of August, and on the following morning a message was left at his house saying that he was dead. Witness made a post mortem examination, and found that deceased had died from abscess in the brain, induced by the external injuries he had received in the head. THOMAS ELLIS stated that the deceased was his son; he was about eleven years of age. On Sunday, the 26th of July last, his wife and himself left home to go to Allspill Marsh to milk his cow, and when he left deceased was holding his donkey outside the front of his house. Witness and his wife were absent about half-an-hour, when Ann Arnold came after him to say JAMES (meaning the deceased) was dead. Witness immediately ran back, and found deceased sitting on a piece of timber. He immediately took him up, and carried him into the house. He looked at his head and found a cut, it was bleeding; he washed him and put him to bed. His wife and Mary Mayne applied a poultice to the head of deceased, and he immediately fetched Mr Turner, the surgeon of Bideford, who gave him some medicine. On Monday morning deceased recovered his consciousness, and stated on his enquiring of him how the injury arose, "that the donkey did not throw him off, but that the men threw a stone at him." Witness saw two men crossing down the marsh before he started for milking, and on making enquiry the following morning of George Cook, he stated that Bale and another men had crossed the river at Ridd, just below where he left deceased. William Bray said he was a police officer, residing at Northam. On Monday, the 3rd of August, he was sent to Ridd, in the parish of Monkleigh, to make enquiries respecting the deceased. From information he received, he obtained a warrant against Thomas Bale, and traced him to Camelford, in Cornwall, where he apprehended him. Witness told the prisoner he was in custody for wilfully and maliciously wounding JAMES ELLIS, upon which he said, "It is a bad job for me and the boy too." Witness aid, "It is a sad thing for the poor boy and his parents," and prisoner said, "Yes it is; I would rather be in his place than mine. Three weeks ago last Sunday he was to Weir, and as I was passing by Ridd with Harry Glover, I saw a little boy sitting on a piece of timber, holding a donkey. I tacked my hand and frightened the donkey away from him; the boy said, 'I'll tell father,' and began to run away. Harry Glover sang out 'Stop him.' I then went to stop the boy, and he took up a handful of dirt and threw at me. I then picked up a stone and throwed at him, and the stone struck him in the head, and he fell across a piece of timber. I thought he was in fun, and I did not go back. I wish I had." Thomas Bale was now in custody under the warrant for the assault. Henry Glover said on Sunday, the 26th of July last, he went to Weir Gifford, accompanied by Thomas Bale, Richard Sandercock, and Robert Chipman. Whilst there they had some beer and gin-and-water. They all left Weir Gifford to return home about six o'clock. Sandercock and Chipman crossed the river just opposite Short's door. Bale and witness crossed opposite Ridd, and passed on by the deceased, who was on the landing holding a donkey. Thomas Bale followed, and witness was a little ahead of him. Afterwards he heard the deceased and Bale talking together, but he did not hear their conversation. He did not see Bale take up a stone or anything else, but on looking back he saw deceased lying on his back. Witness said, "What have you done to the boy," and Bale replied, "Come along; come on." Witness did not go back to see what was the matter with deceased. He went with Bale so far as the lower side of Monkleigh town, and there left him. Ann Arnold said she knew the deceased. On Sunday, the 26th day of July last, about half-past six o'clock, she was going down the road leading from Higher to Lower Ridd. She there met two men with ELLIS'S donkey – Henry Glover was one of them. She drove the donkey back, and on going a short distance down the road she saw deceased lying on the ground, and his head was bleeding. She attempted to get him up, but could not. She then ran off to say what she had seen, and first met Jane Hookway, and told her that JEMMY ELLIS was almost dead, and she then ran on and told her father, THOMAS ELLIS, what she had seen. Jane Hookway said she knew the deceased. On Sunday, the 26th of July last, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, she was passing over Annery Bridge, on her way to Weir Gifford, and saw Ann Arnold running down over the bank of the canal, calling out that "JEMMY ELLIS was almost dead." She went and called on THOMAS ELLIS, and then went back to deceased. She found him sitting on the timber, and a lad called John Short holding him up, and they took care of him until THOMAS ELLIS came. On Tuesday, the 28th of July, she was at Bideford market and saw Thomas Bale, who came up to her and stepped on her dress; he said "Be I stepping on your dress, my dear." She said, "You had better walk off young man." Her sister was standing by her side, and said, "Did you wade across the river at Ridd on Sunday night?" Bale replied, "Yes I did." Her sister then said, "How came you to serve the boy so bad." He made no answer. She then said to him, "You throwed a stone at him and broke his skull." Bale said "D—his eyes, a young b---, serve him right." She (Jane Hookway) then said to Bale, "What did the boy do to you." Bale – "The young b—throwed a handful of stuff at us." Witness then said, "What did you take away the donkey from him for?" Bale – "Damme, walk on." The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the prisoner Bale, and he was committed to take his trial on the Coroner's warrant.

Thursday 10 September 1857, Issue 4770 – Gale Document No. Y3200694842
BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – An elderly woman, named CATHERINE CLARKE, was found dead in her bed at her residence, on Saturday morning last. She retired in her usual good health on the preceding evening, but, according to the opinion of Mr Torr, surgeon, she died from apoplexy. An Inquest was held before I. Bencraft, Esq., the same evening, when a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 17 September 1857, Issue 4771 – Gale Document No. Y3200694861
Death By Drowning. – On Monday evening a person (believed to be a farmer, named DYMOND, residing at Kenton) was drowned in the Exeter Canal. There had been a wrestling match at the Welcome Inn, on the afternoon of that day, and about eight o'clock the deceased left the premises. Shortly afterwards a "splash" was heard, and it would seem that the unfortunate man walked directly into the water. He was taken out in a very few minutes, and the usual remedies were immediately put into requisition. Mr Lyddon, surgeon, was speedily in attendance, but that gentleman's aid was equally unavailing – the vital spark had fled. The Inquest will be held today (Wednesday).

Thursday 1 October 1857, Issue 4773 – Gale Document No. Y3200694922
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq. City Coroner, on Wednesday, on the body of JAMES VICARY, aged 65, and who was a labourer, residing at Whimple. The deceased worked on the Exeter and Yeovil line of railway, a portion of which is now being constructed at Whimple, and on Friday last was engaged in keeping the rails in proper order for the tram-waggons to run on. A main and a branch road had been constructed at Whimple, and the tram-waggons occasionally ran on each of these. On Friday VICARY was standing on the branch-line when a tram wagon, loaded with earth, came out of the gully, and ran along the main line. VICARY must have considered that the wagon was coming on the branch line, for notwithstanding the "tipper" of the tram-waggon called out "stand still, VICARY," the poor fellow was about to step across the main-line when the "bumper" of the wagon caught him, and striking him on the left side, the wagon wheels ran over his right foot. Smale, in trying to rescue VICARY from his impending fate, was also caught by the "bumper" of the wagon, and knocked a distance of twenty or thirty yards. VICARY was picked up and conveyed as quickly as possible to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, in this city, where he died on Tuesday evening. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

A Child Drowned. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at Coneybeer's Buller Arms Inn, Exwick, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN STEED. The deceased was four years of age; and his parents reside at Exwick. On Monday afternoon he went near the river picking blackberries; and it is supposed that in climbing the hedge, he missed his footing, and fell into the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 1 October 1857, Issue 4773 – Gale Document No. Y3200694938
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – A lad named WILLIAM VICARY, of this town, was thrown out of a cart on Friday last. The wheels passed over his body, and he was severely injured. He was taken to the North Devon Infirmary, but death soon put an end to his sufferings. An Inquest was held on the following day before I. Bencraft, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 1 October 1857, Issue 4773 – Gale Document No. Y3200694939
TEIGNMOUTH – An Inquest was held on Monday last on the body of a poor man, named YOULDON, of this town, who was found drowned near the old quay last week, and the verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 8 October 1857, Issue 4774 – Gale Document No. Y3200694955
EXETER – Death In The County Gaol. – An Inquest was held in the Devon County Gaol, last Thursday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young woman, named RIPPON, alias Williams. The circumstances of the case were of an extraordinary character. The deceased had, at one time, lived in respectable service at Tiverton, but in an evil moment she met with a pick-pocket, named Wilson, at Tiverton races, and was committed to the Devon County Gaol for an offence committed in his company. It appeared that she had for some time suffered from an internal disease, which got worse in gaol, and the stomach ultimately became so weak as to be utterly unable to retain any food. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the circumstances.

Thursday 15 October 1857, Issue 4775 – Gale Document No. Y3200694979
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the George and Dragon Inn, St Sidwell's, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an old woman, aged 87, named ANN PHILLIPS. The deceased had been living at No. 7 Albion-place, St Sidwell's for some years past, and it appeared from the evidence of Mrs Belworthy, who lived with deceased for the last three years, that on Friday she got up soon after dinner in her usual health, and went to bed about five o'clock. She had her supper in bed. On the following morning (Saturday), Mrs Belworthy, who always slept with the deceased, got up at seven o'clock to get her breakfast; she returned with it about eight, when she found MRS PHILLIPS at the foot of the bed partially dressed. Mrs Belworthy desired her to go into bed again, which she did, and she then gave her her breakfast. She then left to get her own breakfast, and on returning in about ten minutes she found that she was lying in the bed quite insensible. Mr Farrant, surgeon, was sent for, but life was extinct. He said he could not tell the cause of death. A Juror asked witness if he thought deceased died from natural causes, to which he replied that he could not give an opinion; he did not believe she died from apoplexy or disease of the heart. The Jury, believing death was the result of old age, returned a verdict accordingly.

Distressing and Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Duke of York Inn, Honiton's Clist, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of FREDERICK HOOPER, a carpenter of that village. It appeared that the deceased, who was 33 years of age, was married and had a family. On Saturday he was engaged with a lad, named Henry Arscott, in throwing timber for Mr R. Down, a farmer, on Mr Reynold's estate. The deceased and Arscott had sawn nearly through an elm tree, and whilst the former was driving a wedge into the cut part it fell upon a pollard which was standing near. The elm tree slipped off the pollard, fell on the deceased, and crushed the left side of his head. The poor fellow did not speak afterwards. Arscott went immediately to Mr Reynold's farm for assistance, and Mr Clode, a tea dealer of Rockbeare, who was there, accompanied the lad to the scene of the accident. He found deceased with the tree lying on his neck and shoulder, quite dead. Mr Richard Down, who was also called, stated that deceased was lying nearly on his face, the hammer was under his neck, and the tree was lying over his neck and shoulders. A little blood was issuing from his mouth, and there was also a small quantity on the hammer. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 October 1857, Issue 4777 – Gale Document No. Y3200695046
Sudden Death of a Child. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Anchor Inn, Exe Island, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child named FRANK STONE, aged ten months. The parents of the deceased reside in Saddler's-lane, and on the 24th instant the deceased was put to bed by its mother, and appeared at that time in good health. The child slept on the mother's arm during the night. At seven o'clock the following morning the mother, on waking, discovered that the child was dead. Mr Pates, who had been called in after the death of the child, stated that from an external examination he had made, he thought it was probably that the deceased had died from the congested state of the brain; but he could not positively state that to be the cause of death as the same appearance would be presented if the child had died of apoplexy, drowning, or suffocation; without a post mortem examination, therefore, it would be impossible to arrive at the exact cause of death. The Coroner said the Jury were bound to give their verdict in accordance with the evidence, and could, if they liked, give an Open Verdict; but if they wished that a post mortem examination should take place he would be quite ready to order it, but he did not think in this case, as it was clear that the child had not come by its death by any unfair means, that it was require. The Foreman of the Jury advocated a post mortem examination, but his colleagues thought it unnecessary, and ultimately the following open verdict was returned:- "Found Dead, no marks of violence appearing on the body, but how, or by what means, there was no evidence to show."

Thursday 5 November 1857, Issue 4778 – Gale Document No. Y3200695078
BARNSTAPLE – Shooting With Intent To Murder And Suicide. – On the evening of Wednesday, the 28th ult., about quarter past seven, the inmates of Mr R. Passmore's house, yeoman, of Wigmore Farm, in the parish of Eastdown, were alarmed at the report of firearms, and with bits of glass flying all over the room. On inspection, it was found that the window had been fired through, but fortunately, no one was hurt in the slightest. A pistol was discovered near the window, and a jacket containing a tin box with gunpowder, shot, and caps was likewise found near the spot. The jacket was identified as belonging to HENRY FETHERSTONE, who had lived in Mr Passmore's service several years, but had quitted it at his own choice on the 22nd ult. This led to a warrant being obtained for FETHERSTONE; but nothing was heard of him until Saturday, the 31st ult., when Mr Tamlyn was shooting in Knowle Wood and found a man suspended by the neck from a tree. This proved to be the party suspected. An Inquest was held on the body before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner for the County, on Monday last, and a verdict of "Being in an Unsound State of Mind at the Time" was returned. It came out in evidence that the deceased was a good and steady servant, that he came to Barnstaple, on Tuesday, the 27th ult., and purchased the pistol, powder, shot, and caps of Mr T. Fraine, gunsmith. The rope was new, and is supposed to have been bought at the same time.

Thursday 19 November 1857, Issue 4780 – Gale Document No. Y3200695159
NEWTON ABBOT – The Fatal Accident to MR WILLS. – We briefly state last week that MR W. WILLS, of Ilsington, had been killed whilst hunting. An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before W. A. Cockey, Esq. Mr John Hellings, a farmer, stated that he knew the deceased. On Tuesday last he was in a field in the parish of East Ogwell, when he saw the deceased, amongst others, following Sir Henry Seale's hounds. They came into the field over a fence. He saw the deceased make towards the hedge, there was an obstruction in the hedge, in which his horse became entangled; the rider was precipitated to the ground, and the horse, which turned completely over, fell upon him. The horse immediately got up, but the deceased made no movement. He went to his assistance, and found him stretched out on his back and quite insensible. Deceased remained in this state until some brandy was administered to him, when he rallied a little. Three medical gentlemen were present, who spoke to the deceased; his lips moved but no sound was audible. He remained on the ground about half-an-hour, when he was removed on a hurdle, and after proceeding about a quarter of a mile, he expired. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 24 December 1857, Issue 4785 – Gale Document No. Y3200695339
MURDER OF A YOUNG WOMAN BY HER LOVER, IN THE NORTH OF DEVON. We regret to have to record another shocking murder, which was perpetrated in the picturesque town of Lynton, in the North of Devon, last Wednesday. The sudden and ferocious way in which the crime was committed, and the fact that the perpetrator thereof was keeping company with his victim, have naturally very much excited the public mind in the North of Devon. The name of the murdered girl in MARIA BLACKMORE; she was for some time a servant at the Valley of Rocks Hotel, in Lynton, but latterly she lived with her parents, who are persons in a humble station in life, and reside in the same town. It appears that the poor girl had for some time past kept company with John Barwick, a young man who jobbed about as a labourer, and who also lived with his parents at Lynton. On Wednesday last Barwick appears to have been drinking a good deal, and had been fighting with another man. Hearing of this the deceased went to his house, had him called out, and remonstrated with him on the impropriety of his conduct. Excited by drink, and smarting under the well-deserved remonstrances of the girl, and, as it is alleged, her threat to him – that if he did not alter his conduct she would break off the engagement – Barwick took out a knife and inflicted a frightful wound in the poor girl's throat, which resulted in almost instantaneous death. Barwick was immediately apprehended, but, strange to say, no Coroner's Inquest was held until Saturday – so that the body of the poor girl was allowed to remain from Wednesday until Saturday, and the prisoner kept in the same town all that time. The Coroner was not even apprised of it until Friday, and he started off immediately from Barnstaple, and caused the Inquest to be held at an early hour the next morning. In our report of the Inquest it will be seen that the worthy Coroner alluded to this great neglect, and we hope that some satisfactory explanation will be afforded to him. CORONER'S INQUEST ON THE BODY OF THE MURDERED GIRL. On Saturday, at nine o'clock, an Inquest was held at the Castle Inn, Lynton, before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner for the district, and a respectable Jury, on the body of MARIA BLACKMORE. The first witness called was Hannah Mogridge, who stated that she was a domestic servant, in the employ of Mr Crocombe, of North Cliff Cottage. She knew the deceased, MARIA BLACKMORE. On Wednesday evening last witness left her master's house about twenty minutes before eight o'clock to go some errands. On going up by the Valley of Rocks Hotel she met the deceased, who said there had been fine works at the Globe today, that Barwick and Lethaby had been fighting, and that she should like to see Barwick, for she had no doubt he was marked. Deceased then asked witness if she would go to his mother's house, and call him out. Witness did so. John Barwick was in the house, and she said, "MARIA wants to speak to you." On Barwick's coming out witness heard the deceased say to him, "You have been drinking today." Barwick replied that he had not. Deceased said, "Yes you have, for I have been told so." She also said, "I heard you had been fighting," and he replied that he had. Witness then went for some milk, and on returning to where the deceased and Barwick were standing, she said to the former, "Are you coming?" Deceased replied, "Not for a few minutes." Witness did not see her alive afterwards. Agnes Bromham stated that the deceased lived with her mother. Between nine and ten o'clock she came into her (witness's) kitchen, and said to her husband, "I'm bleeding." She was covered with blood. Witness asked her who did it, and deceased replied, "Barwick." Witness seated her in a chair, but she fell along the floor. She immediately called for assistance, and Richard Norman, James Ridge, and Ann Ridge soon came in. The mother of deceased was in bed, but by the time she got up MARIA BLACKMORE was dead. James Ridge stated that he returned from Barnstaple about twenty minutes before ten o'clock; he found his stable-door locked, and he went after the key. In passing he saw Barwick and deceased standing at the door. Witness spoke to them, and said jocosely to the latter, "I will tell your mother of it tomorrow." Shortly afterwards witness was alarmed by a scream, and on going to Bromham's house he found the deceased, weltering in her blood. Ann Ridge, wife of the last witness, deposed that she went with her husband to the stables. Whilst there she heard a scream, and on going into Bromham's house she found deceased lying in a pool of blood. Richard Norman, who lives next door to Agnes Bromham, stated that he was alarmed by a scream, and on going into the kitchen he saw the deceased in the manner described by the last witness. Mrs Bromham told him that MARIA BLACKMORE had said that John Barwick had done it. Mr John Clark, surgeon, deposed that on the Wednesday night, about ten minutes before ten o'clock, he was sent for by Richard Norman and Jane Ridge. He went immediately to Bromham's house, and found the deceased lying on the floor in the kitchen. Her clothes were saturated with blood, and a large pool of blood was on the floor. She was quite dead. On examination, witness discovered a wound in the throat, about an inch and a half in length, and the same in depth, in the direction of the internal jugular vein and common carotid artery. The wound appeared to have been made by a knife. Death was caused by the division of the arteries. John Woodrow, police-constable for the parish of Lynton, stated that on Wednesday night, about ten o'clock, he was passing through the village of Lynton, and met a woman, whom he afterwards learnt was John Barwick's sister. She said that Barwick had cut her sister's throat. Witness immediately went to Barwick's house, and asked him what he had been doing? He replied, "If you had not come when you did, you would not have found me alive." Whilst witness was there, James Ridge and Richard Norman came in, and the latter said, "She is dead." Witness said to Norman, "Who is dead?" and he replied "MARIA BLACKMORE." Witness then told Barwick that he should take him in charge for the murder of MARIA BLACKMORE. On searching Barwick he found in his pocket two knives and a razor, which he produced. The large knife had a quantity of blood upon it, which was apparently fresh. There were spots of blood on Barwick's hand when he took him into custody. After cautioning Barwick, he said to witness, "She told me that she should break off all correspondence with me that night, and that caused it." The Coroner summed up the facts to the Jury, and very strongly deprecated the long delay that had taken place before the Inquest was held. The police officer ought to have immediately apprised him of the circumstance, so that he might have held the Inquest earlier. He should communicate with the Chief Constable on the subject, and if he did not get a satisfactory explanation he should inform the Secretary of State of it. [We understand that the police officer states that he did not apprise the Coroner of the occurrence oat the request of the surgeon, and to suit his convenience. It was that gentleman who apprised the Coroner of it on Friday, two days after the murder.] The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against John Barwick, who was immediately conveyed to Barnstaple. A crowd of persons had assembled on the railway platform, and evinced the usual morbid and eager curiosity to get a sight of the prisoner. From Barnstaple the prisoner was conveyed to Exeter by the mail train. On arriving there, a crowd of persons had also assembled on the platform to gratify their morbid curiosity for a brief second or two. It was not more than that, for the police officer in charge of the prisoner immediately conveyed him from the railway carriage to a fly, and drove off to the Devon County Gaol, where the prisoner was safely lodged at half-past nine o'clock the same night.

Thursday 24 December 1857, Issue 4785 – Gale Document No. Y3200695324
EXETER – Suicide. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at the Oat Sheaf Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN EVANS, aged 57. Deceased was a hairdresser and resided in the Mint; but of late he had been observed to be very low and depressed in spirits, and on Monday last he was found suspended by a rope in his coal cellar, with a wound in his throat about three inches long. A razor was afterwards found partially covered with blood. He was immediately cut down and Mr Pates, surgeon, sent for, but EVANS was beyond the reach of medical skill. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict that the deceased had "Destroyed Himself while labouring under Temporary Insanity."

Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT GREGORY, a carpenter, aged 40 years. It appeared that deceased was in April last at work in the parish of Cadbury, when in ascending a ladder with a heavy piece of timber, the step of the ladder broke, and he was thrown to the ground, and sustained a compound fracture of the right leg. Deceased was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where every attention was paid him, but it was found necessary to amputate the limb, which was accordingly done, but deceased expired on Tuesday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 24 December 1857, Issue 4785 – Gale Document No. Y3200695342
CHUDLEIGH – Suspected Infanticide. – On Wednesday last, Wm. A. Cockey, Esq., held an Inquest at Chudleigh, on view of the remains of a newly-born infant, the illegitimate child of ELIZABETH SMALE, who resided with her mother. Evidence was given of the finding of the body, which had been dismembered to the extent of both legs and an arm. An attempt also had evidently been made to sever the head from the trunk. Mr Moore, surgeon, made a post mortem examination of the body, but was not prepared with any positive opinion as to whether or not the child had been born alive. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with that evidence. We understand the mother and daughter were examined yesterday before the magistrates at Chudleigh on a charge of concealing the birth, and committed for trial.

Thursday 7 January 1858, Issue 4787 – Gale Document No. Y3200695404
EXETER – Sudden Death of a Young Woman. – An Inquest on the body of MARY ANN BARTON, a young woman of 22 years of age, was held at the New Ship Inn, on Saturday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner. It appeared that deceased was a dressmaker, and resided on St David's Hill. On Friday morning she visited her mother, who is a widow living in service, complained of head-ache, and said she had been unable to eat her dinner. She left her mother to go for a walk, and about five o'clock the same evening, Mrs barton was called to see her, and found her dead. She had been for some time afflicted with a cough. Thomas Dobles stated that he met deceased on the afternoon in question on the Iron Bridge, in North Street. After asking her how she was, and her replying that she was better than she had been for a fortnight, he said to her "Jack," meaning a young man called Kerridge, a printer, to whom she was engaged, "is going off to London; what will you do without him?" The deceased said, in reply, "The best I can, as they do in France;" and then coughed and spat blood. Dobles then noticed a quantity of blood coming from her mouth and nose. She was taken to the New Ship and died in a few minutes. The cause of death was the rupture of a blood vessel. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Fatal Result of a Kick. – Manslaughter. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at the Butchers' Arms, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of CHARLES GOOD, an old man, aged 57 years, who died on the previous day, under very distressing circumstances. It appeared that the deceased was one of Mr Eyre Kingdon's staff of benevolent coadjutors at the cheap vegetable store, and on Christmas Eve he had been engaged there until past nine o'clock. At ten o'clock he went to his home in Smythen-street, and told his wife he should return home in about half-an-hour. He then went to the Three Cranes Inn, where he met one of his colleagues, Mr John Fildew, who asked him to take a glass of grog, as it was Christmas time. The deceased said he would, and he and Fildew went to the Golden Lion, where they drank two glasses of gin and water each. When they left the public-house it was twelve o'clock. On going down Preston-street, there was a number of boys who had made a bonfire. Fildew remonstrated, and tried to disperse them. Mary Ann Ingram, a fishwoman, was present, and in a state of intoxication. She came over to GOOD, and without the least provocation, as it appeared, called him a foul name, and kicked him in a dangerous part of the body. Deceased stooped, and exclaimed, "Oh! Fildew, that woman (Ingram) has kicked me." The poor fellow was conveyed home, and told his wife "he was a dead man." From that moment to the time of his death he suffered great agony; and on Monday he died. On the previous day, the Mayor (H. Hooper, Esq.) took his depositions in the presence of Ingram, who had been previously apprehended by the magistrates. Mr J. Webb, surgeon, was called to attend the deceased, and he stated that he found him suffering great pain in the bowels. Witness examined him, but did not find any external marks. He treated him for inflammation of the bowels. In conjunction with Dr Drake, he had made a post mortem examination, by order of the Coroner, and the cause of death he considered to be inflammation of the bowels, which might have been accelerated from a blow in the bowels. Such a blow might have been inflicted without its being visible. Dr Drake corroborated this evidence; and the Coroner having summed up, the Jury, by a majority of 14 to 6, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against Mary Ann Ingram. On Tuesday, at the Guildhall, the magistrates committed her for trial.

The Fifth of November and Its Victim. – As we briefly reported last week a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body of HENRY CODNER, who died from injuries he received in the Cathedral-yard on the 5th of November. The Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, before h. W. Hooper, Esq., and a respectable Jury. It will be remembered that the unfortunate deceased was a young man, aged twenty-one years, and was in the employ of Mr Gibbs, a bookbinder. Whilst standing in the Cathedral-yard on the night of the 5th of November he received a wound in his leg, which was so severe that it was found necessary to amputate it. About the time CODNER was struck, a ship's blunderbuss, without a stock, was fired from the part of the yard near the city bank. This piece was in charge of William Lake and Henry Lake, porters and cousins, and of Robert Rowe, ostler at the Dolphin Inn, who fired it four times, twice in the direction of St Mary Major's Church, and once towards the city bank. When it was fired it lay upon the ground, and blew up the gravel into the faces of persons hard by. Once it rebounded five or six feet and struck a man named Evans on the leg, and knocked him down. When it did this, a porter, named Holman, very properly seized the blunderbuss, and refused to let it be again fired. On the following day, WILLIAM CODNER, a brother of the deceased, and Mr Gibbs, bookbinder, sought out Lake and Rowe, and they admitted they had fired the piece in the yard, and they and the other Lake were afterwards find for infringing the local (Commissioners of Improvement) act, by firing unlawful weapons in public. CODNER, after the amputation, did well for a few days, but there is always greater danger in the amputation of a limb of a healthy person, in consequence of accident, than in amputation rendered necessary by disease, and in this case the danger was soon manifest in a high degree; the wound sloughed, the thigh suppurated, bad sores broke out, and the blood absorbed foreign matter; the constitution was entirely broken down, and death ensued. A post mortem examination was made on Tuesday, by Dr Biggs, and Mr James, both of whom were of opinion that the deceased died from the effects produced by the wound in the leg. The amputated limb was examined by Dr Biggs and Mr Woodward (Mr James's pupil), and four pieces of blackened paper – like brown paper –were found in the muscular part at the back of the leg, thus showing that some paper substance – probably the wadding of the blunderbuss – had struck the leg, and penetrated through the bone. Mr Hooper, in summing up the evidence to the Jury, drew attention to the law, which provides that if a person by an unlawful act, but without malicious intent, causes the death of another, the act amounted to manslaughter. He regarded the present case as having grown out of the license for riotous proceedings in the city on Guy Faux night. He did not condemn the Protestant feeling that led to the celebration of the day, but if the proceedings could not be kept within due bounds, then the celebration ought to be altogether suppressed. He could suggest to the Jury no other verdict than that of Manslaughter against the firers of the blunderbuss. The Jury, after a brief consultation, found a verdict of Manslaughter against the two Lakes and Rowe; at the same time they made the following statement:- "That a strong representation be made from the Jury to the authorities of this city, calling upon them to use every legal means for entirely suppressing the letting off of fireworks and other dangerous instruments within the Cathedral-yard, and other parts of the city, inasmuch as it leads to the destruction of human life, and is the cause of serious bodily injury." Henry Lake and Rowe are in custody.

Thursday 21 January 1858, Issue 4789 – Gale Document No. Y3200695474
BARNSTAPLE – An Amiable Spouse. – On Tuesday, the husband of MARY JANE OSBORNE, of Bideford, was taken into custody upon the serious charge of murdering his wife's illegitimate child. The mother found the child dead in the cradle, and she instantly imputed its death to have been caused by her husband. An Inquest was held on the following morning, and the result of the post mortem examination proved that the child had come to its death from Natural Causes. The husband was, of course, discharged.

Fatal Accident. – THOMAS COURTNEY, who has been for thirty years in the employ of Mr Thomas Buckingham, of Landkey, died shortly after arriving at the North Devon Infirmary, on Tuesday week, from injuries received at Venn Quarry. The deceased was engaged in looking after the machinery used in pumping the water from the pit. Some repairs were needed, and whilst the engine was at work the unfortunate man endeavoured to do what was required. Whilst thus engaged he got entangled in the machinery, and received such hurts as led to a hasty dissolution. The inquest upon the body resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death.

Thursday 28 January 1858, Issue 4790 – Gale Document No. Y3200695500
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Red Lion Inn, St Sidwells, on Tuesday before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of FRANCES BORN, an elderly lady residing in St Sidwells. The deceased, it appeared, was in good health on Monday, but early on Tuesday morning she was found lying on her bed, dead. Mr Perkins, surgeon, was sent for, who believed death to have arisen from the deceased's having been seized with a fit (which frequently occurred to her) and having fallen with her face on the bed, suffocation had been caused. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young man named WILLIAM DAVEY, aged 18, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Sunday morning. It appeared that deceased was in the employ of Mr B. Lear, butcher, of Kenn. On Saturday he was driving a horse and cart to his master's field, when the horse ran away, and on jumping out of the vehicle, his foot slipped, and one of the wheels passed over his body. A young gentleman, named Farborough, picked him up in the road, and had him conveyed to a neighbouring cottage, where he bathed the poor fellow's head with vinegar. He complained of great pain in the chest, and was unable to speak much. By the kindness of Mr J. Ley, of Trehill, the deceased was conveyed to the Hospital in a cart. Every attention was paid to him by Dr Biggs, the house surgeon, but deceased died on Sunday morning. The cause of death, Dr Biggs said, was rupture of the left lung. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 February 1858, Issue 4792 – Gale Document No. Y3200695569
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD CARLISLE. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Taylor, the contractor for the works of the Yeovil railway, now in progress in this city. He was at work at Lion's Holt on the 9th of January, loading a barrow near a well, when the water issuing from the well caused the ground over which the deceased was at work to give way, which fell on his back as he was in the act of stooping. He was soon extricated, and taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was found he had received a severe injury of the spine; and, notwithstanding the attention paid to him, the poor fellow died on Thursday afternoon last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was an unmarried man, a native of Cornwall, and was about 29 years of age.

Melancholy Death of a Child. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, on Saturday last, before the city Coroner, on the body of a child named MARY GLANVILL, aged two years and four months. It appeared that on the 3rd instant, the mother of the deceased, who resides on Stepcote-hill, in this city, left the child alone in an upper apartment, but soon after she had left the room, she heard a scream. On going there, it was evident that the child had been drinking boiling water from the tea-kettle. She examined her mouth, but did not see any bladders; and the child soon becoming cheerful again, no further notice was taken of it. About an hour afterwards, however, the child appeared ill, and the mother took her to Mr Tozer's, chemist, who recommended her being taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she was examined by Dr Biggs, the house surgeon, who prescribed for her, and she became an out-patient. In the evening the child became worse, and was again taken to the Hospital, when it was found that she had great difficulty in breathing. A consultation of surgeons took place, and an operation was performed. She continued to get worse, and died on Friday, the 5th. Death was attributed to inflammation of the throat, caused by drinking boiling water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 February 1858, Issue 4792 – Gale Document No. Y3200695584
CULLOMPTON. – Death by Burning. – On Wednesday last an Inquest was held at Luxton's Railway Hotel, before A. W. Leigh, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN HAWKINS, aged seven years. It appeared that the mother left the deceased with a younger child whilst she went to see for the father; and soon afterwards the deceased was seen running out of the doorway enveloped in flames. Mrs Ducham and Mrs Perkins immediately ran to its assistance, but not until the child was dreadfully burnt. An unfeeling woman, living close at hand, named Hellice, was asked to assist while Perkins ran for the doctor, but she looked on for a while, and then walked deliberately away. The Jury expressed their disgust at such conduct, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The child was buried in the cemetery on Saturday last when the disconsolate parents had to wait nearly an hour and a half for the Vicar, who was busy visiting the living, and had quite forgotten it.

Thursday 18 February 1858, Issue 4793 – Gale Document No. Y3200695601
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on Saturday last, on the body of JOHN LORAM. It appeared that on the 29th of January last, deceased, who was a labourer, aged 47, residing at Drewsteignton, was at work at a lime-stone quarry, belonging to the Rev. W. Ponsford, at Drewsteignton. He was engaged in loading a wagon in the quarry, at a depth of about two hundred feet from the surface, when a stone about eighteen hundred weight fell on his right leg, and a lesser one on his hand. The poor fellow was soon extricated and conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital; when, on examination by Dr Biggs, the house surgeon, it was found he had received a severe laceration of the right hand and a compound fracture of the thumb and fore finger. There was also a long deep cut on the back of the left hand, and a contusion of the right leg and thigh. Amputation of the thumb and finger was performed the same evening, and a few days after an unhealthy abscess formed on the calf, followed by another on the hand. Deceased continued in a state of depression, and required a quantity of stimulants to support him. He died on the 12th instant. The cause of death was attributed to absorption of purulent matter into the blood, causing inflammation of the bowels, which arose from the injuries he had received. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased had been deaf and dumb from his childhood: he has left a widow, but no children.

Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Oat Sheaf Inn, Fore-street, on Thursday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SUSAN GOODYEAR. The deceased was a charwoman, residing in Bartholomew street, in this city, and on Tuesday last she went to work at Mrs Josland's on the Heavitree-road, in her usual health. She returned home just before six o'clock in the evening, and went to her daughter's room, which is in the same house as her own. She took a cup of tea, and on rising from her seat to replace the cup and saucer on the table, she said, "I'm faint and ready to drop;" and immediately fell, but was caught by a young man, named John Milton, who was in the room at the time. A neighbour was called to her assistance and Milton went to fetch Mr James, surgeon, the relieving officer for the district. On arriving at Mr James's he requested him to visit MRS GOODYEAR, who was taken dangerously ill. Mr James asked him if he had an order from the relieving officer, but Mr Milton replied that he had not; Mr James told him where he could obtain one, but Milton, however, before going to fetch the order, returned to MRS GOODYEAR'S where he ascertained that Mr Kingdon had been called in. Life, however, was extinct before he arrived. A Juror asked whether Mr James was not bound to come when called upon? The Coroner said that medical officers were under the new Poor Law Board, and the rule provided "that a medical officer was not bound to visit a patient without an order from the relieving officer; but in a case of sudden emergency he might visit the patient, and report thereon to the Board of Guardians." In consequence of an observation from a Juror, the Coroner said he had always found Mr James exceedingly attentive and kind to the sick poor. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from the Visitation of God;" and the following note was appended to the verdict, "that the Jury regret, as the present was a case or urgent necessity, that Mr James did not attend."

Thursday 18 February 1858, Issue 4793 – Gale Document No. Y3200695605
BARNSTAPLE – Found Dead. – MR FRAINE, father of MR THOS. FRAINE, gunsmith, of this town, was found dead on Gribbles Hill, near Barnstaple, on Tuesday last. The deceased left Waytown the previous evening, to retire to his residence at Rawleigh: he complained of feeling ill at that time, but nothing serious was apprehended. An Inquest was held on the Tuesday evening, but the result had not reached us at the hour of publication.

Thursday 25 February 1858, Issue 4794 – Gale Document No. Y3200695639
PAIGNTON – Melancholy Suicide. – On the 13th instant, MR MUDGE, of Blagdon, committed suicide. It appears that a\bout noon on that day the report of a gun was heard in one of the out-buildings connected with MR MUDGE'S house, at Lower Blagdon. On the inmates proceeding to the spot they were horrified at seeing MR MUDGE dead, shot through the head. Mr Goodridge, surgeon, was speedily sent for, but death must have been instantaneous, for the charge entered at the forehead, going clean through the brain. The unfortunate gentleman was fifty-eight years old, and universally respected. The Inquest was held before Mr Cockey, the Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide while labouring under temporary insanity.

Thursday 25 February 1858, Issue 4794 – Gale Document No. Y3200695649
BARNSTAPLE – Found Dead. – Under this head some particulars were last week given respecting the finding of the body of MR THOS. FRAINE, on Gribbles Hill. An Inquest has since been held before Mr Incledon Bencraft, which resulted in a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

SUICIDE – MR RICHARD COATS HARDING, of Regent's Park, Ilfracombe, has committed suicide. The deceased seems to have been in a somewhat desponding state of mind; and soon after the departure of his wife and son to church on Sunday evening last, the unfortunate man left the room – apparently crying – and went upstairs. A few minutes afterwards he was discovered in the closet with his throat dreadfully cut, and a razor by his side. Medical aid was unavailing. An Inquest was held on the following day before Richard Bremridge, Esq., when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity," was returned.

Thursday 25 February 1858, Issue 4794 – Gale Document No. Y3200695646
EXETER – Suicide By A Gentleman. – An Inquest was held at the Poltimore Inn, St Sidwell, on Thursday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ALBERT STANLEY WELLAND, who committed suicide by shooting himself. The deceased, who was about twenty-one years of age, had been a lieutenant in the 67th Regiment of Foot, now stationed at Plymouth. He had served at St Lucia and Trinidad, in the West Indies, but sold out last July; and for the last two months had lodged at No. 8, Park-place, St Sidwell's. Since he left the army he had been endeavouring to obtain a Government appointment, but had not succeeded. On Monday he went to the house of his mother, on the Friars; and while there he appeared greatly excited. He went to Plymouth the same day, and did not return until Wednesday, when he again visited his mother and sisters on the Friars. He said he was very cold, and asked for a glass of brandy and water, which he drank. On leaving, he shook hands with his mother, wished her good bye, and said she would never see him again. About four o'clock that afternoon his sisters went to his lodgings to look after him, in consequence of the observations he made to his mother, and of his excited state. He was then up stairs, and in the same state of mind. They communicated their suspicions to Mrs Richards, his landlady, and begged her to watch him. Mrs Richards, in her evidence, stated that the deceased had been very low spirited since he had lodged in her house, and she never saw him intoxicated but once. On Wednesday he seemed more excited than usual. When his sisters came to see him they asked her to go up stairs, and search over his things to see if he had anything which might cause death. She promised to do so, and to look after him. In about a quarter of an hour after they left she heard a noise like a "crack" issuing from his room. She ran up-stairs and saw him lying in the drawing-room, upon which she screamed and ran for Mr Webb, a clergyman, who resides at No. 3. On returning she heard him moan; she lifted up his head, and he breathed. There was a pool of blood by his side. Mr S. S. Perkins, surgeon, was instantly sent for; but on his arrival the deceased was dead. He found his face and shirt covered with blood. In the evening Mr Perkins again visited the house; and in the chest of drawers in the deceased's bed-room he found two leaden balls, and on the mantel-piece in the drawing room were eleven percussion caps and a paper of gunpowder. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 11 March 1858, Issue 4796 – Gale Document No. Y3200695709
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Turk's Head Inn, High-street, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child, named JAMES CHERITON, aged five months. The mother of the child, who resides in Pancras-lane, stated that the deceased was a healthy child, having received no medical treatment since his birth. On Friday he appeared restless, which was attributed to a sore on his ear. The child slept with his mother during the night, and about six o'clock the next morning the child seemed to be very restless. He was, however, nursed to sleep again, but some little time afterwards the mother discovered he was dead. Mr James, surgeon, was sent for, who gave it as his opinion that the child died from a fit; and a verdict to that effect was accordingly returned.

Thursday 18 March 1858, Issue 4797 – Gale Document No. BC3200695742
TIVERTON – An Inquest was recently held on the body of a youth, named ALDRIDGE, whose dead body was discovered in a ditch at the bottom of a hedge, in a field near his father's house. It appeared that he was liable to fits, and it is conjectured that he was seized with one and fell into the pit. Verdict, "Found Dead."

Thursday 25 March 1858, Issue 4798 – Gale Document No. Y3200695786
HONITON'S CLIST – Fatal Accident. - On Friday evening, about dusk, a waggoner, named NEWBERRY, of Ottery, was driving his team with a load of potatoes, and when going down the hill at Honiton's Clist one of the leaders became restless. NEWBERRY, it appears, was trying to check the horse when he fell, and the wheels of the heavily-laden wagon passed over his body. Death was almost instantaneous. An Inquest was held on Monday at the Black Horse Inn, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. It was stated that a brother-in-law of NEWBERRY'S was killed at Ottery on Saturday.

Thursday 1 April 1858, Issue 4799 – Gale Document No. Y3200695817
OTTERY ST. MARY – Inquest. – On the 22nd ult. an Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on the body of THOMAS BASTIN, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Manley, of Tipton Mills, in this parish. It appears that the deceased was returning from Sidmouth with a horse and cart; when near the mills, the horse ran off, running the wheels on the side of the hedge and upsetting the cart on him. H. Hayman, Eq., surgeon, was immediately in attendance. The poor fellow lingered for three days in a state of insensibility from a rupture of the vessels of the brain, when death terminated his sufferings, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 22 April 1858, Issue 4802 – Gale Document No. Y3200695888
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the London Alehouse, Mary Arches-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY JANE DENSUMBE, aged five weeks. Deceased was the infant child of ELIZABETH DENSUMBE, from whose evidence it appeared that deceased had been a healthy child from her birth, and had not required any medical attendance. On Saturday morning last, about seven o'clock, before getting up, witness suckled the child, and left her in bed asleep, but on going to see her some time after, found her dead. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr W. W. James, surgeon, who was of opinion that death had been caused from malformation, or disease of the heart, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 29 April 1858, Issue 4803 – Gale Document No. Y3200695915
EXETER – Found Drowned. – An Inquest was held at the Custom House Inn, on Friday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN LITTEN, aged fifty-nine. It appeared that on East Tuesday last, the deceased, who was a mason's labourer, residing at Exmouth, came to Exeter to see if he could find a married daughter, who he thought was staying in the city. Not being successful in his enquiries, he went to the house of a relative, and enquired what time the Exmouth carriers left Exeter; and ultimately went away, as the relative thought, to go home by a carrier. At that time he appeared to have been drinking. Deceased was not seen by any one after that until Thursday last, when a lad, named James Tucker, saw the body of a man in the water, at the Quay. It was in an upright position, with the head just above the water. On being taken out the features, from decomposition being so far advanced, were not recognizable, but the clothes were the same as had been worn by deceased, and his wife said she had no doubt it was the body of her husband. There was a mark across the nose, and the eyes appeared to be swollen; but Mr A. Cumming, surgeon, who examined the body, said the mark might have been produced by an accident, and that there were no indications that the deceased had been unfairly dealt with. The body was so far advanced in decomposition that he could not say if death was caused by drowning, but it was probably it had been. The deceased had very defective sight, and the Coroner, in his summing up, suggested to the Jury that it was probably the poor man had accidentally fallen into the water, and been drowned. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER – Death of a Dartmoor Convict. – An Inquest was held last Thursday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, at the Devon County Gaol, on the body of a man named JOHN MAY. The deceased was a convict from Dartmoor, and was tried at a recent assizes before Mr Justice Coleridge for attempting to murder a warder. After the sentence, it will be remembered, he used obscene and blasphemous language to the judge, and conducted himself in a most unseemly manner in court. He died of scrofula in the gaol, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday 13 May 1858, Issue 4805 – Gale Document No. Y3200695965
Fatal Accident On The South Devon Railway. The city was painfully excited on Friday last, by the report that a guard employed by the South Devon Railway, named RICHARD WILLIAMS, (who was well-known to a large number of the citizens as a well-conducted man,) had been found lying on the railway that morning, with his legs smashed in pieces and nearly dead. The poor fellow was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where every attention as paid to him, but he died shortly afterwards. An Inquest was held on Saturday, at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalene-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner. From the evidence of Mr Cockshott, traffic superintendent of the South Devon Railway, and other witnesses, it appeared that the deceased was a head passenger guard on the South Devon Railway, and had been in the Company's employ ever since its formation – twelve years. He was thirty-nine years of age, was married, had seven children, and resided at Red-hill, near this city. He left Plymouth at seven o'clock on Thursday evening; was off duty, at Exeter, at ten o'clock, and would not be required at the Exeter station again until a quarter to seven on the following morning. At half-past ten on Thursday night, deceased went into the Pack Horse Inn, on St David's-hill, where he had a pint of beer, in company with Mr Vigurs and Mr Stubbs, two guards of the great Western Line. He remained there until half-past one o'clock, when he left to go home. At that time he was stated to have been perfectly sober by Vigurs and Stubbs, who parted from him at Little-silver, to go to their homes. Just before two o'clock Inspector Guppy saw deceased come through Bartholomew-street, with a railway lamp in his hand. He was then reeling, and as well as the officer could judge by observations, from the opposite side of the street, the officer said he believed deceased was intoxicated. A man in the employ of the Company, named Sabin, was going up the line at five o'clock the same morning, and saw the deceased lying on his back between the rails and the wall on the Okehampton bridge. There was a pool of blood under his legs, and he was speechless. With the assistance of a man, named Stephens, the poor fellow was conveyed to the Hospital, and Mr De la Garde and the house surgeon, Dr Biggs, found that his legs had been frightfully mutilated just below the knee, and he was in a very exhausted state – so much so that amputation was considered impracticable. It was probable that the poor fellow was on his way home, and was crossing the line, when the mail train, which left Exeter for Plymouth about half-past three o'clock, came in contact with him, and inflicted the injuries, with the step of the mail van, which occasioned his death – for Mr Cockshott stated that he had examined the mail train and found that an iron step had been broken off the post-office mail tender, and on examination he found the step at the place where deceased was found. The post-office guard, who travelled in the mail train on Friday morning, told Mr Cockshott, that when on Okehampton bridge the train received a sever shock, as if it had come in contact with something. At the spot where the accident occurred the space between the centre of the rail and parapet wall was about two feet ten inches in width, and the step of the carriage projected about eighteen inches, thereby leaving only a space of one foot four inches. The Coroner having carefully summed up the facts, drew attention to the narrowness of the bridge. A Juror asked whether there were not generally recesses for people to stand in whilst trains were passing? Mr Cockshott said there was on long bridges, but on short ones this was not the case. The bridge was the width allowed by the Government Inspector, but he was happy to say that a bill was to be laid before Parliament to the effect that for the future all bridges should be made wider. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the following was appended to the verdict – "That it is advisable, for the future, that all bridges shall be erected wider than at present."

Thursday 20 May 1858, Issue 4806 – Gale Document No. Y3200695995
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Honiton Inn, Paris-street, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a single woman, named HARRIET CHOWN. It appeared that the deceased, who was a shoebinder, was 26 years of age, and had been for several years afflicted with a disease of the heart. She had for some time past lived with her brother-in-law, at Mount Radford-square, but three weeks ago she returned to her mother's house, in St Sidwell's. She was enceinte, and had made every preparation for her approaching confinement. For several days past she had complained of pains in her shoulder, and had called her mother up in the night to attend to her. On Sunday morning she again complained of pains in the shoulder, and Mr S. S. Perkins, surgeon, was sent for, but before his arrival, she was dead. There was a rumour prevalent that deceased had "made away with herself" by poison, but there was no foundation for it, as it was ascertained that she had not taken any other medicine for some weeks than a couple of antibilious pills, and Mr Perkins said the cause of death was disease of the heart. A verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

Thursday 27 May 1858, Issue 4807 – Gale Document No. Y3200696029
EXETER – Sudden Death. – Last Thursday an Inquest was held at the Pack Horse Inn, St David's, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of MR EDWIN BUTLAND. It appeared that on Wednesday evening MRS BUTLAND and her servant left the house to attend religious service, the deceased staying at home. On returning the servant found the deceased had fallen down by the side of an arm chair. She immediately called for assistance, and medical aid was sent for, but life was extinct. The deceased, who was sixty-eight years of age, was well known and respected in the city; he had for many years carried on a Berlin wool business in High-street, but had latterly lived retired. He had recently complained of pains in the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Sudden Death of COLONEL ARDEN. – On Friday afternoon an Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Black Horse, on the body of GEORGE ARDEN, a retired colonel of the East India service, who had died suddenly on the previous night. It appeared that the deceased, who was seventy-four years of age, and was the brother of CHRISTOPHER ARDEN, Esq., a magistrate of this city, had visited the Devon and Exeter Club on Thursday night, and had played a game of whist there. About twelve o'clock he left, in the company of Mr Waugh, Capt. Dacie, and Mr Floud, to go to his home in Hill's-court crescent. Parting with Mr Floud at the New London Inn, the deceased and his other two friends, Mr Waugh and Capt. Dacie – proceeded up Hill-s court towards COL. ARDEN'S home. They were walking rather fast, and Capt. Dacie advised the deceased to walk a little slower. They conversed about the Indian war, the deceased expressing his opinion that the news was very bad. He said "We must send more troops out to India," and then said, "Stop a bit." He had no sooner uttered these words than he dropped down and died instantly. It was elicited from Mr Waugh and Capt. Dacie that the deceased had not taken any refreshment at the club during the whole of the night; that he was in unusually good health and spirits; and that the gallant captain was in the habit of accompanying deceased home whenever he met him out, being on very friendly terms with him, and having consideration for his age. Mr Cumming, surgeon, who was called by Mr Waugh to attend deceased immediately after the fall, stated that death was caused by the giving way of the heart, or from the rupture of one of the large vessels near the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes." [COL. ARDEN entered the service in 1804 and retired in 1830.]

Thursday 3 June 1858, Issue 4808 – Gale Document No. Y3200696059
EXETER - SUDDEN DEATH – An Inquest was held at the Black Horse Inn, Longbrook-street, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES MARSH. The deceased, who resided in Rockfield-place, was a "navvy," in the employ of Mr Fryer, a sub-contractor on the Yeovil railway. He was a native of Dorsetshire and was about forty-eight years of age. He rose about five o'clock on Friday morning last and lit the fire, and then turning to his wife said, "Mary Ann, how giddy, I do seem," and in answer to her question as to what was the matter, he replied "that he was so giddy that he did not know what to do," and immediately fell down. His wife then went for her neighbour (John Prior), who resides in the same house, and requested him to come to her husband's assistance, as she believed he had fallen down in a fit. A medical man was immediately sent for, but long before he arrived MARSH was dead. He died within five minutes after he was seized. Deceased, who was of temperate habits, was in good health, on the previous day, having performed a day and a quarter's work. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

Thursday 3 June 1858, Issue 4808 – Gale Document No. Y3200696059
SUDDEN DEATH. – MR BAYLEY, son of W. R. BAYLEY, Esq., of Cotford House, near Sidmouth, died suddenly at Oriel College, Oxford, last week. It appeared that the deceased was on a visit to his brother, who is an undergraduate of Oriel, and retired on the previous evening in his usual health, but not appearing at his brother's lodgings at breakfast time, according to appointment, the latter proceeded to make inquiry as to his absence. Upon finding the bedroom door locked, an entrance was forced, and the deceased was found lying on the floor, quite dead, with every appearance of having fallen out of bed. Deceased was about eighteen years of age, and had just received a commission in her Majesty's 19th Regiment of Foot. The melancholy occurrence has caused a painful sensation throughout the city and University of Oxford. An Inquest was held on the body of the unfortunate gentleman, when the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death resulted from a fit of apoplexy.

Thursday 10 June 1858, Issue 4809 – Gale Document No. Y3200696099
OTTERY ST. MARY – On Friday week last an Inquest was held at the Royal Oak Inn, Sidbury, on the body of GEORGE HOLISGROVE, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Ashford, of the same place. It appears that the poor fellow was returning home from the Lime-kilns with a waggon heavily laden; when near his home his foot accidentally slipped, and he fell beneath the wheels, which passed completely over his body, causing instantaneous death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 17 June 1858, Issue 4810 – Gale Document No. Y3200696116
Shocking Accident On The Bristol and Exeter Railway. A great sensation was caused in this city and neighbourhood last Wednesday by the report that MR JOHN DEWDNEY, a paper-manufacturer, formerly of Hele, but who has recently resided at Staplake House, Starcross, had been killed by the express train at Hele Station. It appears that the deceased, who was 67 years of age, had on the day in question dined with Mr Charles Matthews at Bradninch. After dinner he proposed to return to Exeter by the third-class train, which leaves Hele Station about twenty minutes after the down express. The latter does not stop at Hele Station, but passes there at 2. 55 p.m. On this occasion the express was twenty minutes late; and on seeing the train coming the deceased who had left Mr Matthews to speak to Mr Drew, and who evidently thought that the third-class train was coming, rushed across the line, notwithstanding that a policeman, named Thomas Ireland, endeavoured to keep him back, and had nearly reached the other side when he was struck by the engine and instantly killed. He was struck by the buffer of the engine, cut literally in two; and one portion of his body was hurled against the first of the iron pillars on the platform, and the remainder dragged on to the third pillar. The scene was of a very harrowing nature; the brains of the deceased, and portions of his body, being scattered over the platform. At an Inquest, which was held on Thursday before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, the above facts were elicited, and Mr Matthews stated that the deceased was perfectly sober, and was of very temperate habits. He added that he thought it was a disgraceful thing that within a short period of time four or five accidents had occurred at the station, there being nothing but a level crossing and no gate kept closed. He thought if a gate had been placed on the road leading to the station and kept closed when trains were due, deceased's life would have been spared. The carriage gate was open. The Jury then retired for twenty minutes, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." They also appended the following to the verdict – "We unanimously desire to represent that there is at the Hele Station an insufficient number of policemen to perform the necessary duties on the arrival of the trains, and thus to protect the lives of the public, and at the crossing of the said station, by the public highway, where there is very large traffic, it is our opinion that a bridge should be carried over the line." On Saturday the remains of the deceased were interred at Starcross, and were followed to the grave by a large concourse of people.

Thursday 24 June 1858, Issue 4811 – Gale Document No. Y3200696148
EXETER – Sudden Death. – Last Thursday morning, a printer in the Exeter Gazette office, named PARKHOUSE, fell down in an apoplectic fit whilst at work, and died in a few moments. An Inquest was held on the body at the Half Moon Hotel in the afternoon, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned. The deceased was a steady and industrious man, and much respected.

Thursday 24 June 1858, Issue 4811 – Gale Document No. Y3200696163
CLISTHYDON – Suspected Child Murder. A gloom has been cast over this quiet village and neighbourhood in consequence of the discovery of the mutilated body of a child, which was found on the premises of the Rev. J. Huyshe, the worthy rector of the parish, last Friday. An Inquest was held on the following day, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner. The evidence adduced showed that one of the servants having occasion to go to the larder, smelt something offensive; and on lifting the cover of a vessel he was horrified at seeing the remains of a child, which had been cut in pieces. Suspicion immediately fell on SARAH BAZLEY, the cook, who is a widow, with two children. Her husband, a native of Cullompton, died eighteen months ago, at Bristol, and four months since his wife was taken into the service of the Rev. J. Huyshe, and was much respected by her master and mistress. On the day the body was found, she had accompanied them to Exeter, and on a messenger having been despatched to inform the Rev. gentleman of the circumstance, BAZLEY was given into custody, and remained in the hands of the police until the following day, when she was taken to the Inquest. The evidence as to whether the child was born alive being inconclusive, the Jury returned an Open Verdict; and the prisoner having been subsequently examined before the Magistrates, was committed for trial on a charge of concealment of birth.

Thursday 1 July 1858, Issue 4812 – Gale Document No. Y3200696175
EXETER – Death By Drowning. – An Inquest was held at the Paper Maker's Arms, Exe-street, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN BELLWORTHY EVELEIGH, a lad about seventeen years of age. It appeared that the deceased, who was a baker in the employ of Mr B. Salter, of Smythen-street, went on Thursday, the 24th June, to bathe at Head Weir. After being in the water for some time, the attention of Nicholas Tapson, a marine store dealer residing in Preston-street, who was also bathing, was called to the deceased, who was struggling in the water on the St David's side of the river. Tapson swam towards deceased, but before he could get near him he had sunk. He dived after him, but was unable to reach him. A boat and the grappling irons were then obtained by a man named Peter Tucker, who succeeded in taking out the body, about twenty-five minutes after he had received information of the accident. The water was not more than six feet in depth where the deceased was drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death"; and appended the following presentment:- "We, the Jurymen empanelled upon an inquisition on the body of JOHN BELLWORTHY EVELEIGH, this 26th June, regret that a former presentment of a Coroner's Jury was not attended to, with a view of saving the lives of bathers at Head Weir. We respectfully suggest to the Coroner that in future a policeman should be constantly on duty at Head Weir (which should be the only place where bathing should be allowed), with appliances – such as boats, drags, &c., - for the saving of life; the expense of which would be very trifling; and they further respectfully request the Coroner to present the matter to the Town Council."

Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Wednesday, before H. D. Barton, Esq. (deputy Coroner) on the body of JOHN LEWIS. The deceased was a labourer, and resided in Frog-street. On Tuesday he was at work in a hay field, belonging to Mr Wright, of St David's. In the afternoon he got on the top of a waggon, which was being loaded with hay; and whilst in the act of treading it down, he fell off, and received a severe injury. He was removed to the hospital, where he died the following morning. Dr Biggs, the house-surgeon, stated that the deceased died from a fracture of the spine, which produced paralysis. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 8 July 1858, Issue 4813 – Gale Document No. Y3200696211
CHAGFORD – Death in a Hay Field. – A fatal accident occurred to WILLIAM DERGES, at Drewston, Chagford, on Saturday last. It appears that the old man was engaged saving hay, and through some mishap he fell off the hay rick and dislocated his neck: he died immediately. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body at Moreton, when the Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 July 1858, Issue 4814 – Gale Document No. Y3200696237
Melancholy and Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalene-street, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM DANIEL SHEARS, a married man, aged 32 years. The deceased, who was the son of JAMES SHEARS, a waggoner, was in the employ of Messrs. Wall and Co., railway carriers. On the 25th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, he left Exeter, in company with Robert Splatt, (a boy of eleven years of age, who assists in driving horses for Messrs. Wall and Co.,) with a waggon and three horses laden with furniture, for Hatherleigh. They proceeded safely until about a mile and a half beyond Bow, where they arrived about four o'clock on Saturday morning, when, on descending a hill, the deceased, who was sitting on the "off shaft," in jumping off to put on the drag, caught his "smock" in a crook, in the front of the waggon, used for the purpose of "hitching up the shafts," which threw him down. Whilst on the ground the front wheel passed over his right, and injured his left leg. When he was run over he called to the horses to stop, which they did, and he asked Splatt not to leave him there. He was then very faint and bled very much. After lying in the road about ten minutes a carrier came up, and the deceased was taken to a cottage which was near, where a doctor attended him, and he was subsequently conveyed from thence to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Dr Biggs, the house surgeon, stated that he received SHEARS into the Hospital about ten o'clock on Saturday morning. He examined him and found that he had received a compound fracture of the right leg. A consultation of the surgeons shortly afterwards took place, when it was determined to attempt to save the limb, by avoiding amputation. The patient progressed favourably until the following Wednesday, when an unhealthy appearance about the limb presented itself. From that time he continued to get worse until the following Monday, when it was decided to perform amputation of the thigh. Amputation was performed by Mr Edye; but, notwithstanding the most assiduous attentions, he died on Friday. The deceased had only been kept alive by the large quantity of stimulants he had taken. From Monday up to the time he died he had received no less than four bottles of brandy, four bottles of port wine, besides a large quantity of beef tea, &c. The result of the case he attributed to the exceedingly unhealthy state of the man. He did not believe any private gentleman could have received more or even the same attention which had been devoted to the deceased. The Jury expressed their approbation of the attention deceased had received, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 22 July 1858, Issue 4815 – Gale Document No. Y3200696268
SUICIDE – MR JAMES JOCE, of New House, Bishop's Tawton, committed suicide on Friday last. The servant girl discovered her master suspended to a beam in an outhouse, about two hours after he had been missed. Mr Bremridge held an Inquest on the following day, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned. The deceased was eighty-three years of age, and he seems to have been in a desponding state for some time previous to the occurrence.

Thursday 29 July 1858, Issue 4816 – Gale Document No. Y3200696314
BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – That "life's uncertain" has again been painfully illustrated in this borough. About five o'clock on the morning of Friday last, the son of BARTHOLOMEW KING, master of a collier belonging to this port, called upon his father to go down the river. The mother seems to have been up at that time, and she accordingly roused her husband: a little time passed, but on the wife's return to the bedroom she found him quite dead. An Inquest was held the same evening by Mr Incledon Bencraft, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday 5 August 1858, Issue 4817 – Gale Document No. Y3200696338
EXETER - Killed By The Wheel Of A Cart. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a lad, named METHERELL, aged eight years. Deceased was the son of HENRY METHERELL, a miller, residing at Dean Prior, and on the 16th ult. he was requested by his father to put a stone to the wheel of a cart that had stopped at his house laden with coals. The horse, however, suddenly moved on, and the wheel of the cart went over the deceased's right arm, near to the shoulder. Medical assistance was procured, and the lad was subsequently removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Thursday last. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SUICIDE BY A FARMER. – An Inquest was held by H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, on Monday last, at Wood Farm, South Tawton, on the body of RICHARD LETHBRIDGE, a very respectable farmer of that parish. The deceased had been in a state of great excitement for some weeks past, in consequence of an action brought against him by Mr Fewings for slander. The cause was tried on Wednesday last, at our Devon Assizes, and a verdict given for plaintiff, with £100 damages. This seems to have so worked upon his mind that, after writing a most affectionate farewell letter to his eldest daughter, he committed suicide by hanging himself in his barn. Verdict – "Temporary Insanity." The deceased was an intelligent and kind-hearted man. His loss will not only be felt by his family, consisting of four young daughters, but by the parishioners generally.

Thursday 12 August 1858, Issue 4818 – Gale Document No. Y3200696368
EXETER – Sudden Death. – On Wednesday an Inquest was held at the Round Tree Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of FRANCIS HONSLOW. The deceased was a pensioner, and resided in Exe Island. On Tuesday evening he retired to bed in apparent good health; but on his daughter going into his room the following morning she found the deceased dead in bed. No medical testimony was tendered as to the cause of death; the Jury being quite satisfied that it resulted from natural causes. They returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 12 August 1858, Issue 4818 – Gale Document No. Y3200696383
TORQUAY – Death By Drowning. – On Sunday morning last, as a young man named TREGASCIS, was bathing in the Cove adjoining the New Bath, he swam some distance from the shore and got entangled in the weed. He called for assistance, but before that could arrive he had sank. The body was shortly afterwards recovered, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Town Hall, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 19 August 1858, Issue 4819 – Gale Document No. Y3200696403
EXETER - Rumoured Death From Bigg's Sheep Dipping Liquid. - On Saturday last, Mr H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Blue Boar Inn, in this city, touching the death of RICHARD BOWDEN, a farm labourer, who resided at Littlesilver, in the parish of Exminster. The deceased was in the employ of Mr E., Trood, and on the 3rd and 4th of August he was with others engaged in dipping sheep. He did not complain of illness till the evening of the 5th, when, on his return to his home, he said to his wife, "I can't eat any supper – I'm light headed." He went to bed, but at six o'clock the next morning he left his house as usual. His wife took his dinner to him that day, but on her arrival in the harvest field he remarked to her, "I can't work any more – I feel so ill." He then went home with his wife. He reached during that afternoon, and the same indication of ailment manifested itself several times on Saturday, in the evening of which day he observed to his wife that "if he was not better in the morning he should go to the hospital for advice." He found himself worse in the morning, and between eleven and twelve o'clock he left his home for the purpose of going to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Upon his arriving at the door of that institution he met a relative, who inquired what was the matter? and BOWDEN replied, "I'm ramping in my arm." The relative asked what he had done to it? and the answer was, "I've been dipping sheep, and I think I've poisoned my arm." BOWDEN was admitted into the hospital, and the testimony of Mr Biggs, the house surgeon, was to the effect that he found the patient's right upper arm considerably swelled and much inflamed. The patient made a similar statement relative to his being poisoned. Mr Biggs ordered what he deemed necessary, and on the following morning the patient was seen by Mr Kemp. About four o'clock in the afternoon of Monday Mr Biggs was requested to see the patient, and he then found him delirious. The patient's arm seemed intensely painful, and a long incision was made in the part affected – a copious discharge of yellow fluid followed. The arm became much relieved, and the swelling diminished. The delirium continued, and the fever assumed a lower typhoid form. This continued to get worse and worse till the patient's death, which took place about one o'clock on the 13th of August. Mr Biggs said he considered the cause of death to arise from typhoid fever, followed by phlegmonied erysipelas. The Coroner put it to Mr Biggs whether he considered that the disease arose from the liquid which had been used for dipping sheep; but the house surgeon said he was unable to speak positively on that point; it might have been produced by the liquid, but he had known many similar cases arise where the person affected had not been using anything at all likely to produce the disease. It seems that BOWDEN had a few pimples on the back of his right hand, and upon his wrist were two small abrasions of the skin, which the deceased accounted for by saying, "I stubbed that by reaping." These wounds, together with BOWDEN'S own assertion relative to his being poisoned, led to an easy belief that death was caused by the liquid used for dipping sheep. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from typhoid fever, but how that disease was caused there was no evidence before them. The deceased was thirty years of age – had been married five years, and during that period had never before complained of illness. It should be stated that the Coroner read a letter which he had received from Mr Trood, relative to the death of BOWDEN, and from it was gathered the fact that the liquid had been more than usually diluted when it was used by the deceased, who had been employed in actually "dipping" only half-a-day. Mr Trood likewise remarked that he had for many years used Bigg's sheep dipping liquid, and had never experienced any ill results from it.

Thursday 2 September 1858, Issue 4821 – Gale Document No. Y3200696484
TORQUAY – Suicide. – A suicide was committed on Saturday morning last by a young woman, ELIZA VINNACOMBE, a servant in the employ of Mr John Tapley Harvey, Wellswood Park. It appeared from the evidence adduced at the Inquest held on Monday last, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., that deceased had lived in Mr Harvey's family for a few weeks only, and had got up that morning at the usual time. Shortly after, her fellow servant came down and went into the coal-cellar, where she found the deceased suspended from a nail in the wall. Assistance was soon procured and the body cut down, but life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 9 September 1858, Issue 4822 – Gale Document No. Y3200696498
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – A young engine fitter, named GEORGE ROWE, lodging in Beedwell's-terrace, Fore-street-hill, went out on Saturday night with some friends. He did not return until one o'clock on Sunday morning, and on going into the garden for some purpose, it is supposed he leaned against a temporary railing, which broke, and the poor fellow fell from a height of ten feet into another garden. His neck was broken, but he lingered in the hospital until yesterday, when he died. An Inquest will be held this afternoon.

BARNSTAPLE – Suicide. – MR RICHARD HUNT, farrier, &c., - but better known as DR HUNT, - of Bratton Fleming, was found hanging to a tree by a piece of cord, in Twitchen wood, Arlington, on Thursday last. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest, held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., it appeared that the deceased was last seen alive by Mr James Tucker, who lives at Twitchen Farm, going towards the wood in which his body was found. The unfortunate man did not appear to look as usual, nor did he seem to speak as cheerful. Other witnesses confirmed his having been in a desponding state of mind ever since the fire at Haxton, where he lost considerable property. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had hanged himself, being of unsound mind.

Thursday 16 September 1858, Issue 4823 – Gale Document No. Y3200696530
Fatal Accident – We stated last week that a young man, named GEORGE ROWE, had died from injuries received by his having fallen over a wall. An Inquest was held on Wednesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Dr Biggs, the house surgeon of the Devon and Exeter Hospital, who stated that death had resulted from fracture of the spine, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a request to the Coroner that he would communicate with Mr Beedell, the owner of the property, their opinion "that the garden from which the deceased fell was not properly or sufficiently fenced, with a recommendation that a railing be erected to prevent a recurrence of similar accidents."

Thursday 23 September 1858, Issue 4824 – Gale Document No. Y3200696565
Fatal Gun Accident. – A fatal accident occurred near Kennford on Monday evening last. A labourer in the employ of a farmer, named BAKER, was engaged, with two or three others, in cleaning a gun, which they were not aware was loaded. The gun accidentally went off, and lodged its contents in the side of the unfortunate man. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he arrived about ten o'clock the same evening. Every attention was paid him, but the injury was of so serious a character, that he died about three hours afterwards. An Inquest will be held this (Wednesday) afternoon.

Thursday 30 September 1858, Issue 4825 – Gale Document No. Y3200696600
BARNSTAPLE – GRACE WILKEY, an elderly woman, was found dead in her bed on Friday night last. Deceased had resided for some years in a house in Litchdon-street, in this borough. An Inquest on the body resulted in a verdict of "Found Dead."

Thursday 30 September 1858, Issue 4825 – Gale Document No. Y3200696616
TEIGNMOUTH – Death of an Infant from Parental Neglect. – An Inquest was held on Thursday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of al child belonging to JOHN and SARAH COSE. It appears the father and mother had gone to a picnic, and had left the child, only three months old, at home alone. It is stated that remonstrances were made in vain to induce the mother to return home; but she would not leave without her husband. On their return home about 4 a.m. the child was insensible, and expired shortly afterwards. The Coroner having severely censured the unfeeling conduct of the parents, the Jury returned a verdict "that the deceased had died from natural causes, occasioned by the culpable neglect of its parents."

TORQUAY – Coroner's Inquest. – An Inquest has been held at the Town Hall, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man, named WILLIAM TOLL, a labourer. Deceased, who had been in the employ of Mr Prowse, brewer, for many years, left the brewery on Monday evening in a cart, with the intention of driving it to a farm at Barton, which belongs to Mr Prowse. The cart was observed in the Teignmouth road without a driver, and a short time after the deceased was picked up in a state of insensibility. He was conveyed to his residence, where his wife, believing him to be intoxicated, put him to bed; where he remained until about five o'clock the following morning, when he was observed to be worse, and shortly after expired. The Jury found a verdict to the effect that the deceased died in consequence of injuries received from falling out of a cart.

Thursday 7 October 1858, Issue 4826 – Gale Document No. Y3200696628
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Mount Pleasant Inn, yesterday (Tuesday), before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young man, twenty-three years of age, named THOMAS HARRIS. Deceased was at work on Sunday night about ten o'clock on the works of the Yeovil extension line, near Lion's Holt. He was engaged in leading a pair of horses attached to a tram waggon laden with earth. The horses went off at a trot, and the deceased, who was leading the rear horse, unchained it, when about thirty yards from the place where the waggon was to "tip." It is supposed that he then slipped his foot, fell on the rail; and the wheel of the tram-waggon passed over his neck. The poor fellow was found lying on the ground near the place where he had detached the horse, his neck and head over the rail. On being taken up a quantity of blood flowed from his mouth and nose; but life was extinct. The body was taken home; and Mr S. S. Perkins, who made an external examination, stated that death had resulted from the jugular and other veins on the left side of the neck, having been ruptured, which caused instantaneous death. The Coroner asked whether it was necessary that the "navvies" should work on Sundays? A foreman on the works said it was necessary in tunnelling, as it was dangerous to leave the tunnels for any length of time. A Juror said he had seen other work besides that of tunnelling done on Sundays. The foreman said it had been done, but it had been discontinued by the request of the Mayor. The Coroner said it was to be regretted that work should be done on Sundays; but it appeared in this case to be necessary. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was a married man, and has left a widow and one child.

BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – On Wednesday last Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest at the Barley Mow public-house on the body of ELIZABETH JONES, an elderly woman. The deceased seems to have left her residence at Northam on the preceding day for the purpose of visiting her daughter at Bratton Fleming. Arriving at the Barnstaple railway station, the deceased showed evident signs of illness, and her appearance attracted the attention of Mr Thos. Cornish, who had her speedily removed to a friend's house in the borough. Medical aid was unavailing, and the poor woman died a few hours afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 7 October 1858, Issue 4826 – Gale Document No. Y3200696641
TIVERTON – Suicide. – On Thursday evening last an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARIA LAWTON, wife of WILLIAM LAWTON, marine store-dealer, who, the previous Tuesday, committed self-destruction by cutting her throat. It appeared from the evidence adduced, that during the last three or four months deceased suffered from mental aberration, and was so bad at times as to render it necessary to call in people to hold her. On Tuesday morning she contrived to get hold of a rusty, blunt knife with which she cut her throat. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 14 October 1858, Issue 4827 – Gale Document No. Y3200696657
Suicide. – On Wednesday a man named PORTBURY, in the employ of the Rolle Trustees, committed suicide. He at first took a quantity of poison, but fancying that it did not take effect, he then cut his throat, and died from the effects. The deceased has left a wife and several children; he was a steady man, and was much respected by his employers. An Inquest was held on Thursday, at Budleigh Salterton, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict in accordance with the facts returned.

Thursday 4 November 1858, Issue 4830 – Gale Document No. Y3200696746
EXETER – Suicide. – An Inquest was held on Friday afternoon, at the White Horse Inn, High-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man, named JOHN SCOTT. The deceased was some time since a linen-draper, in Bath, but having been connected with the railways, he became destitute. He came to the house of his brother-in-law, Mr Manning, who is a waiter at the New London Inn, about ten months since; and he gave him lodgings at his house, in Northernhay-place. The deceased was connected with the Prudential Life Office, and had told Mr Manning a day or two ago "that it would be all up with him if he could not make up his accounts with the company." On Friday morning the deceased was found by Mr Manning's servant hanging to a crook in the passage leading to the kitchen. He was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 11 November 1858, Issue 4831 – Gale Document No. Y3200696779
Fatal Accident. – An accident occurred at Metcomb farm, Ottery St. Mary, on Saturday last. A labourer, named JOSEPH OTTON, forty-three years of age, was engaged in thrashing barley with a steam thrashing-machine, when his foot accidentally slipped, and his right leg became entangled in the fly-wheel. Before the engine could be stopped his leg was completely crushed. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he expired the same evening. At an Inquest held yesterday (Tuesday) before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 18 November 1858, Issue 4832 – Gale Document No. Y3200696809
Death of a Child by Burning. – On Wednesday last an Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of JANE ENDICOTT, six years old, the daughter of a labourer residing at Countess Weir. The poor child was left alone in the house the father and mother having gone to work. Mr Bradbeer, clerk to Messrs. Davy and Sons, ship-owners and lime-merchants, heard screams issuing from the house, and on looking in that direction saw the little girl enveloped in flames. He immediately took off his coat, threw it round the child, and by the assistance of several neighbours, succeeded in extinguishing the fire, and took the little girl in a blanket to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Every attention was there paid to the little sufferer by Dr Biggs, the house-surgeon, but the injuries the child had sustained in the lower part of the stomach were of such a nature as to preclude all possibility of her recovery, and she lingered in intense agony until Tuesday evening, when death put an end to her existence. The deceased stated before her death that her clothes caught fire whilst she was in the act of putting a saucepan upon the fire. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and remarked that great praise was due to Mr Bradbeer, for his promptness in conveying the deceased to the Hospital.

Thursday 25 November 1858, Issue 4833 – Gale Document No. Y3200696860
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Oat Sheaf Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ANN YOLE, aged sixty-four years. Deceased was a single woman and a laundress, residing in the Mint. She had been suffering from a slight cough, and on being visited about nine o'clock on Sunday evening was found dressed, lying on the bed dead. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr C. B. Kingdon, surgeon, who was of opinion that death had been caused from dropsy of the heart, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 2 December 1858, Issue 4834 – Gale Document No. Y3200696879
Fatal Railway Accident. – A fatal accident occurred to a man, named THOMAS HONEYWILL, at the Saint David's station-yard of the Bristol and Exeter Railway, on Saturday last. An Inquest was held at the Red Cow Inn, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body, and from the evidence adduced it appeared that the deceased has been in the employ of the Bristol and Exeter Railway Company, as a goods' porter, for about two years. On the arrival of the North Devon trains, it was his duty to receive the way-bills from the guard. A train from Crediton arrived at the station about 10.25 on Saturday night, when he proceeded from the goods' shed to cross the rails to receive the way-bills. He was standing on a branch-rail about midway between the higher and lower stations to allow the Crediton train to pass, when the engine of the express train from Bristol, which had arrived about twelve minutes previously, was detached from the carriages and was turned on the line on which the poor fellow was standing, for the purpose of proceeding to the engine-house. It is supposed that his attention, being solely directed to the Crediton train, he did not her the engine coming. The driver of the engine felt he had passed over something; and at first thought he was off the rails. He immediately stopped, and on examining the wheels on one side found them covered with blood. The body of the unfortunate man was then discovered lying on the rails fearfully mangled. His head, right arm, and right leg were crushed, and the trunk was frightfully mutilated. Some time elapsed prior to the officials being able to ascertain who the poor man was; for although he wore the porter's dress, it was not known who he was until he was found missing, and he was then recognised by his boots, and by a pocket-book. The night was very dark, but lamps were situated on either side – one about twelve and the other eighteen feet from where the accident occurred. The man appears to have been perfectly sober, and no blame was attached to any party. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased, who was at one time a draper of Tiverton, and in good circumstances, was about forty-six years of age, and has left a wife, in a delicate state of health, and one child.

Thursday 2 December 1858, Issue 4834 – Gale Document No. Y3200696890
EXETER – Death of an Old Man by Burning. – An Inquest was held last Thursday, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of a man named RICHARD GOLDSWORTHY, alias "LORD GOOSEBERRY," aged fifty-five, who lodged at Mrs Courtenay's, Rack-street. It appears that the deceased went into the tap-room of the Round Tree Inn, on Saturday, the 13th ult., and stood before the fire warming himself. Whilst in that position his trousers caught fire, and burnt him very severely about the thigh and leg. He called for assistance, and the fire was extinguished; he was admitted into the Hospital on the evening of the same day, where every attention was paid him, but he lingered in great agony until Wednesday, when he died. Dr Biggs, the house surgeon at the Hospital, gave it as his opinion "that his death was caused from the injuries received, and the consequent depression produced upon a very enfeebled constitution." The Jury, under these circumstances, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 9 December 1858, Issue 4835 – Gale Document No. Y3200696909
EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Elephant Inn, North Street, on Thursday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a new-born female illegitimate child. It appeared that on Wednesday morning the servant girl (MARIA FRIENDSHIP) at the Elephant complained of being ill; and Mrs Ann Baker, the wife of a cheese dealer, of Somerset, who was staying at the inn, went and knocked at FRIENDSHIP'S door, at the request of Mrs Rattenbury, the landlady, and she said she would come down directly. Finding, however, that FRIENDSHIP did not come down stairs, Mrs Baker and Mrs Rattenbury insisted on having the door opened, and it was then discovered that FRIENDSHIP had been delivered of a female child; which appeared to be dead. Mr K. Webb, surgeon, was then sent for. He found the child to be full grown, and having since made a post mortem examination of the body, he was of opinion that the child had been born alive, but from appearances on the body, he had no doubt death was caused by the child falling on its head, and not from any designed violence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 23 December 1858, Issue 4837 – Gale Document No. Y3200696973
EXETER – Suicide. – An Inquest was held on Saturday before the City Coroner, on the body of a man, named WILLIAM BIDGOOD, aged 63. Deceased, who was a widower, with three children, was a sawyer, residing in Johnstone's-place, Coombe-street. On Friday night he complained to his eldest daughter of not being able to obtain work, and appeared very depressed in spirits. The daughter left him about nine o'clock to go to a neighbour's to sleep, and on the following morning, about eight o'clock, she found the door locked, and was unable to obtain admittance. An entrance having been effected by the windows, the deceased was found suspended by a rope to the hand-rail of the stairs, quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Fatal Accident. – An accident occurred on Friday last to a man, named JOHN MILLS, who was employed in connection with an omnibus which runs to and from the Exeter station. On the arrival of the express train on Friday night he rode from the station behind the 'bus; and assisted the driver to unload at the White Lion Inn. Afterwards, whilst the driver w3as speaking to the "boots," something was heard to fall on the ground. It was then found that the deceased had fallen from the roof of the 'bus to the pavement. He was taken up immediately, but was insensible. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter hospital, where it was found by Dr Biggs, the house surgeon, that he was paralyzed in his arms and legs, in which state he continued until nine o'clock the following morning, when he vomited a considerable quantity of arterial blood. He continued insensible up to the time of death, which occurred about six o'clock on the same evening. Death was occasioned from a fracture of the spine, and no hopes were entertained from the first of his recovery. Deceased, who was a single man, aged 45, had been drinking prior to the accident. An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Blue Boar Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Sudden Death – An Inquest was held at the City Prison, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT PERKINS. The deceased was committed to prison in August last on two charges of assaulting children under twelve years of age. Since that time he has occasionally been ill, but was in his usual health on Friday night when locked up. On the following morning he was found dead in his bed. Mr Webb, surgeon, attributed the cause of death to disease of the heart. Deceased was seventy-two years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 30 December 1858, Issue 4838 – Gale Document No. Y3200697007
EXETER – Sudden Death. – On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the King's Arms Inn, on the body of WILLIAM PULLEN. The deceased, a respectable young man, was at work at his employer's (Mr Franklin, coach builder,) on Wednesday, when about one o'clock he was taken ill, fell down, and expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 30 December 1858, Issue 4838 – Gale Document No. Y3200697009
BARNSTAPLE – Mr H. Toller, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Braunton, on Monday, upon the body of HENRY FOWLES, who was about seven years old. On the preceding Saturday the deceased seems to have pursued two horses which were passing through the village. He caught hold of the tail of one of the animals, which kicked the boy in the head. His skull was fractured, and death soon followed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and accompanied their finding with the recommendation that masters should discontinue the practice of intrusting their horses to the care of lads of tender age, as was the case in the present instance.

Thursday 6 January 1859, Issue 4839 – Gale Document No. Y3200697060
TORQUAY – The Late Catastrophe. – The adjourned Inquest on the bodies of MR and MRS EDWARD HAMBLING, who were killed by the fall of a high wall upon their dwelling at No. 4 Beacon-terrace, in this town, on the night of Monday, the 20th of December, was held at the Town-hall, on Thursday, before Mr W. A. Cockey, the Coroner. Mr Tanner, one of the survivors, who resided at 2, Beacon-terrace, was present, and gave his version of the catastrophe, but no additional facts were elicited. s The workmen who were engaged by Mr Jacob Harvey in raising the wall which fell, and in laying out the intended garden behind, stated that, although it was only sixteen inches in thickness, the deposit of a quantity of "deads" and earth at its back gave them no reason for apprehending the danger. There was no evidence to show that any one had previously regarded the wall as insecure, and the Coroner, in summing up, recommended the Jury to find a verdict of Accidental death, as there was evidently no blame attached to Mr Harvey. The Jury, however, after forty minutes' deliberation, handed in the following Open Verdict:- "That EDWARD HAMBLING and LOUISA HAMBLING, his wife, on the 21st of December, were killed by the falling of a certain wall. The Jurors considered that proper precaution was not used in the construction of the wall, and that the old wall was not in a fit state to receive the addition."

Thursday 13 January 1859, Issue 4840 – Gale Document No. Y3200697090
BRIXHAM – Horrible Accident. – An inquest was held last Friday, before A. W. Cockey, Esq., on the body of MARY PINE, a child two years of age, who came by her death under the following painful circumstances:- It appears that her grandfather has been afflicted with a dimness of sight, which almost approaches total blindness, all his life; and, being unable to follow the trade of a mason, obtained a livelihood by purchasing timber, and cutting it up for firewood. On Monday, the 3rd instant, the old man was engaged as usual, in cutting up wood in front of his own door in Higher-street; his grand daughter, unperceived, approaches to cling round his legs, when he, aiming a blow at the wood, buried the axe in the child's head. Mr Bowden, a medical man, was sent for, who said it was impossible that the child could live, and all that could be done was to bind up its head. the deceased lingered on in great agony till Wednesday, when she died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The old man, ROBERT SHARP, has been in a fearful state of mind since the accident, and it is feared that he will lose his reason.

Thursday 20 January 1859, Issue 4841 – Gale Document No. Y3200697126
BARNSTAPLE – Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest last week at Bradiford upon the body of JOHN STEWARD. Returning from Pilton to Bradiford on the night of the 1st inst., the deceased ( who it is reported was then intoxicated) fell down in the road, and whilst there the wheel of a miller's cart passed over him. The injuries he sustained led to the old man's death, which took place eight days after the occurrence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 27 January 1859, Issue 4842 – Gale Document No. Y3200697147
EXETER – Death of a Child from Suffocation. – An Inquest was held at Moore's London Ale House, Mary Arches-street, on Monday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child named CAROLINE VAUGHAN, aged three months. The deceased child was the daughter of a labourer, residing in Mary Arches-street, named ROBERT VAUGHAN. She was born in the Exeter Workhouse, where she remained with her mother until Thursday week. The child was put to bed on Saturday night by the mother, and at twelve o'clock the same night it was found to be dead. Mr F Warren, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from suffocation, as the child was found on its face. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Suffocation."

Thursday 27 January 1859, Issue 4842 – Gale Document No. Y3200697163
EXETER – Sudden Death of a Child. – An Inquest was held last Thursday at the Barnstaple Inn, Lower North-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of a male child, named WILLIAM CAHILL, aged eight months. The parents of the child live at No. 9, Lower North-street, and are agents for Kelly and Co., of London, for the sale of books, &c. On the night in question they retired to bed about eleven o'clock, with the child in the mother's arms, and about three o'clock on the following morning she found the child quite cold, and immediately got up and sent for medical advice. Mr Warren speedily arrived, and at once pronounced it dead, and gave it as his opinion that the child died from suffocation. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE – Suicide. – MRS MARY PARKIN, of Rookebeer Farm, Fremington, committed suicide on Tuesday. The deceased, who was nearly eighty years old, appears to have attended to the ordinary affairs of the house in her customary way that morning. Nothing unusual was observed in her manner; but during the temporary absence of her daughter MRS PARKIN seized her husband's razor and cut her throat. On the daughter's return she found her mother lying in dangerous proximity to the fire, and the blood freely oozing from the wound. Mr Dene, the surgeon, was soon in attendance; but the poor old woman only survived the dressing of the wound a short period. It seems that the deceased has been for some time past in a rather weak state of mind, and it is rumoured that some family disarrangements have tended to increase the weakness. Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy Coroner, afterwards held an Inquest upon the body, and the verdict returned was in accordance with the foregoing particulars.

Thursday 27 January 1859, Issue 4842 – Gale Document No. Y3200697160
Mr R. Bremridge held an Inquest at Eastdown on Wednesday last upon the body of GEORGE SMITH, son of MR CHAS. SMITH, of Bowden. The deceased resided with his father, and about noon on the preceding day one of the domestics saw him in the kitchen – he then appeared in a very desponding way. He left the house soon after, and not returning to dinner search was made by the two maid servants, who discovered him hanging to a beam in the hayloft – quite dead. The unfortunate man was forty-four years of age; and it was stated that he had for some time past been labouring under some mental defect. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst in an unsound state of mind.

Thursday 3 February 1859, Issue 4843 – Gale Document No. Y3200697190
Sudden Death – Mr Richard Bremridge held an Inquest at the New Inn, Bishopstawton, on Saturday last, upon the body of JOHN PILE, a labourer, who was a married man with eight children. The deceased was discovered early that morning lying in the water in the hedge-trough, adjoining Bird's Marsh. The water was six feet wide, and generally about eighteen inches deep; but where the deceased's head rested the water was eight inches only in depth. The discovery was made by one Anthony Snell, who was going to his work at Hall; and this witness stated that there was not the slightest signs of life remaining when he took the body from the water. There were no marks of violence on the body, and the medical testimony went to prove that death resulted from an exposure. There was no conclusive evidence adduced as to how the deceased got into the water, and the Jury consequently returned a verdict in accordance with the foregoing facts.

Thursday 3 February 1859, Issue 4843 – Gale Document No. Y3200697196
EXMOUTH – Sudden Death. – On Sunday last, about half past six in the evening, a few tradesmen were returning from a walk, when near Boarden Barn-hill they noticed something lying across the foot-path. On approaching the object they discovered what they thought to be a drunken man, but on raising the body and placing it against a hedge they found that life was extinct. On examination it was found to be the body of MR STAMP, cabinet-maker, of Bicton-place. His umbrella and stick were placed in the hedge, and a handkerchief was in his hand. It is considered that he must have been dead nearly an hour, as a party of young people returning to Littleham had previously noticed him lying there, but thinking it to be some one intoxicated, they passed on, but gave notice to the tradesmen whom they met soon after that some person was lying across the footpath. It appears the poor fellow was on his return from Littleham, where he usually went on Sunday afternoons, to read the scriptures to some aged persons residing there, when the sad occurrence took place. A Coroner's Inquest is to be held on the body.

Thursday 3 February 1859, Issue 4843 – Gale Document No. Y32006971961
BRIXHAM – An Inquest was held last week on the body of JOHN PETHERBRIDGE, a twine-spinner, who was found suspended in his loft by a rope The evidence proved that he had been in a desponding state for some time, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was accordingly returned.

Thursday 10 February 1859, issue 4844 – Gale Document No. Y3200697231
TORRINGTON – Sudden Death. – Mr J. H. Toller held an Inquest at Coombe Farm, Great Torrington, on Thursday last, on the body of MR J. F. WILLIAMS. On the preceding day the deceased, together with some friends, was engaged in shooting rabbits on Henland Farm, St. Giles. The attention of the deceased was called to a particular bush, under which it was supposed there was a rabbit; he went back some five or six feet in anticipation of a shot, and whilst preparing the deceased suddenly fell on his left side and rolled over. He breathed two or three times after he was raised from the ground, but death soon followed. MR WILLIAMS was about forty years of age, and the medical testimony proved that he died from a rupture of a vessel in the heart – accelerated by over exertion. The Jury returned a verdict of "Sudden Death."

Thursday 10 February 1859, issue 4844 – Gale Document No. Y3200697217
CULLOMPTON – Suicide. – An Inquest was held at the Merry Harriers Inn last Thursday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an agricultural labourer, named ISAAC FLAY, who committed suicide by hanging himself. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 10 February 1859, issue 4844 – Gale Document No. Y3200697232
TEIGNMOUTH - Fatal Accident. – A farmer, of North Bovey, named HAYWOOD, met his death at the Toll Bar, on Haldon, on Wednesday last, in consequence of his horse falling with him and severely fracturing his skull. It appears that deceased and his cousin had some sheep at Dawlish which they went to inspect on the day in question. They rode through the Toll Bar very fast and did not pay the toll which was demanded by the collector. Previous to their return the collector had put a chain across the road to prevent their again passing without paying him. On seeing them returning he went out and again demanded the toll, which they took no heed of, and deceased, who did not see the chain, rode against it, which was broken by the violence of the shock, and the horse fell throwing the rider on his head into the middle of the road. Deceased was picked up insensible, and immediately conveyed to the Dispensary here, where every attention was paid him. He lingered in the greatest agony until tw3elve o'clock the same night, when death put an end to his sufferings. An Inquest was held on Saturday by Mr Cockey, Coroner, who in summing up said, the collector was fully justified in putting up the chain to enforce his authority. The Jury, from the evidence adduced, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but recommended that bars instead of chains should e placed on all roads where there was need of them. Mr Temple, the lessee, promised that the chain should not be used there again.

Thursday 17 February 1859, Issue 4845 – Gale Document No. Y3200697247
EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Greyhound Inn, Paris-street, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female child, named MARY COUNTER LANE, aged fourteen weeks. The father of the child is a dairyman, residing in Paris-street, and from the evidence of MRS LANE, it appeared that the child had not been well from its birth, and that it continually wasted until Wednesday night when it suddenly became worse, and died at five o'clock the following morning. Notwithstanding the child's illness, no medical assistance had been sought for it with this exception – that at one time the mother took it to Mr Stone's, druggist, who gave it some powders. Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, had made an external examination of the body and he was of opinion that death had resulted from a wasting away, caused by an internal complaint. The Coroner in summing up said that he had thought fit to bring this case before them as it was the sixth case which had been reported to him within three months where children had been permitted to die on that parish without medical aid having been sought; and he thought the mother had been guilty of culpable neglect in suffering a child to remain ill for three months without having medical advice. The Jury concurring in the remarks of the Coroner, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 17 February 1859, Issue 4845 – Gale Document No. Y3200697265
INQUESTS. – Mr H. A. Vallack held an Inquest on Tuesday at Staddon Farm, Winkleigh, upon the body of MR JOHN BULLIED. The deceased, who was eighty years of age, fell over a flight of eight stairs, and the injuries he thereby received led to an almost immediate death.

Mr Vallack held an Inquest at Lifton, in the same parish, on Friday, upon the body of JANE ALFORD. The deceased appears to have been engaged on the preceding evening in lighting the fire to get supper for her father, who is a labourer; but whilst doing so her clothes caught fire, and she was burnt to death. The deceased was only eight years of age, and at the time of the occurrence there was no other person in the house. In both cases the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SANDFORD – An Inquest was held at the residence of Mr J. Norris, Dira Farm, in the parish of Sandford, on Saturday last, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of THOMAS STABBACK, aged thirty-five. The deceased was a respectable man, and resided at Cheriton Fitzpaine. For some time past he has been in a state of mental depression, and on Thursday last was seen by two labourers suspended from a tree in Dira Wood, in the parish of Sandford, quite dead. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 24 February 1859, Issue 4846 – Gale Document No. Y3200697280
EXETER – An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) at the New Ship Inn, St David's, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZA BEER, aged two months. From the evidence of LUCY BEER, the mother, it appeared that she retired to rest on Sunday night with the deceased, who was in her usual good health, and on the following morning she found her child lying by her side quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death by Suffocation.

Suicide – An Inquest was held at Timewell's Swan Inn, St Thomas, on Monday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner for the district, on the body of MAURICE MYERS, a lad eighteen years of age. From the evidence of John Smith, a servant in the employ of MR MYERS, who is a member of the Hebrew persuasion, it appeared that the deceased, who was deformed, was last seen alive about four o'clock on Sunday afternoon, when he was present in the court-yard, and entered into some conversation with witness. Smith did not observe that he was more than usually excited; but he had frequently expressed a wish that he was dead, or that some one would cut his throat, without giving any reason for such a wish. Soon after six o'clock the same evening, Smith having occasion to go to the hayloft, found the poor fellow suspended by a rope to the beam of the loft. He rushed into the house, and acquainted the parents with the fact. The father immediately went to the loft, when he untied the rope from the beam, and then cut it from deceased's neck. Mr Pates, surgeon, was sent for, and promptly attended, but life was extinct when the body was cut down. Mr Pates was not called at the Inquest. Smith and the other witnesses were unanimously of opinion that the deceased was of unsound mind. The Jury returned a verdict that "deceased had committed suicide while in a state of 'Temporary Insanity'."

Thursday 24 February 1859, Issue 4846 – Gale Document No. Y3200697292
BARNSTAPLE – Mr Richard Bremridge recently held an Inquest at Bickington, near Barnstaple, upon the body of JOSEPH EVANS, a child four years of age, who died from injuries received from his clothes catching fire. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 24 February 1859, Issue 4846 – Gale Document No. Y3200697293
BRIXHAM – An Inquest was held last Wednesday on the body of MR SAMUEL JONES, shipbuilder, who, having occasion to go to a loft at the back of his house a few days previous, fell through the beam, a height of ten feet, and fractured his skull. He lingered on a few days and died, leaving a wife and four young children to lament his loss.

Thursday 3 March 1859, Issue 4847 – Gale Document No. Y3200697304
EXETER – Death From Burns. - An old woman, seventy-six years of age, named ELIZABETH STUMP, residing in Albert-street, Newtown, died on Saturday morning last from having been severely burnt on the 12th of February. The deceased was the wife of a Brickmaker, and has for some years been of unsound mind. She had been an inmate of the St Thomas Lunatic Asylum, but for the last twelve months resided with her son and daughter-in-law. On the 12th of last month she was left by her daughter-in-law in the kitchen alone for a short time. During her absence she heard the deceased screaming, and on going into the room she found that the poor old woman's clothes were on fire. The flames were speedily extinguished, and on examination it was found that the deceased had received some severe burns on her right side and face. The poor woman was wholly unable to account for the occurrence, and the only observation she made was – "I'm done for." Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, was sent for: he stated that from the first he considered it a fatal case, in consequence of the burns and the shock which the system had received. An Inquest was held on the body at the Globe Inn, Newtown, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 10 March 1859, Issue 4848 – Gale Document No. Y3200697355
BARNSTAPLE – Mr J. H. Toller, the deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Westdown, on Monday, upon the body of RHODA VICKERY, who was only eight months old. On the preceding Saturday morning the deceased was placed in a chair, which was put near the fire; and whilst there received such injuries from the upsetting of a kettle of boiling water that led to her death on the following day. The parents (who earn their livelihood by tailoring) were from home at the time, and the infant was left in the charge of a son who was getting the breakfast. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 24 March 1859, Issue 4850 – Gale Document No. Y3200697413
CHUDLEIGH – Suicide of a Farmer. – Much excitement was caused in this town on Thursday last, on its being known that WM. SOUTHWOOD, a small farmer of this place, above seventy years of age, had committed suicide by hanging himself in a linhay, situated in one of his fields. It appears that he had been living a very unhappy life with his wife and son for some time past, and very sad disturbances had recently taken place. In the morning before he committed the rash act, he said to different persons he should never seem them again, that he should destroy himself; but knowing him to be a man of excitable temper and that he had before said the same thing, they thought nothing of it. About two hours afterwards his son went to the linhay and found him hanging. There was no doubt that he had been dead some time; but what is singular instead of cutting him down he locked the linhay door, and ran back to the town, about a quarter of a mile distance, to say what had occurred. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, when a verdict was returned of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 31 March 1859, Issue 4851 – Gale Document No. Y3200697428
EXETER – Death from Suffocation. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Anchor Inn, Exe Island, before the City Coroner -= H. W. Hooper, Esq., - on the body of a child, aged ten weeks, named FRANK STONE. The parents of the child reside in Saddler's-lane, and the father is a smith in the employ of Mr Vickary. The child was in its usual good health when put to bed on Saturday night; but on the following (Sunday) morning was found dead by its mother, with whom it had slept. There was no doubt that the child's death had been occasioned by suffocation, caused by being over-laid. This is the second infant belonging to the family which has met its death from that cause in a period of eighteen months. The Coroner impressed upon the mother the necessity of being more cautious. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 April 1859, Issue 4852 – Gale Document No. Y3200697459
ST MARY CHURCH – Suspicious Death of A Child. – Much excitement has prevailed in this parish during the last few days in consequence of the somewhat mysterious death of a child, five weeks old, the illegitimate offspring of ANN LAMBLE, a single woman, aged about thirty. It appears that on Saturday night at twelve o'clock, the infant was seen alive and in perfect health – in the morning it was dead. Whether its death was caused by accidental overlaying or other means remains to be proved. From circumstances which came to the knowledge of policeman Holwell, as well as certain dubious expressions made use of by the woman a short time before the child's death, it was deemed advisable to communicate with the Coroner, A. W. Cockey, Esq., who fixed Tuesday afternoon for holding an Inquest, the result of which was a verdict – That the deceased died from suffocation, but by what means the Jury were unable to determine. Connected with this case is another likewise of a serious character. The father of the woman LAMBLE, an old blacksmith, and a rather determined character, has been heard to threaten the life of a butcher named Ellis, who is alleged to have been the father of the child. He has even gone so far as to declare that he has already cast the bullet which should do for Ellis if he did not leave the town. In consequence of this the interference of the magistrates has been deemed necessary, and a warrant for a LAMBLE's apprehension has been applied for.

Thursday 7 April 1859, Issue 4852 – Gale Document No. Y3200697473
BARNSTAPLE – Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Chulmleigh, on Saturday, upon the body of ELIZABETH WESTACOTT, who was about 15 years of age. On the preceding Wednesday the deceased appears to have fallen upon the floor and to have severely knocked her head by its coming in contact with a chair. The blow on the head led to her death, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Sinking of the "Spitfire" (Fishing Boat) and Loss of Life. - Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at the New Inn, Clovelly, on Saturday last, upon the body of JAMES BATES, a fisherman. The deceased and another man (named EMANUEL BEER) appear to have gone out on the preceding day in the Spitfire fishing, and whilst out the boat seems to have sunk by a sudden gust. The occurrence was witnessed by a man on board the Eliza and Ann, of Bideford, who in about half an hour afterwards discovered the body of BATES, who was then quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Death From Excessive Drinking. – Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest on Thursday evening, at the White Hart Inn, upon the body of SARAH GUARD, who was 76 years old. The deceased resided in Anchor-lane, and appears to have been much addicted to drinking. On the preceding evening she was so intoxicated that she was obliged to be assisted into bed; and about seven o'clock the next morning the husband discovered her dead by his side. The medical testimony directed the Jury to a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from apoplexy which was produced by excessive drinking of ardent spirits.

Thursday 14 April 1859, Issue 4853 – Gale Document No. Y3200697488
EXETER – Another Death of An Infant From Overlaying. – On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the Poltimore Arms, St Sidwell, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female child, aged seven weeks, named MARY JANE HARRIS. The deceased was the daughter of a man residing in Warren-place, and had since birth enjoyed good health. She slept with her parents on Friday night, and on the following morning was found dead in bed. Mr Warren, surgeon, was sent for, and stated that death had resulted from suffocation by overlaying. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Fatal Accident. – On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD ANNIS, a labourer, of Topsham. The deceased, it appeared, left Topsham on the morning of April 2nd, to go to his work, and was in the course of the day sent to Heavitree. He was turning round a corner near Heavitree Church, when the wheels of the waggon he was driving grazed the edge of the kerbstone, and threw him off the shafts, and the wheels went over his right leg, which had received a compound fracture; but dead ensued. The deceased was about forty-six years of age. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 21 April 1859, Issue 4854 – Gale Document No. Y3200697521
EXETER – Sudden Death Of An Infant. – At the Golden Lion Inn, Newtown, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, an Inquest was held on the body of an infant child, named JAMES MANLEY. The deceased was five weeks old, and was the son of al cabinet-maker, residing in Sandford-street, Newtown. On Saturday the mother noticed that the child's limbs were contracted when it was put to bed, but it got better. About seven o'clock the following morning it was found dead by the mother, after having been seen alive about an hour previously. Mr S. S. Perkins, surgeon, said the child had died from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Thursday 12 May 1859, issue 4857 – Gale Document No. Y3200697612
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Honiton Inn, Paris-street, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female child, named ELIZA SALTER STANTON, aged six years. On Friday evening, about half-past five o'clock, Mr Wm. Brice, of Pinhoe, was driving his dog-cart through St Sidwell's-street. When nearing the Acland Arms Inn, the deceased child attempted to cross the street; but, it is supposed, not seeing the dog-cart coming she ran close in front of the horse, which knocked her down, and the wheel of the vehicle passed over the child's bowels. Mr Brice, who, according to the evidence of Mr Warren and Mr Thomas, two butchers, who witnessed the accident, was driving at a very moderate rate – not more than five miles an hour – immediately stopped. The child was picked up by Mr Thomas, and was sensible. It was carried to its parents' house, and Mr Perkins, surgeon, was sent for. He promptly arrived but found the poor child in a dying state, and about a quarter of an hour afterwards she expired. Mr Perkins said he believed death had resulted from a rupture of the liver causing a great haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The case presented features of a melancholy nature, the deceased being the only child of a man living in Russell-street, who had his leg broken near the same spot a few weeks since, and who is still a patient at the Hospital, and the mother was ill in bed at the time of the accident, the account of which so affected her that she has suffered from hysterics ever since.

Alleged Death From A Fight. – An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) afternoon at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a man, named WILLIAM CLARKE. It appeared that the deceased, who was thirty-one years of age, was a mason, living at Plymtree. On the 14th of April last CLARKE, in company with his father, brother, John Tapp, and others were drinking at the New Inn, Plymtree. They were in the public-house for several hours, and late in the evening Tapp challenged CLARKE to fight. Deceased, at first, took no notice of the challenge; but, subsequently, offered to fight Tapp for a sovereign. No blows, however, ensued, and the party remained in the inn until eleven o'clock, at which hour they left, and proceeded homewards. The deceased and Tapp were both partially intoxicated, and without further provocation on either side, and when about a quarter of a mile from the inn, they took off their coats and began to fight. They had been struggling together for a short time, when deceased appeared to be falling, and a man, named Salter, who supported him, told him to "stand up." Deceased replied, "Stop a minute – let me take something off my leg." He was then supported to a bank, and sat down. On examining the leg it was found to be broken. A surgeon was sent for, and the deceased conveyed home. When there he said that Tapp had kicked him. On the following morning he was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, notwithstanding the attention paid him, he gradually sank, and expired on the morning of the 8th instant. Mr Rendle, the house-surgeon at the Hospital, stated that death had resulted from a compound fracture of the lower part of the left leg, but how that fracture occurred he could not say. He should consider it more probable that it had resulted from a fall than from a kick. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Death From Suffocation. – On Monday an Inquest was held, before the City Coroner, on the body of a male infant. The deceased, who was born on the 3rd inst., was the son of a woman, named HARRIET O'NEIL, who is lodging at the house of Thomas Westacott, a railway policeman. She arrived in the city about a month since, in company with an elderly gentleman, who represented her as the wife of a captain. He obtained a lodging for her, and then departed for Kingsbridge. The child was found dead under the bedclothes, on Saturday night last, by Westacott's wife – the mother being asleep at the time. Mr J. Webb was sent for, and he stated that death had resulted from suffocation, and the Jury found accordingly.

Thursday 12 May 1859, issue 4857 – Gale Document No. Y3200697624
BARNSTAPLE. – Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest at the Bear Inn, Green-lane, on Friday evening, upon the body of JOHN PATTERSON, aged about 50. The evidence showed that the deceased had been engaged by Mr Potts' committee as a messenger, and whilst on the Square at the declaration of the poll PATTERSON was seized with violent illness. He called at a chemist's and was supplied with a draught. He then went home – complaining that he had a dreadful pain on the right hand side of the chest. Subsequently he was supplied with a powder from another chemist's, and on Monday he got up and went to Mr Potts' committee-room, but was compelled to retire to his house shortly afterwards. He became worse, and on Wednesday afternoon Mr Michael Cook, surgeon, was in attendance upon PATTERSON, who "was as mazed as a sheep" during the night. On Thursday morning PATTERSON insisted upon going out in company with his brother. On their way to the Quay they called at the Golden Anchor Inn – PATTERSON wanted half-a-pint of beer, but the liquor was refused at the wish of the brother. Some one present offered to give him three pennyworth of brandy, which was considerably diluted with water, and he drank the whole of it at once. He remarked that it had done him good, and another man gave him two pennyworth of brandy, which was also diluted. About half-an-hour afterwards he became worse, and was assisted home, where he died shortly after his arrival. The medical testimony proved that the deceased died from inflammation of the lungs and delirium tremens, which latter disease was caused by excessive drinking a short time previously; and that his death was accelerated by his persisting in going out of doors. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the foregoing particulars.

BIDEFORD – Mr T. L. Pridham held an Inquest last week upon the body of WILLIAM MORRISH, alias SPLODGER. The deceased was shockingly burnt some time since whilst sleeping by the side of one of the lime kilns, East-the-Water. His life was despaired of from the first moment of the accident, and it s surprising that he should have so long lingered. To his imbecility might partly be attributed the cause, for to a man whose nervous system was more susceptible the injuries MORRISH sustained would have probably caused almost immediate death. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

CULLOMPTON – Melancholy and Fatal Accident On The Bristol and Exeter Railway. – An Inquest was held before R. R. Crosse, Esq., at Sampford Peverell, on Friday last, on the body of a carpenter, named JAMES FARR, who was killed about quarter past ten p.m., on the 4th instant, by the up mail train. It appeared from the evidence that deceased, who resided at the abovenamed place, had attended Cullompton fair on the day of the sad occurrence, and departed therefrom very much the worse for liquor, in company with some friends whom he left at the Half-way House, in Willand. Deceased on taking leave of his friends here, stated that he purposed going home by a nearer way (which would compel him to walk a quarter of a mile up the line) than the road. He was, however, strongly urged to go home by the road, but, unfortunately, without success – and early the next morning the unfortunate man was found by a packer about a quarter of a mile above the Tiverton Junction Station, by the up side of the railway, with his skull very much fractured, and the small toes of the left foot cut off. Death must have been instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The deceased has left a wife and child to deplore his untimely end.

Thursday 2 June 1859, Issue 4860 – Gale Document No. Y3200697695
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the Sawyer's Arms, Preston-street, on Friday last, before H. D. Barton, Esq., (Deputy Coroner) on the body of an old woman, named MARY KNAPMAN. the deceased who was a widow, seventy-seven years of age, has, for a number of years, carried on a cider-shop, in Preston-street. On Thursday night she retired to rest about eleven o'clock, in her usual good health, requesting a lodger, named Mary Payne, to call her in the morning. No answer was given to the summons on the following morning, and the door being locked on the inside, it was broken open, and the old woman found dead in her bed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 9 June 1859, Issue 4861 – Gale Document No. BA3200697727
EXETER – Suicide. – Last night MR ROWSELL, the landlord of the Canteen, Higher Barracks, was discovered quite dead, suspended by a piece of sacking cord to an iron rod, which is attached to his bed. The deceased had gone to lie down in the afternoon, as was his custom, and on his wife's attempting to go into the bedroom at ten o'clock she found the door locked. It was immediately forced open, and the deceased was discovered as above described. An Inquest will be held today.

Fatal Accident To A Child. – Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Greyhound Inn, Paris-street, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a child, named ALBERT GEORGE GIBSON, aged twenty months, son of MR GIBSON, superintendent of the Devon County Police. From the evidence of a lad, nine years old, named William Vining, it appeared that on Monday evening, by the request of MRS GIBSON, he took his little brother and the deceased, in a perambulator, on Northernhay. Whilst there he met with a lad, younger than himself, named Bowden, and he assisted Vining to push the perambulator up to the higher slope, under the Castle. Vining left Bowden in charge of the perambulator for a short time whilst he looked at some fruit trees in an adjacent garden. Bowden was taking the perambulator down the sloping footpath, but finding it too much for his strength, he called to Vining to come to his assistance. Before, however, the lad could arrive the perambulator had turned over and had fallen upon the poor children. Rabjohns, one of the Northernhay lodge-keepers, and a woman, rescued the children and took them to their parents. Little GIBSON had sustained a severe concussion of the brain, and when Mr A. Cumming came to him, on his way home, he was quite insensible and was moaning. He died soon afterwards. Vining was not injured. The Coroner thought it could not be considered in any other light than that of an accident, and the Jury, agreeing with him, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Death By Drowning. – An Inquest was held at the Bear Inn, South-street, on Saturday last, before H. D. Barton, Esq., (Deputy Coroner), on the body of a boy, named JAMES STONE. The deceased, who was about ten years of age, was the son of a shoemaker, residing in the College, South-street. On Friday evening he left home in company with a little boy, named William Paperell, and two others, to bathe at Head Weir. To reach the bathing-ground it was necessary, as there was no bridge erected, to cross the weir. This the boys attempted to do; but in consequence of the thunder-storm of the previous day, the water was much higher and swifter on the weir than usual; and when the lads were about halfway across the deceased, who was in front, was suddenly washed off the weir into the stream below. His companions (who, with the exception of Taperell, were younger than himself), immediately returned and after telling a young man that the boy had been drowned, hastened home. A boat and gropers were obtained by a labourer, named Reed, and after two hours' search the body was discovered some distance below the weir. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Drowning."

Thursday 16 June 1859, Issue 4862 – Gale Document No. Y3200697761
EXETER – Death From Drowning. – An Inquest was held last Thursday, at the Topsham Inn, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy-Coroner, on the body of a little boy, named WILLIAM JOSEPH WILKINS, aged ten years. It appeared from the evidence that deceased, with other boys, went on the previous evening to the Head Weir to bathe, and in crossing the Weir the deceased fell, and before assistance could be obtained was washed away and drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and remarked that they hoped the authorities would not delay putting up the bridge across the Weir.

Suicide – An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at the Eagle Tavern, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of GEORGE ROUSELL, aged fifty-five, who committed suicide under the circumstances mentioned in last week's Flying Post. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 23 June 1859, Issue 4863 – Gale Document No. Y3200697792
EXETER – Accidental Death. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN WARREN PAYNE, aged seventy-four years. The deceased was a labourer, and worked for Mr Trood, of Exminster; and on Saturday last was engaged in forming a hayrick, when he accidentally fell off the rick, and sustained a fracture of ten of his ribs, some in two places. The poor old man was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he lingered until Monday morning last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 23 June 1859, Issue 4863 – Gale Document No. Y3200697811
BIDEFORD – Suicide. – THOMAS HONYWELL, who was seventy years old, has committed suicide. Deceased had been in the employ of Mr Clarke, painter, of Bideford, many years, but old age rendered him incapable of work. He was consequently obliged to apply for parochial relief, but that seems not to have "smoothed the pillow of declining age." The poor old man appears to have been for sometime in the habit of paying his rent weekly, but his extreme poverty compelled him to forego this arrangement. the circumstance of owing seven months' rent gave him much uneasiness – especially during the last fortnight, when, according to his wife, he had become "very indifferent and very nervous." On Tuesday week he left his house saying he was going to his wife's sister's, but he did not return. Search was made for him, and on Thursday his body was discovered in the Plantation, near Mount Pleasant, which is some short distance from the Bideford railway station. His throat was cut, and his razor (half-open and bloody) was found by his side. Mr Bremridge held an Inquest upon the body at Westleigh on Friday, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased killed himself by cutting his throat with a razor – being of unsound mind.

SPREYTON – Frightful Death By Burning. – On Thursday night last MR JOSIAS MIDDLEWICK, of the White Hart Inn, in this town, had occasion to be absent on business for about two hours. On returning to his home at eleven o'clock at night he saw sparks of fire in the passage of his house, and on going into the sitting-room he was horrified at seeing his wife literally burnt to a cinder. It appears that the three children and the servant boy went to bed about ten o'clock. MRS MIDDLEWICK sat near the chimney with the candle on her lap reading or sewing. It is believed that she fell asleep; that the candle caught her clothes on fire whilst asleep (as the candle was lying on the floor all but burnt out, and part of her clothes thrown off); and that she met her death in this frightful manner without being able to call for help. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 30 June 1859, Issue 4864 – Gale Document No. Y3200697842
BARNSTAPLE – Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Braunton, on Thursday, upon the body of MR WM. HEDDON. The deceased seems to have indulged himself very freely in intoxicating liquors, especially during the past five months. On the morning preceding the day of the Inquest he got up between the hours of four and five o'clock and when his wife came down stairs shortly after six she found her husband drinking. About half-past ten in the morning the deceased went again to bed in a state of intoxication, and between six and seven in the evening he died. He was fifty-one years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Sudden Death, which had been accelerated by Excessive Drinking."

Thursday 14 July 1859, Issue 4866 – Gale Document No. Y3200697878
EXETER – Death Of A Child From Scalding. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Acland Arms Inn, St Sidwell, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HUBERT LONG, aged twelve months. From the evidence of Mrs Martin, it appeared that she had had charge of deceased for about ten months, but on the 27th of May last, deceased crept towards the fire-place, and turned over a small boiler of water on himself, causing severe scalds about the lower part of the body. Medical aid was procured, but deceased died on Wednesday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Frightful Accident. – A paper-maker, named ROBERT BULL, in the employ of Mr Collins, of Hele Mills, met with a shocking accident on Monday. He was attending to a machine, when his slop was accidentally caught by the fly-wheel; the poor fellow was whirled round the wheel, flung against the ceiling, and then violently pitched down on the floor on his back. His spine was fractured, and his sufferings, as might be imagined, were very great. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where all that medical skill could do was done for him, but without effect; he died yesterday evening. An Inquest will be held by H. W. Hooper, Esq., this (Wednesday) afternoon.

Thursday 14 July 1859, Issue 4866 – Gale Document No. Y3200697895
BRIXHAM – Two Inquests were held in this town last week. The first was on the body of WILLIAM BURMAN, a painter, who hung himself on the night of the 1st instant, whilst suffering from an attack of delirium tremens. A verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

The second was held on the body of WILLIAM HAZLEWOOD, a mason, aged sixty-eight years, who came by his death though falling from a scaffold, which produced concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 21 July 1859, Issue 4867 – Gale Document No. Y3200697912
EXETER – The Inquest on ROBERT BULL, who was so frightfully injured last week, at Hele paper mills, as reported in the Flying Post last week, terminated in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 21 July 1859, Issue 4867 – Gale Document No. Y3200697926
STOKE GABRIEL – An Inquest was held last week at the Church House Inn, on the body of a lad, named BUNSTOW. The boy was about five years of age, and had gone into a field near his father's house, in which a horse was kept. It is supposed that in some way he got meddling with the animal, which kicked him, and so violently injured his head, that he died very shortly afterwards. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

DARTMOUTH – A melancholy accident occurred here last week. It appears that MR W. EDWARDS left his house one evening for the purpose of taking a walk, and not returning at his usual hour, search was made for him. ~After some time his clothes were found in a boat near the shore, a little beyond Mr Kilby's shipbuilding-yard, and his body was picked up close by. The old gentleman, for he was seventy years of age, had gone in the water to bathe, and by some unknown cause was drowned. An Inquest was held before Mr Puddicombe, the Coroner, when a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 28 July 1859, Issue 4868 – Gale Document No. Y3200697938
EXETER – Sudden Death Of An Infant. – An Inquest was held at the Royal Oak Inn, Coombe-street, on Wednesday last, by H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of an infant child, named ROBERT LYNE. It appeared from the evidence that the parents reside in Coombe-street, and that the deceased was only six weeks old. the mother was ill on Monday last, and the deceased was left in charge of a girl twelve years old. During Monday night it was fed with bread and milk, as the mother was too weak to suckle it, and it was remarked by the parents how heartily it ate. The following morning about half-past five o'clock it died suddenly. Mr Cumming said death resulted from convulsions produced by the child's eating a hearty supper. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Thursday 28 July 1859, Issue 4868 – Gale Document No. Y3200697941
BRAUNTON – Suicide. – A young woman, named HARRIS, who was in the service of Mr James Martin, of Braunton, has committed suicide by hanging herself. An Inquest on the body was being held when our correspondent's parcel was despatched.

DAWLISH – Singular And Melancholy Death. – An Inquest was held on Sunday, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., on the body of a servant girl, named BOND. The deceased appeared to have fallen in the passage of her mistress's house, and her head being caught in the loop of a swing, used by the children, the spinal cord was so injured that she died instantly. Verdict, "Found Dead."

Thursday 28 July 1859, Issue 4868 – Gale Document No. Y3200697956
BARNSTAPLE – Death From Drowning. – Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest at Snow's White Lion Inn, on Friday morning, on the body of a little boy, named JOHN SANDERS, a son of SAMUEL SANDERS, a joiner, of Holland-street. On the preceding evening the deceased and some other boys went to bathe in the river on the Barnstaple side of the Pottington Lime Kilns. SANDERS was seen to sink, and an alarm was given; but the body was not recovered for about an hour subsequently. The father was present when the body was found, and it was an affecting scene to see him clasp the corpse into his arms and to hurry off with it to his home. The usual remedies, in such cases, were applied; but death had triumphed over medical skill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

INQUESTS – Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Berrynarbor, on Thursday last, upon the body of JOHN GILL, a labourer, who was sixty-two years old. According to the evidence of the wife the deceased was on the preceding Monday engaged in arranging some furze which was being thrown upon a cart; but whilst thus employed GILL was suddenly seized with giddiness and he fell heavily upon the ground. The injuries he thereby received led to his death on the Wednesday after the accident. It would seem that the deceased had been subjected to giddiness. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

On Friday Mr Toller held an Inquest upon the body of DANIEL TAMLYN, who was in the service of Mr Copp, of Horwood. It seems that on the preceding evening the deceased retired to rest apparently well; but about five o'clock the next morning his bedfellow (Thomas Spearman) was aroused from his slumber by the gurgling noise which the deceased was making. Spearman stated that TAMLYN died within three minutes afterwards. It was the opinion of Mr W. A. Dene, surgeon, that the deceased, who was only fourteen years old, died from a disease of the hart – a conclusion which was arrived at from the body being so generally blue. The verdict was in accordance with the medical testimony.

CREDITON – Melancholy Suicide. – MR RICHARD GAY, of North-street, committed suicide on Thursday morning last. Deceased who was about sixty years of age, lived by himself, and was the owner of a number of houses, several of which were destroyed by fire, as reported in our last. This appears to have preyed on his mind. About the middle of the day on Thursday the neighbours remarked that they had not seen him as usual; and fearing something had happened they obtained the assistance of the police, who entered the house, when they found deceased suspended by a rope from a beam in his bedroom. Medical aid was immediately sent for, but it was evident that deceased had been dead some hours. An Inquest was held at King's Market House Inn, on Friday, before R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 4 August 1859, Issue 4869 – Gale Document No. Y3200697969
BRAUNTON – Fatal Accident. – A little boy, the son of MICHAEL BARNES, a labourer, of Braunton, died on Monday evening from injuries he received by the kick of a horse. On the preceding Saturday the deceased and some other children were amusing themselves in a field by driving a horse into a corner, and whilst there the animal appears to have kicked the child in the head. The skull was fractured, and the brain protruded. Mr J. H. Toller held an Inquest upon the body on Tuesday, and a verdict in conformity with the foregoing facts was returned.

SUICIDE – We recorded in last week's Flying Post the suicide of a young woman named HARRIS, who was in the service of Mr Jas. Martin, of Braunton. Mr Bremridge held an Inquest upon the body on Tuesday evening week, at the New Inn. The deceased was seen apparently happy enough talking to a young man after eleven o'clock on the Monday night, and she parted from him saying she must go to bed for she was going to get up early in the morning washing. Her master and mistress did not return home till the servant had seemingly retired to bed; and at five o'clock in the morning, Mrs Martin went into the girl's room to see if she had got up. The appearance of the bed led to the belief that she had gone down to her work; but on Mrs Martin's coming downstairs just after seven o'clock she discovered that the servant had not been down as had been expected. Subsequently Mr Martin found the deceased hanging in the hay-loft. It seems that the girl had given notice to quit the service, having as she thought obtained another situation, but in which she was disappointed. This is said by many to have operated injuriously on her mind. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se.

Thursday 11 August 1859, Issue 4870 – Gale Document No. Y3200698005
EXETER – Death By Drowning. – An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the Round Tree Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of FRANCES MAY, aged ten years. From the evidence of a girl named Catharine Cornish it appeared that she was in company with deceased on the previous day, when the latter left her to go on the rafts which were floating in the river, near the Shilhay. On deceased getting to the end of the raft she fell into the river; and on her body being discovered life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 August 1859, Issue 4870 – Gale Document No. Y3200698009
Melancholy Death By Drowning. – On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR HENRY BETHUNE ABBOTT, aged 42. The deceased was a superannuated officer connected with the General Post-office, and had been lodging at Mr Sercombe's, on Southernhay. On Friday afternoon, he was in a boat and went up the river Exe. Whilst passing the Bonhay, he asked two girls, who were reading, if they would accompany him down the river? They assented, and went some distance; when near the ferry on their return, deceased rose up to put on his coat, and arrange the cushion of the boat. In doing so he fell into the water. Several persons were near, and efforts were made to save him, but the deceased never rose to the surface. The body was picked up about twenty-five minutes afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr Westron called the Coroner's attention to the fact that no efforts were made to save the deceased after he was taken out of the water. He was of opinion that if efforts had been made the deceased's life might have been spared. He suggested that a house should be erected, with all the appliances necessary to save drowning persons. The Coroner said that he had no power in the matter, but had no doubt that the Press would take cognizance of it, and thus be brought under the notice of the authorities.

CHAGFORD – Fatal Accident. – On Thursday last a number of young people, of this place, held a pic-nic at Caster Rock, a distance of four miles from the town. On returning to the village, a fatal accident occurred to a labourer, aged thirty five, named JOSEPH PIKE. Being intoxicated he endeavoured to catch hold of an omnibus, but failing in the attempt he fell on the ground. The omnibus ran over him, smashing his ribs and collar bone to pieces. One of the ribs penetrated the lungs, and the poor fellow only survived a few hours. On Saturday an Inquest was held on the body of the deceased, before Mr Vallack, county Coroner. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 18 August 1859, Issue 4871 – Gale Document No. Y3200698036
EXETER – Shocking Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the waiting room of the St David's Station, on the body of SAMUEL HANNAFORD. It appeared that on Saturday last, about ten minutes to one in the afternoon, as the up express train from Plymouth was backing from the platform towards the South Devon Bridge, the deceased was walking across the line. The engine driver, when about twenty yards from the deceased, blew his whistle, but he did not seem to hear it, for he made no effort to escape, and was knocked down and killed on the spot. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 25 August 1859, Issue 4872 – Gale Document No. Y3200698069
FATAL ACCIDENT – An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the Blue Boar Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young man, named SAMUEL SHORE, aged 25 years. It appeared that deceased was a farm labourer, and resided at Morchard Bishop, and on the 27th of July last was returning from the harvest field, when he slipped his foot in crossing a gate and fell on his reaping hook causing a severe injury to the right knee. Medical aid was procured, and deceased was subsequently removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he lingered until Saturday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 25 August 1859, Issue 4872 – Gale Document No. Y3200698088
MONKLEIGH – Mr R. Bremridge held an Inquest at the Hunter's Inn on Wednesday, upon the body of WILLIAM STONE, the illegitimate son of SOPHIA STONE. The deceased was about two years of age. He was left with Mrs Blight, but on the preceding day the body was discovered in the Torridge. It seems that a very short time previous to the child's being found in the water he was at play in front of Mrs Blight's house, and it is supposed that he must have fallen into the river. ~The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

EAST DOWN – Suicide. – Mr R. Bremridge held an Inquest at East Down on Saturday, upon the body of JOHN BOWDEN, who was in the employ of the Rev. T. F. Arthur, the rector of the parish. It was the duty of the deceased to drive in the milch cows in the morning, but from their not arriving some time after the customary hour an inquiry was instituted as to the whereabouts of BOWDEN. AS visit to his bedroom showed that he had not seemingly been to bed for the night, although he had left the other servants apparently for that purpose. He was ultimately discovered hanging by the neck in a cart-linhay – quite dead. Two or three witnesses described the deceased as having exhibited an unusual strangeness in his conduct during the week, but he had been to Barnstaple on the preceding day with his master's carriage. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased (who was about sixty years old) hung himself – being at the time in an unsound state of mind.

Thursday 1 September 1859, Issue 4873 – Gale Document No. Y3200698104
EXETER – Drowned. – An Inquest was held on Saturday last at the Railway Hotel, St David's, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN WYATT, aged twelve years. Deceased went with other boys to bathe near the Bristol and Exeter Railway Station, and got into a gravel pit, and before assistance could be procured the poor little fellow was drowned. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 September 1859, Issue 4873 – Gale Document No. Y3200698107
MERTON – Fatal Accident. – Mr R. Bremridge held an Inquest on Sunday at Great Wood Farm, in this parish, upon the body of MR THOMAS ASHTON. On Thursday the deceased and Mr William Snell went t Hatherleigh together on business; and on their way back – when a bout a mile from Hatherleigh – MR ASHTON'S horse took fright and started off at a rapid rate. Mr Snell did not increase the speed of his horse; but at a distance of forty yards from where the horse started he found the deceased lying insensible upon the ground. Mr Trewman, surgeon, of Hatherleigh, was promptly in attendance, but he died soon afterwards, of concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 September 1859, Issue 4873 – Gale Document No. Y3200698122
BARNSTAPLE – Another Suicide by Hanging. – Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday, at Swimbridge, upon the body of HENRY CROCKER, a farmer, who was eighty years old. On the morning preceding the Inquest the deceased went to Landkey Newland Mill for the purpose of getting some corn ground, and after his return he laid his head upon the table. His wife asked if he wasn't going to have some dinner, but he made no reply. On returning to the house some two hours afterwards the wife found her husband in his bedroom – apparently upon his knees, as if in prayer; but on a closer examination she found that one end of his neckerchief was fastened round his neck, and the other fixed to the bedstead. The medical testimony went to prove that the poor old man must have been dead when he was discovered upon his knees; but his wife thought the contrary. The deceased was supposed to be labouring under inflammation of the membranes of the brain, which must have caused an excruciating pain. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased hung himself whilst in an unsound state of mind.

Thursday 8 September 1859, Issue 4874 – Gale Document No. Y3200698138
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held at the North Devon Inn, Paul-street, on Friday last, on the body of an old woman, named CAROLINE STEER. The deceased, who was fifty-seven years of age, resided by herself in the garret of a house in Richmond-place, Paul-street. She was last seen alive by her neighbours on the Sunday afternoon previous; and, strange as it may appear, no inquiries were made about her until Friday morning. On that morning, Miss Williamson, for whom the deceased had been in the habit of working, called to see her. She went up the stairs and found the door and window of her room open, and the old woman lying dead in bed. The body was in a frightful state of decomposition. Mr Webb, surgeon, examined the body, and he gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from the rupture of a vessel near the heart, which would party account for the rapid decomposition. No doubt was entertained that the poor woman died on Sunday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Frightful Self-Mutilation. – On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man, named JAMES WOODGATE. Deceased was a blacksmith, in the employ of Mr Buckingham, in the parish of Poughill. On the 30thult., Thomas Searle went to Mr Buckingham's shop, where he saw WOODGATE. Searle asked WOODGATE for some nails, but he returned no answer, and he then saw him take a poker from the fire. It was sharp at one end and red hot. WOODGATE'S back was towards Searle; who, however, saw him point the poker towards himself and some smoke issue from him. He asked him what he was about but he returned no answer; WOODGATE then put the poker into the fire again, and commenced blowing the bellows. Searle afterwards saw that there were burnt holes in his waistcoat and trousers. Notwithstanding this he walked away very quietly, merely saying to Mr Brown, a farmer, who was standing at the door of the Rose and Crown Inn, that a bad job had happened at the blacksmith's shop – the old Gayer (by which name the deceased was well-known) had run a red-hot iron into himself. When Mr Brown arrived, WOODGATE was again heating the poker. Mr Brown caught hold of him and he fell exhausted into his arms. There were four wounds in his abdomen which had been made by the red hot poker. Mr Boddy, surgeon, was sent for; and he advised his removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was removed the same evening; and died on Thursday night from the injuries he had inflicted. When asked why he did it, he said "For the want of the grace of God." The evidence went to prove that deceased was not drunk at the time; but in a silent, stupid state. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased had committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 15 September 1859, Issue 4875 – Gale Document No. Y3200698179
BARNSTAPLE – Accidental Death. – Mr R. Bremridge held an Inquest on Friday last, upon the body of MR ROBERT COATES, of Deane Farm, West Down. It appeared that Mr George Avery met the deceased on the preceding Friday evening at the New Inn, Braunton. MR COATES had just arrived there from Barnstaple, and was supplied with one glass of gin and water. He was in liquor, and Mr Avery accompanied him to Stoney Bridge, where the deceased expressed himself as being able to proceed without him. On the following morning about five o'clock George Keift, who was in the employ of MR COATES, discovered his master lying in the road near Heddon Mill: he was apparently asleep – his head and shoulders were in the water-table, and his hate was isn't he centre of the road. Near the hat was a little blood, and it was considered that the deceased had fallen from his horse. He was eventually removed to his home, and on the Monday and Tuesday he had recovered sufficiently to admit of going out over his farm; but he complained of a violent pain in his head. On the Wednesday MR COATES became much worse, and Mr P. Stoneman, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, was called to attend him. On Mr Stoneman's second visit he found the deceased much worse, and he then recommended further medical advice. Dr Budd, of Barnstaple, was thereupon sent for; but that gentleman at once declared the case a hopeless one, and MR COATES died on Thursday morning. According to the medical evidence death was the result of an effusion of blood on the brain, caused by concussion; and that it was accelerated by an exposure to the wet and cold. The Jury in effect returned a verdict that the deceased was accidentally killed by a fall from his horse. MR COATES was forty-two years of age, and was much respected in this neighbourhood.

Thursday 22 September 1859, Issue 4876 – Gale Document No. Y3200698211
TORQUAY – Suicide. – An Inquest was held last Thursday at the London Hotel, on the body of a married woman, named SUSAN DANN, aged sixty-four. It appears that the poor woman left her home at Devonport unknown to her husband and went to the house of her nephew, Mr Chenoweth, boot and shoe salesman. She was very much depressed, and repeatedly said she was very miserable. On Wednesday morning, when a little girl was sent to call her down to breakfast, she could not be found. Mr Chenoweth then went to her bedroom, and found the poor woman kneeling on a chair with her head thrown back, and resting on a serephine; she was insensible. The assistance of the neighbour was procured, and she was laid on her bed, when it was discovered that she had tied a strip of calico so tightly round her neck as to cause strangulation. A medical man was sent for, but life was extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 22 September 1859, Issue 4876 – Gale Document No. Y3200698212
BRIXHAM – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held a few days ago on the body of a labourer, named JOHN DENNIS, in the employ of the Superphosphate Company. It appeared that he was engaged in sinking a pit, when the upper portion of it fell in on him, and inflicted such injuries that he died in a few hours. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 September 1859, Issue 4877 – Gale Document No. Y3200698243
MARWOOD – Fatal Accident. – Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday, at Marwood, upon the body of ROBERT BAMENT, who was about eleven years of age. The deceased was the grandson of MR JOHN BAMENT, a farmer. On the 22nd of August the deceased and a man named John Chugg were at work in one of MR BAMENT'S fields: Chugg was raking the corn errish, and the lad was driving the horse, which suddenly started off. In his attempt to stop the animal the deceased became entangled in the rake, and one of the teeth penetrated his right cheek. The boy proceeded favourably under medical treatment for about a month; but at the expiration of that time some symptoms of irritation of the brain became apparent, and he rapidly got worse. It was the opinion of Mr Cooke, surgeon, that the tooth of the rake had injured the base of the skull, and that death (which took place on the preceding Saturday) was occasioned by a formation of matter at the base of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Another Suicide By Hanging. – On Monday last Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the North Devon Inn upon the body of JOHN GOER, who was fifty-nine years of age. On the preceding day the wife of the deceased appears to have gone to a neighbour's house for the purpose of getting something baked for dinner; and whilst there one Jane Redmore, the wife of a labourer, told her a disagreeable tale to the effect that her husband had been guilty of an indecency with a little child. The wife returned to her own house and reiterated the story she had heard to her husband, who denied it. Jane Redmore was consequently called into GOER'S home, and she there insisted upon the truth of that which she had previously urged against the deceased, who threw himself into a passion, and vehemently exclaimed "I'll see the out of this tomorrow." He then left the house, and some short time afterwards his body was discovered hanging by a rope from a tree. The discovery was made by his son and a man named Richard Reed. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased hung himself whilst labouring under temporary insanity.

Thursday 6 October 1859, Issue 4878 – Gale Document No. Y3200698275
BICKLEIGH – On Saturday last, a little boy, aged two years, the son of MR ROBERT BATER, of Mill Hayes Farm, Bickleigh, was accidentally drowned by falling into a deep trench which had been cut for the foundation of a barn. An Inquest was held on the body of R. R. Crosse, Esq., on Monday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but by what means there was no testimony to shew."

TIVERTON – Fatal Accident. – On Saturday morning last, an Inquest was held before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, over the body of THOMAS BIDGOOD, of Bolham, who was in the employ of J. H. Amory, Esq., by being run over by a waggon belonging to Mr Stevens. Mr Henry Ascott, assistant overseer of Halberton, said that about quarter past four on Friday afternoon he was driving down the Leat towards Halberton. He met the deceased with a waggon drawn by two horses. Deceased was on the near side of his horses, and on the near side of the centre of the road. On the near side of deceased's waggon was another drawn by two horses and driven by Thomas Stevens, who stood on the shafts: the horses were trotting. The fore horse of Stevens' waggon took deceased by the shoulder and knocked him down. Deceased began to crawl to the head of the shaft horse, but before he could get up the front wheel of the waggon he was driving caught him and passed over his thighs. The hind wheel caught deceased near the shoulder and dragged him a distance of four or five feet. He (witness) called out to the horses, and they stopped He pulled deceased from under the hind wheel and helped him on a chair, when he was taken into Mr Gould's house. He heard deceased groan once, but he did not see him move. He thought Stevens saw deceased before the horse knocked him down, but he did not hear him shout or give any warning. Stevens jumped from his waggon immediately he saw the accident. He had seen Stevens drive many times through Halberton but had never seen him driving furiously or in an intoxicated state. Stevens was committed for trial on the charge of Manslaughter.

Thursday 13 October 1859, Issue 4879 – Gale Document No. Y3200698289
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the Blue Boar Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN ARSCOTT, aged twelve years. Deceased was an indoor apprentice to Mr Wm. Wrayford, of Orchard Lake Farm, Morchard Bishop, and on the 30th of September last was driving a thrashing machine with four horses, when he fell off the be3am, and his legs were caught between the pinson and horse wheels. The poor fellow was crushed in a shocking manner. Mr Stephens, surgeon, of Dunsford, was sent for, who advised that deceased should be removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Saturday last. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr Rendle, the house surgeon, who stated that deceased had died from tetanus, arising from the injuries he had received, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 October 1859, Issue 4879 – Gale Document No. Y3200698308
TORQUAY – Suicide. - ELLEN WILLIAMS, a servant girl, living at Newstead, in this town, in the service of W. Beasley, Esq., has met with an untimely death. It is said that her mind has been affected for some time, in consequence of some love affair, which has not gone on altogether smoothly. On Wednesday night the girl was supposed to have retired to rest. Her fellow servant was much surprised the next morning to find that she had not been in bed for the night. A search was made; the door were locked as usual, but the pantry window was left open. A letter was found in the missing girl's handwriting, stating that life had for a long time been a burden to her, and that by the time this note was read, she should have found a watery grave. She expressed a hope that her body would be found and interred. Search was made along the coast on Thursday and Friday, but no traces of her could be found. But early on Saturday morning a boatman, named William Furze, found the body of the girl in the Basting cove, thrown up on the beach by the receding tide. An Inquest was held on Monday morning at the Maritime Inn, when the above facts were given in evidence by several witnesses. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 27 October 1859, Issue 4881 – Gale Document No. Y3200698350
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Saturday, before the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esqr.) on the body of a boy, named HENRY DERFORD SNOW, aged nine years. The parents of deceased reside at Littleham-cum-Exmouth; and he was in the employ of MR SNOW. On the 10th instant, he was engaged in driving some cows, when a heifer belonging to Mr Bastin intermixed with the animals. The boy in endeavouring to separate them struck it with a small stick, when the animal kicked him in his left leg, by which he sustained a compound fracture. The poor boy was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital the same day, and for some time seemed improving: but tetanus ensued and he died on the morning of the 20th. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 27 October 1859, Issue 4881 – Gale Document No. Y3200698362
FATAL ACCIDENT AT BRAUNTON. – Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the New Inn, Braunton, on Friday last, upon the body of JAMES MOCK, who was fifty years of age. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Philip Tucker, farmer. On the afternoon of the preceding day Mr Tucker went to Lobb after two casks of cider – one contained ten and the other sixty gallons. On his return he propped the shafts of the butt and took the horse out. Subsequently the deceased and his employer drew the cider from the small cask; and whilst they were on the vehicle endeavouring to put the large cask in a position to admit of their drawing off the cider they caused an oscillation, the effect of which was that the prop under the front of the butt which was kept in a horizontal position moved away, the deceased was thrown forward on the ground, and the large cask pitched upon him. The deceased died in about three-quarters of an hour afterwards. Mr S. O. Lane, surgeon, stated that the deceased had had several of his lower ribs fractured; and the jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

FATAL ACCIDENT AT A QUARRY – Mr Bremridge held an Inquest on Friday last, at the North Country Inn, Goodleigh, upon the body of WILLIAM RIDMORE, who rented Snapper Quarry. It seems that whilst the deceased and a man named Thomas Jenkins were working in the quarry the preceding day a large quantity of earth fell and completely embedded them. One Jacob Grigg visited the quarry shortly afterwards, and seeing the rubbish ran to the North Country Inn to ascertain whether RIDMORE and Jenkins were there. Finding they were not, he said he was afraid they were buried in the deads in the quarry; and he and a man named William Symonds hurried to the spot. They listened for about a minute, satisfied themselves there were persons under the earth, and they soon discovered Thomas Jenkins. Some ten minutes subsequently they found the body of WILLIAM RIDMORE, who was quite dead. In the meantime Mr C. H. Hiern, surgeon of Barnstaple, had arrived, and that gentleman directed the removal of Jenkins, who was severely bruised about the head and body, to the North Devon Infirmary. The medical gentleman stated that the deceased (who was much bruised about the forehead and temple, and had had his legs broken) died from concussion of the brain. The quarry was represented as being in a most dangerous condition; and Mr Hiern stated at the Inquest that he had great apprehension as to the safety of the men whilst they were removing the debris. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 November 1859, Issue 4881 – Gale Document No. Y3200698381
BRAUNTON – The Storm. – On Thursday Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy-Coroner, held two Inquests at the New Inn, Braunton. the first had reference to the death of JAMES BROWN, a pilot of Cardiff, whose body had that morning been discovered about a mile-and-a-half from the Bar by Mr Spicer, the light-house keeper, who observed something dark in the water and on nearing he found it to be the remains of a man. The body was taken to the dead-house at Braunton; and subsequently it was identified by Mr Thomas Lee, mariner, of Lundy Island. Verdict – "Found Drowned."

COMBMARTIN. – Singular Death. – On Thursday Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at Combmartin upon the body of WILLIAM SMITH, second mate of the bark Marlborough, of London, which was bound for Swansea. The vessel encountered the storm which that day prevailed, and she was eventually wrecked off Redcliff Rocks. The deceased was the first that left the bark. He got upon a rock where he was joined by some of the crew, and whilst they were sitting there some stones fell from the cliff upon the deceased. For their own security the others were compelled to go higher up the cliff, and they left the deceased upon the rock in a state of insensibility He had on his boots and trousers at the time, when his companions in distress left him, but when the body was afterwards found on the beach by Richard Burgess, of Combmartin, these things had been removed. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally killed by the falling of a stone from the cliff.

BRATTON FLEMING – Death From Exposure To The Storm. – Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest at Bratton Fleming, on Thursday, upon the body of HENRY PHILLIPS, a blacksmith. The deceased was an old man and has been crippled for years. On the preceding Tuesday he left his home on a pony for the purpose of taking a basket of fowls to Mr Richards', at Patchpole, Kentisbury. He arrived there in safety, and was afterwards seen returning, but he never reached home. On the following morning a labourer, named Lancy, of Loxhore, saw the pony grazing in a pathfield, and upon a heap of stones he discovered the deceased lying quite dead. According to the evidence of Mr Morgan, surgeon, of Barnstaple, the deceased died through being exposed to the inclement weather; and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with that opinion.

HOLSWORTHY – Mr Bremridge held an Inquest on Tuesday week, at Sutcombe Mill, upon the body of ROBERT ALLIN, who was 55 years old. Whilst the deceased and his son were engaged in removing a cob-wall at Langator on the preceding Friday, a portion of the wall fell upon the father. Mr Rowse, surgeon, of Bradworthy, attended him; but the injuries were of such a nature that death ensued on the following Monday. The medical gentleman stated that death resulted from the fracture of four or five ribs, which had penetrated to the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

OTTERY ST. MARY – Fatal Accident. – An accident occurred near Ottery St. Mary, on Tuesday week last, to ROBERT and WILLIAM JEFFERY, two farmers' sons, aged respectively 17 and 15 years, by a tree falling on them. It appears that the unfortunate lads had been to turn off the water from a brook into the river, and in consequence of the fields being flooded they both rode on one horse. On returning a tree was blown down and fell upon them, killing the youngest instantly, and severely injuring the eldest. He was taken to a cottage near and medical aid sought. It was found that his chest bone was broken, and that he was suffering very severely. An Inquest was held on Wednesday last at Woodford Farm, on the body of WILLIAM, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 24 November 1859, Issue 4885 – Gale Document No. Y3200698488
CREDITON – Death By Drowning. – An Inquest was held at the Railway Inn, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES MAUNDER, a labourer, aged seventy years. The deceased was in the employ of J. W. Buller, Esq., M.P., and on the 18th inst., when on his return home from work, he fell into the Creedy and was drowned. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 24 November 1859, Issue 4885 – Gale Document No. Y3200698489
TORQUAY – An Inquest was held last Wednesday, at the Castle Inn, on the body of RICHARD WEBBER, who died on the previous Monday at the Infirmary. It was stated in evidence that deceased had been drinking at the Castle Inn on the night of the 23rd ult. At half past eleven he went out of the back door and fell over a steep flight f stone steps. About an hour afterwards he was taken up insensible and carried to the Infirmary suffering from concussion of the brain. He never wholly recovered consciousness up to the time of his death. A verdict in accordance with the above was then returned, and the Jury expressed a hope that the steps would be altered.

Thursday 1 December 1859, Issue 4886 – Gale Document No. Y3200698503
EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Blue Ball Inn, in Heavitree, on Thursday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES SMITH, aged ten years, whose death had been caused by one of the tram wagons on the new railway running over him and killing him on the spot. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 December 1859, Issue 4886 – Gale Document No. Y3200698505
SHOBROOKE – Death By Drowning. – An Inquest was held on Monday on the body of a JAMES TAPP, a child nine years old, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner. It appeared that the deceased was living with Mr W. Tuckett, of West Raddon, and that on Saturday night two other boys were requested to turn off the water from a pond. Deceased followed these boys to see them do it, fell into the pond and was drowned. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 December 1859, Issue 4886 – Gale Document No. Y3200698519
FRIGHTFUL DEATH FROM TRESPASSING UPON THE RAILWAY – On Thursday evening Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest at the Barnstaple Railway Station, upon the remains of JOHN YATES, whose life was most shockingly terminated. The deceased, who was seventy-four years of age, was the father of MR J. YATES, of West Sowden Farm, Barnstaple, with whom the unfortunate man resided. It seems that his habits were exceedingly eccentric – having for some time past indulged himself by picking up pieces of paper, wool, rags, &c., from the streets or elsewhere. Though his intellect was much shattered, yet he was not considered a maniac; but was deemed quite capable of avoiding all ordinary dangers. He left his home about ten on Thursday morning, and appears to have engaged himself in his old pursuits – several pieces of paper, &c., being found in his pockets. He is considered to have gone out over Barnstaple Bridge, and to have walked up the Seven Brethren Bank. Getting to Pill Bridge, which belongs to the North Devon Railway Company, the deceased clambered over the railings and had proceeded over the iron-bridge to the extent of forty-three feet when he was knocked down by the train which was due at Barnstaple a few minutes afterwards – 1.26 p.m. The engine-driver (James Scott) saw the deceased approaching when the train was at about one hundred yards from the bridge – the driver instantly sounded the signal-whistle; but seeing no heed taken he then blew the double-whistle for the guard to put on his break – the fireman had in the meantime put on the break of the tender, and the driver had reversed the engine, which was going at a speed little short of twenty miles an hour. The old man was walking towards the train with his head inclined downwards – as if in quest of something upon the ground; but when within a few feet of the train the deceased held up his head, gave a look which cannot be described, and jumped between the metals. The engine struck him, and his head was thrust into one of the interstices of the iron mouldings of the parapet. As the engine pushed him forward the up0per part of the front of the head was completely cut open, and the skull so fractured that scarcely an atom of the brain remained therein. His arm was broken in a shocking manner, and there were other serious injuries; but his death must have been instantaneous. The accident was witnessed by a lad named George Stone, who is in the service of the Rev. H. B. Wrey, of Corfe. Stone heard the train coming, and saw the deceased going up over the bridge; but though he called lustily to him, the old man did not take the slightest account of it. The train stopped within fifty yards of the spot where the accident occurred, and the engine-driver and the guard (John Rice) ran back; but it was inevitable that no human aid would avail anything to the deceased, and the train was driven on to the Barnstaple Station, which is rather more than a mile from Pill Bridge. Patrick McKanna, the foreman of the locomotive department, gave evidence as to the state of the breaks, which he described as being in an excellent condition – a statement that was entirely borne out by the train's stopping within the distance stated by George Stone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave it as their opinion that not the slightest blame was attributable to any person in connection with the railway. It appears that some twelve months since the deceased had a narrow escape of his life from trespassing on Pill Bridge.

Thursday 8 December 1859, Issue 4887 – Gale Document No. Y3200698537
EXETER – Accidental Death. – An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Blue Boar, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN SHELSON, aged fifty-five years. Deceased was a labourer, and worked for Mr Norris, of Gay's Farm, Sandford, and on the 27th day of July last, after having worked in the harvest field, he was in the act of feeling about for his reap hook, and it being dark he fell on it, which caused wound near the right joint. The wound for some little time went on favourably, but at length it grew worse. He was then admitted into the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Friday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 8 December 1859, Issue 4887 – Gale Document No. Y3200698539
HONITON – Fatal Accident. – On Saturday evening, MR HARTNELL, landlord of the Greyhound Inn, Exeter-road, well known as a cattle dealer in this neighbourhood, left this town about nine o'clock on horseback. On his arrival home, he appeared to alter his mind about going into the house, and attempted to get on horseback again. In doing so the horse reared and fell on him, frightfully crushing his skull. He died in three hours afterwards. On Monday an Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 8 December 1859, Issue 4887 – Gale Document No. Y3200698549
SINGULAR DEATH – Mr J. H. Toller, the Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquisition at the Barnstaple Inn, Chulmleigh, on Saturday last, upon the body of RICHARD HEYWOOD, who was seventy-four years old. On the preceding evening whilst returning to his home, the deceased stumbled and fell into some water called Huntacott Pond, which is close by the side of the road. Verdict accordingly.

Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at West Anstey, on Thursday, upon the body of GRACE SAGE, who was sixty-five years of age. On going to Mr Thomas Elworthy's, on the Wednesday previous to her death, the deceased fell whilst crossing a stile; and though the injuries she then received did not prevent her from walking, yet they were of such a character as to hasten her death. Verdict accordingly, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 December 1859, Issue 4887 – Gale Document No. Y3200698576
BARNSTAPLE – Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, Chulmleigh, on Tuesday week, upon the body of JANE WILLIAMS, aged seventy-five. On the preceding day the deceased fell into the fire-place, and was so severely burnt as to cause her death on the succeeding morning. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary, on Saturday evening, upon the body of WILLIAM WHEATON, who was forty-nine years of age. The deceased was a hind to Mr John Stanbury, of Woollacombe Barton, Morthoe. On the evening of the 10th of October last he and John Berry put a young horse into a cart; but whilst leading the animal down the hill from the court-yard it started off a gallop, and the deceased was knocked violently against the wall. He was taken up in a state of insensibility, but he soon recovered his speech. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, attended and continued his visits for five weeks, during which period (through the kindness of Lady Chichester) the deceased was likewise seen by Dr Budd, of Barnstaple. The poor fellow was removed to the Infirmary on the 11th of November, but he gradually sunk, and death terminated his sufferings on the preceding Thursday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXMOUTH – Mysterious Death. – An Inquest was held at the Globe Inn, in this town, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RACHEL CORBET, a child of six months old, the daughter of BARONESS MALTZEL, known also as MRS CORBETT and MRS COBHAM. The child was alleged to have died suddenly in August last, but as no Inquest was held at the time, and a good deal of talk having arisen in consequence, the Secretary of State ordered the body to be exhumed, and the present Inquest to be held. It was proved that the child slept by itself in a basinet, and that one morning it was found dead in the bed. It had had a cold previously, and a Mr Howard, who lived in the house of the Baroness, suggested that the child had got the pillow into its mouth, and had been suffocated. Mr Spettigue, surgeon, said the child was previously very healthy. It always appeared to receive a very kind treatment from the mother. He examined the body the same night that it died. He saw no marks on the face, but on turning up the clothes of the child he perceived an unusual discolouration on the left side of the abdomen; decomposition was rapidly taking place. Decomposition usually did not begin so quick, presuming that the child had been dead only twelve hours. He then turned the body over on its face, and on the back he saw discolouration arising from gravitation of the blood. He then examined the pillow (which was composed of down) and saw marks upon one corner of it as if it had been in the mouth. If suffocation had taken place the lips, and perhaps the eyes, might have been turgid, but the appearance of the child was placid and pale. He had sent the intestines for analytical examination to Mr Herepath, who had not yet made his report. The Coroner thereupon adjourned the Inquiry until the results of Mr Herepath's analysis were made known.

Thursday 22 December 1859, Issue 4888 – Gale Document No. Y3200698591
BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident At A Foundry. – JAMES LUSCOMBE, an engineer, 34 years of age, in the employ of Mr Thompson, of the Silver-street Foundry, has died from an injury he received whilst at work. While working at a seam lathe on the morning of Tuesday weeks, the sleeve of the deceased's jacket caught in the wheel, and his arm was frightfully crushed – causing a compound fracture of the arm. He was removed to the North Devon Infirmary; but he died on Monday. Mr Bencraft, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 29 December 1859, Issue 4889 – Gale Document No. Y3200698627
SUDDEN DEATH - An Inquest was held on Saturday last at the Exeter Workhouse, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN HOOPER, aged fifty-nine years. From the evidence of Mr Dunn, the master of the workhouse, it appeared that deceased, who stated himself to be a gardener, was admitted into the house as a pauper on Monday last, when he complained of being unwell, and Mr Warren, surgeon, was called, but deceased expired on Friday evening last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER – Awfully Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Friday last at the Golden Lion Inn, Newtown, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of STEPHEN HOOPER, aged sixty-two years. Deceased, who was a retired gentleman's servant, resided with his wife in John-street, Newtown. On the previous night he partook of supper and appeared in his usual good health, but on going upstairs his wife observed that her husband had not the power of getting into bed. On going to assist him she discovered that he was speechless, and before medical aid could be procured he died. The Jury, after hearing medical evidence, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 5 January 1860, Issue 4890 – Gale Document No. Y3200698660
SWIMBRIDGE – Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest at Bond's New Inn, Swimbridge, on Tuesday week, upon the body of WILLIAM COURTENAY, who was thirty-three years of age. The deceased was in the employ of Mr George Burden, of Kerscott Barton; and on the preceding day, whilst returning with a load of tiles, he is supposed to have fallen from the vehicle and injured his neck. He was soon afterwards discovered in the road speechless, but he did shortly after his removal. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 5 January 1860, Issue 4890 – Gale Document No. Y3200698677
LINTON – Death From Hanging. – Mr Bremridge held an Inquest on Thursday last, at the Castle Inn, Linton, on the body of THOMAS BALE, who was seventy-four years old. On the previous Tuesday morning about half-past seven the deceased's daughter went to her father's bedroom to call him; but the door was locked, and she could get no answer from within. Eventually the door was forced open, and the deceased was discovered suspended by a rope – one end of which was fastened to the "couple of the roof" and the other round the neck of the deceased, who was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased hanged himself whilst being in an unsound state of mind.

SHEBBEAR – Death Of A Child From Suffocation. – On Monday week Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest at Mills's public-house, Shebbear, on the body of ANN GILBERT'S illegitimate offspring, which was nine weeks old. The mother, who has but recently left the Torrington Union, seems to have been wandering about from one person's house to another; and on the preceding Friday evening about ten she called at the house of Arscott Parsons, a labourer. Parsons himself had no previous knowledge of GILBERT, who was however known to his wife. By-and-bye Parsons asked GILBERT where she was going to sleep as he had only one bed. He recommended her to go to her sister's, but GILBERT said "she'd rather lie down in a pig's house." Subsequently she accepted the offer of remaining in an outhouse during the night rather than sit by the fire. Parsons went out and threw some straw about for her to lie upon; and on his leaving she requested him to lock the door – fearing that if her child should cry somebody might come in and frighten her. Parsons accordingly locked the door; but about four hours after James Balsdon, a neighbour, whose attention as directed to the outhouse from sundry screams and a kicking at the door, waked Parsons from his slumbers to ascertain who it was that he had got in the outhouse. Parsons went immediately thither, and on his asking what was the matter, GILBERT replied, "My poor child's death." There seems to have been no marks of violence upon the body of the child, and death was supposed to have resulted from suffocation. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict that the child died from suffocation, but by what means there was no evidence to prove.

Thursday 11 January 1860, Issue 4891 – Gale Document No. Y3200698692
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM DAWE, aged fifty-five years. It appeared that deceased, who was a farmer, and resided at Wood Farm, in the parish of Ottery St. Mary, was, on Friday night last, returning home from Exeter on horseback, and whilst riding through Honiton's Clist he was thrown from his horse, which fell on him, causing a fracture of the skull. Assistance was procured, and deceased was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he lingered until the following Monday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 January 1860, Issue 4891 – Gale Document No. Y3200698705
Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at Northam, on Monday, upon the body of RICHARD CANN, who was sixty-two years old. The deceased was a ship carpenter. On the 28th of December, whilst engaged at Uffculme in repairing the barque Token, of London, CANN fell down the hole of the vessel upon a heap of stones, and fractured his skull. He died on Saturday. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Thursday 25 January 1860, Issue 4893 – Gale Document No. Y3200698756
Death Of A Child From Drowning. – An Inquest was held by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy-Coroner, at the Royal Oak Inn, Romansleigh, on Wednesday last, upon the body of ANN WEBBER, who was between three and four years old. The deceased (who was the daughter of JOHN WEBBER, labourer) was missed on the afternoon of the preceding Monday, and the body was afterwards found in the water. Life was extinct. There was no evidence to prove how or by what means the deceased got into the water, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 1 February 1860, Issue 4894 – Gale Document No. Y3200698769
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Exeter Workhouse, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an old woman, seventy-two years of age, named MARY JAMES. It appeared that deceased, whose husband is an inmate of the workhouse, lived with two of her daughters at No. 8, Portland-place. On Sunday, the 15th ult., she dined with a married daughter, named Northway, in Russell-street. About six o'clock in the evening she insisted on going home by herself; and on reaching the door of the room in which she lived, on the first storey, she fell back over four stairs, where she remained three hours until her daughters returned from chapel. She was subsequently removed to the workhouse at her request, where she was seen by Mr H. F. Warren, surgeon, who from the examination which he made found that she had sustained a fracture of the upper part of the spine, from which paralysis ensued to all the lower parts of the body. She lingered until the morning of the 28th ultimo, when she died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 1 February 1860, Issue 4894 – Gale Document No. Y3200698770
BIDEFORD – Burnt to Death. – Mr T. L. Pridham held an Inquest at the Terminus Inn, East-the-Water, on Thursday last, upon the body of ROBERT CADE. The Deceased (who has recently been leading a vagrant life) appears to have gone to one of the lime kilns on the preceding evening, and he got so dreadfully burnt whilst sleeping by the side of the kiln that death shortly afterwards occurred. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 1 February 1860, Issue 4894 – Gale Document No. Y3200698779
BARNSTAPLE - At the Exeter Inn, on Saturday last, Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest upon the body of a female child, which was only five days old. The mother of it is HARRIET, the wife of ROBERT JONES, a labourer, now living at Barbican; and there were some painful circumstances attending the Inquiry. The husband appeared to have left his wife and family some two years and a half since – during which time he has visited America; but on his return some nine weeks ago, his wife disclosed to him the painful fact that she was enceinte. His daughter ( a young woman) stated at the Inquest that "her father and mother were on very good terms after his return till the child was born, but since that he had been very bad." The child was born on the preceding Sunday night, and it died on Friday morning. The husband left the house just previous to his wife's confinement, and did not return till the Monday evening. JONES is in the employ of Mr Dendle, builder; and he seems to have attended regularly to his duties during the week. His victuals were taken to him by either his son or daughter, and by them he sent back messages to his wife having reference to her misconduct. These matters had, naturally enough, given rise to sundry conjectures relative to the death of the child, and it was supposed by many that the infant had met its death by unfair means. This belief was strengthened by the fact that there was no medical advice obtained though the child had been ill for two days previous to its death. Mr Cooke, surgeon, made an internal post mortem examination of the body; and that gentleman's evidence proved most satisfactorily that death was the result of natural causes. The Jury, of course, returned a verdict to that effect.

ACCIDENTAL DEATH – On Friday last WILLIAM HAYWOOD, of Southmolton, was found drowned in a pool of water at Stone Moor Quarry, Georgenympton. It appears that about eleven o'clock of the above day he was seen working in the quarry, and that about one o'clock some one went there for the purpose of speaking to him, but he was not to be seen, and his tools were partly covered with stone, which seemed to have fallen from the upper part of the quarry. These were taken out, and after a search for deceased he was discovered in some water at the bottom of the quarry. He was taken out but life was extinct. On the following day an Inquest was held at Georgenympton, by R. Bremridge, Esq., District Coroner. From the evidence then adduced it is supposed that deceased was knocked into the water by the stone which had fallen from the quarry. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 15 February 1860, Issue 4896 – Gale Document No. Y3200698834
TORRINGTON – Sudden Death. – An elderly man, named WILLIAM LANE, who was an inmate of the Torrington Union, died suddenly on Monday morning. The deceased seems to have been in his usual state of health; but shortly after breakfast, whilst at work, he dropped off the chair and died almost immediately. It is thought that death resulted from a diseased heart, but an Inquest will be held this morning (Wednesday).

Wednesday 15 February 1860, Issue 4896 – Gale Document No. Y3200698845
BICKLEIGH – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held in this place on Monday, before A. W. Leigh, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a labourer, named WILLIAM LOCKYER, aged thirty-one. On Saturday night lat it appears deceased was returning to Bickleigh with a loaded waggon drawn by two horses, and about ten o'clock P.C. Ortop met the waggon and horses entering Bickleigh without a driver; in consequence of which he conducted them to the owners. Meanwhile deceased had been discovered lying on the road apparently helpless and was driven to his home, where he survived but three hours afterwards – having expired about one o'clock on Sunday morning. The surgeon who attended deceased said he was of opinion that he died from apoplexy. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 22 February 1860, Issue 4897 – Gale Document No. Y3200698865
EXETER – Sudden Death Of A Child. – An Inquest was held before the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.,) on Monday, at the King's Head Inn, St Sidwell's, on the body of a child, named ANN PURRINGTON, daughter of a chimney-sweep, aged about seven weeks, who was found dead in bed. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Dead."

Wednesday 22 February 1860, Issue 4897 – Gale Document No. Y3200698867
DEATH FROM BURNING – Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Woolfardisworthy, on Monday upon the body of BETSY DUNN, aged 14. On the preceding Thursday the deceased caught her clothes on fire, and the injuries she received led to her death on Saturday. The deceased was the daughter of a labourer, and she appears to have been subject to fits – a malady that deprived her of reason. The evidence showed that every attention had been bestowed upon the unfortunate girl, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Wednesday 29 February 1860, Issue 4898 – Gale Document No. Y3200698893
EXETER – A Warning To Drunkards. – An Inquest was held at the Fireman's Arms, Preston-street, on Monday afternoon, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy-Coroner, on the body of a man, forty-six years of age, named FREDERICK RICHARDS. The deceased was a barber residing in Preston-street, and has been much given to drink. On the night of Friday, the 17th of February, he was drinking at the Fireman's Arms, and when he rose up to go home he was unable to stand. A man named Sheen, and the landlord, assisted him home, and he was put to bed. RICHARDS had been drunk for several days previous. On getting up the following morning in answer to his wife, he muttered some unintelligible words. Believing that he was still labouring under the effects of liquor she left him in his bed. Finding, however, that he did not get any better, she applied for medical assistance at the Corporation of the Poor. Mr A. J. Cuming, surgeon, visited the deceased and found his right arm and side paralysed. He was perfectly insensible, and continued so up to the time of his death, which occurred on Friday last. Mr Cuming stated that death had resulted from apoplexy, without doubt caused by continued drunkenness. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Apoplexy."

Wednesday 29 February 1860, Issue 4898 – Gale Document No. Y3200698896
ALWINGTON – Alleged Poisoning. – Some excitement has been caused here by a suspicion that the wife of a labourer had poisoned her husband, but after Enquiry it does not appear that any proof of the alleged offence could be adduced. The circumstances of the case are briefly these – JOHN SANDERS, aged 80, and his wife, did not live very happily together. On the 18th instant, MRS SANDERS warmed some pudding and meat for her husband, who ate of sit. On the following night SANDERS was taken ill, and vomited. The next day he was very ill, and a messenger having been sent to Mr C. C. Turner, of Bideford, that gentleman sent some medicine, and desired to know how the patient was on the following day. No one came to inform Mr Turner, and he then went to see SANDERS, whom he found in a dying state. Shortly afterwards death ensued, which Mr Turner attributed to inflammation of the lungs. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Thompson, of Bideford, and an Inquest was held by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from congestion of the lungs – Mr Thompsons giving it as his opinion that that was the fact. Not the slightest trace of poison could be discovered.

Wednesday 7 March 1860, Issue 4899 – Gale Document No. Y3200698930
MONKLEIGH – A labourer, named CARTER, was found drowned in the river near Wear Dock Lime Kiln. A man saw his hat blow from his head into the river, which the deceased made an ineffectual attempt to reach. It is supposed that in a subsequent attempt he fell in and was drowned. On an Inquest the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 7 March 1860, Issue 4899 – Gale Document No. Y3200698944
MERTON – Singular Death Of A Child. – An Inquest was held at Merton on Saturday last by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, upon the body of JOHN LEWIS, the illegitimate offspring of MARIA LEWIS. On the preceding Thursday, whilst the grandmother was giving the child some soaked break, "it caught its breath twice, turned black in the face, and soon afterwards expired." Mr W. Risdon, of Dolton, made a post-mortem examination of the body, which was only eleven weeks old; and from that gentleman's evidence the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally suffocated by a piece of soaked bread. The bread weighed about five grains.

Wednesday 14 March 1860, Issue 4900 – Gale Document No. Y3200698967
BARNSTAPLE – Death From Drowning. – On Friday evening a lad, named JOHN SHADDICK, of Pilton, was drowned in the Pilton Gut. The deceased, who was eleven years old, was amusing himself on one of the floating timbers, which are moored to the bank, when he fell into the water. The body was not recovered for some hours afterwards. Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the following day: Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned." The boy's father met a similar fate.

WEAR GIFFORD – Burnt To Death. – On Friday last a child named CLARA ROBINS, 2 ½ years old, daughter of a boatman, was burnt to death. The deceased (who was left in the care of her mother's sister) seems to have caught her clothes on fire – death occurring three hours afterwards. Mr Bremridge held an Inquest on Saturday: Verdict, "Accidentally Burnt to Death."

Wednesday 21 March 1860, Issue 4901 – Gale Document No. Y3200698982
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Pack Horse Inn, St David's, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little boy, named ESTON B. HUTCHISON, aged three years and eight months. The deceased was the son of CAPTAIN F. J. HUTCHISON, of the 54th Regiment of Foot, now stationed in India. He was born on the voyage to India; but being in delicate health he was sent to England by his parents a short time since, and placed under the care of Mr Truscott, solicitor, Hill's Court. On Friday, the 2nd instant, the child was out with Mrs Truscott and another lady. The party were crossing the High-street, opposite the Half Moon Hotel, on the afternoon of that day, when without seeing any vehicle near they were ran over by Miss Wrey's carriage, drawn by two horses. s The ladies providentially escaped without uninjured; but the poor child was knocked down by the horses, one of which trod on its right hand. The child was rescued by a man, named Purrington, but on examination by Mr Caird, surgeon, amputation of the finger was found necessary. The child progressed favourably for some days; but on the Thursday night following, he complained of toothache, and on examination the following morning by Mr Caird, tetanus was found to have supervened, and the poor child died on Saturday afternoon of lock-jaw. The child was buried a few days after death, but was ordered to be exhumed, by the Coroner. There was no person present at the Inquest who witnessed the accident, and as the question for the Jury was whether the coachman had exercised due care and caution in driving, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry until this day (Wednesday).

Wednesday 21 March 1860, Issue 4901 – Gale Document No. Y3200698999
EXMOUTH – Starved To Death. – A few weeks ago we announced the mysterious disappearance of JOHN BERRY, who left his home suddenly. The fate of the poor man has now been ascertained. It appears that after his discharge from his employer, he went to Lympstone, and from thence he intended to go to Beer, but having proceeded as far as Lyme, he was taken ill, and was reported to a police officer as being drunk. The officer, however, on seeing him, found that he was not drunk, but in a very weak state, and immediately had him removed to a lodging-house, and went himself for Dr Carey, who found him insensible. After taking a little bread and milk deceased appeared much better, and made the following statement: That his name was BERRY, was a farm labourer, a native of Exmouth, and was going to Beer, where he knew several persons: that he had slept under hay ricks for the last three nights, but had had no food of any sort for five days, except at Charmouth, where the woman at the turnpike gate, on his asking for a cup of water gave him a cup of tea, a piece of bread and butter and a penny, with which he bought a pennyworth of tobacco. About eleven o'clock, after Dr Carey's visit, a man who slept in the same room went to bed, when BERRY got out, but returned to bed again without any help, saying he was much better. Nothing more was heard of him until he was found dead in the morning. An Inquest was held on the body, the following day, when Dr Carey expressed his opinion that the cause of death was congestive apoplexy, brought on by exposure to cold and want of food.

Wednesday 28 March 1860, Issue 4902 – Gale Document No. Y3200699014
EXETER – The adjourned Inquest, which took place on Wednesday last, on the body of the little boy, Master HUTCHINSON, who had had his finger mutilated by a carriage and pair of horses, in High-street, and who died from lock-jaw, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death." No blame was said to attach itself to any party.

FATAL ACCIDENT – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, on Monday, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy-Coroner, on the body of WM. BUCKLAND, a boy fifteen years of age. The deceased was the son of a labourer, residing at Woodbury, and was employed at the Ebford Manure Company's Works, near Topsham. He had been on the works about three weeks, and was employed as stoker of a steam engine. On the morning of Tuesday, the 13th inst., he was engaged in oiling the bearings of the bone-mill, when his left arm became entangled in one of the wheels, and ere the engine could be stopped his arm was severely mutilated. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, on examination by Mr C. B. Rendle, the house surgeon, it was found that the left arm was severely lacerated. Under careful treatment he progressed favourably until the 21st, when lock-jaw ensued, and he died early on the morning of the 25th. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 March 1860, Issue 4902 – Gale Document No. Y3200699032
On Thursday last Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at the Cross Inn, Sherwill, upon the body of GEORGE TAYLOR, aged thirteen, who was in the service of Mr John Alford, farmer. On the 10th instant the deceased and another lad (Joseph Lovering) were engaged in conveying wood from Viveham Wood to the house of William Fry, of Eastdown; and whilst unloading one of the carts a heavy piece of wood fell on TAYLOR'S head, which bled profusely. The wound was at once washed with chilled water, then with some brandy, and TAYLOR returned to his master's; but the bleeding was not stanched for some time. Acting upon his own desire TAYLOR went home to his father's house, and four days afterwards he returned to his work – remaining till the Saturday, when he again went home to his parents. On the succeeding Monday, Mr Michael Cook, surgeon of Barnstaple, was called in to attend the boy, but he died on the Wednesday. Verdict – "Accidentally killed by a heavy piece of wood falling upon his head."

Wednesday 4 April 1860, Issue 4903 – Gale Document No. Y3200699060
FATAL GUN ACCIDENT. – Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest at Braunton, on Monday, upon the body of JOHN DAVIS, aged 16. The deceased was in the service of Mr William Hodge, farmer. On the preceding Saturday afternoon Mr Hodge's two sons went out to see if they could kill a rabbit; on their return they deposited the gun in the crib in the shippen, which was then being cleansed by DAVIS. Simon Hodge assisted; and on hearing that his father was coming with the yearlings he took up the gun, which exploded – the contents entering the body of DAVIS, who expired a few minutes afterwards. Simon Hodge and the deceased were first cousins, and they were upon the most friendly terms. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

SHEBBEAR – Caution to Mother. – Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest last week upon the body of an infant five months old – the child of MR JOHN ADAMS, farmer, of Shebbear. Verdict, "Accidentally suffocated whilst in bed with its mother."

Wednesday 11 April 1860, Issue 4904 – Gale Document No. Y3200699080
EXETER – Death From A Blow. – An Inquest was held at the Round Tree Inn, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an old man named JOHN MOORE, aged seventy-two. The hour appointed for the holding of the Inquest was two o'clock, but the Court was delayed more than half-an-hour in consequence of the requisite number of jurors not having attended. The Coroner intimated that if such an occurrence again took place he should be compelled to impose a fine. It appeared that on the morning of the 28th of March the deceased was at work as usual at Mr Mortimer's, a brush maker, in Paul-street. During the morning an apprentice named James Trood told Brook, a boy in Mr Mortimer's employ, to put in some fire. Deceased asked Trood why he wanted fire, and thereupon struck him. A fight then ensued between deceased and Trood. Ultimately the latter, according to the evidence of Brook (which, however, did not obtain much credence either with the Coroner or the Jury) struck MOORE a blow in the face and gave him a pair of black eyes. Brook stated that MOROE struck the first blow without any provocation. During the morning MOORE was sick, and he afterwards told Mr Mortimer that Trood had struck him with a stool. On his return home to dinner at his lodgings in Frog-street, he was very much enfeebled, and a man named Troake, a relative with whom he lived, considered that he was intoxicated. Notwithstanding that he was convinced in his mind that he was drunk, on MOORE'S requesting him to get him some beer he did so, and afterwards offered him some rum and water, with the avowed object of "bringing him round." He continued to get worse from that time, but requested that no medical man should be sent for. Troake, however, sent for Mr S. S. Perkins, on the 6th instant, who, on his arrival, found the poor man in a very low state. He prescribed for him, but he died early on Sunday morning. Mr Perkins said he was unable at present to state positively the cause of death, and a post mortem examination was thereupon ordered, and the Inquest adjourned until Monday next.

Wednesday 18 April 1860, Issue 4905 – Gale Document No. Y3200699114
EXETER – Accidental Death – An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of LUCY MARIA ALLEN, a child six years old, the daughter of a plasterer, residing in Coombe-street. On Friday the deceased was playing with some other children on the stones, when a carriage came down Coombe-street. She fell off the kerb, and the carriage went over the left side of her chest. She was taken to the Hospital, where she died in half-an-hour. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ALLEGEGED MANSLAUGHTER – The adjourned Inquest held on the body of JOHN MOORE, a brushmaker, in the employ of Mr Mortimer, Paul-street, was held on Monday. The facts of the case were reported in last week's Flying Post. It will be recollected that some dispute arose between the deceased and an apprentice, named James Trood. Blows ensued, and the deceased was struck in the face. After being ill for about ten days he died; and Mr S. S. Perkins, who attended the deceased during the last two days of his life, said he was unable to certify the cause without a post mortem examination. The Inquest was adjourned for that purpose; and Mr Perkins now stated that death had resulted from extravasation of blood on the brain; but whether it had resulted from the blow (which was only skin deep) or from excitement he could not positively state. The Jury, after consulting for some time, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Trood, and a warrant for his committal was issued by the Coroner.

FATAL ACCIDENT – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, before the City Coroner, on Monday, on the body of MRS ELEANOR T. SHAPCOTT, aged fifty-seven. From the evidence of Henry Sharland, a dealer in haberdashery, it appeared that he attended the Honiton market on Saturday last, in company with the deceased, who carried on the same business. They journeyed to Honiton in a waggon, drawn by one horse, and Sharland drove. On their homeward journey, when near the lodge leading to Bishop's Court, one of the front wheels of the waggon came off, and the driver, deceased, and other persons were precipitated into the road, and the waggon upset. The stock of a hind wheel was found to be on the deceased's stomach, and the felloe of the wheel on her throat. The driver was under the wheel unable to move, and the deceased said to him, "Harry, I am dying." A light and assistance were asked for at the lodge, but no one came. Ultimately the deceased was extricated from under the waggon, but life was apparently extinct. She was placed in the waggon and conveyed to Heavitree, where the assistance of Dr Miles was sought, but that gentleman declined to attend, saying they had better take her to the Hospital. She was conveyed to Exeter where Mr Roper examined her and found she was dead, and had been so apparently for some time. No external injuries of a nature to cause death were visible. She appeared much blanched and he (Mr Roper) was of opinion that she had died from some internal injuries received from the accident. There was a severe injury on the arm. In answer to Mr Jeffery (a Juror), Mr Roper said it would not, in his opinion, be of the least good if Mr Miles had attended. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 25 April 1860, Issue 4906 – Gale Document No. Y3200699153
EASTDOWN – Death Of A Child From A Scald. – Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Eastdown, on Thursday last, upon the body of ALFRED LOVERING, three years old, son of DORCAS LOVERING. On the Thursday preceding, the child seems to have gone to the fire-place and turned over a saucepan of hot water, some of which fell upon his neck and shoulders. The scald was very severe, and resulted in death next day. The evidence showed that every attention had been paid to the deceased; and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death from a scald.

APPLEDORE – Death From Drowning. – On Wednesday last two boys (JOHN BERRY and THOMAS HANDCOCK) were drowned near Horsey weir from the capsizing of a boat. The accident was observed, but no effectual assistance could be rendered. The body of BERRY was found the next day near the weir at Horsey by Thomas Williams, of Braunton; and on Friday Mr Bremridge held an Inquisition upon the remains. Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned."

Wednesday 9 May 1860, Issue 4908 – Gale Document No. Y3200699205
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Saturday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a mariner, named JOHN RICE. The deceased was crossing a field at Whitstone, about a fortnight ago, with a gun in his hand. He fell, the gun went off, and lodged its contents in the poor fellow's knee. He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Friday of lock-jaw, after all the resources of medical skill and attention had been exhausted. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 16 May 1860, Issue 4909 – Gale Document No. Y3200699236
EXETER – An Inquest was held yesterday, at the Blue Boar Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY RUDD, aged seventy-two years. Deceased resided in Magdalen-street, and on Monday, the 7th of May, was observed by a neighbour, named Piper, apparently asleep on the stairs, and shortly afterwards was found lying at the foot of the stairs bleeding from the nose and mouth. Deceased was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she died yesterday. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from "Apoplexy."

SHOCKING ACCIDENT – An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES HUTCHINGS, aged fifty-eight years, who came by his death under the following painful circumstances. He was a farm labourer, and worked for Mr Robert Salter, of Wescott, in the parish of Cullompton, and on the previous Tuesday was engaged in paring trees, and whilst holding to one of the limbs deceased was seized with cramp in his hand, which caused him to let go his hold, and he fell a depth of twenty feet, causing a fracture to his right arm, both clavicles, his thigh, and three of his ribs. Assistance was procured and deceased was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he lingered until Friday last. The Jury, after hearing medical evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 16 May 1860, Issue 4909 – Gale Document No. Y3200699240
BERRYNARBOUR – Death From Croup. – Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Berrynarbour, on Saturday, upon the body of THOMAS HUXTABLE, aged three years, son of a labourer, who had died from Croup. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, made a post mortem examination of the body, and he expresses it as his opinion that the deceased would not have died from croup if a medical man had been called in on Thursday evening. Verdict "Sudden Death."

Wednesday 16 May 1860, Issue 4909 – Gale Document No. Y3200699254
CULLOMPTON – Melancholy Death. – HENRY FARE, aged about fifteen, and son of a labourer, residing at Langford village, in the parish of Cullompton, met with his death by drowning; and this melancholy event exposes most deplorable sanitary defects. Deceased lived with his parents, who occupy one of a row of cottages – four other families being their immediate neighbours, consisting of men, women, and children. Not the least outhouse convenience for necessary purposes is provided for these families, and the custom has been for the different members to resort to a gutter, a short distance from the house. About six o'clock on Saturday morning, deceased repaired to that gutter, and not returning within an hour, his younger brother went in search and found him drowned in the gutter. The state of his clothes left no doubt as to the purpose for which deceased went there, and as he was subject to fits, it is supposed that he was seized with epilepsy and fell into the water. An Inquest was held before R. R. Crosse, Esq., on Monday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned – the Jury not forgetting to animadvert pretty strongly upon the disgusting facts which this catastrophe developed, and to which the poor lad's death is doubtless attributable.

Wednesday 16 May 1860, Issue 4909 – Gale Document No. Y3200699260
ILFRACOMBE – Fatal Occurrence. – On Thursday last Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Ilfracombe upon the body of JOHN GIBBS, a mason. On the previous morning the deceased was engaged in repairing the stable at Langley Cottage, which is situate a short distance from the town; and in stepping from the ladder to the roof (as it is conjectured) the unfortunate man fell to the ground. His skull was dreadfully fractured, and his death was instantaneous. Verdict, "Accidental Death." The deceased was for many years sexton of the parish church.

Wednesday 23 May 1860, Issue 4910 – Gale Document No. Y3200699280
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HITCHCOCK, aged fifty years. The poor fellow was at work on the railway, at Lyon's Holt, when he was knocked down by horses drawing a waggon, and frightfully crushed – particulars of which appeared in the Flying Post at the time. When taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital it was found necessary to amputate the right leg. Mortification, however, ensued, and deceased died on Saturday last. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 23 May 1860, Issue 4910 – Gale Document No. Y3200699291
SOUTHMOLTON – On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the Town Hall, before James Flexman, Esq., upon the body of al female infant – found dead in a coalhole of a room lately occupied by PHOEBE PERRIN (since deceased), in Thorne's-court, East-street. From the evidence adduced the Jury concurred in the opinion of Mr Gardner, surgeon, who was sent for on the discovery of the child, that it had died from the want of proper attention at its birth. The Inquest upon PHOEBE PERRIN, who previous to her death had confessed that the child found was hers, was adjourned until Monday last, that Mr Gardner might make a post mortem examination. That gentleman deposed that he had examined deceased and found that she had recently given birth to a child, and he had no doubt her death was induced by the discovery of the child, for soon after that fact was named to her she became dreadfully feverish and ultimately delirious. A verdict in accordance with the above facts was accordingly returned.

Wednesday 30 May 1860, Issue 4911 – Gale Document No. Y3200699328
TORRINGTON – Suicide. – Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at the West Country Inn, Torrington, on Friday last, upon the body of WILLIAM RIDGWAY, aged sixty-four. On the preceding Tuesday night the deceased and his wife and daughter retired to bed – the father occupying a room by himself. The next morning the daughter found that her father had quitted the house; and his body was discovered in the river Torridge on Thursday. The deceased appears to have previously attempted to drown himself. The unfortunate man had been erecting some houses, and it is supposed that he entertained a notion that the speculation would not prove profitable. Verdict, "Drowned Himself whilst in an unsound state of mind."

HUISH – Fatal Accident. – An inquest was held at Huish, on Saturday last, by Mr Bremridge, upon the body of JOHN GOULDS, aged fifty-nine, a farm labourer. The deceased and another man went to the Eggesford railway station on the previous Tuesday for two waggon loads of lime; and whilst descending the hill leading to New Bridge the drag-chain belonging to the vehicle driven by GOULDS broke and the safety-chain gave way. In endeavouring to check the waggon the near wheel caught the deceased and he was jammed against the wall. Mr W. A. Dene, surgeon, of Dolton, was soon in attendance, when he found the deceased labouring from a compound fracture of the thigh, a fracture of a rib on the right side, and some internal injuries. The unfortunate man died on Friday; and according to the medical testimony, the immediate cause of death was the laceration of the liver. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 6 June 1860, Issue 4912 – Gale Document No. Y3200699364
EXTRAORDINARY DETH FROM POISONING – An Inquest was commenced on Monday, at the Barnstaple Inn, in this city, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of SAMUEL HOOKWAY, a coppersmith, in the employ of Messrs Garton and Jarvis, who had died on the previous Sunday, under circumstances which are detailed in the following evidence:- MR JAMES W. C. HOOKWASY, son of the deceased, stated that he was sent for to see his father, who was fifty years of age, on Friday. He found him in bed very ill; witness asked him how he could account for his illness, and he said it was from eating gurnets which had been sent up by |Mrs Jacobs for his daughter, Maria. Deceased complained of a pain in the throat, which prevented his swallowing, and said it was "like a bolt run through him," and that he was unable to move. He also said that when at Winscott, in the North of Devon, where he was at work for his employers, he suffered violent purgings. Dr Budd and Mr J. Webb were called in, but deceased died on Sunday. THE CORONER: Has any other member of your family been suffering? Witness: Oh! yes, sir; my mother and my nephew are seriously ill from the same cause. MARY JANE HOOKWAY, daughter-in-law of the deceased, stated that she was called in to see her mother-in-law, who was very ill, on Tuesday last. She met the deceased, who said he was going to call Mr Webb for his wife, as she would not drink the brandy he had provided for her. When he returned he said he was scarcely fit to go the journey, as he had such pains in his limbs, but he did not say then what he had been eating. Deceased returned from the North of Devon on the night of Thursday, and said, "I am very ill." Witness asked him what was the matter? and he replied, "I have a very bad sore throat." She advised him to go to bed, and offered to get him some gin and water. Deceased replied, "No, Mary, it's no good, I can't swallow it." On the following day she saw him again; he was in bed, and she offered him some coffee, but he said, "I cannot swallow it; whatever made Jacobs send that fish to Maria; I wonder whether it is that or no?" That was all that passed on that occasion. Her nephew soon after returned home, and he also complained f sore throat and said, in answer to her enquiry, "I have been bad ever since Tuesday morning, when I eat the fish." Witness first saw the fish on the Tuesday morning; it was a round piece of fish, looking dry and yellow; it appeared as if it had been either friend or baked. Witness had given a small piece of fish to the boy. Both the deceased and the boy, his grandson, complained of precisely the same symptoms, which were a sore throat and pains all over them. MRS HOOKWAY had no sore throat, but she complained of sickness and vomiting, and all of them suffered severe purgings. GEORGIANA HOOKWAY, a daughter of the deceased, stated that on Monday her mother brought home two small rounds of fish (gurnet), which were very dry and yellow, to the tea-table, and said, "Here is a present I have for you, Maria," but did not say from whom she got it. Her sister said she could not touch it them, and it was put away. After that, deceased came home to tea, and the fish being produced by her mother, he ate one piece of it. The deceased went to bed at ten O'clock, but did not eat anything more that night. Her mother ate a small piece of the fish, which the deceased left, the same evening. On the following morning, between three and four o'clock, her mother was taken very sick, and the deceased got up to obtain some brandy for her. At seven o'clock witness was called by her mother, who said, "I am in agonies of pain, do get me a cup of tea." Witness did not know the cause of it until she heard that another family, named Maunde3r, living in an adjoining house, had been seized in the same way. Mrs Jacobs had given some meat and fish to Mrs Maunder, of which the family partook, and which made them very ill. Witness then asked her mother where she got the fish, and she said Mrs Jacobs had given it to her for her sister, Maria. A JUROR: Has Mrs Jacobs been in the habit f giving away food previous to this? Witness: Not that I am aware of. Mrs Jacobs is a member of the Jewish persuasion, and is a married woman; she had given her mother fish on former occasions. s The fish in question appeared to have been dressed in oil and eggs. Mrs Jacobs and witness's family were on friendly and visiting terms, and had never quarrelled. BY A JUROR: - Some three or four years ago, fourteen fowls and two ducks, belonging to the deceased, died as she believed from poison. Mr Jacobs was living in the neighbourhood at that time. MARY JANE HOOKWAY here said that her nephew had stated that the fish tasted sweet and was very nice. Mrs Maunder was called but not sworn, and she stated that \Mrs Jacobs had sent for her – to wash some clothes; she had never spoken to her before. Mrs Jacobs said she had some beef and veal, which she would give to witness for her work. Witness took home the meat; there was something white on it like pepper, and she remarked to her husband that the Jews did not pickle their meat like the Christians Witness boiled a piece of the beef, and ate a small quantity of it. Her little girl also ate a small piece, and they were both taken ill. Witness took back the mat that was left to Mrs Jacobs, and heard from her that she was suffering from the bowel complaint. Mrs Jacobs was present, and tendered her evidence. THE CORONER cautioned her that anything she might say might be given in evidence against her, if found necessary. Mr Solomon, the President of the Hebrew Congregation, here stated that as the husband of Mrs Jacobs was ill, and they were very poor, he had visited them to administer to their necessities if necessary. Mrs Jacobs, however, said she and her husband were unwell, and that they had more meat and fish in the house than they knew what to do with. Mrs Jacobs was then sworn, and stated that her husband was a member of the Jewish persuasion, and travelled with trinkets. She resided in North-bridge Terrace, near to the HOOKWAYS. On Monday afternoon last witness was standing at the door, and saw MRS HOOKWAY. She called her over and told her she had pains in her bowels. MRS HOOKWAY said she often got them, and was frequently obliged to go to the Dispensary to get a draught. Witness then said, "MNRS HOOKWAY I have got plenty of meat and fish in the house, and we can't eat it: we are all so poorly." Their holidays – the Feast of Pentecost – were then on. Witness said, "would you like to have a bit f my fish, MRS HOOKWAY?" and she said, "Yes." Witness then took down a plate of fish from the shelf and gave her two bits; it was a large species of gurnet, two of which she had purchased in the Exeter Fish Market, on the Friday previously, of a woman whose name she did not know. The fish appeared to be very fresh indeed. Witness stewed the heads and friend the other portions in slices, using olive oil and eggs, and a sprinkling of flour. MRS HOOKWAY took away the pieces of fish. On the Friday witness and her family ate the stewed heads for dinner, but did not feel any ill effects from them. She did not partake of any of the fried portions of the fish until the following Monday, which was the same day she gave the piece to MRS HOOKWAY. She could not recollect whether or not she partook of any of the fried portions of the fish before she saw MRS HOOKWAY on the Monday. On Tuesday evening witness gave a slice or two of the fried fish to a child of some poor Jew, named Israel, but they sent it back again saying that they did not want it. Witness's daughter said to her, "Serve you right; you should not be so free in giving away things, for you only get abused for your good nature." Her daughter afterwards gave the pieces of fish in question to one of Mrs Maunder's children. THE CORONER: Have you any poison for killing vermin about your house? Witness: No. Q. – Have you at any time had rates about your house? A. Yes, about eighteen months ago we were very much troubled with them. Q. – Did you use anything to destroy them? A. – I used some paste, which smelt like brimstone; but I have not used any lately, as it had no effect. Q. – Had you any of that paste in the house at the time you gave MRS HOOKWAY the fish? A. – Not that I know of. I used to keep the paste in the coal-house, and not where the victuals are kept. The flour used in cooking the fish was taken from the bag. I bought the oil of Mr Passmore, and a little of it is now left. A JUROR suggested that the oil should be examined. THE CORONER said they could get both the flour and the oil which were left examined. Witness said that she was in the habit of putting a little pepper over her meat when she pickled it. She had thrown away the beef which had been returned by Mrs Maunder. The meat was purchased at Mr Chamberlain's. Mr Solomon said it was a part of the religious duties of the Hebrew persuasion to put the meat in water in order to purify it, and that naturally turned it a lightish colour. Witness, in answer to further enquiries, stated that the frying-pan she used was kept in the coal-house. Some of the paste might be in the coal-house now. Mr Jacobs, husband of the witness, was here requested, in company with Ginham, the police officer, to examine the house and see if there was any of the paste left, and if so to bring it to the Jury, as well as the flour and oil and salt and pepper which remained, and which formed a part of that used in cooking the fish. Examination of Mrs Jacobs continued: She had always been on the best of terms with MRS HOOKWAY, to whom she had previously given fish. Her husband had thrown away the meat, but she did not know where. Mr Solomon said that unless the meat was marked so as to be able to identify it, the rules of their persuasion forbade its being received back again after it had been given away. [The pot of paste for destroying vermin was produced. It was marked "poison", and from the appearance of the pot it did not seem to have been used for a long time.] Mr Jacobs stated that he threw the meat, which had been returned by Mr Maunder, into the river at Head-weir. At this state of the Enquiry the Inquest was adjourned until the following evening. TUESDAY. The Inquest was resumed this evening. Mrs Ann Maunder was the first witness sworn. She stated that on Tuesday week last Mrs Jacobs sent to her to say that if she would send a plate she had something for her. Witness sent her little girl, and she returned in about a quarter of an hour with about a half-pound of boiled beef. Mrs Jacobs then sent for her again, and asked witness if she could do a little washing for her? Witness replied in the affirmative, and then Mrs Jacobs opened a small back recess, from which she took out about ten pounds of uncooked beef and veal, and said she (witness) could work it out by washing, and they should not fall out about it. Mrs Jacobs then gave her some things to wash, and she took home the meat and put it into the cupboard. On the same evening she boiled a bit of the beef for supper, and she and her husband ate a small portion of it. On the next day Mrs Jacobs sent for witness's daughter, and on her going to her house she gave her two slices of dressed fish (gurnet). It was dry and whitish; her husband ate nearly the whole of one slice for his tea, and about nine o'clock in the night he was taken very sick, and was violently purged; he continued in that state all that night, and the whole of the week up to Saturday. Witness's daughter, who had eaten a portion of the beef, was similarly seized, and also continued ill up to Saturday. On Thursday Dr James was called in to see her husband and children, and he had been in attendance upon them ever since. The children were improving, but her husband continued very ill. Witness had never spoken to Mrs Jacobs before this. The meat did not smell good, and Mrs Pollard, a neighbour, took it out of her house and returned it to Mrs Jacobs, with the message that she could not keep the meat as it had made them very ill. She did a portion of the washing, and returned the remainder. The meat, which was salted, was "white all over," as though something had been thrown over it in the pickling. BY A JUROR. – It did not smell like "stinking meat." The beef did not taste badly. Witness was seized in the same way as the rest of the family. A lad, named Israel, stated that he was sent by his father to inquire for Mr Jacobs on Monday week. He gave witness a piece of meat and two pieces of fish, which he took home; but his mother said she did not require it and sent it back. She had no other reason for returning it but that she did not want it. Mrs Israel stated that Mr Jacobs had given her daughter some bread and meat, and after eating it the child was taken ill. Mr Benjamin Johnstone Webb stated that he was a surgeon, residing at Exeter. He was the deceased's medical man, and on Thursday, the 31st of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, he was called to see him. He did not, however, go that night, but sent him medicine. On the following morning witness visited deceased; he found him in bed, suffering great pain in the bowels, with continual vomiting and purging of dark matter; he had no cramp, but there was great thirst and a cold sweat. Witness prescribed a mustard poultice to be applied to the pit of the stomach, with a mixture of ammonia, and food in the shape of arrow-root and toast-water. He saw him again at nine o'clock at night; he was in precisely the same state. Witness then prescribed an opiate pill, and MR HOOKWAY, jun., and witness decided to call in additional medical aid if the deceased was not better. On the following morning he still continued in great pain, and then Dr Budd visited him with witness and prescribed medicines, but deceased gradually sank, and expired on Sunday afternoon. Witness, Dr Budd, and Mr Hawkins had made a post mortem examination of the body. On opening the chest they found the heart and lungs in a healthy condition. The stomach and intestines were in a high state of inflammation, especially that part of the smaller intestine, called the ileum – the lower part of it. The stomach was marked by old chronic ulcers, which were cicatrized. MR HOOKWAY had previously suffered from this for which he had attended him. The mucous membrane of the stomach was in a highly congested state, but the liver and the other organs were healthy. THE CORONER: Were there any traces of poison? Witness: Only the inflammatory state of the stomach. Q. – Would this inflammation be likely to have been produced by eating putrid fish, or decayed animal or vegetable matter? A. – Yes. A JUROR – What was the cause of death? Witness. – I consider death to have been caused from some acrid matter having been introduced into the stomach, causing inflammation. There were no portions of the fish remaining in the stomach. I did not see any of the matter which deceased vomited. there was no rash on deceased, as is generally the case when a person is poisoned by fish. Deceased had no delirium or convulsions, but was perfectly sensible to the last. Mr Webb was then examined with reference to MRS HOOKWAY. He found her in a similar state to her husband. She had vomiting and purging, with no cramp, but with great prostration. He prescribed some pills for her which relieved her. She continued in a low and dangerous state for several days, but she was now better. On the same or the following day he was requested to attend the grandson, who had precisely the same symptoms as those of MR and MRS HOOKWAY. He continued in the same state for several days, but was now better. On Sunday week witness was called to the Jacobs's, and he found Mr Jacobs and the daughter suffering from vomiting and purging. He prescribed for them, and they got better. BY A JUROR. – He believed that putrid fish or putrid meat would produce similar symptoms to those mentioned, but possibly not such severe inflammation as that exhibited by MR HOOKWAY. He had retained a portion of the liver and stomach for future analysis if required. He had not examined the blood, as he did not think that would be of any service after such a lapse of time. Mr Samuel Budd, a physician, practising in this city, visited the deceased with Mr Webb. The symptoms were violent and incessant vomiting and purging, intense pain of the bowels, and great thirst. He said he had cramps; he was in a state of great prostration; with a feeble pulse; and had all the ordinary symptoms of sinking. Deceased also complained of a burning feeling in swallowing, but there was no redness about the faces of the throat. Witness visited deceased on the following morning between six and seven o'clock; he then found him dying. At first sight the symptoms struck him as much resembling Asiatic cholera, but it differed materially therefrom in the character of the evacuations. It differed from ordinary English cholera from the fact that the pain was far more intense and persistent than was usually the case in that disease. After having examined deceased, witness examined the grandson and the wife, who had precisely the same symptoms. The lad was in extreme danger then, but afterwards he rallied. Witness assisted in making a post mortem examination; the description of which was similar to that by Mr Webb. There were no cases that he was acquainted with, or had read of, in which death had resulted from eating putrid matter; but there were many cases where death had resulted from eating partially decayed matter, some of which he cited. He considered the cause of death to have arisen from the inflammation of the stomach and intestines. s The symptoms exhibited by deceased were just such as might have been produced by an irritant mineral poison, or acrid animal matter. BY A JUROR. – Fish would not produce such symptoms if fresh. He never saw such a virulent case as the present from eating fish. It was not possible for him to detect poison in the stomach of deceased from the incessant vomiting which he underwent, but if poison was to be detected it would be more likely to be found in the liver from absorption. There could be no doubt that eating very small quantities of partially decayed animal matter would cause death, as it acted as a ferment. Corrosive sublimate would produce symptoms like those exhibited by the deceased, but that generally acted more quickly, and the patient was salivated, which did not appear in this case. The symptoms were like those produced by arsenic, but it was very unusual for so long an internal to occur between the taking of food, containing the poison, and the first appearance of the symptoms. With regard to the rat poison, that was phosphorus, and he was not aware that there was any case in the books of poisoning by phosphorus. He though the present was one of those cases of animal matter, in a partial state of decay, acting as an irritant poison. These cases were rare in this country, but they did sometimes occur. They were, however, more frequent abroad. THE CORONER, in summing up, said this was one of the most extraordinary cases he ever remembered to have occurred in this city. He read a case of poisoning by eating partially decayed animal matter, in the shape of sausages, which resembled the present case. He could not see any motive that would have induced Mrs Jacobs to give anything injurious to the HOOKWAYS, as it was admitted that she was on the most friendly terms with them. The fact appeared to be that Mrs Jacobs had a larger quantity of meat and fish than her family could make use of, and she accordingly gave some of it away. He thought that the fish was in that state of putrescence which acted in the injurious manner described by Dr Budd. The Jury, after some deliberation, returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased, SAMUEL HOOKWAY, died on the 3rd of June from eating fish, called gurnet, in a partial state of decay – thereby poisonous."

Wednesday 6 June 1860, Issue 4912 – Gale Document No. Y3200699365
FATAL ACCIDENT. – On Monday a fatal accident happened to a young man named BOLT, a native of Sidmouth, one of the carpenters working on the railway. Several workmen were proceeding to Shute, though the tunnel, drawn by the Exeter engine; the trucks contained several metals, and at the mouth of the tunnel one of the metals sprung from the carriage, and hitching on its end, rebounded on the trucks, and struck BOLT on the head: he was immediately taken home, but life was extinct. On Wednesday an Inquest was held at the Globe, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. On Friday a large number of the inhabitants attended the funeral of the young man.

PLYMOUTH – Fatal Occurrence. – On Thursday evening MIS LUKE, daughter of a boot and shoemaker in George-street, died under very distressing circumstances at a branch establishment in Union-street, which was under her charge. It appears that for some time past an ill-feeling has subsisted between the father and daughter, and that on Monday last there was a dispute in relation to the sale of a pair of boots, which were found to be too small, and were returned by the purchaser, a sailor. to MISS LUKE, with an offer of one-half the amount realised by the second sale. The fact, whatever it was, so exasperated MR LUKE, whose temper is generally ungovernable, that in the evening he went to Union-street, and, although his daughter is nineteen years of age, beat her most severely with a rope. He then left the house, but returned in a short time, took the rope, and threatened to repeat the infliction, when the high-spirited girl retreated to her bedroom on the second floor in the rear of the house, opened the window, and jumped out. She fell on a porch and thence on to the pavement, a height of twenty-five feet. Her skull was fractured so frightfully that the brain protruded through her nostrils. At the Inquest held on the body, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that while labouring under temporary derangement the deceased jumped from the bedroom window of her father's premises and fell on the ground below whereby her skull was fractured and brain lacerated; and the Jury further said that the father's conduct towards the deceased was marked by undue severity. During the time the foreman was reading the decision of the Jury, LUKE made use of some incoherent expressions, and then sank forward on the desk weeping like a child.

Wednesday 6 June 1860, Issue 4912 – Gale Document No. Y3200699347
EXETER – Sudden Death Of A Child. – An Inquest was held at the Red Lion Inn, St Sidwell, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an illegitimate child named JOHN KERSWELL. The child was born on the 2nd of May, and was healthy up to within two days of its death. Mr Hunt, surgeon, was of opinion that death had resulted either from accidental suffocation or a spasm. The Jury returned an Open Verdict of "Found Dead."

Wednesday 13 June 1860, Issue 4813 – Gale Document No. Y3200699380
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday), at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before the City Coroner, on the body of WM. GOODING, aged thirty-six, who came by his death under the following circumstances:- The Deceased was a navvy, and worked on the Exeter and Exmouth railway and on the 17th of April last, while at work in the parish of Woodbury, a quantity of earth fell, and before deceased could get out of the way he was violently struck by the earth, sustaining serious injuries. Deceased was attended by Dr Brent, of Woodbury, but was subsequently removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Monday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 13 June 1860, Issue 4813 – Gale Document No. Y3200699381
BISHOPSNYMPTON – Death From Intemperance. – On Monday last Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest at Bishopsnympton, upon the body of WILLIAM MARLOW, aged 41. The deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Wm. German, a smith, seems to have been much addicted to drink, and he has often suffered from falling down whilst inebriated. The revel at Bishopsnympton took place on Whit-Monday, and the deceased made excessively free during the week. When he returned to his home one night blood was issuing from a wound in his head; but he did not say anything as to how it occurred, and it was presumed that he had again fallen. On the Wednesday morning preceding the Inquest the deceased went to his work as usual; but after dinner complained of a pain in his head and back, and he was advised to go to bed. The next morning the deceased was attended by Mr A. H. Attwater, of Southmolton; but medical aid was ineffectual. The deceased died on Friday morning – having been in a state of insensibility from Wednesday night to his death. Mr Flexman, of Southmolton, assisted by Mr Attwater, made a post mortem examination of the body; and according to their evidence death resulted from the injury done to the head. The Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased died from the effects of a blow, but how or by what means inflicted there was no evidence to prove." Various rumours were afloat as to the cause of the death of the unfortunate man; but no testimony as forthcoming to justify the slightest supposition that the deceased died through another person's misconduct.

Wednesday 13 June 1860, Issue 4813 – Gale Document No. Y3200699401
EXMOUTH – An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before R. Aberdein, Esq., on the body of the unfortunate boy BARDONS, who was drowned in the marsh, the particulars of which we gave last week. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 20 June 1860, Issue 4914 – Gale Document No. Y3200699436
HIGHBICKINGTON – Death From Gluttony. – An Inquest was held here on Tuesday by Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM GOODING, aged thirty-seven. The deceased was a man of weak intellect, and subject to fits. He was known to be a gourmand, and was in the habit of swallowing his food without mastication. On the preceding Saturday there was a wedding in the village, and deceased was entertained with the ringers at the Black Horse Inn, where he swallowed some bread and beer. He went home to bed, and next morning he was found with his head hanging over the bed quite dead. He had ruptured a blood vessel in the head. The Jury having heard the evidence of Mr Jones, surgeon, returned a verdict of died from a rupture of a blood vessel, induced by excessive eating and drinking.

BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the New Inn, Bishop's Hull, near Taunton, on the body of MR JAMES VELLACOTT, a farmer, of this town. Deceased had been on a visit to Mr Wearer, of Staplegrove mills, Roughmoor, and on Monday morning he went to bathe in the river Tone, in company with the son of Mr Wearer. It is supposed that he was seized with cramp, for before assistance could be rendered he was drowned. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 20 June 1860, Issue 4914 – Gale Document No. Y3200699432
BARNSTAPLE – Singular Death Of A Child. – Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday last, at Horne's Lamb Inn, upon the body of GEORGE THOMAS BEER, aged four, son of MR JOSEPH BEER, grocer, of Boutport-street. On the preceding Friday afternoon the deceased lay down upon the pavement near his father's house; and whilst in this position another boy came across the street and told him to get up. The deceased didn't do so, and the boy struck him on the left arm just below the shoulder. The little fellow then got up, and he ran into his house crying. He told his sister that a big boy had knocked him on the arm; but on getting to the front door the sister could not see the boy. Some short time afterwards the deceased and the boy who struck him were said to have been seen together at play in the Butcherow and nothing appeared to be going wrong. On MISS BEER'S putting her brother to bed that night he complained of a pain in his arm; but no mark was visible. On Sunday evening, Mr Michael Cook, surgeon, was called in to attend the child, whose arm was then swollen. The next morning the arm was worse; and the child died on Tuesday. According to the medical testimony death was caused by the blow in the arm, which blow caused inflammation. Verdict accordingly.

THE RECENT ACCIDENT AT COMBMARTIN. – On Thursday last Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary upon the body of THOMAS SMALLDON, a lad. The deceased was in the service of Mr Day, farmer, of Combmartin. On the 28th of May SMALLDON was sent to Vellacott Moor to see if his master's sheep were all right, and the boy seems to have met one William Creek, who accompanied him to the top of the cliffs at Chericombe. Getting there the deceased said he should go down to the beach for a boat, and he went down over the rocks. Creek went upon his errand; and on his return he called out to SMALLDON, but receiving no reply he left. The next morning the poor boy was discovered on the rocks. He was sensible, and he stated that he had been asked to go down over the rocks for the boat; but on returning "his head turned round and he fell." He was forthwith removed to the Infirmary. Mr James Ford, the house surgeon, stated that the deceased's right thigh was fractured when he was brought to the Infirmary, and there was a wound on the right side of the head. The deceased at first appeared to improve, but he was never quite free from delirium. On Tuesday morning he was seized with convulsions, and died about eleven o'clock on the morning of the Inquest. The post mortem examination led to the discovery that the skull of the deceased had been fractured in two places, and death was pronounced to have been caused from the injuries on the head. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

HARTLAND – The Danger Of Seeking Gull's Eggs. – On Saturday last Mr J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Harland, on the body of WILLIAM MUGFORD, aged fifty. The deceased appears to have been in the employ of Mr John Lee, of Lundy Island. On the preceding Sunday afternoon the unfortunate man seems to have gone in quest of gull's eggs, and he is supposed to have fallen over the rocks into the water. His body was found the next day under the cliff, and there was a basket on the top of the cliff. The body was removed from Lundy on Wednesday night in a skiff to Clovelly –thence it was taken to Hartland, where the deceased's wife resides. There was a bruise upon the forehead, and a wound on the back of the head. The Jury returned an open verdict.

Wednesday 27 June 1860, Issue 4915 – Gale Document No. Y3200699450
SUICIDE – On Tuesday week a waggoner in the service of Lord Poltimore, named JOHN COOMBES, committed suicide by hanging himself. He had lately been much given to drink, and on the morning in question, about half past eight o'clock, he was found suspended by a rope from a beam in the hay-loft. At an Inquest held on the body, on Wednesday, a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

EXETER – Death Of A Child By Drowning. – An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before the City Coroner, (H. W. Hooper, Esq.,) on the body of a little boy, named DANIEL SAUNDERS, five years of age. It appeared that on the morning of the preceding day, about nine o'clock, a man employed at the Quay Mills, named Munford, found the body of the poor little fellow close to one of the fenders, in about five or six feet of water. The deceased, who was the son of a sawyer, residing in Commercial-road, was last seen alive about two hours previously; and must have fallen into the leat, and been washed down to the mill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 4 July 1860, Issue 4916 – Gale Document No. Y3200699484
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Blue Boar Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of a young man, named HENRY REWE, aged eighteen. It appeared that on Saturday week the deceased was engaged in removing some furniture for his brother, from Broadclist to Woodbury. Whilst ascending Elford-hill with a waggon and two horses, the deceased caught hold of one of the wheels to assist the horses. In doing so his hand was caught between the wheel and the wood of the waggon, and was crushed in a shocking manner. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and soon after gangrene ensued, which resulted in his death on Saturday last. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 11 July 1860, Issue 4917 – Gale Document No. Y3200699528
EXETER – A little boy, named WEBBER, was drowned in the Exe, whilst bathing, last Friday. At an Inquest held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

FATAL ACCIDENT – A poor man, named EDWARD PALMER, a weaver, 71 years of age, living in St. Thomas, whilst endeavouring to pass the Exwick crossing with a wheelbarrow, near the Exeter Railway Station, about half past twelve o'clock on Wednesday last, was knocked down by some loaded trucks, which were being shunted by an engine on the goods siding. Three trucks passed over his shoulder and head, and when released he was quite dead. He was immediately removed to the Red Cow Inn, where an Inquest was held on the body last Thursday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and it having been proved that there was no negligence on the part of the policeman in keeping the crossing clear, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 18 July 1860, Issue 4918 – Gale Document No. Y3200699565
EXETER – Fatal Accident From Machinery. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday, before the City Coroner, on the body of a little boy nine years of age, named WILLIAM HUNT. The deceased, who was the son of a dairyman, living at Oakford was sent by his father with grist to the mill of Mr R. Beedell at Stoodleigh. During the temporary absence of Mr Beedell, the lad by some means got entangled in the machinery and his right arm was crushed by the wheel. On being immediately extricated he was attended to by Mr Edwards, surgeon, for some time; but was subsequently removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. On his arrival there amputation of the arm was found necessary which was accordingly performed; but the poor little fellow lingered in great pain until Friday when he died. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

DEATH OF TWO LADS BY DROWNING. – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Paper Maker's Arms, Exe-lane, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the bodies of two youths, named JAMES PRIN and JAMES WILSON, aged respectively about nineteen and fifteen. The deceased were in the employ of Messrs Franklin and Co., coach builders, of this city, as are also their fathers. About six o'clock on Saturday evening they left the shop together and proceeded, with two other lads, to Head Weir to bathe. PRIN, who could swim, first went into the water followed by WILSON. The latter could not swim, and PRIN induced him to get on his back, and he thus swam across the river with him. On reaching the opposite bank they rested for a short time, and had started to returned, WILSON being still on PRIN'S back. They had not however, proceeded but a few yards from the bank when their friends – Keen and Hellier – who were bathing on the opposite side, saw WILSON disappear under the water. At first they considered that PRIN was kipping him or teaching him to swim, but this idea was quickly dispelled when they saw PRIN throw up his arms and also disappear beneath the water. Neither Keen nor Hellier could swim, and they were, therefore, unable to render assistance to their unfortunate companions. they immediately left the water and crossing on the bridge called for a boat. Capt. Dacie was present in a arbour overlooking the river, with some friends, all of whom immediately proceeded to the scene. They got into a boat and commenced a search with the paddles. After a short time the body of PRIN was raised on a paddle but just as it reached the surface of the water it slipped off the paddle and again fell into the water. Although there were about a hundred persons present at this time, only one got into the water to endeavour to save the lives of the poor lads, but he soon became exhausted and left. A young man, named Thomas Tapley, however, having arrived at this point immediately jumped into the water and soon succeeded in bringing the body of PRIN to the surface, when it was placed in a boat, and conveyed to the bank. Restoratives were immediately applied by Capt. Dacie and his friends, but although it was considered that life was not quite extinct when he reached the land, yet he was soon past all human aid. Search was made for the other body, and after about ten minutes it was found by Tapley, whose noble conduct throughout received the highest commendation from the Coroner and Jury. The Coroner having remarked on the melancholy character of the case, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 18 July 1860, Issue 4918 – Gale Document No. Y3200699582
SHOCKING ACCIDENT – An Inquest was held by Mr Bremridge on Saturday last, at Yelland, Fremington, upon the body of WILLIAM HOLLAND, aged twelve. The deceased resided with his brother (MR JOHN HOLLAND), and on the previous Thursday evening he was engaged in saving hay. Going through a gateway the deceased was forced by the shaft of the cart against the post, and his head was shockingly crushed. Medical assistance was unavailing, the poor boy died the next morning. Verdict, Accidental Death.

APPLEDORE – Death From Drowning. – On Saturday Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at the Royal George Inn, Appledore, upon the body of a lad named GEORGE CLARK. On the 6th instant the deceased accompanied his father from Appledore to Bideford in a barge. After some time, and whilst returning, the father told his son he might get into the boat and go ahead. The boy did so; but he seems to have incautiously stood upon the seat of the boat sculling – the oar is supposed to have slipped, and the poor boy found a watery grave. The body was picked up on Friday last by Thomas Shaddick; and the Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased was Accidentally Drowned in the river Torridge by falling out of a boat."

Wednesday 25 July 1860, Issue 4919 – Gale Document No. Y3200699606
EXETER – DEATH BY DROWNING A Melancholy Catastrophe. - An Inquest was held, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, yesterday, at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, on the body of WILLIAM TREW, formerly in the 78th regiment of foot, and for six years a sergeant in the First Devon Militia; and on the body of a little boy, named GEORGE WESTERN, aged ten years, the son of a widow, of this city. Mrs Lang, who resides in a cottage adjoining the canal, stated that on Saturday afternoon her little boy called out to her that a lad was in the canal. She screamed out, and at this moment she saw WILLIAM TREW coming towards her, with a fishing rod in his hand. Seeing the lad in the water he immediately jumped upon a piece of plank in the canal, and then into the water after the boy. She saw the lad get up on TREW'S back, climb up the piece of timber, and get safely to the bank. TREW was sinking, and then she observed two other boys in the water. A JUROR said the water at this point in the canal was twelve feet deep. Leonard Gerry, who was working in the gas house adjoining, having heard an alarm, went to the canal, and saw TREW, who was in the water, with three boys. Witness and a man, called William Beer, got upon some planks, and reached out a stick, by which two of the boys were saved. When these were landed witness lost sight of TREW and the other boy; but by this time "grapples" were brought. Witness saw TREW near him under water, and he put out his hand and landed him. He believed that he had not been under water more than three minutes. When taken out he was, to all appearance, dead, but they rubbed and rolled him on the bank, and Mr Edwards, of the Port Royal, sent for a doctor. In the meantime the boy, who was in the water three or four minutes after TREW had been taken out, was rescued, but was quite dead. Mr Marchant, surgeon, soon arrived, and TGREW was taken into the gas-house. The body was placed by the fire, and every exertion was used to restore animation. The deceased revived for a little time, and groaned, but he died about two hours after having been taken into the house. RICHARD WESTERN, a lad twelve years old, and the brother of the deceased lad, stated that his mother sent him to the Haven Banks to gather sticks. His two brothers, who were twins, accompanied him. After looking at Mr Hamlin, who was fishing, one of his brothers went on some planks, which were in the canal, to catch minnows. In endeavouring to do so he fell in. The other brother also got upon the planks and fell into the canal; and witness was so frightened that he did not see where he was going and fell into the water also. TREW jumped in to try and save them; and witness and one of his brothers were helped out by Gerry with a stick. The brother, who was the second to fall in, was the one drowned. Mr William R. F. Marchant, surgeon, stated that he examined the body of TREW when taken out of the water, and found him insensible. He was breathing feebly, and his pulse was also exceedingly feeble. Witness had his clothes removed, the body wrapped in flannels, and friction applied to the limbs, &c. He also adopted Dr Marshall Hall's method for producing artificial respiration. Hot stone was likewise applied to the feet, and an apparatus containing hot water was applied to the surface of the body. He also applied mustard poultices to the calves of the legs, the chest, and the back of the neck. Ammonia was applied to the throat and passed in front of the nose. An improvement was visible in breathing, but the lungs were never properly filled with air. TREW died after he had applied remedies for two hours. The CORONER here remarked that it must be a great satisfaction to the public and all concerned that such zealous efforts had been made to restore life. In reply to questions from Jurors, Mr Marchant stated that the deceased spoke incoherently, and struggled violently whilst under the treatment, which he attributed to a difficulty of breathing, and not to any disordered state of the brain, as was suggested by one of the Jury. Henry Harris, of the Devon County Constabulary, stated that when the deceased lad, WESTERN, was taken out of the water, there were no signs of life in him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of the lad; and "Death from attempting to rescue WESTERN" in the case of TREW. The Funeral - The deceased TREW, was buried in St. Thomas's churchyard, yesterday afternoon, with military honours. The band of the First Devon Militia attended, and played the Dead March in Saul. A troop of the 9th Lancers and a number of the Militia formed an imposing military procession. there was an immense concourse of spectators present to witness the funeral. The Lancers fired volleys over the grave. An Appeal. – The circumstances of the above case are of a very distressing character, and we have seldom heard of one which more strongly appeals to the sympathies of the benevolent. Here was a man, who the moment he saw a poor child struggling in the water, instantly plunged into the canal to endeavour to save him, and lost his own life in making the courageous and humane attempt. We deeply regret to state that he has left a wife, who is enceinte, and five young children totally unprovided for. The deceased was twenty-one years in the army: he served in India, and obtained the Ghuznee medal. Since his return he has been for six years a sergeant in the First Devon Militia, and was much respected for his excellent conduct by the officers and his comrades. The case has excited much commiseration, and we are glad to state that efforts are being made to raise a fund for the bereaved family. The Jury kindly gave up their fees, and the Coroner and Mr Marchant, surgeon gave subscriptions. We understand that T. Snow, Esq., has consented to act as treasurer.

Wednesday 1 August 1860 – Gale Document No. Y3200699640
EXETER – Another Case Of Drowning. – On Sunday evening a little girl, named HARRIETT BROOKS, seven years of age, was playing by the river, in the Bonhay, with her sister. She was seized with a fit and fell into the water. No one being near at the time, several minutes elapsed before any person arrived to rescue the child. A man named Galpin, who was on the opposite side of the river, came across as soon as possible, but when the body was found life was extinct. An Inquest was held on Monday at the Round Tree Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

ANOTHER MELANCHOLY CASE OF DROWNING. – On Thursday, two boys, named WILLIAM BULL and FREDERICK CHANNING, about 13 or 14 years of age, in the employ of Mr Mason, brick-maker, St Sidwells, were drowned in a pond, in the yard adjoining, occupied by Mr Hancock. The boys, during the dinner house, jumped over the hedge which separates the two yards, and undressed themselves for the purpose of bathing in a muddy pond, about five feet deep. It is supposed that they sunk deeply into the mud, and so were drowned, being unable to cry for assistance. Being missed from the yard, one of the men looked over the hedge, when he discovered the clothes of the boys lying close to the pond. A search was made, and the bodies were speedily taken out of the water, but they were quite dead. The bodies were then conveyed to the Globe Inn, Newtown, where an Inquest was held on Friday evening.

FATAL ACCIDENT – On Wednesday a fatal accident occurred to a little boy, named WILLIAM COLEMAN, six years of age, the son of a widow, residing in Paris-street. The boy was sent by his mother, in company with his brother STEPHEN COLEMAN, at nine o'clock in the morning, to St Sidwell's School; but instead of going there, they went to the Exeter barracks, where they remained until eleven o'clock. The boys then went upon the railway works in Queen-street, and in spite of frequent remonstrances from the workmen, persisted in riding behind the wagons. Ultimately, WILLIAM COLEMAN got his left foot between the axle, and the bottom part of the frame of the waggon. His clothes became entangled in the axle, and his head was drawn through the wheel by the pedestal, his body being completely mangled. The wagons were stopped, and the poor boy released from his position, but life was quite extinct. The body was removed to the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, where an Inquest was held the same evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner. The above facts being fully proved, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." A man, named Cooke, stated that he drove the boys off the line twice during the morning, and an engine driver also ordered them to leave.

Wednesday 1 August 1860 – Gale Document No. Y3200699644
BIDEFORD – Death From Drowning. – WILLIAM CLEVERDON, son of a labourer, was drowned in the river Torridge, on Monday. Returning from Mr Cox's shipbuilding yard, whither he had gone with his uncle's dinner, the deceased was induced to accompany some other boys into the water. CLEVERDON ventured beyond his depth and was drowned. The body was discovered next morning above the bridge, opposite the gas works, - a distance of three-quarters of a mile from the place where the boy went into the water. Mr T. L. Pridham, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest upon the body, and a verdict in accordance with the foregoing particulars was returned.

Wednesday 8 August 1860, Issue 4821 – Gale Document No. Y3200699687
PRINCETOWN – Death From Drunkenness. - Mr H. A. Vallack held an Inquest at the Albert Inn, Princetown, on Friday last, upon the body of JAMES WILLIAMS, aged 19. the deceased and another young man on the preceding night seem to have gone to the Albert Inn in a shocking state of intoxication: they were known to the landlord, and he permitted them to sleep in the bar: in the morning the deceased was discovered by his companion to be dead. Verdict accordingly. The Coroner censured the landlord for leaving the two men in the bar during the night without some one else being in attendance; but it should be remembered that the two young men did not get intoxicated at his house, and their being permitted to remain there was an act of kindness.

Wednesday 15 August 1860, Issue 4922 – Gale Document No. Y3200699709
THREE SUDDEN DEATHS IN THE DEVON COUNTY GAOL. - Last week Inquests were held by R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on SAMUEL PERCY, THOMAS WASH, and STEPHEN JOHNSON, three prisoners in the Devon County Gaol, who had died almost suddenly. Their deaths were attributed by the medical gentleman to natural causes, and verdicts accordingly were returned.

EXETER – Another Death From Crinoline. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, on Monday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a girl, named THOMASIN TRICKEY, aged about sixteen years. The deceased, who resided with her grandmother, at Cullompton, was employed at Messrs. Drew and Comins's paper-mills, in the parish of Bradninch. On the 23rd of July ult. she was engaged with Ann Tatchell in cutting some rags with a portion of a scythe. Deceased's scythe required sharpening, and she went with Tatchell to another part of the mill to grind it. The scythe was ground at the grind-stone driven by water power, and in turning round to leave the room, the crinoline which she wore caught in one of the cogs. The poor girl was lifted from the ground, and her legs were drawn into the wheel. The machinery as almost instantly stopped and she was extricated, but her legs were dreadfully mutilated. Three surgeons – Messrs. Spencer, Potter, and Puddicombe – speedily arrived, and advised the removal of the girl to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, whither she was conveyed the same evening. On examination by Mr Rendle, the house surgeon, it was found that the right leg was completely smashed and the left leg was severely fractured. Amputation of both legs was performed, and although the girl rallied for a short time, pleurisy succeeded, which, with the combined effects of the injury, terminated her life on Sunday morning last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 22 August 1860, Issue 4923 – Gale Document No. Y3200699755
BARNSTAPLE – Inquests. – Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest on Friday evening on the body of an infant, named RALPH WHEELER BOWDEN NUTT, who was an illegitimate child. Its mother (a married woman, whose husband has been for some years in America,) died five or six weeks ago; and the deceased child has since been taken care of by the putative father (FRANK BOWDEN.) The child appeared unwell; but BOWDEN would not have any medical advice, and for this neglect he was censured by the Coroner. The evidence, however, showed that the child had been kindly treated; and the medical testimony affirmed that the deceased died from inflammation of the lungs. Verdict, "Died from natural causes."

On Monday Mr Bencraft held an Inquest at the Crown and Anchor Inn upon the body of GEORGE HANDFORD, aged forty. The deceased, who was in the employ of Mr William Pridham, coach proprietor, went to Ilfracombe on Saturday last; and on his return in the afternoon he was compelled from faintness to lie down in his master's harness-room. He was soon removed to his house; but he died the next morning. The deceased took some powders which were prescribed by Mr Tatham, chemist, but he would not consent to the attendance of a medical man. Alarmed at his illness his wife sent for Mr Gamble; but that gentleman (who went immediately) found that he had died in the short interval. The deceased had stated that he had not been able to eat anything for two days; and Mr Gamble expressed the opinion that HANDFORD died from a collapse of the nervous system, which was caused from exhaustion. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 22 August 1860, Issue 4923 – Gale Document No. Y3200699739
FATAL ACCIDENT – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn yesterday (Tuesday) morning, before the City Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of an elderly female, named ANN WARREN. The deceased, who was the wife of a bargeman, living at Countess Weir, was fifty-three years of age. Being in a garden at Topsham on the 13th of June last she fell and sustained a severe wound in her shoulder. She was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, notwithstanding the utmost attention paid to her, she gradually became worse, and erysipelas supervening she died on Monday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 29 August 1860, Issue 4924 – Gale Document No. Y3200699780
DEATH OF CHANCELLOR MARTIN. The sad intelligence of the death of the REV. CHANCELLOR MARTIN, on Monday night, caused a most painful sensation in this city, and the hearts of many are deeply sorrowful for the great loss which the Church and society have sustained. The deceased was 69 years of age; he was made a canon of the Cathedral in 1816, and chancellor of the Diocese in 1820. He was also vicar of Harberton, Judge of the Exeter Consistorial Court, and he took an active part in the proceedings of the Lower House of Convocation, where his abilities and sound judgment were highly appreciated. He was a kind and zealous parish priest, an able preacher, a conscientious churchman, and a good and useful member of society. He has left eight children, by his former and present wife, to mourn his irreparable loss, besides a large circle of deeply-attached friends. The melancholy circumstances connected with the death of the deceased are detailed in the following evidence adduced at an Inquest held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., yesterday, at Harberton. The first witness called was, MRS RENIRA HENRIETTA ALDEBURGH MARTIN, who said – The deceased was my husband; lately he has not been so strong, but his general health has not been bad during the last three weeks; he has been very nervous; I remarked it seriously about that time ago; he said he felt himself much overdone by business. He was Rector of this parish, Chancellor of this diocese, Canon of Exeter Cathedral, and was much engaged in ecclesiastical duties. On Friday there was a parish meeting, about which he was very much disturbed. Mr Kellock, solicitor, attended that meeting. On Sunday last, deceased preached in the morning, read the prayers in the afternoon, and baptized a child. He came home in the evening, and was very low; he retired to rest about half-past ten; he did not disturb me during the night; he had not slept well for many nights, nor did he do so on Sunday night. On Monday morning he got up about eight o'clock. When he awoke he said he had a spasm through his heart; he partially dressed himself, and then shaved and put on his boots. I was in and out of his dressing-room every minute, and was very much frightened because he seemed so much unlike himself. I was in the same room with him, but separated from him by a partition, and I got close to the doorway; I heard a noise, and was satisfied he was dressing; but suddenly he stopped, and I heard a violent pouring of something gurgling; I ran into the room, and found him kneeling with his arms over the foot pan, and I saw he had cut his throat on both sides; he was not quite dead; I poured brandy down his throat, and sent for Mr Owen, who arrived from Totnes in about forty minutes; he came while MR MARTIN was still living, but gave no hopes of his recovery; I should think he lived about twenty minutes after Mr Owen came; that was about an hour after he cut his throat, but I cannot say exactly. Samuel Varder, the butler, deposed finding the deceased in the position described by MRS MARTIN. When that lady gave the alarm, he adopted prompt measures for stopping the blood, previous to the arrival of the doctor. In answer to Mr Paige, a Juryman, the witness said he had heard the deceased was distressed about his circumstances. Grace Ellis said: I am housemaid in this establishment. On Monday morning last, I went into my master's dressing-room, and found he had cut his throat, and afterwards on emptying the foot-pan, I found the razor. I believe that was the instrument with which he cut his throat. T. C. Kellock, Esq.,: I am a solicitor in Totnes. I knew the deceased intimately, and for some time resided in his parish. I have been in the habit of seeing the deceased very frequently, and he has been in the habit of speaking to me about parochial matters connected with the church of the parish. I had something to do with the charities for some time – in the first place as parishioner, and afterwards as solicitor, and what I undertook to do was directed by an order of the Court of Chancery, which I received from my London agent last Friday morning. The matter which so disturbed the deceased was that, a special return of the charities having been asked for by the Charity Commissioners, a mistake occurred in the account sent up, the sum of 8s. 2 ½d. being stated as expended, instead of carried forward. He showed me a long letter which he purposed sending to the Charity Commissioners to explain to them that he had no motive in signing the document in which the mistake occurred. He was so miserable about it that I was satisfied he did not exhibit his usual strength of mind as I had previously known him to do. At my earnest solicitation, and that of MRS MARTIN'S, he left out those sentences which related to his motives. I said to him, "Do, sir, dispel every idea of this kind from your mind," and he said, "Oh, sir, I have signed the document; I should have been more careful, as now I shall be disgraced." About the same time he came to me respecting another matter. There had been a certain division in the parish; the parish church having been built in Harbertonford, and he had conveyed the incumbency to Rockford, as the site for the new incumbent, Mr Luscombe. Since then he said to me that he did not think it was right to convey an old house to the incumbent, and he would therefore convey it free from dilapidation and give £200 for the purpose. But it was considered by the surveyor, who was called, that a much larger sum should be laid out. It was necessary to obtain the sum of money on mortgage, and the papers for it were drawn up, and I went with the deceased to Exeter, when the Dean and Chapter approved of the documents, and I was appointed the nominee to receive the money by the Bishop, the Dean and Chapter, the deceased, and the incumbent. At every interview since that time the deceased pressed me to take the £200 that he was going to give in addition to the £400. He said he wished to get it out of hand. Last week he rushed into my office in a very excited manner, and not at all like himself, and wished me to take a cheque for the money. The alteration in him, in matters of business, was very striking, and at last he rushed away from me, saying he should be too late for the train, and then hurried off. Last Wednesday I again called, and had a long conversation with him about the 8s. 2 ½d. and the charities. He again said he should be disgraced, and that he had received no answer to the letter which he had sent to the Charity Commissioners. He then went on to speak about the contract for Rockford, and aid he did not like the way in which it was being carried on, for he should be drawn into great expenses. He then spoke of the parish meeting respecting the re-seating of the church and a large seat for the parishioners. I left him, promising to see him again; I did not see him on Thursday, but on Friday I came here and brought the Order in Chancery with me, thinking it would be a solace for him to know that all we had been trying to do had been approved of by the Court of Chancery; but, to my surprise, he did not ask to look at it. MRS MARTIN was with him, and his mind was so absent that all who were present on the occasion asked him to give up the idea of visiting the church, and I asked him not to go to the meeting, and nothing was done at it, because only the two churchwardens attended, and I returned and remained with him in his room until about ten o'clock in the evening. He kept returning to the same question, and was very uneasy in his mind. I saw him next on Sunday afternoon when I rode over to Harberton Church. I saw him for a minute just before the commencement of the service, and he shook hands with me, and said in an anxious manner, "I shall see you after the sermon." When he came back, MRS MARTIN and myself asked him if he would go for a walk, then he said with an air of indifference, "Just as Mr Kellock likes." He kept his hand on his shoulder, and then took off his gown, which he threw into a chair. I saw there was a great alteration in him. I went into his study, and as soon as I got there he began to talk about money matters. He said he was not satisfied about the £200, and asked if a cheque drawn on a Sunday would be good? I said that if it would be any comfort to him I would take the money, and then had it. He asked for it back again, and I understood him to say he would call on me and bring it. He then began to discuss money matters generally, and he did so in a very incoherent manner, and said you know that a man with my establishment could not have a large balance at his bankers to put his hands on. I said he would not want it, and that the £400 raised on mortgage and the £200 he was to give, would be more than ample for the required outlay, and would leave a balance to hand over to Mr Luscombe. He said he would give up the living, and go away into some place where he would not be known, and then went back to the subject of 8s. 2 ½d. He was so excited that I left him, but after a few minutes I saw him through a window, with his brown knitted, and his hands clenched, and he looked so wretched and uncomfortable, that I went in and asked him to go for a walk or come into the garden, and I said what a blessing it would be if the weather would hold up and we had a fine harvest, but I got no answer. He went into the garden and paced up and down, and began to tell me that his expenses were too much, and they must be reduced – his carriages put down, and the horses sold, and so on – and I then tried to divert his mind. He said he had been elected president of the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and ought to be in Exeter on Tuesday at the anniversary sermon, and he thought he would write a note and put it off, but he allowed the post time to go by. He told me of many other engagements, and said figures worried him, and he would give up the agency of the Savings' Bank, and would not go to Convocation; and immediately afterwards added, that he would give up the living the canonship and the Chancellorship. He was very much excited, and had been in a low, dejected and desponding way. I met Mr Owen, the medical attendant of the family, on Thursday, and hinted my suspicions as to the condition of the deceased's mind. Thomas Edward Owen, surgeon, of Totnes, the last witness called, said that he was sent for to attend the deceased on Monday morning, and on arriving found that his throat was cut. He was then breathing, but pulseless. Witness applied lint to the wound, but deceased died about twenty minutes afterwards. The cause of death was haemorrhage from the bleeding of the wound. Here the Coroner was interrupted by the Jury, who said, they did not require any more evidence. The CORONER addressed the Jury, and after a short consultation, they found that the "Deceased destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary insanity."

Wednesday 29 August 1860, Issue 4924 – Gale Document No. Y3200699795
BIDEFORD – The Recent Gun Accident. – The gun accident which occurred four or five weeks since terminated fatally on Monday. JOHN HAWKESLEY, a joiner, of Bideford, went out in the morning with his gun; it rained in the interval, and to prevent the lock from getting wet he put the butt-end under his coat on the left side; whilst walking the gun exploded, and the contents entered his right foot – shattering his toes. Mr T. L. Pridham held an Inquest on the body on Tuesday morning, and a verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

Wednesday 29 August 1860, Issue 4924 – Gale Document No. Y3200699791
Singular Conduct Of A Married Woman. – On Thursday last Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at Berrynarbor, upon the body of an infant – the child of ALICE LEONARD, wife of WILLIAM LEONARD. On the preceding Tuesday the mother of the child seems to have gone to the house of one Jane Hicks, whom she asked to take some poultry to Ilfracombe, alleging that she was from illness unable to go there herself. Hicks took the poultry, and on her return in the night she found ALICE LEONARD in her bedroom very ill: she then stated that she was enceinte, and Hicks stepped over for LEONARD'S mother – Jane Willis. The mother was told of her daughter's illness; but she would not visit her because her daughter had denied being pregnant. On Hicks's return she found the child had been born in the interval, but it was dead. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, made a post mortem examination of the infant; and he gave evidence to the effect that the child was stillborn – there were no external marks of violence, and the lungs had not been fully distended. Verdict Accordingly.

SOUTHMOLTON – Fatal Accident. – On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Town-hall, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MISS SARAH, who died from the effects of an accident which occurred five weeks since, and which we reported at the time. From the evidence of William Norton, who is employed at the George Hotel, it appeared that he was engaged to drive the deceased to the Newnham Station. In passing a waggon and a cart the vehicle came in contact with one of these, and the result was that the deceased was thrown out upon the road, and sustained severe injuries. She lingered for some time, and ultimately died of lock-jaw. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 September 1860, Issue 4925 – Gale Document No. Y3200699811
FATAL ACCIDENT – An Accident, which resulted fatally, occurred on the South Devon Railway last Wednesday,. It appears that a man named JAMES DICKEN, in the employ of Mr Carpenter, contractor for doubling the line between Exeter and Exminster, after taking his dinner, sat on the wall of the bridge near the station and fell asleep, when the express train came up, and caught him, smashing his leg and thigh to atoms, and fearfully mutilating his body He was immediately removed to the King's Arms Inn, St. Thomas, but life was quite extinct. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 12 September 1860, Issue 4926 – Gale Document No. Y3200699843
TORRINGTON – Melancholy Death From Drowning. – MR HENRY GRANT DURKE, builder, of Torrington, and a party of friends, went on an excursion trip to Northam Burrows on Monday. Some of the party bathed; and whilst in the water MR DURKE seems to have been seized with violent cramp by which he became completely powerless. The water was only breast-deep, and he was soon taken out; but ere the arrival of a medical man from Bideford, MR DURKE had ceased to live. Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at Northam on Tuesday upon the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Drowning." The deceased was thirty-five years of age.

NORTHTAWTON – Caution to Mothers. – Mr H. A Vallack held an Inquest at Northtawton, on Wednesday last, upon the body of JOHN, the infant son of THOMAS DEMENISH, a cordwainer. On the preceding Monday the mother seems to have given the child some white precipitate instead of magnesia. The mistake was soon discovered; but Dr Budd's efforts to counteract the poison were unavailing. Verdict, "Excusable Homicide."

Wednesday 19 September 1860, Issue 4927 – Gale Document No. Y3200699872
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on Friday, on the body of JOHN CREEDY, aged 30, who was in the employ of Mr Taylor, the contractor on the Exeter and Yeovil line, as engine-cleaner. On the evening of Wednesday last he went to the station-yard at Axminster for the purpose of cleaning and taking charge of the engine Sultan for the night. On his arriving there the engine was being used for the purpose of shunting some trucks of gravel from one line to another. The poor fellow, who stood between the two lines of rail. was caught by a rope which was attached to the engine on one line and the trucks on another, and was dragged towards the trucks, when the buffer caught him and knocked him down, the first truck passing over his left leg, and completely smashing it. In his agony he struggled, and in so doing threw his right leg on the line, when the second truck passed over it, and fearfully mutilated it also. Two medical gentlemen were soon on the spot, and on consultation it was deemed advisable to send him to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Whilst there he was quite conscious, requesting William Bray, a policeman on the Exeter and Yeovil line, to fetch his wife, who resided at Pinhoe, which was done, but before she arrived he had expired. Mr Rendle, the house-surgeon, stated that when brought to the hospital he found both legs were fearfully smashed, and the man in a dying state. The usual restoratives were applied, and surgeons sent for. A consultation was immediately held, but it was not considered advisable that amputation should be resorted to. The poor fellow died about ten o'clock from the injuries he had received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased has left a wife and two children.

Wednesday 26 September 1860, Issue 4928 – Gale Document No. Y3200699902
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held last Thursday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, south-street, on the body of JOHN HENRY HOOKWAY, who met his death under the following circumstances. The deceased, a married man, thirty-one years of age, was a plumber, in the employ of Mr Downe, South-street. He was at work on the previous day at the back of the Devon and Exeter Institution, and while going from the ladder to the roof, or the roof to the ladder, he slipped his foot and fell on the pavement below, a distance of twenty-three feet. A man named Skinner, a gardener in the employ of Archdeacon Bartholomew, saw from the subdeanery garden the deceased falling with his head towards the ground, and Miss Squance, who was in her bedroom, heard something fall as if thrown from the roof, and almost immediately a dull sound as if produced by the fall of a body. Hearing a groan she gave an alarm, and by the aid of several parties the deceased was carried to the Hospital, when every assistance possible was rendered, but the unfortunate man expired about ten o'clock the same night. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The deceased is the son of MR HOOKWAY who recently died on St David's-hill from eating fish said to have been in a semi-putrid state.

Wednesday 3 October 1860, Issue 4929 – Gale Document No. Y3200699956
BARNSTAPLE – Death From Burning. – MRS JOHANNA RENNELS, who occupied one of the Salem Almshouses, was burnt to death on Wednesday morning. It is thought that the unfortunate woman was seized with giddiness while lighting the fire: her clothes were nearly all burnt to a cinder, and her body was very much scorched. Mrs Grace Taylor, who lives in another of the almshouses, smelt something burning; and on going into MRS RENNELS' house she found the deceased lying on the floor – her head resting on the grate. Mr Gamble was soon in attendance; but though the body was then warm, the poor old lady was quite dead. Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest in the afternoon, at the Barnstaple Inn, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased, who was seventy-six years of age, was the widow of MR RENNELS, the late paymaster of the North Devon Militia. MRS RENNELS was sister-in-law of Mr Vandenhoff, the celebrated tragedian.

Wednesday 17 October 1860, Issue 4931 – Gale Document No. Y3200700023
BURNT TO DEATH – On Thursday last Mr Bremridge held an Inquest upon the body of THOMAS DOWDLE, son of WILLIAM DOWDLE, of Swimbridge. The deceased was one year and eight months old, and the child seems to have been left with three other children on the preceding Tuesday. In the evening they were sitting around the fire, and the deceased's clothes ignited; he was dreadfully burnt, and died about nine hours afterwards. Verdict – "Accidentally burnt to Death."

Wednesday 24 October 1860, Issue 4932 – Gale Document No. Y3200700055
BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – THOMAS POPHAM, a labourer, of Green-lane, died suddenly on Saturday night. The deceased appears to have been labouring from a bronchial complaint. Mr cook, surgeon, attended him on Saturday morning; and finding his means limited, Mr Cook procured him some parochial relief. POPHAM partook of veal in the evening for his supper and went to bed; but in a short time he became very ill, and ere the arrival of the medical man he died. Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest upon the body, at the Bear Inn, on Monday, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from Natural Causes. POPHAM was forty-two years old.

Wednesday 7 November 1860, Issue 4934 – Gale Document No. Y3200700074
EXETER – Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, at Taylor's Acland Arms Inn, St Sidwell's, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN HILL, a young man, twenty-six years of age. The deceased was the son of WILLIAM HILL, coachman at Miss Cudlip's, on Pennsylvania; and resided with him at 2, Poltimore-place. He was in the employ of Mr P. Collings, jun., Black Horse Inn; but during the last two months he had been prevented from working by a bad foot. On Sunday evening deceased drank tea with his parents, and about seven o'clock he left the house, saying he should return shortly. He never returned. After leaving home he appears to have gone to the Horse and Groom Inn, Longbrook-street, where he drank about a pint of beer, and remained until nearly eleven o'clock. He did not pay for the beer, but told the landlord, who knew him well, that he would pay for it in the morning. When he left he was quite sober. About half-past eight on Monday morning, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Smith, on going to work in a field behind St Sidwell's Church, found the deceased hanging from the branch of a tree by a piece of packing cord. Assistance was obtained and he was taken down, but was found to be quite cold and stiff; having evidently been dead for some hours. The poor fellow has been very depressed of late in consequence of having been unable to earn anything for his livelihood; and the Jury believing this had affected his mind, returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 7 November 1860, Issue 4934 – Gale Document No. Y3200700088
BARNSTAPLE – Death From Drinking. – On Saturday last Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at the Rolle Quay Inn, Pilton, upon the body of JAMES HARRIS, an elderly man. The deceased kept the Braunton Turnpike Gate, and on the preceding afternoon he left home. He told his wife he was going to the letting of the tolls at the Barnstaple Guildhall In the evening he was seen rambling about the High-street; and one Sarah Jane Perkin and a lad, named Dendle helped him home. He was placed in a chair; and some time afterwards his wife went to bed. At one o'clock she got out and laid her husband on the floor, placing a pillow under his head: at three o'clock she found him dead. Mr C. R. Morgan, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from congestion of the brain, which was accelerated by drinking. Verdict, "Died from Excessive Drinking."

Wednesday 14 November 1860, Issue 4935 – Gale Document No. Y3200700104
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – A boy, seven years of age, named HENRY WOODLEY, of this city, died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Tuesday week last, from scalds received from a saucepan of water, which he had accidentally pulled over him a few days previously. At an Inquest held on the body on Wednesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 14 November 1860, Issue 4935 – Gale Document No. Y3200700125
HONITON – Suicide. – MR WM. BROMFIELD, grocer and bacon-factor, of New-street, Honiton, committed suicide on Saturday morning last. The deceased was a middle-aged single man, and had usually appeared to have good health; but during the past week had been heard to complain of a pain in the head. On Saturday morning he went into some premises at the back of his house, and with a large carving knife cut his throat. An Inquest was held n Monday, by Mr S. Cox, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

A CHILD BURNED TO DEATH. – On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the Three Tuns Inn, Culmstock, before Mr S. Cox, Coroner, on the body of a little girl, named ELLEN SMITH. The deceased was the daughter of a labourer living at Hunter's Hill. On Monday, during a short absence of her mother, she is supposed to have gone too near the fire, and her clothes became ignited. Her screams brought her mother and neighbours to the spot, and the poor child's clothes were stripped off. Medical assistance was soon obtained, but she was so severely burnt that she died two days afterwards. A verdict in accordance with the above facts was returned.

Wednesday 21 November 1860, Issue 4936 – Gale Document No. Y3200700153
INQUESTS – On Wednesday last an accident occurred to GEORGE BIDGOOD, which terminated fatally. It appeared that the deceased, who was seventy-six years of age, was a mason, but being unable to do but little at his advanced age he lived and boarded with Mr Robert Tremlett, a small farmer at Kenton. On the morning of Wednesday last he went to Powderham to put in a stove for Mr Pitts. On his return about nine o'clock that evening he was attempting to cross a style when he missed his footing and fell backwards. This occurred near Mr Tremlett's house, and the farmer was attracted to the spot by the deceased's cries. He found him lying against a hedge unable to move. He took him into his house and the following morning deceased was, by his request, conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where Mr C. Rendle, the house-surgeon, found he had sustained severe injuries in the back and neck. Paralysis ensued and he died on the afternoon of Saturday, about two o'clock. Mr H. D. Barton, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday, where the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

An Inquest was held at the Blue Boar Inn, Magdalen-street, on Monday afternoon, before the Deputy Coroner, on the body of a little boy, named WILLIAM BENJAMIN DARBY. the deceased was about five years of age, and was the son of a paper-hanger residing in Mary Arches-street. The deceased had three sisters with whom about half-past five o'clock on the evening of Friday last he went, as customary, to the Ragged school in Preston-street. The mother left her house to go to an elder daughter's in Summerland-street, during the time the children were at school. The children returned before the mother and lighted the fire. the elder ones left the room for a short time, and in the interval the clothes of the poor little fellow caught fire. Seeing a flame, a woman named Knight, who resides in the same house, ran into the room where the boy was and found him standing by a bed enveloped in flames. She instantly tore off his frock, and in answer to her question as to how it happened he said that a coal had fallen from the grate, caught a piece of paper and the latter had set his frock on fire. He immediately afterwards became insensible and was conveyed to the Hospital, where he expired on Saturday evening. Great blame was attached by the Jury to the father, who earns good wages but spends it in drink. From this cause the mother is necessitated to go out to work to the neglect of her family, in order to get the necessary support for them. Mr Rendle having stated that death resulted from the burns, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 21 November 1860, Issue 4936 – Gale Document No. Y3200700172
DEATH FROM DRINKING. – On Friday last, Mr Bremridge held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, at Hartland upon the body of CHARLES PROWSE. The deceased had been employed with others by the Coast Guard to protect the wreck of the barque (Frederick the Second), under the Milford Cliff. PROWSE was employed by day only: but he seems to have sent word to his wife that he was not coming home on Wednesday night. Early the next morning he was found lying on his back upon the cliff quite dead. It was the opinion of Mr R. G. Thomas, surgeon, that the deceased had been drinking ardent spirits, and from his being at the time much fatigued the action of the cold upon the system led to congestion of the brain from which he died. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 28 November 1860, Issue 4937 – Gale Document No. Y3200700191
EXETER – Death From Burning. – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, yesterday (Tuesday) before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of a little girl, named JANE BABBAGE, eight years of age. The deceased lived with a woman named Cairn, who had care of her, and who resides in Coombe-street. On Monday morning Mrs Cairn lighted her fire. The child shortly afterwards came down in her night dress and seated herself in front of the fire to put on her shoes and stockings. During the absence of Mrs Cairn, the child's night dress caught fire and she was so severely burnt that she died the same evening, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, whither she was removed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

CONCEALING BIRTH – ELIZABETH BLIGHT, for some months in the service of Mr John Luxton, of Specott Farm, Merton, gave birth to a child on Sunday morning, and subsequently buried it. Appearances led to suspicion, and when questioned the girl admitted the fact. At the Inquest medical evidence went to show that the child was stillborn, and a verdict to that effect was returned. BLIGHT will be committed for concealment of birth.

Wednesday 28 November 1860, Issue 4937 – Gale Document No. Y3200700210
HONITON – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, before the Coroner of the district, Mr Cox, on the body of a young woman, named BETSY HAVILAND, twenty-three years of age. The deceased lived with Mr R. Bishop, of Chilcombe Farm, Northleigh. On a post mortem examination of the body, made by Dr Jerrard, it was ascertained that death had resulted from disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God.

Wednesday 5 December 1860, Issue 4938 – Gale Document No. Y3200700238
FATAL ACCIDENT - An Accident occurred to a man, named JAMES POPE, on the 5th of November, which has terminated fatally. POPE, who was forty-five years of age, was a waggoner in the employ of Mr William Tuckett, of West Raddon Farm, Shobrook. On Monday, the 5th November, he was engaged in driving a waggon and two horses laden with salt up Park-hill, near Shobrook Park, when a young man fired a gun at a bird near the turnpike-road. The horses took fright and galloped off, knocking down the deceased, who was walking by the side of them, and the wheels passed over his right leg causing a compound fracture. A lad, named Gribble, shortly afterwards found him lying in the road, and having obtained assistance the poor man was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, notwithstanding the care paid him, he expired on Saturday from the injuries received. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Coroner's Jury at an Inquest held on the body on Monday last, at the Blue Boar Inn.

MELANCHOLY SUICIDE – An Inquest was held at the Axminster Inn, Paris-street, on Monday evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an elderly man, named GEORGE POMEROY, sixty-six years of age, who had committed suicide that morning by hanging himself. The deceased was a fish-vendor, and has for many years carried on business in the Higher Market. He was a widower, and resided, with his youngest daughter, in Paris-street. He appears to have been in a dejected state for some weeks past: it is supposed from having a son dangerously ill at the Hospital, from pecuniary affairs, and other family troubles. He spent Sunday evening with his daughter and daughter-in-law at his house, and retired to bed about half-past eight o'clock: when the servant went to his bedroom on Monday morning to call him she found him hanging to the bedpost with a small cord; but his feet were touching the ground. He was warm at the time, but on assistance being obtained, and being cut down, he was found to be quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

BIDEFORD – Death From Burning. – Some three weeks since EMMA FRIENDSHIP, a girl nine years old, caught her clothes on fire. The injuries led to her death on Thursday last. Mr T. L. Pridham held an Inquest upon the body on Saturday, at the Torridge Inn, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Wednesday 12 December 1860, Issue 4939 – Gale Document No. Y3200700271
FATAL ACCIDENT – An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Thursday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man, fifty-six years of age, named THOMAS FORD. the deceased was a waggoner in the employ of Mr Wippell, of Brenton Farm, Exminster. On the 21st of November he was riding on the shaft of his waggon, when he was thrown off and received a compound fracture of the leg, from the effects of which he died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Wednesday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Another Dressing Suicide. – Another suicide was committed to swell the previously large number that we have recently had to record in this city. On Sunday morning a man, named JOHN COLLINGS, about thirty years of age, drowned himself in the Exeter Basin. About two years since the deceased held a responsible situation at the office of Messrs. Geare, Mountford, and Geare, solicitors, and some time previous to that was honorary secretary to the Ragged Schools. When he was discharged from Messrs. Geare's he went to London, where he remained until about five months since. He was a married man and had two children; and some time before he left London, his wife, with the children went to her father's, Mr Pearce, at Exeter. On deceased's return from London he obtained a temporary situation in Cornwall, where he remained about one month. He came back to Exeter, where his wife and family were still living with Mr Pearce, but he was prohibited from visiting them. After some time deceased obtained a situation at Mr Huggins's, solicitor, Paul-street; and recently joined the Volunteer Artillery. Six weeks ago he had a seizure in his hand, which caused him to go to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and there he remained until Thursday last, when he left. His conduct both prior to going to the Hospital and afterwards, was very eccentric, and being denied access to his wife and family appears to have preyed on his mind. Doubts of his sanity existed in the mind of his sister, who about a week after he had been in the Hospital consulted with his (deceased's) wife about having him taken to an Asylum, or to some place where he could be looked after. Mrs Thomas (COLLINGS' sister), who resides in St Sidwell's, attempted to prevail on her brother to remain in the Hospital; but he said he must leave "for the sake of his family." When he left that institution on Thursday, he went to his sister's, where he conducted himself very strangely by refusing to answer questions, or to take nourishment. For three nights he slept at the house of Mrs Thomas, whose son married deceased's sister. Between eight and nine o'clock on Sunday morning as two men, named Baker and Lee, were walking down the road leading to the Exeter Basin they discovered a man's clothes near the weigh bridge. They immediately gave information at the gas-house and Leonard Garry and some other men procured grappling irons, and after dragging the river for some time Garry brought the body of COLLINGS to the surface He had on a shirt and one sock. He was removed to Hellier's Bullers Arms Inn, St. Thomas, where an Inquest was held on the body on Monday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., the Coroner for the district. All the witnesses examined stated their belief, that the deceased was not of sound mind, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Wednesday 12 December 1860, Issue 4939 – Gale Document No. Y3200700290
MELANCHOLY DEATH - On Tuesday evening week Mr J. H. Toller held an Inquest upon the body of MR EDMUND FISHLEY, a farmer of Fremington, aged fifty-four. It seems that whilst crossing a stream that runs through the farm the pole broke and the unfortunate man was thrown into the water. It is supposed that his head came in contact with some hard substance, and, being stunned, he could not extricate himself. He was found with his head and shoulders covered with water. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

BARNSTAPLE – Sudden Death. – AGNES GAYTON, a nurse, living at Newport, died suddenly on Thursday morning. The deceased was taken ill whilst in the back premises, and although medical attendance was speedy upon the discovery of her illness she had died before assistance could be rendered. The deceased was sixty-seven years of age: she had suffered from asthma, but appeared in her usual state of health up to a few minutes previous to her death. The medical testimony ascribed the death to disease of the heart; and an Inquest being held on Friday by Mr Incledon Bencraft, at the Rising Sun Inn, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes.

WOODBURY – Fatal Accident. – Last Wednesday a dreadful accident occurred to a little boy, nine years of age, named MARTIN DUNCAN. The boy was the son of a labourer, in the employ of Messrs. Ware, tanners, and was assisting his father at the bark mills, when by some means the lower part of his clothes became entangled in the machinery, and before the poor little fellow could be extricated he was terribly lacerated. Mr Pratt, Dr Brent's assistant, was immediately called in, and the doctor himself arrived shortly afterwards; but they could do nothing more than administer opiates to sooth the pain, as it was impossible to save the lad's life. The little fellow bore his sufferings very bravely, only asking to see his mother, who was at Topsham. She was accordingly fetched, and the poor child died in her arms, about eight o'clock the same evening. An Inquest was held on the body on Friday by S. M. Cox, Esq., when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Wednesday 26 December 1860, Issue 4941 – Gale Document No. Y3200700344
EXETER – Inquests. – An Inquest was held at the Black Horse Inn, Longbrook-street, on Wednesday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an old man, named WEILLIAM BENDING. The deceased, who was seventy-seven years of age, was a brewer, and resided in one of Attwell's Almhouses, New North-road. He was walking down Longbrook-street the previous evening, when he suddenly staggered, fell, and almost immediately expired. The Jury returned a verdict of died by the "Visitation of God."

Two Inquests took place on Monday afternoon. The first was held at the Lord Nelson Inn, Spiller-street, on the body of JESSIE CANN, aged about six weeks. The deceased was the daughter of a labourer residing in Russel-street. From her birth she had suffered from the "snuffles;" and on Sunday night she slept with her mother. At four o'clock the next morning the child was found dead in her mother's arms. Mr Perkins, surgeon, having examined the body, stated that death had resulted from suffocation, accelerated by the "snuffles." The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

The second inquest was held at the Exeter Workhouse, on the body of the illegitimate female child of BESSIE TAYLOR. The mother was admitted to the workhouse on Thursday afternoon last, and the same night was confined. The mother and child progressed favourably up to ten o'clock on Sunday night. Some hours afterwards, the mother called Mrs Salter, the nurse, and when the latter came into the room the child was dead and the mother appeared greatly distressed. Mr Warren, surgeon,

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