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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1866-1870

Articles taken from Trewman's Exeter Flying Post

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: - Adams(3); Aggett; Allen(2); Allman; Ansley; Avery; Babb; Babbage; Badcock; Baker(2); Ball; Barne; Bartlett; Barrett; Basten; Bastin; Bates; Bedford; Beer; Bellamy; Belvin; Bennett(2); Berry(2); Best; Bickley; Bidwill; Bird(2); Bishop(2); Blackmore; Boden; Bourne; Bowden; Braddon; Bradford; Brewer; Brice; Bromhead; Brookland; Brooks; Brown; Browning; Brutton; Buffett; Bulley; Burnett(2); Burridge; Burrow; Burrows; Cann(3); Carter; Chambers; Chapple(2); Chubb; Clampett; Clapp; Clarke(2); Clemens; Coleman; Coles; Collins; Connett; Conram; Cook; Cotton; Cottey; Crook; Cross; Cruwys; Davenport; Davey(2); Davidge; Davis; Down; Downham; Drane; Draper; Durham; Durnford; Dyer; Dymant; Dymond; Eales; Easterbrook; Edwards(2); Ellicott(2); Elliot; Elliott(2); Elms; Elston; Emery; Endacott; England; Evans(2); Ewens; Facey; Fear; Ferris; Fey; Fishley; Fortescue; Fowler(2); French; Frome; Gee; Gepson(2); Gibbings; Gill; Gillam; Godbeer; Gosling; Gould; Graham; Greenway; Gribble; Hamlyn; Hancock; Hannaford(2); Harding; Harington; Harris; Hart; Hartland; Harvey; Havill; Haydon; Hellins; Henley; Hern; Hexter; Hoare(3); Hodder; Hodge; Holdsworthy; Holloway; Holman; Holmes; Holwill; Honeywill; Horn; Horwill; Howard; Hurford; Ireland; Jackson; Jago; Jerred; Johns(3); Jones(2); Kellow; Kerslake; Kirkwood; Lake(2); Lamble; Lang(2); Langworthy; Lawday; Lee(2); Legg; Lethaby(2); Lewis(2); Ley(2); Loram; Lovell; Luscombe; Lyne; Macnamara; Maddian; Mann; Marlow; Marsh; Martin(2); Matthews; Maunder; Mays; Meade; Melhuish; Michelmore; Milford(2); Miller; Mills; Milton; Mogford; Molland; Morris; Morrish; Murch; Nicholls; Norman; Norrish; Northey; Nosworthy; Olding; Orchard(2); Paddon; Palfrey; Parish; Parkhouse; Parsons(2); Partridge; Passmore; Pedrick; Perrin; Perring; Phillips(2); Pike; Pitts; Prickman; Prout; Pulman; Putt; Quicke; Rattenbury; Reddaway; Reed(2); Richards(3); Robertson; Ronchetti; Routley(2); Rowe(2); Salmon; Salter; Sampson; Sanders; Sandford(2); Sansom; Sansum; Sarah; Satterley; Scotford; Scott; Shapley; Sherrard; Shillabeer; Shilson; Simmons; Smale(2); Small(2); Smith(3); Speare; Sprake; Stalway; Stamp; Stanbury; Standlake; Steer; Stentiford; Stevens; Stoodly; Stookes; Summerville; Sweetland; Tancock(2); Tapson; Taylor; Thomas(2); Thorn; Thorne; Tinkham; Tree; Trickey; Tucker(4); Vanstone; Vickary; Wadham; Walkey; Wall; Ware; Webber(4); Wescomb; Westcott; Western(2); White(3); Willcott; Williams; Wills; Windsor; Winsor; Wolland; Wood; Woodrow; Woolacott; Woolard; Wrey; Wright; Youlden;

Wednesday 3 January 1866, Issue 5197 – Gale Document No. Y3200707937
TIVERTON – Mr Coroner Mackenzie held an Inquest on Wednesday upon the body of CHARLOTTE STEER, aged forty-two. The deceased seems to have kept Christmas too merrily – she got intoxicated and fell against her door; she was assisted into her room, and the next morning was there found dead. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Wednesday 3 January 1866, Issue 5197 – Gale Document No. Y3200707923
An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon at the Round Tree Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of a man who could not be identified, but supposed to be that of JOHN MARTIN, a drover, about fifty years of age, of Bratton Clovelly, and appeared to have been in a very destitute condition. S. Buckingham, a moulder, residing in Exe Island, said his attention was called by some children on Saturday afternoon to the fact of a man lying on the floor in the public closet under the Exe Island arch. He went to him and found him with one arm on the seat and his body on the floor downwards. He spoke to him but could get no reply. He then left thinking he was drunk. He was soon afterwards discovered to be dead and taken to the Round Tree Inn. Mr Perkins, surgeon, said he examined the body and found no external marks of bruises. The right ankle was a little dropsical, and the body presented a flaccid appearance, and in his opinion he died from disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from disease of the heart."

EXETER – On Wednesday an Inquest was held at the Fireman's Arms Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of PHILIP HOLMES, a single man, aged sixty-one. HANNAH COOMBES, sister to the deceased, residing in Broadstones, in the parish of St. Mary Major, said she heard something fall heavily in her brother's room on Sunday, 24th December. She went to the room and found her brother lying on the floor and a man named Perkins on the top of him. On her asking what they were quarrelling about Perkins said it was about the price of a coat which HOLMES was making for him. She saw her brother's eye was bruised and his face much swollen. Perkins was ordered out of the house, and deceased, who complained of something in the chest, was put to bed. He had been in his usual good health previously. On the 26th she thought he was dying, and a doctor was sent for, but he died before his arrival. Dr Marchant said he examined the body of deceased and found an abrasion over the right eye, a bruise on the left leg, and several small abrasions on the right leg. He could not speak positively as to the cause of death; but he considered, from the evidence and from what he had seen, that deceased died from disease of the heart. He could not say that the deceased was suffering from heart disease, or, whether his death was accelerated by the quarrel. The Enquiry was then adjourned until Saturday, and a post mortem examination ordered. When it was resumed on Saturday morning Mr Floud attended on behalf of Perkins. Dr Marchant then said that, assisted by Mr Clapp, he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found the heart very much diseased and the lungs congested. In his opinion death was caused by disease of the heart. He did not consider that death was accelerated by the blows. The state of the heart was such that he might have died at any moment. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the Doctor's evidence.

Wednesday 10 January 1866, Issue 5198 – Gale Document No. Y3200707959
DARTMOOR – The danger of crossing Dartmoor by by-paths in order to effect a saving of distance has been enforced by another death. Mr Coroner Vallack has held an Inquest at the London Inn, Princetown, on the body of RICHARD ALLEN, of Sourton, who left his home to go to Sticklepath, and attempted to cross a portion of Dartmoor in order to save three miles. On the following afternoon Mr John Gard, of Youlditch, guided by the instinct of a sheep dog, found ALLEN in a sitting posture, and with an umbrella under his feet, under a rock near the place called the Island of Rock, on the west of Okement river, whither the unfortunate man had probably gone to shelter himself during the boisterous night, and where he probably died from exposure and fatigue. Deceased was fifty years of age. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

DEVONPORT – Suicide of a Royal Marine. – SERGEANT GEORGE KIRKWOOD, divisional muster clerk of the Plymouth division of the Royal Marines, committed suicide yesterday week. He did not present himself at the office for two or three hours after his customary time, and then he was discovered in his barrack room with his throat cut. The door was locked on the inside, and the unfortunate man had been dead some hours when his body was discovered. His habits were temperate and he was considered "a jolly fellow." He frequently took part in the theatrical performances connected with the Royal Marines, and the night after he committed the rash act upon his own life he was set down to play the character of Cox in the farce of "Box and Cox." He was keeping company with a young woman in the service of Major Gray; but nothing could be gleaned as to the cause of his launching himself into eternity. He had intimated to a comrade that he had received a letter which had sorely perplexed him; but what the letter was about, or who it came from, remains a secret. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 7 February 1866, Issue 5202 – Gale Document No. Y3200708040
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the George and Dragon Inn, Black Boy Road, on the body of COLONEL LAYTON DRAPER, late of the 64th Regt. The deceased resided in the Old Tiverton-road. Disease of the heart was the cause of death, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 7 February 1866, Issue 5202 – Gale Document No. Y3200708049
PAIGNTON – On Saturday WILLIAM BARTLETT, a fisherman, and his son were capsized from their boat in Torbay. Mr Capel, of Torbay House, witnessed the accident, and that gentleman used all diligence in obtaining the assistance of two coastguardsmen and others in rendering aid to the man and boy in the water. They picked up the body of the father; but the boy was not discovered. An Inquest was held on Monday upon the remains of the father, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

BRIXHAM – SAMUEL ROBERTSON, sixteen months old, was scalded to death a few days since. The child pulled a basin of boiling water from a table, and the water fell upon his stomach. The poor little fellow lived nearly forty-eight hours after the occurrence. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE – ELIZABETH PROUT, of Queen-street, a week ago cut her throat with a razor. Soon after the attempt on her life the poor woman was removed to the infirmary, where she died on Friday. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the woman was not in a sound state of mind when she committed the rash act. The deceased was fifty-seven years of age.

TIVERTON – The result of the Coroner's Inquest on the body of MARY ANN COLEMAN, whose husband keeps the Market House Inn, was that death resulted from apoplexy. The deceased, who was forty-seven years old, has been subject to fits. One day she fell and knocked her head severely, and the next day she died.

Wednesday 14 February 1866, Issue 5203 – Gale Document No. Y3200708071
DEVONPORT – Suicide of a Soldier. – SERGEANT FRANCIS ALLMAN, 65th Regiment, has committed suicide in the Raglan Barracks, by shooting himself through his head with a rifle. The deceased was about forty years of age, and had had twenty years' service in the regiment, where he was much respected as a quiet painstaking officer. Some recent promotions in the regiment had caused him dissatisfaction from another person being established in an office, the duties of which the deceased had been previously performing pro tem. for some time. In this frame of mind he had absented himself from the barracks for a day and a night, and on his return he was made a prisoner and confined to his room. It was whilst so confined that he committed the rash act. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 21 February 1866, Issue 5204 – Gale Document No. Y3200708095
COLALTON RALEIGH – Suicide of Father and Son. – MR HENRY MATTHEWS and his son ELLIS have committed suicide. The family have not lived very happily together for some time; and on Friday there was a great altercation between them – particularly with parent and son. The next day the father went and drowned himself in the river Otter. The body was recovered and taken to the farm house; and on Monday the son – who had seen the body of his father – terminated his existence by cutting his throat. An Inquest was held yesterday upon the both bodies, when the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the unfortunate persons committed suicide whilst in an unsound state of mind.

TORQUAY – MINNY CLARKE and her father were a few days since crossing Fleet-street when the child was knocked down by one of the horses in a carriage, and the injuries she then received led to her death a few hours afterwards. the Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death.

Wednesday 28 February 1866, Issue 5205 – Gale Document No. Y3200708107
EXETER – Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Honiton Inn upon the body of ELIZABETH BROWNING, aged 76. The deceased was a widow and lived on parochial relief. On Thursday night she complained of illness, and on Friday evening, a boy taking her milk, found her lying on the bed dead. Mr Warren said the deceased was greatly emaciated, and thought she had died from apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Another Inquest was held at the Fireman's Arms on Monday upon the body of a child, two years old. MRS HARDING, the mother of the deceased, said the child had frequently suffered from convulsions, caused by cutting its teeth, and was so visited on Sunday morning about two o'clock. She called in the aid of a neighbour, and after a warm bath the child was put to bed and apparently slept; but shortly afterwards the mother observed it breathe its last. Mr S. S. Perkins, surgeon, who saw the child some hours after death, was of opinion that the child had died from convulsions. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 7 March 1866, Issue 5206 – Gale Document No. Y3200708133
BUCKFASTLEIGH – HENRY BOURNE and two other men were engaged on Thursday in taking down a wall, which was twelve feet high. They were undermining it when the wall fell upon BOURNE. The poor fellow was killed on the spot. Mr F. Kellock held an Inquest upon the body: Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 21 March 1866, Issue 5208 – Gale Document No. Y3200708169
EXETER – Sudden Death. – An Inquest was held on Thursday at the Phoenix Inn on the body of MR J. WALL, for many years an inspector in the city police, but who had been superannuated on account of his ill health. Deceased was at the Phoenix Inn in his usual health on Wednesday evening when he was suddenly taken ill and expired in a short time. A verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned.

Wednesday 21 March 1866, Issue 5208 – Gale Document No. Y3200708165
TOTNES – ELIZABETH ELMS, widow, has died from injuries caused by catching her clothes on fire. The deceased was eighty-five years old – blind and failing in her faculties. One day she imagined that two children were up the chimney, and on going to the fire place her clothes ignited. She died a few hours afterwards. Mr F. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest upon the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 March 1866, Issue 5209 – Gale Document No. Y3200708194
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Elephant and Castle Inn, Summerland-street, upon the body of ANN BROOKS, aged forty-one. HENRY BROOKS, a cabman, said the deceased was his wife. She at times complained of pains in the bowels. She did not receive medical treatment. On Tuesday last she suffered from the same complaint; but it passed away, and she did her usual work up to Saturday night. On returning home on Saturday night, about ten o'clock, the husband found his wife very ill in bed, attended by a neighbour. He sent for Mr Perkins, who could not come as he was very ill; but sent some medicine, which did not relieve the deceased. Witness afterwards sent for Mr Hunt, who came and saw the deceased. He left to get some medicine, and brought back Mr Perkins with him. Mrs Sarah Gregory said she lived in the same house with the deceased. On Saturday night she heard the deceased groan, went to her, and found her sitting by the bed. Deceased said she had violent pains in her bowels, had seen her mother (who is dead), and that she should die. Witness gave her a little brandy and ginger tea, and remained with her till she died. Mr W. C. Hunt, surgeon, said he went to the deceased on Sunday morning about one a.m. She was in bed, and very cold – in a state of collapse. He applied necessary remedies, and finding that it was a very urgent case, he went for some medicine and called Mr Perkins, who, although he was very unwell, came with him and remained till the woman died – at three a.m. He had never attended the deceased before, and could not say exactly what she was suffering from. He could not state positively what was the cause of death. The Coroner and the Jury thought the evidence very inconclusive, and Mr Hunt, adjourned the Inquiry to make a post mortem examination of the body. The Inquest was resumed last evening, when the Jury returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 28 March 1866, Issue 5209 – Gale Document No. Y3200708205
HALBERTON – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on Saturday at Ascott's Swan Inn upon the body of ISAAC HOLLOWAY. Deceased was a nutseller, and on the preceding day he went to the sale at West Manley Farm. His habits were intemperate and he got tipsy that day. In the evening his body was discovered lying in mud and water near Halberton Court. There was no marks of violence on the body of the deceased and the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Wednesday 4 April 1866, Issue 5210 – Gale Document No. Y3200708220
EXETER – Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Windmill Inn, Holloway-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of MARY ANN AGGETT, about eighteen years of age, a domestic servant in the service of Mr Couch, of No. 9, Friar's-walk. The deceased hung herself with some small cord by means of a crook to the ceiling of the back kitchen. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 4 April 1866, Issue 5210 – Gale Document No. Y3200708233
OTTERY ST. MARY – Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest on Thursday last at Fenny Bridges upon the body of HANNAH WEBBER, who died from injuries received by being thrown out of a Bath chair a short time since. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 11 April 1866, Issue 5211 – Gale Document No. Y3200708250
FATAL ACCIDENT – A sad accident, which has terminated fatally, happened on Thursday evening to MR FREDERICK MURCH, youngest son of MRS MUCH, Broadgate, in this city. The deceased, who was engaged in farming pursuits at Mr Shapland's, Winslade Farm, St. Mary's Clyst, was returning thither on horseback from Exeter, when he was thrown. He fell on his head and sustained severe concussion of the brain. He was taken to Winslade as speedily as possible, but he never recovered consciousness, and died on Friday at mid-day. the deceased was twenty-five years of age. An Inquest was held on the body at Winslade Farm, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Wednesday 18 April 1866, Issue 5212 – Gale Document No. Y3200708284
NEWTON ABBOT – Mr Deputy-Coroner Kellock held an Inquest at the Commercial Hotel on Wednesday upon the body of SAMUEL MEADE, who died on the preceding Monday from the injuries he received through the falling of a ladder while he was engaged in colouring the front of a house. Verdict, Accidental Death. "It is singular (says the Exeter Gazette) that the deceased's wife in June, 1863, summoned a man named Calendar, known as the 'white witch,' before the Newton magistrates for threatening to murder her, when she stated in her evidence that she had given the defendant 7s. 6d. and three chairs to have her fortune told. He told her that her husband would die from an accident, and that she would take little notice of the sad event, and that shortly afterwards she would marry again under more favourable circumstances."

TIVERTON – Mr Coroner Mackenzie held an Inquest on Thursday upon the body of a girl named GILL. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Rendell, shoemaker, and on the 8th of March she caught her apron on fire and was severely burnt. She was removed to the Tiverton Union, where she died on Wednesday. Verdict – Accidental Death.

PAIGNTON – A most distressing accident happened at Paignton on Monday evening week. A man named WILLIAM TINKHAM, in the employ of Mr Blackaller, of Soventor, Berry Pomeroy, was sent to Paignton with a horse and cart, and whilst stopping at Mr Evans's, saddler, to get his bridle repaired, took it off and was in the act of putting on another, when the horse, which was a young one, took fright on seeing its load of a few bundles of straw), and darting off at a rapid pace knocked the poor fellow down and killed him on the spot by the wheel passing over his head. The horse proceeded towards Goodrington without any further injury. The animal was ultimately stopped and taken back to Paignton. The Coroner's Inquest was held the next day upon the body of TINKHAM, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Wednesday 25 April 1866, Issue 5213 – Gale Document No. Y3200708294
CHERITON FITZPAINE – JOHN BROOKLAND, a labourer, living at Ball, committed suicide last week. His wife returned to her home from work in the afternoon and then found her husband hanging by a rope in his bed room. The evidence at the Inquest left no doubt that the deceased, who was sixty-five years of age, was of unsound mind, and a verdict in accordance was returned.

Wednesday 2 May 1866, Issue 5214 – Gale Document No. Y3200708323
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Valiant Soldier Inn upon the body of JOHN LANG. The deceased lived at Drewsteignton: some time since he fell from a cart and the wheels passed over him. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where his leg was amputated. Mortification set in and he died on Thursday. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 16 May 1866, Issue 526 – Gale Document No. Y3200708364
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Globe Inn, Newtown, upon the body of SARAH WEBBER, who died suddenly on the preceding night. The deceased was fifty-four years old, and the evidence led to the belief that she died from apoplexy.

Wednesday 2 May 1866, Issue 5214 – Gale Document No. Y3200708331
NEWTON ABBOT – SAMUEL SANDFORD, a porter at the Newton railway station, was run over by a luggage van on Thursday. The poor fellow was fearfully mutilated, and he died soon afterwards. SANDFORD admitted that the accident occurred through his own inattention. Mr Coroner Kellock held an Inquest upon the body: Verdict, Accidental Death.

Wednesday 16 May 1866, Issue 5216 – Gale Document No. Y3200708364
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Globe Inn, Newtown, upon the body of SARAH WEBBER, who died suddenly on the preceding night. The deceased was fifty-four years old, and the evidence led to the belief that she died from apoplexy.

Wednesday 23 May 1866, Issue 5217 – Gale Document No. Y3200708394
NEWTON ABBOT – SARAH BULLEY, who resides in Sun-court, Newton, has place herself in a very awkward position. Her husband has been dead some fourteen months; but five weeks since she gave birth to a child. She said it was still born, and she gave two shillings to Sexton Jerman for interring the remains in the churchyard. The birth of the child was felt to be a disgrace by the woman, whose shame made her act somewhat secretly, for she only made the circumstance known to two female friends. The affair afterwards got into many mouths, and as the tale was recapitulated each teller told something fresh, till they made SARAH BULLEY amenable to the law. The story reached the ears of the police, and the police told the Coroner, and the Coroner directed the body of the child to be exhumed. Two medical gentleman made a post mortem examination, and they were satisfied that the child had breathed. The question then came – had the child a legal or separate existence? Therein was the doubt, and the Coroner's Jury gave the woman the benefit of that doubt by returning a verdict to the effect that the child was "stillborn".

Wednesday 30 May 1866, Issue 5218 – Gale Document No. Y3200708411
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the George and Dragon Inn on Monday upon the body of JOHN WESTERN, a cab owner. The deceased had complained of illness, but he continued to drive his cab till Saturday, when he was compelled to return to his home. Mr Perkins was sent for, but before that gentleman had arrived WESTERN had ceased to live. It was the opinion of the medical man that death was caused by disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

A CHILD BURNT TO DEATH – An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Topsham Inn, before Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of WILLIAM WESCOMB, two and a half years old, the son of a mason's labourer, residing at Salutary Cottages, St. Sidwell's. The mother got up at half-past seven on Friday morning, leaving the child in bed asleep. She went out about nine, and on returning half an hour afterwards heard the child calling out. On proceeding to the room she found him lying on the floor with his night dress in flames, and by his side were some matches which had been ignited. He was immediately removed to the hospital; the usual remedies were applied without avail, and he died in two or three hours. Mr W. J. Land, acting house surgeon at the hospital, said the cause of death was the shock to the system consequent on the burns, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 30 May 1866, Issue 5218 – Gale Document No. Y3200708419
CREDITON – The story afloat yesterday week at Crediton to the effect that one boy had deliberately shot another was exaggerated – exaggerated in the assertion that the act was wilfully done. the two boys – James Jervis, aged thirteen, and WILLIAM OLDING, aged seventeen – were in the service of Mr J. A. Francis, of Ford Farm. On Monday week the boys went together to turn the horses into the field, and they took a gun and a pistol with them to shoot birds. On their return and when close to the back door of the farm house OLDING pointed his pistol at Jervis and exclaimed, "I'll shoot you." Jervis replied, "Oh will you," and turning quickly round the gun which he had on his left arm exploded. The contents entered the right cheek of OLDING and lodged in the base of his skull. The poor fellow's death was instantaneous. Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest upon the body on Wednesday, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The boys had lived on good terms with each other, and were bedfellows. OLDING'S saying "I'll shoot you" was considered to have been uttered in fun.

BRADWORTHY – MRS JOHNS, wife of the miller at Ash Mill, has met a fearful death. In the absence of her husband she went to the mill to set the smut machine in motion, and whilst adjusting the band round the drum her dress was caught by the machinery and the poor creature was carried with fearful rapidity around the wheel till she became a mangled corpse. Her body was broken, her head dashed in pieces, and the brains was scattered on the machinery. There were four children in the house, and on the return of their father he asked them where their mother was? One of them replied "in the mill," and on reaching the mill MR JOHNS beheld the frightful remains of his wife – crushed almost beyond identification. An Inquest was held on Saturday – verdict Accidental Death. Some fourteen years since the brother of the deceased lost his life almost exactly in the same horrible way.

Wednesday 6 June 1866, Issue 5219 – Gale Document No. Y3200708443
TEIGNMOUTH – Mr Coroner Kellock held an Inquest at the Teignmouth Infirmary on Monday upon the body of HENRY JAMES BOLT ADAMS. Deceased, with other boys, went on the East Cliff and amused themselves with rolling on the grass. Notwithstanding that the deceased was cautioned as to his proximity to the brink of the cliff he rolled on and fell over (a depth of 123 feet 6 inches) and was killed. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Wednesday 13 June 1866, Issue 5220 – Gale Document No. Y3200708458
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Monday at the Custom House Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of LOUISA LEWIS, a jewess, wife of SHOLTS LEWIS living on Quay-hill. The deceased was in her usual health and spirits on Sunday up to eight o'clock when she was taken suddenly ill. Mr Perkins was sent for and ordered blisters for her head. She died about twelve o'clock the same night. Mr Perkins said the deceased died from apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was taken. It appeared the deceased had been rather addicted to drink.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Cowley Bridge Inn on Friday upon the body of THOMAS WOLLAND, aged 37. Deceased was in the employ of Mr Morgan, carrier, of the Commercial-road, in this city. On the preceding day WOLLAND went with two horses and a waggon to Dunscombe for a load of hay; and on returning the unfortunate man fell off trying to get on the shaft whilst the horses were moving and the wheels of the waggon passed over his head – causing instant death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was a native of Dolton.

Wednesday 20 June 1866, Issue 5221 – Gale Document No. Y3200708486
EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Poltimore Inn, St. Sidwell, on Saturday evening, on the body of JANE BIRD, aged sixty-five, who resided in Gill's Court, Cheek-street, and who was found dead in her bed that morning. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was a native of Winkleigh, and had been an out-patient at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Hunt, surgeon, stated his opinion that deceased died from "effusion into the chest," and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon before H. W. Hooper, Esq., at the Valiant Soldier Inn, upon the body of CHARLES HOLMAN, a lad of fourteen years of age, who had been living with Mr Brock, farmer, of Kenn. Deceased was the son of THOMAS HOLMAN, a labourer, of Ashton. On Monday, the 4th of June, he was driving a hay cart along the high road at Kenn when the horse took fright and ran away, and having gone a short distance deceased was flung in over some iron fencing and received severe injuries to his thigh. He was at once taken to the hospital, where he died on Saturday morning, the 16th instant. Upon being received in the hospital, a consultation was held as to the amputation of the thigh, but it was thought advisable to let it remain. Mr W. J. Land, who attended the deceased, said he died of exhaustion consequent upon the injuries he received, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the King Alfred Inn, before Mr H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of ROBERT HENRY EVANS, about five week sold, son of ROBERT EVANS, a labourer, of Friernhay-street. The child was taken ill some days since in, what was at the time thought to be convulsions, and on Sunday morning died. Medical assistance was not procured until it was too late, and the Coroner expressed his disapproval of the proceedings of the parents with regard to their child. Mr J. Perkins said he believed the child to have died from infantile diarrhoea, and a verdict to that effect was returned. When called to visit the child he found it very emaciated and in a state of collapse.

Wednesday 27 June 1866, Issue 5222 – Gale Document No. Y3200708507
EXETER – In the river at Countess Weir the body of a woman named COLES was discovered by one of the workmen at the Paper Mills. The deceased was sixty years old, and had resided with her sister – Mrs Woodgage, of Countess Weir. Poverty was supposed to have caused the unfortunate woman to drown herself; but as there was no direct evidence the Coroner's Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Wednesday 4 July 1866, Issue 5224 – Gale Document No. Y3200708531
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn on Wednesday upon the body of ELIZA, aged eight, daughter of MR JOHN WILLCOTT, joiner, of St. Sidwell's. On the 14th of June deceased placed herself on a timber waggon, but unfortunately fell and the wheel went over her foot. She was taken to the hospital, and her foot was amputated; but tetanus intervened and the child died. Verdict – "Accidental Death.

Wednesday 4 July 1866, Issue 5224 – Gale Document No. Y3200708540
BIDEFORD – JOHN RATTENBURY, driver of the waggon between Bideford and Torrington, was drowned on Friday. He and a young man (William Copeland, clerk at the goods department at the railway station,) went to bathe at a point in the river called Cross Park Rock. They could swim; but to prove which was the best swimmer they proceeded across the river. However, they had not gone far when poor RATTENBURY sank. His body was recovered in less than half-an-hour by two fisherman – Thomas and Jacob Lane; but resuscitation as not possible. Mr Coroner Pridham held an Inquest upon the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." The unfortunate man was thirty-eight years old, and he leaves a widow and three children.

Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest at Braunton on Wednesday upon the body of JOHN BLACKMORE, aged fifty-two. Deceased was a farmer; but he terminated his existence by hanging himself in one of his outhouses. It was stated that the father of the deceased committed suicide; and as the deceased had been for some weeks in a desponding state the Jury considered he hung himself whilst labouring from Temporary Insanity.

EXMOUTH – WILLIAM TUCKER and Simon Thorn, labourers, were returning to Littleham on Wednesday night, when their cart was upset in Maer-lane. The next morning TUCKER was discovered lying with the shaft of the vehicle across his neck. The pressure of the shaft caused the poor fellow's death. The other man was fast asleep, and he could give no particulars as to the upsetting of the cart. The men were no doubt the worse for liquor. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 11 July 1866, Issue 5225 Gale Document No. Y3200708553
The Coroner's Jury have returned a verdict of Manslaughter against John Willis (in the employ of Mr Chamberlain, butcher,) for having caused the death of the little boy DANIEL ELSTON. Willis was driving a cart down Bridge-street, when the unfortunate little fellow – crossing the street to a companion – was knocked down and so injured that he died within an hour. One of the witnesses at the Inquest stated that Willis was driving down Fore-street-hill at a furious pace; but another witness said that could not have been the case because the driver was enabled to pull up the vehicle directly the boy was knocked down.

On Friday morning MRS ELIZABETH SCOTT, an elderly lady residing with Miss Forard, of East Southernhay, was found dead on the floor of her bed room. Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest the same day, and after hearing the evidence of Dr Marchant, the Jury brought in a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 18 July 1866, Issue 5226 – Gale Document No. Y3200708586
MARYTAVY – Mr Coroner Vallack held an Inquest on Saturday upon the bodies of two girls, named RICHARDS and MANN, who were killed by the train passing over them. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and entirely exonerated the railway officials from blame, it being evident that the poor girls were victims to their want of caution in walking on the metals at the time that a train was due.

Wednesday 25 July 1866, Issue 5227 – Gale Document No. Y3200708614
TRUSHAM – Mr Coroner Kellock held an Inquest at Trusham on Friday on the body of WILLIAM DOWN. On the preceding Monday evening the deceased and Samuel Potter were amusing themselves by wrestling in a hay field, one was thrown and then the other; but DOWN complained after a fall of a pain in his stomach, and then lay down. Potter lifted him upon a hay slide, and there he remained till early the next morning, when he walked home and went to bed. Medical aid was sought, but the poor man died before any remedies could be administered. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 25 July 1866, Issue 5227 – Gale Document No. Y3200708604
EXETER – MR MILFORD, landlord of the Anchor Inn, Exe Island, was likewise head cooper at the City Brewery. On Friday afternoon the unfortunate man by some means fell into the millstream adjacent to the Brewery, was carried under the water wheel of Mr Bastick's Round Tree Mills, and there crushed to death. The deceased was a widower, and he was stated to be a man of very temperate habits. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their opinion that Mr Bastick should repair the close which had been suffered so long to be out of repair.

Wednesday 1 August 1866, Issue 5228 – Gale Document No. Y3200708627
JOHN BISHOP, of the Bridge Inn, Heavitree, committed suicide yesterday week in the County Gaol. His wife had summoned him that day for assault, and from being unable to procure sureties for his keeping the peace towards her the magistrates committed the husband. He was placed in one of the receiving cells, and when one of the warders entered the cell to conduct him to the bath room BISHOP was suspended to the bell pull. He had twisted his scarf tightly round his neck. The next day an Inquest was held upon the body, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind."

Wednesday 8 August 1866, Issue 5229 – Gale Document No. Y3200708663
SIDMOUTH – Mr Coroner Brent held an Inquest on Saturday at the Bedford Hotel upon the body of ELIZABETH SCOTFORD. The deceased was cook in the service of Mr Lowrie, in whose stable yard were large pieces of timber, which formerly composed the platform for the guns of the volunteer artillery. Attached to these timbers was a clothes line, and whilst the unfortunate woman was hanging up clothes upon the line the timbers fell upon her and caused her death. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 22 August 1866, Issue 5231 – Gale Document No. Y3200708706
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Valiant Soldier Inn on the body of JANE SANSOM, a widow, fifty-one years of age. On the previous evening the deceased, who lived at Bradninch, went to the paper mills to see her son, who is employed there. On going round to the back of the machinery where her son was at work her dress became entangled, and her right arm and side were drawn into the machinery, her arm being dreadfully mangled. She was immediately taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was thought necessary to amputate the injured limb at the shoulder. She did not survive the operation, death occurring about eleven o'clock the same night. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 22 August 1866, Issue 5231 – Gale Document No. Y3200708716
BRIXHAM – JOHN HANNAFORD, an old fisherman, who has for some period lived in his boat, was returning to his "home on the water" one night when he fell over the quay and was drowned. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but censured the Harbour Commissioners for not having the public lamps lighted, some of them conceiving that if the lamps had been lighted HANNAFORD would have been able to have steered a different course.

EAST OGWELL – Mr Coroner Kellock held an Inquest on Saturday at East Ogwell upon the body of a lad named BERRY. Deceased was in the employ of Mr Elliott, and on the preceding day whilst drawing corn the cart was upset and the poor lad was found dead underneath the vehicle. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 September 1866, Issue 5233 – Gale Document No. Y3200708769
BEAFORD – Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest last week upon the body of the illegitimate child of CHARLOTTE DYMANT. Rumour had been pretty free in assigning foul means as the cause of the death of the child; but the evidence was conclusive that the child was not born alive. Verdict accordingly.

TORQUAY – JOHN HOLDSWORTHY, employed in making a new siding from the Dartmouth and Torbay Railway to the Torquay Gasworks, unfortunately lost his life on Thursday by the falling of a quantity of earth upon him. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SHOCKING OCCURRENCE AT OTTERY ST. MARY. Eight Persons Killed. - The historian who chronicles the incidents of the present year at Ottery St. Mary has a sad task before him. It was only a short time since that Ottery was visited by a fearful conflagration, destroying more than one hundred houses. The greatest sympathy was felt for the sufferers; and more money was subscribed than was needed. The committee, who had the management of the funds, have recently been assailed for having devoted £1,000 to the rebuilding and endowment of the church schools; and now while the discontented are publishing their grievances another calamity – more terrible in its consequences – befalls Ottery. Connected with the Exwick (near Exeter) Paper Mills is a female named ELIZA HAWKER, who is a member of the Plymouth Brethren, and who thinks it her mission to go from place to place preaching. On Sunday evening she was at Ottery, where she expounded the Scriptures to a large number of persons, taking up her position amidst the ruins of the shop formerly occupied by Mr Abraham Harding, grocer, at the corner of Tiphillfoot, leading into the square. Opposite were the ruins of the house occupied previous to the fire by Mr Windover, saddler, consisting of a portion of wall six feet in length and ten feet in height, and a chimney fifteen feet high behind it. At half-past seven the congregation from the neighbouring chapel augmented the crowd. There was no indication of approaching danger, and the people were quietly listening to the preacher, who, by a remarkable coincidence, was discoursing of the Judgment Day, when the rocks and stones, she said would fall on them. Presently a noise as of something giving way was heard. Instantly the chimney tottered over and fell on the wall, and before the crowd had time to escape the mass of brickwork was on them. The scene was of the most heartrending description. In place of the one voice which had been hard just before the cries and shrieks of a hundred voices rent the air. The road was covered with the debris, among which lay the mangled bodies of those on whom it had fallen. The groans of the injured and dying mingled with the lamentations of their friends, whom the news of the disaster soon brought to the spot. The unfortunate sufferers were soon extricated, and those in whom life was not extinct were attended by Dr Whitby, Messrs. Edwards and Davy, surgeons, of Ottery; and Drs. Jerrard and Mayne, of Honiton. The town was in a state of the greatest consternation, and the excitement was speedily communicated to the neighbouring places. The names of the dead were JOHN GILLAM, a boy seven years of age, son of MR GILLAM, watchmaker; EMMA ROWE, sixteen, daughter of a thatcher; JANE LANG, twenty, wife of JAMES LANG, carpenter and machinist; MARY ANN BISHOP, fifty-two, widow of a miller (she buried her husband last week); ELIZABETH DAVIS, seventeen, laundress, residing with her grandfather, a mason; ELIZABETH KELLOW, seventeen, living with her mother, a widow, who keeps a dairy. These died within an hour of the accident; EMMA HAKE fifteen, , daughter of JOHN HAKE, of the Lamb and Flag Inn; and JAMES LANG, the husband of the woman LANG who was killed, died on Monday afternoon. The seriously injured persons were Elizabeth Rounsevill, twenty, scalp wound, daughter of William Rounsevill, labourer; Fanny Temple, twenty, scalp wound and injury to the chest; Elizabeth Green, contusions in various parts of the body, daughter of James Green, shoemaker; George Pyle, eight, dislocation of the ankle joint, son of Mr Pyle, of the Volunteer Inn; Mary Gillam, a young woman of seventeen, scalp wound and injury to the side, sister to the boy Gillam who was killed; Biddy Jeffrey, eighteen, daughter of Mr Jeffrey, of the Five bells Inn; John Littley, a pensioner from the Marines, working as a labourer, and his wife, each aged about fifty, and Robert Channon, twenty-four, mason, various contusions; W. Churchill, twenty-three, labourer, had his toe smashed; Baker, fifty, gardener to Sir John Coleridge, had his leg broken, and is now an inmate of the Devon and Exeter Hospital. These are progressing favourably, and it is thought most probably will recover. Besides these at least a dozen persons were more or less severely bruised. Lovell, a labourer, had his clothes torn, but escaped with slight bruises; and many other persons who were struck escaped with comparatively slight injuries. A strong wind was blowing at the time of the accident, and it is believed that the foundation of the chimney had been sapped by water which had collected around it since the great fire. An Inquest on the eight bodies was held at the King's Arms Inn on Monday afternoon, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. There will in this case be fairly a further claim upon the plentiful funds for the relief of sufferers by the late fire, as this disaster is a direct consequence therefrom.

Wednesday 12 September 1866, Issue 5234 – Gale Document No. Y3200708797
TIVERTON – Mr Coroner Mackenzie held an Inquest at the Townhall on Saturday upon the body of MARY LAKE, aged seventy-four. The deceased was found dead in an arm chair in her room on the preceding morning. Verdict – "Death by the Visitation of God."

Bishopstawton, some two miles from Barnstaple, will probably rank amongst the places where the crime of infanticide has been perpetrated. Living there was one MARY MORRIS, widow of a labourer that drowned himself some three years since while suffering from delirium tremens, and this woman gave birth to a child a short time since. In her confinement she was assisted by a midwife named Ann Green. One day last week the child died suddenly, whereby suspicion of foul play entered the minds of the police. An Inquest was held upon the body of the child, and according to the opinion of Mr Fernie, surgeon, of Barnstaple, poison had been administered to the child; and this belief is strengthened by the fact that several bottles containing poison were discovered in the mother's house. The two women are now in custody, waiting the result of the analysis of the child's stomach, which has been sent to Professor Herapath, of Bristol.

DARTMOUTH – The Éclair steamer returned from Jersey early on Friday morning. Amongst the passengers was MR STOODLY, spirit merchant, of Martock, who, with his wife and child, was returning from a trip to the Channel Islands. The night was very dark, and the weather rough, and MR STOODLY, mistaking his way, fell over the side of the jetty into very deep water. Captain Lewis made a brave attempt to rescue him, at great risk to himself; but some little time elapsed before he could get MR STOODLY on shore, and though restoratives were applied immediately, life was extinct. Mr Coroner Kellock held an Inquest the same evening upon the body of the unfortunate gentleman, who was twenty-seven years of age, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 19 September 1866, Issue 5235 – Gale Document No. Y3200708817
SUPPOSED MURDER AT TOTNES. - On Monday the men in the employ of Mr Bowden were engaged in clearing the fenders at his stores on the Mill Leat, when they found the body of a woman in the water. It was immediately removed to the nearest public house. From the appearance of the corpse it had evidently been in the water several days, and on being examined by a medical man he discovered marks of blows in the head. It is, therefore, considered that foul play must have taken place. The body was identified in the evening by a woman of Plymouth, whose husband had a roulette table on the race course. This woman says that the unfortunate deceased was the wife of a man named GEORGE GEPSON, of Plymouth, who had a sparring booth on the course. The woman states that on the evening of the second day of the races, GEPSON came to her at a public house in the town and told her that his wife and child were missing. On searching the deceased, a few shillings and a child's boot were discovered in her pocket. No clue has been obtained to the whereabouts of the child. An Inquest was commenced yesterday at the Lord Nelson Inn, before Frederick Kellock, Esq., Coroner, and evidence given as to the identity of the body and its discovery in the mill leat. A few other facts were deposed to of but trifling importance, but as the Jury were of opinion that their publication might frustrate the ends of justice the Reporters were requested to withhold them for the present. Mr Wm. Kellocks, the surgeon, gave it as his opinion that the injuries on the head were inflicted during life, but he could not tell the extent of those injuries without a post mortem examination. The Enquiry was adjourned till Thursday. It was stated that GEPSON was attending Barnstaple fair. He had been telegraphed for to his residence at Plymouth, but no answer had been received.

Wednesday 26 September 1866, Issue 5236 – Gale Document No. Y3200708830
EXETER – Two lads – named WILLIAM FEAR and John Anstey – got into a boat moored opposite to the Port Royal Inn on Friday and rowed towards Trews' Weir. The river was swollen and the wind high and the boat was carried over the weir and capsized. FEAR was drowned, but Anstey swam ashore. An Inquest was held upon the body of FEAR on Monday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." FEAR'S father was drowned in the Exe some years ago and his mother is likewise dead.

Wednesday 26 September 1866, Issue 5236 – Gale Document No. Y3200708835
TOTNES – The Supposed Murder. – The Coroner's Inquiry into the cause of the death of ELIZA GEPSON was resumed on Thursday evening, when the husband of the deceased (GEORGE GEPSON) gave evidence. He stated that his wife was twenty-seven years of age, and that they had two children, and lived at Stonehouse. He had a sparring booth on the Totnes race course, and his wife was there with him. On the evening of the second day of the races he and his wife and their two children were at the Oxford Arms, at Totnes; and GEPSON asserts that he left a Mrs Coombes, Barney Brown, a pugilist, and a young woman in the room with his wife, and her youngest child. GEPSON stated that he went directly back to the race course with his eldest child, drank a glass of ale in Palmer and Chubb's booth, and then laid down for the night. He got up at seven the next morning; and discovering his wife absent, he asked Mr Chubb if she had been there. Mr Chubb replied in the negative. GEPSON professes to have made most anxious inquiries as to the whereabouts of his wife; and to one person he expressed himself in threatening language towards his wife – saying, "I must not come across her." On the Friday morning, GEPSON left Totnes by the first up train, taking his little girl with him, and proceeded to Barnstaple, intending to have his sparring booth at Barnstaple fair. His wife knew he was going to Barnstaple fair, and on the Saturday he went to meet the down trains at the Barnstaple railway Station, thinking she would arrive by one of them. She did not, however, come; and before he was out of bed on the following Tuesday morning the landlady of the Stafford Arms at Barnstaple came and said, "Here's some news of your wife." He then leant that her body had been found in the mill leat at Totnes, and thither he immediately repaired. GEPSON wrote a letter to his landlady at Stonehouse, stating that he had not seen his wife since he left her at the public house at Totnes. This letter was read to the Jury and the answer to it; but there was nothing in them that in the slightest degree implicated the husband. GEPSON further stated that his wife had been away from him for a day or two; but he always knew where to find her. She was a very jealous woman. He had no reason to question her fidelity towards himself; nor was he acquainted with any circumstance that was likely to embitter the feelings of any one against his wife. The Inquest was adjourned till Monday, when Mary Allery, who was a waitress at the Oxford Arms, deposed that GEPSON and his wife were at the public house together as previously stated; that GEPSON left the house some twenty minutes before his wife quitted the room; and that GEPSON came to the house the next morning and asked her what time his wife left the preceding evening, for she had not since been to his booth. But Mary Ann Sage, another waitress at the Oxford Arms, declared that GEPSON and his wife and a man left the house together. The testimony of Sage, however, was contradicted by Hannah Coombes, wife of a hawker, who was with the GEPSONS at the Oxford Arms. Mrs Coombes averred that GEPSON gave some money to two little singing girls that came into the room; that GEPSON'S wife was annoyed at GEPSON'S giving them the money, declaring in the coarsest language that they were unchaste. Upon that GEPSON said to his wife, "If you're on for a row I'm off," and he then left the house. Mrs Coombes says she left the Oxford Arms half-an-hour after GEPSON left; that she left MRS GEPSON in the house, seeking for her little girl's shoe; and that the next morning GEPSON came to her and asked if his wife had slept in the waggon. Mr Thomas Palmer, innkeeper, of Plymouth, who had a joint booth at Totnes races, stated that he awoke about one o'clock on the Thursday morning and then saw GEPSON lying asleep on the seat outside the counter in the booth; that between seven and eight in the morning he conversed with GEPSON as to his wife's absence, and later in the morning GEPSON said "he would give any man a quid" (sovereign) that would prove infidelity against his wife, and that "he hoped that some one would find her drowned." Mr Stephen Chubb was a partner in the booth with Mr Palmer, and he stated that GEPSON returned to their booth at a quarter to eleven on the Wednesday night, and when Mr Chubb said to him, "Where's your wife?" GEPSON replied, "I left her in the public house in Totnes. We had a few words, and I came away because I would have no row." GEPSON then had a glass of ale, and within half-an-hour laid down upon one of the seats and fell asleep. GEPSON seemed to be angry when he came to the booth, but there was nothing peculiar in his clothes. The next morning Mr Chubb heard GEPSON say "he would give any person a sovereign to bring the news that his wife was drowned." Mr Henry Crocker was likewise a partner in the booth with Messrs. Palmer and Chubb, and the witness stated that on the Thursday morning he heard GEPSON say "he hoped his wife may be a corpse if ever he saw her again," and that "he would break her bones." On the Friday morning a Mrs Medland had a conversation with GEPSON respecting the absence of his wife, when he said "he did not care whether he ever saw her again". Mr Coroner Kellock, in summing up the evidence, said there were two questions in the case. First, the nature and character of the offence; and secondly, by whom the offence had been committed. The first was not at all difficult to answer; the second was not very likely to be solved. The body was found with such a wound as was sufficient to cause death. The evidence clearly established the fact that a murder had been committed. There was nothing apparent to reduce the crime from murder to manslaughter; but he did not think either of the Jurymen could lay his finger upon a single sentence in the evidence and say, "That points to the perpetrator." He believed the only verdict they could arrive at would be "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown." After a lengthened deliberation the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the suggestion of the Coroner.

Wednesday 3 October 1866, Issue 5236 – Gale Document No. Y3200708850
EXETER – Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the George and Dragon Inn, St. Sidwell, on the body of DOROTHY HOLWILL, aged seventy-three , widow of a tradesman of this city. The deceased lodged with Mr Scott; she retired to rest in her usual health on Monday night, but the next morning was found dead in her bed. Mr Hunt gave it as his opinion that suffocation was the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

FATAL QUARREL – Manslaughter. – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday, upon the body of WILLIAM CHAMBERS, a labourer, seventy-four years of age. The deceased was an inmate of the St. Thomas Union Workhouse, and on the morning of the 18th September last, Mr Timewell sent another pauper named William Smith, an old man aged sixty, into the oakum room to procure him some junk. The deceased went to the box where it was stored, and Smith was standing by with a piece of junk in his hand. The Deceased said, "put down that, it isn't yours," but Smith refused to do so. CHAMBERS tried to take it away from him and a struggle took place, in which the deceased was thrown by his antagonist, the force of the fall breaking his leg. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital almost immediately. A consultation of the surgeon took place and was decided to amputate the left leg, the deceased having sustained a compound fracture of the ankle joint. The case went on well for a few days, but sloughing of the stump set in, he grew rapidly worse, and died on Saturday morning. Mr J. U. Huxley, the house surgeon at the hospital, said he considered death had resulted from gangrene of the stump consequent on the amputation. The deceased was of a very shattered constitution, his arteries being much diseased, but had it being otherwise, and he a young man, he would probably have recovered. Without amputation, there was no chance for his recovery, and he would have died had that not being done. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Manslaughter". Previously to the deceased's death his deposition was taken before R. S. Gard, Esq., in the presence of Smith, who was afterwards remanded until Friday at the Castle. He is now in the County Gaol.

Wednesday 3 October 1866, Issue 5236 – Gale Document No. Y3200708857
TOTNES – The body of GEPSON's Child has been found floating in the river; and the Coroner's Jury returned the same verdict in the case of the child as they did on its mother – "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown."

The unfortunate man JOHN LUSCOMBE, the guard of the goods train, who was severely injured on the morning of Thursday week at the Daynton incline, died on Thursday morning. An Inquest on the body was held on Saturday at the Railway Hotel, Totnes, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 10 October 1866, Issue 5237 – Gale Document No. Y3200708883
TIVERTON – Mr Coroner Mackenzie held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of GEORGE COLLINS. Deceased was in the employ of Mr C. Snow, of Firebeacon Farm, and whilst ascending a ladder on the preceding day the poor man fell and broke his neck. Verdict – Accidental Death.

ASHPRINGTON – Mr Coroner Kellock held an Inquest on Friday on the body of THOMAS PERRING. The deceased had been making himself merry at the Malsters' Arms Inn, at Tuckenhay, on the preceding night, leaving there at three in the morning, and it is presumed that he must have walked into the river Harbourne, where his body was found on Friday morning. Verdict – "Accidentally Drowned."

Wednesday 10 October 1866, Issue 5237 – Gale Document No. Y3200708874
EXETER – On Friday an Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., at the Red Lion Inn, on the body of ELIZA DURNFORD, daughter of the late Lieutenant-Colonel DURNFORD, of Stonehouse. Deceased and her sister were well known in the city from the fact of their always being in company with each other and dressing alike. It is believed they were twins; and MISS ARABELLA DURNFORD said they had lived together since they were children. On Tuesday night the deceased did not feel very well and took to her bed: but no medical advice was procured. She did not get any better on the Wednesday. On Thursday her breathing became bad, and towards the evening she was much worse. She told her sister she thought she was dying and asked to be lifted up in the bed. While the sister was lifting her up she died. They had resided with a Mrs Brice for two and a half years, and the deceased was observed to have been failing for some time. Mr J. S. Perkins, son of Mr Perkins, of St Sidwell, said death was caused by disease of the heart.

Yesterday an Inquest was held at the Windsor Castle Inn, on the body of ELIZABETH LETHABY, eighty years of age. Deceased had lived at No. 1, Alma-terrace. She had been in a declining state of health for the past twelve months, and on Sunday night she complained of being worse; at fie the next morning she was found dead in her room. Dr Budd attributed her death to disease of the heart resulting from old age.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, on Monday, upon the body of RICHARD SATTERLEY, aged 66. Deceased lived in Rattenbury's-court, St. Thomas, and on Friday morning he went to Kennford with a waggon for wood. On returning the horse shied at the lights of a passing carriage, and in endeavouring to hold it back the unfortunate man fell; the wheels passed over him and fractured his arm and several ribs. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Monday morning. Dr Huxley stated that death resulted from the injury to the chest caused by the broken ribs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 17 October 1866, Issue 5238 – Gale Document No. Y3200708896
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, upon the body of JOHN BRADFORD, fifty-eight years of age. Deceased was a labourer and lodged in Pancras-lane, and on the preceding afternoon was found dead in his bed. Mr Phelps, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death was caused by disease of the heart, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of ELIZA DUNO LAWDAY, aged eighteen months, daughter of KEZIAH LAWDAY, of King William Terrace, St. Sidwell's. On the 28th September the sister of the deceased fetched a teapot of boiling water for a neighbour, and by accident it was thrown over the chest of the deceased. She was taken to the hospital and died on the 14th October. Mr Huxley said the cause of death was consequent from exhaustion caused by the injuries.

Wednesday 17 October 1866, Issue 5238 – Gale Document No. Y3200708892
TORRINGTON – Mr Coroner Toller resumed the Inquest on Thursday at the Board Room of the Torrington Union touching the death of the infant of SARAH ORCHARD. The child was born in the road on the morning of the third instant, and the Inquest (held on the following day) was adjourned for the appearance of JAMES ORCHARD, the father of the child. Verdict – "That the child, from the suddenness of its birth, died from its mother not being able to procure proper care and attendance in her confinement."

TOTNES – The Coroner's Jury gave a verdict of "Found Drowned" in reference to the young man, WILLIAM PARTRIDGE, whose body was found in the river Dart.

DAWLISH – MR ANDREW HAYDON, farmer of Cockwood, was in the act of removing a cob wall, when a portion of it fell upon him and he was killed on the spot. Deceased was forty-five years old. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 24 October 1866, Issue 5239 – Gale Document No. Y3200708918
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, in this city, on Friday upon the body of ROBERT HARVEY, aged sixty-six years. The deceased (a carpenter of Ide) was returning from Crediton a fortnight since in a waggon with other persons; when the horse took fright and the waggon was overturned. HARVEY was so injured that he had to be removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died from the injuries on his head on Thursday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 24 October 1866, Issue 5239 – Gale Document No. Y3200708928
WITHYCOMBE RALEIGH – Mr Coroner Brent held an Inquest at the Prince of Wales Inn on Wednesday upon the body of WALTER WILLIAMS. Deceased was blind, but he earned his living by basket making. The evidence showed that the poor fellow died from a diseased heart, and a verdict in accordance was given.

Wednesday 31 October 1866, Issue 5240 – Gale Document No. Y3200708947
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Buller's Arms on Monday upon the body of MRS ANN FERRIS, who died suddenly on Saturday night. Deceased had been ill for some time, and the cause of death was attributed to disease of the heart. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 7 November 1866, Issue 5241 – Gale Document No. Y3200708974
ROCKBEARE – Mr Coroner Brent held an Inquest on Friday upon the body of MRS MARY BASTIN, a widow, sixty years of age. Deceased lived at Woodhouse Farm, and on the preceding morning her body was found suspended in her bed room. The evidence supported the belief that, owing to some family affliction, MRS BASTIN had recently been in a desponding state; and, consequently, the Jury considered that she hung herself whilst in an unsound state of mind.

Wednesday 21 November 1866, Issue 5243 – Gale Document No. Y3200709017
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, in this city, on Wednesday, upon the body of JAMES BABB. Deceased was a scavenger, and on the 3rd instant he injured the forefinger of his right hand whilst greasing and replacing the wheel of a cart. At first he took but little notice of the injury to his finger; but it became worse, and he was compelled to go to the Hospital, where a portion of the finger was amputated. Some days afterwards unfavourable symptoms presented themselves, which were followed by lockjaw, and the poor fellow died early on Wednesday morning. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

MRS MARY STANBURY, seventy-six years of age, widow, of Ivy Cottage, Cowley Bridge, died from suffocation on Thursday. The deceased had suffered for many years from a large swelling in her neck, which Mr Cumming, surgeon, described as a goitre, commonly called a "Derbyshire neck," from its frequent occurrence in the vicinity of the mineral springs in that county. She often had a difficulty in swallowing food; and in her endeavour to swallow a piece of bread for breakfast she was choked and expired in a few minutes. Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest upon the body the same day at the Cowley Bridge Inn, when the Jury returned a verdict in keeping with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 28 November 1866, Issue 5244 – Gale Document No. Y3200709041
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn on Thursday upon the body of JOHN ELLICOTT, a plasterer, of this city. Deceased was employed at the Shillingford Rectory a fortnight since, when he fell from a scaffold 20 feet high and fractured his back and spine. He was removed to the Hospital, where he died on Wednesday from the injuries. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 November 1866, Issue 5244 – Gale Document No. Y3200709047
HONITON – Suspected Infanticide. – On the 24th of October SARAH ANN BENNETT entered the service of George Neumann, Esq., of Tracey House, and her appearance soon attracted the attention of Mrs Neumann, whose suspicions however, were somewhat diminished by the girl's fervent declaration that there had been no impropriety in her conduct. But on Friday evening last BENNETT complained of being unwell and she went to bed – sleeping by herself. Towards the morning she was heard moving about in her bed room, by a fellow servant, sleeping in an adjoining room; but BENNETT was downstairs before seven in the morning, attending to her duties. Her appearance then increased the suspicion which had been entertained against her by one of her fellow servants, who went into BENNETT'S bed room and there discovered evidence which afterwards proved that BENNETT had become a mother. Mrs Neumann was apprised of what had been seen in BENNETT'S bed room, and Mr Gundry, surgeon, of Honiton, was soon at Tracey House, and upon that gentleman interrogating BENNETT she admitted that she had given birth to a child; that she had placed the body under the head of the bed. There it was found wrapped up – cold, and the limbs set. Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest upon the body of the child on Monday, and from the evidence of Mr Gundry the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the child died from loss of blood at birth. It is understood that BENNETT will be charged with concealment of birth.

Wednesday 5 December 1866, Issue 5245 – Gale Document No. Y3200709064
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, in this city, on Thursday, upon the body of JOHN SMALE, aged forty-four. Deceased was a bricklayer and lived in Blackboy-road. On the evening of Saturday fortnight when at supper a piece of meat lodged in his windpipe. He was taken to the Hospital, and soon after his admission he became suffocated; but an operation was then performed and the meat extracted. Unfortunately inflammation set in and the poor fellow died on Wednesday. Verdict – "Accidental death."

Wednesday 12 December 1866, Issue 5246 – Gale Document No. Y3200709093
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at Strong's London Alehouse, Mary Arches-street, upon the body of GEORGE FORTESCUE. He had been a cripple and paralysed from birth. In the morning he fell as if in a fit and expired immediately. Verdict – "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 2 January 1867, Issue 5249 – Gale Document No. Y3200709162
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held two Inquests on Thursday. One was at Collings's Black Horse Inn upon the body of an unmarried woman, named ELIZABETH LEGG. Deceased was thirty-six years of age; the mother of three children; and lived with them in one room in Waterloo-place, Deerpark-road. the poor woman was taken ill on Christmas-day, and she died the next morning from spasms of the heart. She had previously suffered from the malady.

The other Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Inn upon the body of the infant daughter of MRS BRICE, of West-street. The child died on Christmas-day whilst in the arms of its mother; and the evidence satisfied the Jury that death resulted from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 9 January 1867, Issue 5250 – Gale Document No. Y3200709191
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Poltimore Inn, St Sidwell, on Wednesday, upon the body of CHARLOTTE GEE. The deceased lived in the service of Mr Woodman, surgeon. She was a native of Exeter, her parents having kept an inn in Longbrook-street, her maiden name being TROAKE. She was seventy-seven or seventy-eight years of age. In 1862 she was living in London, where she married a man many years her junior, who dissipated what little property she had and left her. She became chargeable to the parish; but feeling ashamed of her marriage, kept that secret, and was removed to the Exeter Workhouse. After she had been there some time she went into service, hiding as much as she could her real age. She had lately complained of spasms in the left side, but could not be persuaded to apply to her master for advice. On the Tuesday night she complained of being unwell. She retired to bed about half-past ten o'clock, and soon after eight the next morning was found dead in bed. Mr Woodman said he had no doubt deceased died from disease of the heart; and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

MANSLAUGHTER BY A HUSBAND – On Wednesday last an Inquest was held at the Port Royal Inn, on view of the body of ANN FEY, wife of ROBERT FEY, straw buyer for Trew's Weir Paper Mills, and on Friday there was an Enquiry before the Magistrates. From the evidence it appeared that on Friday, the 28th of December, ROBERT FEY had been drinking. In the evening his wife found him at the Hour Glass public house, where he had a pint of beer with his son. He left the house with his wife, and for some time the neighbours heard them quarrelling. FEY wished his wife to go home, which she refused to do, called him foul names, and said that she would follow him wherever he went. They were then in Lime Kiln-lane, and the deceased being still very provoking, FEY said if she did not go home he would knock her down. The wife said "Do it! Do it!" and Mary Ann Carnell, who was standing near, said he struck her on the side of the head and she fell. She got up immediately and walked to the door of her house, which was close at hand, but not being able to go further she was assisted upstairs by Carnell. When she got upstairs she was unconscious. Thomas Underhill and Mrs Bradbeer heard the quarrelling, and heard FEY say that if his wife did not go away he would knock her down, but they did not see the blow. Deceased passed them immediately after crying: she said, "This is not the first time he has done it, but it will be the last." Carnell, who saw the blow struck, heard the same words. Mr Stonard Edye was called to see the woman on Saturday. He found her unconscious. Saw no external marks of violence. Having heard of the blow and the fall he treated her accordingly but without effect, and she died on Tuesday without recovering consciousness. Made a post mortem examination: could not then discover any external marks of violence. Death was occasioned by effusion of blood on the surface of the brain, which might have been occasioned by a blow, a fall, or great excitement and passion. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of MANSLAUGHTER, and on Friday the magistrates arrived at a similar conclusion. FEY was committed for trial. Bail was accepted.

Wednesday 9 January 1867, Issue 5250 – Gale Document No. Y3200709200
KINGSTEIGNTON – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of an infant, five weeks old. It was the child of a labouring man named FRENCH, living at Torhill, and the evidence led to the belief that it had been accidentally laid on by his mother in bed. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 16 January 1867, Issue 5251 – Gale Document No. Y3200709214
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Bristol Inn on Saturday afternoon upon the body of MR VANSTONE, aged eighty-two years, who resided in Longbrook-street. Ten days previously the deceased fell over the stairs, and the fall produced concussion of the brain, which was the cause of death. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

SARAH CANN, a young woman, who came from Sandford a few weeks since and took lodgings in Ewings'-lane, in this city, went to the Quay on Saturday night week to see a young man. Since then she had not been seen alive; but on Monday afternoon her body was discovered in the river below Trew's Weir. An Inquest upon her remains will be held this afternoon.

EXETER – Mr H. W. Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Topsham Inn, on the body of JOSEPH CONNETT. Deceased was a married man, forty-four years of age, and had lived at Honiton. In former years he had worked as a butcher, but latterly as a painter and glazier for Mr Shute, of Honiton. On the 26th December, about half-past ten o'clock in the night, P.C. John Tippetts, of the County Constabulary heard some one calling for assistance at the Exeter Inn, Honiton. He went into the back yard of the inn in company with another constable, and found the deceased there. He said his legs were injured; and the constables, with the assistance of two other men, took him home. It was then discovered that his leg was broken just above the ankle. The next day, on the suggestion of his medical attendant, deceased was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Here he suffered greatly from delirium tremens, and could get no sleep. Mr Huxley, the house surgeon, said death was caused by exhaustion. The deceased had said that he was kicked in the leg by some one. He told his wife that he slipped down by stepping on a piece of orange peel; and the police that he fell over a wheelbarrow. The only thing certainly known is that he was strongly under the influence of drink when the accident, whatever it was, happened. The Jury returned an open verdict.

Wednesday 23 January 1867, Issue 5252 – Gale Document No. Y3200709236
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Rising Sun Inn, St Sidwell, on Monday, upon the body of an infant. The deceased was the daughter of MR STANDLAKE, cabinet maker, of Russell-street, and the evidence left no doubt that the child had been accidentally overlaid by its mother. Verdict "Died from suffocation."

Mention was made in these columns last week that the body of a young woman named SARAH CANN had been discovered in the river Exe. It turns out that she was a native of Shobrooke, near Crediton, and left her home three years ago. Since then she has been living as the wife of one ISAAC GOODING, a lumper. On the night of the 5th instant GOODING was working on board one of the vessels at the Exeter Quay, and CANN went to the Quay to inquire when he was coming home. He answered her from the vessel, telling her to go home and he should soon be there. No one saw the woman afterwards, and as it was a rough night and the river was greatly swollen it is conjectured that she walked into the water and was drowned. Mr Coroner Cross held an Inquest upon the body at the Countess Weir Inn on Wednesday, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Honiton Inn, in this city, on the body of MRS BETSY ELLIOT, of 36 Paris-street. The deceased, who was of a weak and debilitated constitution, had been confined to her bed for three days with a severe cold and on Sunday last she was being assisted to dress by her daughter when she said she was not able to stand. Her daughter put her into bed and left the room to get a glass of brandy and water. Mrs Bird, another daughter of deceased, then went up and found her mother dead. Deceased had refused to eat anything for the day. Mr S. Perkins gave it as his opinion that the cause of death was syncope and exhaustion. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 30 January 1867, Issue 5253 – Gale Document No. y3200709261
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Fireman's Arms Inn on Monday upon the body of ANN HERN, found dead in her bed on Sunday morning. She was sixty-eight years of age. Mr Roper, expressed his opinion that death resulted from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at Mr Snow's Duke of York Inn, St Sidwell, on the body of GEORGE CLAMPETT, a labourer, twenty-nine years of age, residing at Clarence-place, St Sidwell. His wife said he had been suffering from a cold up to Sunday, and on the evening of that day he complained from suffering great pain under his heart, and spat a small quantity of blood. He had no medical advice, but on Monday evening his wife went and asked Mr Hooker, chemist, to recommend her something for a cough and spitting of blood. He gave her some sweet spirits of nitre for the cold but said she must have medical advice for the spitting of blood. She gave her husband the nitre and he slept well during the night. The deceased went to his work at six o'clock the next morning and he came home to his breakfast, which he eat heartily, and said his cold was better, but he still suffered from the pain under his heart. He went out in the court and shortly after his wife heard a fall and then found her husband lying against the wall, and he died shortly after. Mr Woodman gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from internal haemorrhage caused by the rupture of one of the vessels of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Wednesday 6 February 1867, Issue 5254 – Gale Document No. Y3200709286
SUICIDE – An Inquest was held at the Paper Makers' Arms Inn before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on Monday, o the body of JOHN ADAMS, an inmate of the St Thomas Union. Deceased was twenty-three years of age, and had been in the Union from his infancy, filling the post, up to the time of his death, of messenger. He was not on the books of the Union as an imbecile, but was evidently of weak mind. On Tuesday some of the inmate of the Union were treated to the Theatre, and JOHN ADAMS was one of them. While there something transpired about some money; and the deceased handed Mr Timewell, the master, 8s. to keep for him, as he had kept money for him before. Respecting the money the Coroner read two anonymous letters, stating to have come from the inmates of the Union, one of which was delivered while the haring was going on, and the other he received by post. The letters stated that it was through Mr Timewell that the young man had committed suicide; as Mr Timewell had got some of the money of the deceased's and kept teasing him about it. It came out in evidence that the pauper who wrote one of the letters and the other paupers who gave testimony affecting Mr Timewell had been imprisoned several times for misconducting themselves at the St Thomas Union. On Friday night the deceased was sent to Mrs Emmens' in South-street to deliver a band box; and on the return journey to call at a house in the Prince's-road. He delivered his message to Mrs Emmens, but did not carry the letter entrusted to his care to the house of Mr Colwill in Prince's-road. The body of the deceased was found in the river on Saturday morning near Engine Bridge Mills. The Coroner expressed his opinion that there had been a gross conspiracy to injure Mr Timewell on the part of those to whom he had given offence by properly discharging his duty. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned by the Jury.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Gold Lion Inn, Newtown, on Saturday, upon the body of ANN ROUTLEY, aged sixty-seven. She resided with her brother in Sandford-street, and on Friday evening was found dead in a chair. Mr Perkins gave it as his opinion that she died from loss of blood, owing to the rupture of a large vessel in the cavity of the heart. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 13 February 1867, Issue 5255 – Gale Document No. Y3200709308
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Honiton Inn, Paris-street, on the body of MARY DAVEY, eighty-four years of age, wife of a stonemason. Deceased had been in failing health for some time, and on Wednesday died. Mr Perkins, who had attended her some six months ago was applied to for a certificate of her death, but refused to give it; and a rumour having been spread that deceased could not obtain medical advice, Mr Pinn, a relative, requested Mr Hooper to hold an Inquest upon the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Visitation of God."

Mr H. W. Hooper held an Inquest on Friday evening at the Turk's Head Inn on the body of the newly-born infant of EMMA PARSONS, a single woman, twenty-two years of age, living in Pancras-lane. EMMA PARSONS resides with her mother, a widow and her sister. On Thursday morning the mother thinking her daughter was ill sent for Dr Drake; and that gentleman on his arrival found that the young woman had been confined. He asked where the child was, and she replied in an old box in the upper room. The young woman had slept in the same bed with her sister and in the same room as her mother; but the mother in her evidence said she did not know that her daughter was enceinte, or that anything was wrong. Mr J. Perkins' evidence went to show that the body was that of a healthy well-developed male child, rather above the usual size. There were no marks of violence; and the child had all the appearance of recent birth. He made a post mortem examination and the conclusion arrived at was that the child had partially breathed, but not sufficiently to support life, therefore that it was stillborn. The Coroner remarked, in summing up, that what the Jury had to consider was whether the child was born alive. A verdict to the effect that the child was stillborn was returned. It is believed that a charge of concealment of birth will be preferred against the woman.

Wednesday 13 February 1867, Issue 5255 – Gale Document No. Y3200709321
ASHBURTON – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Saturday at the Globe Inn, Ashburton, upon the body of EDWIN LANGWORTHY, twelve years of age. On the preceding Thursday the deceased was helping his father at the Druid Mine, when he was unfortunately struck on the breast by the capstan and his death soon followed. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

DEVONPORT – FANNY JANE SMALL, cook in the service of Mr Miller, chief engineer of Keyham-yard, was discovered on Wednesday to have given birth to a child and had concealed the body in an ash-box; a piece of tape was tied tightly round the child's neck. The medical evidence at the Inquest was wanting in proof that the child had a separate existence, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. The mother will be charged for concealing the birth.

Wednesday 20 February 1867, Issue 5256 – Gale Document No. Y3200709333
MR W. F. CROSS. – Yesterday afternoon Mr Coroner Cross held an Inquest at No. 12, Mount Radford-terrace, on the body of the late WILLIAM FRANCIS CORY CROSS, architect, of Queen-street, in this city, who died on Thursday night under very distressing circumstances. MR CROSS had been feeling unwell for a fortnight or three weeks past, frequently complaining to his sister of weakness and pains in the chest, but he only took to his bed on Monday week, on the suggestion of Mr Farrant, his medical attendant. He daily grew worse, and on Thursday Mr Farrant called Drs. Drake and Budd in consultation. They agreed with Mr Farrant, that MR CROSS was suffering from tetanus. He was then in a very nervous and excited state, and late in the evening he died. A few hours before his death, on Dr Drake's recommendation, Ellen Summersford, a nurse at the Training Institution, was called in; and it was through her information that this Enquiry was held yesterday afternoon. She thought MR CROSS'S death very peculiar, and the next morning, when in the kitchen, the servant brought downstairs some medicine bottles and powder, which she said MISS CROSS had told her to destroy as they were rank poison. They were none of them labelled, and this fact seems to have strengthened a suspicion previously formed in the nurse's mind. "I told the girl," she said in evidence yesterday afternoon, "that I thought it strange these bottles of poison should have been locked up. (The girl had told her they were taken from a locked drawer.) I took one of the bottles in my hand and smelt the contents. They had no kind of smell. They were of a pale colour, with a little white sediment. I examined the powders, and then told the girl to burn them one at a time, fearing that they might also contain poison. These were of a reddish brown colour. These circumstances made me feel uneasy, and I told the lady superintendent what had transpired." The bottles taken by the nurse were produced and shown to Mr Farrant. They were, he said, preparations which he had given to MR CROSS years ago. Henry Walter Fuller, an articled pupil to MR CROSS, said he went skating with him on the 17th and 18th of January. MR CROSS was no skater, and had two severe falls, in one case hurting his thumb so much that he almost fainted. Mr Farrant made a post mortem examination in the presence of Drs. Drake and Budd. He found the brain and spinal cord healthy, although, he said, in cases of tetanus post mortem symptoms were generally discoverable. He found no irritant poison in the stomach. The deceased, he believed, died of tetanus; and tetanus, in his opinion, might have been produced by the falls on the ice. His nervous temperament would predispose him to an attack of this kind. Upon this the Jury found a verdict of death from Natural Causes, adding that they thought the nurse had only acted from "conscientious motives." MR W. CROSS was a young man of high promise in his profession. He began life as second master of the Exeter School of Art and afterwards became a pupil of the late Mr Macintosh. Since the death of that gentleman he had acquired an extensive business. The Queen-street Chambers and Scotland House were erected from his designs, and he was the architect of the Wonford Asylum. He was highly respected by a large circle of friends. His age was only thirty. The funeral will take place at St. Leonard's Church tomorrow (Thursday) at twelve.

Wednesday 13 March 1867, Issue 5259 – Gale Document No. Y3200709412
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Topsham Inn, in this city, upon the body of WILLIAM LEE, aged fifteen months. The evidence satisfied the Jury that the child died from convulsions.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Axminster Inn on the body of FRANCIS JAMES STAMP, ten week sold, son of MR FRANCIS STAMP, compositor. The deceased had always been an ailing child; and on Saturday morning his mother fancied he was not breathing, and on taking him up she heard a gurgling in the throat, when he immediately expired. Mr Hunt, surgeon, said the child died from suffocation caused by spasm in the glottis. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 20 March 1867, Issue 5260 – Gale Document No. Y3200709431
TEIGNMOUTH – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at the White Horse Inn on Wednesday upon the body of SUSAN BODEN, ninety-six years old. The old lady lived with her daughter in Sax-street, West Teignmouth, and in the morning when the daughter arose she perceived a strong smell of burning. On going into her mother's room she found that the bed was on fire, and that both legs and one arm of the poor old lady, who had been bedridden for some years, were completely consumed. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 27 March 1867, Issue 5261 – Gale Document No. Y3200709457
WILLIAM JONES, who has been an inmate of the Exeter Workhouse some nine months, died from apoplexy on Saturday. He was seventy-two years of age. The deceased went into the garden of the Workhouse soon after noon on Saturday, and at two o'clock an inmate named Green discovered the poor old man lying dead on his back. An Inquest was held on his body on Monday when a verdict in accordance with the foregoing facts was returned.

Wednesday 27 March 1867, Issue 5261 – Gale Document No. Y3200709468
CHAGFORD – WILLIAM ROWE, in the employ of Mr Gale, of Chagford, shoemaker, hung himself a few days since in a loft adjoining the workshop. The deceased was a steady man; and the Inquest upon his body resulted in a verdict that he had committed the rash act whilst labouring from Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 3 April 1867, Issue 5262 – Gale Document No. Y3200709493
TIVERTON – JAMES ELLICOTT, residing at Cove, near Tiverton, committed suicide on Saturday morning by cutting his throat. The poor man, who was about fifty years of age, had been the sexton of Cove Chapel for some years, and was a hard-working man. for the last twelve months he had been in ill health, and within the last fortnight appears to have been subject to certain delusions. On Sunday week he dressed himself to go to perform his duties at the chapel; but afterwards refused to go, stating he was afraid he should be killed. Mr Coroner Mackenzie held an Inquest on the body of the deceased, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. Poor ELLICOTT leaves a widow and eight children.

Wednesday 3 April 1867, Issue 5262 – Gale Document No. Y3200709483
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, West Quarter, on the body of ELIZABETH HART, wife of a labourer. On Sunday evening the poor woman was taken very ill, and her husband at once went to Mr Roper's for some medicine; but on his return his wife was dead. Mr Roper considered that the decease died from a rupture of a blood vessel in the heart. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 10 April 1867, Issue 5263 – Gale Document No. Y3200709512
TOPSHAM – GEORGE SMITH, in the employ of Mr W. Palfrey, farmer and butcher, was accidentally killed on Thursday morning. He was driving a horse and cart, and the animal seems to have run away. The driver was thrown from the shaft, and the wheel passed over his body, killing him on the spot. The deceased was twenty-one years old. Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on the body, when the foregoing facts were narrated.

NEWTON ABBOT – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of the illegitimate child of MARY ANN NOSWORTHY. The medical testimony proved that the child died from convulsions and a verdict in accordance was returned.

Wednesday 17 April 1867, Issue 5264 – Gale Document No. Y3200709527
ROCKBEARE – Fatal Accident. – A respectable farmer, named BICKLEY, thirty-three years of age, and who occupied Little Houndbeer Farm, met with a violent death on Monday week. In the morning he took out a gun to shoot rooks. Some time afterwards his corpse was found, his head and face being frightfully shattered. No one witnessed the accident, but it is supposed that the trigger of one of the barrels must have caught in something and lodged the contents in his head. At the Inquest on Wednesday, before W. Every, Esq., Deputy Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased has left a widow and young family to mourn their loss.

EXETER – Fire and Loss of Life. – Early on Tuesday morning a fire was discovered in the house of Mr Richard Partridge, in Sandford-street, Newtown, in which also resided a Mr Ley, and an old woman named MARY CRUWYS, seventy-seven years of age. It broke out about two o'clock, and was discovered by Mrs Partridge. The floor of the room in which MRS CRUWYS lived was found to be on fire, and assistance was called. Several parties went to the room, but could not get in from the quantity of smoke. After a short time Mr Stedham and Mr Hill went into the room and found the old woman in bed, but life was extinct. The floor under the bed and the bedding was on fire. The poor old creature was frightfully burnt about the body. She was a native of Southmolton, and the widow of a farmer. She had been suffering from an incurable disease for some time, and had been compelled to keep her bed for a few weeks. She was also in receipt of relief from the parish. Her friends had visited her about half-past eight the previous night, and left all safe. She had often complained to her friends that there were mice under her bed, and she was afraid they would come into bed with her; but she had not complained within the last few days. She always kept a candle burning in her room close to her side. The engines of the city were present, but their services were not required. The fire-escape was under the management of Messrs. J. Vicary, R. West and J. Abraham. An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased at the Golden Lion Inn, yesterday afternoon, before Mr H. W. Hooper, when the testimony of Mr Woodman, who was called in to see her, was to the effect that she died from suffocation; and a verdict was returned in accordance with that testimony.

EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Red Lion Inn, St Sidwell, on the body of JOHN KERSLAKE, eleven months old. On the previous evening the mother was nursing the child, when it began to cry and get black in the face. Mr Perkins, surgeon, was sent for, but the child died before that gentleman reached the house. The deceased was a delicate child, and it being the opinion of Mr Perkins that it died from convulsions, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 1 May 1867, Issue 5266 – Gale Document No. Y3200709582
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Sawyer's Arms Inn, on Friday, upon the body of MARY ANN, infant daughter of WILLIAM MADDIAN, of Preston-street. Deceased was three months old, had always been unwell, and was found dead in bed. Mr Perkins, surgeon, was of opinion that the child died from spasms of the heart. Verdict accordingly.

EXETER – FREDERICK CHAPPLE, whose parents reside in Tudor-street, in this city, was drowned on Saturday afternoon. He had been playing with other children in the Bonhay; and on returning to his home the girl in charge slipped her foot in a hole, whilst passing over the Bonhay Bridge, and the poor little fellow was unfortunately pushed into the rapid stream. His body was recovered near Mr Hartland's garden. He was two years old. An Inquest was held upon the body at the Anchor Inn, on Tuesday before Mr H. W. Hooper, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" returned. It was the unanimous wish of the Jury that the Coroner should call the attention of the parties belonging to the bridge to get it repaired.

EXETER – JOHN DYER, a mason's labourer, living in George's-street, in this city, committed suicide on Friday morning. An Inquest upon his body was held on the same day at Mr Bowcher's wine vaults, when the wife of the deceased stated her husband had been working at the New Church on Mount Dinham, St. David. He worked on Monday till dinner time, and then went to the fair at St. Thomas. What he did with himself the subsequent three days is not exactly known; but early on Friday morning he told his wife he should go and see his employer (Mr White) and ask him to take him in again. Not long after he had so spoken to his wife she found him apparently standing by the door of a closet. She shook him, but he made no reply; and his wife (somewhat frightened) called in her neighbours, who discovered he had hung himself. His hands were warm when the neighbours placed his body on a table. Verdict "Temporary Insanity."

EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Valiant Soldier Inn upon the body of the child of a MRS JANE REED, who stated that she came from London about a fortnight ago, and had since lodged with Mrs Willey, of Holloway-street. The child was one of twins, and had never been registered or baptised. She told Mrs Willey that she had only one child, because she objected to children. The child had been unwell lately, and she got some simple medicine, of which she gave the child a few drops in its food, and it seemed better on Sunday afternoon. Her sister on that lay down with the child and awoke about five, when the child was dead. ELIZABETH HARRIS, sister of last witness, corroborated this evidence. Mrs Willey said that when MRS REED and her sister came to lodge with her they represented that they had only one child, and she was not aware until the child was dead, when she was called up, that there were two. Mr Roper, surgeon, said he was called on Sunday evening to see the child, he went directly, but the child was dead, his opinion was that it died from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 1 May 1867, Issue 5266 – Gale Document No. Y3200709589
CHUDLEIGH – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Thursday upon the body of JAMES TANCOCK, a labourer, n the employ of Lord Clifford, of Ugbrook. The deceased (a married man, thirty years of age,) was engaged on Wednesday with several other men binding wood. Between ten and eleven o'clock it began to rain, and the men adjourned for shelter to a linhay belonging to John Cook, at Gappah. They there remained the rest of the day, and after they had drunk all the cider in their bottles Cook replenished them from his own stock. About eight o'clock in the evening the party broke up, and the deceased proceeded towards Chudleigh, where he resided. He was a little the worse for liquor, but walked upright and without difficulty He was afterwards met by George Ridgeway. Early next morning the deceased was found by a labourer in a quarry near Chudleigh Rocks, quite dead. P.C. Ford discovered footprints on the top of the rock, and also the deceased's hat hanging to some bushes beside the cliffs, and there was also other signs which left no doubt that the deceased had fallen over. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 15 May 1867, Issue 5268 – Gale Document No. Y3200709635
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the City Workhouse on Saturday upon the body of MARTHA BEER, aged ten years. The deceased fell over the stairs, whereby she received injury that soon afterwards resulted in death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

The Coroner likewise held an Inquest on Monday on the body of THOMAS BREWER who was killed by being struck with the branch of a tree from which he was stripping the bark at Whitstone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 August 1867, Issue 5280 – Gale Document No. Y3200709934
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Topsham Inn, in this city upon the body of GEORGE SAMPSON. The Deceased was assisting his father in blinding grass in a field at Whitstone, when he stepped n some wooden spars and one of them punctured his ankle. The next day he complained of pain, and subsequently he was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Verdict "Accidental Death."

BOAT ACCIDENT AT DAWLISH – We briefly noticed in a late edition of last week's Flying Post the melancholy accident at Dawlish on Tuesday evening, when MR HENRY GEORGE BRUTTON, of Exmouth, was drowned. An Inquest was held on Thursday before Mr Bone, Deputy Coroner, when Mr C. H. Benet (articled clerk to Mr Gray, of this city,) who resides at Lympstone, stated that on Tuesday, about six o'clock, he accompanied deceased in a sailing boat to Dawlish. They landed, had one or two glasses of ale, and shortly before nine left Dawlish pier. Soon after they were afloat, the end of the halyard caught in the top of the mainmast. Deceased told witness to sit quiet in the middle of the boat and he would get it down. He then stepped on the gunwale for that purpose, when the boat immediately capsized. They were then about 150 yards from shore. The sea was very calm. Deceased, who was heavily clothed, swan about six yards. Witness held him up for a little time, hoping for assistance, but was obliged to let go as he could hold on no longer. Deceased then sank. He never spoke. they had been in the boat about ten minutes before the accident happened. Deceased told witness that he had been drinking; but as he appeared quite sober witness thought he was joking. All that witness saw him have was two glasses of beer. They walked on the beach some time before leaving the pier. Mr Charles Warwick Tapper, of Dawlish, stated that he saw deceased before getting into the boat. He appeared to be quite sober. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 14 August 1867, Issue 5281 – Gale Document No. Y3200709960
EXETER – THOMAS HEWETT HOWARD went with his father's dinner on Thursday to the gas works near the Haven Banks, and on leaving the works he went directly to the river side and was drowned. His cries were heard, and it is conjectured that he tried to jump on board Mr Brand's diminutive steamer, but fell short of the leap. His body was recovered not long afterwards, and the Coroner's Jury attributed his death to accident/ His parents live in Smythen-street, in this city.

CHARLES GODBEER, a lad, was drowned in the Exeter Basin on Friday. He and another boy named George Baker got into a boat; afterwards GODBEER jumped ashore, and in his endeavour again to jump into the boat fell into the water. Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on the remains on Monday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 28 August 1867, Issue 5283 – Gale Document No. Y3200710010
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, in this city, on Friday, upon the body of WILLIAM NICHOLLS, living in Magdalen-street, who was found dead in bed that morning. Mr Perkins, surgeon, said he had attended deceased for a long time for disease of the heart, of which disease it was his opinion he died. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 11 September 1867, Issue 5285 – Gale Document No. Y3200710059
EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday at the Poltimore Inn, St Sidwell, upon the body of JOHN SMITH. The deceased was a mason and had been working at the new church at Mount Dinham. Returning to his home on Wednesday he complained of being unwell; and the next day, though advised not to do it, he took an emetic, thinking it would remove a tightness across his chest. Soon afterwards his wife found him dead in his bed. His death was attributed to Natural Causes. He had for many years suffered from polypus, and was sixty-three years old.

An Inquest was held on Monday before Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of SAMUEL MAUNDER, thirty-nine years of age, messenger at the Bankruptcy Court, residing in Church-street, St Sidwell's. Deceased had been at work all the day on Saturday, and about four o'clock partook of some tea at his home and then retired to his bedroom. He was soon afterwards taken with a fit of shaking, and in about twenty minutes expired. Mr Woodman was sent for, but did not arrive before life was extinct. He believed the man died from Natural Causes, most probably from an aneurism or rupture of a blood vessel of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Wednesday 25 September 1867, Issue 5287 – Gale Document No. Y3200710109
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Fireman's Arms Inn, West Quarter, on the body of the illegitimate son of MARY DOWNHAM. The deceased was seven weeks old; and the mother, who is about twenty-one years of age, has been living in Rack-street, with a man named Coombes. The child had not been well since its birth, and on Sunday morning when the mother awoke she found it dead by her side. A fortnight since it was under the care of Mr Roper, and was apparently getting better. Dr Perkins, acting for Mr Roper, thought the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest at the Exminster Asylum last week upon the body of JAMES DYMOND, formerly residing in Exeter. He had been in the asylum between four and five years. On the preceding Sunday forty of the inmates of the asylum, among whom was the deceased, were taken for a walk on the Haven Banks; and when near Countess Weir Bridge, the deceased suddenly jumped in the Canal. Skinner, one of the three attendants who were present, endeavoured to rescue him with a crooked stick, but the deceased swam away from it and disappeared. An alarm was raised and a drag procured, but when the body was got out life was extinct. Dr Saunders, medical superintendent at the asylum, was of opinion that the deceased jumped into the water under a sudden impulse, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 25 September 1867, Issue 5287 – Gale Document No. Y3200710118
HONITON – MR SAMUEL BROMHEAD, son-in-law of the Mayor of Honiton, accidentally killed himself on Thursday evening. The unfortunate gentleman, accompanied by a Mr Hewlings, left Honiton to go to Mr Trott's, at Round Ball Farm, for the purpose of shooting rabbits. When they arrived at the farm Mr Hewlings asked his friend to supply him with some ammunition. MR BROMHEAD stood with the stock of his gun resting on his foot; and whilst assisting to load the gun held by Mr Hewlings his own exploded, the contents lodging in his face, blowing away part of his nose and some of the brain. MR BROMHEAD expired within five minutes of the melancholy event. Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest the next day upon the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. MR BROMHEAD was a young man, and has only lately lived at Honiton. He leaves a widow and one child, for whom, and for her father and the other members of her family, much sympathy is felt.

Wednesday 2 October 1867, Issue 5287 – Gale Document No. Y3200710135
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday upon the body of ANN SIMMONS, aged sixty, wife of GEORGE SIMMONS, of Strong's-court, Bartholomew-yard. Deceased died suddenly on Sunday, and the medical evidence attributed death to weakness and spasms of the heart. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 9 October 1867, Issue 5288 – Gale Document No. Y3200710158
EXETER – Melancholy Case of Drowning. – Mr H,. Hooper, held an Inquest yesterday at the Custom House Inn, Quay Hill, on the body of HENRY MOGFORD, twenty-seven years of age, a member of the Exeter Police Force. Deceased went on his duty near the Quay on the previous night, and was visited by the patrol about two o'clock in the morning, when in answer to the usual question put he said, "All right." The patrol went on the beat again about two hours afterwards and could not see anything of him. On his being missed search was made for him; and as nothing could be heard about him, the river was ultimately dragged, and his body found about seven o'clock in the morning near the higher end of the wharf on the Quay. He was quite dead; and was at once taken to the Custom House Inn. In answer to the Jury it was stated that there was a large block of wood near the spot where he had fallen in but that was some four feet from the edge; and the body was found some five feet further down. He was in the habit of sleeping on his beat. Mr C. H. Roper stated that he had examined the deceased but did not find any marks of violence upon him. From the state of the body he appeared to have been in the water some hours. His opinion was that death resulted from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned; but as to how the body came into the water there was no evidence to show." Deceased leaves a widow and two or three children, and was known to be a steady and well behaved man. Several rumours had been current during the day as to unfair play having taken place; but the Coroner said the verdict passed by the Jury did not preclude any further steps being taken. Mr D. Steel, superintendent of the police, said nothing should be wanting on his part in giving the matter a thorough investigation.

Wednesday 9 October 1867, Issue 5288 – Gale Document No. Y3200710153
BIDEFORD – JOHN WALKEY, of Bideford, in the employ of the Rolle Canal Company, was at his work in a shed on Thursday, when, from some unexplained cause, the wheel of the engine burst. One part of it struck the unfortunate man, fracturing his skull and lacerating the brain. The injuries led to his death within four hours of the occurrence. He was forty-four years of age. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." He has left a widow and two children to mourn his loss.

Wednesday 30 October 1867, Issue 5291 – Gale Document No. Y3200710240
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Corn Exchange Inn on Monday upon the body of an infant. The mother (SUSAN CLAPP, wife of a labourer, living in Coffin's Court, Smythen-street,) stated that on the night of the 217th instant she awoke and found her baby dead. There was no marks of violence on the body and death was attributed to the child's being overlaid.

Wednesday 4 December 1867, Issue 5296 – Gale Document No. Y3200710386
SHALDON – MRS ANN WHITE, who has for nine years been housekeeper to Mr Withers, hung herself on Saturday afternoon. She had complained in the day of being unwell; but having partaken of a cup of coffee, said she should go into her bed room. Subsequently she was found suspended in a garret. At the inquest on Monday a verdict was given of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 11 December 1867, issue 5297 – Gale Document No. Y3200710400
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Clifton Inn, St Sidwell, on Thursday upon the body of NICHOLAS HELLINS. The deceased, an Independent minister, resided at No. 8, Summerland-terrace; and on the previous day was found dead in his bed room. He was seventy-four years of age, and it was the opinion of Mr Hunt, surgeon, that MR HELLINS died from apoplexy, whilst in the act of washing himself. Verdict accordingly.

SINGULAR FATALITY AT ST. THOMAS' ASYLUM. – On the 23rd Nov. a lady named MRS JANE CLARKE, fifty-eight years of age, was admitted as a patient to the St. Thomas' Asylum. She had been admitted four times previously; and was of the class of lunatics who are generally mischievous, but do not show any personal violence or suicidal tendency. When admitted into the institution she talked very rapidly and incoherently, and had remained in a similar state up to within a short time of her unfortunate death. She was very destructive, and would at times tear down the paper from the walls, knock the cob or plastering off, and break away the woodwork from around the fire-place. She was also when in this state endowed with such great strength that she would even split in the panels of the door, and knock the brickwork out from between the supports of the wall. She went on in this way up to the 3rd Dec. At that time she was kept in a room by herself; and had broken everything up in such a manner as to cause the officers of the institution to have a room prepared for her in a stronger manner. In the room she had been kept in a guard, as of course is usual in the rooms of lunatics, was placed before the fire; but to her enormous strength it was as nothing. She wrenched the bars asunder, and had full access to the fire. As a necessary precaution, therefore, the room in which she was to be placed was supplied with a much stronger fire guard, and boarded up to the heighth of about ten feet. Shutters were also put to the windows, with holes pierced in them to admit the light. In fact everything that was thought necessary to prevent her from doing any harm was done. Her bedstead – or rather the remains of her bedstead, for she had broken it in several pieces – was taken away from her, and she was only left two mattresses – one of flock and the other of straw – to lie on, besides the usual bedding. About half past five on the evening of the 3rd Dec. she was removed from the room in which she had committed such destruction to this one specially prepared for her. She did not express any dislike whatever at the removal, and, to use the words of the attendant, for MRS CLARKE, appeared very quiet and comfortable. She complained a little of the cold and wanted more fire to be put in; but in the opinion of the attendants there was quite fire enough and no more coals were put on. As is always usual she was visited about half-past ten o'clock by the head attendant, and then appeared to be very quiet and comfortable. The fire was then in a very low state, and as MRS CLARKE complained of the cold previously, the head attendant thought she would not put the fire out but let it burn out of itself. About half-past five the following morning the head attendant was awakened by the cries of fire from patients in rooms near the one in which she slept. Dr Eales, the medical gentleman temporarily acting for Mr Lisle, was immediately brought acquainted that there was fire in the house. He at once hastily dressed himself and proceeded along the main passage to the ladies' compartments, and there found a room full of smoke. He soon found, however, that the fire was not in that room but in one immediately under, and gave orders for some water to be thrown through the flooring. He then at once proceeded to the room below which was that of MRS CLARKE. By that time the head attendant, Jane Johns, and another called Mary Lee, had unlocked the door. On looking into the room which was filled with smoke he saw the body of MRS CLARKE stretched at full length upon the floor. She was immediately removed to an adjoining room by his orders, and then seen to breathe once and died. The usual means to restore animation were persevered in for nearly an hour but without avail. The body was then stripped and examined. It was found that she had several superficial burns on the face, head, arms and legs; also a superficial burn along the spine. Her clothes were those of the usual night habiliments; but what was most mysterious and extraordinary they were not in any way burnt or even discoloured by the fire. That could not in any way be accounted for by those in attendance. The room was discovered to be on fire in several places, the bedding all burnt, in fact everything, even the boarding on the walls, more or less charred or burnt. It was thought the whole house would be in flames; but water was supplied very freely, and the fire luckily extinguished before any further damage was done. The unfortunate deceased had been attended previous to her removal to this asylum by Dr Drake, and that gentleman stated her mania was that she was always wanting to be lighting fires. She would get up in the middle of the night and light fires in every grate in her house. The deceased was a lady; but nothing has transpired showing her place of residence, or the names of her relatives. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner for the County. The foreman of the Jury was Mr Smith; and from the evidence given it was thought by all present to be a very extraordinary thing that the deceased lady should have been burnt in different parts, and her clothes not even soiled. The only reasonable supposition that could be put upon it by the witnesses was, that she must have dressed herself afterwards. In the opinion of Mr Eales, the deceased met with death by suffocation accelerated by the burning. All the evidence that could in any way tend to clear up the mysterious death of this lady was given, and the verdict ultimately arrived at by the Jury was that the deceased intentionally set fire to the room and that she died of suffocation and burning. Several pieces of straw were found about the room, and from the singular position of some pieces on the fire-guard it is conjectured that the deceased ripped her straw mattress and ingeniously contrived to procure a light through the bars of the fire-guard, and then ignited the bulk.

Wednesday 18 December 1867, Issue 5298 – Gale Document No. Y3200710423
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday upon the body of GEORGE TRICKEY, baker, of Paris-street, in this city. The evidence went to prove that the deceased died on Saturday from the rupture of a blood vessel. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 24 December 1867, Issue 5299 –Gale Document No. Y3200710447
EXETER – JOHN GREENWAY, employed at the brickfield, in Polsloe-road, was crushed to death on Saturday by the falling of a large quantity of bricks. It was the duty of the deceased to attend to the fire in the kiln and to superintend the drying loft; and on Friday there were about two and half tons of bricks in the loft under which the deceased was in the habit of working. During the night of Friday he told one of the men at work with him that he heard one of the joists snap, and the man told him he ought not to work there as it was dangerous. However, he continued working until Saturday morning about ten o'clock, when the joist gave way and the deceased was buried under about 700 or 1,000 bricks. Some men working near heard the crash and immediately proceeded to extricate him. He was heard to speak twice, and a minute afterwards groaned and died. Mr J. E. G. Coxwell, surgeon, of Heavitree, promptly attended, but his assistance was of no avail; and at the Inquest yesterday that gentleman gave his opinion that death resulted from compression of the brain, the Jury returning a verdict in accordance therewith. Deceased was forty-eight years of age, and leaves a widow and nine children, five of them under seven years of age, in the most destitute state. He was in the receipt of 15s. a week.

On Sunday evening a man named MILTON (a pensioner), residing in Mary Arches-street, dropped down and died near the Post-office. He was at once taken to the South western Hotel, when it was found he had ruptured a blood vessel. Deceased had for several years filled the situation of porter at Messrs. Brocks. He was formerly in the Coldstream Guards. An Inquest was held upon the body yesterday at the London and South-Western Hotel, and a verdict of "Death from Natural causes" was returned.

Wednesday 24 December 1867, Issue 5299 –Gale Document No. Y3200710460
CREDITON – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest at the Crediton Union Workhouse on Friday upon the body of the infant of JANE BROWN, an inmate. The child was found dead in bed by the side of its mother, and the evidence left no doubt that it had been "overlaid". Verdict accordingly.

BRIXHAM – Death From Starvation. – Brixham reckons amongst its resident fishermen an individual by the name of JAMES BUFFETT. His habits generally need not be ascertained. He has a wife and three children; and instead of living with them he prefers the "domestic" comforts of his boat. The wife seems to have maintained herself and family for some time; but latterly she has experienced great difficulty in keeping body and soul together. One of her children fell sick; but for three days the only thing the mother could procure for her sick child was a little boiled rice. The girl became worse, and whilst the mother went out in quest of Charity the poor child died. They lived in a two-roomed underground cellar, almost devoid of furniture – their bed was a mere bundle of straw; and there were n windows, except holes covered by wooden shutters, which when open to admit the light likewise admitted the cold. And at the time of the death of the child, who was ten years old, there was no food, no coal, no candle in this wretched home of Misery. Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at the Old George Inn upon the body of MATILDA BUFFETT; and the Jury returned a verdict that "Death resulted from Natural Causes, accelerated by want f the necessaries of life and by parental neglect." In the course of the Inquiry the Coroner remarked that the place where the wife and children lived was a scene of destitution such as he never before had witnessed; and he was quite surprised to think that in Christian England, with so many who professed to visit the poor and relieve their wants, this miserable hovel had not been previously found out. He thought there must be great neglect of someone. He believed the town possessed a Local Board; and if so, where was its inspector of nuisances, that he had not brought the state of this wretched family under the notice of someone who could have alleviated their wretchedness. Mr Wicks, the inspector of nuisances, said he had brought this matter under the notice of the proper authorities, but he believed the defect was in the law and not with the authorities, as they had no power to interfere. Mr Webber thought that such a scene as this was a disgrace to the opulence of the town.

Wednesday 24 December 1867, Issue 5299 –Gale Document No. Y3200710461
Early on Saturday morning an alarm of fire was raised at 4, Hick's-lane, Looe-street, Plymouth. A woman, named SUSAN FOWLER, eighty-one years of age, who resided in a small room in the house, caught her clothes on fire and thus fired the room. Assistance was promptly rendered and the fire extinguished, but not until the old woman was very severely burnt. She was immediately taken by the police to the South Devon Hospital, where every attention was paid her, but she sank under the shock, and died during the day. In the evening an Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 1 January 1868, Issue 5300 – Gale Document No. Y3200710489
BIDEFORD – GEORGE PADDON, thirteen years of age, was out with other little boys shooting on Thursday, and when PADDON was pushing a stock down the barrel of the gun the gun exploded. The stick was forced into the body of the boy, who died from the injury the next day. Mr Coroner Pridham held an Inquest upon the remains, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 8 January 1868, Issue 5301 – Gale Document No. Y3200710501
EXETER – ALICE MORRISH, a poor deserted infant, died at the Workhouse on Monday. She was three years of age, and entered the Workhouse on the 2nd January, 1865. The child was always weakly, and on Monday whilst at the nursery was seized with convulsions, and after a few minutes died. Everything that was necessary in such cases was immediately attended to by the matron; but to no purpose. An Inquest was held yesterday upon the body, and the verdict of the Jury was that she died from convulsions.

Wednesday 15 January 1868, Issue 5302 – Gale Document No. Y3200710523
EXETER - INQUESTS - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., upon the body of MRS MARGARET BURNETT, of Holloway-street. Deceased was forty-eight years of age, and suffered from asthma and general weakness. On Saturday she appeared worse; but did not have any medical advice until noon. Mr Harris, who was her medical attendant in general, was then sent for, but was not at home. After some time Mr Roper was sent for; but before he arrived the deceased was dead. In his opinion she died from syncope, produced by weakness of the heart, and a verdict in accordance with that testimony was returned.

Another Inquest was held at the Country House Inn, Catherine-street, on the body of a child named PHILLIPS, six months old. The child was taken suddenly ill with something in the throat on Friday afternoon and almost immediately died. Mr Roper believed the child died of spasmodic croup, and a verdict to that effect was returned by the Jury.

Another was also held yesterday at the Wellington Inn, King-street, on the body of the infant child of MRS JERRED, living at the Golden Fleece Inn, Smythen-street. The child was only a month old, and of a very weakly constitution. On Monday night it was taken with convulsions ,and died in about a quarter of an hour. Mr Hartnoll was of opinion that death was caused by a "£spasm of the glottis." Verdict accordingly.

Also one took place at the Topsham Inn, yesterday, on the body of ALBERT GEORGE BADCOCK, aged thirteen months, son of MR GEORGE BADCOCK, of James-street. The child had been ill at intervals since November, but on Sunday afternoon was taken much worse. Mr Edye was sent for but was not at home. Mr Roper was then sent for, but the child was dead before his arrival. Mr Edye had examined the child since its death and gave it as his opinion that death was caused from convulsions. The verdict of the Jury was in accordance therewith.

EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday at Widgery's Spirit Vaults, Summerland-street, upon the body of MARY PHILLIPS, aged 54, wife of a coach-builder, living in Summerland-row. The deceased died somewhat suddenly on the preceding day, and it was considered that death resulted from the rupture f a blood vessel, in connection with disease of the heart. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 15 January 1868, Issue 5302 – Gale Document No. Y3200710534
BARNSTAPLE – Mr Coroner Bencraft held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of MARY JONES, aged sixty. The deceased had for a few weeks lives as nurse with Mr Pugsley, butcher, of Rumsam; and on Saturday morning she took up a cup of tea to Mr and Mrs Pugsley. Whilst conversing with Mr Pugsley as to the arrangements for bringing to Barnstaple the remains of his brother (Charles Pugsley) from the Exminster Asylum the nurse fell backward and expired almost instantly. The medical evidence proved that death resulted from Natural Causes, and a verdict in accordance was returned.

TEIGNMOUTH – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Saturday at the Teignmouth Infirmary upon the body of CHARLES BABBAGE, aged fourteen, son of the late MR BABBAGE, manager of the Dawlish Bank. On Thursday week the boy BABBAGE and another lad, named Medland, went out shooting small birds. BABBAGE got on the top of a hedge and requested Medland to give him one end of his gun that he might assist him up. Medland accordingly gave him the muzzle of the gun, while he held on to the stock end of it, and he was in the act of being pulled up the hedge when the gun exploded. BABBAGE'S right arm from the elbow to the shoulder was fearfully shattered, as was also a portion of his side. The deceased exclaimed , "O, my God, I'm killed!" and fainted; but, Medland, giving him some water from a brook close by, he recovered a little, and afterwards with the assistance of his companion walked partly home, but on the way he again fell down from exhaustion. Medland went for assistance, and on returning, accompanied by a man named John Greenslade – another man called Tucker having refused to go when asked, - deceased was found lying in a stream water and greatly exhausted from loss of blood. He was taken to the Infirmary close by; but he was found to be too weak to have the limb amputated. The wound was consequently dressed, and he lingered until Thursday in much agony, when mortification set in, and, as the last resource to save the poor fellow's life, the limb was taken off. This, however, proved too much for him, and he died about nine o'clock on Saturday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 22 January 1868, Issue 5303 – Gale Document No. Y3200710546
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday at the Round Tree Inn upon the body of JAMES LEE, a sweep, aged twenty-one. The deceased had been an inmate of the Hospital on several occasions; and he seems to have suffered from a diseased brain. He was found dead in bed; and Mr Perkins, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that he died from convulsions, caused by the affliction from which he had for many years suffered. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 22 January 1868, Issue 5303 – Gale Document No. Y3200710560
CHUDLEIGH – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at Waddon Farm House on Monday upon the body of JOHN BERRY, who had worked for Mr Wills for some years. Deceased was found dead in the road near his cottage on Saturday evening, and the medical testimony attributed death to apoplexy. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 5 February 1868, Issue 5305 – Gale Document No. Y3200710611
EXMOUTH – The police imagined they had a case of concealment of birth at Exmouth on Thursday, when Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest upon the body of the infant of HENRIETTA RICHARDS, a mere girl. But the evidence satisfied the Jury that the infant came to its death by natural causes; and there was no concealment of birth, for the woman with whom RICHARDS lived went immediately for the doctor when she ascertained what was likely to occur.

DUNSFORD – Policeman John T. Rowe was on duty in the village of Dunsford on Friday, when he saw a mendicant pursuing his vocation; but to make certain of it the policeman changed his clothes and then put himself in the way of the man, who, mistaking the constable, sought aid from him. Thereupon the officer took the beggar into custody; but the tramp resisted with considerable force. In the course of the struggle the policeman saw his opponent turn very white in the face and that froth was coming from his mouth. The officer became alarmed and went at once for medical aid, removing the mendicant to the Royal Oak Inn; but the poor old fellow was a corpse before MR E. B. Stephens, surgeon, was able to reach the public house. Some of the village tattlers indulged themselves freely at the expense of the policeman, alleging that he had been guilty of such violence as to cause the tramp's death; but at the Inquest on Monday before Mr Coroner Crosse, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and the policeman was fully exonerated from blame. The deceased was called WILLIAM PARISH, and was over fifty years of age.

TORQUAY – JACOB WINSOR, a mason, committed suicide last week. He was fifty-eight years of age; had been unwell for some time; and was compelled to allow his subscription to the Masons' Society to fall in arrears. He got better, went to work for Mr W. Harvey, whose foreman and some other workmen gibed the poor old fellow from being a non-society man. This was thought to have affected his mind, and one morning he was found in his house in Lower Union-lane with his throat cut. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane," expressing strong disapproval of the conduct of those men who had twitted the deceased in reference to the society.

Wednesday 5 February 1868, Issue 5305 – Gale Document No. Y3200710600
EXETER – Manslaughter. – An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, upon the body of THOMAS SMALL, twenty-eight years of age, a mason of Exmouth. The deceased on the 6th January left his home to attend his club; and had previously been drinking. He called at one or two places during the evening, and about half-0past ten went into the White Hart Inn. While there a man named John Cook, a baker, of Exmouth, and another man named Hallett tossed for some brandy, Hallett winning. The brandy was brought in but was drunk by Cook. Angry words ensued, and the deceased took the matter up on the side of Hallett. Further angry words then followed between the deceased and Cook, and ultimately they fought. During the fight the men fell twice – each time Cook being upper-most. Upon getting up the second time the deceased requested to be taken out of the room. This was done and every assistance rendered. He then complained of internal pain; and was subsequently assisted home. Not entering into conversation with his wife and appearing stupefied she thought him tipsy. He did not sleep during the night, and in the morning desired his wife to send for a doctor. Mr Ward, surgeon, of Exmouth, immediately ordered the removal of the deceased to the Hospital. He was admitted there on the 7th January. A short time afterwards an operation was performed upon him which gave him a great deal of ease, and it was thought the patient was in a fair way of recovery. In a few days, however, extensive sloughing and repeated bleeding came on, and this continuing the patient sank under it. By order of the Coroner, a post mortem examination as made of the body by Mr Huxley, house surgeon at the Hospital. He discovered that internal injury had taken place which might have been produced by the weight of one man upon another, and in such cases usually proved fatal. The Coroner briefly addressed the Jury expounding the law, and after a few minutes' deliberation they returned a verdict of Manslaughter against John Cook, who was committed to take his trial at the next assizes. Bail was accepted in two sureties of £25 each, and Cook himself in £50.

Wednesday 12 February 1868, Issue 5306 – Gale Document No. Y3200710626
WILLIAM DAVEY, in the employ of Mr Kerridge, of Halscombe Farm, Ide, was driving a cart on Monday, when he fell and received such injuries as led to his death within a short period afterwards. He was only fourteen years old. An Inquest is to be held on Thursday.

EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held two Inquests on Thursday. One was at the Golden Eagle Inn upon the body of the infant of ELIZABETH HORWELL, of Bartholomew-street. The evidence satisfied the Jury that the child died from Natural Causes.

The other Inquest was at the Star and Garter Inn upon the body of a child aged eight months, daughter of Mr THOMAS HARTLAND, saddler, of Commercial-road. The sister of the deceased fell over the stairs with the child in her arms, and its death was caused by injury done to its head. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 25 March 1868, Issue 5312 – Gale Document No. Y3200710778
WILLIAM TUCKER, farm labourer, of Woodbury, died in the Exeter Hospital on Sunday morning. On the previous day he was engaged in drawing coal from Topsham to Woodbury, and whilst in the road he fell off the waggon and one of the wheels passed over him. He was not sober at the time. An Inquest was held yesterday morning, when a verdict of "Accidental Death was returned.

Wednesday 1 April 1868, Issue 5313 – Gale Document No. Y3200710807
EXETER – MR VICKARY, one of the most energetic and successful of Exeter tradesmen, died very suddenly on Wednesday about noon. Few men were better known or more generally esteemed than MR VICKARY, and the suddenness of his death created a most painful sensation throughout the city. The Inquest was held at the deceased gentleman's residence, South Lawn, on Friday morning, before Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner for the City and County of Exeter. The house was described as standing on "No Man's Land," adjoining the parishes of St Sidwell's and Holy Trinity. Mr Musgrave Bickford said, I am a carrier's agent and reside in Bedford-street, Exeter. MR VICKARY was my brother-in-law. He was forty-nine years of age on his last birthday. Yesterday I received information, about half-past two, and went immediately to MR VICKARY'S residence, at South Lawn, and on arriving I found him sitting in a chair in the dining room, apparently asleep, but he was quite dead. MRS VICKARY, the nurse and Mr Arthur Cumming were with him. Grace Hopping said, I am a nurse in the service of the late MR VICKARY, and have been so for some years. I was at home on Wednesday, when MR VICKARY came home about half-past one o'clock. He walked round the lawn with MRS VICKARY. He appeared very cheerful and in his usual health. I saw him happy and cheerful at the dinner table with his children. He had some boiled whiting for dinner, with a small slice of cold beef after, and a glass of cider. About half-past two o'clock, after dinner, MRS VICKARY called me to the dining room. I found MR VICKARY seated in the easy chair, and MRS VICKARY was bathing his temples with cold water. He was breathing very heavily. He drew some heavy breaths and died in my presence. I heard him say he had been at a fire adjoining his foundry, and it had passed off better than he had expected. Arthur James Cumming said, I am a surgeon residing and practising in Exeter. I knew the deceased, JOHN VICKARY. I was his medical attendant. I was called to go to him at South Lawn on Wednesday last, about half-past two o'clock. I found him in his arm chair in the dining room and dead – quite warm and in an easy position. I had not seen him very recently. I have no doubt he had a diseased heart and that he died from disease of the heart. I think the excitement he had undergone in the morning at the fire may have accelerated his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Sudden Death from Disease of the Heart." The funeral of the lamented gentleman took place yesterday in the family vault at the old cemetery, the Rev. G. H. Shield, rector of Trinity, officiating. The attendance of citizens and others, with the Right Worshipful the Mayor, several members of the Town Council, and about 150 of MR VICKARY'S work-people, testified to the great esteem in which he was held; and many were the expressions of sympathy and condolence with his bereaved widow and her numerous family.

Wednesday 22 April 1868, Issue 5316 – Gale Document No. Y3200710886
TORQUAY – Fatal Disaster. – The Torquay Railway Station was the scene of a fatality on Wednesday. The points and signals at the station were under the charge of John Chamberlain, who on Wednesday ought to have been relieved at dinner time by a porter named Coleridge; but Coleridge seems to have made a private arrangement with another porter named Edward Michelmore to take charge of the points whilst Chamberlain was away at dinner. The excursion train from Exeter had arrived at the Torquay Station, the passengers had alighted, the carriages were removed in on the middle set of rails, and the engine ran up to the Torre Station (where it was turned round), thence it was driven back to the Torquay Station and "couple up" to the empty carriages, in readiness to take the excursionists back after the steeple chases were over. The excursion engine had only just taken up its position, when the usual goods train (which seldom stops at Torquay) was heard coming from Torre. The whistle from the goods engine seems to have greatly confused the pointsman Michelmore, who gave the "clear" signal, without shifting the points to their normal state, and stood with his arm out, indicating "all right." The result was that the goods engine ran directly against the stationary excursion engine. The driver and stoker thereof jumped off before the engines met; and the driver (CHARLES MARSH) and the fireman (William Kerswell) of the goods train leaped from their engine at the moment of the collision. MARSH was killed on the spot by one of the trucks turning over on him. Kerswell and one of the guards (Robert Stanlake) were seriously injured; and they were removed to the Torquay Infirmary. The remains of poor MARSH were gathered up and placed in a room adjoining the station; and on Thursday Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest thereon. The evidence exonerated everyone from blame, excepting Coleridge and Michelmore; but Coleridge was not legally responsible for placing Michelmore to look after the points instead of doing it himself. The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Edward Michelmore, who immediately after the disaster ran away; and it was supposed on Thursday that he had committed suicide. But he seems to have hurried away to Kingsbridge, where his wife's relatives reside; but when the news of the verdict reached him he was advised to give himself up to the police. Consequently on Friday he returned to Torquay, and was afterwards taken before the Coroner at Newton Abbot. He was committed for trial, but bail was accepted. The remains of poor MARSH were interred at Moretonhampstead on Sunday, when the funeral was attended by more than 200 persons. The decease leaves a widow, who is in the last stage of consumption. He was thirty-five years old, and had been stationed at Moretonhampstead since the railway was opened to that town.

Wednesday 6 May 1868, Issue 5318 – Gale Document No. Y3200710943
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Alexandria Inn, Bonhay-road, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of JOSEPH LOVELL, whose body was found in the leat at Mr Pyne's mill, that morning. The deceased was forty-five years of age, and a whip maker by trade. He lost his wife about seven months ago, and has since been in a desponding state. He had complained that he was in debt and unable to earn a livelihood. On Friday night he was selling shrimps at the Paper Makers' Arms Inn, near where the body was found. he left about ten o'clock, and was seen to go over Engine Bridge, on which his basket was found next morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned.

Wednesday 13 May 1868, Issue 5319 – Gale Document No. Y3200710981
CHITTLEHAMPTON – Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of RICHARD WEBBER, aged seventy-six. Deceased was a thatcher. One day he slipped his foot on getting over a gate and fell on his head, whereby he sustained a fracture of the spine, causing death two days afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental death."

Wednesday 20 May 868, Issue 5320 – Gale Document No. Y3200711009
TIVERTON – Another instance of the danger arising from the stupid practice of playing with fire arms has occurred at Oxford. MR JAMES WATSON BARNE, commoner of Exeter College, and son of the late MR JOHN BARNE, banker, of Tiverton, went out in a punt on the Cherwell, accompanied by his intimate college friend, Mr A. M. Gordon. They were amusing themselves by shooting birds with a breech-loader pistol. Not knowing that his friend had put a bullet into the barrel Mr Gordon took up the pistol and pointed it in fun at his companion. The pistol exploded and the bullet entered the breast of MR BARNE, causing instant death. An Inquest was held on the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, with the annexed remonstrance: "We wish to express our strong disapproval of the prevailing indiscriminate use of saloon pistols by the undergraduate members of the university, and desire to call the attention of the authorities of the universities and the colleges to the dangerous practice.

Wednesday 3 June 1868, Issue 5322 – Gale Document No. Y3200711049
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Three Cranes Inn, South-street, upon the body of the child of MARY WHITE. The child was born on the previous Thursday, and died on Saturday. No medical man had been called in; and the Inquest was adjourned to enable a post mortem examination.

Wednesday 10 June 1868, Issue 5323 – Gale Document No. Y3200711075
Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest at the Falmouth Inn, St. Thomas, on Saturday, on the body of JAMES THOMAS, one of the staff sergeants of the First Devon Militia, who committed suicide on the previous day. On Saturday, the 30th May, the deceased returned home from the forty-one days' training, about half past eleven in the morning, the worse for drink and very much excited. He refused to have any dinner, and again went out, returning about five o'clock in the evening, having been drinking still more. He continued drinking at intervals up to the Wednesday night; and early on Thursday morning he got up and went downstairs for the purpose of getting some gin, but, in mistake, took some silvering solution which was composed of nitric acid, prussic acid, nitrate of silver, and mercury. Mr Farrant, surgeon, was sent for and administered the usual remedies, and deceased seemed to be progressing favourably till Friday morning, when Mr Farrant was again sent for, and shortly after THOMAS DIED. Mr Farrant observed a spot of blood on deceased's shirt, and on looking at his chest discovered a punctured wound half an inch deep and three inches wide, which had penetrated the cavity of the chest. Mr Farrant thought the effects of the poison would eventually have caused death had not deceased stabbed himself; but the wound was the immediate cause of death. THOMAS' son-in-law, John Keen, was watching him on Thursday night, and early on Friday morning deceased got out of bed and went downstairs. He had a very wild look. He returned shortly after and got into bed, and asked Keen whereabouts the region of the heart was, and kept feeling his chest. It was then he must have inflicted the wound in his chest with a chisel. The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

ALLEGED CHILD MURDER. – Mr O. A. Bodley, of No. 10, Richmond-terrace, St David, in this city, had in his service a young woman named ANN RICHARDS. On Saturday afternoon Mr and Mrs Bodley went to Exmouth, and on their return, just before ten the same night, they were detained somewhat longer than usual before they were admitted into their house. Noticing something peculiar Mrs Bodley asked the servant what was the matter, and eventually she admitted that she had given birth to a child, and that she had put it into the cupboard in her bedroom. Mr Bodley went at once for Mr S. Edye, surgeon, and to that gentleman the young woman confessed that she had become a mother. In the cupboard Mr Edye found the body of the child, wrapped in carpet, and twice round its neck was a piece of clothes-line, tied tightly in a bow. The face of the child was much discoloured, and it appeared to be full grown. An Inquest upon the body was held on Monday at the Pack Horse Inn, St. David, by Mr Barton, Deputy Coroner, but was adjourned till last evening to enable Mr Edye to make a post mortem examination. On the reassembling of the Jury, Mr Edye stated that, in conjunction with Mr Grigg, he had made a post mortem examination and found that the child was of mature age, fully developed, had breathed, and the lungs were perfectly healthy. The head and face were deeply livid, and the tongue was protruding between the gums. He found three turns of a thick cord, apparently a clothes-line, tied with two knots, round the neck and under the left ear; it was then brought from the ear under the right arm, across the chest, and up to the back of the neck; and tied with another knot, leaving a livid indentation. The cord was tied so tightly that it was with difficulty it could be separated from the neck. On opening the body the lungs were found inflated and had all the appearances that the child had breathed. The heart and lungs were placed in a tub of water and they floated. The rest of the body was perfectly healthy. On the head being examined there was found at the back patches of extravasated blood which were apparently caused by a fall. The membranes of the brain were somewhat congested; the brain itself being gorged with blood. The blows at the back of the head were not sufficient to cause death. Mrs Bodley believed the cord to be her clothes line usually kept in the kitchen. Mrs Pyne, nurse, said she was fetched on Saturday night and found the girl in bed. She saw no baby linen about the house. She asked the girl if she had any made, and the young woman said she had not, as she did not expect to have been confined for a month. The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against ANN RICHARDS.

Wednesday 10 June 1868, Issue 5323 – Gale Document No. Y3200711083
BARNSTAPLE – An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary on Friday upon the body of JOHN WREY. The deceased and other children were at play in Chanter's Green on the preceding day, when the poor little fellow fell into the ornamental water. He was soon taken out of the water and removed to the infirmary; but the efforts employed to restore animation were unavailing. Verdict "Accidentally drowned."

Wednesday 17 June 1868, Issue 5324 – Gale Document No. Y3200711105
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Foresters' Arms Inn, Commercial-road, on the body of ELLEN COOK, eight weeks' old, daughter of a labourer. The evidence satisfied the Jury that the child died from Natural Causes.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, on Saturday afternoon on the body of JAMES HOARE. Mr William Morgan, dairyman, of Paris-street, for whom deceased was working, said that on the previous day they were "housing" hay at Whipton. HOARE was on the top of a waggon-load of hay, when he slipped and fell on the side of his head. He was taken up insensible and conveyed to the hospital, where he died the following day. Dr Huxley, house surgeon at the hospital, gave it as his opinion that deceased died from a fractured spine. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Mr County Coroner Crosse held two Inquests on Monday. One at the Horse and Groom Inn, Heavitree, upon the body of FREDERICK HOARE, aged 13. He and some other boys went to bathe on Saturday in Duck's Lake, which supplies the paper mills at Countess Weir. The poor boy couldn't swim, out of his depth, and was drowned. The deceased was an illegitimate child and had been brought up by a married woman named Woodman. Verdict – "Accidentally Drowned."

The other Inquest was at the County Gaol upon the body of JOHN QUICKE, aged 72. The deceased was received at the gaol on the 8th of April. sentenced to two months' imprisonment for absconding from the Torrington Union Workhouse and carrying with him the union clothes. His term expired on June 6th; but he was too ill to leave. He lingered till the 12th when he expired. The medical evidence was to the effect that the deceased died from senile decay. He was taken on his admission to the infirmary, put on extra diet, and every attention paid him. Verdict – "Died from Natural causes."

Wednesday 24 June 1868, Issue 5325 – Gale Document No. Y3200711129
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Teignmouth Inn, Westgate, on Monday upon the body of SUSANNAH ANSLEY, thirteen weeks old. The child died early on Sunday morning; but the medical evidence went to show that death resulted from spasms of the heart, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Wednesday 24 June 1868, Issue 5325 – Gale Document No. Y3200711138
INFRACOMBE – EDWARD LEWIS, a cooper, fifty-five years old, lodged at the George and Dragon Inn, Ilfracombe. He was intemperate in his habits, and on Wednesday was found dead in his room. Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest upon the body, when the Jury returned a verdict that LEWIS died from apoplexy, induced by excessive drinking.

Wednesday 1 July 1868, Issue 5326 – Gale Document No. Y3200711166
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, Westgate, on Thursday, upon the body of MARY HEXTER, aged fifty-eight. On the preceding morning the deceased passed some putrid mackerel thrown into a gutter on Stepcote-hill. This affected her stomach so much that she continued vomiting and died the same night from the effects. Mr Roper, surgeon, who was called in to see the deceased, said he believed she was not a strong person, that the vomiting caused exhaustion, and that eventually she died from syncope. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 15 July 1868, Issue 5328 – Gale Document No. Y3200711216
PINHOE – WILLIAM FOWLER, shoemaker, aged sixty-two, hung himself on Friday at Pinhoe. He was addicted to drink. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

STARCROSS – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on Saturday at the Courtenay Arms' Hotel, Starcross, upon the body of WILLIAM BURROW, seventeen years old, who was accidentally drowned whilst bathing in the New River on the preceding evening, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Wednesday 22 July 1868, Issue 5329 – Gale Document No. Y3200711243
TEIGNMOUTH – MR CONRAM, farmer, of Shaldon, has been accidentally killed whilst returning home from his farm with a drill. On descending the hill near Brook Vale Cottage the horse ran away, and MR CONRAM was dragged into the machine and fearfully mutilated. He was immediately removed to his home, but only lingered a few hours. A Coroner's Inquest has been held, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Wednesday 29 July 1868, Issue 5330 – Gale Document No. Y3200711257
KINGSTEIGNTON – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, Kingsteignton, on Saturday, upon the body of MRS ISABELLA IRELAND, aged nineteen, wife of MR IRELAND, who was confined to bed by reason of the injuries he had sustained, gave an account of the melancholy occurrence which had made him a widower. He stated that his wife went to Torquay on the preceding Monday; and that he went after her and some furniture with a horse and waggon on Thursday. They left Torquay on Friday afternoon, and when they were some two miles from Chudleigh the horse began to shake its head, and started off at a wild gallop. He was then sitting on the off side of the waggon, and his wife upon a cushion placed on the top. He instantly jumped across to the near side in order to catch the bridle rein; but failed. At last he seized the driving reins and struggled with the horse some forty or fifty yards, when he was thrown down and two of the wheels passed over him. He got up, and, walking some dozen yards with difficulty, he found his wife lying on the road. He then ran back to a cottage and called for help. On his return he lifted the head of his wife, and she breathed once and expired. Mr Watson, miller, at Bellamarsh Mills, said that his foreman, Henry Metherell, stopped the horse and adjusted the harness, which had been much disarranged by the animal running off. He went back the road and found MR IRELAND and his wife, the latter being dead at the time, and had them removed to the King's Arms. Mr Crocker, the landlord of the King's Arms, proved that MR IRELAND was perfectly sober immediately before the accident. The Coroner, in summing up, thought there was no doubt deceased had come by her untimely death through jumping off the waggon and her had (which was severely bruised) coming in contact with some stones. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." MR IRELAND is progressing favourably.

Wednesday 5 August 1868, Issue 5331 – Gale Document No. BC3200711288
EXETER – WALTER TUCKER, aged eighteen, in the employ of Mr Carter, of Exwick, was kicked in the back by a horse on Wednesday causing a dislocation of the spine. He was removed to the Exeter Hospital, where he died. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 August 1868, Issue 5331 – Gale Document No. BC3200711282
TOTNES – WILLIAM SHILLABEER, an apprentice to Mr Farley, tailor, was drowned on Saturday morning whilst bathing in the river Dart. He and a younger brother went to bathe – they walked across the river first, but on returning WILLIAM walked into a deep pit and was drowned. Coroner's verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 12 August 1868, Issue 5332 – Gale Document No. BC3200711311
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the City arms on Friday upon the body of ELIZA BELVIN, servant to Mr Hellier of Fore-street hill. The deceased was taken ill on Thursday afternoon; she was attended by Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, and died the same day from a ruptured blood vessel in the head. Verdict in accordance with medical testimony.

Wednesday 26 August 1868, Issue 5334 – Gale Document No. Y3200711365
PLYMOUTH – The Plymouth market was the scene of a most painful occurrence on Saturday. MICHAEL DURHAM kept a butcher's stall in the market, and on Saturday morning he and his wife were heard quarrelling: presently the wife rushed out of the stall, exclaiming, "O, my God! he's stabbed – he'll die, he'll die." In a few minutes the man died without intimating by whom the wound in his chest had been inflicted. He was much given to drink, was in difficulties, and his wife declared that he had stabbed himself with what is called "a calf-skinning knife." Abundant evidence was given at the Inquest on Monday, when the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased met with his death from a wound in the heart, but by whom or how inflicted, there was not sufficient evidence to show. His wife was described by the brother of the deceased as "a hard-working woman."

Wednesday 9 September 1868, Issue 5336 – Gale Document No. Y3200711408
EXETER – WILLIAM LETHABY, an errand boy, in the employ of Mr Ackland, chemist, was crossing Queen-street yesterday morning when he was knocked down by the pole of an omnibus. The wheels passed over his body, killing him almost instantly. He was about sixteen years of age. No blame is attached to the driver of the 'bus. The Inquest will be held this day, Wednesday.

Wednesday 16 September 1868, Issue 5337 – Gale Document No. Y3200711439
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday upon the body of CHARLES SMALE, whose mother lives in Preston-street, in this city. The child was found dead in bed by the side of its mother. Verdict – Death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 16 September 1868, Issue 5337 – Gale Document No. Y3200711433
INSTOW – GEORGE FISHLEY, fifteen years old, son of the Instow ferryman, was shot dead on Thursday evening. SAMUEL FISHLEY, brother of the deceased, took out in the day two gentlemen named Woodcock, each of whom had a gun, in one of his father's boats. Returning in the evening they were met at the landing place by the deceased, and while Mr B. Woodcock was in the act of taking up one of the guns lying upon the seat it went off and the contents entered the poor boy's neck, causing instantaneous death. The gun was half cocked. At the Inquest held before Mr J. H. Toller on Saturday Superintendent Cunningham said he had examined the gun and in consequence of the imperfect state of the lock it could be discharged at half-cock. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death," with a recommendation that the gun be destroyed.

Wednesday 30 September 1868, Issue 5339 – Gale Document No. Y3200711489
EXETER - MR WILLIAM ORCHARD, for fourteen years clerk to Mr Thomas Floud, solicitor, of this city, was found dead in a mill stream at Huxham on Thursday. The deceased lived at Broadclist, and he left his home on horseback in the morning, making arrangements with his son to meet him at Mr Floud's office about half-past nine. The deceased seems to have gone out of the direct road in coming to Exeter, for soon after eight o'clock he was at Stoke Canon, where he had something to drink, while his horse was being shod. He there complained of having a pain in his head; but there was nothing in his appearance to indicate the unfortunate circumstance that happened afterwards. Instead of coming direct to Exeter from Stoke the deceased went back the lane leading to Huxham, and in this way he had to pass a stream of water, which crosses the lane. Soon after ten o'clock his body was discovered in this stream, where the water was about two feet deep; but a little higher up than where the vehicles cross the water. His horse was found by Mr Gould, of Poltimore, in one of his fields: the bridle was wet and one stirrup was thrown across the saddle. An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased at the King's Arms Inn, Stoke Canon, by Mr Deputy Coroner Lee, on Friday, when the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was found dead in the water, but how or by what means there was no direct evidence. The deceased leaves a widow and several children. It should be stated he was that day summoned to appear before the magistrates of Exeter to answer the charge preferred against him of having committed perjury. Mr Floud was the attorney in the case of Isaacs v. Gorwyn – tried at the last Exeter Assizes; and it was alleged against ORCHARD that he made a false declaration as to the costs concerned in that action. The deceased is said to have averred that he had a complete answer to the charge; but however this may be it was clear from the correspondence which had taken place between himself and Mr Floud, that he had made an error of 5s. and had over-paid White, the bailiff.

Wednesday 7 October 1868, Issue 5340 – Gale Document No. Y3200711516
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Swan Inn, Catherine-street, in this city, on Monday afternoon, on the body of EMMA DRANE. Ellen Down, of Smythen-street, stated that she saw the deceased go into the Swan Inn about a quarter to eleven on Saturday night Shortly after (as witness was standing drinking a glass of ale at the bar) she heard a noise as if someone was choking in the closet. She went to see what it was and found the deceased leaning against the wall, rigid. She had her removed into a room where she shortly after died. Down had known DRANE four or five years and she was always very temperate. Mr Stonard Edye, surgeon, was called, but DRANE was dead when he arrived. There were no external marks of violence, and he could not account for the death of the deceased. The Inquest was adjourned till last evening in order that the medical gentleman might make a post mortem examination when he gave it as his opinion that the case of death was an apoplectic fit, and a verdict in accordance was returned.

Wednesday 21 October 1868, Issue 5342 – Gale Document No. Y3200711569
EXETER – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on Friday at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, upon the body of RICHARD SHILSON, whose remains were found on Wednesday in the Exeter Canal, near the bridge leading to Salmon Pool. He was foreman to Mr Parratt, builder, of this city. No evidence whatever could be ascertained as to the cause of death, and the Jury, therefore, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 4 November 1868, Issue 5344 – Gale Document No. Y3200711633
PAIGNTON – JOHN STOOKES, residing with his brother, a farmer, was kicked by a horse on Saturday evening and died on Sunday. Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest upon the body of the deceased on Monday when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 11 November 1868, Issue 5345 – Gale Document No. Y3200711648
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of BLANCH EDITH ELLIOTT, infant daughter of MR J. ELLIOTT, smith, of Russell-street, in this city. On the preceding Thursday the mother left the child in the kitchen, and a few minutes afterwards the clothes of the child were discovered in flames. The child was much burnt and was immediately taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it died early on Saturday morning. Death was considered to have been caused by the shock to the nervous system, and a verdict was given in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 2 December 1868, Issuer 5348 – Gale Document No. Y3200711723
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, St Sidwell, on Monday upon the body of an infant. MRS SARAH ROUTLEY, of Jones' Court, stated that the child was four months old; that it was restless on Sunday night and early the next morning she heard a gurgling noise in her baby's throat and directly afterwards the child died. Mr S. S. Perkins, junior, considered that death was caused by the sudden closing of the air tube; and the Jury gave a verdict accordingly.

SUICIDE – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Bude Haven Hotel, in this city, on Friday upon the body of JOHN CLAUDE MARTIN. MR WILLIAM MARTIN, of Pen Leonard House, St. Leonard's, said the deceased was his nephew. He was thirty-seven years of age. In March last his wife died at Newton. Deceased was much affected by that event, and had to go to Scotland for a change. He was born in India, and came to this country at the age of six or eight. He went out to India again when he was about eighteen, and remained there twelve years. About eight years ago he had a severe sunstroke. He was delicate in health and excitable after that event. Witness saw him eight or nine days ago. He then seemed in perfect health, and played chess and billiards. About eight o'clock that morning witness was sent for to deceased's lodgings in Southernhay. He found deceased lying on a sofa in his sitting room quite dead. The effects of the sunstroke, which caused deceased to become delicate in health and irritable in temper, obliged him to leave India, where he had an excellent appointment worth some £1,200 per annum. Miss Mary Radford, 23, Southernhay, said the deceased had lodged in her house for more than seven months. His bed room was on the second floor. For about a week he had complained of being very poorly, and witness called in Dr Marchant to see him on Tuesday. On the following day he seemed better. On Thursday morning he told witness he had no rest the previous night; and he was very poorly the whole of that day, taking little else than cold water. On Thursday night he went to bed about half-past ten. A few minutes afterwards he came down stairs and went into his sitting room. He went up the second time in five or six minutes, leaving his bed room candle in the sitting room. Witness knocked at his bed room door, which was not shut, and asked him if he wanted his candle. He was then in bed, and witness went into the room. The deceased said he had taken his medicine, and thought he should have a comfortable night. That morning about a quarter past seven witness hard the front door bell ringing and a noise in the street. The servant opened the door and the body of the deceased was brought in. Dr Drake was there and pronounced him dead. Witness found the window of deceased's bed room open. Witness had frequently noticed that the deceased was depressed in spirits when speaking of his wife. He frequently took down her likeness and put it on a chair. The deceased never drank anything but ale – very little wine or spirit, he said, affected him, owing to the sunstroke. John Quant, butler, 17, Eaton-place, said he was in Southernhay about a quarter-past seven that morning, and saw the deceased fall from the second floor. He fell head foremost. He had his dressing gown on. Witness picked him up. His head was bleeding. Witness left him in charge of another man, and went for Dr Drake. Deceased did not speak. Dr Marchant said he had attended the deceased for sleeplessness and nervous excitement. Witness saw him yesterday. He was nervous, dull, and heavy, and complained of not having slept the previous night. Witness gave him medicine such as he had taken on previous occasions with benefit. Deceased always appeared to be a very amiable person. He told witness he had a sunstroke in India, the effect of which would make the brain easily acted upon by slight excitement. Witness saw the body that morning. There was a very large wound on the head, and witness had little doubt that there was a fracture of the skull. He had no doubt there was sufficient injury to the brain by the fall to account for death. The Jury returned a verdict that "The deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 16 December 1868, Issue 5349 – Gale Document No. Y3200711779
BUCKLAND FILLEIGH – Mr Coroner Vallack held an Inquest on Friday at Buckland Filleigh on the body of MRS JACKSON, who destroyed herself whilst suffering from delirium by strangulation with a neckerchief. She was much respected, and was the housekeeper of Thomas Fisher, Esq.

NORTHTAWTON – Mr Coroner Vallack held an Inquest on Saturday at Broadnymett Barton, Northtawton, on the body of MRS PRICKMAN, who was found dead in her bed room. She is supposed to have died from concussion of the brain, caused by a fall against the wall of her room, as she had a bruise and contused wound on the back of her head, from which she bled freely. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 23 December 1868, Issue 5350 – Gale Document No. Y3200711807
STARCROSS – Mr Coroner Lee held an Inquest on Monday at the Courtenay Arms Inn upon the body of MARY BIDWILL, aged fifty-four years. Miss Medland, of No. 12, Hill's-court, Exeter, said that the deceased had been in her employ as general servant more than two years; had been very depressed in spirits of late, and had been under medical care. She last saw her on the 7th inst., about six o'clock in the evening. The deceased was then about to go out. It was raining, and she advised her to remain at home. The deceased, however, went out, at the same time asking if there were any letters for the post. On the morning of the previous day the deceased was very depressed, and on being asked what was the matter, she replied that she was afraid she should come to want. She told deceased not to be afraid of that, she would promise that during her lifetime she should not want. As the deceased did not return about twelve o'clock she went to the deceased's bed room, and there found £3 10s. in gold, which had been paid her as wages a week before, 2s. in silver, and 1 ½d. in copper. There was also a bunch of keys. She opened one of the deceased's boxes, and there found two letters addressed to a daughter living at Teignmouth. One written on the 6th December was as follows:- "My dear Eliza, I have some money in the Savings Bank; I give it to you for in case I should die suddenly that you may get it. I should have told you of it, but I did not know what I should want for myself." James Searle, a boatman of Lympstone, said that on Saturday last he was gathering shell fish of New River, between Starcross and Lympstone, when he found the body of the deceased. He called the attention of another boatman called James Flay, who was near at the time, and then went to Lympstone and informed the police. In answer to an inquiry by the Coroner as to whether a body would wash down from Exeter, one of the witnesses said that at this season of the year he had known of other bodies having been washed down. The Coroner then briefly summed up the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 6 January 1869, Issue 5352 – Gale Document No. BC3200711846
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Axminster Inn, Paris-street, in this city, on Monday upon the body of EDWARD EMERY, gardener, aged sixty-five. The deceased died suddenly when at work in Mr Bustard's gardens, Heavitree-road; and it was the opinion of Mr Shirley Perkins that the cause of death was disease of the heart. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 20 January 1869, Issue 5354 – Gale Document No. Y3200711898
NEWTON ABBOT – MR THOMAS EDWIN SARAH, of the Prince of Wales Inn, Newton, visited a house in Queen-street at midnight on Wednesday, and when on the first landing seems to have fallen to the bottom of the stairs, his head coming in contact with the "dern" of the door, whereby his head was lacerated at the hinder part. He remained insensible, and died the next day. Two young women of questionable reputation live in the house where the deceased with another man had gone; but the women were ignorant of what had occurred till made acquainted with it by the police. The Inquest on the deceased resulted in a verdict – "That the deceased died from injuries received at No. 1, Windsor-terrace; but how the injuries were received there is no evidence to show."

Wednesday 3 February 1869, Issue 5356 – Gale Document No. Y3200711948
DAWLISH – Thursday was a particularly stormy day throughout the South Devon coast, but no very material damage was then done. The wind calmed somewhat on Friday; but on Saturday evening it blew with terrific force, and the rain was at times excessively heavy. The gale culminated about eight o'clock on Sunday morning, when there was a spring tide. The down train from Exeter had passed only a short time, when the sea made a breach in the wall outside the railway and the force of the receding waves eventually carried out a large quantity of the railway itself, effectually stopping the traffic. The up morning train could not come beyond the breach, and a special train was sent down from Exeter to the Warren to bring on the passengers, who were conveyed by vehicles from Dawlish to the Warren – a step which will have to be continued for some days to come. It is said that the railway has never at any one period before suffered so much damage from the sea. The wind blew from the south and south-east, and the present spring tides have been the highest known for many years. A large body of men have since been at work in restoring the injury done to the railway, which injury extends to nearly 200 yards. Messrs. Williams, contractors, of London, have recently erected a high wall against the embankment and inside the railway, and this wall (having suffered from the action of the tempestuous sea) fell outwards, whereby a young man named SAMUEL COOMBES was killed, and several other persons injured. An Inquest was held on Monday upon his body, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The sea has made a clear breach across the Warren, landing (it is feared) an immense quantity of sand upon the new oyster beds belonging to the Oyster Bight Company.

Wednesday 24 February 1869, Issue 5359 – Gale Document No. Y3200712021
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Three Tuns Inn, in this city, on Friday, upon the body of ROBERT PITTS, aged forty-eight. The deceased had been in the employ of Mr Davy, of Countess Weir, but had been staying a few days at the Three Tuns Inn. He indulged himself with liquor rather freely on Thursday, but went to bed at nine. Three hours afterwards he was found outside his bed room. He was then carried into his bed; but though Mr Woodman, surgeon, was quickly in attendance the poor fellow had ceased to live. Death was attributed to apoplexy.

Wednesday 24 February 1869, Issue 5359 – Gale Document No. Y3200712032
BARNSTAPLE – An Inquest was held at the Exeter Inn on Saturday upon the body of EPHRAIM HANCOCK, who was in the employ of Mr Wilshire, ironfounder. The deceased had been suffering from an affection of the lungs, and had been under medical treatment. He was advised to avoid stimulants; but finding himself better he went to the Exeter Inn on Friday night and drank three threepennyworths of brandy. He returned to his home soon after eleven, ate his supper, and went to bed. Soon afterwards his wife heard a gurgling noise, and on speaking to her husband he made no reply. She instantly procured a light, when she saw blood issuing from the mouth of her husband. He died a few minutes afterwards. The cause of death was the rupture of a large blood vessel in the chest. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 24 March 1869, Issue 5363 – Gale Document No. Y3200712134
FARRINGDON – WILLIAM MILLS, labourer, aged sixty-two, committed suicide on Saturday. He had been out of work for many months and was very poor. He was in receipt of 2s. 6d. a week from the parish authorities. He had been labouring under the idea for some time that he would be starved. On Saturday his wife left him in the house, and on her return she saw her husband lying on the floor in the kitchen, which his head nearly severed from his body. The Inquest upon his remains resulted in a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 24 March 1869, Issue 5363 – Gale Document No. Y3200712128
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Rising Sun Inn, Russell-street, on Saturday, upon the body of HARRIET SANDFORD, aged seventy-eight. The deceased, who lodged with a Mrs Mary Casley, was found dead in bed that morning. Death was attributed to Natural Causes.

Wednesday 31 March 1869, Issue 5364 – Gale Document No. Y3200712157
STOKE CANON – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on Monday at the Stoke Canon Inn upon the body of JAMES WESTERN, whose death was caused by one of those unguarded acts of trifling with fire arms. John Richards, junior, was at work in his shop on Good Friday morning making a coffin, and whilst so engaged his father's apprentice (Charles Staddon) came to the shop. On the preceding day Mr John Richards, senior, put some powder into a gun, intending to shoot at a pigeon, but in ramming home the powder the head of the ramrod came off in the barrel of the gun. He tried to withdraw the piece of ramrod, but could not, and placed the gun in his shop. On Good Friday morning Staddon took up the gun (not dreaming that there was any powder in it) and saying to Richards junior, "I should like to try if this cap is good or not," put a percussion cap upon the nipple, pointed the gun towards the doorway, and then pulled the trigger. To the consternation of the younger Richards and Staddon the gun exploded with a loud report, and the head of the ramrod unfortunately passed through the door, entered the left eye of JAMES WESTERN, and lodged at the back of his skull, causing the poor fellow's death. WESTERN and Staddon were companions. WESTERN had gone to the churchyard, intending to go in to the morning service; but finding he was somewhat late he remarked to Abraham Staddon (machine man at Messrs Dewdney's paper mill), whom he met at the churchyard, that he should go to Mr Richard's workshop and get some tobacco from young John Richards, and he arrived there at the very moment when Charles Staddon, his intimate friend, so incautiously discharged the gun. WESTERN had been to Mr Richards's shop just before, and left there to go to church, and he knew that the young Richards was at work. Immediately on the discovery that WESTERN had been shot, Staddon fainted, and when he recovered and was in custody he made a statement to the effect that he snapped off the cap to frighten somebody outside the door; but the evidence of young Richards removed much of the impression against Staddon. The Jury, however, took some little time to consider their verdict, which was "Excusable Homicide."

BLACKAWTON – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Thursday at Blackawton upon the body of MR ANDREW P. LAMBLE, who was found with his throat cut the previous day. A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned. Deceased's father committed suicide.

Wednesday 31 March 1869, Issue 5364 – Gale Document No. Y3200712145
EXETER – MRS WARE, wife of MR WARE, wine and spirit stores, of South-street, in this city, committed suicide by cutting her throat early on Saturday evening. Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body at the Britannia Inn, South-street, on Monday. On Thursday, the 25th instant, the deceased complained to Mrs Ann Andrews, a relative, of suffering in her head and stomach. She had been very unwell for some time past. Mrs Andrews believed MRS WARE to be a very temperate woman. MARY ANN WARE, daughter of the deceased, said her mother remained in the sitting room all day on Saturday, and complained of a pain in her head. She went upstairs about a quarter past five and witness heard her vomiting. She went up to her and deceased asked her to get her some tea. Witness left the bed room for that purpose and on returning saw her mother in a stooping posture with blood issuing from her throat. She called her father who went up to deceased and sent for a doctor. MRS WARE again returned to the sitting room and remained about five minutes. She then went upstairs again and MR WARE laid her on the bed where she died. MISS WARE denied that there had been any unpleasantness between her father and mother. It was here stated that Mr Neale was at MR WARE'S on Thursday night and heard MR and MRS WARE quarrelling. He saw MR WARE strike his wife across the head twice, and Mr Neale then gave MR WARE a blow on the eye which discoloured it. The Jury wished to hear Mr Neale's evidence and he was sent for. The Jury also thought it very strange that assistance was not called in quicker than it was. Mr Samuel Perkins, surgeon, said on going to the deceased he found her dead in bed with a transverse incised wound in her throat about an inch long, opposite the first ring of the windpipe. He also found a bloody razor on the washhand table. Mr Perkins afterwards had a conversation with MISS WARE who told him that her mother had told her that she had taken poison, and she saw her throw away a bottle. Mr Perkins found some bloody fluid in the deceased's bedroom which smelt of peppermint water. He communicated this to MISS WARE, who attributed it to her mother's taking some mixture which MR WARE had procured for a cold. Mr Perkins obtained the prescription and found it to be quite harmless. He also analysed the bloody fluid and found no trace of poison. The cause of death was not from loss of blood, as the bleeding was stopped, which caused an effusion of blood into the windpipe. This, or a spasm of the glottis, was the cause of death. Had she been allowed to bleed freely there would have been no fatal consequences from the cut throat. Mr Neale was called and said that on the morning of Thursday MRS WARE told him that her husband had made very grave charges against her, and that she was going to send for her daughter as she could not live happily at home without a companion. Mr Neale denied giving MR WARE a black eye or that he saw any blows passed between MR and MRS WARE. He had known MRS WARE when her husband kept the White Horse Inn, and always believed her to be a sober woman, but MR WARE was greatly addicted to drink. Mr Neale also stated that MRS WARE had appeared very excited for several days, and Mr Perkins added that she attempted to jump out of window the same morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 21 April 1869, Issue 5366 – Gale Document No. Y3200712232
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Ferry Boat House, Exeter Quay, on the body of CHARLES EDWARDS. The deceased, who was seventy-two years of age, rented the Ferry Boat, and for some time had been under medical treatment. He was working the boat on Monday; but was taken ill in the night and died the next morning. Medical evidence was given to the effect that the deceased died from a rupture of one of the blood vessels, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Wednesday 28 April 1869, Issue 5367 – Gale Document No. Y3200712267
BRIXHAM – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Monday at the Commercial Inn, upon the body of GEORGE WOOD, aged nineteen. Deceased was mate of the vessel Corsan of Brixham, and whilst on the voyage from Neath to Teignmouth the unfortunate fellow fell from the rigging upon a boat on the deck of the vessel, whereby he sustained injuries that led to his death on Saturday. The cause of deceased falling from the rigging was owing to the breaking of a rope; but no one appears to be blameable for this, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 April 1869, Issue 5367 – Gale Document No. Y3200712250
VERDICT, NOVEMBER 11th. - The Inquest on the body of ALBERT EDWARD JOHNS, the child of R. JOHNS, tailor, of 7, Morley-street, Plymouth, who was burnt to death the previous day, was held yesterday at the Cambridge Inn, before J. Edmunds, Esq., Coroner. It was shewn that the deceased, in the absence of his mother, must have lit some matches which were on the table, and thus set fire to the room. The Jury, by their foreman, Mr Rolestone, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death", recommended the use of Bryant and May's Special Safety Matches, which light only by friction on the box in which they are contained. In this the Coroner concurred.

Wednesday 5 May 1869, Issue 5368 – Gale Document No. Y3200712289
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM EVANS, a man sixty-three years of age, who was in the employ of Mr Pope, builder. The deceased was at work a few days ago on a scaffold outside a house in Lansdowne-terrace. Whilst there he caught hold of a piece of iron which projected from the wall. That gave way and he fell. He was removed to the Hospital, where he died yesterday. Mr Ley, the House surgeon, stated that the poor fellow had three of his ribs fractured and his vertebrae injured. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 May 1869, Issue 5368 – Gale Document No. Y3200712283
WHITSTONE – MRS CANN, widow, of Whitstone, whilst crossing a stream on the 27th of April last fell and broke her leg. She was then removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she died on Monday morning. An Inquest was held upon the remains the same afternoon, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased was eighty-five years of age.

MONKLEIGH – Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest on Thursday at Monkleigh upon the body of JOHN TAYLOR. The deceased and another man (Named Scoins) were washed overboard from a barge off Appledore in the violent gale of the 19th March last. The remains of poor TAYLOR were discovered in the river Torrridge on Tuesday, and the verdict of the Jury was "Found Drowned."

TORQUAY – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Monday at the Steam Packet Inn, Torquay, upon the body of MRS E. STENTIFORD. On Friday night whilst the deceased was preparing a poultice for her husband she exclaimed "Oh, my God!" and when her husband came to her assistance she vomited a large quantity of blood. He sent for Mr Hind, surgeon, but she died before he arrived. The surgeon was of opinion that deceased died from a ruptured vessel, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

DUNSFORD – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, upon the body of JAMES EWENS, who died in the Hospital on the preceding day. William Sercombe, a miller, of St. Thomas, stated that on Wednesday afternoon he met the deceased coming down Culverhouse-hill. He was driving a cart drawn by one horse, and was riding on the shafts. The cart was laden with manure, and on the top of the manure there were two empty casks. As the cart passed witness one of the casks fell off, and the horse was frightened and started off. The deceased jumped off the shafts and tried to get hold of the horse's head, but failed to do so, and fell down, and the cart went over his body in a transverse direction. Witness went to deceased and placed him by the hedge till he got a trap and took him to the hospital. Mr Ley, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said deceased was admitted to the hospital suffering from concussion of the brain, and then complained of a violent pain in the abdomen. The deceased was dying when brought in, but lingered on until about four o'clock the next morning. He believed that there was some internal rupture either of the intestines or of the liver. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was twenty years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

Wednesday 19 May 1869, Issue 5370 – Gale Document No. Y3200712353
TALLATON – Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest on Friday at the railway Hotel, Ottery-road Railway Station, upon the body of EDWARD PALFREY, aged six years. The deceased was with his father (who works for Mr Wright, of Salt Water) on the afternoon of the 13th instant; but about eight o'clock in the evening the boy was discovered in a cow crib, where he lay groaning. He was instantly removed into Mr Wright's house, and after the father had quietly taken his supper he carried his son to his own home. The mother of the boy put him to bed and at one o'clock in the morning he had ceased to live. The medical evidence went to prove that death was caused by the rupture of the liver, induced by a violent blow or fall; but by whom the blow was inflicted remains to be proved. Rumour assigns the act to the father of the child; but rumour too often imputes the commission of a crime upon the flimsiest pretence. The father, however, is in custody, and the Inquest stands adjourned till today (Wednesday).

Wednesday 26 May 1869, Issue 5371 – Gale Document No. Y3200712379
TORQUAY – The Inquest upon the remains of ISABELLA GRAHAM, whose body was discovered isn't he sea at Livermead, resulted in a verdict to the effect that she had committed suicide whilst suffering from Temporary Insanity. As stated last week the deceased was a native of a place near Hull, in Yorkshire, and had kept company with a young man living near Hull and with a young man at Torquay at the same time. She was to have been married to the young man at Torquay last week; but she left her situation as cook to the Rev. Mr Brown, of Torre Park, ostensibly to return to Hull to be married to her "first love." The young man at Torquay only learnt that he had a rival at Hull a few days before the young woman's remains were found in the sea; and when he told her of it she simply replied, "It is all off now," whereas she had accepted the offer of marriage from the Torquay lover when "corresponding" by letter with her lover at Hull. The poor young woman seems to have been puzzled t times what course to take, for she had said as much to one or two female acquaintances at Torquay; and it is supposed that either from the fact that because she had expended all her money (for only one-penny was discovered in her boxes) or from compunction she must have determined to "quite this word where strong temptation tries." The young man at Torquay is in nowise at blame for the sad end of ISABELLA GRAHAM.

TALLATON – The Alleged Child Murder. – The Inquest upon the body of EDWARD PALFREY, aged six years, terminated in a verdict that "The child died of rupture of the liver, but by what means there was no evidence to prove." The father of the deceased, however, has been committed for trial at the instance of the Magistrates for causing his son's death. What is alleged against the father is that he was exasperated with his child for telling a neighbour that his father had taken away some coal; and in consequence of this statement by the child the father had been compelled to seek for another house in which to live. When the deceased was discovered in the cow crib and conveyed in the house of Mr Wright, the father and the mother thought their son was suffering from intoxication and the father (somewhat roughly) removed the boy from the kitchen and put his head into water. The mother of the child conveyed him to her own home, and four hours afterwards the poor boy's earthy career was over. the father was committed for trial by the Magistrates on Monday week; but the Inquest was not concluded till the Wednesday after, and at the Inquest Police-Sergeant Froude stated that on Monday he was informed that the prisoner wanted to send a message to his wife, and on going to him prisoner said that he wished his wife to come and give evidence, as she could prove that he did not see the child from half-past six until she brought him into the house, for he had been to Colestock to try to take a house, that he saw Mrs Tucker, but he could not get the house as it was out of repair, and that he could prove that he was there about seven o'clock. The sergeant added that he had seen Mrs Tucker, and that he believed that statement to be true. Mr Coroner Cox, after reading the evidence to the Jury, pointed out that the testimony of the medical officers showed that the death of the child could not have been caused by the injuries inflicted in the house, and that his being put into the water would rather tend to revive him than to cause his death. Other malice than that would have to be shown against the accused. They would have to say whether the evidence about the coal would show any motive for PALFREY doing an injury to the child. But it should be remembered that the affair about the coal occurred on Monday morning, and the child was not injured until Thursday. Naturally speaking, if the father was angry with the child he would have vented it at the time. But still it might be possible that after returning from Colestock, and being unable to get the house, that he vented it then. Then, as to the cider drinking, Mr Wright stated that he thought the child was drunk, and it would be for them to judge whether the father did not think so too. It seemed that if the malice was on account of the coal it was a very unreasonable and unlikely sort of malice. It would be for them to say whether the motive was adequate to account for such ill-treatment as the child must have received from someone. The injury from which the child died must have been inflicted before the child was found in the crib. The father's conduct towards the child at the supper table did not appear to be unnatural. The only motive for the supposed crime that he could see would be the prisoner's being unable to get the house. It seemed an insufficient one for treating the boy so brutally, and he was glad that that was left to them to decide instead of him. The medical testimony seemed to point to the conclusion that the injuries were inflicted by a fall or a strong blow, but what seemed to be against it was that there was n evidence of external injuries. There was no evidence of general unkindness towards the boy, but rather the contrary. Somebody must have inflicted the injuries, but it would be for them to say whether there was sufficient evidence as would justify them in committing a man for trial for murder. They would have to say whether the subsequent harsh treatment of the child might not be consistent with the father believing that the child was drunk. The Coroner concurred in the verdict of the Jury; and evidence – far stronger than that adduced at the Inquest – must be forthcoming at the trial to lead to the conviction of the father. He is now in the county gaol, where he has previously been for felony. He is a native of Brandninch, but has been for some months working at Feniton. He is about thirty-five years of age, and has a wife and child – other than the one whose death is attributed by magisterial mandate to the father.

TEIGNMOUTH – MR HODDER, who threw himself from a window on the third floor of a house in Higher Brook-street, Teignmouth, on the 22nd instant, died on Saturday from the injuries then received. Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest upon the body and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from injuries caused by his jumping from a window whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Wednesday 9 June 1869, Issue 5373 – Gale Document No. Y3200712430
ATHERINGTON – The body of a labourer named JOHN MARLOW, aged forty-five, was found isn't he river Taw on Friday. Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest upon the remains of the deceased, and Grace Hunt, MARLOW'S mother-in-law, stated that he had often said he "should have a watery grave." Verdict, "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 16 June 1869, Issue 5374 – Gale Document No. Y3200712460
NEWTON ABBOT – Mr Deputy Coroner Gaye held an Inquest on Friday evening at the Commercial Inn upon the body of FRANK LAKE, aged three years. The deceased fell into the mill leat on the preceding evening and unfortunately passed over the water wheel, whereby he received such injuries as to cause his death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

AXMINSTER – JOHN CHUBB, aged fifty-one, woodman, in the employ of Mr J. A. Knight, of Axminster, has been burnt to death. The other morning the pigstye at his house was found to be on fire. His wife, who had two children ill, tried to open the door of the stye, but the fastening was so hot that she had to take the gongs to do so. In the stye she found the charred remains of her husband. The body was scorched like a log of wood. Deceased had been intoxicated and was a great smoker. It is supposed that whilst the man was smoking the stye had taken fire. At the Inquest the Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

DARTMOUTH – ARTHUR C. SHERRARD, thirteen years of age, one of the cadets training on board the Britannia, was on Monday morning engaged with others on duty in the foretopmast, some sixty or seventy feet high, when the accidentally missed his hold, falling on the skylight in the deck underneath, cutting his head completely open, the brain being scattered about. His death occurred a few minutes afterwards. Mr John Caldwell, surgeon on board, was speedily in attendance on the poor fellow, but his assistance was of no service. A telegram was at once despatched to the parents of the deceased, who are abroad. An Inquest was held in the evening at the Cadets' Hospital, Sandquay, by Mr Coroner Puddicombe, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. This is the first fatal accident that has occurred on board the Britannia since she has been used as a training ship.

Wednesday 23 June 1869, Issue 5375 – Gale Document No. Y3200712485
HARTLAND – Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest at Hartland on Thursday upon the body of MOSES BAKER, Maltster. On the preceding Monday the deceased and several others were at work on board a vessel lying at the quay. They went ashore to dinner, and while there the deceased began boasting about climbing, and went again on board the vessel to exhibit his activity. He got up as high as the cross tree, but on trying to climb higher his hands slipped and falling on deck he was instantly killed. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 23 June 1869, Issue 5375 – Gale Document No. Y3200712476
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn upon the body of a man named TANCOCK. Deceased lived in Russell-street. Yesterday week the poor man cut his throat with a razor. He was removed to the Hospital, but died from the effects of the wound on Wednesday. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst suffering from Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 30 June 1869, Issue 5376 – Gale Document No. Y3200712498
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the George and Dragon Inn, St Sidwell, yesterday evening, on the body of an infant named MARIA LYNE. The child was born on Sunday, but died ten hours afterwards. Mr Phelps, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 7 July 1869, Issue 5377 – Gale Document No. Y3200712541
HALBERTON – MRS ELIZABETH HONEYWILL, of Rose Cottage, Halberton, committed suicide on Thursday. She made her way to the Tiverton Railway, and when she saw the 11.25 train coming she deliberately placed herself on the metal, face upward. The engine driver did all in his power to save the poor woman's life; but the wheels passed over her body, mutilating it in a fearful manner. She was formerly housekeeper to a gentleman, who left her an annuity of £100 per annum, and she was the wife of a former official on a railway. She was fifty-nine years of age. Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest upon the remains on Friday, when Richard Westcott, a miller, residing at Mether Mills, in the parish of Halberton, said he lived close by the deceased. He had been acquainted with her and her husband for five or six years. He believed they lived a happy and comfortable life. He never heard any quarrel between them, and one very rarely saw one walking without the other. He never observed anything unusual in the state of mind of the deceased, but he was aware it was reported that she was out of her mind. He saw the deceased last alive on Thursday morning about half-past eleven. She was then standing on the railway line, which runs about twenty or thirty yards from her residence. He walked around the road from the bridge, and heard the alarm whistle of the train. He went to the line to see what was the matter, and there he saw the deceased on the line The engine had passed over her and the body was horribly mutilated. The train was going towards the junction, and when he arrived had passed out of sight. He went for assistance, and the remains were gathered and taken to the deceased's house. There was no one near her when he saw her. JOHN NORTHAM, brother of the deceased, never heard but that she and her husband lived happily together. She was, however, deranged at times. He had heard that she had threatened to destroy herself. He did not believe that at times she was accountable for her actions. She was, however, perfectly harmless, so that there was no necessity for putting her under restraint. He believed that the deceased destroyed herself whilst in an unsound state of mind. Mary Westcott, wife of a labourer, stated she had known the deceased for the last twenty years, and had been in the habit of working as charwoman for her. She had not been right in her mind for some time. She was taken worse last Christmas when her husband was ill. Lately she had been afraid that people had been coming after her to take her away. Witness was quite satisfied that deceased was not in her right mind. She, however, could not say she was no accountable for her actions at the time. She believed it was her own act. Deceased had threatened to destroy herself, but she did not take any particular notice of her words. She had also heard her say that she should like to die a quick death. JAMES NORTHAM, brother of the deceased, said his sister had not been in a sound state of mind for many years, and he had no doubt that it was the deceased's own act. Henry Beedal, stoker of the train, said he saw the deceased leave the fence and deliberately throw herself across the metals. She looked at the engine as it came on and never moved. The Jury unhesitatingly gave a verdict to the effect that ELIZABETH HONEYWILL committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

MARWOOD – Fatal Gun Accident. – MR JOHN BATES, late principal manager of the West of England and South Wales Bank, died on Friday morning from a wound inflicted by the accidental discharge of his gun. The deceased resided at Umberleigh House, Atherington, but occasionally visited his estate – Whitefield Barton, Marwood. Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest on the body of the unfortunate gentleman on Friday evening, when evidence was given as to MR BATES'S being in the room by himself – the hearing of the report of a gun – the finding of his body on the floor – and the coming of the surgeon from Barnstaple – Mr Michael Cooke, whose statement fills up the melancholy narrative. Mr Cooke said he received instructions about half-past one that afternoon to go to Whitefield Barton, as MR BATES had fallen down in a fit. He went immediately, and found the deceased lying on the floor in the sitting room on his stomach, with his face on the hearth rug. A double-barrelled gun was lying on his right side and a ramrod near his left foot. I turned him over on his back and found he was quite dead and had been apparently so for an hour or two. There was blood flowing from his nose, which was fractured. The injury to the nose was caused by the fall. I observed there was a hole burnt on the left side of his waistcoat, and on removing his clothes I found a gunshot wound on the left side immediately under the ribs. The wound extended upwards into the chest, had lacerated the heart, fractured the ribs, and was of such a character as to cause immediate death. From the position of the wound and the direction that the shot had taken I am of opinion that the deceased must have been leaning on the muzzle of the gun when it exploded, and one barrel being loaded, and he being in the act of loading the other, the gun might have accidentally gone off and caused the fatal injury. The shot and powder flasks were on the table. He might have been turning round to get the shot. The deceased's feet were not drawn up one above the other. He must have fallen instantly dead on being shot. Mr Richard Hutchings stated that he resided at Muddiford, in the parish of Marwood, and knew the deceased. I have been with him frequently when he has been out shooting. I have no hesitation in saying that he was most careless and incautious in handling firearms. He would talk while loading his gun and appeared to be treating it in a very careless way. His general temperament was cheerful and hopeful as any man I knew. The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict that the deceased died from a gunshot wound, caused by the accidental discharge of one barrel while he was in the act of loading the other. On his retirement as manager of the West of England and South Wales District Bank the deceased went to reside in the neighbourhood of Barnstaple, and purchased a short time since the Whitefield estate, with the intention of building himself a suitable residence on the site of the former house. A few years since he held the office of mayor of the city of Bristol.

Wednesday 7 July 1869, Issue 5377 – Gale Document No. Y3200712526
Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, upon the body of WM. PULMAN, painter, aged 42. The evidence of Mr J. C. Grigg, surgeon, led to the belief that the deceased had died from disease of the heart, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Wednesday 14 July 1869, Issue 5378 – Gale Document No. Y3200712556
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Monday at the Bishop Blaze Inn, upon the body of JOHN COTTEY, aged 53. The deceased lived in Ewings-street, West Quarter, was a hawker and umbrella maker, had been for nine years suffering from disease of the lungs. Gradually decaying he hastened his death by taking chloride of zinc. Verdict, "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 21 July 1869, Issue 5379 – Gale Document No. Y3200712593
STOKE CANON – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest at the Stoke Canon Inn on Monday upon the body of JAMES MOLLAND, aged seventeen. On the preceding morning the deceased went to bathe in the Culme, and whilst swimming across a deep pit he suddenly sunk, and his body could not be got out of the water for some time afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death by Drowning."

Wednesday 21 July 1869, Issue 5379 – Gale Document No. Y3200712594
Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on Monday at the Haven banks Inn upon the body of EDWARD THOMAS MELHUISH, ten years of age. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Lambert; and whilst dipping water out of the Exeter Canal the poor boy fell in and was drowned. Verdict " Accidental Death by Drowning."

MR THOMAS NORRISH, farmer of Churchill, Loxbeer, near Tiverton, committed suicide on Friday at Witheridge, whither he had gone to see his brother. The deceased seems to have been disappointed in an affair of the heart, and it was stated that about eighteen months since the deceased much injured his head through an accident. An Inquest upon the remains resulted in a verdict that the unfortunate man committed "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Wednesday 28 July 1869, Issue 5380 – Gale Document No. Y3200712608
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier yesterday morning on the body of HENRY YOULDEN, a labourer, residing at Rockbeare, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased was twenty-four years of age, and was in the employ of Mr Hawkings, builder and surveyor, of Rockbeare. On Saturday last he was sent with three others to Hollyball Copse to fetch a piece of timber. It was put on a timber carriage, and when proceeding down Aylesbeare-hill the deceased and a boy got off the carriage to steady the timber. The deceased afterwards jumped on the "nib" of the carriage, which caused the "dogs" to give way. The "nibs" then flew up and knocked the deceased on to the ground. He was taken to the Hospital where he died after he had been there a short time. Mr Ley, house surgeon, said he examined the head of the deceased after his death and found effused blood on both hemispheres. The skull was split across, and nearly in two halves. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 July 1869, Issue 5380 – Gale Document No. Y3200712606
EXETER – WILLIAM SMITH, an inmate of the St Thomas Union, was one day last week employed in the potato field belonging to the Union. The weather was excessively hot at the time, and it is supposed that whilst stooping for water from a pond he fell in a fit on his face and hands and died in that position. The deceased was sixty-eight years of age and was crippled, and it was at his own option that he was in the field at the time. The particulars of the case came out before a Coroner's Inquiry, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 4 August 1869, Issue 5381 – Gale Document No. Y3200712635
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Sawyer's Arms upon the body of SELINA, the infant of SUSAN HANNAFORD, a married woman residing in Fryer's-court. The child was born on Saturday morning and died in the evening from Natural Causes. A verdict to that effect was returned by the Jury.

Wednesday 11 August 1869, Issue 5382 – Gale Document No. Y32007126611
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday at the Sawyer's Arms, in this city, upon the body of SUSAN BELLAMY, aged eighty. The deceased entertained a notion that she was going to have her parochial pay – 3s. 6d. a week – taken away from her, thereby compelling her to go into the workhouse. This idea seems to have affected the poor old creature, and she hung herself in her bed room. Verdict, "Suicide whilst of Unsound mind."

Wednesday 1 September 1869, Issue 5385 – Gale Document No. Y3200712730
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Sawyer's Arms, Preston-street, upon the body of MARY JOHNS, widow, aged 69. Mr Perkins, surgeon, gave evidence to the effect that death was caused by haemorrhage of a large blood vessel in the region of the heart; and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 8 September 1869, Issue 5386 – Gale Document No. Y3200712759
TOTNES – There were several races on Thursday as a sort of "finish;" but unfortunately in a steeple chase a man named GEORGE BARRETT, of Totnes, was thrown and the horse rolled over upon him, causing injuries resulting in the poor fellow's death the next day. He was a colt breaker, and forty years of age. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 15 September 1869, Issue 5387 – Gale Document No. Y3200712788
IDE – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on Friday at the Huntsman Inn, Ide, upon the body of the child of JAMES BURNETT, a drainer. The deceased was five months old, and was found dead in bed with its mother. In the early part of the night the child was restless; but about two in the morning it fell asleep. The mother then went to sleep, and on waking at seven found the infant dead. Mr Farrant, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that the child had been overlaid; and the Jury returned a verdict that its death was caused by "Accidental Suffocation."

Wednesday 6 October 1869, Issue 5390 – Gale Document No. Y3200712856
EXETER - WILLIAM TREE, labourer, thirty-four years of age, died suddenly at Heavitree on Saturday. The deceased was at work with a man named Francis Vanstone for Mr A. Bustard, nurseryman, in a linhay, and he was apparently in perfect health. Vanstone left the linhay for about twenty minutes, and when he returned he found TREE lying on his back gasping for breath. Dr Grinfield Coxwell was sent for, but before he arrived TREE was dead. Mr Deputy Coroner Lee held an Inquest on the body on Monday, when a verdict of "Died from the Visitation of God," was returned.

Wednesday 13 October 1869, Issue 5391 – Gale Document No. Y3200712885
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Forester's Arms Inn, Commercial-road, on Friday upon the body of THOMAS PEDRICK, a turner, who died somewhat suddenly on the previous evening. The medical evidence went to the effect that death resulted from disease of the heart; and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Wednesday 20 October 1869, Issue 5392 – Gale Document No. Y3200712917
NEWTON ABBOT – The body of JOSEPH ENDACOTT was found in the canal near Teigngrace on Wednesday. The remains were in an advanced state of decomposition. He was a labourer, and about fifty years of age. There were no marks on the body to indicate that his death was caused by violence. How he came into the water is a question that could not be explained at the Inquest.

AXMINSTER – An Inquest was held on Friday on the body of an infant named JOSEPH JAMES SPRAKE, who was accidentally shot on the previous Wednesday. THOMAS SPRAKE, the deceased's brother, was at the house of a neighbour named Love, and took up a gun which Love told him was not loaded. SPRAKE'S sister, with the deceased in her arms, was standing at Love's garden gate, and he put a cap on the gun and fired at her. The gun proved to be loaded and the charge entered the head and neck of the baby, killing him instantly. Part of the charge also struck the girl. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 24 November 1869, Issue 5397 – Gale Document No. Y3200713044
TIVERTON – Mr Coroner Mackenzie held an Inquest on Friday upon the body of HENRY PARKHOUSE, aged one year and nine months old. On the preceding Wednesday morning the mother of the deceased left the child on a chair near its bed by the side of the fire; and on her return the bed was on fire, and the child received such injuries from the flames that it died the next day. Verdict, "Accidental Death." The father of the child is a mason's labourer.

Wednesday 24 November 1869, Issue 5397 – Gale Document No. Y3200713033
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Three Cranes Inn, in this city, upon the body of FLORENCE ANNIE HODGE, the infant daughter of MR HODGE, baker, South-street. The medical evidence proved that death was caused by convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 8 December 1869, Issue 5399 – Gale Document No. Y3200713097
TORQUAY – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Wednesday upon the body of GEORGE WILLS, twenty-five years old. The deceased was coachman to Dr Hall, of Torquay, and whilst engaged in singeing one of his master's horses, the animal kicked the poor fellow in the abdomen. The injuries he then received led to his death the next day. Everything was done to alleviate the unfortunate man's sufferings. He was a native of North Devon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 8 December 1869, Issue 5399 – Gale Document No. Y3200713087
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held two Inquests on Monday. The first was at the Round Tree Inn upon the body of ELIZABETH WADHAM, who died suddenly on Sunday. The deceased went to the house of her nephew, a Mr Warren, residing in Frog-street, for the purpose of attending the funeral of his son, a lad, whose death was caused by a kick from a horse. As the corpse was being brought down stairs, the deceased suddenly fell down, and although immediately attended to, did not move or show any signs of life. Mr Perkins was sent for, and pronounced her dead. The medical evidence now showed that the deceased died from disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

The other Inquest was at the Sawyer's Arms upon the body of BESSIE TUCKER, nine months old, who died suddenly the previous morning. The deceased had been unwell for some time. On Sunday morning she was taken worse, and a medical man was sent for. Mr Roper attended quickly, but before he arrived the child was dead. Mr Roper now said that the child was very weak from the time of its birth. It was not larger when it died than a child a month old, and he believed that death resulted from its not being strong enough to stand the cold weather. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on Friday at the Devon County Gaol upon the body of JOHN TAPSON. Mr Rose, the governor, said the deceased was received into the Prison on the 15th of December last. He had been a gentleman's servant, but since that a cab driver of Torquay, from which place he was committed on the charge of maliciously wounding a man with whom he had had a quarrel; and at the January Sessions he was sentenced to twelve months' hard labour. His age was twenty-eight; when he came into the prison he appeared in good health, and underwent the usual labour. He was a very well-behaved man, and did not complain of his illness until it was noticed by the warders. On the 18th of October he came under the doctors' care, and continued so up to the time of his death. The doctor's certificate was sent to the Home Office, and on the 24th November the governor received a pardon for the prisoner from the Secretary of State; but he was too ill to be removed, and continued to get worse up to the time of his death, which occurred on Thursday morning. During his illness his relations were communicated with and his sisters came and saw him before his death. Mr Caird, the surgeon of the prison, said when he first saw the prisoner he was in good health, but on October 18th he was informed of his illness, and found him suffering from diarrhoea and bronchitis. He was removed from his cell to a more convenient one; his diet was changed, and he was ordered off labour, to which he never returned. Witness produced the book which showed that deceased's diet was changed from time to time, and warmer clothes provided for him. There was also supplied to him port wine, fish, chops, eggs and rice pudding, and such food as his case required, and on November 24th he was removed to the infirmary, where he died. Every possible care and attention was paid to him. When a remission of sentence came, he was far too ill to be removed. He became rapidly worse for ten days previous to his death. The deceased had been generally employed in gardening. His illness was produced partly by constitutional tendency, and having lived, previous to imprisonment, a hard out-door life as a cab driver; he had, also, been ill in the early part of the year before he came into prison. The Coroner said that if the poor fellow had been out of the prison he could not have been more kindly treated, and he never found that any death in the prison was due to any hardships which might tend to shorten life. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 15 December 1869, Issue 5400 – Gale Document No. Y3200713123
TORRINGTON – MRS ELIZABETH CHAPPLE, who was more than eighty years old, drowned herself yesterday week in the canal. The poor old creature was subject to mental aberrations, and had twice previously attempted self-destruction. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict that the deceased drowned herself whilst suffering from Temporary Insanity.

GITTISHAM – Mr Deputy Coroner Every held an Inquest at the Nag's Head inn,. Gittisham, on Friday upon the body of a man named WRIGHT, who was in the employ of Mr Blackmore Crammer, of Broadhembury. Deceased had been sent to Gittisham for a thrashing machine. A little before he came to the turning leading into the turnpike road to Honiton his horses were startled by the noise of a train. WRIGHT was knocked down, the wheels passing over his legs, and his head in some manner became entangled in the machinery. The poor fellow was killed on the spot. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 January 1870, Issue 5403 – Gale Document No. BC3200713203
SHOBROOKE – Mr Coroner Leigh held an Inquest at the Red Lion Inn, Shobrooke, on Friday, upon the body of GEORGE GRIBBLE. The deceased was engaged in removing a cob wall at Pennycott Farm, when by reason of his digging at the base the upper portion of the wall fell upon him, causing his death. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 January 1870, Issue 5403 – Gale Document No. BC3200713207
EXETER – An Inquest was held yesterday at Widgery's Spirit Vaults, Summerland-street, on the body of MARY RONCHETTI, aged 72. She was in her usual health on Saturday, having partaken of a good supper; but when her husband awoke the next morning she was dead. Verdict – Death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 12 January 1870, Issue 5404 – Gale Document No. Y3200713239
KENTON – Mr and Mrs Hartwell, of Clogshall Farm, had in their employ a woman named ELIZABETH HOARE, who gave birth to a child during the absence of her mistress from the house. The infant was discovered some thirteen yards from the bed room window, whence it was alleged to have been thrown by its mother. Around the child's neck was twisted a handkerchief, but, according to medical evidence, not sufficiently tight to cause suffocation. Mr Cann, surgeon, of Dawlish, was unable to say whether the infant had a separate existence of not, and consequently, the Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead." The woman had previously given birth to an illegitimate offspring; and in her box a quantity of baby linen was found. When taxed by her mistress with being pregnant, HOARE did not deny it, and assured Mrs Hartwell that she was going to be married soon. The police will probably charge the woman with concealing the birth.

Wednesday 19 January 1870, Issue 5405 – Gale Document No. Y3200713265
FALL OF A COTTAGE – THREE PERSONS KILLED. - BURRINGTON. One of the cottages at Penniford near Burrington, was occupied by a carter named BIRD, his wife and four children, and an old man named WM. GOULD. Early on Saturday morning the chimney of the cottage fell, carrying with it the roof. Three of the inmates were killed – namely, the poor old man, GOULD, aged ninety-one, whose leg was nearly severed from his body; and two of the children, aged eleven and nine years. The mother and two other children miraculously escaped, though they occupied the same bed room – the only sleeping room in the cottage. The husband (BIRD) was at Barnstaple at the time of the unfortunate disaster. It was an old cob house, but the chimney was of stone. Mr Deputy-Coroner Tolley held an Inquest on the bodies on Monday, when MARY BIRD said: I am the wife of a labourer living at Burrington. I live in a cottage owned by Mr W. Buckingham, solicitor, of Exeter. WILLIAM GOULD was a relation of mine. He married my husband's mother, and he has lived with my husband, myself, and my four children for some time past. On Friday evening last my husband was not at home; he was working at Barnstaple. I, my four children, and WILLIAM GOULD went to bed about nine o'clock on that evening. I did not have much rest owing to one of the little ones being very poorly. Between twelve and one o'clock the old man said to me, "I think there is something the matter with that child, or else it wouldn't be crying so." I replied I thought there was, and we then heard something "litering" down, and WILLIAM GOULD asked, "What's that?" I answered, "Oh, it isn't the wall falling, WILL; it's only the plastering." I then thought about my dear children near the wall, and I turned over on my side to get a light. Whilst I was feeling for one the house came tumbling down all around us. The rubbish tumbled down all about me; and, though my head was free, I shouldn't have been able to get out of it hadn't it been for Thomas Hill, who lives in the adjoining cottage and who came to my assistance. My little girl ELIZA was the one who called for Thomas Hill; and little WILLY tried to get out, but couldn't. ELIZA got him out. They are both bruised a little, but they don't complain much. I never heard a voice or a sound from the two dear children that are dead, and I only had that conversation with WILLIAM GOULD. The Coroner: Did you ever complain of the cottage being in a bad state of repair? A. – Oh, yes, sir. Q. – Why did you live there then? A. – Well, I didn't care about living there. I was weary of living in the house, and wanted to get away from there. The Coroner; Well as there was danger there I wonder at your living there. Witness: I didn't think of the chimney falling; but it has been in a miserable state ever since I have been there. I suppose it was difficult to keep the damp out. It was in a very bad state I assure you, sir. Q. – You paid rent for it I suppose? A. Yes. I paid all that was due up to last Michaelmas. Q. – Have you said anything about repair before? A. – I don't know that I have, but my husband has, and also my brother-in-law (THOMAS HILL). By the Foreman: Did your little girl say on Friday night that she was afraid to go to bed for fear the house might fall down? A. – Yes she did. She said, "I am afraid to lie here – look at these cracks." I didn't say anything, because I thought it was only the cracks on the plaster. Q. – You said just now you heard a "litering." What was that? A. – It was part of the back wall falling. The Foreman: The back wall, sir, is completely rotten, and must have given way. I am here on my oath, and I do say that the place was not fit to be inhabited by human beings. I was in the next cottage the other day, but I wouldn't have stopped in there five minutes if I had known the state it was in. Witness: I have been weary of living there – and that's a fact. The Coroner: As to the repairs you applied to have something done before last Michaelmas. Witness: Others have. Last rent day I told Mr Buckingham myself, and he asked me particularly about it, and I told him it was the back wall. Q. – You say that you don't know how it was that the other house didn't come down. I suppose they were both in the same state? A. – I don't think the other was quite so bad. There was a little parting between the two, and I suppose that was the reason it didn't come down. Q. – Well, why did you live in this house? A. – I hoped it might be repaired, and was looking out for another place. Houses are very scarce here. By Mr Buckingham, through the Coroner: When did WILLIAM GOULD go there? Witness: About six week ago. His wife died, and he was left alone with no one to take care of him; and we thought we would take care of him. He was ninety-one years old; and the children that are dead were eleven and five years of age. Mr Buckingham: I only asked this question because I didn't know GOULD was living there. There were too many in one cottage I think, and in one room; and I wish to say they were not there with my knowledge. Of course I can't blame her, because it was only natural. Other evidence was given, and the Jury returned the following verdict: "We believe the death of these persons to be accidental, through the fall of a house, which, however, at the time was out of repair." The Jury gave up their fees for the benefit of the BIRD family.

CREDITON – Mr Deputy Coroner Leigh held an Inquest at Uton on Saturday upon the body of WILLIAM BURROWS, aged sixty-seven. On the preceding Wednesday evening the unfortunate man was returning to his cottage, and in crossing the railway he was knocked down by the train, and died almost immediately afterwards from the injuries. No blame whatever seems to be attached to any one, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE – WILLIAM THORNE, journeyman tailor, of Pilton, has had his domestic matters ventilated in consequence of a Coroner's Inquiry touching the death of his child, aged ten weeks. THORNE and his wife one evening allowed a little difference of opinion to exist between themselves; and the husband left the house, taking himself into the Chichester Arms. His wife followed him, and his stay was exceedingly short at the public – thence he proceeded towards Barnstaple, and at his heels was his "better half," with her baby in her arms. The wife in the street gave utterance to expressions not very complementary to the individual whom she had vowed to obey; and these observations induced the husband to quicken his steps. Finding herself in the position of the little boat the wife placed her baby on the pavement and returned to her home – apparently indifferent alike as to her child and its father. It was not long after, however, before the child was taken to its unfeeling mother. The child died the day afterwards, and the circumstance of the child's being left in the street on an inclement evening was made the pretext for all sorts of gossiping stories. The mother seems to have fallen with the child in her arms (before she left it in the street), and it was assumed that by the fall of the mother the child's head was injured, and the injury led to its death. The mother declared that she left the child in the street simply "to tease her husband, and that she put it down carefully." The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the child died from a severe fracture of the skull, but how the fracture was caused there was not sufficient evidence to prove. The Jury accompanied their verdict by a censure to the mother.

Wednesday 26 January 1870, Issue 5406 – Gale Document No. Y3200713282
EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Paper Maker's Arms yesterday, before Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of an infant named STALWAY. A verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned.

Wednesday 2 February 1870, Issue 5407 – Gale Document No. Y3200713306
NEWTON ABBOT – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Saturday evening at the Commercial Inn, Newton Bushel, upon the body of WILLIAM STEVENS, eleven years of age. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Vicary, tanner, of Bradley; and on Saturday morning the boy was sent to his master's stables for a horse. Soon afterwards the poor boy was seen being dragged along the road by a galloping horse, and at no great distance from the place where he was first seen he was found lifeless – minus his arm and his ear, - and his head and face were dreadfully cut. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BERRYNARBOR – WILLIAM FACEY, a native of Berrynarbor, near Ilfracombe, committed suicide last week at Allen's Temperance Hotel, Temple-street, Bristol. The poor man was sixty-two years of age, and his wife and family had been recently staying at Llanelly, South Wales. The deceased had been in the employ of Mr Morris, ship-owner, of Bristol, and had made two voyages to North America in one of his vessels. On his return from the first voyage he did not give up his accounts, and neglected to do so when requested after his return from the second voyage. As a consequence he was discharged. The language used in his letter sot his wife shews his distress to have been extreme. John Pugsley, of Berrynarbor, said that he had known the deceased for the past twenty-two years; he was born in the above place. Had not seen him since June, 1868. Some little time before that date decease had lost his own vessel, and there was a law suit between him and the insurance office, and the deceased became a bankrupt. His passing was opposed, but he got his certificate in July, 1868. His difficulties oppressed him very much, and he was reduced to poverty. He complained that his losses would "drive him wild," and he seemed vacant and absorbed in grief. Witness, however, had seen no symptoms of actual madness in him. In August last he wrote to witness and said he should never recover his position. Witness had not seen him since. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se.

Wednesday 9 February 1870, Issue 5408 – Gale Document No. Y3200713353
CREDITON – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest at the Crediton Union on Monday upon the body of the illegitimate offspring of JANE GIBBINGS. The child was only two days old, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found dead in bed, but how, or by what means it came by its death, there is no evidence to prove.

Wednesday 9 February 1870, Issue 5408 – Gale Document No. Y3200713334
EXETER – SUPPOSED CASE OF POISONING. Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Barnstaple Inn, in this city, on Saturday, upon the body of JOHN MILLER, a currier, in the employ of Mr Wreyford. The deceased had been for some time under the care of Mr Phelps, surgeon, who, after MILLER'S death, signed the certificate, believing it to have been caused by the complaint from which deceased had suffered. It seems, however that deceased and his wife (a washerwoman) had led a very uncomfortable life, and from circumstances which transpired it was deemed necessary to hold an Inquest on the body. RICHARD MILLER, the father of the deceased, said that his son was a currier, residing in Exe-street, and was about forty-three years of age. Deceased had been ill for some time, and was under medical treatment in the Dispensary. He last saw deceased alive about a week since, and he then said he was getting better. About four o'clock on the preceding Tuesday morning, one of the deceased's daughters came to his house and told him her father was dying. He immediately went to the deceased's house, but on his arrival found that he was dead. Deceased's wife asked him if he would go upstairs and see the body, but he declined. He asked deceased's wife, later in the day, if she would have the body opened, and she replied, "No, by no means." He wished to have the body opened because deceased had told him that he fancied something was put in his milk, which grated between his teeth. Deceased's mother was present when this was said. ELIZABETH MILLER, mother of the deceased, said she saw him last about a fortnight ago, and he then told her that he was much better. Just before Christmas deceased came to her house, and remained there two days, as he said he could not live with his wife. He also said that he would go to the Workhouse and take the children with him. On a subsequent occasion, when in his own house, deceased said, in the presence of his wife, that he would go to the Workhouse. The wife made use of a foul expression, and said, "You shall all go together." Deceased had three children, one of whom had been with witness for some time. During the time deceased was staying at her house he said to her, "I can eat what you give me, but what I get at home grates between my teeth." Deceased made no complaint of pain in the stomach while with her. Samuel Brooks, a fellow workman of deceased, said that for the last six months he had complained of a pain in the chest, which came on directly after he had had his meals. Witness persuaded him to go to the Dispensary and get medical advice, and deceased did so. They usually had some beer together for lunch, but after deceased went in the Dispensary, the doctor told him that he must not drink beer, and he then had cocoa or coffee, which was sent to him from his home. After he had his luncheon he would complain of the pain. If he could manage to eject a kind of phlegm he got easier. Deceased said the pain always came on after having his meals. One day when the witness returned from his meals, he found deceased lying on his back in the workshop, in very great pain. He remembered deceased going to live with his father for a couple of days about Christmas. On the day after one of the men in the shop asked deceased how he felt, and he replied, "Beautiful, I am able to walk now without pain." When deceased went back to his own home he complained that the pain returned. Elizabeth Westaway and Jane Tolcher (the latter was severely reprimanded by the Coroner for the tardy manner in which she gave her evidence ) said they had known that deceased had been ill for some time. They were called to the house at the time of his death. JOHN MILLER, a lad, seventeen years of age, a son of deceased, said he heard his father upon one occasion say that the milk given him was rather dirty, when his mother replied that the can in which it was fetched was clean. His father did not complain of pain for a week after he came from his grandmother's. Mr Phelps, surgeon, said the deceased came under his care on the 3rd January last as a Dispensary patient. He said he was suffering from pains in the stomach, which increased after eating. Witness told him that if he could not come to the Dispensary he would visit him at his house. He saw deceased the day before he died, and deceased then told him that he had had a good deal of pain on the Sunday. On the following morning he was called to see deceased, and he was told he was dying. When he got to the house he was dead. He had since signed a certificate of death, stating that it was caused by a perforated ulcer in the stomach. He was not aware when he gave the certificate of anything being amiss. A perforated ulcer in the stomach would be likely to cause such a death. He had since viewed the body, and there were no marks of violence on it. The pupils of the eyes were "clouded", but that would be likely from the state deceased was in. The body was not very nourished, and looked blanched, but deceased had always a pale unhealthy look. In answer to questions from the Jury, Mr Phelps said vomiting such as deceased had would be caused by the complaint. It was very singular that for the two days there should have been no vomiting or pain. In the case of an ulcer in the stomach the passage of food would cause great pain. He still believed that deceased died from perforation of the stomach caused by some ulcer, although he could scarcely account for death being so sudden. In answer to the Coroner Mr Phelps said deceased died on Tuesday morning, about four o'clock. The Coroner said he considered after hearing the evidence that it was a fit and proper case for a post mortem examination. It was necessary in the interests of the public; and it was necessary that the investigation should be made for the sake of MRS MILLER, in order that the matter should be cleared up. The Jury entirely agreed with the Coroner, and the Inquest was then adjourned until six o'clock on Monday evening, when Mr Bankhart, surgeon, said he had, in conjunction with Mr Phelps, made a post mortem examination of the body of JOHN MILLER. They removed portions of the viscera which were very much congested, and the blood was of a dark venous character. There was no ulceration or perforation of the stomach, and they did not think the appearances were satisfactory to account for death. Without an analysis of the contents of the stomach and viscera they could not give a positive opinion as to the cause of death. The Coroner said the case was one of very grave suspicion, and in duty to MRS MILLER and the public he thought an analysis should be made, and in order to do that it would be necessary that the Inquiry should be adjourned for a fortnight. A Juryman said he had heard a rumour that MRS MILLER had insured her husband's life, without his knowledge, in the Prudential Life Assurance Society for £13. Mr Pinney, district superintendent of the society, said deceased's life was insured, but he believed deceased knew all about it. The money had not been paid to MRS MILLER, but was held in reserve pending the Inquiry, which was adjourned till the 22nd instant.

Wednesday 9 February 1870, Issue 5408 – Gale Document No. Y3200713340
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, upon the body of JOHN SWEETLAND, mason, aged 67. On the 23rd of December the deceased was engaged in removing a cob wall, when some of it fell on his leg, inflicting an injury that necessitated his removal to the Hospital. It was thought advisable at first to amputate the leg; but the poor man refused, and he died on Saturday night. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 23 February 1870, issue 5410 – Gale Document No. BC3200713400
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at the Bishop Blaze Inn, in this city, upon the remains of JANE HENLEY, aged sixty-four. THOMAS HENLEY, husband of the deceased, stated that his wife left him at the Okehampton Inn, on Saturday night, about half-past eight o'clock, for the purpose of proceeding to the Welcome Inn to see if his wages had been left there. He went home about half-past ten, and finding that his wife had not returned, he though there was something wrong. He immediately got his boat and went to look for her. He found her body in the water just below the Welcome Inn. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

An Inquest was also held at the Rising Sun Inn, Russell-street, on the body of WM. HENRY NICHOLLS SPEARE, ten months old, infant child of WILLIAM HENRY SPEARE, a printer. The child had been under Mr Woodman's care. On Monday night nothing unusual was observed in its appearance, but about six o'clock in the morning it was found dead. Mr Woodman was sent for, and gave his opinion that the child died from a convulsive attack. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

THE SUPPOSED POISONING CASE. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of JOHN MILLER, carrier, residing in Exe-street, who died a short time since under circumstances which at the time were considered of a suspicious character, was held at the Barnstaple Inn, yesterday morning, before Mr Coroner Hooper. The deceased, it will be remembered, suffered from pains in his stomach after partaking of his meals when living with his wife; but when he resided with his parents he enjoyed good health. He complained that the liquor his wife gave him sometimes caused a sort of grating to his teeth, and shortly before his death, which occurred whilst he was living with his wife, he was heard to call out "Murder." The Coroner stated that the Inquest was adjourned until that day in order that an analysis of the contents of the stomach, &c., might be made. Immediately after the last Inquest he caused the contents of the stomach to be forwarded to London to Dr Taylor, one of the most eminent men of the day, in order that they might be analysed, and he had received from him a written report upon his analysis, and after he had read it he did not think the attendance of Dr Taylor necessary. He then read the report which contained an elaborate detail of the analysis. The conclusion arrived at was that no poison was present, and that, therefore, there was no chemical evidence to shew that poison had been administered or taken, or that it had operated as a cause of death. The Coroner stated that after the report of Dr Taylor he did not think it necessary to bring him before the Jury to prove the facts therein stated. If he had been brought before them a great expense would have been incurred, and he could only have reiterated what was in the report. Everything had been done that could be, and it was clear that death was not caused by poison. He did not know whether Mr Phelps would like to make any remarks as to the death certificate he gave. Mr Phelps said he treated the deceased in the uniform way. He had attended him for several months, and sudden death, after several stomach complaints, was not uncommon from such a cause as perforation. Taking into consideration the symptoms from which the man had suffered for some considerable time, he considered himself justified in believing that that was the cause of death. There had been no post mortem examination at the time he gave the certificate, and he saw no necessity for one. The Coroner remarked that Dr Taylor himself did not appear to suggest any cause of death. Mr Bankhart (surgeon) said the evidence as far as it went bore out Mr Phelps' treatment of the case. Without any post mortem examination he did not see what other certificate he could have given under the circumstances. The Jury returned the following verdict, " That deceased died by the Visitation of God in the Natural Way, and not from any violence to the knowledge of the Jury."

Wednesday 2 March 1870, Issue 5411 – Gale Document No. Y3200713428
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, upon the body of SARAH PARSONS, aged seventy-eight. The deceased lived at Newton St. Cyres; and on the 26th of January last, whilst going for a jog of water, the unfortunate woman fell and broke her leg. She was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she died on Saturday morning. According to the medical evidence death resulted from old age, accelerated by the accident, and the verdict was to that effect.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Barnstaple Inn, North-street, on Monday, upon the body of JOHN CARTER, aged fifty-five, of Exwick. The wife of the deceased stated that her husband went to work on Saturday morning as usual. He was working for the Local Board under the Iron Bridge. Last summer deceased fell over some steps at the Iron Bridge, and hurt his back, of which he sometimes complained. She heard nothing more of her husband until the evening, when she was told to go to the Barnstaple Inn; her husband was dead. George Roach, in the employ of the Local Board, said he was at work with the deceased all last week. They were working under the Iron Bridge, and all at once, about a quarter to five on Saturday, he missed the deceased. He saw him on the ground, and at once lifted him up, and gave him some water. He asked him where he lived, and he said near the railway station. He at once put him in a cart to take him home, but he died just as he put him in. Mr Roper, surgeon, said he was passing over the Iron Bridge at the time, and was asked to come and look at the deceased, which he did, but he was quite dead. There were no marks of violence on the body, which was well nourished. He was of opinion that the deceased died from disease of the heart which was the Jury's verdict.

Wednesday 9 March 1870, Issue 5412 – Gale Document No. Y3200713469
NORTHMOLTON - MARY PERRIN, aged seventy-five, committed suicide last week. The deceased was discovered in the bed room with one part of a silk neckerchief round her neck and the other end tied to an iron bar in the window. She had ceased to live. Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest upon the body and the verdict was in accordance with the foregoing particulars. There was no evidence as to the woman's state of mind.

DREWSTEIGNTON – SAMUEL CANN, of Drewsteignton, was at work in a quarry at Drewsteignton on Thursday, when a quantity of rock fell upon him, inflicting injuries which necessitated his removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The poor fellow died there on Saturday. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of Accidental death.

Wednesday 16 March 1870, Issue 5413 – Gale Document No. Y3200713483
BRIXHAM – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Monday upon the body of WILLIAM MICHELMORE, landlord of the Rising Sun, who died on Friday. In December the deceased, in the course of a disturbance in his house, was severely injured, and had one of his thumbs broken. He had not been able to work since, and had been in bed for the past month. Mr Green, surgeon, stated that since the deceased had taken to his bed he had gradually lost the use of his arms and legs. He believed the immediate cause of death to be disease of the lungs, which set in about a month ago, and the loss of the use of the limbs to be caused by paralysis, the effect of the assault. The fall at the time of the assault might have developed the lung disease. The Inquest was adjourned until the 14th of next month for the production of material evidence. Deceased was forty-three years of age.

BRATTON CLOVELLY – Mr Deputy Coroner Fulford held an Inquest on Monday upon the body of MR JAMES REDDAWAY, of Highampton. On Saturday the deceased gentleman was returning from hunting, and when a short distance from Bratton village his horse shied and threw him. He was discovered shortly afterwards in a state of insensibility, and conveyed to Tucker's Pack Horse Inn. Messrs. Willis and Budd, surgeons, were called in, but the injured gentleman never recovered consciousness, and expired on Sunday evening. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was sixty-two years of age.

Wednesday 16 March 1870, Issue 5413 – Gale Document No. Y3200713487
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday at Widgery's Spirit Vaults, Summerland-street, upon the body of JOHN HORN, aged eighty. The deceased was found dead in his bed early that morning; and, according to medical belief, he died from Natural Causes. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 23 March 1870, Issue 5414 – Gale Document No. Y3200713514
EXETER – MISS HARINGTON. – Some excitement was caused in the city on Sunday by a report that MISS HARINGTON, sister of the Chancellor, a lady held in high esteem, and distinguished for her eminent virtues and great benevolence, had been found dead in bed. Before retiring to rest on Saturday at the usual hour she complained of a pain in her head, when her maid gave her some sal volatile, and shortly afterwards left her. MISS HARINGTON not appearing next morning at her accustomed time, nor indeed for upwards of an hour afterwards, some alarm was felt; and as the Chancellor had left home on Saturday for a couple of days, Mr Kemp, MISS HARINGTON'S medical adviser, was sent for. Receiving no response to the loud knocking from without, he gave orders that the bed room door should be forced. A carpenter was accordingly sent for, and when an entrance was effected the deceased lady was found on her right side, dead – her left hand outside the bed and cold, but the rest of the body quite warm. There were no marks of violence on the body. MISS HARINGTON had been in a delicate state of health for some years, but worse during the last six or eight months, although not so bad as to confine her to the house. Indeed, she paid several visits on Saturday. An Inquest was held at the Chancellor's residence on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, when the foregoing facts were deposed to. Mr Kemp stated that the deceased frequently complained of giddiness in the head. She feared to go out lest she should fall down in the street. Looking at the nature of her illness and what had happened, he had no doubt that apoplexy was the cause of death; and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. The Chancellor, as already stated, left home on Saturday, stating that he should return on Monday night or Tuesday morning, but, his absence being so short, did not leave any address, consequently no communication of the melancholy event could be made to him. To prevent the shock which he must have experienced had he returned home to discover on the instant the sudden death of his sister, it was thoughtfully arranged by the Dean and Canon Cook that one of them should be in attendance on Monday at each train that arrived, and they attended, we believe, alternatively till the Dean met the Chancellor at a six o'clock train.

Wednesday 30 March 1870, Issue 5415 – Gale Document No. Y3200713537
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday at Mr Blacking's Wine and Spirit Vaults, upon the body of LUCY JANE BALL, aged five months. Mr Stonard Edye surgeon, expressed his opinion that she died from spasms of the heart, and a verdict was given in accordance with the medical testimony.

Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest at Exwick on Wednesday upon the body of HENRY ALLEN, aged fourteen, who committed suicide on the previous day by hanging himself in a hay loft. The deceased was the son of a guard on the Bristol and Exeter Railway. The evidence at the Inquest failed to reveal any cause for the commission of the rash act by the boy, who was said to be of a very sulky temper. His step-mother was examined by the Jury as to whether she had not ill-treated him, but she denied that she had done so, and some neighbours gave testimony confirming this statement. Life was quite extinct when the boy was discovered by his father hanging in the loft. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 6 April 1870, Issue 5416 – Gale Document No. Y3200713559
COPPLESTONE – Copplestone Railway Station was the scene of a lamentable occurrence on Thursday morning. The particulars will be fully gleaned by the evidence given at an Inquest held by Mr Coroner Crosse at the Copplestone Cross Inn on Saturday upon the body of WILLIAM WOODROW, aged forty-seven. Henry Mitchell, railway porter, stated that the deceased was the driver of the mail cart from Copplestone to Launceston. The deceased came to the station with the mail cart as usual, but the witness did not observe anything the matter with him. After the train left witness looked about for the driver of the mail cart, as he did not see him in the station, where he usually went to sort his bags. The witness made search, and found him lying between the rails on the down line, with his head nearly severed from his body. The body was lying straight, the head towards the station, the legs being crossed and the hands folded. The deceased had no business whatever to be on the line. The bags were always handed out. Witness could not account for the death, nor say if it was accidental or intentional. There was no doubt the deceased was killed by the train. Ewings, another porter, and P.C. Blackmore corroborated some of the statements of this witness. James Parkin said he was guard of the mail train which reaches Copplestone at 4.10 a.m. On Thursday morning the train arrived at the station at 4.13. He had been guard to that train fifteen years. The deceased drove the mail cart to Launceston, and almost every morning he was there to receive the bags from the witness. He was not there as usual on Thursday morning. The bags were put on the platform, and the train then proceeded. The train overran the station about two carriage lengths that morning, owing to the rails being slippery. He knew nothing of the accident until he came back again. James Clements, the driver of the train, corroborated the guard's testimony. JOHN WOODROW, son of the deceased, said he last saw his father on the Wednesday night, about ten minutes past eight o'clock; he came in and drank a cup of tea; he was very low-spirited; he told witness he was summoned to appear before the Lifton magistrates the next day. He said he did not know what he should do. The summons referred to an illegitimate child. He was always low-spirited if anything troubled him. His father and grand-father both died insane. Charlotte Bibbings, servant at the Copplestone Cross Inn, said she saw the deceased there the Wednesday night; he was generally very chatty and jocular, but on that night he was very strange and scarcely spoke. He did not eat his supper. Deceased slept at the inn. The Jury, after a short deliberation, brought in a verdict "That the deceased committed suicide on March 31st whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity." The deceased has left a widow and family.

Wednesday 13 April 1870, Issue 5417 – Gale Document No. Y3200713593
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, in this city, upon the body of the infant son of ELLEN BAKER. Mr Edye, surgeon, considered the child died from congestion of the lungs, and a verdict in accordance was returned.

Wednesday 4 May 1870, Issue 5420 – Gale Document No. Y3200713694
EXETER – Mr Deputy Coroner Barton held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, on Saturday on the body of MARTHA BRADDON, aged sixty-six (wife of a currier residing in Channing's-court, Magdalen-street) who died suddenly he preceding day. The evidence of Mr Stonard Edye, surgeon, showed that death was caused by a diseased heart. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 25 May 1870, Issue 5423 – Gale Document No. Y3200713765
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held two Inquests on Friday. One at the Topsham Inn upon the body of CHARLES SHAPLEY, aged nine months, whose death was caused by convulsions.

The other Inquiry was at the Round Tree Inn upon the body of WILLIAM HENRY WINDSOR, aged six months, whose death was also attributed to convulsions.

Wednesday 25 May 1870, Issue 5423 – Gale Document No. Y3200713773
NORTHTAWTON – WILLIAM AVERY, the young man who had his thigh fractured about a fortnight since whilst endeavouring to prevent the horses in his waggon from running away, died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday week, from the injuries. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was in the employ of Mr Salter, of Barton Farm, Southmolton.

Wednesday 1 June 1870, issue 5424 – Gale Document No. Y3200713801
DEVONPORT – A man named JAMES DAVENPORT, has been procuring a livelihood by going through a dangerous performance in the streets. He placed himself on his back and then allowed a large stone to be cracked whilst it rested upon his chest. On Friday he was following his vocation at Morice Town. A large stone was placed upon his chest and a man had cleft it with a sledge hammer – the pieces flying from his chest. Another man stood by with a sledge hammer uplifted to strike the stone, and so anxious was he to strike the blow that his hammer descended on the chest of the unfortunate street performer, causing injuries that led to the poor fellow's death the next day. "Accidental Death" was recorded at the Inquest. The deceased is said to be respectably connected; and he leaves a widow and one child, who is said to be living in France.

Wednesday 15 June 1870, Issue 5426 – Gale Document No. Y3200713849
EXETER – WILLIAM REED, shoemaker of Morgan's Court, St Sidwell's committed suicide early on Saturday morning by drowning himself in the water butt. An Inquest was held at the Poltimore Inn on Monday morning, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity," was returned.

SUICIDE AT DAWLISH – The Dawlish Railway Station yesterday afternoon was the scene of a dreadful suicide. MR WILLIAM HENRY EDWARDS, about forty years of age, accompanied by his wife, arrived at Dawlish by the train leaving Exeter at 1.40. They had been staying for a week at Exmouth. It is stated that they were married only a few months since; and that the gentleman was suffering from a complaint that occasionally affected his mind. There was nothing unusual observable in his manner yesterday when he arrived at the station; but whilst standing on the platform by the side of his wife (apparently watching the approach of the up train) he quietly walked close to the edge of the platform and deliberately threw himself upon the metals in front of the engine. He was knocked down by the engine, was caught under the "guard," thrown across the rail, and carried along for three or four yards; the engine and two carriages then passed completely over the poor gentleman's body, causing instantaneous death. Before the train was actually pulled up James Green, one of the porters, on seeing what had happened, got over the "couplings" to the other side of the train, and pulled the body out, the face being upwards. Mr Webb, surgeon, was standing on the platform, close to the deceased, and he also went to the other side of the train, as well as several other persons. The body was almost severed, and presented a frightful appearance; being dreadfully mangled. In his pockets were eleven or twelve sovereigns, some of which were very much bent. The scene on the platform and in the two trains was most heartrending, ladies screaming on all sides. MRS EDWARDS, as may well be imagined, was in an awfully excited and distressing state, and although at first she could scarcely conceive that her poor husband was dead, on being told that he was, she displayed grater self-control than could have been anticipated. Her husband's attendant, the station-master, and others did all they could to console her and assuage her grief, but of course their efforts were of little avail. It was considered best she should return to her home at Clifton, and she took her seat alone in the same train and proceeded by it. A covering was thrown over the body until after the departure of the trains, when it was removed to Hatcher's Hotel, where it awaits an Inquest.

Wednesday 22 June 1870, Issue 5427 – Gale Document No. Y3200713870
DAWLISH – The Recent Suicide. – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Wednesday at Hatcher's Hotel, Dawlish, upon the body of WILLIAM HENRY EDWARDS, who on the preceding day threw himself from the Dawlish platform, upon the metals, just in front of the approaching train, - the engine and two carriages passing over him, causing instant death. Dr E. L. Fox, of Clifton, deposed that he had for some years known the deceased, who lately resided at Clifton-part, and was a tobacco merchant, and had been in constant attendance on him during the last six months. He did not notice any symptoms of insanity until three weeks ago, when deceased was suffering from great depression ,and witness advised him to give up business, and travel with his wife and an attendant. Deceased had on one or two occasions expressed a weariness of life. The deceased's father and two other members of the family suffer from depression. The deceased was fifty years of age. William walker, the keeper, said he had been with deceased eight days, and during that time the deceased had said that he was not worthy to live, and on one occasion, when at the Beacon, Exmouth, he attempted to throw himself out of the window of the house, but witness prevented him. When asked what he intended doing, his reply was that he had a notion of jumping out of window. On the arrival of the down train at Dawlish, witness took charge of what luggage the deceased and his wife had in their hands, and they then crossed the line to the up platform, the porter removing the luggage. Witness followed him, and the deceased and MRS EDWARDS came after. Witness hard screams, and on looking round saw MRS EDWARDS standing by herself, and the deceased underneath the train. Mr Webb, surgeon, who was present when the deceased was taken from the metals, said he breathed a very little, and then died. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased, whilst in an Unsound State of Mind, threw himself under the train, by which means he was killed."

Wednesday 29 June 1870, Issue 5428 – Gale Document No. Y3200713896
TORQUAY – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at Torquay on Monday upon the body of DAVID WHITE, labourer, aged thirty-three. The deceased was with others working on the New Pier on Saturday, when he missed his footing and fell into the water, striking his head against a crosspiece of wood in his descent. Verdict, "Accidentally Killed."

Wednesday 6 July 1870, Issue 5429 – Gale Document No. BC3200713910
CRUWYS MORCHARD – In the employ of Mr Hill, farmer, of Cruwys Morchard, was a young man named RICHARD CROOK, who some three weeks since went to the Tiverton Limekiln for lime. He was unfortunately thrown from the waggon, and the wheel passed over his leg, fracturing it. He was removed the next day to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Thursday. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 6 July 1870, Issue 5429 – Gale Document No. BC3200713923
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Axminster Inn, Paris-street, upon the body of MARY ANN BEDFORD, aged 52. The deceased lived apart from her husband. She had been suffering from an internal complaint for some time. Evidence was given that she had not eaten food for two weeks; but had drunk brandy and gin rather freely. Mr Hunt, surgeon, said deceased was very much emaciated, and he believed she died from exhaustion, coupled with an organic disease. The Jury could not agree for some time, but after some discussion, returned a verdict "that deceased died from exhaustion."

Another Inquest was held shortly after at the Acland Arms, on the body of JAMES EALES, aged 69, of 4 Summerland-street. The deceased was a very eccentric man, and had been to America twice. He could never agree with his family. On Monday as he did not come down at his usual time, his door was forced and he was found dead. Mr S. Perkins said deceased appeared to have an epileptic fit, and had fallen on the bed where he was smothered. Verdict accordingly.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Underhill's Railway Hotel, St. David's, on Wednesday, upon the body of ANN BENNETT, aged thirty-eight, who died suddenly the previous evening at the St. David's Station. Charles Knight stated that the deceased was first cousin to his wife; that she remained at his house for eight or nine weeks; and a fortnight since left to fill a situation at Countess Weir. A few days afterwards he heard that the situation did not suit her, and that she was going to leave. Henry Lees, ticket collector in the employ of the London and South-Western Railway Company, stated that he first saw the deceased eagerly rushing down the stairs from the bridge crossing to the platforms. She came to him and asked him to let her into the train, which was going to Northtawton. As he was unlocking the door the deceased fell dead to the ground. She was taken to the waiting room, and Mr Grigg, surgeon, pronounced life to be extinct. She was after that removed to the Railway Hotel. Mr Grigg, surgeon, said he was called to go to the St. David's Railway Station, and on arriving there he found a woman lying in a second-class waiting room, quite dead. The body was warm. The pupils of the eyes were slightly dilated. He examined the body the next morning, and there were no marks of violence. His opinion was the deceased died from apoplexy, caused by over exertion. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Wednesday 6 July 1870, Issue 5429 – Gale Document No. BC3200713913
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday, upon the body of JOHN JAGO, aged 12. On the 13th June the deceased ran a thorn into his finger, which became so irritated that it produced a general inflammation. Twelve days afterwards he was removed to the hospital, where he died from inflammation of the blood, which brought on pyemia. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 13 July 1870, Issue 5430 – Gale Document No. Y3200713933
STOKE CANON – Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, on Saturday upon the body of WILLIAM SANDERS, twenty-seven years of age. He was a native of Broadclist; but was in the employ of Mr Dewdney, of the Stoke Canon Paper Mills. On Friday the deceased was engaged in cutting withies near the mill-leat, when he incautiously went further into the river than he should have done and was drowned. Verdict, "Accidental Drowning in the Culm."

SIDBURY - Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest at the Royal Oak Inn, on Saturday, upon the body of RICHARD SALMON, a shoemaker, who hung himself in a barn on the preceding Thursday night. The deceased left a letter in his pocket, wherein he assigned the cause of his rashness to his being "witched." "Temporary Insanity" was the verdict.

Wednesday 13 July 1870, Issue 5430 – Gale Document No. Y3200713937
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, upon the body of WILLIAM EASTERBROOK, aged fifty-four. The deceased had suffered from epileptic fits, and had been somewhat strange in his manner for about a fortnight. His wife found him suspended by a rope in his bed room in about half-an-hour after she gave him a cup of tea. Verdict – "Temporary Insanity."

Yesterday morning WILLIAM BOWDEN, a mason, in the employ of Messrs. Stephens, sculptors, Fore-street-hill, met with a fatal accident. A waggon containing some masonry was despatched to Seaton, and the deceased accompanied it to fix the work. When at Newton Poppleford the unfortunate man attempted to get on to the shafts of the waggon whilst it was in motion, but missing his hold he fell and the wheels passed over him killing him on the spot. The Coroner was holding an Inquest at the village at the time, and directly that was over the Jury were sworn to Enquire into the death of BOWDEN. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased resided in Bartholomew-street, and has been in Messrs. Stephens' employ for a number of years.

Wednesday 20 July 1870, Issue 5431 – Gale Document No. Y3200713975
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday morning at the Valiant soldier Inn, on the body of JOHN GOSLING, who died the previous day at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased was at work on a scaffold at Otterton Church, when he slipped off the scaffold, falling a depth of sixteen feet, and pitched upon a "puddock." He was taken to the Hospital, where he died, as the house surgeon stated, from an injury to the spinal marrow of his back. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Sergeant Fouraker, who had examined the scaffold, said it was perfectly firm.

Wednesday 3 August 1870, Issue 5433 – Gale Document No. Y3200714018
Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest yesterday at Upton Pyne upon the body of the child (THOMAS BASTEN) who was unfortunately shot on Sunday afternoon (as recorded in another column). The verdict was "Accidental Death;" but the Coroner censured Gibson for keeping a loaded gun in such a place.

Wednesday 10 August 1870, Issue 5434 – Gale Document No. Y3200714050
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Exeter Workhouse upon the body of a newly-born female child. Some days since a woman named ELIZABETH ADAMS, believed to be a native of Topsham, went to a lodging house in Smythen-street, in this city, and remained there till Monday morning. She seems to have acknowledged the fact that she was soon expecting to become a mother, and had obtained an order for the Workhouse. On Monday morning, however, she was so ill it was thought advisable to remove her to the Workhouse in a fly; but on her way the child was born, and died before medical aid could be obtained. Verdict, "Accidentally suffocated."

Wednesday 17 August 1870, Issue 5435 – Gale Document No. Y3200714088
TOPSHAM – On Thursday, a boy, aged ten years, named EDWARD PUTT, the son of a ship's carpenter, was drowned in the river. His mother had taken him and some of his companions for a walk on the wall under Mr Hamilton's grounds, and when they arrived at the steps she gave him permission to take his shoes and stockings off and wade in the water, which was flowing over the walk. Unnoticed by her, he stripped and whilst walking along stepped over the side of the wall into some eight or ten feet of water. He could not swim and his poor mother, half distracted, was preparing to jump in after him, but some men from the grounds, who were attracted by the screams, arrived in time to prevent her. The little fellow sank almost immediately, and although every exertion was made the body was not recovered until three hours afterwards. It was then brought to shore in a seine. An Inquest was held on Saturday and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" returned. The funeral took place on Sunday, the coffin being born by four of the deceased's school companions. The children attending the Wesleyan Sunday School walked in procession, preceding the coffin.

Wednesday 24 August 1870, Issue 5436 – Gale Document No. Y3200714117
BARNSTAPLE – Mr Coroner Bencraft held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of WILLIAM NORMAN, aged thirty-six. The deceased was a farmer of Challacombe. On the preceding Monday he was attacked by a bull, and he then received injuries from which he died in the North Devon Infirmary on Friday. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 31 August 1870, issue 5437 – Gale Document No. Y3200714147
BROADCLIST – WILLIAM ENGLAND, in the employ of Mr James Chamberlain of Broadclist, was returning with a load of lime on the 19th August, when he fell from the shafts and the wheels passed over him. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died last week from the injuries. He was thirty years old. The verdict of the Coroner's Jury was "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 September 1870, Issue 5438 – Gale Document No. Y3200714161
SAMPFORD PEVERELL - THOMAS HURFORD was at work in a lime kiln on Monday week, when two stones fell into the kiln. The unfortunate man descended for them, but could not get out till assistance came to hand. His cries brought one George Hellier to his assistance, and Hellier found the poor fellow with his clothes on fire standing in the middle of the kiln. He was removed to his home; and when Mr Grigg, surgeon, of Exeter, attended him that gentleman advised his patient's removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Thither he was taken, but he died from the injuries on Friday. The next day Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest upon his body, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

DARTMOUTH – Mr Coroner Puddicombe held an Inquest on Friday evening upon the body of WILLIAM DAVIDGE, who was drowned on the 22nd August. The body was identified by the widow. The deceased and another man (named Godfrey) were in a lighter, coming from Redlap Cove, near Dartmouth, when the lighter went down – occasioned by being overladen. The two men on board were drowned. The body of DAVIDGE was found by one Robert Godfrey; but the remains of the other unfortunate fellow have not been discovered. Verdict – Accidental Death.

Wednesday 5 October 1870, Issue 5442 – Gale Document No. Y3200714273
THE BOILER EXPLOSION AT TREW'S WEIR. – As we announced in our second edition on Wednesday last, the accident at Mr Blackburn's Mills, at Trew's Weir, terminated fatally, CHARLES NORTHEY, the timekeeper, having succumbed to the frightful injuries he sustained at three o'clock the following morning. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, before Mr Coroner Hooper. John Samuel Rogers, who had had the care of the engine and boiler for the past month, stated that it was a Cornish boiler and fitted with Field's small patent tubes, which have the effect of heating the water more quickly. He was standing at the front end of the boiler, near the gauge glass, when the explosion took place. They wanted to get up from 45lbs. to 50lbs. pressure, but at the time it was only at between thirty and forty. He was suddenly struck by a brick on the right side of the neck and knocked down. Immediately before the explosion he saw the deceased in the office doorway and was about to ask him the time. the next he saw of him was crawling down the bank of the river. On the bursting of the boiler, both the water and steam rushed out, and carried with it the fire. He had since examined the boiler, and there seemed to be a flaw across one of the seams. He could not account for the accident. The boiler was comparatively a new one. Mary Hartnoll saw the deceased jump into the water – he cried out that he was burning. James Rowland, the foreman at the mills, stated that he was talking with Mr Blackburn at the time f the explosion. They ran out and saw the deceased standing by the front of the gate, outside the office, holding up his arms; his face was very black, which witness thought then was probably occasioned by soot. His (witness') house was in a heap of ruins. Witness said he had been in two explosions previous to this, and he was always particular to examine the gauge glasses, which were on this occasion all right. Rogers was their confidential man. He could not give any idea of how the accident occurred. Mr Blackburn, a joint proprietor of the mills, said he examined the boiler and found about three feet of the seam between the second and third plate ripped. The boiler was composed of the very best iron, three-eighths of an inch thick, and was made at the Eagle Foundry only three years ago. The rent could not have been caused by over pressure, because they were not working to the full, but were about to start. The boiler was insured in the Boiler Insurance Society of Manchester, and was licensed to work at 60lbs. pressure to the square inch. Every three months the association's engineer visited the place – the last inspection being on the 19th of August. The inspector left a certificate (produced) which the Coroner read to the Jury. The boiler was stated to be in good order, and a few suggestions were made, all of which, the witness said, had been attended to with the exception of the addition of a check valve, which had been ordered and was in course of accomplishment. The boiler had been worked about two and a half years – it cost £300. He had been there twelve years and this was the first accident of that kind that had happened. Mr Longridge, the examiner, had been to the mills and inspected the boiler, but could not contemplate the cause of the accident. Mr Ley, surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased was suffering from extensive scalds on the face, arms and legs. His chest was more free from burns than any other part of the body. The foreman of the Jury considered there ought to be some government investigation into the cause of the accident, but the Coroner said they had all the evidence in the certificate that was required. The Coroner then summed up the evidence and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 12 October 1870, Issue 5443 – Gale Document No. Y3200714301
Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest yesterday at Axminster upon the body of ABRAHAM WOOLARD, aged 45. The deceased was a telegraph labourer. He was working between the Axminster and Chard Railway Stations; but quitted his work about noon on Saturday, intending to go to his home at Whitley. Some little time after he was seen walking in the railway; and, although he engine driver sounded the alarm whistle long before the train reached the unfortunate man, he was knocked down by the buffer and killed on the spot. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday upon the body of SARAH LEY, aged twenty-six, daughter of MRS LEY, of the Mount Radford Inn, Mount Radford. The deceased was of weak mind, and had been under medical advice. She was missed on Friday afternoon; but her mother thought she might have gone down to Countess Weir to see a friend. On Saturday morning, however, it was thought advisable to break open the door leading to the room of the deceased, and there the unfortunate young woman was found lying lifeless. Near the deceased was a phial bottle and a tea cup. Outside the bottle the words "Laudanum" and "Poison" were marked. MRS LEY stated that some time ago she was ill and then used laudanum, and put the bottle containing it in a locked drawer. Her daughter knew it. Dr Elliot stated that the deceased was a person of nervous temperament. He found her lying on her right side, with her head resting on her hand. There were no marks of violence. He was of opinion that she died from taking poison. Inspector Foweraker drew the attention of the Coroner to a mark in the deceased's throat (like a cut.) Dr Elliott said it appeared to be the bite of a rat. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased took poison while in a state of Unsound Mind.

Wednesday 19 October 1870, Issue 5444 – Gale Document No. Y3200714325
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Poltimore Inn, St Sidwell, on Saturday, upon the body of JAMES THORN, aged nine. The deceased had complained of a swollen face, then of an internal pain; and, finding him getting worse, medical aid was obtained. Mr Phelps, surgeon, said he had seen the deceased, and his opinion was the cause of death was inflammation of the windpipe, which often caused death instantly. Verdict accordingly. A subscription was opened for the poor parents, the Coroner heading the list with 5s.

Wednesday 26 October 1870, Issue 5445 – Gale Document No. Y3200714349
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn on Saturday upon the body of ELIZABETH SALTER, eight years of age. The mother of the deceased went to Exmouth on Friday to sell fish, and on her return in the evening she found her daughter dead. Mr Edye, surgeon, was in the house on the mother's return. The father of the child was spoken of as "an habitual drunkard," and as the child was only a little poorly when the mother left in the morning it was deemed particularly advisable to hold the Inquest, as the father was in bed tipsy when his wife came back from Exmouth. Mr Edye stated that he examined the body, found it well nourished, and free from any mark of violence. He considered her death was caused by "effusion of blood on the brain." Verdict accordingly. The mother of the child was said to be a very hard-working woman.

Wednesday 26 October 1870, Issue 5445 – Gale Document No. Y3200714357
MARWOOD – Mr Coroner Toller held an Inquest yesterday evening week upon the body of CAPTAIN HENRY LEY, formerly of the royal navy, but lately of the North Devon Hussars. The deceased lived at Ley House, Marwood, and was about fifty-seven years of age. Recently he seems to have entertained the belief that his worldly affairs had ran down to cureless ruin; but, from the evidence of Mr George Brown (steward to the deceased) there were no grounds for so terrible a conviction. However, on Tuesday morning MR LEY went into his saddle room and discharged the contents of a gun into his mouth, scattering his teeth and brains in all directions. His death was instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity. The unfortunate gentleman had lived freely in times past, but the grave shields the dead from obloquy. It is singular to relate that forty years ago a Jury sat in the same room to inquire into the death of MR LEY'S father, who committed suicide by shooting himself.

NEWTON ST. CYRES - MR JOHN PASSMORE, of Norton Farm, was invited on Thursday to accompany Mr Helmore, of Rewe, a day's shooting. In the morning MR PASSMORE went for his gun, which he kept in a part of his house not occupied, and in a few minutes the unfortunate gentleman was a corpse. He was shooting on Monday and is supposed to have left one of the barrels of his gun loaded; that when he took it up the gun exploded and the contents passed from just under the right eye through his head, scattering his brains, and, of course, causing instant death. One of his servant men heard the report of a gun (as coming from the house) and he ran in and discovered the fatality. It was only a few minutes after seven. MRS PASSMORE was not downstairs at the time, neither was her son. The deceased did very little farming – had independent means – and was about forty-five years of age. He was greatly respected, and much sympathy is felt for MRS PASSMORE and her son. Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest upon the body on Friday, when the first witness called was the deceased's son (about eleven years of age), who stated that he last saw his father alive on the morning of Thursday, in his bed room, shortly before seven o'clock. He was then talking to his mother; could not say what they were talking about. His father had not been ill, but was slightly nervous and intended on the day of his death to have gone to Dr Budd, of Exeter. The gun was usually kept upstairs; could not tell where it was that morning. Mr Body, surgeon, stated that he considered MRS PASSMORE was too ill to undergo an examination. The Coroner said if such was the case he could not take her evidence although he should liked to have done so. Thomas Greenslade, workman to the deceased, was then called. He stated that on Thursday morning he was at work in the front of the house, when MRS PASSMORE spoke to him from the upstair window asking him about some workmen who were expected. Within a few minutes witness heard the report of a gun in the house. He at once went to the door, and, on opening it, saw MR PASSMORE lying on his back in one of the rooms, with blood at the back part of his head. Witness ran for Mr Rew. He did not go into the room, nor did he see any gun. The last time he saw MR PASSMORE alive was on Wednesday evening. He was quite well then and spoke to him of some work to be done the next day. He never saw anything mentally the matter with him during the four years he had worked for him. He did not know that he was going shooting that day: he was often going in the room. Mr Tozer, farmer, living near the deceased, said he had known MR PASSMOREW for many years. He never considered there was anything the matter with him. On Thursday morning about seven o'clock the servant girl fetched him, and told him what had happened. He immediately ran down, and saw the deceased lying on his back on the floor quite dead, with a double barrel gun lying on the body. He took the gun up and put it in a corner of the room, and went for some assistance, and then lifted the head of the deceased and put it on a bag, and drew the body away from a pool of blood. He did not remark anything about the gun more than the ramrod was in its proper place. The gun, on being produced, proved that the left hand barrel had been exploded, and there was a dead cap on the nipple; the right hand barrel was loaded with the usual charge of shot and had a cap on. [The Coroner remarked that the lock of the gun was very delicate.] Witness had no reason to suppose it anything but an accident. The deceased was frequently out rabbit shooting early in the morning. The deceased had his slippers on, and was wearing his usual shooting jacket. Mary Ann Lee said she heard her master on the morning in question between five and seven o'clock walking about the passage. She also heard her master and mistress talking together, but could not tell what was said. MR PASSMORE went downstairs as the clock struck seven. About two minutes afterwards witness heard the explosion of a gun. Greenslade told MRS PASSMORE what had occurred. MRS PASSMORE then told witness to fetch Mr Tozer. The deceased complained on Wednesday of having a pain across his chest, and took some medicine that same evening. The next morning MRS PASSMORE took him up some tea, which she usually did when he was not very well. Her master and mistress were very happy together, and never quarrelled. Did not think the deceased was in any way excited; thought it must have been purely an accident. Mr H. Body, surgeon, of Crediton, stated that he saw the deceased about eleven o'clock lying in the same room where the accident occurred, and on examination found a gun-shot wound, which had been undoubtedly the cause of immediate death. It was at the right angle of the inner orbit, and was about an inch in diameter. The whole of the charge of the gun had passed through to the back part of the head. From the size of the wound he should consider the head of the deceased was bending forward at the time of the explosion. Witness considered it would be a very difficult matter to shoot oneself intentionally in such a place, and believed it to be quite an accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

DAWLISH – WILLIAM JOHN MAYS, who lived at No. 7, Charlotte-street, Morice Town, Devonport, left his house yesterday week, without intimating to his wife that he was going away. On Wednesday evening he was at Mr Edgecumbe's Inn, at Dawlish; he left there quite sober about a quarter to seven, when it was blowing and raining very hard. The next morning his body was found in the stream under the iron-bridge at Dawlish. It is supposed that he walked into the water and was drowned. The deceased had been master-at-arms in the royal navy, but was discharged on account of his suffering from paralysis, of which he had several attacks. About three months since he had a seizure, and had since complained very much of severe pains in the head. Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest upon the body on Thursday, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 2 November 1870, Issue 5446 – Gale Document No. Y3200714385
TOTNES – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at the Albert Inn, Bridgetown, on Saturday, upon the body of WILLIAM ELLIOTT, a greengrocer, of Clerkenwell, London, aged 71. The deceased was said to have been in a desponding state since the death of his wife – some two years since. He left London recently without intimating to his son where he was going; but as he had a daughter (Mrs Sutherland) living at Harberton, near Totnes, it was suspected that he had come into Devonshire. On Friday morning his body was found in the river Dart. He slept at Mrs Tucker's lodgings on Thursday night; but left soon after six in the morning. the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased drowned himself whilst in a state of Insanity.

Wednesday 2 November 1870, Issue 5446 – Gale Document No. Y3200714375
EXETER – MRS SANSUM, nurse at the Exeter Hospital, had a daughter twelve months old. The child was nursed by a Mrs Kendall, of St. Thomas; and on Monday evening Mrs Kendall's two children were putting the little SANSUM to bed, when the infant's night dress was caught on fire and the child was severely burnt. It was removed to the Hospital, but died yesterday morning. An Inquest was held in the afternoon at the Topsham Inn, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Wednesday 2 November 1870, Issue 5446 – Gale Document No. Y3200714373
The railway disaster at the Bishopstoke Junction yesterday week was caused by a special cattle train from Exeter to Chichester fair passing at full speed through the Bishopstoke Station and coming into contact with a number of loaded trucks. It is stated that the train ought to have stopped at the junction before reaching the station; but, although the alarm-whistle was sounded for a mile only one of the guards (of whom there were three) put on the break. The Inquest upon the bodies of the two Exeter men – JAMES CLEMENS and EDWARD BEST, the engine driver and the stoke, - resulted in a verdict of Accidental Death. CLEMENS was killed on the spot; but poor BEST had to undergo amputation of both legs. He only survived a few hours. Thirty seven head of cattle were killed and a dozen more have had to be since slaughtered.

Wednesday 9 November 1870, Issue 5447 – Gale Document No. Y3200714414
COOKBURY – Mr Deputy Coroner Fulford held an Inquest on Friday upon the body of JOHN HARRIS, in the employ of Mr Charles Saunders, of Upcott. On the preceding day the deceased became entangled in a chaff-cutting machine, worked by water power. He removed the belt from the fly-wheel, which then went round with a whirl, and the deceased was caught by it, and killed on the spot. Verdict "Accidental Death."

STONEHOUSE – PATRICK JOSEPH MACNAMARA, two and a half years old, died at Stonehouse early on Saturday morning, it is alleged, from violence. Some ten days ago there was a swelling under his right ear, and the mother (the wife of a corporal in the marines, living at Cleave's Cottages, George-street) took it to Mr Wey, chemist, who gave her a lotion. The following day the child began to bleed from the ear, nose and mouth, and the mother sought the assistance of the barrack surgeons – Mr Burnett and Mr Bamfield – who came on alternate days, and supplied medicine, which was administered according to directions. On Friday Mr Perry, surgeon, happened to visit a patient in the same house, and being called in to see the child he ordered the mother to put a linseed meal poultice to the ear. The child, however, never improved, and died at half-past four o'clock on Saturday morning. Mr Burnett being of opinion that the child died from fracture of the skull produced by violence. The Coroner was communicated with, and an Inquest was held at the Queen's Arms, Stonehouse, on Monday afternoon, when a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Wednesday 9 November 1870, Issue 5447 – Gale Document No. Y3200714404
MRS LETHBRIDGE, of Wonford, adopted a child and had it under her care two or three days. On Sunday she left it by the fire; but whilst out for her milk the little fellow's clothes got on fire, and he was thereby injured to such an extent that he died in the Hospital on Monday morning. An Inquest upon the body yesterday resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death". The deceased was eighteen months old, and named WILLIAM PIKE.

EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn on Friday upon the body of JOHN HAVILL, aged 72. The deceased went to Aylesbury Common on the 7th October for a load of wood. He rode on the off-side shaft. The wheel of the waggon in turning a corner went into a hedge-trough, and the driver was pitched off on his head. He was removed to the Hospital, but died on Tuesday from paralysis of the lower limbs, caused by concussion of the spine. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Wednesday 16 November 1870, Issue 5448 – Gale Document No. Y3200714435
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, in this city, upon the body of JOHN BURRIDGE, aged 17. The deceased was the son of a farmer of Tedburn St. Mary. On the 2nd instant the unfortunate lad converted a piece of a gun barrel into a cannon, biding it to a piece of wood with three pieces of hoop iron. On putting a light to the touch-hole the "cannon" burst and one of the pieces of hoop iron entered the forehead of the deceased. He was removed to the Hospital. The medical testimony proved that death was caused by a compound fracture of the skull. Verdict accordingly.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday evening upon the body of MARY THOMAS, aged 41. John Thorne said he had lived with the deceased seven or eight years. He was a hawker. The last time he saw the deceased was on Sunday afternoon about three o'clock. She went out of the house for the purpose of fetching a loaf of bread. She was perfectly sober. Henry Jackson said that on Sunday night he saw a woman in the leat behind the Bishop Blaze. He saw her paddling in the water, and heard her cry out twice and then sink. He called out as loud as he could for help, but no one came. George Baker said he met the first witness at the bottom of Water-lane on Monday morning. He told him he had missed his wife ever since Sunday, and he was told she was in the leat. He went into the water, and found the body of the deceased by Mr Vigus' saw mills, amongst some stones. He dragged her out, and was going to take her to the Bishop Blaze Inn; but the landlord refused to let him do so. The clothes of the deceased were torn very much, and she was half naked. Elizabeth Jones said she had known the deceased for some years. She saw her on Sunday afternoon about three o'clock, at the corner of Ewings-lane. She was by herself, and witness called her to go over to her house with her. She sent for a half-pint of brandy, which they drank. Before that she had had a half-pint of brandy, with the deceased in a public-house. Deceased left witness's house about half-past four in the afternoon, and as she was leaving asked her to lend her three halfpence to get a loaf of bread. She was drunk, as was also the deceased. Mr J. Perkins, surgeon, said there were no marks of violence about the body, and he considered the cause of death was drowning. The Jury, after sitting two hours and a half, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how, there was no evidence to show."

Wednesday 23 November 1870, Issue 5449 – Gale Document No. Y3200714477
NEWTON ABBOT – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of ALICE ADA WOOLACOTT, the natural child of SARAH JANE WOOLACOTT. The deceased was eighteen months old; and the evidence led the Jury to believe that the child was accidentally suffocated whilst sleeping with its mother.

Wednesday 23 November 1870, Issue 5449 – Gale Document No. Y3200714465
EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held two Inquests on Monday. One upon the body of SAMUEL SALTER FROME, aged 24. Deceased was in the employ of Mr Blake, of Ottery St. Mary. On Friday the deceased was returning to his master's house with a load of lime, when his horses (through the breaking of the harness) took fright and he was thrown from the waggon, whereby he received such injuries that caused his death just before he was taken to the Hospital.

The other Inquest was upon the body of JOHN LORAM, aged 64. The deceased was passing through Queen-street, in this city, on Saturday, when he became so ill that he was removed to the Hospital, and he died directly after his admission. The medical evidence left no doubt as to the cause of death in both instances and verdicts accordingly were returned.

Wednesday 30 November 1870, Issue 5450 – Gale Document No. Y3200714489
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday at the Valiant Solder Inn upon the body of GEORGE SUMMERVILLE, aged six. According to the evidence of the mother the deceased went down stairs on Wednesday morning to look for a toy; and he unfortunately caught his clothes on fire. He was burnt very severely, and died in the Hospital on Thursday. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 December 1870, Issue 5451 – Gale Document No. Y3200714517
Mr Coroner Crosse held an Inquest on Monday at the Windsor Tap, Heavitree, upon the body of MARY MILFORD, aged 78. The deceased was found dead in her room, and according to medical evidence her death was caused by apoplexy.

Wednesday 21 December 1870, Issue 5453 – Gale Document No. Y3200714579
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday upon the body of the child of a shoemaker, named WESTCOTT, of Coombe-street, in this city. The deceased (aged three years) was sitting near the fire on Wednesday morning, when he fell off the chair. In falling he upset a kettle of boiling water over himself; and was so fearfully scalded as to cause his death in the Hospital. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 December 1870, Issue 5454 – Gale Document No. Y3200714617
NEWTON ABBOT – Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Thursday upon the body of WILLIAM HAMLYN, farmer, of Preston. The deceased left his home on Wednesday morning to attend the Newton Market. On returning to Kingsteignton he called at the King's Arms and had something to drink; but nothing more was heard of him till his remains were found in the Kingsteignton Canal. Verdict – "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 28 December 1870, Issue 5454 – Gale Document No. Y3200714604
EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday at the Acland Arms, St. Sidwell's, upon the body of SARAH COTTON. The deceased (who lodged with Mrs Herbert) was discovered dead in her bed room on Friday morning; and, according to the evidence of Mrs Hartnoll, the poor woman died from "Syncope, induced by a feeble heart and the cold weather." Verdict accordingly.

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Last updated: 13 Jan 2015 - Brian Randell

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