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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1876-1880

Articles taken from Trewman's Exeter Flying Post

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included: - Abbot; Abel; Adams(2); Allen; Andrews; Ashill; Attwell; Bailey; Baird; Baker(2); Bambury; Barber(2); Barrett; Bartlett(2); Bassett(2); Bastin; Beadle; Beal; Bellamy(2); Bending(2); Bennett; Berry; Biddlecombe; Bisney; Blachford; Blackmore; Blomfield; Bond(2); Bowden(2); Bowles; Bowyer; Boyce; Bracewell; Bradford(2); Brealey(2); Brimson; Brown(2); Bulford; Butland; Callaway; Camble; Carnall; Carter; Castle; Chaple(2); Chapman; Chard; Chevasse; Chorley; Chown(2); Churchill(2); Cleave; Cloak; Cloud; Cockram; Collard; Collins; Cook; Coombes; Coram; Courtney; Cousins; Cramp; Creedy; Crocker; Crump; Cuming; Curtis; Cusack; Dart; Davey; Dawe; Dawson; Day(2); Delves; Denly; Dewdney; Dolbeer; Dominy; Down; Drew(2); Drewe; Driscoll; Duff; Dymond; Ebbles; Elliott(2); Endacott; England; Evans; Every; Ewings; Ferris; Finch; Fogwill; Foile; Foley; Forsey; Foyt; French(3); Froom; Furze; Gater; Gaye; German; Gerry; Giles; Gillard(2); Gilpin; Gitsham; Glyde; Gooding; Govier; Grear; Greenslade; Gregory; Groves; Guscott; Hall; Harding; Harris(2); Harrison; Heal(2); Hearn; Hedgeland; Hellier; Hellyer; Hexter; Hill(3); Hills; Hockey; Holden; Hookway; Hooper(2); Hopkins; Horsford; Hosegood; Hoskins; Howard(2); Howarth; Howe; Howes; Hunt; Hurrell; Hussell; Hutchings(2); Ireland; Isaac; Jacobs; Jenkins; Jones; Joslin; Kemp; King; Kingwill; Knill; Lake(2); Lawrence; Leach; Leaman; Lean; Leaworthy; Lee(3); Lewis; Ley(2); Long; Longman; Lowman; Lucas; Luffman; Luxton; Lyne; Lytton; Macdonald; Macrae; Maddicks; Maeer; Major; Mallet(2); Mallett; Manley; Mann(2); Marchant; Marshall; Martin(3); Matthews; May(2); Mayne(2); Michelmore; Mighall; Milford; Miller(2); Milsom; Moore(2); Morgan; Morris; Morrish; Mortimore; Mugford(2); Murphy; Neale; Newcombe(2); Newman; Nichols; Norman; Norsworthy; North; Northcote; Northcott; Norton; O'Neill; Osborne; Owen; Oxenham; Packer; Page; Palfrey; Palmer(2); Parish; Parkin; Parr; Parrington; Pates; Pearson; Penny; Pepprell; Percy; Perkin; Perriman; Perry(2); Pfaff; Pilmoor; Pinsent; Pitts; Pollard; Pomeroy; Pooley; Pope; Potter(2); Powlesland(2); Prowse; Putt; Pyke; Pyle; Pym; Rawe; Read; Redwood; Reynolds; Rice; Richards(4); Richardson; Rindle; Rix; Robertson; Rogers; Rosamond; Rouse; Rowe; Rude; Salter(2); Sanders; Sansom; Saunders(3); Scanes; Scoines; Seamour; Searle(2); Segar; Sellick(2); Sercombe(2); Shapcotte; Sharland; Shermon; Shilson; Simpson; Sing; Skinner(2); Slade; Slater; Slee; Smale; Smeath; Smith(5); Snell; Sowden(2); Sparrow; Spender; Squire; Squires; Stanton; Stark; Steer; Stevens; Stockman; Stone; Stoyles; Strawson; Street; Stringer; Stuckley; Sturges; Swan; Sydney; Tamlyn; Taperell; Taverner; Taylor(2); Thompson(2); Thorne; Tolley; Tothill; Towell; Townsend(2); Tozer(2); Trace; Tree; Tremlett; Trethewy; Trowbridge; Tucker(3); Turner; Venn; Vernoun; Vinnicombe; Walke; Ward(2); Ware(2); Warmington; Waterman; Way; Webber; Weeks; Wellaway; Wellington(2); Wellsman; West(5); Westaway; Westcott; White(2); Whitton; Widger; Williams; Wills(6); Wilson; Withycombe; Wollacot; Wolland; Wood; Wooder; Woodgates; Woodrow; Wyatt; Wyndham; Yabsley; Yardley; Yelland(2); Youlden;

Wednesday 5 January 1876, Issue 5786 – Gale Document No. Y3200721841 TEIGNMOUTH – The Late Boat Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on Saturday evening, before H. Michelmore, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN PEPPRELL, a fisherman, who was drowned on the 6th December last, and whose body was not picked up until that morning, when it was found just above the Breakwater by a man named Chudleigh. WILLIAM HENRY STAFFORD, boot closer, identified the body as that of his brother-in-law, who was twenty-five years of age. Jacob Mutters, one of the survivors of the ill-fated boat's crew, stated that, as they were running their boat for the harbour about eight p.m., after having been out all day herring fishing, the deceased, who was steering, said "Look out," and immediately the boat was turned bottom upwards by a wave, and the crew were all shot into the sea. Witness managed to get on the bottom of the boat, and after having kept himself afloat over an hour by two oars, was picked up by the crew of the lifeboat. During that time he saw a boat pass about ten or twelve fathoms from him, which he hailed, but with no effect, though he felt sure they heard him. John Criddiford gave corroborative testimony. He said after Mutters left the boat righted again, and he with Hole and PEPPRELL got into it, but the two latter were soon washed out and never seen again. He thought the men in the boat which passed must have heard their cries for help, and should have come to their assistance, although even had the men rendered assistance, it would have been too late to save the lives of the drowned. The Coroner caused the men in question to be sent for, and they subsequently attended the Inquiry Bryant was the man in charge of the boat, and a youth named Skedgell was with him, the other two occupants being boys. Bryant said they heard the cries, but took them to be cries from the shore directing their boat into the harbour, and as they were in great danger themselves, they made for the harbour as quickly as they could. It was not until they had got well inside the rough water that they could make out that the cries for help proceeded from outside. They then immediately lowered their sail and mast, intending to go out again, and see if they could render assistance, but after they had taken down their mast the lifeboat passed them on its way to the rescue, seeing which they considered it no good to endanger their lives and their boat by getting into the rough water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and gave their fees to the widow of the deceased.

Wednesday 12 January 1876, Issue 5787 – Gale Document No. Y3200721870 EXETER – Death From An Overdose of Chloral. - The City Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at No. 6, Higher Summerland-place, Heavitree-hill, respecting the cause of the death of MISS JESSIE RAWE, step-daughter of W. KENDALL, Esq., J.P., who was found dead in her bed room the previous evening. The Jury included many of the Town Councillors of the City, with Mr H. Hughes as foreman. The first witness called was MR KENDALL, and, previous to his being sworn, the Coroner informed him that he was sure all the gentlemen of the Jury sympathised with him in his bereavement. For himself he did so deeply. MR KENDALL then deposed that the deceased was his step-daughter and resided with him. She was an unmarried lady and about thirty-five years of age. She had lived with him for about twenty years and generally possessed good health, but was rather nervous. She had been attended by the most eminent medical men of the city, latterly by Dr Samuel Perkins. On Saturday she was rather excited and depressed, and he spoke to her respecting this. He suggested that she had been taking something, and he was led to believe from what passed between them that it was chlorodyne. He suspected that she had been taking this lately for toothache. She was not accustomed to take wine or spirits. Shortly after she appeared to recover herself. On Sunday her sister visited her, and a very pleasant day was spent. he did not see her on the Monday alive. He went out in the morning, and at a little before five o'clock he was fetched from the Club. On arriving home he found her lying in her bed room on the floor insensible. She was dead. Mary Ann Dymond, house and parlour maid to MR KENDALL, had known the deceased for three and a-half years and had seen more of her than anyone else in the house. She saw her on Sunday and Monday, and she appeared in her usual health, being perhaps a little depressed on Monday. She said to her about nine in the morning that she did not feel very first-rate. At 10.30 she went to the bed room again, and she asked witness to fetch her a bottle of chloral from the billiard room. It was a 2s. 9d. bottle, and it was about half full. At 12.30 she went into her room again. The door was shut before she entered. She found her sitting by the fire in her night-dress, and she thought she was sewing. Deceased spoke to her as usual on general subjects saying she would have her dinner at 1.30, and mentioned what she would have. Witness then left again. Whilst in the room she said to her, "If I were you Mary, I would clear those bottles from the cupboard," alluding to the empty bottles of various kinds. She did so, and among them she thought there was the one she had previously taken to her containing the chloral. At any rate she missed it from the table. If it was there it was empty. Several of the bottles had contained chloral. Deceased appeared at this time in her usual state. The room had since been searched and no bottles were found there. She had taken chloral for some time, saying it was the only thing that would relieve the pains in her stomach. She had complained of these pains for a long time. At 1.30 witness went to her again, and found her lying on the floor by the washstand on her right side. She was still in her nightdress. She spoke to her, but got no reply. She shook her. She was warm. She thought she was asleep. Finding she did not speak she left the room. She told the cook what she had seen, and about two o'clock went to the room again, and found her in the same position. She then put a pillow under her head, and a blanket over her. She thought she was asleep, and was not alarmed, as she had often seen her sleep on the couch, &c. She went into the room several times after this. The cook also went up. At 4.30 she got rather nervous, and as it seemed odd her being on the floor, she sent for MR KENDALL. He came almost immediately. They went into the room together, and MR KENDALL shook deceased. Mr Perkins came directly and said she was dead. they searched for the bottle with Mr Perkins, but could not find it. To the Jury: She used to take this liquid in water. I once previously found her sitting on the stairs in a state of stupor, but she awoke on my approaching. Harriet Chamberlain, cook, deposed that she had been in the habit of fetching chloral for deceased. She generally fetched it from Mr Palk's. She fetched some on Saturday evening last, at MISS RAWE'S request, as she was suffering from pains in her stomach. Mr Charles Pasmore, chemist, East-gage, said he was in the habit of selling Hunter's solution. It was a patent medicine sold in bottles. He knew nothing of the composition of the medicine, except from what was on the label. He knew the late MISS RAWE, as a customer, and had sold her this medicine. To the Foreman: the bottle contained twelve does, and the bottle was graduated into twelve parts. Dr Samuel Perkins, of St. Sidwell's, said he had known the deceased for twenty years. She was stout, and of full habit, and of nervous temperament. He attended her in July last when she complained of a sinking pain in her stomach. He treated her and she got better. He then went on to state how he had been summoned to the house by MR KENDALL on Monday, and found the deceased as described by previous witness. On examination he found that she had been dead an hour and more. He found from enquiry that she had been in the habit of taking chloral. On the chimney-piece was a wine-glass full apparently of water. He tested it and found it was a solution of chloral; it was Hunter's solution. He wrote to Mr Hunter on the previous night, and requested that he would send him a telegram of the exact strength per drachm. He put in the telegram which stated that the liquid was twenty-five grains to the drachm. Therefore the bottle produced contained 300 grains of chloral. From half-past ten to half-past twelve he considered she took 125 grains of chloral, ample to produce death. It was a fact that chloral produced the sinking feeling in the stomach, which she complained of, and which increased with the dose. His opinion was that death resulted from an overdose of chloral producing congestion of the lungs and apoplexy. In reply to the Foreman, Mr Perkins said he wished it to go forth to the public that chloral was an exceedingly dangerous remedy, and ought never to be administered without the advice of a medical man. This was not the first case of the kind he had met with. Such a dangerous thing ought to bear the word "poison," upon the label. The Coroner went into the manufacture of chloral to show that it contained chloroform, and gave it as his opinion that the deceased had taken this to soothe the pains in her stomach, whereas it only caused greater irritation and inclined her to take another dose. He hoped the Press would take notice of what Dr Perkins had said respecting the dangerous practice of taking chloral. The Jury were unanimously of the same opinion as the doctor upon that matter. After a short consultation the Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by an Overdose of hydrate of chloral."

Wednesday 19 January 1876, Issue 5788 – Gale Document No. Y3200721886 EXETER – Found Dead. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Sawyer's Arms, Preston-street, on Monday evening, respecting the death of RICHARD SNELL STRINGER, an infant of ten weeks, who was found dead in bed on the morning of the previous day. The deceased was the illegitimate child of a woman residing in Sherman's-court. Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, said the child appeared to have been well nourished; it bore no external marks of violence. He was of opinion that death resulted from natural causes. The Jury formed their verdict in agreement with the medical evidence. The mother and father, with four children, lived in one small room, the children all sleeping with their mother when the father was not at home. He is a drover, earning 6s. or 7s. per week.

Wednesday 19 January 1876, Issue 5788 – Gale Document No. Y3200721902 TIVERTON - The Recent Accident At The Railway Junction. - WM. VINNICOMBE, porter in the employ of the Great Western Railway, who was very seriously injured on the 11th inst., whilst doing duty at the junction station, died on Saturday last in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. At the Inquest held before Mr Hooper, the City Coroner on Monday, the following evidence was taken:- William Snell, porter at the St. David's Station, said deceased was a married man, and was employed to work at the Tiverton Junction. On Tuesday the 11th, witness left Exeter by the 4.45 up train in charge of a composite slip carriage, which slipped off on the train reaching Tiverton Junction. When near the Junction witness saw a light, about thirty yards ahead, carried apparently by a man in the direction of the rails. On nearing it he saw it was a man carrying a lantern, and who was endeavouring to cross the line. Witness put on the break and shouted as hard as he could. Deceased took no notice of the alarm, but continued to approach the metals. The carriage in which witness was had a front window, and in this compartment two lights were burning. Deceased appeared to take no notice of his danger, and the carriage knocked him down, and dragged him about thirty yards. As he dropped off, the wheels passed over his body – so the witness concluded from the lurch which the carriage gave at the time. Deceased was neither deaf nor short sighted. He was there on duty. Deceased attended this slip carriage every day, and knew well the time it came up. Walter Smallbones, porter at Tiverton Junction, was the first to go to the deceased after the accident. He found him laying by the side of the rails covered with blood and bruises. Deceased appeared to be unconscious. He was placed in a guard's van and immediately conveyed to the Hospital. Witness added, that deceased was a sober man. John Dyer Weeks, signalman at the Junction, said he saw deceased shortly after five on the afternoon in question. He was perfectly sober. In the course of conversation, deceased said to him, "I have put up that lamp down there (meaning the signal lamp), but in the act of putting it up the light went out. I must go down the line and see to it." He went away for the purpose, and in a short time witness was informed that he had been run over by the slip carriage from Exeter. Mr Cumming, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, stated the nature and extent of the injuries from which the man was suffering, when admitted, and that he died from them on Saturday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Mr Superintendent Green was present to watch the Inquiry. He gave deceased an excellent character, and said he was one of the best servants the Company had in their employ. Deceased leaves a widow and seven small children.

Wednesday 26 January 1876, Issue 5789 – Gale Document No. Y3200721932 ASHPRINGTON - Alleged Manslaughter. - On Friday evening an Inquest was held at the Maltsters' Arms, Tuckenhay, before Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of ELIZABETH ELLIOTT, aged seventy-three years. The deceased had been twice married, and on the death of her second husband she went to live with JOHN HANNAFORD, her son by her first husband. He is a married man, and keeps the house where this Enquiry was held. Deceased had lived with him about three years and a-half, and it was stated that when she went there she had about £100 belonging to her. MRS ELLIOTT died on Tuesday morning, and the charges made by her neighbours were so serious that the policemen stationed at Ashprington laid the matter before the Coroner, who instructed Messrs. Hains and Wallis, surgeons, of Totnes, to make a post-mortem examination of the body. At the Inquest Susan Camp stated that the deceased had complained to her of having been kept short of food, and that she had seen the HANNAFORDS ill-treat the deceased. Mary Clements, another woman living near by, corroborated this evidence. Mr Hains, surgeon, stated that he and Mr Wallis had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found it emaciated to a very great extent. There were recent scars, which appeared to be remains of old wounds, upon the legs, arms and chest. Every organ of the body was perfectly healthy, but there was not the slightest trace of food inside, and the whole body was devoid of fatty substance. The brain was healthy, but there was an accumulation of serum in each lateral ventricle, and this was the immediate cause of death by producing serous apoplexy. Mr Albert J. Wallis corroborated Mr Hains's testimony, and in reply to the Coroner's Jury, both witnesses expressed their opinion that the accumulation of serum was caused by debility, and that the cause of the debility was want of nourishment. HANNAFORD and his wife, after being cautioned, denied having treated the deceased cruelly, or having kept her short of food. They called a young man named William Hawkins, a cooper, who works near the place, and who stated that he had at times seen the deceased taking her meals. He never heard her ask for more and get refused, and she never complained in his hearing of not having enough. The Jury, after an absence of twenty minutes, returned as a verdict that the deceased died from neglect and want of proper care. The Coroner said he quite concurred with the verdict, which was tantamount to Manslaughter. HANNAFORD and his wife were then committed for trial at the Assizes on a charge of Manslaughter, and the Coroner accepted the bail of two sureties in £50 each. The Enquiry lasted from four until half-past ten.

Wednesday 26 January 1876, Issue 5789 – Gale Document No. Y3200721919 EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on Monday evening, on the body of a child, named BEATRICE ANNIE TOWNSEND, aged nine months, who died in the Hospital on the previous day. ELIZABETH SARAH TOWNSEND, the mother of the child, said she was a single woman, and the child was put out to nurse. Mary Hooper said that on Friday last she was at the house of her mother-in-law, who had the care of the deceased. She was sitting in front of the fire with the child in her lap, and was about to light a lamp, when the top fell off, and the oil splashed over her apron, and over a clothe which covered the child's legs, and both articles took fire. The child's feet and legs were seriously burnt, and witness's fingers were also injured. As soon as she could obtain assistance she took the child to the Hospital. Mr C. E. Bell, Assistant House-Surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased was admitted by him on the previous Friday. She was very much burnt about the feet and legs. The child was a small one for its age. In his opinion death resulted from the shock to the system caused by the burns. Verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 9 February 1876, Issue 5791 – Gale Document No. Y3200721993 EXETER – Sad Death From Burning. - W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on Friday, touching the death of ELIZABETH YOULDEN, a child five and a half years of age, daughter of AARON YOULDEN, a labourer of Whimple. About half-past six o'clock on Wednesday evening the deceased child was sitting near the fire when her pinafore caught alight. She ran away down the garden to an older sister who had just left her, and by that time her clothes were all in a blaze. The sister immediately wrapped her dress around her and endeavoured to extinguish the flames, and, with the assistance of a neighbour named Harris, this was done. The child was found to be severely burnt, and oil and flour were at once applied. Later in the evening it was thought advisable to take her to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she died on the following afternoon, from the effects of the burns and the shock to the system. Verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 16 February 1876, Issue 5792 – Gale Document No. BC3200722037 NEWTON ST. CYRES - A Child Burnt To Death. - An Inquest was held before the City Coroner (H. Hooper, Esq.), at the Topsham Inn, South-street, last evening, touching the death of WM. HOWES, a child aged three years, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Sunday last from the effects of burns. ANNIE HOWES stated that she was the wife of JAMES HOWES, employed as groom to Mr Quicke. On the previous Saturday, about 4.30, she left the deceased sitting on a chair in a downstair room by the side of a coal fire. An infant was sitting in a chair on the other side of the fireplace. She went out of the room to fetch some water, and was absent about ten minutes. On returning the child was in the arms of a woman named Mary Hawkins, and his clothes were partially burnt. Shortly after the child was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital in Squire Quicke's carriage. There was a fender in front of the fire. Mary Hawkins stated that she resided at Newton, and on Saturday, when near the last witness's house, she was attracted to it by the cries of children. As she approached a child of the village opened the door from the outside, and witness saw the deceased standing up just inside the door with his clothes on fire. She caught it up and wrapped her clothes around it. She could see nothing in the room at the time for smoke. Witness, with a man, put oil and wadding to the wounds. The mother, recalled, stated that the kettle which she left upon the fire was unmoved, and the fire looked not to have been touched. Mr Cumming, house surgeon at the hospital, said the child was much burnt, principally on the back and stomach, and never rallied. It died on Sunday evening from the burns and shock to the system. The Coroner said it was very mysterious how the child's clothes caught fire, and it was rather careless of the mother to leave the children alone. The mother said she was a stranger to the village, and therefore knew no one who would look after them. The Jury were unanimous in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 16 February 1876, Issue 5792 – Gale Document No. BC3200722014 EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Crown and Anchor Inn, Newtown, on Thursday evening, respecting the death of an infant, two months old, son of MR RINDLE, dairyman, of John-street. The parents early in the morning found the child stiff in bed by their side. MR RINDLE went immediately for Mr A. S. Perkins, but before he arrived the child was dead. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence, which was to the effect that the child died from spasms.

EXETER – The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Sawyer's Arms, Preston-street, on Monday, on view of the body of JOHN DAY, a middle aged labourer, who died suddenly on Saturday night. Deceased had been working for Mr Biddell, at Duryard, and latterly suffered from pains in the side, and shortness of breath. He was in his usual health on Saturday night when he went to bed, but was taken ill a few minutes after. Mr Perkins surgeon, who was called to the deceased, thought he died from the rupture of a vessel in the region of the heart, and a verdict in accordance was returned.

The Coroner afterwards held an Inquest at the Queen Victoria Inn, Exe Island, touching the death of JOHN LOWMAN, aged seven months, who was found dead in bed by its mother's side on Sunday morning. Mr Perkins said the child was rather emaciated, but he thought it died from a spasm of the heart. The Coroner censured the parents for their neglect, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

A third Inquest was held at the Crown and Anchor Inn, Newtown, on the body of EARNEST J. C. KEMP, aged about five months, who was also found dead in bed on Sunday morning. The child had been healthy and strong from its birth, and Mr J. W. Harris, surgeon, was of opinion that it had been "over laid." Verdict accordingly.

Yesterday morning the City Coroner held an Inquest at the Bridge Inn, St. David's, on the body of ANN SMITH, aged 80 years, a widow, lately living in the Free Cottages, California. It appeared from the evidence of Mr Domville, surgeon, that death was the result of Natural Causes, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Wednesday 23 February 1876, Issue 5793 – Gale Document No. BC3200722046 EXETER – Mr H. D. Barton, Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday, at the Victory Inn, St. Sidwell's, on the body of WILLIAM VINCENT STRAWSON, the infant son of MR CHARLES STRAWSON, of St. Sidwell's. The deceased child was about a year and five months old, and had been very sickly from its birth. On Friday night it suddenly breathed heavily, and, in a few minutes, expired. Mr Hunt, surgeon, was immediately sent for, and, at the Inquest, he stated that death was produced by Natural Causes. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 1 March 1876, Issue 5794 – Gale Document No. Y3200722103 TEIGNMOUTH – Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the Dawlish Inn, on Wednesday night, by Mr H. H. Michelmore, County Coroner, touching the death of JOHN YABSLEY, a dairyman, 47 years of age. From the evidence of his wife, it appeared that he had been low-spirited for the past fortnight; had taken but little food, and had not been able to sleep, which she attributed to a bad cough. He was in difficulties, and had a bill of £40 to meet on Thursday. John Bond, of the Black Horse Inn, West Teignmouth, stated that on Tuesday evening he found the deceased in a linhay in the corner of the field, hanging by a rope to a beam. His hands were cold and stiff. He had known deceased for years, and for the past fortnight he had noticed a difference in him. He particularly noticed a strangeness in his manner on Tuesday morning, and heard him say he had not been able to sleep, and was not very well. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the "Deceased hanged himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind".

Wednesday 1 March 1876, Issue 5794 – Gale Document No. Y3200722088 EXETER – Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday afternoon at the Bishop Blaze Inn, respecting the death of a tinman named WILLIAM RUDE, aged 76 years. Mary Endacott, of Ewing's-lane, with whom the deceased lodged, stated that he was in his usual good health up to six o'clock on Wednesday evening. After tea whilst talking with some neighbours and filling his tobacco pipe, he was noticed to suddenly turn pale and totter. A doctor was instantly sent for, but the old man died within a few minutes of the medical man's arrival. Mr Tosswill, surgeon, said he could hardly decide whether the cause of death was heart disease, apoplexy, or aneurism, but it was evidently the result of natural causes. A verdict to that effect was returned.

Wednesday 1 March 1876, Issue 5794 – Gale Document No. Y3200722104 EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr W. H. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Red Lion Inn, St. Sidwells, respecting the death of JOHANNA TUCKER, an old lady eighty-one years of age, residing in Townshend's-court, and who died on Tuesday morning. On the previous night a neighbour gave her a drop of wine and a biscuit as usual for her supper and offered to remain with her if she liked as she had not been in particularly good health for the previous few days. The old lady replied that if she wanted help she would call Mrs Harvey who resided in the same house. Mrs Harvey saw the old lady on Monday as usual and heard no complaints from her. On Tuesday morning she went to her room and opened the shutters when she found the old lady was dead. She heard her coughing early in the morning. Mr Phelps, surgeon, saw the deceased about a week ago, when she was suffering from chronic bronchitis. He saw her body yesterday morning. She was very emaciated and weak. He thought she might have died from syncope produced by the coughing. the Coroner asked what sum the old lady had been receiving from the Guardians of the Poor. It was stated that she received 3s. 6d. per week out of which she paid 1s. 3d. rent. The Jury thought this sum insufficient. One of the witnesses, a neighbour of the deceased, said she was sure the old lady never wanted anything as several besides herself had helped her. Mr Phelps said during his visits he had never seen any signs of distress. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 8 March 1876, Issue 5795 – Gale Document No. Y3200722133 WHIPTON – R. R. Cross, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at the Half Moon Inn, Whipton, on the body of ELIZABETH BRADFORD, aged 43, who died suddenly on Thursday. William Cockeram, gardener, said he had known deceased for twenty years, and for the past ten months had been keeping company with her with a view to marriage. He left her house on Tuesday evening, about eleven o'clock, and she accompanied him to the outer door. She then appeared to be in her usual health. Mr Williams, surgeon, said he had several times attended deceased, but only for slight ailments. On Wednesday he was called to her house, and found her in a profoundly unconscious state, with symptoms of apoplexy. He had examined the body since death, and believed death had resulted from the effects of an effusion of blood in or on the brain, and that the bruises on the neck and arms of deceased were caused by her struggles after the seizure. JANE JORDON, sister of deceased, said that between seven and eight o'clock on Wednesday, her attention was called to the fact that deceased had not been seen throughout the day. She went to the cottage and tried the door, but found it locked from the inside. Hearing moans from the interior of the cottage, she requested Mr White, the landlord of the Half Moon Inn, to force open the door, and on this being done deceased was discovered lying on the floor of the passage in a state of unconsciousness. Various remedies were applied but without effect and she died about one o'clock on the following morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Coroner said he thought he had done right in holding an Inquest over this poor woman. he had heard rumours in this part of the neighbourhood concerning this case, and he did not think it right that the man Cockeram should be accused of causing the death of the woman as it was reported. He was quite sure he was innocent of what had been said about him.

Wednesday 8 March 1876, Issue 5795 – Gale Document No. Y3200722123 EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, last Saturday evening, on the body of CATHERINE WEST, aged seven. Mrs M. Comnick, of London, said the child was the daughter of THOMAS WEST, a clerk in the goods department of the Great Western Railway Company at Paddington, and was suffering from consumption. About three weeks since witness left London to visit her friends at Honiton, and at the father's suggestion brought the child with her for change of air. On Saturday morning she left Honiton to come to Exeter to return to London by the Great Western. On the way the child became very ill, and on arriving at Exeter she took it to Mr Webb, surgeon, where it died. Mr Webb said when brought to him the child was in a dying condition. He gave it some brandy and water, shortly after which it expired. The cause of death was congestion of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

On Monday evening Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Custom House Inn, on the body of another child named ALFRED HAYCRAFT EVANS, aged 13 months, son of WILLIAM EVANS, residing on Quay-hill. It appeared from the evidence that the child had been suffering for a day or two from a cough, and on Sunday morning it died. Mr Roberts, surgeon, who was called in, gave it as his opinion that death arose from Natural Causes, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Wednesday 22 March 1876, Issue 5797 – Gale Document No. Y3200722183 STOKE CANON - The Missing Parishioner. - The mystery connected with the disappearance of MR DEWDNEY, Sen., late of this parish, has at length been cleared up. The body of the unfortunate man was picked up on Tuesday out of the river near Bulhill, where it was seen floating by two sailors named Bowdritch and Debridge. The deceased appeared to have been in the water two or three weeks. On searching deceased's pockets, five shillings and sixpence in silver, a halfpenny, and a few horse-beans were found. The body was taken to the Beach Hotel, where an Inquest was held on Wednesday, before J. C. Macaulay, Esq. There was no evidence to show by what means the deceased came into the water, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 22 March 1876, Issue 5797 – Gale Document No. Y3200722197 EXETER – Distressing Suicide. - On Wednesday last, the City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on the body of WILLIAM THOMPSON, an engineer, who died in the Hospital on the previous Tuesday from the effect of self-inflicted injuries. ELIZABETH THOMPSON, wife of the deceased said she was living at Bradford, and had been separated from her husband for some time. She did not hear of his condition until Sunday last, and then she at once came from Bradford to Exeter to see him. She found him in the Hospital, and he told her that he was looking out of the window and fell out, he being in such pain that he did not know what he was about. Deceased had suffered from some internal complaint for years. Mrs Tozer, with whom the deceased lodged in Edmund-street, said he had been suffering from some internal disease ever since he had lodged with her, and had been under medical advice. For a week previous to the event he had been drinking. On the previous Wednesday he came home about twelve o'clock in the day intoxicated, and complaining of pain. He went to his room, and she did not see him again until he fell out of window. Deceased had often complained of a pain in his head. William Hooper, an engine-fitter, residing in the adjoining house to the last witness, said he was in Edmund-street about two o'clock on Wednesday last, and saw the deceased come out of his bed room window, and fall on to the pavement. the window was twenty-five feet from the ground, and deceased was undressed. The deceased pitched on the back of his head, and witness noticed that his throat was covered with blood. He put his hands to deceased's throat and pulled him into the shop. On the previous day witness spoke to the deceased, who did not answer, and was peculiar in his manner. P.C. Stark proved taking the deceased to the Hospital, and produced a knife found by his bed. Mr Cumming, house-surgeon at the Hospital, said he knew the deceased, whom he had seen in the Hospital some seven years ago, and who was then suffering from a very painful disease. On Wednesday night deceased was brought to the Hospital, and then had a wound on the back of the scalp, and a wound about an inch-and-a-half long just under the jaw. The throat appeared to have also been injured by some blunt instrument. On the second day after he was admitted deceased had an attack of inflammation of both lungs, from which he died on Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died from injuries inflicted by himself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 29 March 1876, Issue 5798 – Gale Document No. Y3200722232 SIDMOUTH – Suspicious Death Of A Boy. - At the Bedford Hotel, Sidmouth, on Thursday, Mr C. J. Macaulay, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of HARRY CHURCHILL, nine years of age, who died on Tuesday last, under somewhat suspicious circumstances. Dr Charlton Fox said he saw the deceased on the previous Saturday, and found him suffering from partial paralysis of the lower limbs, and with all the symptoms of peritonitis, and there was also complete stoppage. The lad died between three and four p.m. on Tuesday last. He made a post-mortem examination, and found that deceased had suffered from intense peritonitis, to which cause he attributed death. He found no external marks of a blow, the only symptoms indicated being internal ones. Fanny Perry, ten years of age, stated that on the afternoon of the 13th instant, she was in the All Saints' school yard and saw Harry Turner strike deceased across the back with four sticks, one thick and three thin ones. The boys were at play together and the deceased did not cry but laughed as though he were not hurt. William Henry Drewe, nine years of age, gave similar evidence. He added that he heard the deceased say whilst in school in the afternoon that he thought something was the matter with his side. EDWARD CHURCHILL, a gardener, father of the deceased, said that on the 16th instant his son complained of being unwell, and stated that Turner had kicked him in the side, but did not say when it occurred. The deceased had always enjoyed good health. HARRIET CHURCHILL, mother of deceased, said her son complained of headache on returning from school, on the Monday, and asked to go to bed. The following morning he appeared better, and continued going to school until Thursday evening, when he complained of a pain in his stomach. The Deputy Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said if the Jury were of opinion that deceased died from peritonitis, and this was the result of the blow given by Turner, it would be their duty to return a verdict of Manslaughter against Turner. The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Death resulting from peritonitis and inflammation of the bowels.

CREDITON - Fatal Result Of A Family Quarrel. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Crediton Workhouse last Saturday, on view on the body of MATTHEW BELLAMY, farm labourer of Colebrook, who died under somewhat suspicious circumstances. Mr William Vanstone, the master of the Crediton Workhouse, said the deceased was admitted to the House on Saturday, the 11th instant, and on the night of the 22nd instant he died. HENRY BELLAMY, a lad about eleven years of age, and son of the deceased, said on Thursday night, the 8th instant, he saw his mother throw a three-legged stool at deceased. It did not strike him, but passed close to his head. Deceased fell back on the top of a chair in a sitting position; this was two or three minutes after the stool had been thrown at him. Could not say if he hurt his side. Elizabeth Burrows, the wife of a farm labourer, living next door to the deceased, said that she heard a quarrel between deceased and his wife. She did not hear any blows. On the Thursday and Friday following, the deceased complained to her of an injury he had received to his side. He said his wife had thrown the stool and struck him in the side. Mr J. A. Edwards, surgeon, stated that he examined deceased on Monday, the 13th instant. Observed a red mark on the left side. Treated deceased for a contusion, and ordered him into the Hospital. Continued to visit him up to the time of his death. Deceased stated to witness in what manner he received the injury. Had a post mortem examination, and was able to say confidently that the injury the man received in the left side, and which he had described, was the cause of his death. The injury must have been inflicted by a heavy blow, such as being struck by a stool; or it might have been done by falling heavily on the point of a chair. ELIZABETH BELLAMY, wife of the deceased, made a voluntary statement to the effect that there was a quarrel between her and deceased on Wednesday night, the 8th instant. The boy who had been examined was present. Her husband came home drunk, and she threw a stool at him, but it did not strike him. He was going to put her out of doors, and she turned against him and pushed him down. He had a stool in his hand, which he was going to throw at her. He did not complain that night nor the next morning, and she could not say how he got the injury in his side. He complained of it on the Thursday night. The Coroner said he had no doubt in his own mind that this woman inflicted the injury on the deceased which caused his death; but at the same time the evidence, he thought, was not sufficiently clear to bring in a charge of Manslaughter against her; but whatever decision they might come to, he should consider it his duty to instruct the police-officer to lay the case before the Chief Constable that it may be further inquired into. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died from the effects of an injury inflicted on his left side, but how, or by what means, such injury was inflicted, no evidence appeared to the Jury.

Wednesday 29 March 1876, Issue 5798 – Gale Document No. Y3200722229 EXETER – Inquests. - Mr Barton, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Black Horse, Longbrook-street, last Saturday evening, on the body of SARAH VERNOUN. DAVID VERNOUN, a newsman, residing at 3, Eldon-place, said deceased, who was his wife, was forty-seven years of age, and was apparently strong and healthy. During the last few days she had complained of being sick, which she attributed to bile, and on Saturday morning she did not get up as usual. Sarah Greenslade, who assisted the deceased in her house work, said she took her up a cup of coffee, which she drank, and on going to her again about half an hour later, found her dead. Mr Phelps, surgeon, was called in, and he was of opinion that deceased died of disease of the heart. A verdict was returned accordingly.

EXETER - On Monday four Inquests were held in various parts of the city by Mr Coroner Hooper. At the Mount pleasant Inn, Black Boy-road, in the morning an Enquiry was held on view of the body of SARAH PILMOOR, aged fifty-nine, who died from the effects of a fall over the stairs on the previous Tuesday night. Mary Kibby, a widow, said she lived in Albany-place, St. Sidwells, next door to the deceased's house. On Tuesday night she saw deceased in bed; she was then in good health. On the following morning she went into her house and saw her lying in the passage at the foot of the stairs. She asked deceased how she came there, and she said she had no light and had fallen over the stairs. With the assistance of a neighbour witness took her up, put her to bed, and sent for a medical man. Deceased was a very active woman, and very temperate. Mr W. J. Williams, who was called in to attend the deceased, said he considered death was caused by concussion of the spine, with the injury to the posterior part of the brain, both of which would probably be caused by a fall over the stairs. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

The next Inquiry was held at the Corn Exchange Hotel, and it had reference to the death of RICHARD MILSOM, aged fifty-four, a shoemaker, residing in Castle-street. On Sunday he went out to assist at the fire, and about ten o'clock, when laying some straw down to keep the water from running away, he fell. Albert Watts, a corporal in the 11th regiment, picked him up, took him into the inn, and sent for Mr Perkins. Mr Perkins said he found deceased in the kitchen of the inn lying on a table. He was dead. He was of opinion that he died from heart disease. Verdict accordingly.

Mr Hooper then proceeded to the Sawyer's Arms, Preston-street, where he held an Inquest on the body of THOMAS DYMOND, an infant aged one month. The mother said the child was healthy at its birth. On Sunday night it became restless, and on an examination was found to be covered with a number of purple spots. Mr A. Perkins, surgeon, said the child died from natural causes, probably from an eruptive fever having been checked, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with that testimony.

In the evening, Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, touching the death of WILLIAM RICHARDSON, aged forty-six. Inspector Rogers watched the Enquiry on behalf of the Railway Company. AGNES RICHARDSON, deceased's wife, identified the body as that of her husband, who was a platelayer on the London and South Western Railway, and left his home at Appledore that morning, to go to his work, according to his usual custom. David Penwarden, a ganger at the Queen-street station, said that the deceased was working on the line about a quarter past ten that morning When the 10.15 up train was starting, some trucks were being shunted, but owing to the noise made by the engine they did not hear the trucks coming. One of the trucks struck the deceased, knocked him down, and went over him, cutting his right leg off just above the knee. Witness was stooping at the time the trucks came along, and received a severe blow in the hip, but could not tell whether it was from the deceased or the trucks. Witness lifted up the deceased, who cried out, "Oh, my God, let me lie down and die." Samuel Crocker, foreman of the goods yard at the station, said the engine-driver blew his whistle, and he shouted to the men to get out of the way; saw several of them do so. The first truck was laden with coal, and would probably weigh altogether about fifteen tons. Alexander Deane, the engine-driver, said he blew the whistle when he started and then continued moving until signalled to stop. Mr H. Cumings, house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased died almost directly he was brought to the Hospital from haemorrhage caused by the serious injuries he had received. The Jury considered that no blame attached to any one, and returned a formal verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 29 March 1876, Issue 5798 – Gale Document No. Y3200722221 EXETER – Yesterday morning the City Coroner held an Inquest at the Round Tree Inn, Frog-street, on the body of MARIA WHITE, aged three months, daughter of JAMES WHITE, a plumber, residing in the West Quarter. The child had been well until Sunday morning, when the mother found it dead by her side in bed. Mr Tosswil, surgeon, who was called in, attributed the death to Natural Causes. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 5 April 1876, Issue 5799 – Gale Document No. Y3200722263 BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Star Inn, Quay, on Saturday morning, before R. I Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of CHARLES MIGHALL, machinist and gasman connected with Gomperiz's Panorama Troupe now showing in this town. On Thursday night last, deceased complained of a pain in his chest and told a fellow assistant named Pratt that he never suffered so much in his life. They slept together, and about two o'clock Pratt was awoke by the deceased groaning and struggling. Pratt fetched Mr Fernie, surgeon, but when they arrived about ten minutes after MIGHALL was dead Deceased was a temperate and steady man, and was very much liked. He was very well on Wednesday. Andrew Fernie, surgeon, said there was nothing to show the cause of death and he could not tell the cause unless he made a post mortem examination of the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

MURDER OF A BARNSTAPLE MAN IN NEW ZEALAND. - The New Zealand Herald of February 12th, records a cold-blooded murder committed on January 27th by a Maori, named Harry Wynyard, at Mr Cleghorn's farm, Espsome. The victim was EDWARD PACKER, formerly of Harton Farm, Tawstock, near this town. PACKER was employed on Cleghorn's Farm, and slept in a house in the yard. At half-past four on the fatal morning a servant girl saw the Maori cross the yard and go into the house where PACKER slept. She heard the latter exclaim "Hello Harry, where are you off to." She heard no reply and no noise. About a quarter-an-hour afterwards she went to PACKER'S door and knocked. There was no answer. The door being open she looked in, and seeing PACKER was not there, took no further notice of the matter. Shortly after this Mr Cleghorn, junr., and a friend sallied forth to shoot rabbits. Following their dog they approached a lot of posts in the back-yard, when to their horror they saw a human foot protruding from under the posts. They gave an alarm. The posts were removed, discovering the body of the young man doubled up, and with his head split open and numerous gashes on the face and throat. It was evident that the Maori had murdered the young man with one blow of a billhook immediately after the salutation which the servant girl had heard PACKER give the Maori. The billhook was found near the posts. After killing his victim the murderer wrapped his head and neck in sacking, and had carried the body away, it is supposed to buy it, and being disturbed by the servant's movement, he covered the body with posts and fled. Every effort was made to capture the murderer; he was tracked to a dense bush, but all traces of him was lost, and it is surmised that he had escaped to the King country. He always bore a bad character, and had threatened vengeance on young PACKER, because the latter had charged him with stealing money. The funeral of the deceased was attended by all the residents for miles round, for he was much respected by all who knew him in the colony. A Coroner's Inquest returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against Harry Wynyard, and £100 reward is offered for his capture. It is but a very short time ago that deceased left this town with his two brothers for New Zealand.

Wednesday 12 April 1876, Issue 5800 – Gale Document No. Y3200722301 OKEHAMPTON – Suicide. - On Saturday an Inquest was held on the body of JOHN TOLLEY, labourer, who had died at three o'clock the same morning from the effect of a wound he had made in his throat with a razor on the previous Thursday. Dr Waters, who attended the deceased, said the jugular vein was not severed, and at first he had some hopes of his recovery. Sufficient evidence was given to satisfy the Jury that the man was of Unsound Mind at the time, and they returned a verdict to that effect.

Wednesday 19 April 1876, Issue 5801 – Gale Document No. Y3200722333 LYMPSTONE - An Inquest was held on Friday at Pannal's New Inn, by Mr Crosse, Coroner for the Cullompton district (in the absence of Mr Cox, Coroner for this district, and the illness of his deputy) on the body of AMY ANNIE REYNOLDS, the little girl who was drowned on Monday last. There was no evidence to show how she got into the water, and Mr Barton surgeon, stated that he examined the body and found no marks of violence. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Wednesday 3 May 1876, Issue 5803 – Gale Document No. Y3200722397 MORETONHEAMPSTEAD - We reported last week a sad accident which happened on April 21, to a labouring man named JOHN SAUNDERS, who, whilst driving a waggon-load of stone for his employer, Mr Wills, of Pepperdon, had the misfortune to fall under the wheel, which passed over his stomach inflicting fatal injuries. He was taken to his father's house in this town, and attended by the two doctors; but after lingering for a week he died on Friday last. An Inquest was held on Saturday, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was only twenty-two years old; he was a sober, steady workman, and has left a widow but no children.

MORETONHEAMPSTEAD - FATAL ACCIDENT WHILST BLASTING. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, South-street, Exeter, on Saturday, touching the death of THOMAS MAY, a quarryman, sixty-one years of age. Deceased resided at a place called Ducksmow, Moretonhampstead, and was in the habit of working at the quarries for a Mr Easton. On the 1st April last he went to his employment as usual, and, having finished his day's work, he, according to agreement, went to a farm at Bridford, occupied by Mr Tuckett, to blast a rock, of a black ironstone formation. The deceased and Mr Tuckett bored a hole in the rock about fourteen inches deep, and the deceased then proceeded to charge it. Having placed in the blasting powder in the hole, with some straw, he filled it up with rubble. This he drove into the hole with an iron bar. Deceased said to Mr Tuckett that he thought he had pretty well finished when the charge suddenly exploded, split up the rock, and threw the deceased some distance away. Mr Tuckett, who was standing on the top of the rock, was thrown down by the explosion, but was not burnt, and he immediately went to MAY'S assistance. The same evening the deceased, who was badly injured, was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died last Friday evening from inflammation of the lungs, resulting from the injuries he received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 10 May 1876, Issue 5804 – Gale Document No. Y3200722413 EXETER - A POLICEMAN AND HIS PRISONER DROWNED AT COUNTESS WEIR. - On Saturday afternoon R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Countess Weir Inn on the bodies of CHARLES TUCKER aged twenty-five, a member of the Devon Constabulary, and ADA MADDICKS a girl of fourteen, residing at Countess Weir, both of whom were drowned in the Canal on the previous day, the girl having jumped in to escape capture, and the policeman following to the rescue. The Coroner, in opening the Inquest, said they were met to investigate a case of a very unusual very melancholy, and very affecting nature. It was, as he was informed, that of a girl belonging to that village, who had drowned herself; and of a young policeman, who, in endeavouring nobly to save the girl's life, forfeited his own. As far as the case of the young man went, there could be no difficulty whatever, for there would be ample testimony that he was accidentally drowned. With respect to the girl, she appeared to have deliberately drowned herself, and therefore the Enquiry would be principally as to her state of mind. It certainly appeared to be a very unusual circumstance that a young girl should be frightened at the sight of a constable coming for her as to have her mind affected and rush away and drown herself. However, he was informed that witnesses would be called who would tell them something of the girl's condition for some time previous, and their evidence he hoped would be quite sufficient to satisfy them that she was not in her right mind. A very little, and properly so in his opinion, was enough to induce a Jury to return a verdict of "Temporary Insanity," just enough to satisfy their own consciences, because the only effect of a verdict felo de se was that the deceased must be buried without funeral rites at dead of night. This was to his mind a remnant of a barbarous age and all the juries with which he had been connected during an experience of many years had shewn themselves averse to returning a verdict of felo de se except in cases where they could not possibly find sufficient evidence to satisfy their consciences to the contrary. William Whiteway, the first witness called, said he was sergeant-major of the Devon Constabulary, stationed at head-quarters, Exeter. He was present at the magistrates' meeting at the Castle of Exeter on Friday, when he heard MRS MADDICKS, mother of the deceased girl, make application for a warrant for the apprehension of her daughter ADA on a charge of stealing 1s. 2d. Witness received the warrant from Col. Chichester, the chairman, and placed it in the hands of the deceased constable to execute. TUCKER left Exeter at half-past twelve, noon, and proceeded to Countess Weir in company with the mother, for the purpose of executing the warrant. Sarah Ann Lowdon, a girl about ten years old, said, I live in the village, and on the previous day I was with ADA MADDICKS up in the Topsham-road. We were playing together. ADA told me that her mother was gone for a policeman to take her up, and that she wouldn't go to work. She also said that her mother wanted her to fetch Mr Radford's dinner, and she wouldn't. We afterwards went down on the bridge; Little Tommy was with us. Then she said to me, "Sarah Ann, will you come and drown yourself if I will?" She asked me to drown myself with her two or three times. I said, "No, I wouldn't." Then we saw the policeman coming. ADA said "What will 'ee do – run away?" I said, "What for?" She said, "The policeman's coming. The policeman 'll take Tommy home when us be drowned." I said, "No, I won't drown myself." She said, "If you won't, I will – the policeman's coming." I said "S'pose he is – I shan't." ADA said, "I shall then," and she ran towards the Canal bridge, and down the bank; and when she saw the policeman was by the gate, she gave a good spring, and jumped right into the water. I saw her go under water. When the policeman was running along he asked me whose child it was, and I told him in a minute. He took off his hat, and asked me whether I knew how deep the water was, and whether it was a dyke or no. I told him I didn't know. Then he sprang in after her. He caught hold of her hand, and tried to come in, but he couldn't. Just afterwards when he had hold of ADA'S hand, she sprang up, and went down again, and then he looked up like this, (turning up her face with eyes closed) and aid "Oh!" and they both went down. Neither of them came up again. I was standing over on the bank close by the canal. I kept on calling out "ADA, ADA!" but I couldn't get any answer. Alice Lewis, at the canal house, was there. She went into the house, and I went home with Tommy. Thomas Sullock, a sailor residing at Exeter, said he was passing through Countess Weir when he heard the alarm. He immediately went to the spot and then saw several persons using the grapples. Witness took them, being more accustomed to the work, and after about three-quarters of an hour the body of the policeman was discovered. He thought both bodies were together, and he separated them with the grapples. He then put the grapples in the water again and brought out the girl. After the policeman was taken out of the water blood and froth issued from his mouth, and some of the men about thought he was not quite dead. F. C. Creedy endeavoured to restore animation by turning him from side to side and working his arms, but he shortly afterwards died. Other persons also tried to restore the girl to life, but it was useless. Saw P.C. Creedy search the bodies and take from the policeman the warrant for the girl's apprehension, and several letters. In the girl's pocket was found a piece of leather which the people working at the paper factories use to protect their fingers. The watch found upon the policeman had stopped at 1.35 and the body was taken out of the water about five minutes to three. P.C. Creedy said he was stationed at Topsham. He had known the deceased ADA MADDICKS nearly eight years. During that time witness had several times gone with her mother in search of her when she had been absent from her home two or three days. Had spoken to her on several occasions about taking things from her mother. The girl behaved in a very strange way, and he had been for a considerable time under the impression that she was not in her right mind. He now believed that at certain times she was not accountable for her actions. John Endacott, a shepherd, living at Countess Weir, said he had known the girl about two years, and had frequently observed something peculiar in her demeanour. He believed that at times she was of unsound mind. MRS MADDICKS, in answer to the Coroner, said she believed her daughter was of unsound mind. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of the policeman, and with regard to the girl they found that she committed "Suicide while in a state of Temporary insanity." On Sunday afternoon the body of CHARLES TUCKER was buried in the Countess Weir graveyard. The body was carried from the Countess Weir Inn by twelve constables under the command of Sergeant-Major Whiteway, and on the top of the coffin wee placed deceased's helmet and belt. The service was impressively read by the curate of Countess Weir Church, and many were affected to tears. A handsome wreath of flowers in the form of a cross was placed on the coffin, and other flowers were thrown in the grave by the bystanders. Before commencing the Burial Service the rev. gentleman commented in some well-chosen words upon the heroic conduct of the young constable in feeling terms. The funeral was attended by deceased's parents, a brother, and a sister, and several members of the Police Reserve, and the ceremony was witnessed by a number of spectators from Exeter and the neighbourhood. Deceased was a native of Roseash, and had only been in the force two months.

Wednesday 10 May 1876, Issue 5804 – Gale Document No. Y3200722432 An Inquest was held at Plymouth on Wednesday respecting the death of CHARLES STURGES, aged twenty-four, a private of the 14th Regiment, who shot himself through the heart, while on sentry at the barracks, at four o'clock on Tuesday morning. It was shown that he had been in the hospital for heart disease, and had applied to be invalided out of the service, which was refused. A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Wednesday 17 May 1876, Issue 5805 – Gale Document No. Y3200722468 MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Last Friday week a lad named HENRY DOLBEER was riding a pony in the station road, when the approach of a train on the railway so frightened the animal that he threw his rider, who was very badly cut about the head. He was attended by Dr Utting, but after lingering for a week, he died last Thursday evening, aged thirteen years. The Coroner held an Inquest the following day, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. HARRY DOLBEER was a very good and industrious boy, and his early death is greatly regretted.

Wednesday 17 May 1876, Issue 5805 – Gale Document No. Y3200722469 YEOFORD – Shocking Accident On The Railway. - On Saturday afternoon as a labourer named HARRIS was engaged with a horse and wagon on the South-Western Railway line, near the Bow Station, he was run over and killed by a train coming from Lydford. The horse was also killed. On Monday Mr Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at Bow into the circumstances which led t the fatality. Inspector Rogers watched the case on behalf of the South Western Railway Company. The Coroner, in opening the case, said it was a strange coincidence that the driver of the train which killed this man on Saturday was the same as the tone who was in charge of an engine which killed a man a short time since at Crediton. It was well he should state that there was then a strict investigation the verdict of which was that the driver was quite exonerated from blame. That the same man drove the engine that killed both these unfortunate people should not therefore in any way prejudice the minds of the Jury. William Sparkes, ganger, said the deceased, who was twenty-three years of age, was a "tip runner." On Saturday as the midday train from Bow to Exeter was leaving the former station the deceased was running some trucks into the "turn-out" siding. As the train approached, the deceased unchained the horse from the wagon, and stood with him facing the train. This was the custom with railway horses, so that they may get accustomed to the trains passing near them. This particular horse was a rather restive one, but he had been on the bank from four to five months, and had always been accustomed to face the train. The deceased was a powerful young man quite qualified to take charge of a horse of this kind. When the train came to within twelve or thirteen feet of where the horse and the deceased were standing, the former made a plunge and swung the deceased round towards the engine. The train passed on and as it passed he saw the horse rise and then fall dead, whilst immediately afterwards he saw HARRIS lying between the metals. His skull was fractured, his ears cut off, and nearly the whole of the bones in the back appeared to be broken. Life was quite extinct and the deceased, who was a single man, was removed on a hurdle to his parents' house. As far as witness saw there was no blame attributable to any one. The horse had been held previously on the same day quite as close as he then was to the passing trains. Gustavus Alford, a lad who was looking on at the work, and William Glass, stoker, gave similar evidence, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 17 May 1876, Issue 5805 – Gale Document No. Y3200722453 EXETER – Inquests. - Mr Coroner Hooper held two Inquests in the city on Thursday. The first at Mr F. Brodie's Wine and Spirit Vaults, Fore-street, on the body of ELIZABETH SING, a widow, aged 77, lately residing in Beedle's-terrace, Bartholomew-street, who was found dead in bed on Wednesday afternoon. Dr Henderson considered death to have been caused by heart disease. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

The second Inquiry, which took place at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, had reference to the death by scalding of a child three-and-a-half years old, named ELLEN GILLARD, whose parents reside in an upstair room of a house in King-street. On Wednesday afternoon a little girl named Emily Nicholls left a kettle of boiling water on the landing, and the deceased coming downstairs stumbled over it, upset it, and fell down in the boiling water. She was very severely scalded, and was taken to the Hospital, where she died early the following morning. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 24 May 1876, Issue 5806 – Gale Document No. Y3200722498 NEWTON ABBOT – Suicide. - Mr Michelmore, Coroner for the district, held an Inquest on Wednesday night touching the death of GEORGE SKINNER, aged forty-two, late a waggoner in the employ of Messrs. Pinsent, at the Newton Brewery. GEORGE JAMES SKINNER, son of the deceased, stated that after breakfast on Wednesday morning his mother asked him to go to the brewery to look for his father, and he did so. It was just after eight o'clock. Witness went into the waggon house ,and there he was horrified at finding his father hanging by the neck. Being much frightened he ran down to the stables and called for assistance. Deceased would occasionally get tipsy, but he was quite sober on Wednesday and the day before. William Towell, a brewer, in the employ of Messrs. Pinsent, said he last saw the deceased alive about six or seven o'clock on Tuesday evening at the brewery. Witness asked him to help with some bottles and he did, but said nothing. Witness noticed this, because he was usually very cheerful. Deceased had worked at the Brewery for three years, except a few weeks about twelve months since, when he was ill. He then seemed strange in his mind, and was sent to the Cottage Hospital. On Wednesday morning, about half-past eight, the last witness came to him and asked if he had seen his father. They went to the waggon-house in company with Robert Milford and found the body hanging there. They cut down the body, and found the deceased was quite cold and dead. Mr Thomas Pinsent stated that the deceased had worked for his father for about eight or nine years. On the previous day he went to Chudleigh with the waggon. He was always able to take care of himself and his horse, but he would have his glass. He was earning 15s. or 16s. per week. Some twelve months ago he drank something which witness believed was benzoline in mistake for cider, which made him very ill, and he had to be sent to the Cottage Hospital, where he remained some time. Witness thought his sufferings must have affected his mind, but he had noticed nothing wrong with him since. SARAH SKINNER, the wife of the deceased, also gave evidence as to the state of his health. The Coroner, in summing up, condemned the practice of brewers allowing their men unlimited supply of beer in their work, and also the habit of landlords giving these men drink on their delivering ale. He said it was a false kindness and hoped this case would be a warning to brewers and others in this respect. The Jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, returned the following verdict: "That the deceased, GEORGE SKINNER, hanged himself in a fit of Temporary Insanity produced by drink." The deceased leaves a widow and six children, the youngest being but six weeks old.

Wednesday 24 May 1876, Issue 5806 – Gale Document No. Y3200722488 EXETER – A waggoner in the employ of Messrs Wall and Co., named FREDERICK BARTLETT, committed suicide yesterday morning by hanging himself in a water closet near the St David's station. He went to his work as usual, and shortly afterwards was discovered hanging by a rope, which was tied to a nail not six feet from the ground. He was found by a porter named Chapman. With the assistance of Thomas Sampson, also in the employ of the Railway Company, the unfortunate man was cut down, and Mr H. J. Domville, surgeon, was sent for, On his arrival Mr Domville pronounced BARTLETT to be dead. Deceased was forty-seven years of age last Sunday week, and has been married twice. His first wife died about five years ago. About two years afterwards he was married again to an invalid, and she died about seven weeks ago. By his first wife three children were left. The deceased then resided in the Red Cow village, but since the death of his second wife he had been living with his daughter in a house in Exe-lane, kept by Mr Rogers. The deceased was always sober when at work. He had been in the employ of the Company for twenty-seven years, and had always borne a good character. For the last two months a strangeness had been noticed in his appearance, and there is no doubt that the deaths of his wives and other family troubles had temporarily deranged his mind. The body was removed to the Red Cow Inn, where an Inquest will be held this morning.

Wednesday 31 May 1876, Issue 5807 – Gale Document No. Y3200722514 EXETER – The Late Suicide At St. David's Station. - The City Coroner, (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest on Wednesday last at the Red Cow Inn, St. David's, on the body of FREDERICK BARTLETT, aged 47, who committed suicide on the previous day by hanging himself in one of the offices at the St. David's station. The evidence given by JOHN BARTLETT, son of the deceased, the Rev. H. E. Reynolds, and other witnesses left no doubt that deceased had been in a low desponding way ever since he lost his second wife. He had been in the employ of Mr J. C. Wall as waggoner for some years, and bore the character of a steady, trustworthy man. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 31 May 1876, Issue 5807 – Gale Document No. Y3200722528 EXETER - Inquests. - Three Inquests were held in St. Thomas on Monday afternoon by Mr R. R. Crosse, District Coroner. The same Jury considered each case, and the Inquiries were held consecutively.

The first Inquest was held at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, on the body of DONALD MACRAE, lately residing in Gattey's Court, St. Sidwell's, who committed suicide by drowning himself in the Exeter Basin, on Friday night last. The widow of the deceased, SARAH MACRAE, deposed that her husband, who was forty years of age, was a general smith in the 1st Brigade Royal Artillery, but had been pensioned through being an invalid. They breakfasted together on Friday morning, and the last time she saw him alive was about half-past nine o'clock the same morning, when he came to where she worked, in Hampden Buildings, Black Boy-road. He then said he was going to Tiverton on a job, and asked her to let him have sixpence, which she did, but she did not believe he was going to Tiverton, as he had told her so many very strange things, and had often deceived her before. She had observed that his manner had been strange for more than three months past, and believed him to be in an unfit state to go about alone, but she could not afford to pay anybody to watch him. Last week the deceased left their house to fetch a policeman for no apparent reason, and he had frequently done things of a similar kind. She was positive he was not in his right mind, but she had never heard him threaten to take his life. Samuel Marks stated that he was employed at the Exeter Gas Works on the Basin: On Friday evening last he was at work there, and saw the deceased walking up and down the Basin near the water's edge. He watched him for about an hour, and observed that his manner was very strange. About six o'clock he saw the deceased walk to the edge of the water, stand still, put his hands on his head, and then rub his hands in a very curious manner. His manner was so strange that it aroused his suspicions, and he sent a man named Sanders to get a policeman. About a quarter of an hour after Sanders had left, witness saw the deceased run towards the water and plunge in. He immediately called a man named Newberry, whom he had asked to be ready when wanted if anything should occur, and ran for his "gropers" and his boat, and they sculled to the spot as quickly as possible. The deceased rose to the surface once, but went down again as they came up. Witness waited, thinking he would come up again, but he did not, so he used the gropers, and, after a search of about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, discovered the body. They put him into the boat, and brought him to the Inn. He did not breathe, and witness knew he was dead. There was no one near the deceased when he jumped into the water. William Long, landlord of the Welcome Inn, deposed that on Friday evening last his attention was called to the deceased by his wife, who had observed him wandering about the Basin for several hours. He went and asked the deceased what he was doing there; and he replied, "Nothing." Witness then advised him to go home, and deceased said, "I think I will;" and with the same walked away. He talked very rationally. Witness thought all was right, and that he was really gone; but he had hardly reached the inn when he heard the last witness call out that deceased had jumped into the water. Frederick Dickinson, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased after he was taken out of the water, but found that he was dead. The body indicated all the symptoms of death by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

The Jury walked to Exwick to view the body of ALFRED WEEKS, aged five-and-a-half years, and returned to the Prince Albert Inn. St. Thomas, where the second Inquiry was held. Deceased was the son of SAMUEL WEEKS, a waggoner in the employ of Mr J. C. Wall, at St. David's Station, and lived with his parents at Exwick. About half past four on Saturday evening, he told his mother he was going to meet his father, who was expected home from the station by way of Exwick Bridge. He was in the habit of going to meet his father, and had been over the bridge a great many times before, so that his mother had no fear of an accident. About a quarter past six a little boy named Herbert Gardener, was crossing the bridge and saw the deceased struggling in the water, about five or six yards from the bridge. He ran back to the station and called Mr Hamilton and Mr Luxton, who returned with him. Deceased was still floating, and they tried to unloose a boat which was near, but could not do so, and meanwhile the little fellow sank. Some men succeeded in recovering the body about eight o'clock. Mr Mark Farrant, surgeon, examined the body, which presented the appearance of death by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The Coroner wished it to be made public that both himself and all the Jurymen thought the Exwick bridge an excessively dangerous place for traffic, and that they considered something should be done to prevent further accidents. It was stated that the bridge was private property, and that the owner (Mr Buller) received toll.

The third Inquest, which was also held at the Prince Albert Inn, was on the body of HENRY IRELAND, aged 64, lately residing at 139 Cowick-street, St. Thomas, who committed suicide on Sunday evening, by hanging himself to the banisters of the stairs by a neckerchief, which he was in the habit of wearing. REBECCA IRELAND, widow of the deceased, deposed that her husband was a gardener and farm labourer Deceased was unwell, and had been in bed the whole of the Sunday, with the exception of his getting up and going to be shaved in the morning, which she could not persuade him to forego. About five o'clock in the evening she went out for a walk, leaving the deceased alone and in bed. When she returned, shortly after six o'clock, she saw him standing, as she thought, on the stairs. She spoke to him twice, but receiving no answer, she went up the stairs and discovered that he was hanging from the banisters by a neckerchief. She ran for assistance and Mr Smith, a neighbour, living opposite, with assistance cut him down, but he was quite dead. For the past six weeks the deceased had been in a low state, and his manner had been very peculiar. He talked sometimes to himself, and at night he was very restless and did not sleep. His looks and actions were also very peculiar, for many years past she had believed that he was not in his right mind. Some years ago he had a fever, and was then very violent, and she had to get men to look after him. He had not been a strong-minded man since. He had threatened to take his life by cutting his throat sixteen or eighteen years ago. On Sunday afternoon, whilst in bed, he said they did not know where he had been, but he had not been out of bed. She did not consider that he was accountable for his actions. HENRY IRELAND, son of the deceased, corroborated his mother's evidence as to the state of his father's mind. Mr Mark Farrant had not the slightest doubt that the deceased caused his own death while in a state of Temporary Insanity. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 7 June 1876, Issue 5808 – Gale Document No. Y3200722548 EXETER – The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on Friday, touching the death of THOMAS HUTCHINGS. Deceased, who was 72 years of age, and unmarried, lived with a Mr Locke, at No. 3, St Mary's-place, Magdalen-street. About six o'clock on Thursday morning the deceased went out for a walk, and returned about twenty minutes past seven o'clock, when he brought with him some plants, which he asked Mrs Locke to count for him. Whilst she was doing so he suddenly fell back, apparently in a fit, and though a medical man was immediately sent for, deceased died before he came. Mr L. H. Toswill, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death was caused by natural causes. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 14 June 1876, Issue 5809 – Gale Document No. Y3200722598 ILFRACOMBE – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Royal Clarence Hotel on Wednesday afternoon, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SYDNEY PERKINS MORRIS, aged twenty, a clerk in the Bank of England, London, who met with his death by falling from a cliff on Tuesday evening. Arthur Leybourne Burne, a fellow clerk and companion of deceased, deposed that they both went on the Torrs at half-past eight for the purpose of seeing the sun set, but being disappointed, went down to Pebble Bay Beach, and soon after deceased commenced to ascend the cliff. Witness remained on the beach, and when deceased commenced to ascend, cautioned him. Shortly afterwards he saw his companion falling down. He fell on the stones below on his head, a distance of about thirty feet. Witness immediately went to his assistance and found him dead. Dr Gardner deposed that deceased's spine was fractured, and there was a probable fracture of the skull, and that death must have been instantaneous. Verdict; "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 14 June 1876, Issue 5809 – Gale Document No. Y3200722585 EXETER – Inquest. - Mr Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Golden Eagle Inn, Bartholomew-street, touching the death of ALICE MARY POOLEY, aged 14 months. MARY ANN POOLEY, wife of a bookseller residing in Bartholomew-street, stated that the deceased had enjoyed very good health until Friday afternoon, when it appeared to have a fit and died. Mr Webb, surgeon, said the child died from apoplexy. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 28 June 1876, Issue 5811 – Gale Document No. Y3200722663 SAD BATHING FATALITY. - Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at St. Marychurch on Saturday, respecting the death of ALICE JANE OWEN, daughter of MRS OWEN, widow of the late CAPTAIN OWEN, of the merchant service. The first witness called was Mr T. Brown, draper of Torquay, who stated that whilst sitting on the Babbicombe Downs that morning he saw the deceased and her sister go into the water from a bathing machine on Oddicombe Beach. They were walking backwards, and apparently one was teaching the other to swim. After a little time they got out so far that he became alarmed, and directly afterwards it appeared to him as if they were drowning. he took off his hat, and waved it to attract the attention of those on the beach, and shouted out for help. He did not see what subsequently occurred as he ran to his house for some brandy, and when he arrived at the beach the body had been brought ashore. Every effort to restore animation was made, but without success. The deceased and her sister were about forty feet from the shore. There did not appear to be any special arrangement for saving life, not did there appear to be any one in charge. Elias Waymouth, the owner of the bathing machines on Oddicombe Beach, stated that about noon on Saturday he let a machine to the deceased and her sister. He placed the machine down to the water's edge, and saw the deceased and her sister enter the water. At that time he was about twelve yards off, but he subsequently went to a distance of about fifty yards to a lobster pot. Soon after this he heard some one shouting, and on turning around saw something was amiss. He pulled towards the young ladies and picked up MISS ADA OWEN, who was floating on the water. He placed her on shore, and then went out with his grapples with which he recovered the body of the deceased, who had sunk. He took the body ashore, and Dr Chilcote and Dr Steele, who had by that time arrived on the beach, used every means to restore animation, but it could not be effected. The deceased was still alive when he put her in the boat. The Coroner, in his summing up, pointed out that the Jury could only return a verdict of "Accidental Death," and a verdict accordingly was returned. The Coroner cautioned Waymouth to be more careful for the future, and the Jury recommended that he should provide a boat and man to be in attendance on bathers.

Wednesday 28 June 1876, Issue 5811 – Gale Document No. Y3200722665 EXETER – Inquests. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held three Inquests in the city on Monday.

The first Inquiry was at the Lord Nelson Inn, Spiller-street, on the body of RICHARD LONGMAN, aged ten months, who died rather suddenly early on Saturday morning. The child had been sickly from its birth, and Mr Phelps, surgeon, considered that it died from an attack of bronchitis. Verdict accordingly.

The second Inquest was held at the Exeter Inn, Bartholomew-street, touching the death of MAUD SMITH, an infant, who suddenly expired early on Sunday morning. Mr Webb, surgeon, believed the cause of death to have been a natural one, and to have arisen from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from natural causes."

Subsequently at the Round Tree Inn, frog-street, an Inquest was held on the body of JAMES LANGDON SALTER, aged five years, who met with his death by falling into the Mill leat near the Round Tree Inn, on Sunday afternoon. Deceased was the son of a fish-dealer, residing in Coombe-street. On Sunday after dinner he left his home and went with some other boys to the Mill leat, where he took off his boots and stockings for the purpose of going into the water to catch eels. He was sliding down the hand-rail of the steps leading to the stream, when he overbalanced and fell head foremost into the water, and was carried down some distance by the current. After he had gone under the bridge over Edmund-street, a man named William Hooper jumped into the water and pulled the boy out, but he was quite dead. It appeared that there was a crowd of persons standing on the bridge watching the deceased in the water, but no one attempted to assist him until Hooper came. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 July 1876, Issue 5812 – Gale Document No. Y3200722695 TOTNES – Bathing Fatality. - At Bridgetown an Inquest was held on day last week by Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, respecting the death of SAMUEL THOMAS STOCKMAN, who was drowned in the Dart on Monday evening. MARIA TULLY, mother-in-law of the deceased, stated that he had been stopping with her from the previous Saturday. He was about thirty years of age. She last saw him about seven o'clock on Monday evening, when he said he was going to have a bathe. He complained occasionally of suffering very much in his head; never knew him have a fit. It appeared from the evidence of William Parnell, a youth about seventeen years of age, who was bathing at the same place as the deceased, that the latter must have been seized with cramp or some internal disease, as he was not able to cry out for help, although he sank and rose again three times. The witness was not able to swim, and there was no one else near who could go to the assistance of deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Wednesday 12 July 1876, Issue 5813 – Gale Document No. Y3200722716 EXETER – EBENEZER ROUSE, a man sixty-five years of age, who for the past twenty years has been employed at the Exeter Workhouse as a messenger, died very suddenly on Saturday afternoon. On Monday an Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, when it appeared from the evidence of Dr Bell that death resulted from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

EXETER – Found Drowned. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, held an Enquiry at Salmon Pool on Thursday afternoon, touching the death of WILLIAM MAYNE, a mason, aged about sixty-six years, whose body had been found floating in the river Exe. Sarah Clapp, a domestic servant at the inn, deposed that about a quarter to two o'clock on Tuesday afternoon she was near the ferry, and there saw the deceased. She asked him if he wanted to cross the river, and he replied "No, thank you." She did not notice anything strange in his manner, and he appeared to be quite sober. About half an hour afterwards she saw his body in the water, and called for assistance. John Monk, the boatman, said he and his master, Mr Taylor, took the deceased out of the water. They tried the usual means for restoring animation, but without effect. Dr. W. J. Williams, of Heavitree, who was called to see the deceased, said he found him quite dead, and the body presented all the appearance of death by drowning. Deceased's son stated that his father told him on Tuesday he was going to Salmon Pool to look at some sand, and would come to him at Cowick, where he was at work. Deceased was subject to giddiness, and if he fell into the water whilst in one of those fits he would not have strength to get out. He believed the deceased met his death purely by accident. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER – On Saturday, at the Papermakers' Arms, another case of drowning was investigated by Mr Coroner Hooper. The subject of it was an elderly man named WILLIAM POTTER, a retired grocer, of Cullompton, whose body was found on Friday morning in the river Exe, a few yards from the fenders by Head Weir. GERTRUDE POTTER, wife of the deceased, said her husband left her on Thursday to come to Exeter, and she did not see him alive afterwards. John Thurle, a lamplighter, said on Friday morning about ten minutes to four o'clock he saw the deceased in South-street, and was asked by him for some matches to light his pipe. He again saw him at half-past four in Exe-lane, walking towards the river. Deceased then asked him where he could get some brandy. Evidence was next given as to the finding of the body in the river, and Inspector Denning produced a letter and twopence-halfpenny found on the deceased. The letter was directed to the deceased's brother in Exeter, and stated that he had lost a great deal of money in speculating in coal and iron mines, and that the friends to whom he had paid thousands of pounds had forsaken him. After stating the writer wished his dear wife to be taken care of, the letter went on to say that he might as well die as live, as he had no one to care for. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 19 July 1876, Issue 5814 – Gale Document No. Y3200722747 EXETER – Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, at the Acland Arms, St. Sidwell's, before Mr Barton, Deputy Coroner, on the body of JANE CARNALL, who committed suicide on Saturday. CHARLES CARNALL identified the deceased as his wife, aged fifty-eight. He resided at Broadclyst, but his wife in Exeter. The last time he saw her was in the early part of May, when she seemed to be in a very excited state, and refused to speak to him. He sent her money towards her maintenance every week. James Halse, painter, Summerland-street, said he had known the deceased for about four months, as she lived in the same house. On Saturday night about ten o'clock witness went to her room in consequence of missing wearing apparel which deceased previously admitted she had pawned, and he found deceased hanging by a rope. He immediately cut the body down and sent for a doctor. Deceased was a very noisy woman, and very much addicted to drink. Mr Perkins, junr., surgeon, of St. Sidwell's, said he found deceased laid on the bed quite dead. In his opinion deceased died from suffocation. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

EXETER – Death from Sunstroke. - A Coroner's Court was held last night at the Topsham Inn, South-street, to enquire into the circumstances of the death of MR JOHN WILLS. Mr H. D. Barton acted as Deputy Coroner. MR WILLIAM WILLS, printer, Bedford-street, Exeter, stated the deceased was his father, and resided in King-street. He was a general hand in the employ of Messrs Parkin, and was fifty-three years of age. On Sunday, the 10th, he was well and in good spirits. Joseph Hemmett said he was working with the deceased on Monday. During the day he complained to him of being unwell. About 4.30, as deceased and himself were carrying hot metal, the former shook all over, and complained of being ill. Shortly after he left for his home. James Avery, a labourer, saw deceased stagger up and down Bonhay-road, and turn round several times, and then fall on his back. Eventually he was taken to the Hospital. Mr Hugh G. Cumming, house surgeon at the Hospital, said the temperature of the deceased's body when brought to the house was eight degrees above the ordinary temperature of the body. His skin was dried up, and he was quite insensible. Within a short time the heat of his body increased two degrees. He was immediately treated, but convulsions set in and continued until his death. He believed the cause of death was a genuine case of what is commonly called sunstroke, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 26 July 1876, Issue 5815 – Gale Document No. Y3200722794 DUNSFORD - Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Thursday at Collabridge Farm, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Nicholas Seward, senr., was foreman, touching the death of FRANK KEMBLE WILLS, aged fourteen, second son of MR THOMAS WILLS, of Collabridge Farm. The following are the particulars: Deceased being home from school for his Midsummer vacation as engaged driving a four-horse-power thrashing machine, when for some purpose he got on the top of the scaffolding while the horses were in motion; he missed his footing and fell across the large cog wheel. His back was much injured, and his legs and thighs were literally crushed to pieces between the large wheel and pinion. John Payne, working in the barn, hearing his screams went to his assistance and extricated him. The poor boy lived about two hours after the accident, and about half-an-hour after the doctors arrived. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. Much sympathy is felt in the parish for his bereaved parents.

HONITON – Drowned in a Water Butt. - On Friday an Inquest was held at the Lamb Inn, before Mr Macaulay, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN BOWYER, aged 16, a servant in the house of Mr Tweed, solicitor, who was found dead in the water-butt the previous evening. Deceased was wanted about five o'clock, but could not be found, and Miss Tweed, after making search for her, looked into the water-butt, and there saw her, head downwards. Nothing could be seen of the body without looking into the butt. There did not appear to have been more than two feet of water in the cask, and there was nothing near to shew that the girl went to the cask for the purpose of dipping water. There was no evidence to show that the deceased had ever contemplated suicide, and the Jury therefore returned an Open Verdict of "Found drowned in a water-butt," but there was no evidence to shew how she got there.

BARNSTAPLE – Sad Bathing Fatality. - On Friday evening Mr Bencraft, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ALFRED RICHARDS, who was drowned in the river the same morning. Deceased was an apprentice to Messrs. Rush and Co., Joy-street, and he went in company with several companions to bathe at the place on the River Taw known as Pollington Point. A young man named Skinner, who could swim a little, was the first to go into the water, and he was followed by RICHARDS. Some one standing on the bank warned him not to go too far, as the water was deep and the tide was running out quickly. RICHARDS replied that he did not care, and shortly afterwards it was seen that he was sinking. Skinner went to the rescue, but the deceased dragged him under, and he was obliged to let go his hold and get clear. The unfortunate young man had been under water for five minutes, and his friend quickly dressed and came into the town for help. About half an hour after a young man named Cutcliffe went to the spot, and after diving several times picked up the body A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury represented that, as lives are lost every year, there should be a proper bathing place provided, with attendants to prevent accidents.

Wednesday 26 July 1876, Issue 5815 – Gale Document No. Y3200722783 TIVERTON – Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Fox and Hounds, Balham, on the body of HUGH FERRIS, gardener to Mr W. C. Unwin, which had been taken out of the river on the previous Sunday. It appears that deceased had served as a soldier in India, and whilst there had received a sunstroke. On Saturday he complained of pains in the head. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 2 August 1876, Issue 5816 – Gale Document No. Y3200722826 TORQUAY – Fatal Fall. - An Inquest was held at Torquay on Thursday evening, by Mr Michelmore, County Coroner, relative to the death of a little girl named ELIZABETH LEAN, whose parents reside at Upton. It appears from the evidence that during the absence of the mother at Paignton Regatta, on Wednesday, the deceased was playing about the quarries at the rear of Prospect-terrace, when she suddenly fell over the rocks, receiving considerable injury. The child was admitted to the Torbay Infirmary, and notwithstanding the efforts made by the officers of that institution, she died a few hours after having been admitted. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 2 August 1876, Issue 5816 – Gale Document No. Y3200722815 DUNSFORD – Fatal Waggon Accident. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Oak Inn, Dunsford, on Saturday, touching the death of GEORGE SERCOMBE, carrier, of Dunsford. It appeared from the evidence that on Thursday he went to Exeter with a waggon and two horses taking a load of granite. On his return about 8.30 he stopped at the Lamb Inn, Holcombe Burnell, about half an hour and drank a pint of cider. About 10.45 p.m., Fred Paddon, a lad of fifteen, employed by Mr Carnall of Clifford, was returning home, and on the top of Six Mile Hill, he saw MR SERCOMBE'S waggon lying in the road overturned, the shaft horse was lying on his back and the leader standing still. As he passed he thought he heard groans, and hastened on to Reedy and Dunsford for Assistance. John Holman, a wheelwright, went with four of his men to his assistance. The waggon had been overturned by running up the bank by the roadside. Deceased was lying under the body of the waggon. he was not dead, but expired without speaking in about five minutes. Dr Connor arrived about half an hour afterwards, but the man was dead, having received severe internal injuries. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 9 August 1876, Issue 5817 – Gale Document No. Y3200722857 HEAVITREE – The Fatal Encounter With A Bull. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Country House Inn, Wonford, respecting the death of RICHARD BASTIN, who was gored to death on the previous afternoon by a prize bull belonging to Mr R. N. G. Baker. ELLEN BASTIN, daughter of the deceased, aged eight years was the first witness called. While passing the linhay in which the bull was kept, she heard her father cry "Murder," and on going into the yard saw him lying on the ground inside the linhay, the animal being tied to a post outside. At her father's request she fetched her brother JAMES. Edward Briggs, a foreman at the Heavitree Brewery, said he was called to the linhay by the boy BASTIN, and there saw the deceased, who said to him, "Lift me up; I'm a dead man." Witness asked how it happened, but the only reply he got was a request for some water. Mr Williams, a surgeon, was sent for, and he quickly arrived. Blood was flowing copiously from a wound in the deceased's thigh. Mr Williams directed witness and others to do all they could to staunch the wound while he went home for instruments and stimulants. He was absent only a few minutes, and just after he returned the poor man breathed his last. Witness saw blood on the horns and forehead of the bull. One person, and especially a man like the deceased, who had been long accustomed to the animal, was quite sufficient to attend to it, providing the usual precaution of leading it with the hand-staff had been adopted, but this the deceased seemed to have neglected. Mr Baker had time after time cautioned him about using the staff. The bull was said to be a quiet animal, but Mr Baker had it shot immediately after the fatal occurrence. Witness could give no explanation of how the animal came to be tied after it had attacked the deceased; but he agreed with several jurymen that it was probable the deceased had struggled with it some time after he received the fatal injuries, and persevered until he succeeded in trying the bull where it was found, when he must have become faint from loss of blood, and fallen to the ground, where he was discovered by his daughter. Mr Williams stated that on examining the body after death he found that in addition to the wound in the thigh there was a penetrating wound in the abdomen, through which the small bowels were protruding to the extent of eighteen inches or two feet. Later in the day he examined the deceased again, and found that the horn of the bull had penetrated the bowels themselves. The wounds inflicted were undoubtedly the cause of death. In witness's opinion they were inflicted at one time, the animal making a rush at deceased and thrusting one of its horns into the thigh whilst the other entered the abdomen. The Jury, acting upon the advice of the Coroner, decided not to hear any more witnesses; and, after a short consultation, they returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," attaching no blame to anyone. Mr Baker gave the deceased an excellent character, and said that he was a man that he highly valued. The Jury on the proposal of the foreman (Mr J R. Newberry) requested that their fees should be handed over to the widow, who is left with six young children, and is in delicate health.

Wednesday 9 August 1876, Issue 5817 – Gale Document No. Y3200722861 MURDER AT MODBURY - Mr H. Michelmore and a Jury were occupied during the greater part of Tuesday and Wednesday last week, at Mr Tribble's farm-house, North Huish, in the investigation of a very shocking fatality which had resulted from a brawl at Brownstone Cross on the previous Sunday night. The unfortunate victim was a labourer, about 30 years of age, named JOHN ROBERT WARD, who lived at Lupridge, near Brownston, and worked with Mr Tribble, farmer. About a year and a half ago, deceased had a quarrel with a man named Robt. Coaker, which resulted in a challenge to fight. WARD refused to fight, and Coaker in urging him to do so said, "I would as soon kill a man as a cat." On Sunday evening WARD, with his brother and sister-in-law, had been to the Wesleyan Chapel at Lupbridge, and on returning called at the California Inn door and had a pint of beer between the three. Coaker was in the Inn, and seeing WARD and his friends outside, came out and offered to fight WARD. By this time WARD'S brother and sister-in-law were some distance ahead, returning to their homes, and WARD was thus left in the company of two fellow labourers named Clark and Matthews. On Coaker again challenging WARD to fight, WARD and his friends said "We are no fighting men," whereupon Coaker struck WARD a tremendous blow in the mouth and knocked him down, and as he was getting up kicked him several times in the stomach with his heavy toe-plated boots. WARD did not cry out but attempted to get up when Coaker kicked him again, very severely. WARD fell down insensible and never spoke again. Clerk then attempted to interfere, but Coaker felled him to the ground, and Matthews, seeing what had happened, ran away. Coaker pursued him a short distance, and then returned to his victim, and kicked the dead body several times, after which he returned to the inn and boasted that he had murdered the b------. Mr P. A. Cornish, surgeon, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, said he found great extravasation of blood in the pancreas, caused no doubt by a heavy blow. All the organs were healthy but the heart, the aortic valve being almost closed with ossific deposit, the result of rheumatic disease. He considered that death resulted from the blow causing such a shock to the system as to stop the action of the heart. The disease was not sufficient to account for death without the blow. The Jury after consulting together for a few minutes in private returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against Robert Coaker. The Foreman said the Jury also considered that the Coroner should reprimand the two witnesses Matthews and Clark for leaving the man in the road without rendering assistance. The Coroner accordingly did so. He said the Jury would have been much better pleased if, instead of running away, they had gone over and pulled Coaker off the poor fellow now dead. Had they done so his life would probably have been saved. Although no one could compel them to put themselves in danger, it would have looked much better and they themselves would undoubtedly have been much better pleased if, when they saw another man in danger, they had tried to rescue him. The deceased was a steady man and a good labourer, related to a hard-working and industrious family; while Coaker hails from the village of Ugborough, and lives in an unused turnpike-gate toll-house at Fowlescombe with an aged mother and two brothers, the three not having an atom of furniture in their house, and having been ejected from their previous dwelling. On Thursday Robert Coaker was taken before T. King, E. H. Watson, and F. J. Cornish Bowden, Esqrs. at Totnes and charged with the wilful murder of JOHN ROBERT WARD, on Sunday last. The prisoner, who is about 23, is a short, but somewhat thickly-set young fellow, with sharp, dark eyes, and dark complexion. Mr Davies, of Kingsbridge, prosecuted on behalf of the police, and the prisoner was defended by Mr Nepean. The evidence was identical with that given before the Coroner. The prisoner, being cautioned in the usual way, had the charge read over to him. He made no answer, and was then committed for trial for wilful murder.

Wednesday 16 August 1876, Issue 5818 – Gale Document No. Y3200722894 SIDMOUTH – A Fatal Teaspoonful. - On Tuesday the 8th inst. Mr S. M. Cox, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of a child named ERNEST GEORGE WARD, son of SETH WARD, labourer. ELIZABETH WARD, the mother, deposed that the child was 11 months old, and was very healthy. It had been teething, and she was in the habit of giving it Steadman's teething powders. She gave it one on Thursday evening last, as it was relaxed, and she thought it was teething as usual, but she believed it vomited it. The child was very restless all night, and the next morning was sick, and could not eat anything. She sent to Mr Talbot's for something for diarrhoea, and he sent back a bottle labelled Diarrhoea mixture, shake the bottle, and give a teaspoonful every four or five hours. She poured a teaspoonful of the mixture into a wineglass and gave it to the child. She gave only one spoonful; it did not run over. Some hours afterwards a change came over the child, its lips turned purple, and its eyes glazed. She afterwards went for Dr Hodge. The evidence of Dr Hodge showed that the child's symptoms were those of narcotic poisoning, and that the usual remedies were applied without success. Hugh Talbot, druggist, stated that the mixture contained one grain of opium, two drachms of sugar, half a drachm of prepared chalk, and about fifteen drachms of dill water. He thought it impossible for one teaspoonful to have hurt the child, but that the whole quantity missing might kill it. Three teaspoonsful were missing from the bottle. Dr Pullin, who was present as a witness for Mr Talbot, to give evidence as to the previous health of the deceased, &c., here stated that his son Mr F. B. Pullin, had during the Enquiry measured the three spoons produced by the mother, out of one of which she had given the medicine, and that he had found one contained 129 minims, or two teaspoonsful instead of one, and the two others ninety minims, or one and a half instead of a single teaspoonful. The mixture, if given in the larger spoon, would be equivalent to one-eighth of a grain of opium instead of one-sixteenth, as prescribed by Mr Talbot, and if given in either of the smaller ones would reach almost the same excess, and might possibly account for all that had occurred. The Coroner, in summing up, strongly deprecated the use of the word "teaspoonful" by medical men as a measure. The Jury, after a very short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Died from an accidental overdose of opium," and also desired to express their strong disapproval of the use of the word "teaspoonful" inasmuch as the term was proved in the present instance to be deceptive and dangerous.

Wednesday 23 August 1876, Issue 5819 – Gale Document No. Y3200722929 HEAVITREE – Fatal Accident. - The City Coroner ( H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, on Monday evening, on the body of a labouring man, named FRANCIS SLEE, aged 32, and lately residing at Heavitree-bridge. The deceased was employed by Mr Charles Sclater, of Heavitree, as a carter, and on Saturday evening, the 5th instant, the deceased drove a horse and cart into the village for the purpose of bringing back something from the house of a man named John Milum. His little son accompanied him and Milum and his son were returning in the cart at the time of the accident. The deceased drove at a walking pace to the brow of the hill, where the horse began kicking and bolted down the hill at a great rate, continuing to kick violently as it went. SLEE was riding on the front part of the cart, with one foot resting on the shaft. The horse was stopped at the bottom of the hill by a man named William Isaac Squires, and SLEE was removed to his home. He was afterwards taken to the hospital, where the broken leg was set, and for a time all went well, but after two or three days the injured man got into a low state, and expired on Saturday afternoon last. The house surgeon at the hospital said death was caused by the poisoning of the blood resulting from the injury he had received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that as a precaution, in future, Mr Sclater should allow a kicking strap to be used, as the horse was said to be in the habit of kicking.

Wednesday 23 August 1876, Issue 5819 – Gale Document No. Y3200722933 BIDEFORD – Sad Death Of A Young Girl By Burning. - Dr Thompson, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday touching the death of BESSIE MAJOR, aged fourteen, the fourth daughter of MR WILLIS MAJOR, auctioneer, &c. Deceased and her sister went to bed together on Saturday night about ten o'clock, and deceased, who as very fond of reading, took a book into bed with her and commence dreading to her sister, holding a lighted candle on the bed in her hand. The sister fell asleep, and was awoke by screams. Deceased was then out of bed, enveloped in flames, by the washstand looking for water, and exclaimed, "Fetch father – I am dying." About the same time the parents of deceased were alarmed by persons running in from the street and saying their house was on fire, flames being seen in one of the upstair rooms. MR MAJOR at once proceeded upstairs and met deceased on the landing in a blaze. He extinguished the flames by wrapping his coat around her. The whole of her nightdress was consumed with the exception of a string around her neck. Dr Cox was sent for, and applied the usual remedies, but deceased died on Sunday morning, ten hours after the occurrence. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 30 August 1876, Issue 5820 – Gale Document No. Y3200722971 TEIGNMOUTH – Bathing Fatality. - Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at Bishopsteignton last Wednesday on the body of a youth belonging to that place, named CRAMP, who was drowned the day previous whilst bathing near the Summer House, opposite Coombe Cellars. It was thought that he must have been seized with cramp. The body was picked up on Wednesday morning by lighterman below Hackney. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 30 August 1876, Issue 5820 – Gale Document No. Y3200722954 EXETER – Child Burnt To Death. – The Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn on Monday afternoon, to elicit the facts connected with the death of SARAH ANN MURPHY, aged 15 months, daughter of a private of the 11th Regiment. The child was left in a room in King-street, where the mother resides, on the previous Friday morning, and during this time, by some unknown means got itself in flames. The mother had not been absent above one minute, when a neighbour hearing the child screaming, went to its assistance. It was taken to the Hospital, where it died on Sunday. A verdict of "Accidental death" was returned.

Wednesday 6 September 1876, Issue 5821 – Gale Document No. Y3200723002 CHUDLEIGH – Burnt to Death. - An Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, Chudleigh Knighton, on Wednesday, before Mr Michelmore, Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN BARBER, a widow lady, aged 52, who died on the previous day from the effects of severe burns. MR NICHOLAS MORTIMER stated that he resided at Chudleigh Knighton, in the parish of Hennock. The deceased, MARY ANN BARBER, was his daughter. She was the widow of WILLIAM BARBER, and lived in a house close by his. She was 52 years of age. On Monday witness heard screams proceeding from his daughter's house, and running thither he saw MRS BARBER crouching down, and with her hands keeping her clothes around her. Her clothes were on fire. He put the fire out. Deceased was perfectly sensible after the burning, but she was so flurried he could get no sense from her as to how it occurred. Dr Adam Watson, was called to attend the deceased, and he deposed that on arriving at the house about four o'clock on Monday afternoon, he found MRS BARBER lying on her bed with the charred remains of her clothes over her. She was unable to answer any questions, and was screeching with pain. Witness examined her body, and found her badly burnt over the chest, abdomen, arms, and hands, and on the thighs were a few spots. Her throat was also badly burnt. From the first he despaired of her life. He saw her again in the evening, and then heard her say that she had been nodding over the fire, a thing she seldom did, and when she awoke she found her clothes on fire. She blamed no one. She died early next morning. The cause of death was shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

CHUDLEIGH – Suffocated in a Lime-Kiln. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday at Chudleigh touching the death of ROBERT BAKER, of Kingsteignton, who met with his death at the Harcombe Lime-kilns on the previous day. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Joseph Lake, lime merchant, of Kingsteignton, and was in charge of a horse that had drawn some stones from the quarry to the kiln-bed. He had backed the cart against the pit circle, and placed a pole about ten feet long behind the wheels. When the stone was being tipped from the cart into the kiln the pole must have moved away from behind the wheels, as the horse and cart went further back and fell into the burning pit. BAKER called out to John Lake, manager of the quarry, "Oh, John, what shall us do?" and Lake immediately threw some culm on the kiln fire to damp it, and ran below to stop the draught. He was absent about four minutes, and on his return to the kiln-bed he found BAKER in the kiln, as if he was trying to free the horse from its harness. Lake at once jumped in. The horse was then down, but BAKER was on his legs, and endeavouring to vomit. Lake got him up across the horse and cart, and he was then about two feet from the top of the kiln. BAKER was unconscious, and fell forward against the kiln. The poor fellow was got out and placed on the kiln-bed; but he shortly afterwards died. Dr Massiah, who was at once sent for, stated that from the appearance of the body he was satisfied the deceased had been suffocated by the fumes of the burning lime. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was accidentally suffocated, and they also condemned the practice of tipping loaded carts into the mouth of the kiln, as being very dangerous to life. The deceased was about twenty-five years of age, and leaves a wife and one child. The Jury gave their fees for the relief of the widow.

Wednesday 6 September 1876, Issue 5821 – Gale Document No. Y3200722992 DAWLISH – Drowned Whilst Bathing. - A painful sensation was caused at the gentlemen's bathing cove on Monday morning by the sudden distress of one of the bathers – MR EDWARD WAY, a cigar merchant, 16, York-street, Covent Garden, London. Deceased, who was visiting relatives at Alphington, Exeter, with his wife and family, went down to Dawlish with his nephew, MR WAY, by the bathing train, and the two went out together. The sea at the time was rough, and deceased, whilst swimming, suddenly called for help, upon which his nephew and a gentleman, named Pidsley, immediately went to him and brought him ashore in an insensible condition, and to all appearance dead, although he had not been out of his depth in the water and never sank. Medical assistance was sent for, and every means for restoring the apparently drowned was tried without success. After an hour's unavailing exertions the body was removed to Hatcher's Royal Hotel to await an Inquest.

An Inquest was held at Plymouth on Saturday on the body of a man named STOYLES, a cooper, who had died from the result of severe wounds in his throat. When taken to the hospital STOYLES said that while sitting on a seat by the sea shore at Plymouth a man, whose description he gave, came behind him and drew some sharp instrument across his throat and ran away. STOYLES persisted in this story until he died. The Jury, however, after a protracted Inquiry, returned a verdict of suicide.

Wednesday 13 September 1876, Issue 5822 – Gale Document No. Y3200723035 BARNSTAPLE – Death From Lock-Jaw. - On Saturday Mr R. I. Bencraft, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of MR WILLIAM COCKRAM, clothes dealer, who died on the previous day from lock-jaw. It appeared from the evidence, that about five weeks ago Mr Cockram went to his garden in company with his wife, and found that a pig had got out of the house. Whilst catching it, he fell and cut his right arm very badly. The wound was dressed, but after a time deceased complained of soreness in the jaws, and symptoms of lock-jaw were gradually developed. For some time the deceased suffered almost continually from spasms, and he was unconscious at the time of his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 20 September 1876, Issue 5823 – Gale Document No. Y3200723060 EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, last Friday, on the body of JOHN DAY, aged 42, who lately resided at 21, Friars' Walk. Deceased was a widower, and was at one time an auctioneer and surveyor, carrying on business in this city. Jane Lomath, deceased's landlady, stated that for a few days previous to his death deceased had been slightly indisposed, but on Wednesday he returned home early in the forenoon in a state of intoxication. He remained on the sofa until evening, when he went to bed. Next morning she went to him, and at his request she left to procure him a cup of tea. On returning to his room a quarter of an hour later, Mrs Lomath found him lying on the floor, quite dead. Mr Farrant, surgeon, said he had attended the deceased for some time. He was subject to epileptic fits and was also of intemperate habits. The fits generally followed after an excess of dissipation, and witness had no doubt that an epileptic fit was the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 27 September 1876, Issue 5824 –Gale Document No. Y3200723109 HONITON CLYST - An Inquest was held at the Duke of York Inn on Saturday, before Mr Coroner Cross, on the body of the child of ANN BENDING, a domestic of Farringdon House. The child had been concealed, and the mother will probably be taken to Woodbury on that charge. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from neglect at Birth."

Wednesday 4 October 1876, Issue 5825 – Gale Document No. Y3200723138 PAIGNTON - Fatal Fall From An Apple Tree. - Mr H. Michelmore, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Torquay on Friday, respecting the death of JOHN MICHELMORE, twelve years old, son of a labourer living at Paignton. On the 6th of September the deceased and a son of Mr Charles Palk, butcher, of Paignton were in an orchard picking apples, and whilst deceased was up in a tree, the bough he was on gave way and he fell to the ground, a distance of eight feet, breaking one of his arms. The boy was taken to Mr Pridham, surgeon, and he made the lad wait for Mr Spurway, his assistant, who did not arrive for an hour and a quarter. After the bone had been set deceased was removed to the Torquay Infirmary, where he died on Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and complained of Mr Pridham's conduct.

Wednesday 4 October 1876, Issue 5825 – Gale Document No. Y3200723126 EXETER – Inquests. - An Inquest was held at the Victoria Inn, Parr-street, on Wednesday 1st on the body of HARRY DOMINY, aged two years, son of the superintendent of the goods' department at the South Western Railway station. The child was in the kitchen on Tuesday evening, and in the absence of the servant, drank some fresh-made tea from the teapot which scalded the child's throat sufficiently to cause death. Verdict: Accidental Death.

A second Inquest was held at the Paper Maker's Arms, Exe-street, on the body of WILLIAM CLEAVE, who was drowned in the Bonhay-road the previous evening. The child's father is a labourer residing in Exe-street. Deceased, who was playing near the fenders of the mill leat, ventured on the staging, from whence he fell into the stream. Shooter, the bathing ground keeper, was quickly on the spot, and swam up and down the leat for some time in search of the lad, but with no success. In accordance with the wish of the Jury the Coroner promised to see the Surveyor and suggest that a grating be put between the fenders and the bridge. Verdict: Accidental Death.

On Friday another Inquest was held at the Custom House Inn, on the body of a widow named ELIZABETH SELLICK, aged 78, lately residing in St. Thomas, whose body was found in the river near the Quay. No evidence could be obtained as to how the old lady got into the water, but a person with whom she took tea on Wednesday stated deceased had troubled herself much about a notice to quit her lodgings where she had lived since her husband's death, which latter event apparently had permanently weakened her mind. No marks of violence were found on the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

Wednesday 11 October 1876, Issue 5826 – Gale Document No. Y3200723170 EXETER – Killed By A Fall From A Horse. - At the London and South-Western Hotel, Paul-street, on Wednesday, H. W. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner), held an Inquest on the body of JOHN TAPERELL, aged 45, a clerk, in the employ of Mr George Heath. The deceased accompanied a man named Edwards to Dawlish on the previous Friday morning. They took a cab to the Mount Pleasant Inn, on the Warren, for the purpose of bringing two horses to Exeter for Mr Heath. Edwards was to ride the horses back, and the deceased was to return by train and bring back the harness. Edwards got a man named Back to ride the horses to Exeter for him. Deceased at his own request was allowed to ride one of the animals, and it appears that on the road the two men stopped several times to drink. Deceased was rather the worse for it, and in Alphington-road, near the Nurseries, he fell off the horse he was riding. The assistance of Dr Woodman, of the Nurseries, was soon procured, and he had the unfortunate man removed to his house Meanwhile a cab was fetched, and the deceased was conveyed to his home in Upper Paul-street. Mr Webb, surgeon, examined the deceased, and found his collar-bone broken in three places, and the right side of his face paralysed. Death resulted on Wednesday morning from concussion of the brain. Verdict: "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 11 October 1876, Issue 5826 – Gale Document No. Y3200723157 EXETER – Death Through Blood-Poisoning. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Golden Ball Inn, Mary Arches-street, on Monday, touching the death of EDWIN HEAL, of 178, Fore-street, which occurred on the 7th instant, under the following circumstances: - ALFRED HEAL, of London, son of the deceased, stated that his father came up to London on the 26th September, and on the way from Waterloo Station to the Cathedral Hotel, St. Paul's Churchyard, tripped, fell heavily on to a portmanteau he was carrying, and was injured on the back of the hand. EMMA CREASY, sister-in-law of deceased, deposed that MR HEAL came home from London on the 29th September, complaining of an injury to his right hand, and died on the 7th October. Dr S. S. Perkins said he had been MR EDWIN HEAL'S professional attendant for twenty years, and was called to see him on the evening of Sunday week, the 1st of October. He was in bed, and said he was suffering great pain in his hand, from an accident that had occurred to him in London. On examination he found, just above the second finger, on the back of the right hand, there was a bruised wound, about three-quarters of an inch long, rather curved, with an indentation, or slight cut, the whole extent. The back of the hand was very much inflamed and swollen, being what is termed cellulitis or inflammation of the part between the skin and the flesh. The inflammation extended as far as the elbow. After prescribing the usual remedies he left the patient until next morning. At a quarter-past nine, he found him materially worse, suffering from delirium and other symptoms, known by the name of pyaemia or blood-poisoning. He then told MRS HEAL that he was very much alarmed at this condition. He then called in Mr Cumming and they decided, with the consent of deceased and his wife, to open the hand. This was done and it afforded proof that the injury had produced the swelling The effect of probing the wound was to check the inflammation in that part; but on Tuesday morning he complained of a pain in his right groin, where there was another abscess forming like that on his hand. On the following day the swelling had extended so far as to be twice the size of the other thigh. That was a corroborative proof that he was suffering from blood-poisoning. On Friday evening, the 6th October, at 7 o'clock, witness found that mortification or gangrene, had taken deceased's right thumb. He communicated the fact of his imminent danger to MR HEAL, and had another consultation that evening with Dr Drake and Mr Cumming. MR HEAL died early on Saturday morning. Mr Cumming saw him daily also from the Monday to the Friday. The cause of death was pyaemia, or blood-poisoning, produced by the injury he had received. After an absence of half-an-hour, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death had been caused by blood-poisoning according to medical evidence. Several of the Jurymen expressed the opinion that an Inquest need not have been held in the case. The Coroner said he was bound to hold an Inquest in all cases of death resulting from accident.

EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Victoria Inn, Parr-street, on Monday evening, on the body of CEPHAS LUCAS, aged 71, who resided in Codrington-street. Deceased complained of being in pain on going to bed, and on his wife entering the room shortly after she saw he had become worse, and consequently sent for a surgeon, but deceased died within a few minutes. Mr Perkins thought death resulted from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance therewith.

Wednesday 18 October 1876, Issue 5827 – Gale Document No. Y3200723203 BRIXHAM – Dangers of Somnambulism. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Brixham on Friday, respecting the death of MRS JANE BOWDEN, aged seventy-six, who had died from injuries received in falling from an upstairs window into the street early on Thursday morning. A policeman, named Wotton, on duty in Middle-street, about 8 a.m., heard the opening of a window on the third story of one of the houses there, and saw a woman get out and sit on the sill whilst holding by the upper part of the window. He at once raised an alarm, and shouted "Go back" three or four times in quick succession, but the woman let go her hold, and fell into the road five and twenty feet below. Wotton discovered that she was a MRS JANE BOWDEN, and he aroused her son with whom she lived. Mr Colstan, surgeon, was sent for, and he found the poor woman's right arm and leg fractured, and one of her jaws broken. She died from the injuries in the course of a couple of hours. The deceased was not known to walk in her sleep, and it was stated that she had shewn no suicidal symptoms. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased fell out of the window while asleep.

BARNSTAPLE – Suspicious Death Of A Married Woman. - Mr R. I Bencraft, the Borough Coroner, opened an Inquest on Thursday, respecting the death of a woman named MARY ANN READ. MR WILLIAM READ, the husband of the deceased, who formerly carried on business as a tailor and draper in Liverpool, deposed that for the past twelve years his wife had given way to drink. About four years ago he brought her to Ilfracombe, in the hope of effecting some reform, and for the space of twelve months or more she gave up drinking altogether. Of late, however, she had fallen into the old habit, and on Thursday of last week she got a good deal the worst for liquor. Next morning on rising she said she should leave home, and while the witness was downstairs in such a position that he thought his wife could not leave without his knowledge, she managed to get away. Several days afterwards she took lodgings at a Mr Dymond's in Boutport-street, where she became very ill, vomiting almost continually. A telegram was sent to her husband, but the wretched woman died on Wednesday. It transpired that she had pawned her watch for £2. Mrs Payne gave evidence to the effect that deceased told her that she believed she had unintentionally poisoned herself; she took something from a cupboard while sleeping at Mrs Goss's house at Pilton, and became very bad indeed immediately after drinking it. Mrs Goss said there were some bottles in the cupboard, but they were all empty, and she was sure there was no poison in the house. The Inquest was adjourned, in order that a post-mortem examination might be made. On Friday, when the Inquiry was resumed Mr Fernie, surgeon, stated that he had made an examination and found all the organs perfectly healthy, with the exception of the stomach, which was greatly inflamed at the cardiac end. That caused the vomiting, and he thought it was brought about by some irritant that the woman had taken. Doubted whether drink alone would produce such appearance, and was of opinion that the Inquiry would not be complete unless the stomach were analysed. Mrs Dymond, the wife of the man at whose house the woman died, was sworn, and she deposed that the deceased, on first reaching her house on the Saturday evening, said she had been drugged, and just before that the daughter of the landlady of the Braunton Inn came to the deceased, and requested her to "come back to me, directly." Under these circumstances the Inquest was adjourned for a week, in order that the stomach may be analysed and further inquiries made.

Wednesday 18 October 1876, Issue 5827 – Gale Document No. Y3200723191 EXETER – Fatal Fall. - An Inquest was held at the Bude Hotel, on Saturday, on the body of ANN TURNER, aged 80. The old lady spent the previous Sunday with her son, who is an officer at the City Workhouse, and on leaving the house in the evening she slipped whilst descending the steps, and fell heavily, dragging her daughter-in-law, on whose arm she was leaning, with her. Deceased's thigh was fractured, and this led to other symptoms from the effects of which she died on Friday afternoon. Verdict: "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 25 October 1876, Issue 5828 – Gale Document No. Y3200723219 EXETER – Fatal Effects Of Drink. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at Blacking's Spirit Vaults, High-street, on Monday, respecting the death of JAMES CREEDY, formerly a baker in the St. Thomas's Union, who died on Saturday evening. From the evidence of Lydia Lypell, a widow residing in the same house in St. George's-street, it appeared deceased was seventy-two years old. On Saturday evening about eight o'clock a man named Drake called to see deceased and they remained together drinking beer and rum until deceased fell on the floor insensible. After Drake had left the house witness tried to lift deceased by herself but could not She then wrapped him up warm and sent for Mr Perkins, surgeon, South-street, who found deceased in a dying state. he considered that death was caused by drink and his being exposed to the cold. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 25 October 1876, Issue 5828 – Gale Document No. Y3200723236 KINGSBRIDGE – Child Scalded To Death. - Mr Coroner Rodd on Thursday held an Inquest respecting the death of JOHN ROGERS, a little boy who had lived with his grandmother at Woodcock eye, near the Kingsbridge-road Station. Whilst assisting in making cider wine, deceased overturned the boiling crock, and received such injuries that he died in a few hours.

BIDEFORD – A Child Scalded To Death. - Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest last Friday respecting the death of JAMES ARTHUR NICHOLS, a child one year and ten months old, son of MR WILLIAM NICHOLS, brewer. A servant girl, about 16 years of age, had charge of the child on Thursday evening, and went into the Brewhouse, where she got on the platform, over a large tub containing boiling wort from the furnace. The platform was about eighteen inches wide and four feet long, and after standing there some little time, the girl jumped off and attempted to take the child down, but he went backward and fell into the boiling beer. The child was immediately taken out by his father, who was near at hand, but he was so frightfully scalded, that he died two hours afterwards. Verdict; "Accidental Death."

CREDITON – Fatal Accident To A Waggoner. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, on Saturday morning, before Mr Coroner Hooper, respecting the death of JAMES BENDING. Deceased's widow said he was aged 49, and resided at Sandford. On the previous Tuesday morning he left home with a waggon and a pair of horses to go to Copplestone to fetch a load of furniture for a man named Drewe. About twelve o'clock the same morning a man named Shobrooke fetched her to go to the deceased at Copplestone. Deceased told her that he had hold of the shaft horse by the head when the front horse shied, and he hitched his foot and fell. William Shobrooke, labourer, Morchard Bishop, said that on the morning of the accident he saw deceased at Copplestone with a waggon and a pair of horses. He was quite sober. Within a minute or two after their passing he heard deceased call out. On going to him he found him underneath the waggon moaning dreadfully. A medical man was sent for, and ordered deceased to be taken to the Hospital. Mr Cumming, the house surgeon, said he received deceased into the Hospital on Tuesday evening, when he was in a state of collapse. He had a very large contused wound on the body. Mortification set in, and he died early on Friday morning Verdict: "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE – The Late Mysterious Death. - The adjourned Inquest touching the death of MARY ANN READ, wife of a retired Liverpool tradesman living at Ilfracombe, was held on Saturday at the North Country Inn, before Mr R. T. Bencraft, Coroner. The deceased had taken to drink for the last twelve years, and a few days before her death she left her husband and came to Barnstaple, where she was seen by several people in a state of intoxication. She was ultimately taken ill and continued vomiting for two or three days, when she died. She stated before her death that she had taken some poison in mistake for peppermint at the house of Mr Goss, and the Inquest was adjourned in order to have the contents of the stomach analysed. The report of Dr Blyth's investigations went to shew that no poison could be found in the organs of the body, but upon a pillow-case and other articles over which the deceased had vomited, traces of oxalic acid were found, and from that and other circumstances it was rendered tolerably clear in his own mind that death was caused by oxalic acid. Mr Goss, an old man, was called, and he stated that there had been nothing in the bottles in his cupboard for two years, and that then they only contained peppermint. He had never in his life had oxalic acid in his house. After some further evidence had been given as to deceased's intemperate habits, the Coroner said he did not see the utility of prolonging the Inquiry, as they had discovered the cause of death, and he would recommend the Jury to return a verdict that the deceased died from the effects of oxalic acid, but how or by whom administered, or where obtained, there was no evidence to show. Perhaps the police would at some future time find out where she got the poison. A verdict in accordance with the above was returned. The Jury gave their fees to the North Devon Infirmary.

Wednesday 8 November 1876, Issue 5830 – Gale Document No. Y3200723315 TORQUAY – Sad Ending To A Dinner Party. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Hatcher's refreshment rooms on Friday, respecting the death of GEORGE C. RIX, nineteen years of age, which had been caused by falling over the stairs at Hatcher's refreshment rooms, Vaughan Parade, on Wednesday night, on which occasion the Leander Rowing Club held their annual dinner. After the inner Stephen Hatcher, son of Mr Hatcher, went down the back-stairs in company with the deceased. He was seen to turn and take hold of the banister, and then he fell over the stairs He fell to the bottom, with his head against the wall, and one of his shoes came off. After the fall deceased said, in reply to a question from young Hatcher as to whether he would go for a walk or not, "All right, Steve." Afterwards deceased became faint, and was put to bed. Stephen Hatcher said he went down the stairs in front of deceased when the accident occurred. Deceased was not the worse for drink, having had but two glasses of ale and a little sherry. Mr S. Gamble, surgeon, said he was sent for to see deceased at Mr Hatcher's at about one o'clock on Thursday morning, and found him dead, death having resulted from the rupture of a vessel at the base of the brain, the vessels being at the time very much congested. The Coroner said it was a very sad case, and one which should be a warning to all young men. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 15 November 1876, Issue 5831 – Gale Document No. Y3200723332 MELANCHOLY SUICIDE OF AN EXONIAN AT OXFORD. - On Saturday afternoon MR T. H. G. WYNDHAM, Fellow and Tutor of Merton College, was discovered by his servant lying upon the floor of his room, life quite extinct, and a discharged gun by his side. Mr Taunton, the doctor, who was at once sent for, was of opinion that he had been dead at least two hours. Mr Wyndham has been suffering from some time, it is stated, from great nervousness and depression, and his state of health had been a cause of much alarm to his friends. Apart from the shock caused by the painful nature of the accident, MR WYNDHAM'S personal qualities will cause his untimely end to be mourned by his many friends in his own College, and in the University at large, while the loss to science, of which he was a zealous student and teacher, will be equally lamented. The deceased, whose father resides at 3, Dix's Field, Exeter, and who was thirty-four years of age, was a University scholar on the foundation of Baroness Burdett Coutts, for the promotion of the study of geology and natural science as bearing on geology. At the Inquest held in Merton College on Monday afternoon before Mr F. Symonds, one of the University Coroners, the following letter, written by deceased to Dr Acland (supposed to be the last thing he did before committing the act) was read:- "Dear Dr. Acland, -- I must be put into a lunatic asylum. Please put me in. – H. WYNDHAM." It was stated that deceased had spoken to his servant of being engaged to a young lady lately. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Wednesday 22 November 1876, Issue 5832 – Gale Document No. Y3200723369 EXETER - SAD FATALITY ON BOARD THE FORMBY LIGHTSHIP. - THOMAS WINTER CALLAWAY, a young man of this city, was accidentally shot while engaged on board the Formby Lightship, lying off Liverpool. It appears a muzzle-loading single-barrelled gun, belonging to the mate, is kept on board the vessel, and on Friday Robert Thomas, one of the crew, used it for shooting sea-gulls and wild ducks. After firing it Thomas loaded the gun with shot and laid it down upon a water tank in the 'tween decks at the fore part of the ship. Thomas went on deck to speak to the mate, when William Ogleby, a seaman, picked up the gun to examine it. The gun went off in his hands and the contents entered the head of THOMAS CALLAWAY, who was sitting a few yards from the spot, killing him instantaneously. At the Inquest last week the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed the opinion that Robert Thomas was guilty of carelessness in leaving the gun loaded in the position in which Ogleby found it.

EXETER – Melancholy Suicide. - Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, on Friday, held an Inquest at the Royal Clarence Hotel, Exeter, touching the death of SUSAN GREGORY SHEPHERD WEBBER BISNEY, the wife of MR CHARLES BISNEY, hatter, High-street, which sad event took ,place on the previous day under very distressing circumstances. MR BISNEY stated that he had carried on business in High-street for twenty years and had been married about the same period. His late wife, who was sixty-three years of age, had never enjoyed good health, and had recently shown symptoms of nervous depression, being especially distressed by his late pecuniary embarrassments. MR BISNEY had often pressed her to procure medical advice, but she preferred the homeopathic treatment, which she had studied somewhat carefully. On Thursday morning his wife appeared as cheerful as usual, and when he last saw her alive, about four o'clock, there was nothing to in her manner to excite suspicion. An hour afterwards the housekeeper told him that something had happened to her mistress, and on going to his dressing room he found the deceased kneeling on the floor with her head resting on a small tin bath, which contained a quantity of blood that had flowed from a wound in her throat. Two doctors were sent for, but their services were of no avail; in fact, death must have taken place before the witness entered the room. It appeared that the wound had been inflicted with one of MR BISNEY'S razors. In reply to the Coroner, MR BISNEY stated that he was contemplating removal, and the prospect of the change affected his wife very much, as they had occupied the High-street premises for upwards of twenty years. Evidence was given by Susan Norris, the housekeeper; Mr Ball, nephew of MR BISNEY; and Mr G. F. Webb, surgeon The Coroner, in summing up, expressed sympathy – which he was sure the Jury shared with him – for MR BISNEY in his sad bereavement, and intimated that there was little or no reason to doubt that the deceased's mind was so affected by her husband's misfortunes as to render her unconscious of the nature of the fatal act. The Jury, after a brief consultation, unanimously returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide while in a state of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 13 December 1876, Issue 5835 – Gale Document No. Y3200723479 MARWOOD - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at Marwood, near Barnstaple, by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR J. TAMLYN, farmer, sixty years of age, who had committed suicide the day before by hanging himself. It was shown that deceased had been in a very depressed state for some time, and the Jury returned a verdict of suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind.

IDE – Sad Case Of Drowning. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, on Thursday held an Inquest at the New Inn, Alphington, on the body of WILLIAM SCANES, which was found the previous morning in the water, at Alphington Marshes. Sophia Shobrooke, wife of Samuel Shobrooke, Bridge Inn, Ide, deposed that SCANES was in that house from three o'clock on Monday afternoon, the 4th of December, until nearly seven o'clock. He was served with beer during that time, but she could not say how much. When deceased left the house, he appeared to be quite capable of finding his way home. He walked straight enough along the passage. It was very dark outside at the time SCANES left, and there was a great rush of water in the brook. He went out alone, and there had been no quarrelling in the house during the afternoon. Deceased had not been in the habit of coming often to the Bridge Inn, and she was not aware that he was addicted to drink. The Coroner: I never heard anything against your house; but I fear that at the time SCANES left it that day he was very tipsy. Joseph Edwards, Ide, said he went on Monday evening, between six and seven o'clock, to pay an account at the Bridge Inn. He only went to the door of the bar. He saw SCANES coming out. Deceased was rather fond of a little drop of drink, and said to witness on the occasion referred to., "It is not often you and I meet here; what are you going to stand?" Witness replied, "Nothing, Bill; I never stand treat on a Monday." Deceased seemed as if he had been drinking, although he had seen him worse. Witness crossed the bridge to go home, and, although the water was high, it had not reached the road at that time. The night was very dark, and it was likely that SCANES had fallen into the water near the bridge. The place he referred to was not safe, in consequence of want of repairs. Witness further remarked that the cap belonging to the deceased was picked up on Tuesday morning close to the most dangerous part of the bank. He had not the least suspicion that there had been any foul play. He believed that the deceased had accidently fallen into the water. Several of the Jury expressed the opinion that the place where it was likely SCANES fell in was in a very dangerous unprotected state, and remarked that several children had fallen into the water there in consequence. The Coroner requested the Foreman of the Jury to bring the matter before the Turnpike Trustees, or whoever were responsible for the repair of the place in question. Charles Preston, farm labourer, spoke to finding the body of SCANES in the water at Alphington Marshes, on Wednesday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but there was no evidence to show how the deceased got into the water."

Wednesday 13 December 1876, Issue 5835 – Gale Document No. Y3200723478 EXETER – The Inquest on MR MALLETT. - An Inquest on the body of MR JAMES MALLETT, tailor, High-street, who was rescued from drowning in the Exe on Sunday night, was held at the Castle Hotel on Friday evening, before Mr Hooper, the City Coroner. Mr Hirtzel appeared for the family of the deceased. JOHN MALLETT was the first witness. He stated that his father was at home the whole of Sunday last, until about 6.30 p.m., when he went out with a letter to the Post-office. His family herd nothing more of him until about 12 o'clock that night, when information of what had occurred was brought to their house. Deceased was brought home on Monday evening. The deceased never told witness how he got into the water, nor said anything about his doings on Sunday night. – Mr Hirtzel: I believe your father's affairs are very much involved, and that he had consulted a solicitor about filing a petition? Witness: Yes, sir. Mr Hirtzel: Has he been for a considerable time much excited and worried about this, and also unable to sleep at night? Witness: Yes, sir. Mr J. Holmes, foreman at Messrs. Bodley Brothers, Commercial-road, said that on Sunday night shortly before ten he was between the Ballast Quay and the Port Royal Inn, when he saw something lying on the ground. On examination he found it was the body of the deceased. He was lying on his back with his arms extended and his hat partly under his head. It was raining, and the wind blew very boisterously. Witness tried to rouse him, but with no success, and he told a companion he thought he was dead. After some time the deceased was got upon his legs and questioned, but no replies could be got from him. He stared wildly, but did not smell of drink. A Mr Chapman and witness assisted him as far as Holloway-street, where, being able to support himself, they left him. In answer to a juryman, witness said he believed deceased had fallen down in a fit: had no foundation for thinking he had been drinking. After leaving deceased witness went home, and had not been there above fifteen minutes when he heard a cry of "Man in the river." He went out and found the deceased had been rescued by Mr Edwards. He helped to restore animation and to take deceased to the Hospital. Mr Edwards of the Port Royal, said that about half-past ten on the night in question he heard a noise proceeding from the river opposite the stone wall at the further end of the Quay. On looking over the wall he saw the body of a man tumbling over in the water, which was then level with the path. He ran back to the boat-house, got a boat-hook, and jumped into a boat and succeeded in hooking deceased by the coat. He landed him, and proceeded to restore animation. Mr Tosswill, surgeon, soon arrived, and, about an hour after he was removed to the Hospital. Mr Tosswill, surgeon, said that when taken out of the water deceased was in a state of extreme collapse. He did not smell of liquor. Witness considered he had been suffering either from the effects of drink or from the stupor which generally followed an epileptic fit. Mr Phelps, surgeon, visited the deceased at his house on Monday evening. He was suffering on Tuesday from acute inflammation of the lungs, with pleurisy, and died on Wednesday morning from those symptoms. The Jury, after some discussion, returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died from inflammation of the lungs; but there was no evidence to show how deceased got into the water. The Foreman (Mr John White) on behalf of the Jurors, expressed their hearty approval of the conduct of Mr Holmes and Mr Edwards, and also their thanks to Mr Tosswill for his prompt assistance in a time of danger.

Wednesday 13 December 1876, Issue 5835 – Gale Document No. Y3200723480 EXETER – Child Burnt To Death. - Mr Hooper, the City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, on Monday, respecting the death of WILLIAM MATTHEWS, a boy aged 3 years and 9 months, the son of WILLIAM MATTHEWS, a quay lumper. It appeared from the evidence, that on Saturday evening last the mother of the child left it with only its nightdress on whilst she went on an errand. During her absence a neighbour heard screams proceeding from the room, and on going there found the child's nightdress in flames. Assistance was procured, and the fire extinguished, and the child was removed to the hospital, where, after lingering until Sunday, it died from the effects of the injuries received. There was no evidence to show how the nightgown was set on fire, but MRS MATTHEWS supposed that the child must have found some loose matches on the fire-place, and that in lighting them he set alight to his dress. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 20 December 1876, Issue 5836 – Gale Document No. Y3200723513 EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest last Thursday at the Exeter Inn, Bartholomew-street, on the body of a child barely two years old, named FREDERICK HENRY STONE, who died from the effects of severe scalds caused by his upsetting a pot of scalding tea over himself. The boy was at the time attending an infant school on Stepcote-hill, and the teapot was standing by an unguarded fire. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed an opinion that in all schoolrooms where infants are kept fire-guards should be used.

Wednesday 3 January 1877, Issue 5838 – Gale Document No. Y3200723564 EXETER – Inquest. - A Coroner's Court was held at the Elephant Inn, North-street, yesterday afternoon, to investigate the death of JOHN WIDGER, baker, North-street, aged sixty-six, and who died early on Sunday morning. The old gentleman had been an invalid for thirty years, and the medical evidence was to the effect that death resulted from congestion of the lungs and brain, which had been encroaching on deceased for a very long time. A verdict was consequently returned accordingly.

Wednesday 10 January 1877, Issue 5839 – Gale Document No. Y3200723611 DAWLISH – Child Drowning. - Mr H. Michelmore, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Aller Farm, on Saturday evening, on the body of FREDERICK LEE, infant son of MR F. LEE, of the above farm, who was accidentally drowned on the morning of that day. The little lad, aged between two and three years, was missed on the return of his parents from the parish church, whither they had been to attend the christening of their infant child, and on a search being made, the body of the boy was found in the water near the late Miss Long's lawn. It is supposed that after his parents left, he must have gone down the road, and that he reached the streamlet crossing the road just below the house leading to Holcombe, and there fell in. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Wednesday 10 January 1877, Issue 5839 – Gale Document No. Y3200723598 EXETER – Inquests. - On Wednesday afternoon H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Golden Ball Inn, Mary Arches-street, on the body of SUSAN JANE COWARD TOZER, who died suddenly on Tuesday. The deceased was seventy-five years of age, and had been housekeeper to Mr James Pearse, draper, 171, Fore-street. She had complained of illness for some time past, and on Friday evening she had to leave her duties, and retire to her own room on account of being so unwell. On Tuesday she was left alone for a short time, and on a servant going to the room, she found the deceased lying on the floor on her back. She was assisted to a sofa, and Mr Webb, surgeon, was sent for, but she died before he arrived. The surgeon said death resulted from heart disease, accelerated by sickness, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

On Thursday evening the Coroner held an Inquest at the George and Dragon Inn, Black-boy-road, on the body of MARY COUSINS, who died suddenly early the same morning. It appeared that the deceased was a widow, aged sixty years, and resided at Plymouth. Since Christmas Day, however, she had been on a visit to her daughter, MRS MARY REYNOLDS, who lives at 5, Silver-street, Blackboy-road. The deceased had been ill for several months past, and had come to Exeter for a change of air. She died about six o'clock on Thursday morning. After hearing the evidence of Mr Hunt, surgeon, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural causes.

EXETER – Fatal Accident In The St. David's Hill Tunnel. – The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on Saturday at the Topsham Inn, South-street, respecting the death of THOMAS NORTHCOTT, who was killed in the tunnel between the Queen-street and St. David's Stations on Thursday. Detective Rogers watched the case on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company. MARY ANN NORTHCOTT, residing in Southwood's Buildings, Cowick-street, St. Thomas, identified the body as that of her late husband, who was a labourer, 58 years of age, and employed in a coal-yard at the Queen-street Station. Charles White said he was a ganger in the employ of the Company. On Thursday deceased came to him whilst he was at work in the tunnel referred to, and asked him if he could be supplied with fifty sleepers. He had had fifty previously. Witness told him he would supply him as soon as he had got a few minutes to spare. Deceased not having the sleepers at two o'clock, went to the foot of the tunnel, and again asked for them. At that time the up train had left the St. David's Station to ascend the incline. Witness told deceased to stand clear. When the up train reached the middle of the tunnel, the down train approached at the other end. Witness was at this time standing between the metals, and the deceased was leaning against the wall of the tunnel. Another man named Leach was standing in the same position as the deceased. The trains having passed, and the steam cleared away, witness found the deceased lying outside the metals on his back, with his head towards Queen-street. He appeared to be quite dead. Witness obtained a trolley, and conveyed him to the Station, whence he was removed on a stretcher to the Hospital. Deceased had no right whatever to go into the tunnel, but should have gone to the engineer's office and there made inquiries about the sleepers; if he had done this a messenger would have been sent to request witness to prepare the sleepers. There are three manholes in the tunnel. In answer to a juror, witness said that when trains were approaching, the order was to lie in the six-feet way. – By the Coroner: There is three feet clear between the two lines, exclusive of the carriage foot-boards. – Mr Anthony John Bathe, assistant house-surgeon at the Hospital, said when the deceased was brought into the Hospital he was quite dead. On examining the body he found that the spinal column was fractured in the middle of the back, and the neck was also fractured. Several ribs on the right side were broken, and one or two on the left side. Death resulted from the injuries. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased has left behind him a family of twelve children, and the Coroner and Jury expressed a hope that the Company would consider the present case, and do something for the family. Detective Rogers promised to convey the Coroner's remarks to Captain Tyler, who would, no doubt, do all he possibly could for the family.

BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – Coastguard Drowned. - S. Cox, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest last Saturday, at the Rolle Arms Hotel, on the body of THOMAS CUSACK, coastguard, aged thirty-five, who was drowned on the previous Wednesday while ferrying the two guards detailed for duty across the river Otter. It appeared from the evidence that in the attempt to cross the river near the mouth, the tide having turned, the freshet caused by the recent heavy rains took the boat out to sea, all attempts to stop it proving useless. The boat was dashed against the rocks, the deceased having the oars at the time. Russell and Griffin, the two men in the boat with deceased, saved themselves by swimming until help reached them. Deceased could also swim, but it is thought he must have been jammed between the boat and the rocks. His body was found at 1.30 on the following morning nearly covered with beach. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and gave their fees to the widow of the deceased. Through their foreman, they said that high praise was due to W. Bucknill, E. Bucknill and Cooper, who, on hearing cries of distress, crossed at the same place as the coastguards, and with ropes rescued Russell and Griffin just in time. The Coroner said he was very pleased to hear this expression, and hoped it might be brought before the Humane Society.

Wednesday 17 January 1877, Issue 5840 – Gale Document No. Y3200723641 EXMOUTH – Fisherman Drowned. - Mr Spencer M. Cox, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday respecting the death of JOHN NEWMAN, a fisherman, belonging to Topsham, who was drowned off Exmouth by the upsetting of a boat on the evening of the 5th instant. Deceased and a boy named Norton, his nephew, were going out fishing, and in crossing the Mouster Sands a heavy sea struck the boat and threw them both into the water. The boy saved himself by swimming to another boat, but deceased, being unable to swim, was drowned. Verdict "Accidental Death."

BROADCLIST – Fatal Accident To A Blacksmith. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of JOHN WILLS, a blacksmith and shoeing smith, of Broadclist, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the previous Tuesday from kicks received from a horse. It appeared from the evidence that deceased, who is thirty-five years of age, was engaged on Thursday afternoon in shoeing one of Lord Poltimore's carriage horses. He had completed the shoeing, and was holding the animal by the head, when the horse suddenly reared, and came down on him, the fore foot striking and fracturing his skull. At the Hospital he went through a surgical operation, but never recovered consciousness, and gradually sank. Verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased leaves a wife and five children.

Wednesday 31 January 1877, Issue 5842 – Gale Document No. Y3200723711 IVYBRIDGE – Sad Case Of Drowning. - On Wednesday last an Inquest was held before Mr R. R. Rodd, District Coroner, to investigate a very distressing occurrence that took place here on the previous day, and by which MRS SLATER, wife of the principal of the Wesleyan Theological College at Taunton, lost her life. She was on a visit to her father, MR ALLEN, of the Paper Mills, and while walking in the grounds, must have fallen into a rapidly-running leat, which supplies an ornamental pond. On her being missed, search was made, and her body was discovered. She had then, however, been dead several hours. From the evidence of MR EDWIN ALLEN, brother of the deceased, and Mr James Rendle, surgeon, it appeared that deceased was in delicate health, and it is supposed that she must have been seized with a fit, and then fell into the water. This view was borne out by the fact that her hands were not clenched, as is usual in the case of persons who have been drowned while conscious. The Jury, of whom the Rev. G. W. Anstiss was foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and handed over their fees to the funds of the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital. The deepest sympathy is felt for the bereaved husband and family – seven in number.

TEIGNMOUTH – Fatal Boat Accident. - On Friday an Inquest was held at the London Inn, before Mr H. Michelmore, District Coroner, touching the death of GEORGE CHAPMAN, a labourer, who was drowned on Wednesday night. It appeared between eleven and twelve o'clock deceased and a man named Berry had returned to the shore after mooring a barge, when they were induced to put off with two sailors, who wished to go on board their vessel. After pushing off it was found that the sailors were drunk, and the boat had not gone far before one of them fell overboard. CHAPMAN pulled him back into the boat, but in so doing half-filled it with water, and whilst CHAPMAN was engaged in bailing one of the sailors stumbled, and capsized the boat, thereby precipitating the four into the water. CHAPMAN was drowned. Berry caught hold of an oar that was floating past him, one of the sailors saved himself by clinging to the bottom of the boat, and the other caught hold of a rope that was thrown from a ship. The body of CHAPMAN was afterwards recovered and conveyed to his home. The conduct of the two sailors was strongly condemned by the Coroner, who pointed out to them the serious results of their intemperate habits. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the widow, who is left with six children between the ages of fourteen years and three months.

AXMINSTER - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper, at the Topsham Inn, South-street, Exeter, on Wednesday, on the body of JAMES BAILEY, aged forty-four years, a labourer, who died at the Hospital on the previous evening from the effects of injuries received by an accident on the London and South Western Railway. Mr Rogers, inspector, appeared on behalf of the Railway Company. the deceased lived at Rocombe, near Uplyme, Dorset. William Selway said he was a labourer, employed by the London and South Western Railway Company, and n Tuesday he was at work with other men at Broom Ballast-hole, which is situate about three miles from Axminster. They had completed filling twelve trucks with gravel, and the wagons were standing on the siding. The trucks had been set in motion, when BAILEY took hold of the side of one of them with his left hand, having his coat in his right, and endeavoured to jump on. He, however, missed his footing and fell, and the wheels of four trucks passed over him. The deceased was placed in a van, and by the advice of a medical man, was speedily conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Cumming, the house-surgeon at the Hospital, stated that BAILEY was admitted into the House on the previous afternoon. His right thigh, from the hip joint to the knee, was broken, and the flesh was much torn. He seemed also to have received some internal injuries. Deceased underwent the necessary treatment, but he never rallied, and died about five the same afternoon. The cause of death was the injuries received and the shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." It was the impression of several jurymen that it was a long way to bring the deceased. Inspector Rogers, in answer to a question, said the nearest place would have been at the Cottage Hospital, at Yeovil.

Wednesday 21 February 1877, Issue 5845 – Gale Document No. Y3200723796 BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Accident To An Hotel-Keeper. - An Inquest was held at the Golden Fleece Inn on Wednesday, before the Borough Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN PARKIN, landlord of that hostelry, who met with his death by falling from his trap the evening before. Deceased was returning from a sale of stock at Eastdown, near Barnstaple, when the horse he was driving started off, and in turning a corner of the road at a dangerous part, the trap turned over and deceased was thrown out. Being a heavy man he fell with great force, and died immediately, having broken his neck. Verdict: "Accidental death."

Wednesday 28 February 1877, Issue 5846 – Gale Document No. Y3200723829 TIVERTON – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MR HERBERT JOHN SHARLAND, jeweller, whose death had resulted from injuries received on Wednesday night. It appeared that on the day named deceased went on horse-back to Dulverton; and it is supposed that whilst returning late the same night, and when about two miles beyond Bampton, the horse shied and deceased was thrown. He laid in the road until about five o'clock the next morning, when he was discovered by a labourer and assisted to the Exeter Inn. He was subsequently taken home, but lived only about twenty-four hours. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 14 March 1877, Issue 5848 – Gale Document No. Y3200723888 CHERITON FITZPAINE – Fatal Accident. - On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., (City Coroner), on view of the body of JOHN TREE, a waggoner, aged seventy-one, residing at Frogymill, Cheriton Fitzpaine, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the previous day from the effects of injuries received a month ago. Mr William Matthews, farmer, of Colyhill Farm, Crediton, said the deceased was a waggoner in his employ. On the 8th February he sent the deceased with a cart and two horses to draw some earth from the bottom of one of his fields to the top. The deceased left work about five in the afternoon and was proceeding back to the farm with the cart and horses, riding on the shafts. He turned safely out of one field into the road, and was about to enter another field from the road, when the fore horse sharply turned the corner, upsetting the cart, which was empty. the deceased was thrown to the ground, and the cart fell over on his back. Witness got assistance, and extricated the deceased from under the cart, where he was lying on his face and hands, and the cart was resting across his thighs. He was conscious, but so injured that he could not stand, and they removed him as quickly as possible to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Hugh Gordon Cuming, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was received into the Institution on the 8th February, and expired on Friday morning from the combine effects of congestion of the lungs and sores which had resulted from the bruises on his back and hips. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 21 March 1877, Issue 5849 – Gale Document No. Y3200723915 EXETER – Drowned in the Canal. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, before Mr R. R. Crosse, District Coroner, on the body of a man aged sixty-six, known as SAMUEL WOODROW, but whose real name is said to have been WILLIAM WOODER, lately an inmate of the City Workhouse, who was found drowned in the Canal on Thursday morning. Ann Tregale, a married woman residing on the Banks, said she saw deceased on Thursday morning about eight o'clock walking down on the opposite side of the Canal. Noticing something peculiar about him she watched him, and saw him attempt to throw himself into the water, but on seeing witness he went further down the Canal until out of sight. She did not give any information at that time. William Marks, an engine fitter, said that about 11.30 on the morning mentioned he was at work on the Canal, and observed a hat and apron lying on the banks close to the Welcome Inn. On hearing several women say that they thought a man was in the water, he ran to the Gas Works, and having obtained a groper, he, in company with P.C. Vanstone, after some time discovered the body opposite to where the hat and apron were found. The body was conveyed to the inn, but life was extinct. The deceased had a scarf around his neck, and in it were tied two large stones. John Foster, cordwainer, Waterbeer-street, said deceased lodged with him up to his going into the Workhouse. On Tuesday afternoon he came to his house and had a little conversation with him. He appeared not to be in a right state of mind. Mr John Henry Gilbert, boot and shoemaker, 123, Fore-street, said deceased had worked for him about twelve or fourteen years. On Tuesday he came to his shop in search of employment, and was there about half an hour. The man was of a dissatisfied nature, and witness did not think he was accountable for his actions. Mr Farrant, surgeon, St. Thomas, said that he examined the body on Thursday morning and found several abrasions which he thought were caused when deceased got into the water. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 21 March 1877, Issue 5849 – Gale Document No. Y3200723909 EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was opened at the Wellington Inn, King-street, on Monday evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner), on the body of EMILY HOSKINS, aged fifteen, who died very suddenly on Saturday afternoon under circumstances which will be found detailed in the following evidence. WILLIAM CHARLES HOSKINS, baker, Smythen-street, deceased's father, said deceased had always enjoyed good health. On Saturday afternoon about 4.30 deceased was sitting on the hearth-rug looking after her infant brother. The child began to cry, and witness's mother said, "I thought EMILY was sitting there looking after the child." Witness and his wife went towards where the child was, and observed her lying on the floor. Witness asked her what was the matter, and deceased exclaimed, "Oh my legs; I can't get up." Witness lifted her up, and she became very stiff. Deceased afterwards said, "I shall died," and her arms became very rigid. Witness, at deceased's request, put her to bed, and afterwards sent for Mr Roper, but in the meantime Mr Perkins's assistant attended the child, and mustard was applied to the legs. Mr Roper being unable to say what was the cause of death, the Coroner and Jury ordered a post mortem examination to be made, and the Inquest was adjourned.

Wednesday 28 March 1877, Issue 5850 – Gale Document No. Y3200723931 MYSTERIOUS DEATH IN EXETER. SUSPECTED SUICIDE. The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of EMILY HOSKINS, aged fifteen years, daughter of MR HOSKINS, baker, Smythen-street, who died suddenly on the previous Saturday, was resumed on Wednesday at the Wellington Inn, King-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner. The Inquest had been adjourned from the previous Monday to allow of a post mortem examination being made, as Dr Roper, who was called in to see the deceased could give no explanation of the cause of death. Mr Roper now stated that he had been assisted in making the post mortem examination by Mr Harris. He first examined the blood. The blood vessels were very full. The vessels in the brain were fuller than usual, and certain of them not ordinarily visible, could be plainly seen; but there was nothing to account for death. The heart and lungs were quite healthy, as were also the abdominal organs; but the stomach, and a certain portion of the upper intestines were of a much more decided pink colour than they should be. They showed signs of congestion, and probable irritation of the mucous membrane. The stomach was immensely distended with gas, and contained a small quantity of semi-fluid contents. Seeing that this state of the stomach probably pointed to the cause of death, he removed that organ and its contents, placed them in a glass jar, which he tied down and sealed, and subsequently handed over to the Coroner. The appearance of the stomach and upper part of the intestines were certainly not normal, but the large intestine and lower parts of the bowels were in their natural state. The Coroner: Would not some kind of poisons produce this pinkness? A: Oh! yes; no doubt many would. The Coroner: Can you now tell the cause of death? A: I cannot. You see all the organs were healthy. By a Juror: Will any particular kind of poison produce the rigidness spoken of on Monday last? A: Oh, yes. It is essentially a symptom of poisoning by strychnine. Rigidness with sensibility is the symptom of strychnine poisoning, and she was sensible up to the last. Q: If she had taken that kind of poison, would she have lost her senses? A: I should think not. That is one of the characteristics of poisoning by strychnine – the patient is in violent convulsions, and the intellect is unclouded. By the Coroner: MR HOSKINS, did you observe any twitching of the eyelids when your daughter was seized? A: No. I was behind her holding her up. I caught hold of her by the waist. She was very stiff, and held her head back and pushed her legs and arms out several times. I thought it was a fit, and called in a neighbour, who also said it was a fit, which would soon pass off. She was violently convulsed from head to foot. The Coroner asked Mr Roper if he thought the irritation was sufficient to cause death, and the doctor replied that he did not think so, unless there was anything else beyond. He imagined that there was something which very much irritated the stomach in the first place, and that the irritation was so extensive that it went back to the nerves of the spine, then produced violent spasms, and, as a general rule, spasms of that kind fix the muscles of respiration. Mr Bale, assistant to Mr Perkins, surgeon, South-street, stated that on Saturday last, about five o'clock, a messenger came for Mr Perkins to attend EMILY HOSKINS, but as he was ill in bed witness went in his stead. On arriving at the house he saw the deceased in bed, lying on her right side. He noticed that she was in a state of semi-stupor, and her pulse was beating very fast. Her eyelids were twitching, and as the child was so young he thought the case a serious one. Was told that she had had a fit, and he prescribed for her in order to prevent a recurrence of it. He then left, and consulted Mr Perkins, who prescribed a compound which witness made up. The witness here described the contents of the compound, and, in answer to the Coroner, Mr Roper said it was a very good one. the Coroner, by desire of MR HOSKINS, asked witness what his opinion was when he first saw the girl? Mr Bale: I thought it was a very bad case, but I have seen another quite as bad, in which the patient recovered. Jane Woodhouse, servant to MR HOSKINS, was next called, and stated that on Saturday last, EMILY HOSKINS got up just after seven o'clock, had her breakfast, and left the house about twenty minutes after nine o'clock to go to school, but she did not go. The Coroner: How do you know that? A: Because I heard that she was seen in Okehampton-street. She returned about twelve o'clock and she then came upstairs, where witness was at work, and took off her jacket and hat. Deceased told witness that she went for a penny prize packet of sweets at Mr Foote's, Fore-street, for another girl. They had not a penny one, so she bought a twopenny one. In the packet was some sweets and a brooch. The latter was given to her by the girl for fetching it, and she also had a few of the sweets. The deceased then offered the brooch to witness, who took it. She then left to go and play with the children, and witness did not see her again until dinner time, when deceased and herself had dinner together. Deceased ate one potato, a little boiled-beef, and afterwards drank a drop of cold water. She did not see her again until four o'clock. Witness was then in the bakehouse, when the deceased came in with the baby, and took up some sugar from a bag. Deceased had a cup in her hand, and went to the tap with it. Witness said "What a lot of sugar you have got" to which deceased replied, "Well, it's only two ounces," and with this she put it into her cup and poured some water on it. By a Juryman: Were you aware that anything was in the cup before she put in the sugar? A: I did not see the cup before. Deceased then went upstairs to the flour loft, which is just over the bakehouse. As she was going upstairs witness said "EMILY are you going to play with the children?" She answered "Yes." Immediately afterwards the children who were over the loft came down to where the deceased was, and witness went up the stairs from the bakehouse. Deceased was sitting in the loft on some weights, beside the scales. Witness went down again, and then heard one of the children ask the deceased what she had in the cup. She replied "water." One of them asked her for a drink of it, but deceased said, "If you want to drink, go down stairs after it yourself; I can drink this myself." The deceased, a few minutes afterwards, came down into the bakehouse, went to the tap, and rinsed out the cup two or three times. She then took a little water and drank it, after which she went to the closet. She told witness that she had been there before, and wanted to go again. This was all she said, and witness did not see her again until about half-past four, when she was taken ill. By the Jury: Did she drink from the cup in the bakehouse? A: No; she took it upstairs to the loft. Q: Did you see her put anything in the cup besides the water and sugar, or did any one else do so? A: No. Q: Can you tell why she put the sugar in the cup? A: She often took water and sugar. Q: Was she comfortable at home with her parents? A: Yes, very comfortable. I never heard her say an angry word to them, or they to her. Her parents treated her very kindly. Q: Was she blamed for not going to school? A: No. MR HOSKINS did not know it then. She always had a great dislike in going to school, because she said her lessons were so hard to learn. She often said she wished she had never to go at all. John Small, a journeyman baker, in the employ of MR HOSKINS, said that morning he went to the flour loft with his master to fetch some flour for the next day's use, when he observed his master looking about near the scales. MR HOSKINS was called downstairs and witness wondered what he had been looking for. This induced him to look around the scales, where he found a piece of paper, on which was the word "poison," in red letters. The deceased, he believed, had always lived happily with her parents, but she did not like going to school. By the Jury: How was the paper when you found it? A: It was crumpled up. By Mr Roper: Are you in the habit of laying poison for rats or mice? A: I never knew of any being placed in the loft, but I believe master had some a short time ago. In reply to the Coroner, Inspector Denning said he had made enquiries at several druggists' shops, but he could get no information about any having been sold. There were several to which he had not been. The Coroner said the evidence was before the Jury, but the case still seemed a very mysterious one. It was involved in great mystery, for here was this girl living at home with her parents, happily and comfortably as far as they knew, when suddenly she became rigid, in a way that evidently led them to the conclusion that it was the effect of poison. The evidence of Mr Roper pointed to poison of some kind, but what or by whom administered there was no evidence to show. It was most probable that the poison was strychnine, and Mr Roper said that was the most likely poison to produce effects of that kind. It was for the Jury to say if the matter should be carried further, and an analysis made, though he did not see how that would help them, except that perhaps a little delay might throw more light on the matter. MR HOSKINS left the room whilst his servants were under examination, now returned and asked if any of the Jury wished to ask him any further questions. A Juryman: What made you MR HOSKINS look around the place where your daughter had sat. A: I did so on account of what I had been told. I did not like to say to the people in the house what I was looking for, and when I was called downstairs it was to speak to Mr Denning. Whilst I was doing so the servant came down, and said, "Oh, master, John has found the paper." I said, "Is it a sweet paper," and she replied, "No sir, it says poison on it." A Juryman: Have you ever had any poison in your house. MR HOSKINS replied that two months or six weeks ago he sent his servant for a penny packet of Muricidane to poison mice, which his servant signed for, but it was not all used. It was not in the paper produced, but of a different sort. His daughter was present when the poison was brought in, and she said, "Father, suppose any of the children should get hold of it." He said, "Oh, they will die like a mouse," and she said you must take care of it. A portion of that powder was used, and the remained was in his desk at the present time. In answer to a Juryman witness said the label on the poison he bought was similar to the one on the paper found by Small. It was suggested that it should be sent for, which was done, when the label was found to be of a different colour. MR HOSKINS added that he had seen the mistress of the school his daughter attended, and was informed that she had not been at school more than seven or eight mornings since Christmas, her excuse being that she had to stay at home to nurse the baby. The Coroner said the matter came to this – Were they satisfied that deceased died from the effects of poison, and were they of opinion that she administered it herself. He did not know what further evidence they could have except an analysis. A Juryman thought there could be no doubt the child died from poison. The Coroner said the Jury must bear in mind that if they said the deceased took the poison herself, that would amount to a verdict of suicide. According to law, after fourteen a child reached the age of discretion, and was responsible. If they said the deceased took this poison, they must say whether, if at the time she committed the act, she intended to destroy life. A Juryman: Before I should be satisfied of that, I should like to know where she got the poison. Another Juryman: I should like to be satisfied that it was poison. The Coroner: Then you must have an analysis. Mr Roper said if it was found that deceased died of poison, the question would be where did it come from. After some discussion, it was decided to have an analysis, and the Inquest was adjourned until Saturday March 31st.

Wednesday 4 April 1877, Issue 5851 – Gale Document No. Y3200723960 EXETER – The Recent Death From Poisoning In Exeter. On Saturday at the Wellington Inn, Smythen-street, H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, resumed the adjourned Enquiry into the circumstances connected with the death of EMILY HOSKINS, fifteen years of age, daughter of a baker of Smythen-street. The adjournment had been made to allow of the contents of the stomach to be analysed. Sergeant Denning deposed that he took the stomach and its contents to the Western Counties Laboratory, Bristol, for analysis. since then he had made Inquiry at all the chemists shops in Exeter and St. Thomas to find out if deceased had purchased poison at any of them, but without effect. Mr W. W. Stoddart, member of the Pharmaceutical Society, deposed that he resided at Bristol, and had had a great deal of experience as an analytical chemist. On the 22nd ult. he received from the last witness a sealed jar containing the stomach and its contents to analyse. He found the same very much congested, and the principal vessels distended with black blood. The contents were in a state of active fermentation, and he found in one part a small quantity of a nearly black ,powder. It was not disseminated through the food, but was confined to one particular past. He examined a portion of the food for mineral poison, but found no traces of any. He then took another portion for the detection of vegetable poisons by the ordinary "stas" process, and obtained a solution which contained strychnine. The solution was very bitter, and he had no hesitation in saying that strychnine was present. The solution obtained in this manner contained one-eighth of a grain of pure strychnine. The whole contents of the stomach must have contained about one grain, which was sufficient to destroy life twice or three times over. In answer to the Coroner, witness said the most common preparation of strychnine was in vermin poisons. In some compounds it was coloured black, and in others mixed with Prussian blue. The powder in the stomach was not quite black. By the order of the Coroner some rat poison which MR HOSKINS had in his house at the time deceased died was sent for, and Mr Stoddart examined it, but said it was not at all like what he found in the stomach. Mr Roper asked the witness, through the Coroner, whether he found any sugar in the stomach? Mr Stoddard said he did not test for sugar as he had not sufficient time. MR HOSKINS in reply to questions put by the Coroner, said that deceased was his child by a former marriage, and that her mother, when she died, let her three cottages and a small plot of garden ground situated at Moretonhampstead. This property, however, only brought in about £6 or £7 a year. Deceased was entitled to this sum, but witness received it and applied it to her education. His first wife died intestate, and deceased took the property, being the eldest child. The Coroner: then what becomes of it now upon her death? Witness: I have not inquired; I didn't think it right to do so while this Inquiry was pending – in fact, I never thought I should have to inquire about it at all. Mr Stoddart being appealed to be the Coroner as to the law regarding the sale of poisons said, that although the law was most stringent on this point, it did not affect vermin poisons, and they in general contained strychnine, which was one of those poisons for which there was no antidote. Miss Kate Dunning, proprietress of a ladies' school, Bartholomew-yard, where the deceased attended, stated that deceased seemed very happy when at school, but often absented herself, giving as a reason that she was required at home. There was nothing peculiar in her conduct that witness discerned, and she never heard her complain of being overtaxes. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said that he had thought from the first, and still thought, the case was involved in some considerable degree of mystery. He could see no apparent motive for deceased's strange conduct, nor could he see in what form the strychnine was administered. As to where or how she obtained it there was no evidence to show, although every effort had been made to find out. The dislike of going to school seemed to be the only motive which could be assigned for her having poisoned herself, but one could hardly fancy that a sufficient reason, especially as she appeared to live happy and comfortable at home. Whether the poison was administered wilfully or accidentally was a question for their serious consideration. He had called MR HOSKINS, on account of the rumours about the property, and he should have been much better pleased if he could have told them what would become of it. Still he could see no imputation resting on MR HOSKINS. After about five minutes' deliberation the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died through poisoning by strychnine, but how administered, or in what shape it was taken, there was no evidence to show. The Coroner expressed his entire concurrence in the verdict, and asked Mr Gill (the foreman) whether the Jury were unanimous? The Foreman replied in the affirmative, adding that the Jury entirely exonerated MR HOSKINS and his wife or any of the members of the family from blame. Another Juryman said he thought this unfortunate affair shewed the necessity of teachers requiring a written notice from the parents whenever a child was absent from school. The Coroner: It only shows how parents may be imposed upon.

Wednesday 4 April 1877, Issue 5851 – Gale Document No. Y3200723983 MORETONHAMPSTEAD – Fatal Accident. - Mr Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest on Saturday last at Steward Farm in this parish on the body of MR JOHN ENGLAND, an old and respected townsman, who was found drowned on Friday last in the leat at One Mill. The deceased was one of the old school of glee singers well known in this town, and was in his eightieth year. Latterly he had been acting as kind of farm bailiff to W W. Carus-Wilson, Esq. of Hayne, who was much attached to him and strongly sympathizes with the widow in her sad bereavement. Deceased came to town on Thursday last on business, and left again for his house about three o'clock, when it is supposed, according to his wanted custom, he sat down to rest on the bridge and must have fallen over, as his watch was stopped at twenty minutes past three. Great excitement was caused throughout the parish when it became known at a late hour that the hold man had not arrived home, and some kind-hearted friends scoured the immediate neighbourhood all over, but nothing was seen of him till eleven o'clock the next day, when he was found lying dead in the leat at One Mill. Several witnesses were called, who gave evidence as to seeing the deceased on the afternoon in question, and also as to finding the body, and the Coroner having made a few remarks, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally drowned."

Wednesday 18 April 1877, Issue 5853 – Gale Document No. Y3200724034 EXETER – Drown in the Exe. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Royal Oak Inn, St. Thomas, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM PYKE, aged forty-seven, a thatcher by trade, who had been missing from home for some time, and whose body was discovered in the river Exe on the previous day. John Connibeer, landlord of the Buller's Arms, Exwick, stated that on Friday, 19th March, deceased was at his house, drinking with a man named William Woodgates. Other men were with him. Deceased had been at the inn for about three or four hours, and left about 9.30 in the evening. He drank only cider. No quarrelling took place during the whole of the time the men were at his house, and the deceased appeared to be on good terms with everyone. When he left he was neither drunk nor sober. Witness did not know him at that time. He had no reason to suspect that the deceased had been the victim of foul play. William Woodgates, a gardener, of Alphington-street, St. Thomas, and James Lee, miller, of Exwick, who were drinking at the inn with the deceased, deposed that when PYKE left the inn he seemed perfectly sober. Thomas Reed, a lumper, said that while walking through the Exwick-fields, on the previous evening, he saw the body of a man in the river Exe, hanging to a bush. He communicated with P.C. Vanstone, and the body was taken out of the water, and conveyed to the deceased's house. P.C. Vanstone proved searching the body. In one of the deceased's pockets he found 7s. 11 ¼d., a watch, keys, and a knife. The watch had stopped at twenty-six minutes to eleven. Mr Farrant, who examined the deceased, said the body was in such a state of advanced decomposition, that he could not state the cause of death. JOSEPH PYKE, brother of the deceased, stated that his brother enjoyed good health, and he never knew him have a fit. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased met with his death by drowning; but how or by what means he came into the water, there was no evidence to prove.

EXETER – Killed In A Saw Mill. - A youth named FOGWILL, met with his death in a very shocking manner yesterday morning, at Messrs. Sharp's steam saw mills, Shillhay. He had only been taken on that morning to assist three men who were working a large circular table saw. While they were cutting short lengths it was necessary for him to stand upon the bench, and, in stooping to remove a piece of wood, his foot slipped and he fell on to the saw. In a moment his right leg was cut off just below the knee, his arm and head being also cut very severely. The unfortunate lad was picked up by Mr Lee, foreman of the works, and died in his arms almost immediately. Mr Farrant, surgeon, was at once sent for but could be of no service, and P.C. Vanstone, who was also called in, had the body removed to the Plymouth Inn, Alphington-street, to await an Inquest. No blame appears to attach to anyone, and the boy received the usual caution before being put to work. Deceased, who was between fourteen and fifteen years of age, was the son of a railway ganger, employed on the Great Western Railway. It may be imagined that after this terrible mishap the men had no heart for their work, and the mills were stopped for the rest of the day.

Wednesday 25 April 1877, Issue 5854 – Gale Document No. Y3200724068 SHOCKING DETH IN A SAW-MILL - An Inquest on the body of the unfortunate boy, FOGWILL, who met with his death in a very distressing manner, as reported last week, was held on Wednesday at the Plymouth Inn, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner. In opening the Inquiry, the Coroner said the duty devolving upon the Jury was to ascertain whether there had been any culpable act or omission on the part of the owners of the mill or on the part of any persons employed under them. But from information he had received, he thought the Jury would find that that was not the case, and he hoped and trusted that the evidence would shew that the death was purely accidental. He had a copy of the Act of Parliament before him, and it stated that all dangerous machinery should be securely guarded by being fenced off. He understood there was no fencing to this circular saw, but it was also stated that it was almost impossible to fence the saw. John Lee, foreman of Messrs. Sharp and Co's Saw Mills, at St. Thomas, deposed that he was present on Tuesday at the mills. The deceased was working there, he having been employed for the first time that day. Witness engaged the boy, and on enquiring his age, found he was over fourteen. He began to work at nine o'clock in the morning, and was placed at the saw to work with William Tarr, the head sawyer. His work was to remove the pieces of timber as they were sawn off from the bulk, and for that purpose he had at times to stand on the iron table on which the timber was moved to the saw. This was the first accident that had occurred at the mills for twenty-six years. The revolving saw was not fenced in, as it would be impossible to do so without preventing the progress of the work. The boy had nailed boots on, but was requested to bring a pair without nails when he came back from his dinner. The nailed boots made him liable to slip on the iron table on which he had to stand. When witness heard there had been an accident he had the saw stopped. He went to the spot and took the deceased up. The lad was lying on his face and hands, horribly mutilated, and breathed only two or three times. His death was purely an accident and blame could be attributed to no one. He had visited the saw mills at Plymouth Dockyard, and mills at Bristol, Liverpool, London, and other places, and he had never seen a circular saw fenced. The Coroner remarked that he could not find that saw mills were mentioned in the Act which required revolving machinery to be guarded. William Tarr, head sawyer at the mills, said the deceased was placed in his charge on Tuesday at nine o'clock. Before commencing, witness instructed the deceased in his work, and cautioned him to keep as far as possible away from the saw. It was a dangerous position to stand on the iron table. Witness observed that the deceased had nailed boots on, and told him to change them when he went to dinner. At the time of the accident witness was not working the saw, but was standing close to it. The deceased was standing on the iron bed. Witness heard a crash, and looking round saw the deceased entangled in the saw. Witness believed the deceased slipped. There was no larking, or joking, or playing going on. No one was near to touch the deceased, and nothing to distract his attention. At the time of the accident the deceased was doing nothing, although the saw was cutting firewood, but he was not wanted to touch that kind of work. Henry Tarr, who was cutting the firewood, was called, but he did not see how the accident happened. Mr Mark Farrant, surgeon, said he arrived at the saw mills about ten or fifteen minutes after the accident. He saw the deceased lying on the saw-table by the side of the saw and life was extinct. The right leg was severed from the body just above the knee, and was lying on the ground about ten feet in front of him. Both arms were terribly mutilated by being jagged and torn, and the left arm was almost severed. There was a wound across the face almost dividing the head, so that death must have been instantaneous. The foot of the severed limb was almost sawn through. The deceased might have breathed once or twice, but all sensation must have ceased on the infliction of the first wound. The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". They acquitted the firm and those at work with the deceased of any culpable or criminal neglect, but they wished to state that in their opinion the deceased should not have been employed on so dangerous work so soon after his engagement, and that in future it should be so arranged that the boys do not stand on the iron bench. The Jury considered that the nailed boots should have been taken off before the boy was allowed to stand on the bench.

Wednesday 25 April 1877, Issue 5854 – Gale Document No. Y3200724068 SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the George and Dragon Inn, Blackboy-road, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of MRS FANNY BLOMFIELD, wife of MR CHARLES BLOMFIELD, wholesale stationer, living at No. 7, Salutary-place. Before the Jury were empanelled, Dr Shapter said he should, with the Coroner's consent, wish to make a statement. Mr Hooper said he might be permitted to do so. Dr Shapter said it was his impression that there was no occasion to hold this Inquest. The deceased had been under his care since 1862, and she suffered from angina pectoris. From his knowledge of her, and of the circumstances of her death, he had given a certificate that she had died from disease of the heart; therefore he thought the present Inquiry was not necessary. The Coroner said he could not allow Dr Shapter to make such remarks. If he yielded to the opinion of Dr Shapter he should not be worthy to fill the office he did, and should vacate it in favour of the doctor. He believed the case was one that demanded Inquiry, and he had therefore summoned the Jury. Dr Shapter again expressed a strong opinion of the inutility of the present Inquiry, and stated that he should lay the whole facts before the Secretary of state. Mr Greenhill (one of the Jury) submitted that Dr Shapter had no locus standi; and that gentleman then left the room. After Dr Shapter's departure, the Coroner said it was not his desire to hold one unnecessary Inquest, but he could not permit Dr Shapter or any other person to dictate to him. He had been called on by a very near relative of the deceased, and a man of position, with a request that an Inquest should be held. The death, as he understood, was very sudden, and a policeman was called on. After he had ordered the issue of the warrant for holding the Inquest, Dr Shapter wrote him saying that he did not think an Inquest necessary; but he hoped the Jury, after hearing the evidence, would think he was quite justified in deciding to hold one. MR CHARLES BLOMFIELD was then called, and stated that the deceased was his wife. She had not been under medical care for eighteen months, and was last attended by Dr Shapter. The last time she was out was on Friday week, when she took a cold. On Tuesday his wife was much better, and had her meals as usual. Witness returned from business about eight o'clock. He and his wife retired to bed about ten o'clock, having previously partaken of some corn flour. About quarter past three he was awakened by his wife's moaning. He jumped out of bed and lifted her up. Two or three minutes later he felt that her pulse had ceased to beat. He immediately sent his servant for a medical man, and a policeman, who was called in, also ran for a doctor. Mr Perkins, junr., soon afterwards arrived and pronounced life to be extinct. His wife had been suffering from an affection of the heart for about thirty years. Mary Lyons, domestic servant in the house of the last witness, stated that on the afternoon of the day before her death, deceased came into the kitchen and said, "I have a little pain in my heart," at the same time placing her hand to her side. Witness said, "Tell master," and deceased said "He would have a doctor; I shall be better in the morning." She did not take anything. For her tea she had some bread and butter, some tea, and lamb. Deceased also partook of corn flour for supper. She seemed quite well at about ten o'clock. Dr Shapter, who consented to give evidence, stated that he had known deceased many years, and he had no hesitation in ascribing her death to angina pectoris, or spasm of the heart. In this opinion Mr Alfred Perkins concurred. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural causes." They also fully concurred with the Coroner as to the necessity for holding the Inquest.

Wednesday 9 May 1877, Issue 5856 – Gale Document No. Y3200724146 NEWTON – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, Chudleigh Knighton, a few miles from Newton, on Saturday afternoon, before Dr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL LEAWORTHY, who met with his death on the previous Thursday, whilst working in a clay-pit. The evidence shewed that on Thursday afternoon the deceased was engaged in driving away a quantity of earth in a wheel-barrow across an old pit which was partly filled up, and which was from 15 to 20 feet deep and 23 feet wide. A single plank was firmly laid across this pit, and it was on this plank that the deceased drove his barrow. He had been emptying his barrow nearly at the end of the plank, when he was seen by a fellow-workman, whilst still standing on the plank, to lift his barrow up to clear the wheel. Whilst in the act of doing this, the barrow twisted round and knocked him sideways into the pit; the barrow fell also, but not on the deceased. He fell on his chest upon one of the wooden stays. He was seen to slightly raise himself after he fell, but he did not speak, and when he was taken up he was dead. He was forty-five years old, strong, and sober. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BRADNINCH – Fatal Accident. - MR EDWIN LONG, a gentleman about seventy years of age, residing at Bradninch, was picked up senseless on the Great Western Line, near Hele Station, on Saturday. Some passengers by the down train saw a body lying by the line, and communicated it to the stationmaster at Hele, who at once despatched some men to the spot, where deceased was found, having received severe injuries about the head. It is supposed that MR LONG was walking by the side of the lien to reach a private road leading to Bradninch, and was knocked down by the up express from Exeter at 12.50. An Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Crosse, at the Bradninch Arms on Monday, but there was no evidence to account for the deceased's being on the line, and after a searching investigation the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner remarking that no blame could be attributed to anyone.

Wednesday 9 May 1877, Issue 5856 – Gale Document No. Y3200724143 EXETER – An Inquest was held on Monday on the body of JOHN LEAMAN, of Colebrooke, who was found in the mill leat at the back of the City Brewery stables the previous day. The deceased had been missing since Saturday, the 28th April, when he attended the wrestling matches in St. Thomas. After leaving the wrestling field he visited several public houses, and was last seen in the Bonhay-road going towards the St. David's station. As there was no evidence to show how the deceased got into the water, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Wednesday 16 May 1877, Issue 5857 – Gale Document No. BA3200724179 NORTHMOLTON – Death From Hydrophobia. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, by J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of DANIEL YELLAND, a gamekeeper to Lord Poltimore, whose death resulted from hydrophobia. It appeared that in January last, whilst walking with his wife, deceased was bitten in the hand by a dog. Little notice was taken of it, and under the care of a surgeon the wound was soon healed. Subsequently he complained of pains all over his body, and about a fortnight since he ceased work, and continued to get worse until Tuesday last, when he died. Medical evidence having been given of the dreadful effects of the disease, the Jury returned the following verdict: - "Died from the effects of bits, received in the month of January last, from a certain dog, in the parish of Northmolton, thereby producing hydrophobia; and the Jury recommended the authorities to use their utmost endeavour, with a view of preventing a spread of hydrophobia; and also that a lie recommendation be forward to the Rural Sanitary Authority of the Union of Southmolton."

Wednesday 23 May 1877, Issue 5858 – Gale Document No. Y3200724198 EXETER – The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Red Lion Inn, St. Sidwell's, on Thursday, on the body of MARY LEE, aged 86, who died suddenly the same morning. Deceased had for some years past resided with her daughter in St. Sidwell's, and on Wednesday night retired to bed in her usual health, but about three o'clock on Thursday morning her granddaughter was awoke by hearing her vomiting, and she shortly after died. Mr A. S. Perkins, who was immediately called, attributed death to the rupture of a blood vessel in the stomach, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Wednesday 23 May 1877, Issue 5858 – Gale Document No. Y3200724210 NEWTON ST. CYRES - MR RICHARD CRUMP, a much-respected farmer and dairyman of Hill Farm, Newton St. Cyres, was accidentally killed by being thrown from his cart on Friday. Deceased has for a long period visited Exeter twice a day with milk, and whilst returning from one of these visits to the city the accident happened which resulted in his death. It appears that the cart was being driven by a man servant named Burnett, who, on trying to clear a timber waggon that stood in the road, turned the cart into a deep rut, and MR CRUMP was pitched out on his head. Burnett immediately went to his assistance, and the body was removed to an adjacent house, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held at Hill Farm on Monday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TIVERTON – Fatal Boat Accident. - A sad accident, by which two young men lost their lives, occurred on the river Exe at Tiverton on Tuesday. It appears that five young men – J. T. COLLARD, ARTHUR COLLARD, J. C. WILLIAMS, ERNEST WRIGHT and WILLIAM TAYLOR – went for a row about eight o'clock in the evening, and after some time one of the party lost an oar, and his endeavours to secure it caused the boat to capsize in deep water. Williams, being a good swimmer, succeeded in saving himself, and rescuing Wright and ARTHUR COLLARD, but JOSEPH COLLARD and TAYLOR were drowned. The bodies of both were speedily recovered, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held at the Town Hall on Thursday, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, when John C. Williams stated that on Tuesday evening he was on the Exe, on one of Mr Carwood's boats, in company with Ernest Wright, WILLIAM TAYLOR, JOSEPH T. COLLARD, and ARTHUR COLLARD. They were all sober, and no drink was on board. The two COLLARDS had been fly-fishing, and at the time of the accident they were on their way home. When near Chorle, JOSEPH COLLARD, who was rowing, let one of the oars fall; he reached after it, in doing which he leaned over the side of the boat, letting in some water. They all then leaned over the other side in order to right the boat, but let in more water that side also. They all leaned over the opposite side again, and JOSEPH COLLARD put his foot to the edge of the boat and jumped into the water in doing which he upset it, all of them being thrown into the river. When witness rose to the surface he struck out for the bank, and found some one clinging to his shoulders. He swam towards the shore and went about half-way to it. The same person (he did not know which of the party) caught him round the neck; that pulled him under the water again, and he thought he sank a dozen times. The hold was eventually released, and witness swam to the bank, took off his coat and waistcoat and afterwards swam to the assistance of ARTHUR COLLARD, whom with the assistance of Arthur Wright (another of the party), he saved. He saw nothing of either of the deceased from the time the boat capsized until the bodies were recovered. Up to the time of the accident, the boat had not been taking in water. They were not rocking the boat. If the deceased JOSEPH COLLARD had not jumped overboard, he believed the boat would have been righted. After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Wednesday 30 May 1877, Issue5859 – Gale Document No. Y3200724242 WALKHAMPTON - Murder and Suicide By a Farmer. - On Sunday evening the dead body of JOHN GILES, a farmer, 53 years of age, occupier of the Park Town Farm, near Walkhampton, was found in the river Walkham, and to his body was tied that of his son, six years of age, the only child of GILES'S first wife. The bodies were discovered through the agency of a sheep dog, which returned home without his master on Sunday, about seven in the evening, and after being fed, showed such symptoms of restlessness that MRS GILES followed the animal and was led to a bank called Hitoms, near the house, where she found the hats of her husband and stepson. Assistance was called, and on a further search being made, the dead bodies of GILES and his boy were found in the river near the bank before mentioned. No cause can be assigned for the crime. There had been no quarrel on the Sunday between GILES and his wife, but it appeared that he returned home from Horrabridge market on Saturday night a good deal the worse for liquor. On Monday an Inquest was held on the bodies before Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner. Nellie Halling, servant at the farm, stated that on Sunday morning her master had his breakfast as usual, and appeared in good spirits. He went out to walk and returned about ten o'clock for his son, who, having breakfasted, went out with his father, a sheep-dog following them. She thought that they went to look after the cattle as was their usual custom. They generally returned about one o'clock, but they did not return on Sunday. Witness never heard any quarrel taking place between her master and his wife. Joseph Mortimer, residing at Well Town, near Walkhampton, stated that about eight o'clock on Sunday evening he went to the Hitoms, by the river Walkham, and found the bodies in the water, about three feet from the bank. With assistance, witness took the bodies out. they were dressed with the exception of their hats. The little boy was tied to his father by a piece of rope, which passed round their waists. Both bodies were covered with water, the boy was underneath. His head was on his father's left shoulder, and there were appearances of a struggle having taken place. ELIZABETH GILES, wife of the deceased, said her husband appeared in good spirits on Sunday. On Saturday he had had a little to drink. There had been no quarrel between them, and she could not account for the deceased getting into the water with the boy any way. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but that there was no evidence to show as to how the deceased came into the water."

Wednesday 30 May 1877, Issue5859 – Gale Document No. Y3200724244 MODBURY – Fatal Fall Down Stairs. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, respecting the sad and sudden death of MR J. WALKE, a tradesman who lived in Church-street. He was found in the morning lying at the foot of the stairs of his house with his neck broken. In going up to bed the previous night he must have fallen backwards. Strange to say, his fall was not heard, nor was he missed, by any one in the house.

HOLSWORTHY – Suspicious Death Of A Woman. - Mr Fulford, Coroner, held an Inquest at the White Hart Hotel, Holsworthy, on the body of ELIZABETH DUFF, a waitress at the hotel, who had died under suspicious circumstances. John Sargent, superintendent of police, identified the body. He had known deceased for six weeks as waitress at the White Hart. Last saw her on Sunday, the 20th instant, at two p.m., leave the town alone, carrying a carpet bag, in the direction of Bude. Saw the body on Monday at Piper's Cottage. Witness was told she had vomited, and he took away the vomit. Thomas Burnard deposed to deceased living with him since Lady-day last. On Saturday night she was in her usual health, which was good. Did not know of her going out on Sunday; she asked permission of the barmaid. Emma Day, barmaid, said that deceased told her on Sunday that she was going out, and left about 1.30 o'clock. Witness had heard her complain of her heart, and of not being able to carry heavy weights. Laura Grace Nicholls, chambermaid, said she knew ELIZABETH DUFF, and occupied the same bed with her. Had heard her complain of heart palpitations, but did not hear her complain on Sunday. She went to Bude on Sunday afternoon, and appeared in her usual health. She was in the habit of writing and receiving letters frequently; on one occasion last week witness posted a letter for her addressed to W. Cann, Camelford. George Braund Piper, road contractor, living at Higgaton, on the Bude-road, said that on Sunday afternoon a gentleman came to his house with the deceased about 5.30. They asked to have a cup of tea. She opened a bag and took out a pint bottle nearly full, from which she filled up his glass, and took some herself. Witness had some too. She said it was port. They remained about an hour, appeared very comfortable, and left about six. Witness noticed nothing particular in their conversation. They walked away towards Holsworthy. After he had gone to bed he heard a knocking at the door. He saw it was the same gentleman. Deceased was holding by the gate, and groaning. Witness went down at once, and he said: "This young woman has been taken very ill since we left." Witness said: "Where have you been?" He said: "We have been up the road for a walk, and she 'took bad,' poor thing; she has been lying up in the ditch for two or three hours." He wished he could get a trap to take her to Hoslworthy. The gentleman, whose name was Cann, said he had seen several persons on the road, and asked them to lend him a trap. He had to carry her much of the way to the house. Witness could not get a trap, but said they were welcome to remain, and see if she got better. She walked in great pain. Deceased said: "Let me right down on the floor." She lay down on some things by the fire, and remained in the same condition, and witness suggested that a medical man should be called without delay. Cann said: "By all means; will you go?" Witness asked Cann to go with him. He went, and she appeared to be easier when witness returned, but died about a quarter of an hour afterwards. Mr Cann appeared to be most anxious and kind to her. He remained about two hours after she died; he left his name and address, but gave no direction as to how witness was to act. His address was: William Cann, Free Inn, Stratton. Matilda Piper corroborated her husband's statement. Dr Ash said on Monday he was called at three a.m. by Piper and Cann, and hearing their description of the case sent some remedy. At four o'clock precisely Piper came again alone. She was not better, and he wished witness to see her at once, which he did. He found deceased in bed. She was cold, pulseless, and breathing with much difficulty, in fact dying. He told Mrs Piper that she was past remedy or hope, and he did not think she had an hour to live unless she rallied. He told Mr Cann that she was dying; nothing could be done for her. He said: "You don't say so." I asked him where they had been. He said: "Out for a walk, and she was taken suddenly ill in the road. This was about six p.m." Witness asked him: £"Can you offer me any explanation upon the altered condition she appeared to be in since leaving the cottage?" He said he could not. He thought it was spasms, as she had had spasms before. A bucket was produced which was said to contain the vomit which came from the stomach. Witness placed it in a bottle. He went upstairs and examined the woman, and said to her: "Can you account for this illness in any way? Have you taken anything to produce these symptoms?" She said: "No, I cannot." Witness said: "Have you suffered from these attacks before?" and she replied: "Yes, many times." He told her she was dying; she made no reply. He had since made a post-mortem examination. There were signs indicative of previous pregnancy. The general appearances of the stomach were not consistent with those of health. There were no marks of violence to show that instruments had been used. The uterus contained a foetus about five months old. It measured twelve inches, and weighed eighteen ounces; a healthy female child. The Enquiry was adjourned for the contents of the stomach to be analysed by Dr Wynter Blyth, the county analyst.

Wednesday 6 June 1877, Issue 5860 – Gale Document No. Y3200724275 AXMINSTER – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, at the valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of JAMES CLOUD, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Saturday morning, from injuries received on the 10th of March last. GEORGE CLOUD deposed that he was a mason, and resided at Axminster. The deceased, his son, was seventeen years of age, and also resided at Axminster; and was also a mason by trade. Deceased was working, on the day in question, at Mr Boon's warehouse "landing in" stone. Whilst standing on the scaffold, 35 feet from the ground, his foot slipped, and he fell off on to the ground, breaking his left thigh. On the Monday following, he was brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr H. G. Cummings, house surgeon at the Hospital, said the man's left thigh was broken, and he was also suffering from severe paralysis, pointing to injury in the upper part of the spine. He gradually wasted away, and died on the 2nd instant. The cause of death was injury to the spine, resulting in paralysis. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was given.

ASHBURTON – Suicide By A Farmer. - On Thursday last Mr H. Michelmore, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Westabrook on the body of MR WILLIAM KINGWILL, a farmer of that place, who had committed suicide on the previous day by hanging himself in a cowhouse on his farm. It appeared that deceased, who was forty-eight years of age and in comfortable circumstances, had been in a low, depressed state for two years, and the Jury found a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

THE HOLSWORTHY POISONING CASE. - The Inquiry respecting the death of ELIZABETH DUFF was resumed at the White Hart Hotel, Holsworthy, on Wednesday, before R. Fulford, Esq., County Coroner. the proceedings excited a great deal of interest, and the hotel was thronged throughout the sitting of the Coroner's Court. Mr Rowe, of Stratton, watched the case on behalf of Mr Cann, of Camelford. The depositions already taken were read over by the Coroner, and George Piper Braund corrected his statement that the bottle was empty on the return of deceased and Cann to his house. It contained nearly as much as before they left. He and Cann drank what remained. Sergeant Stone deposed to carrying the bottles to Dr Blyth on May 24th. On searching deceased's box he found fourteen letters (produced), a packet of some powder, and a bundle of herbs. Dr Winter Blyth, County Analyst, Barnstaple, said he received on the 24th of May, from Sergeant Stone, three bottles labelled1, 4, 5, all containing vomit. No 2 labelled "contents of stomach," a jar containing a stomach, and two powders. The lining membrane of the gullet was red and inflamed. At the end of the stomach, nearest the gullet, there was an irregular patch about the size of the palm of the hand, much inflamed and discoloured, and several other smaller patches of inflammation in other parts of the stomach. These appearances could be only explained by the action of some acrid or irritating substance. There was no known disease which would produce them. The vomits contained in bottles 1 and 4 were identical, of a green colour and peculiar odour, slightly acid. Vomit No. 5 was of a reddish colour. The contents of the stomach were greenish, not unlike the vomit. The powder consisted of sulphate of iron. He carefully examined various fluids, but could detect no mineral poison. The greenish substance he found, by the microscope and chemical tests, to be savin, a poisonous shrub which has been used for the purpose of exciting abortion. He also found fragments of other leaves, which he had not yet indentified. From the post-mortem appearances, from his own analyses, and from the depositions he had heard, he formed the opinion that the deceased died from poisoning by savin. By the Coroner: From the appearances after death in the gullet, it was certain that the poison acted immediately, or almost so. In this case, probably, it was given in the form of a tea. Dr Ash, recalled, stated that the appearance of the stomach was much as would have been produced by an acid substance like savin, and could not be caused by any natural disease that he knew of. From the condition of the back of the throat and gullet, he considered that the poison acted immediately. It was probably taken in a decoction, judging from the olive green colour of the vomit. Savin was frequently used by certain classes for the purpose of exciting abortion; but he had never known it to succeed, except by shock through the maternal system. Dr E. T. Pearse, who assisted at the post-mortem examination with Dr Ash, confirmed this evidence. Gilbert Sanders, of Killatree, deposed to seeing deceased and Cann about seven on Sunday evening in the road between Pyworthy and Bridgerule. They both appeared to be perfectly well at the time. The bag ,produced (deceased's) was very much like the one witness saw the gentleman carrying. The bag, at the request of Mr Rowe, was put in as evidence and identified as the one taken to Braund's house by deceased. Mrs Braun identified it. Mary Bowden saw them about eight o'clock, the woman lying in a gateway, groaning and coughing, the man by her side with jacket off. Witness asked if there was anything the matter. Cann said, "Yes; she is taken very unwell." Deceased declined to speak to witness, thinking she would be better in a few minutes. Cann said she was taken very suddenly in her stomach, and had been sick. They had further conversation. He wanted a trap, to take deceased to Holsworthy. Thomas Petherick saw deceased at 9.30 p.m. in the same road lying in the ditch. No one was with her. He asked, "What's the matter?" She replied, "I am very ill." Asked her name, and she said, "I can't talk to you;" but added that she lived about three miles away, and that they were gone after the horse and trap. Witness remained with her until Cann came. Cann said, "My darling, I'll do anything for you." He tried to lift her up, and assisted her towards Holsworthy. He saw them into the cottage. He knew both Cann and deceased. Cann had asked his father to lend him a horse and trap. He would not tell his name, but offered to pay. The distance from where he first saw the woman to the cottage, half a mile, took them half an hour to walk. Mr Rowe elicited that this witness's father and uncle were on the Jury and could give material evidence. The Coroner declined to examine them, and strongly censured those who summoned the Jury. After an adjournment for luncheon, the Coroner drew attention to the fact that Cann and deceased met not by chance on Sunday, but by appointment. Mr Burnard, in his evidence, stated that the deceased was absent for two nights about a month ago, but he could not tell where she was. Margaret Penwarden deposed to the deceased asking her where she could go to with her "chap," who was coming up from Stratton. Witness told her to an inn, but she preferred going to witness's house. She remained there all one Sunday. In the forenoon she sent witness to the Stanhope Arms to see if she could find Cann; she found him, and asked him if he was not the person the waitress was waiting for. They remained at her house all day together. She provided meals for them, and hired a bed at Routley's for them; but deceased stayed in witness's house all that night with Cann. On Monday she went to the White Hart to work, leaving Cann and deceased in her house. On her return about six found them still there. Deceased complained of being ill; was sick, groaning, and complained of feeling so much swollen that she could not undo her things; she appeared in agony. Deceased sent witness to Mr Mill for tincture of rhubarb, and after taking a dose she seemed to get better. They remained up a great part of the night with her. She vomited on Tuesday before she left more than once. Cann left at eight o'clock with her, and witness saw no more of them. Cann paid witness nine shillings for accommodation. Deceased drank something out of a bottle before she became worse on the Monday. Did not know she was in the family way. At this stage the letters were produced; but the Coroner declined to read them, as on a future occasion they might be more strictly legal evidence. There was, he said, enough evidence at present to satisfy his Inquiry. Cann, after being warned by the Coroner, and having consulted his solicitor, tendered himself for examination, but his evidence in no way materially differed from that of former witnesses. He said he had given the deceased nothing to bring on illness. The Coroner then summed up the evidence, and stated the law. An act done without the primary intention of killing, but which was felonious and resulted in the death of a person, was held by the law to be an act of murder. The Jury retired for a few minutes, and on their return, the foreman said they were agreed to a verdict of "Wilful Murder against William Cann." The Coroner then formally committed the prisoner to take his trial. A warrant was issued and Cann surrendered.

Wednesday 6 June 1877, Issue 5860 – Gale Document No. Y3200724263 EXETER – Fatal Accident At St. David's Station. – An Inquest was held at the Red Cow Inn, St. David's, on Saturday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of THOMAS SANSOM, aged 61, of North-bridge, who met his death the previous day at St. David's Station. The deceased had been in the employ of Messrs. Wall, railway carriers, and on Friday was standing in a waggon when he leant over the tail-board to unfasten it. the latter suddenly gave way, and precipitated the deceased to the ground. He came down on his head and dislocated his neck. He was picked up insensible, and died in about twenty minutes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 13 June 1877, Issue 5861 – Gale Document No. Y3200724309 NEWTON ST. CYRES. - An Inquest was held here on Monday, before Mr Crosse, District Coroner, touching the death of MR JOHN DAWE, of Newton St. Cyres, an old man between seventy and eighty years of age, clerk to the School Board, and assistant over-seer for the parish in which he lived. MRS SUSAN DAWE, the widow, stated that for some time past her husband had been in a desponding state of mind, and this was especially noticeable within the last fortnight. He had lately done more writing than had been his custom. On Friday he complained of being poorly in his head, and went to Exeter to procure some medicine at Mr Stone's, chemist. The bottle was produced at the Inquest, and was marked "chloral." Witness in the night gave him a teaspoonful of the mixture in some water. The next morning he rose as usual, and partook of his breakfast. He then went out, and was absent about a quarter of an hour, when witness heard a noise proceeding from the loft which adjoins the house. Upon proceeding there she discovered her husband hanging to a halter which was around his neck, and suspended from a beam. He was partly lying upon a heap of straw, which seemed to shew that the deceased first stood upon the straw, and when the halter was round his neck pushed himself off. When witness saw her husband in this position she took a knife from his pocket and cut the rope. She then fetched her daughter and a woman named Sarah Payne, who both gave evidence as to seeing the deceased in the loft dead. Mrs Payne could say nothing about the deceased's state of mind, but the daughter stated that she considered her father unaccountable for his actions. Other evidence was then adduced by several persons, who stated that the deceased had of late been very reserved. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." Only a few days before deceased was foreman of the Jury which enquired into the cause of the death of Mr James Wotton, assistant overseer and Clerk to the School Board at Cheriton Fitzpaine, an old man who had committed suicide under very similar circumstances.

Wednesday 20 June 1877, Issue 5862 – Gale Document No. Y3200724344 TEIGNMOUTH – Shocking Death Of a Little Boy. - Mr H. Michelmore, District Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday evening, touching the death of ERNEST WILLS, aged three years, son of MR F. WILLS, butcher. On May 24th the deceased was placed on a pony, to which he was strapped, and sent for a ride in charge of a boy named Causley. The animal became restive, and knocked he attendant down, and started off with the child suspended to the stirrup by his foot, and with his head hanging down. Whilst the pony was jumping over some pieces of timer, the head of the child came in contact with them, and the scalp was entirely removed, and the skull severely bruised. Mr Lake attended the sufferer, but little hope was entertained of his recovery from the first, and he died on Tuesday morning. Verdict: "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY – Sad End Of A Young Woman. - Mr H. Michelmore, District Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday evening respecting the death of ELIZABETH POWLESLAND, servant, eighteen years of age, whose body was picked up on the seashore on Sunday afternoon. When found the body was lying in about four feet of water some fifteen yards from the sea wall near Cumper's Hotel. A woman's boot, velvet tie, and a hat were found near the spot later in the day. These facts having been spoken to by Thomas Ascott, P.C. Trott, and a fisherman named Skinner, the following evidence was taken. P.S. Board stated that as soon as the body was found he sent for Mr Marsh, surgeon. On searching the body witness found a pocket handkerchief, a book, and a photograph of a young man. [The book was "A brief sketch of Mrs Hannah More."] JOHN POWLESLAND, father of the deceased, a milkman, of Barton, near Torquay, said deceased was eighteen years of age, and had been in the service of Mrs Lear, St. Marychurch, for about two years. He had not seen the deceased since the 9th instant, and Mrs Lear had said to witness that she did not know where deceased had gone since she left her service. Deceased had always been very steady, and he knew nothing of her having kept company with a young man. Mrs Lear, wife of Mr W. H. Lear, ironmonger, of St. Marychurch, with whom deceased had been living as general servant, said that the deceased left her service on Sunday morning, the 10th instant, at about six o'clock. She was under notice to leave on the following Tuesday, having, on one occasion, gone out and left the children alone, and not returning till after eleven o'clock at night. Deceased had lately been in the habit of going out a good deal. She went to bed on Saturday apparently in her usual spirits. Deceased was of a cheerful disposition and did not appear to be at all likely to commit suicide. William Worden, Upton, Torquay, stated that the deceased came to his house on the night of Friday, the 15th instant, and said that she had been with her grandmother in Exeter, but had now got a place at Mr Slade's, grocer, Torquay, where she was going on the following Wednesday. Deceased, who was very well known to witness, was given some supper and a night's lodging, as she said she had missed the late train to Exeter. During supper deceased took the photograph (which had been produced) from her pocket, saying it was that of her young man, who lived in Torquay, as a coachman and was named John Dart. She left witness's house on Saturday morning, and the last time he saw her was on Saturday night, in Fleet-street, at about nine o'clock, when she appeared to avoid him. Mrs Godfrey, of Temperance-street, said that deceased and a man named Tregaskis slept at her house on the night of Monday, the 11th instant, the man saying that deceased was his wife. Deceased had never been in her house before nor since. This testimony was corroborated by Robert Tregaskis. Mr E. A. Marsh, surgeon, stated that he, as assistant-surgeon at the Torbay Infirmary, made a post mortem examination of the body, and he had no doubt that the cause of death was drowning. John Nias, labourer, stated that he went to Upton with deceased at about half-past ten on Saturday night to a house in which deceased said her aunt lived. He had seen deceased only two nights – Friday and Saturday. On Friday night he gave deceased his photograph (the one produced.) When he left deceased, at half-past ten on Saturday night, she appeared to be in good spirits. He did not give her the name of John Dart, but told her his proper name. She gave her name as Ellen Beer. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned." The woman Godfrey and the men Nias and Tregaskis were called forward by the Coroner and received a severe reprimand for their conduct in connection with the deceased. The Coroner also called attention to the fact that during the Inquiry great inconvenience had been caused by the Local Board not having allowed the mortuary to be constructed, so that post mortem examinations might be conducted in it.

Wednesday 4 July 1877, Issue 5864 – Gale Document No. Y3200724395 EXETER – Inquests. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Poltimore Inn, St. Sidwell's, yesterday afternoon, respecting the death of JOHN BOYCE, aged seventy-five, a pensioner of No 7, Park place, Longbrook-street. The deceased was found dead in a water closet and Mr W. H. Budd, surgeon, was of opinion the deceased died from an attack of apoplexy. A verdict accordingly was returned.

An Inquiry into the cause of the death of MARY ABEL, aged seventy who resided in Summerland-street, was held at the Windsor Castle Inn on Monday. Some time ago deceased had an attack of paralysis, from which she only partially recovered and on Saturday afternoon, after complaining of pain lay on a bed where she was soon after found dead. Mr Bankart, surgeon, thought the deceased died from natural causes, probably apoplexy. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 11 July 1877, Issue 5865 – Gale Document No. Y3200724444 HONITON – Accidentally Drowned. - Mr Deputy-Coroner Fox held an Inquest here last Friday on the body of JAMES CHARD, aged forty-four years, tailor, who was found dead in a ditch in Turk's Head-lane on Tuesday. It appeared from the evidence that on Tuesday morning when deceased left home he was unwell and on the afternoon of the same day he was found lying in a pool of water in Turk's Head-lane. When found he appeared to be washing his face, but on examination he was found to be dead. The deceased's coat, waistcoat, and hat were off, and his shirt-sleeves were turned up. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Drowning.

Wednesday 1 August 1877, Issue 5868 – Gale Document No. Y3200724526 EXETER – Drowned Whilst Bathing. - At Salmon Pool on Monday, R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest upon the body of WILLIAM SAUNDERS, who was drowned in the Exe, at Salmon Pool, on Sunday, under circumstances which are detailed in the following evidence. Samuel Clarke, labourer, said on the previous morning, the deceased, himself, and another young man took a walk in the fields near Salmon Pool, where they bathed. The deceased, who was in advance of the others, suddenly slipped his foot, but he recovered himself, and called to his companions to be careful and not to go too fast. Not long after making this remark the witness and the other lad observed the deceased, who had got nearer to mid-stream, struggling for life in a deep pool. Deceased could swim a few strokes only, and he could do very little better, but he went to the poor fellow's assistance and succeeded in taking hold of his hand, but he was unable to support him and being gradually dragged under had to free himself from the grasp of deceased, who sank. After considerable delay drags were procured by some men who had come up when called. They unsuccessfully searched for the body, and some men tried to recover it by diving. About three o'clock in the afternoon two men, named Harris and William Rowe, dived, and succeeded in bringing the body to land. William Clynick, who was with Clarke and SAUNDERS at the time, confirmed the evidence given by the last witness, and William Rowe proved the recovery of the body. In summing up the Coroner commented upon the fact that no drags were kept at Salmon Pool, they having, in case of necessity, to be fetched from so great a distance as St. Thomas. They might, observed the Coroner, have been of little use in the present instance, but in cases of future accidents in that locality they might be found of the greatest utility. The Jury, who concurred in these remarks, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr Baker, plumber, of South-street, in whose employ the deceased had been, suggested that the Coroner might direct that a notice board should be fixed, warning persons of the risk they were running in bathing in the locality. The Coroner said that from representations that had been made to him he understood that there was no necessity for bathing in that part, a proper bathing place being provided in Exeter. One of the Jurymen said this was so, but numbers of boys would bathe in the river near Salmon Pool on Sundays, to the annoyance of a great many living or passing near. The Coroner said he would certainly make the recommendation suggested by Mr Baker, and would advise the proprietor of Salmon Pool to procure drags as soon as possible.

Wednesday 8 August 1877, Issue 5869 – Gale Document No. Y3200724568 BROADCLYST - Fatal Accident. - On Friday, at the Railway Inn, R. R. Cross, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest on the remains of the unfortunate man, JOHN REDWOOD, a ganger in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, who was run over by a goods' train at Broadclyst station on Thursday morning. John Rowe, the driver of the train, deposed that on approaching the station, he saw the deceased standing in the four-foot way, immediately in front of the train. All efforts to pull up, or to warn him of his danger by sounding the whistle, proved ineffectual, and he was run over. Witness considered that deceased was standing in the down four-foot way to allow the seven a.m. up-train from Exeter to pass, forgetting that the down goods' train from Yeovil was due to pass at the same time. Witness informed the stationmaster of what had occurred. Alfred Cann, the fireman, corroborated. Mrs Upcott, gate-keeper at the level-crossing, just above the station, and close to the spot where the accident happened, proved seeing the engine of the goods train strike the deceased, who, she said, was literally cut to pieces, his body being sent flying in all directions. Deceased had been in conversation with her not five minutes before the fatal occurrence, and she shared the opinion of the last witness that he was endeavouring to get out of the way of the up-train, and so got in the way of the down. Mr Webb, the stationmaster, spoke as to sending men to collect the scattered remains of the deceased, which, he said, presented a ghastly spectacle. The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased met his death in a purely accidental manner. Deceased, who had been in the company's service ever since the line was opened in 1860, and who took part in its construction, was spoken of as an honest and steady man. He leaves a widow with a family of six young children totally unprovided for. Mr Webb, stationmaster, Broadclyst, and Mr Rendle, permanent inspector, Queen-street, said they would gladly receive subscriptions on behalf of the bereaved family.

Wednesday 22 August 1877, Issue 5871 – Gale Document No. Y3200724633 EXETER – An Inquest was held on Friday evening at the Topsham Inn, South-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., (City Coroner), touching the death of RICHARD BAKER, aged sixty-five, a carter, employed at Mr Vicary's factory, Northtawton. On the 18th June the deceased was driving a horse and cart, which contained a bag of wool weighing 360 pounds, from Chagford to North Tawton. He was accompanied by his daughter SARAH BAKER. About 4.30 in the afternoon they were descending a hill near Lew Down, the deceased riding on the cart, and his daughter walking behind. Going down the hill the horse suddenly shied, one of the wheels went into the hedge and the cart overturned. The deceased was thrown out, and the cart and the bag of wool fell on him. His daughter pulled him out as well as she could, and afterwards a man came along and assisted her. The deceased was put into the cart and driven to his home, where he was attended by Dr Budd. The doctor ordered his removal to the Hospital, and he was received at the Devon and Exeter Hospital the same night. Mr T. Wilson Caird, one of the surgeons of the Hospital who attended in the absence of the house surgeon, said the man when admitted was suffering from a compound fracture of both bones of the left leg. Consultations were held on his case, and he progressed favourably for the first month, but afterwards, symptoms of stomach disease appeared, and he died at the Hospital on Thursday morning. Mr Caird said he assisted to make a post mortem examination of the body at the Coroner's request, and he gave the cause of death as chronic-ulceration of the stomach going on to perforation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 22 August 1877, Issue 5871 – Gale Document No. Y3200724634 OTTERY ST. MARY – MR JAMES CHURCHILL, aged sixty-nine, bailiff to the Honiton County Court for a great number of years, died suddenly on Wednesday evening last. An Inquest was held on the body, when it appeared, from medical testimony, that deceased died from heart disease; although he seemed to be in his apparent health up to the time of his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 29 August 1877, Issue 5872 – Gale Document No. Y3200724649 EXETER – Fatal Blasting Accident. - W. H. Hooper, Esq., the City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn last Monday evening on the body of WILLIAM KING, aged thirty-three, who died at the Exeter Hospital on Saturday from the effects of an accident. Deceased, who lived at Knowle, Braunton, had been in the employment of Mr Shephard, and on the 15th August was engaged at the Exminster Asylum, driving an adit to form a connection between one well and another. The seven men engaged were about 117 feet below the surface, and the distance between the two wells was 250 feet. At about half-past five in the morning, deceased and a fellow-worker, named John Winser, were in the adit. Blasting had to be resorted to in order to get through the red rock, and while deceased was engaged in charging the blast-hole with about two pounds and a-half of rock powder, an explosion took place. Both the men were knocked down, but Winser, being the hindermost, escaped with little injury, while deceased was fearfully cut, but managed, with assistance to climb up the ladder to the surface. From the evidence of Winser it appeared that the explosion was caused by the deceased persisting in the use of an iron crow bar instead of the wooden mop stick provided for the purpose. After Mr Davis, of the Asylum, had seen deceased, he was conveyed to the Hospital. According to the evidence of Mr Anthony John Bathe, acting house surgeon at the Hospital, deceased's face and the upper part of his chest and left thigh and leg were burnt and lacerated. His eyes were full of powder and his right wrist shattered very much, one of the bones being laid bare for an inch and a-half, and the wound black from the burning of the gunpowder. A consultation was held on the case, and it was considered unadvisable for any operation to be performed on the shattered arm. Deceased progressed favourably until Friday morning, when he commenced to sink, and died at midnight on Saturday from tetanus arising from the injuries. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," expressing their opinion, in which the Coroner concurred, that Winser was entirely exonerated from blame.

Wednesday 5 September 1877, Issue 5873 – Gale Document No. Y3200724700 MISERABLE DEATH OF A DROVER. - An Inquest on the body of a cattle drover named JOHN HOOKWAY, aged about 57, of Newton St. Cyres, but who had eked out a miserable existence in the city for a number of years, was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, Exeter, on Thursday evening, by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.). The deceased was found on Wednesday morning by the police lying across the footpath in Tiverton-road, drunk and incapable. He was taken to the police station on a stretcher and dealt with by the police in the usual way. HOOKWAY not reviving as was expected some hours after, Mr Phelps, surgeon, was sent for, who, with Mr C. Bell, treated him very carefully, but, failing to revive him. Mr Phelps consulted with the Magistrates who were then sitting, and deceased was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died a few hours after his arrival. Additional interest was given to the Enquiry by rumours that the police were to blame in their treatment of HOOKWAY. P.C. George Sullock was sworn and stated how and where he found HOOKWAY and that they obtained the stretcher from the Guildhall because he would not allow two officers to carry him in their arms nor would he walk. On the road to the station he swore very much and endeavoured to get off the stretcher. A half-pint cup, a box of matches, an old nail, and a piece of rope were found on him. P.C. Perriam stated that about twelve o'clock, on Tuesday night, he saw HOOKWAY knocking at the door of the Duke of York Inn, St. Sidwell-street. Witness walked across the road to see what he wanted, and deceased then "rambled" away up the footpath. When he got a short distance up he fell from the footpath to the street. Witness then went towards him, and deceased called out, "All right, master; I'll be up again in a minute. I've knocked myself hard, almost senseless." He got up shortly after, and rambled off. Inspector Wreford, who was in charge of the station on Tuesday night, stated that about half-past three deceased was placed in a cell. About twenty minutes to six he visited the prisoner, and found him lying on his left side on the cell-bed. Witness called out "HOOKWAY" to him two or three times, and also shook him. He did not answer, and witness then thought there was something wrong more than drink. Leaving P.C. James Sullock in the cell, witness went into the station-house, where he found Inspector Short had come on day duty. They both went into the cell again, and, finding the prisoner in the same state, sent for a doctor. P.C. Sullock, who was reserve at the station on Tuesday night, stated that he visited the deceased and the other prisoners continually, and then described how he found HOOKWAY on each occasion. Mr F. Phelps, surgeon, then gave evidence. About six o'clock on Wednesday morning he visited the deceased. There was a smell of drink from him, which he thought was rum. From what witness heard and the appearance of the man he was sure he was drunk, and he concluded, from his weak appearance, that a small quantity of drink would have a great effect upon him. He treated him, and remained with him until nearly nine o'clock, when he went to breakfast. On returning he found his directions had been carried out, and had hopes of a change for the better. At 11.30, however, he got worse, and was then removed to the hospital. Mr Phelps having previously apprised the house-surgeon of the case. Mr Phelps gave it as a theory that when deceased was received at the Guildhall he was purely drunk, that effusion of the brain gradually took place, and that the heavy fall in St. Sidwell-street ruptured one of the small arteries in the brain. No power on earth could have saved him. Mr A. J. Bathe, acting house-surgeon of the Hospital, then gave the results of a post mortem examination he had made of the deceased. He considered the cause of death was compression of deceased's brain by an abnormal amount of serous fluid, and by a clot of blood in the lateral sinus, which arose from congestion. The death was a natural one. The Coroner summed up at great length, and expressed an opinion that the police had done their duty in every respect. The Jury, by thirteen to one, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed their unanimous opinion that the police had done their duty and given their evidence in a most satisfactory and straightforward manner. Inspector Symes, who appeared to watch the case on behalf of the police, thanked the Jury for this expression.

Wednesday 12 September 1877, Issue 5874 – Gale Document No. Y3200724734 BROADCLYST – Accident In The Harvest Field. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, Exeter, on the body of W. ABBOT, a waggoner, sixty-eight years of age, lately in the employ of Mr Gould, of Newhall, Broadclyst. It appeared that on Tuesday last, the 4th instant, the deceased was employed in cutting corn, and as he was passing out of the field gate with his waggon the horse took fright and started off. Another labourer named Gillard went up to see what had happened, and found the deceased lying in the road senseless. He at once procured assistance and deceased was conveyed home, where he was examined by Mr Sommers, surgeon, who stated that his thigh was broken. The same evening deceased was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The medical evidence was to the effect that the injury to the thigh, combined with the shock to the system, was the cause of death, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 12 September 1877, Issue 5874 – Gale Document No. Y3200724731 EXETER – Suicide By a Lunatic. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday at the Exonia Spirit Vaults, South-street, touching the death of ARTHUR HENRY FURZE, aged twenty-three, son of MRS FURZE, a widow, carrying on business in the same street. It appeared from the evidence of the mother and sister of the deceased, that he was an architect by profession, and had served his articles with Mr Ashworth, of Dix's Fields. Symptoms of insanity, which were attributed to over study, made their appearance about three years ago, and in the course of a few months he was sent to Wonford Asylum, where he remained, with the exception of short intervals, until a day or two before his death. About six weeks since he escaped from the institution, and at the end of fourteen days, during which time nothing was heard of him, he was discovered at Otterton, near Budleigh Salterton, and was taken back to the Asylum. A day or two after this MRS FURZE visited the deceased at the Asylum. He then appeared to be much more reasonable, and wished to go home. Dr Lyle, the medical superintendent, consented to his returning home for short periods two or three times. His mother expressed a wish to have her son home altogether, but Dr Lyle did not seem to think he was quite as well as he had been. Eventually, and with some reluctance, Dr Lyle consented to allow him to be removed, on her promising to take all responsibility. Deceased returned home on Saturday last. On Sunday morning he went for a walk alone. In the afternoon he obtained from his mother the key of the shop, and subsequently went into the cellar. He was called two or three times, and promised to come up, but did not do so. At tea-time his sister went down into the cellar to look for him, and found that he had hanged himself to a beam. Mr Davey, a neighbour, was called in. He cut the body down, and found that to all appearance life was extinct. Dr Lyle, the medical superintendent at Wonford House, stated that deceased suffered from melancholia with delusions. On the 1st August last he was confined in a walled garden, when, with the assistance of another patient, he scaled the wall and escaped. After a lapse of thirteen days he was brought back by a police-constable, who stated that he had found him by a hedge near the village of Otterton. When brought back he was quite exhausted, but was able to give an account of what he had done on every day since his departure. He also stated that he thought he should have returned if he had not been brought back. On the day following his return MRS FURZE came to the institution, and requested that the deceased might be allowed to go home with her. Witness at first opposed this, telling MRS FURZE that she had better wait He, however, consented to his going home for an afternoon occasionally. This the deceased did; but he was never allowed to leave or remain away without being under care. At the end of a month, MRS FURZE again expressed a wish to have her son home, and on her consenting to take all responsibility he was allowed to go. Before he left witness told MRS FURZE that the deceased had not been as well for a day or two previously. Deceased had a suicidal tendency, and MRS FURZE was made acquainted with this. He had once before attempted to take his life in a manner similar to that which had proved fatal to him on Sunday. – A Juror: Could you have kept the young man there against his mother's wish? - Witness: If he was violent the law would provide for his custody. He could be kept under confinement upon the signatures of two medical gentlemen. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of unsound mind. They expressed an opinion that no blame attached to either Dr Lyle or the Asylum authorities.

Wednesday 12 September 1877, Issue 5874 – Gale Document No. Y3200724722 EXETER – H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest, on Thursday evening, at the Blue Boy Inn, West Quarter, on the body of REUBEN SELLICK, a cattle-drover, thirty-two years of age, who dropped down dead whilst driving some cattle that afternoon. Mr A. C. Roberts, surgeon, who was passing t the time of the occurrence, gave it as his opinion that death resulted from natural causes – probably heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Wednesday 19 September 1877, Issue 5875 – Gale Document No. Y3200724762 FATAL DISASTER AT THE EXETER QUAY. CAPSIZING OF A VESSEL. - A large number of persons assembled on the Exeter Quay on Saturday afternoon to witness some rowing matches and other sports, which had been organised by a committee in the neighbourhood for the purpose of affording an afternoon's amusement to those who delight in aquatic sports. As is usual on such occasions a vessel lying alongside the Quay was engaged for the purposes of the committee, and the public were allowed to go on board to obtain a better view of the sports at a charge of 3d. per head. The only vessel at the higher part of the Quay on this occasion was the Aquila, of Goole, commanded by Captain Wilson, which had just finished unloading a cargo of coal, and therefore lay very high in the water, with no ballast to steady the heavy "deck cargo" that was subsequently taken aboard. As some precaution against the occurrence of any mishap, and in order to keep the ship in a perpendicular position, a rope was attached from a ring on the Quay to the upper portion of one of the masts, in addition to a chain hooked on to the rigging, as well as two hawsers run out from the deck. The vessel was also kept at a distance from the shore, to prevent persons entering except by the plank, and therefore all on board had to pass the money-taker, and pay the fee. About five o'clock, when the deck of the vessel was crowded with men, women, and children, much amusement was afforded by several attempts to walk a greasy pole – placed in a horizontal position from the deck of the ship – at the end of which was suspended a leg of mutton. One man made the attempt to reach it, but fell into the water, and a second had just slipped off, but caught the pole with his arms and legs, causing a rush to that side of the vessel to see the result. Just at that moment the rope fastened to the mast snapped, throwing a great strain on to the chain, and causing the hook which attached it to the rigging to straighten out and slip from the rigging. The spectators were immediately after horrified at seeing the ship gently capsizing outwards towards the stream. The shouts of the spectators, mingled with the screams and cries of those on board, rendered the scene one of intense excitement for a few seconds; but just as the bulwarks had reached the river's edge, and the water pouring over the deck, the downward movement was suddenly arrested – supposed to have been by the keel turning up against the side of the Quay – and the spectators were relieved from witnessing what at that moment seemed to be a frightful disaster. The sudden check gave an opportunity to those on the banks of assisting in bringing the ship back to its original position, and scores of willing hands at once seized the hawsers and were successful in righting the vessel, which but a little time before had been hauled close to the Quay. Notwithstanding this it was seen that about forty persons – men, women, and children – had been precipitated into the water, and for a few moments a scene of the wildest confusion took place. Luckily a large number of boats were in the neighbourhood of the disaster, and as soon as their occupants recovered their self-possession efforts were made to rescue the struggling crowd from their perilous position, and one after another they were hauled on board the boats. Many were the narrow escapes that took place in the few minutes that ensued, and shouts f encouragement were raised as the boatmen succeeded in rescuing those who had apparently but little chance of being saved; the marvel is how so many unable to swim were able to keep themselves afloat for the time necessary for their recovery, as among the number were many women and children – children of tender years, whose parents were either struggling for life in the water or had been unable to prevent their little charges from slipping from their positions on the deck. Many of the persons thrown out succeeded in laying hold of the bulwarks of the ship – among them a young woman, who pluckily stuck to her holding – and were drawn up from the water as the ship was righted, and were at once taken over the side by those on board. Too much praise cannot be bestowed on those who jumped in to the assistance of the boatmen, particularly the men who had been walking the pole, and who were good swimmers, for to their promptitude may be attributed the rescue of a number of the sufferers. Many of those who were fortunate enough to escape being thrown into the river were in great peril, for they were heaped up against the bulwarks, with the water pouring over them, and were unable to extricate themselves for some time. The number of bats and bonnets floating about led to the belief that many had been drowned, and the drags kept by the Council at the ferry boat house were at once brought into requisition, and within a very short time a little boy named CHARLES YARDLEY was picked up. Efforts were immediately made to restore animation, and a surgeon was sent for; but they were of no avail, as the little fellow had been in the water about twenty minutes. It is believed that this was the only death resulting from the catastrophe, as no one has been reported missing, and the river was dragged for some hours after the occurrence. The police, under Inspector Wreford and Sergeant Meardon, did good service during the excitement which prevailed, and took charge of the hook which gave way and the broken rope. THE INQUEST – On Monday afternoon an Inquest was held on the body of CHARLES HENRY YARDLEY, at the Fireman's Arms, in the West Quarter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner. JAMES YARDLEY, plasterer, of West-street, said deceased was his son and lived at home with him. He was eight years of age. On Saturday afternoon he was with the deceased on board the Aquila, looking on at some sports which were being held opposite the Quay. He had two other children with him on board, but he did not pay for them or himself. At one time there were, he thought, a hundred people on board. He saw that the vessel was secured by a large chain with a hook at the mast. He put his children in the bow where he thought they would be safe, and then went on to the hatchway. A greasy pole was stuck out from the side of the ship with a leg of mutton on the end. The people went to one side to see what was going on and the vessel heeled over. A lot of people fell over into the water, and then the vessel was righted again. As soon as he cleared himself he went to look for his children. He found the youngest in a boat having been picked out of the water. The eldest boy was also in the boat, and he said "where's CHARLEY." They looked for him on board but he was not there. He then went home, and not finding him he ran back to the Quay. By that time the child had been taken out of the water, and Dr Perkins was trying to restore animation. With the doctor's sanction he had the body removed home. To a Juror: Did not consider the vessel was over-crowded. James Mortimer, of Rack-street, shoemaker, said a young man named Clarke, secretary for the sports, engaged him a day or two before to take money on Saturday and see him pay the expenses. He went down to the Quay on Saturday afternoon, and Clarke placed him on board a ship called the Aquila to take money. The Aquila was moored alongside the Quay. Clarke gave him a lot of tickets for admission to the vessel on payment of 3d., and children were passed on board for a penny or anything they had. He took about 25s. or 26s., which he passed over the Clarke. The ship was secured by a chain and two ropes. The chain was made fast to a ring on the Quay and at the other end to the upper part of the vessel. There was also a rope on the mast made fast to a ring on the Quay. A leg of mutton was hung out of the water on the end of a greasy pole. Between five and six o'clock the people on board all went to one side of the vessel, which caused something to give way. The ship then went over on its side, and between forty and fifty people were thrown into the water. He found that it was the chain had given way, and he believed it gave way in consequence of the strain caused by the people going to one side. To a Juror: Heard no one on the Quay say that the vessel was not sufficiently well moored. The vessel had no ballast in her. He did not think there was more than 100 people on board. John Clarke, ship's carpenter, living on Friar's-hill, said, William Roleson and himself got up some rowing matches which took place off the Quay on Saturday. They obtained permission from Captain Wilson to use the Aquila, for the purposes of the committee, and they were to pay 10s. 6d. for the privilege. He received about 25s. for admissions to the vessel. He gave no instructions for securing the vessel. The sailors promised that should be done. He believed it was made secure. There was a chain on the mainmast, and a rope from the foremast. A sudden rush of people on board to one side, and of others on to the vessel from the quay, to see a man walk the greasy pole, caused something to give way, the vessel heeled over, and a good many people were thrown into the water. To a Juror: He considered that the vessel was safely moored, or he should not have gone aboard. John Bailey, carpenter in the employ of the Exeter Town Council, said he was on the Haven Bank side of the river when the accident occurred. He procured a boat and, with two others, went to render what assistance he could with a book. He afterwards examined the moorings f the vessel, and found the broken piece of rope through the ring to which the vessel had been fastened. He took charge of the rope, and by direction of Inspector Wreford cut off the broken end from the rope on the vessel. Both these pieces he produced. The hook, produced by Inspector Wreford, was brought down from the top of the mainmast by one of the sailors. It was strained nearly straight. It was a 9.16 chain. William Giles, quay labourer, spoke to finding the body. It was about the centre of the river, and he pulled it up with the grapnels. Witness complained that the grapnels were too heavy; they sunk so much into the mud that two men could hardly drag them. Bailey said they were made in accordance with the instructions of the Royal Humane Society. Witness believed the body might have been recovered five minutes earlier if the grapnels had not been so heavy. Bailey suggested that a single grapnel would be much more serviceable in cases of emergency. The Coroner said the grapnels belonged to the Council and he promised to make some enquiries about the matter. Mr Perkins, surgeon, of South-street, said he was called to the Quay on Saturday evening between five and six o'clock, and found some persons trying to restore animation in the body of the deceased. On examination he was of opinion the child had been in the water a quarter of an hour, but he made use of all the usual means then available, for the resuscitation of the body. All these efforts failing he sanctioned the boy's father removing the body home. Death resulted from suffocation though being too long in the water. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said he thought it a matter of great rejoicing there had not been more loss of life in this unfortunate accident. The point for the Jury to consider, was whether a fair and reasonable amount of precaution had been used. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their unanimous opinion that every precaution had been used to render the vessel safe. The Coroner said he entirely agreed with the verdict, and had no doubt that it was the sudden strain which caused the fastenings to give way.

Wednesday 26 September 1877, Issue 5876 – Gale Document No. Y3200724792 TEIGNMOUTH – On Wednesday an Inquest was held at the Old Quay Inn, Teignmouth, before Dr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, on the body of JACOB HURRELL, coastguardsman, of Dawlish, who was missed on the morning of Sunday September 9, and whose body was picked up off Teignmouth bar on Tuesday. It appeared from the evidence that on the evening of the 8th September deceased went out on duty at five minutes past midnight, his beat being from Dawlish to Warren Point. He had a meeting at the Warren Point at 1.45 a.m., and a service letter in his possession to deliver. Deceased met George Brown, chief-boatman of Exmouth station, and delivered the letter, after which he left Warren Point, and was seen by Brown coming towards home, but he never appeared at Dawlish, where he was due at 5.15 a.m. on the Monday morning. It was thought deceased must have returned by the beach and been over-taken by the tide. Deceased was a sober, steady, attentive man, and had been in the service seventeen years. The deceased's watch had stopped at twenty minutes to four. The Jury returned an open verdict, to the effect that the deceased was found in the sea off Teignmouth bar, but by what means he became drowned there was no evidence to show.

Wednesday 26 September 1877, Issue 5876 – Gale Document No. Y3200724784 EXETER – Inquests. - Mr Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Custom House Inn, on Friday evening, respecting the death of SEFTON WILSON, aged 19, a seaman. Deceased was the son of the mate of the Aquila (the vessel from which a number of persons were thrown into the water on Saturday week), and the two were in company on Sunday afternoon (the 16th) and parted on Northernhay. On Sunday evening he was seen at the Jolly Sailor Inn, very drunk, and eventually was helped on board the Aquila by Elizabeth Denby. No one on board, however, saw him, but in the morning a hat was found lying on the deck. On Friday the river was dragged and the deceased's body was found. 5s. 4d., and other small articles were found on him, and he was free from marks of violence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

A second Inquest was held by the Coroner at the Poltimore Inn, on the same day, to investigate the circumstances under which RICHARD STARK, a married man, aged 25, committed suicide. Deceased, who was a cab proprietor, and formerly in the City Police, had been in bad health for a considerable time. He had been under the treatment of Dr Henderson, and a short time since was out of his mind for two days. On the previous Tuesday he was again taken ill, and on Thursday midday he went to bed. About seven o'clock, at her husband's request, MRS STARK went to see deceased's horse at the stables in Summerland-street, and on returning she found her husband had locked himself in his bedroom. On the door being forced it was found deceased had cut his throat. Dr Henderson stated that STARK suffered from mental depression caused by bodily weakness. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

Wednesday 3 October 1877, Issue 5877 – Gale Document No. Y3200724814 EXETER – Inquest. - Mr Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Corn Exchange Hotel on Friday respecting the death of JOHN HENRY MARTIN, the illegitimate son of SELINA MARTIN, domestic servant. The child was about seven weeks old and under the care of Mrs Stephens, widow, Smythen-street. On Tuesday afternoon it was seized with convulsions and died immediately after. It had, however, been suffering from diarrhoea for a considerable time previously, and was very emaciated. Mr Perkins (South-street) who arrived shortly after the child's death, said the food the child had been fed on was not fit for a cat. Mrs Stephens denied this, and the mother of the child said she had often visited her child and was always satisfied that it was well cared for. She paid 5s. per week for its maintenance. After a short deliberation the Jury returned the verdict that deceased died from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 3 October 1877, Issue 5877 – Gale Document No. Y3200724830 EXMOUTH – Inquest. - The District Coroner (S. M. Cox, Esq.), held an Inquest on Friday morning, at the Rolle Hotel, on the body of WILLIAM WEBBER, butcher and farmer. From the evidence of the widow, it appeared that deceased, who was fifty-three years old, had been in a depressed state of mind for two years past in consequence of having to give up some farm buildings. On the Tuesday deceased got up at the usual time, and had breakfast. About eleven o'clock her son returned with the horse and trap, and she asked deceased to set off and see Mr Lipscombe and make arrangements with him. He went upstairs as she thought to get ready, and being gone some considerable time she went up to the bedroom, where she saw him lying on the bed, and by his side was a bottle which had contained hydrocyanic acid. A Juror asked how long the farm had been in the family, and she said over a hundred years. In replying to a question suggested by Mr Ewen (surgeon), she said that deceased's grandmother and an aunt had destroyed themselves by drowning. Other evidence having been given, the Jury returned a verdict – "Deceased killed himself while in an unsound state of mind."

Wednesday 10 October 1877, Issue 5878 – Gale Document No. Y3200724865 BRADNINCH – Fatal Accident At The Paper Mill. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY SANDERS, a boy ten years of age, the son of HENRY SANDERS, a labourer, in the employ of Mr C. Cummings, of Keynsham Mills, Bradninch. It appeared that the deceased was employed at the mill on half time as a cutter boy, and received 3 ½d. for his half day's work of six hours. The boy's duty was to lay the paper for the cutting machine, and he had no business in the machine-room, but on Monday morning the 1st instant, during the temporary absence of the engineer, the boy went into the room, and in the course of a few minutes was found with his arm caught in the machinery. As soon as the lad could be released, he was laid out on a felt, and Mr Stevenson, surgeon, sent for, who finding that the lad's arm was broken in two places, recommended his removal to the Hospital, where he was conveyed in his employer's waggonette. Mr H. G. Cumming, house-surgeon at the Hospital, said that when received deceased was in a state of collapse, his left arm was shattered, and he was very much bruised about the chest, the left shoulder, and the left side of his head. An attempt was made to restore the deceased, and a consultation of surgeons took place, when it was decided to amputate the shattered limb. Deceased appeared relieved after the amputation, but never properly rallied, and died on Tuesday morning He believed death was caused by the injuries received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

HORRIBLE WIFE MURDER AT BARNSTAPLE. A painful sensation as created in Barnstaple on Saturday by a report that a young butcher named WILLIAM HUSSELL had murdered his wife, and the excitement greatly increased when the details of this brutal and horrible crime were made known. It appears that the murderer, WILLIAM HUSSELL, is the son of one of the oldest butchers in Barnstaple. He is about thirty years of age, and seven years ago married MARY BELLEW, the daughter of a respectable farmer, living at Northam. During their married life HUSSELL has carried on business in the Butcher-row, his residence being a cottage in Sander's Court, Diamond-street. The result of the marriage was the birth of four children, the oldest six years and the youngest an infant of five weeks, but the life of the family has been anything but a happy one. HUSSELL was greatly addicted to drink, and his conduct generally was such as to cause much unhappiness to his wife with whom he frequently had serious quarrels. It is said that he used his wife very badly, beating her frequently, and that he had more than once threatened to murder her. On the Monday previous he pointed a pistol at her and threatened to shoot her, and he had also expressed a determination to do for her with a knife. To such an extent had these threats gone that the poor woman seems to have been afraid of her husband when he was in liquor. Friday being market day HUSSELL and his wife were boy busy all day at their stall in the Butcher-row. HUSSELL, however, left early in the evening, and, according to his custom on market days, visited several public-houses before going home, where he arrived about a quarter to nine. His wife at the time had not come home, and was supposed to be either at the butcher's shop, or to be in search of him at some of the public-houses he was known to frequent. After closing shop, about half-past ten, it is supposed MRS HUSSELL went home. Her husband was then in the house with their little servant girl, named Docketty, the children being in bed. she was apparently afraid to enter the house, and he told her if she would come in he would not hurt her. She went in, and notwithstanding his promise, some high words passed between them, which lead to a violent quarrel, and when at last HUSSELL produced a butcher's knife from his pocket, the little servant girl fled from the house in terror to alarm the neighbours. Soon screams of "murder" were heard coming from the house and, although these cries were not uncommon, they were on this occasion so distressing that Mrs Giddy and other neighbours went to see what was the matter. MRS HUSSELL was then found lying at the bottom of the stairs in a pool of blood, which flowed from a terrible gash across the woman's face from mouth to ear, and two stabs in the breast. Beneath her lay the infant child which she had held in her arms at the time HUSSELL made his ferocious attack upon her. The mother was quite dead, but the babe had escaped quite unhurt and was properly cared for by some of the neighbours. An ordinary butcher's knife about six inches long in the blade was found on the floor in a pool of blood. As soon as the police were communicated with they instituted a search for the murderer and found him in Mrs Giddy's house close by. He was sitting with his head on his arms on the table groaning and moaning in a half-stupefied state, and made no resistance when taken into custody. On Saturday morning the prisoner was taken before the Mayor (C. S. Willshire, Esq.) and other Borough Magistrates, when, after some formal evidence had been taken, he was remanded until Thursday next. The Court was crowded throughout the hearing, and the prisoner, although a strong man, appeared quite overcome by a sense of his position, and afterwards, when removed to the cells, he fainted. THE INQUEST. - The Borough Coroner (Mr R. T. Bencraft) held an Inquest on the body of the unfortunate woman the same afternoon, at the Royal Fortescue Hotel. Mr Richard Ashton was chosen foreman of the Jury. Before proceeding to view the body, the Coroner stated that this was the first time during his career of twenty-five years as Coroner he had had to summon a Jury to consider a case of wilful murder, and it was with great regret that he had to do so on this occasion. He was sorry that the annals of the borough should be so disgraced during his coronership. The first witness called was Emily Docketty, fourteen years of age, who stated that she was a servant in the employ of HUSSELL. The family consisted of HUSSELL, his wife (the deceased), and four children. HUSSELL kept a stall in the butchery, and on Friday night he returned home about nine o'clock, when his wife was attending to the shop. He was not sober. She went to fetch his wife from the butchery; but MRS HUSSELL was not there, and the shop was shut. On going back about ten o'clock she saw MRS HUSSELL outside the door, apparently afraid to go in. HUSSELL was still in the kitchen. The deceased asked her to take the baby out of the cradle, as the child was crying; and she took it out into the court to her mistress. HUSSELL then went into the court and asked deceased to go in, but she refused, saying she was afraid he would hurt her. He promised not to hurt her, but ultimately pushed her indoors. She then walked out into the back kitchen, and sat in the stairs, and suckled the infant. He asked witness to make tea for him, and whilst she was doing so she saw HUSSELL take knife out of his pocket, remarking "I have got it ready for her," after which he replaced it in his pocket. He took it out a second time, about a minute after, and then said the knife was "what he killed pigs with." During all this time MRS HUSSELL was in the stairs. He produced the knife a third time, and ran to the back kitchen to his wife. MRS HUSSELL threatened to scream "murder," and she (witness) ran from the house into a Mrs Sanders's house and said HUSSELL was hurting his wife; but no one went to the unfortunate woman's assistance. She was absent about a minute and a half, and, as she returned, she met HUSSELL coming down the court. He went into a Mrs Gidley's house, remarking "I have finished her." Witness went back into the house and saw her mistress lying on the floor, on her face. Could not see the body, but there was a great deal of blood on the place. Asked if she could do anything to assist her, and the deceased made no reply. Witness went back to Mrs Sanders, and Mrs Giddy called her to come into the house. Could not tell whether MRS HUSSELL was dead, but did not see her move. Mrs giddy told witness to take the baby, and the girl replied "I can't." but the former took the child, and witness took it to Mrs Sanders. The child had blood all over its arms and nightdress. HUSSELL had many times threatened to kill his wife, and was generally intemperate. On the Monday previous they had a quarrel, and the deceased ran to a neighbour's house. MRS HUSSELL often found fault with her husband for drinking so much, and then he invariably threatened to kill her. Deceased was not addicted to drink, and she used to be very attentive to the business, and was a very hard-working woman. Eliza Giddy deposed that when HUSSELL entered her house he acknowledged having killed his wife, and said, "Send for a policeman." HUSSELL then sat down in a chair, threw his head on the table, and wept bitterly. He said he supposed he should be hanged. HUSSELL was a very well-behaved, decent man when sober, and witness had never heard him threaten to take his wife's life. He had very often struck her. Elizabeth Sanders stated that on the afternoon of Monday she interposed in a quarrel between HUSSELL and the deceased, and HUSSELL at her request promised to be quiet. He struck his wife on the face during the quarrel. He said he went to prison once, and his wife laughed at him, but the next time he went she would not be able to laugh. In the evening MRS HUSSELL came to her, and asked her to go and endeavour to appease her husband. She found him very much excited, and he said he should take his wife's life. Witness stopped with deceased three or four hours. On his saying he would take her life his wife exclaimed, "I have a pious, good mother; there has been hundreds of prayers offered for me, and you cannot take away my life." When witness went away it was the morning of the next day. HUSSELL had often made "heavy wishes" – that his arm might drop off and his fingers rot if he did not put an end to her life. HUSSELL was very kind to his wife during her late confinement. Police Constable Downing stated that when apprehended HUSSELL as intoxicated, and had to be carried to the station. On his road to the station he said several times, "I have done it," and also said he hoped she was living. Superintendent George Longhurst, of the Barnstaple borough police, said that after his apprehension, about half-past twelve o'clock, HUSSELL asked whether his wife was dead, and witness replied in the affirmative, and charged him with the murder, to which he remarked, "I am guilty." Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination (assisted by Mr Jackson), and found on the upper part of deceased's right breast, a wound that had penetrated very deeply into the flesh into a large blood vessel near the collar bone; there was another wound in the lower part of the same breast, passing between the ribs into the chest, close to the lung and liver; one wound at the back of the left bladebone, not very deep; a wound on the left side of the face, which had passed very deeply down the lower jaw, and from thence across the inside of the mouth, penetrating the palate on the right side. This wound had opened a large blood-vessel, from which a great deal of haemorrhage had taken place; and the knife must have gone in up to the hilt in this wound. The Jury almost immediately returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder." The Coroner then made out a warrant for HUSSELL'S committal to the next Winter Assizes at Exeter, and bound over the witnesses to appear and give evidence. A large crowd assembled outside the hotel to hear the verdict.

Wednesday 10 October 1877, issue 5878 – Gale Document No. Y3200724854 EXETER – Sudden Death. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest at the Workhouse on Monday afternoon on the body of ELLEN HUTCHINGS, a widow, eighty-three years of age, who was found dead in her bed on Sunday. She had been an inmate of the house for many years and went to bed on Saturday about six p.m. in usual health and was waited on at eleven. Mr Woodman, the house surgeon, was of opinion that death resulted from the failure of the heart's action, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EXETER – A Tradesman Drowned. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Port Royal Inn, on Saturday morning, respecting the cause of the death of RICHARD NEWCOMBE, contractor, &c., of St. Thomas, whose body was found in the Exe early on Thursday morning. It appeared from the evidence that on Wednesday deceased called at Mr Yendall's Spirit Vaults, Bridge-street. He left about twelve o'clock saying he was going to pay his rent. He again called about two when he said he had paid it. He remained there until about four o'clock, and was seen to leave by the back door in a state of intoxication and go up Frog street. At nine in the evening he paid a complimentary visit to Mrs E. Hill, in Day's-court, and after a stay of about twenty minutes he left. Nothing further respecting his doings was known until near eleven o'clock at night, when a man employed in a coal yard near the Quay heard him ask the way to St. Thomas. At 11.45 Sergt.-Major Thorn, R.H.A., whilst going along the Quay, noticed a man descend the steps near the Ballast Quay, and call out twice "Is it all right." No answer was heard, and a few minutes after when the sergeant was near the Port Royal Inn he heard a splash and a gurgling noise near the above steps. He ran back and shouted, but neither saw nor heard anything further. He could not say who the man was that he saw, but he thought it to be a very stout man and he seemed to be intoxicated. About five o'clock the following morning the body of deceased was found a little way below the Ballast Quay steps. It was remarked by a Juryman that deceased was in the habit of crossing by the ferry boat, and in the dense fog which existed on Wednesday night deceased must have mistaken these steps for those which lead to the ferry boat and which are situated a little higher up the Quay. When the body was searched no money was found, which many of the Jury thought a strange thing, but no positive evidence could be obtained that deceased had any on him after nine o'clock in the evening, nor that he had met with any foul treatment. The Coroner offered to adjourn the Inquiry if the Jury wishes efforts to be made to obtain evidence on this point, but after a short deliberation, they returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 17 October 1877, Issue 5879 – Gale Document No. Y3200724901 TEDBURN ST. MARY. - Strange Death Of A Farmer. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest here on Saturday afternoon, touching the death of JOHN TAVERNER, a well-known farmer of the district. It appeared from the evidence of Mr Hugh Lethbridge, the first witness called, that on Thursday the farmers of the neighbourhood dined together at the Red Lion Inn, Taphouse, a hamlet on the offside of the parish. The meeting was for the purpose of settling their manure accounts. About ten o'clock he left with Mr Lethbridge and went home with him. They had a light supper together, and deceased, after drinking one glass of gin and water, left at about twelve o'clock to go home. He was at the time slightly the worse for liquor, or "rather jolly." Witness offered to accompany deceased a short distance, but the deceased would not allow him to do so, saying he was all right, and could find the way by himself. Witness bade him "good night," and thought him quite capable of going home alone. Deceased never reached home, and about mid-day on Friday his body was found by two of his labourers in a ditch under a hedge. He was quite dead, and lay with his face on the ground. There were no marks of violence on the body, but a few scratches about the face. It appeared that deceased must have clambered over a hedge, as the bushes were thrust aside just above where he was lying, and it is supposed that after leaving Mr Lethbridge's house, it must have taken a near cut home across the fields. P.C. Pinson stated that the field in which the deceased was picked up belonged to Mr Preston, farmer, and that he found a considerable sum of money on deceased, consisting of £13 in gold, and £1 8s. 9d. in silver. Mr William Connor, surgeon of Dunsford and neighbouring parishes, deposed that he had examined the body of deceased. He found no marks of violence thereon, save a few bruises and scratches about the face. The nose was slightly flattened. In his opinion deceased had clambered over the hedge beneath which he was found, and in so doing had fallen and injured his spine, which would sufficiently account for his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Wednesday 17 October 1877, Issue 5879 – Gale Document No. Y3200724896 PINHOE – A fatal accident occurred during the storm at this village. It appears that the business of the Post-office is carried on by Miss Elizabeth Bambury, who was living with her two sisters, and an aunt, MISS ANN BAMBURY, aged about 53, the lady who lost her life. The four females occupied one bedroom at the rear of the house. The only other occupant of the premises was a Mr Ireland, a young man who manages a little bakery which was carried on in connection with the Post-office. MISS ANN BAMBURY, the deceased, usually slept with her niece, Harriet, in a bed near the fire-place; the postmistress and her other sister, Helen, had a bed at the other end of the room. The door was midway between the two beds. About twenty minutes after eleven, Harriet having got into bed, and the other three being just about to do so, a rather tall chimney was blown down upon the roof of their bedroom. It crashed right through the whole length of the roof, leaving nothing remaining but two or three feet of slating at the end where the bed belonging to the Misses Elizabeth and Helen stood. The other bed was completely buried; and the mass of fallen debris prevented Elizabeth and Helen from opening the door to call for assistance. Their screams, however, were heard by Mr Ireland, whose room had also been broken in by the falling chimney. by his help the door was broken in two, and a means of exit thus attained. The sister, Harriet, was heard crying for help from underneath a mass of rubbish heavy enough to crush the life out of two or three persons, but with assistance she was extricated, apparently without any injury but the shock. The aunt, however, was found to have been crushed to death. She was in a stooping posture, as if the chimney had fallen on her when she was unfastening her boots (which were still on her feet); and besides a fracture of one of the thighs, she had a blow at the base of the skull sufficient to have killed her on the spot. Dr Somers, of Broadclyst, was sent for, but his services were of no avail. Mr R. R. Crosse, held an Inquest on Monday afternoon, at the Poltimore Arms Inn, and after hearing the evidence of Miss Bambury, Richard Bennett, railway signalman, who helped to extricate Harriet Bambury and her aunt, and other witnesses, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 17 October 1877, Issue 5879 – Gale Document No. Y3200724887 EXETER – Inquests. - H. D. Barton, Esq. (Deputy Coroner), at the Windsor Castle Inn, Summerland-street, on Saturday morning, enquired into the circumstances attending the death of FLORENCE ELLEN BELLAMY, the child of a woman residing in Wood's-court. On Thursday night the child (which was two months old) slept in the same bed with its mother and grandmother, and at six the following morning the latter fed it. The mother and child remained in bed and about an hour later the child was found dead, lying in the same position as before. Medical evidence showed that death resulted from suffocation, but whether this was caused by spasms of the throat or by being overlaid Mr Bell could not say. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

The same day an Inquest was held at the Pack Horse Inn, Cowick-street, St. Thomas, on the body of a man named WESTCOTT, fishmonger, residing in Preston-street, who fell down dead whilst selling fish in Cowick-street, on Friday. Mr Atkinson, surgeon, who was called to examine the body, gave it as his opinion that death resulted from disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

EXETER – Sudden Death. - The Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Exeter Inn, Bartholomew-street, yesterday afternoon, touching the death of FREDERICK JAMES THOMAS BOND, aged five years. It spears that the deceased vomited very much on Sunday afternoon, and was very feverish, continuing to be so during the night. He died early on Monday morning. Mr Brash, who appeared on behalf of Mr Perkins, stated that he had viewed the body and that he attributed death to natural causes. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 31 October 1877, Issue 5881 – Gale Document No. Y3200724954 SIDBURY – Child Burnt to Death. - An Inquest was held at Sidford on Thursday, by Mr S. M. Cox, County Coroner, on ALICE GOODING, aged ten years, the daughter of JAMES GOODING, a Brickmaker. The child, in the absence of its mother, took up a lamp containing petroleum, and which was quite full, for the purpose of moving it from one table to another, when the petroleum exploded and severely burnt the child's hand and arm. Mr E. C. Fox, of Sidmouth, was sent for, and attended the little sufferer until her death, which took place on the Monday previous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Experiments were tried before the Jury with some of the same oil, which it is supposed the lamp had contained, and it was proved to be quite harmless; consequently, it is assumed that benzoline must have been put into the lamp, or get mixed with the paraffin.

Wednesday 14 November 1877, Issue 5883 – Gale Document No. Y3200725025 ALPHINGTON – Fatal Accident. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday at the New Inn, Alphington, respecting the death of a labourer named TREMLETT, who was killed on Saturday last by a portion of a cob wall falling on him. It appeared from the evidence that on the day named deceased had been engaged by Mr Way, farmer, to level the piece of wall in question, but had been advised to be very cautious how he did so, as it might fall on him. Whether he took proper caution as to how he proceeded with the work is not known, but on the following morning Mr Way was going over his farm, when he noticed the tools and coat of the deceased near the spot where the cob-wall had recently stood, and upon a further search being made, the poor man was discovered buried beneath the ruins. P.C. Dymond, the parish constable, proved finding deceased's watch in his pocket, which was stopped at two minutes to four o'clock. He also found some money; Mr Way had paid deceased early in the day. He was sixty-three years of age. A verdict of "Accidental death" was returned.

TOPSHAM – Sudden Death. - A painful feeling was created in this town on Monday evening, by the discovery, at a late hour, of MR GEORGE DREWE, an aged and most respectable inhabitant, in the last moments of his existence. The deceased formerly, and for many years, was in the service of Mr and Mrs Hamilton, of the Retreat, and for some time had resided at Topsham, living alone. His practice was daily to visit the Retreat. On Monday he had not done so, and in the evening the gardener at the Retreat, named Williams, went to his house. After knocking at the door without receiving a reply, and the window-shutters not being closed, he procured a ladder, and, after a survey, effected an entrance into an up-stair room. He found all things remained in order in different parts of the house, until, on going into a back kitchen on the ground floor, he discovered the poor old man in a crouching position sinking to the floor, and still breathing, but it was the last breath. The deceased was in his 80th year, and was seen about the town on Monday in his usual apparent health. An Inquest will be held today.

TOTNES – Fatal Fire. - An Inquest was held here, on Wednesday, before Mr Gage, Deputy Coroner, on the body of EMMA GLYDE, aged forty-three years, who came by her death in a very painful manner on the previous morning. Deceased was the wife of a hawker, and it appeared from the evidence that the family, consisting of GLYDE and his wife and two children (a girl aged thirteen and a boy four years old) went to bed about half-past nine o'clock on Monday night. They were all sleeping in the same room, over a stable in which were GLYDE'S horse and his stock of crockeryware, rags, &c. About half-past four o'clock on Tuesday morning GLYDE awoke and saw fire coming up through the floor close by the beside. He jumped out of bed and pulled his wife out, and, awakening his children ,carried the boy down the steps and pushed the girl before him. GLYDE thought that his wife, whom the girl had seen standing by the bed, was following him, but on putting the children in a place of safety he found that she had not done so. He then attempted to get back to the room, or loft, but was prevented by fire and smoke, and the poor woman was burnt to death. When search was made for the body it was found that her head and limbs and part of the body were entirely consumed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 21 November 1877, Issue 5884 – Gale Document No. Y3200725059 NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Newton Cottage Hospital on Wednesday evening, before Dr Gaye, Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN POWLESLAND, aged 30, a foreman shunter, employed on the Great Western Railway at the Newton Abbot Station. It appeared from the evidence that shortly before nine o'clock on Tuesday night, the deceased was engaged in directing the shunting of a train, when he was caught between the buffers of two of the trucks. He was removed to the Cottage Hospital, where he died on Wednesday morning, from internal haemorrhage. Deceased told Roger Partridge, goods' guard, that he slipped his foot and fell between the buffers. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Coroner was asked to invite the Great Western Company to subscribe to the funds of the Cottage Hospital.

Wednesday 28 November 1877, Issue 5885 – Gale Document No. Y3200725079 EXETER – Inquest. - Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, last evening, at the Old Golden Lion Inn, held an Enquiry into the causes of the death of JOSES ENDACOTT, aged sixty-four, a French polisher, residing in Brownstone's-court. It transpired that the deceased has been an invalid for some time, suffering from rheumatic, and on the previous evening he went to bed about ten o'clock, nothing more than usual having occurred. At seven the next morning his wife got up and left him, thinking he was asleep. She visited him again at ten, still thinking he was asleep. At 10.30 she put her hand on his forehead, and then discovered he was dead and cold. Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, was of opinion that death resulted from natural causes. The deceased, his wife, and several children occupied two rooms, which, with those surrounding, in the opinion of several jurymen, were unfit for human habitation; but the Jury were unanimous only in thinking the premises close and over-crowded. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 5 December 1877, Issue 5886 – Gale Document No. Y3200725125 BARNSTAPLE – Melancholy Suicide. - J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Mount Pleasant, near Barnstaple, last Thursday, on the body of MR THOMAS MOORE, a respectable farmer, sixty-three years of age, who had committed suicide two days before by cutting his throat. It appeared that deceased lived very comfortably with his wife and family, but was of rather a melancholy disposition. On Tuesday morning about nine o'clock his wife left him by the fireside smoking his pipe and apparently in good spirits, whilst she went into Barnstaple. On her return about noon she found him in an upstairs room with his throat cut and quite dead. After several witnesses had been examined, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased destroyed himself by cutting his throat and added there was not sufficient evidence to show what state of mind the deceased was in at the time.

STARCROSS – Fatal Accident On The Railway. - An Inquest was held at the Courtenay Arms, Starcross, on Saturday, by Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, on view of the body of EDWARD SEARLE, an old man seventy-five years of age, who was killed at the level crossing on the previous Wednesday afternoon. Captain Peacock was the foreman of the Jury. It appears that SEARLE who is well-known in the neighbourhood, was standing on the railway at the crossing a little above the station, in the direction of Exeter, and he appeared to be noticing an up-train which was in the station. As he was on the line waiting for the train to move away, the 2.20 p.m. train from Exeter approached. SEARLE did not observe the approach of the second train until the driver sounded the whistle. The deceased heard this, and attempted to get out of the way of the train, but being infirm he could not do so in time, and the engine knocked him down. He was dreadfully mutilated, his body being literally cut in two. After a short consultation the Jury found that the deceased came by his death accidentally.

Wednesday 12 December 1877, Issue 5887 – Gale Document No. Y3200725159 EXMINSTER – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, Exeter, on Saturday afternoon, before H. W. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner) touching the death of HENRY THOMAS WHITTON, aged 67, formerly a farmer of Broadclyst. Deceased had lately been living with his son, EDWARD WILLIAM WHITTON, farmer, and landlord of the Stowey Arms Inn, Exminster. On Monday week deceased went to the meadow to drive home some cows, and was returning, when he was met by a cart laden with straw and a timber waggon. The carts passed each other near the station-road, and as they did so the deceased was walking on the hedge-trough. The boy with the cart-load of straw was leading his horse by the head and immediately after passing the deceased the boy heard him call out, so he stopped. MR WHITTON was then standing up, and he told the boy that he had been injured through falling over a heap of earth, and through the wheel going over his hand. He was put into the cart, and driven back to the village, and the same night he was taken to the hospital. Mr Hugh Gordon Cumming, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the cause of death was injury to the hand, and gangrene ensuing, in an exceedingly bad constitution. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 26 December 1877, Issue 5889 – Gale Document No. Y3200725216 FATAL ACCIDENT AT ST. DAVID'S STATION. The Inquest. - The large number of people who had assembled at the St. David's Station on Saturday afternoon to meet or to bid good-bye to friends, were greatly concerned and affected by an exceedingly sad accident which happened before their eyes. The up-train, leaving the station at 3.5, was slowly moving off when a gentleman ran up the platform and begged to be permitted to enter the moving train. A door was tried and found to be locked, but one of the officials as speedily as possible opened it, and the would-be passenger made an attempt to enter – but, by some at present unexplained accident, fell between the platform and the revolving wheels. The shrieks of the affrighted lookers-on, the hallooing of the officials, and the thrill of the break whistle were continued until the stopping of the engine. The train was quickly bisected and the former half having moved on, the unfortunate gentleman was taken up. He was horribly mutilated, principally about the legs; the right one having been crushed by several carriages which had passed over him. With as little delay as possible, he was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital on a stretcher, where he died about one o'clock on Sunday morning. The gentleman was recognised as MR JOSEPH NEALE, aged forty-two, an architect, having offices at Exeter and Weston-super-Mare, to which latter place he was about to proceed to spend Christmas. MR NEALE, who had attained some repute in his profession, leaves a wife and four children. An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon at the Topsham Inn, by H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner. Mr T. W. Walton, of Clifton, superintendent of the Bristol and Exeter Division of the Great Western Railway, watched the case on behalf of the Company. The body having been identified by station-inspector Chapman. Henry Martin, the guard of the train, was called and stated that he arrived at the station with the train from Plymouth at 3.19., and on arrival he saw MR NEALE on the platform and spoke to him. He was perfectly sober. He saw nothing more of him until he blew the whistle. The passengers were then all seated and the train ready to start. Just as he took the whistle from his mouth MR NEALE ran to him and said "Hold on, I am going." Witness again blew to draw the attention of the driver, who shut off steam, and in half a minute the train was at a stand still. When he blew the whistle the second time his back was to MR NEALE and he could not of course see what he was doing. Whilst blowing the whistle the accident occurred, and on his turning round to get into his own van he saw deceased attempt to jump into a carriage, rebound, and fall. He fell on his side between the platform and the steps of the carriages, which were then going at about two miles an hour. He held on for five or six yards, and every endeavour was made by himself and Inspector Chapman, to catch him, but they failed, and the wheels went over his right leg. The train was stopped and the deceased got out as quickly as possible. He was accustomed to see the deceased several times a week and knew him well, and he did not believe he was in any way intoxicated. To the Foreman: - I had no idea but what he would wait until the train stopped, and then enter it. I did not open the door for him, he might have done it himself; he possessed a key. To the Coroner: It was his habit of leave entering the train until the very last moment. John Chapman, station-inspector, stated that he went through the platform, and saw all the passengers seated and the doors locked about four minutes before the engine joined the train. After her had started the train he saw MR NEALE, and heard him say, "I must go." He rushed to a compartment and he endeavoured to assist him in. Just as he had his hand on the carriage-door he stumbled and fell to the step of the carriage. He was carried about twenty yards, when he fell off on to the line, and the wheel went over his leg. The train was then stopped. When put on the stretcher he said, "Carry me somewhere – I have hurted my leg." To a Juror: I opened the door, and heard the stop-whistle. I can't say whether I opened the door before the whistle was blown or after. I opened It out of courtesy, the deceased being well-known to us. I do not think he had been drinking, nor do I know where he came from. Herbert Anstey, porter at the station, assisted the deceased to the hospital. On the way, opposite St. David's Church, he said, "I blame no one – it is entirely my own fault." He also said at the hospital: "I wish to pay those men for bringing me here." He was quite conscious at the time. Another porter, named Hutchins, corroborated. Mr H. G. Cumming, house surgeon at the hospital, stated he received the deceased into the hospital between four and five o'clock. He was in a state of almost complete collapse, and his pulse was very feeble. The right leg was crushed to pieces below the knee, there was a large wound on the thigh, which was also much bruised, and there were some wounds on the front of the right arm, and a small wound at the back of the head. They endeavoured to restore him with beef tea and stimulants, and a consultation took place as to the advisability of amputating, but he never recovered sufficiently to have the operation performed. He died from the effects of the accident about 12.30 the same night. He answered the questions put to him, but he made no voluntary statement. The Coroner said they must all regret that a man in the position of the deceased should have met with such an untimely end. It was for the Jury to consider whether there had been any neglect on the part of anyone or whether it was purely an accidental matter. He should like to ask Mr Walston whether there was any rule in reference to getting into trains after they were in motion. Mr Walston replied that the duty of Inspectors was not to allow passengers to do so if they saw any danger. There was a discretionary power. The Jury after a short consultation, unanimously agreed the deceased met his death in a purely accidental manner, and, as the deceased expressed, there was no one to blame but himself. The Coroner said he was glad to hear such a verdict because such was exactly his own opinion.

Wednesday 26 December 1877, Issue 5889 – Gale Document No. Y3200725201 EXETER – Sudden Death. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, on Saturday evening, touching the death of LOUSE MAUD HEARN, aged four and-a-half months, the daughter of a waiter living in Wynard's Cottage, Magdalen-street. the child had been suffering from whooping-cough, but had not been attended by a medical man. When the mother awoke on Saturday morning, the baby was on her arm, as she thought, asleep. She laid her down when she got up, but when she returned to it shortly afterwards, the child appeared to be dead. Mr Webb was called in, and he considered that the child got the cough, became shocked and died of suffocation. Verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Fatal Accident. - Mr H. D. Barton, Deputy Coroner, on Thursday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, enquired into the circumstances of the death of a little girl, four years of age, named BEATRICE PROWSE, daughter of a blacksmith, of Abbotskerswell. The deceased, who was on a visit to a friend in Russell-street, left home on Wednesday evening with another little girl to go to a magic lantern entertainment in Cheek-street, which is very narrow, and on reaching near the school-room a large waggon, laden with hay, came up to them. One of the girls got in a doorway, but the deceased being less fortunate, was jammed against the wall and knocked down. She was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital where she died soon after admission, probably from an internal injury to the head. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned, and the Jury made a recommendation to the Town Council that vehicular traffic should be prohibited in the street. A complaint was also made of the insufficient lighting of the hospital mortuary.

Wednesday 2 January 1878, Issue 5890 – Gale Document No. Y3200725225 EXETER – Death from Intoxicating Drink. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at the Duke of York Inn, St. Sidwell's on Friday evening, on the body of WILLIAM BOWDEN, aged 52, a stonemason, who it was supposed had drank himself to death. MARY BOWDEN, his wife, stated that she was married to deceased about twenty-six years ago, but, she had not lived with him for the past twelve years owing to his intemperate habits. She now resides at 66 Victoria-road, and earned her living as a laundress. Sarah Coombes, wife of a shoemaker, living in York-terrace, St. Sidwell's, stated that deceased rented apartments of her. He was in the habit of taking gin and water at every meal. She fetched him gin in half-pints at a time, and she would fetch these quantities two or three times a day. If she refused to fetch it he would threaten to get it himself, and on one occasion he went out in a state of nudity, and returned shortly after quite intoxicated. Eventually he took to his bed and drank about a pint of gin per day. On Thursday she sent for a medical man, but had no idea until after his visit that deceased was drinking himself to death. He was told not to drink so much but he replied that he should. He died on Thursday afternoon. She often mixed water with the gin, but deceased thought he was drinking pure gin. Mr J. D. Harris, surgeon, said he was called on Thursday evening, about five o'clock to see the deceased at the house of Mrs Coombes. Before he saw the deceased, Mrs Coombes told him that his illness was caused by drink. On examination witness found his pulse to be quick and his organs saturated with spirit. He told BOWDEN that if he did not give up the gin he would die, and the deceased replied, "Yes I zim I shall." He said he would not give it up, but afterwards said he would give it up next day, but that he would take it that night. From his general symptoms, witness concluded that his patient was in a critical state, and he advised him to give up the gin at once, and take the medicine instead. He took one dose of the medicine, and took no more gin after witness left. About a quarter to three on Friday morning witness was called again to see BOWDEN and was told that he was worse. He found the deceased dead, at which he was not surprised. Witness considered that he died from alcoholic poisoning, brought on by excessive drinking. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from alcoholic poisoning."

Wednesday 2 January 1878, Issue 5890 – Gale Document No. Y3200725242 NEWTON ST. CYRES. - Fatal Fall. - An Inquest was held on Thursday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN TROWBRIDGE, aged sixty-seven years, a wheelwright, residing at Newton St. Cyres, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on the previous day from the effects of a fall. MARK TROWBRIDGE, a son of the deceased, a carpenter, residing in Townsend's-court, St. Sidwell's, stated that his father was a widower, and carried on the trade of wheelwright at Newton St. Cyres. About five weeks ago witness went there to see his father, whom he found in bed. He asked him if he had not sustained an injury, but he declined to say. The only answer he could get from his father was that he had fallen down, but how and when, he would not say. His father also told him that he did not think he had injured himself. On one occasion he said to witness that he thought it was his old complaint – rheumatism. Deceased, refused medical advice, but a week later, as he was no better, Mr Edwards, surgeon, of Crediton, was called, and that gentleman said the case was one for the Hospital, and witness accordingly had deceased removed to that Institution, where he remained up to the time of his death. John Horrell, carrier from Crediton to Exeter, deposed that about five weeks last Monday he was returning home between eight and nine in the evening. About four miles distant from Exeter he saw a man lying in the hedge by the side of the road. He spoke to witness, and said "Horrell, I wish I had waited a little further back; I have been hours coming here," meaning that he wished he had waited and left Exeter with him. Witness recognised the voice as that of MR TROWBRIDGE, and he said he would give him a lift. He took him up, and placed him in a cart. Deceased appeared to have been drinking, for he was not able to stand. Witness did not observe that he had any injury. Witness drove him to within a few yards of his house, and the deceased then said, "John, you put me there, because I can hold by the rails; I shall get home all right." Deceased had to go down a steep incline to gain access to his house, and the rails were by the side of a narrow pathway. Witness did not see him again alive. Mr G. E. Crelland, assistant house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was admitted into the Institution on November 27th. He was in a very helpless state. On examination he found a fracture of the neck of the left thigh bone. After his admission he became weaker, and he expired on the 26th instant. Death resulted from the injuries to the leg. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 2 January 1878, Issue 5890 – Gale Document No. Y3200725243 SUICIDE IN EXETER – The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at Blacking's Spirit Vaults, touching the death of WILLIAM MORTIMORE. ROSINA ANN MORTIMORE, widow of deceased, stated that she resided at Messrs. Pasmore and Savery's. Her husband was fifty-two years of age, and held the position of care taker of the premises. She left her bed room about 7.30 that same morning thinking her husband was still asleep. He had suffered for many years in pains in the back of the head, and had been under the treatment of several doctors. After 7.30 she did not see her husband alive, but she left a girl of fourteen to attend to him. William John Pidsley stated that he resided on the premises of Messrs. Pasmore and Savery, and had been in the habit of seeing the deceased daily for the past fifteen months. He had often said he had a great pressure at the back of the head and felt much shaken. He repeated this the latter part of last week, when witness shook hands with him and his hand trembled very much. He saw him on Sunday, and he then seemed composed and easy. He did not see him again until Tuesday morning when he entered the top wareroom just before nine o'clock. He then saw him lying in a pool of blood on his back and partially dressed. There was a razor on the right hand side of deceased and a case on the left. He reported it down stairs, and a clerk having gone up and convinced himself deceased was dead, Dr Henderson was sent for. One of the Jurymen asked witness if he was aware that the deceased and his wife had a few unpleasant words in the morning. The Coroner thought this question should not have been put if he had no foundation for believing so. The Juryman replied he had some foundation for believing so, but he did not prove such was true. The Coroner then asked him if he would put the question again, but he refused to do so. The Coroner to the witness: Let me ask if you ever heard there had been any disturbance between MR MORTIMORE and his wife? Witness: Not the slightest. The Coroner: Do you know but what they lived happily together? Witness: I believe they did. In answer to further questions, witness replied that he had heard that deceased had been in the Wonford Asylum. P.C. Paul having been called and detailed his visit to the warehouse, Dr Henderson was sworn, and stated that he had known the deceased for many years. He attended him last Sunday week. He was very depressed, had taken cold, and was suffering from bodily derangement. He visited him again on Wednesday, and he was then more depressed and bordering on a state of insanity. He gave instructions that he was not to be left alone for a moment, as he feared he had a tendency to suicide. He improved towards the end of the week, and on Sunday he was much better. He was called in that morning, and from the position of the body and the razor, he felt convinced he committed suicide whilst of unsound mind. The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 9 January 1878, Issue 5891 – Gale Document No. Y3200725261 EXETER – Inquest. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquiry into the circumstances of the death of ERNEST EDWARD COURTNEY, yesterday noon, at the Hour Glass Inn. The child is the son of a carpenter living in Colleton Buildings, and although it appeared in its usual health on the previous evening and was fed during the night, it was found dead in the bed on Monday morning Mr Tosswell, surgeon, was of opinion the child died whilst in convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with his evidence.

Wednesday 16 January 1878, Issue 5892 – Gale Document No. Y3200725281 EXETER – Inquests. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., enquired, at the Topsham Inn on Wednesday, into the circumstances of the death of JOHN SMITH, aged seventeen. Deceased was the son of a labourer of Southmolton, and engaged as a labourer by the Devon and Cornwall Railway Company. On the morning of the 7th instant he was riding, with others, on a railway-waggon. It was going down an incline with an engine attached, and on reaching the foot it got into collision with another waggon, and deceased fell out, with his right leg across the rails, over which passed two heavily-laden trucks. Deceased was immediately conveyed to Summerstown and afterwards to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr G. E. Crallan, assistant house-surgeon at the hospital stated that deceased was brought to the house on Monday evening. One of his feet as cut off, and the upper part of the leg much bruised. He was in a state of collapse, and died the same night. Verdict "Accidental Death."

An Inquest on the body of MARY JANE CASTLE, aged three years, who was suffocated on Wednesday last (as stated in our second edition) was held on Thursday at the Coach and Horses. From the evidence of the mother it appeared that the child and her sister, five and a half years of age (both illegitimate), were left in bed whilst the mother went to the Guildhall to obtain a summons against the father. There was a fire in the room, a box of matches on the chimney-piece, and a bit of a candle and some clothes on the table. The elder child was cautioned not to touch anything, but she had since confessed that she struck a match, and lit the piece of candle, in doing which she ignited the clothes. She was much frightened and screamed for help, but no one heard her. On the mother returning, in about half-an-hour, the room was full of smoke, and she cried for help She succeeded in finding the deceased child, but it was quite dead. She afterwards rescued the other child, who was unconscious. She locked the door because a short time previously one of the children left the room and fell over the stairs. Mr Bell, surgeon, who was called immediately after the occurrence, said death was caused by suffocation. He attended one of the children about three months since, and then cautioned the mother against leaving them. About a month later the girl EMILY was burnt, and became an out-patient of the Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and concurred in censuring the mother for her neglect.

Wednesday 23 January 1878, Issue 5893 – Gale Document No. Y3200725317 EXETER – Inquests. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest at the Lord Nelson Inn, St. Sidwell's, on Thursday morning. The deceased was ANN MUDGE CARTER, aged 68, wife of JOHN CARTER, poulterer, of 21 King William-terrace. It appeared that the old lady had been an invalid for years, suffering from bronchial affection and heart disease. Early on Tuesday morning she complained of great thirst, and hot tea, and then cold water, were given her. Her hands discoloured whilst she was drinking, and in consequence of what she said to her husband he fetched a neighbour and Dr Henderson, but before the latter arrived the woman was dead. The medical evidence was to the effect that she died from the exhaustion of vital powers and a weak heart. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance therewith.

The Coroner held another Inquest yesterday at the Barnstaple Inn, on the body of an infant named SAMUEL MANN, son of a labourer residing in St. David's-place. The child, which was only three days old, was found dead in bed on Monday morning, and Mr Domville, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death was the result of insufficient vitality. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

DEATH FROM CHLOROFORM. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, on Saturday morning, respecting the death of a young man, named JOHN TRACE, aged 17, late assistant to Mr Havill, butcher of Wonford, and who died in the Hospital on the previous Thursday, under the following circumstances:- Mr Hugh Gordon Cumming, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was admitted a patient into the institution about six or seven week ago, suffering from an infectious disease, and he was placed in a special ward for that kind of disease. He was attended to in the usual way, and was particularly under the care of Mr Bankart. The patient progressed satisfactorily up to a certain point, and they were awaiting to complete the cure by performing an operation, which the surgeon himself considered necessary. It was one of those painful things which were in the habit of being done under the influence of chloroform, and indeed it could scarcely be done without. Witness's duty was to superintend the administration of the chloroform, and he was responsible. On Thursday afternoon, it was being administered by Mr Crallan, a duly qualified man, in witness's presence. The patient went on satisfactorily for a few minutes, during which witness felt his pulse and found it to be steady The young man then gave a severe spasm, his face became pale, and the pupils of his eyes suddenly became dilated. His appearance became bad, and his body rigid, and the chloroform was at once stopped. Witness immediately dashed some cold water, which was at hand, on the patient's face and chest, threw open the windows, and attempted to restore him by artificial respiration, but all these means of restoration were unavailing, and the boy died there and then. Before the administration of the chloroform was commenced, the patient's heart was examined by Mr Crallan, and there was nothing to contra-indicate the usual course, although there might have been something which was not obvious to them. Every care was taken during the administration. He believed the patient only inhaled one drachm – an exceedingly small quantity. The disease from which the patient was suffering would not make him more susceptible to the influence of chloroform than any other disease would. The period of inhalation was short only extending to about four minutes from the commencement to observing the first change, and about five minutes to the end. TRACE was not unwilling to be put under the influence of chloroform. The Coroner inquired what quantity could be inhaled by a strong male person before insensibility was produced? The witness replied that it would depend on the physical strength of the inhaler. Six or eight times the quantity received by the deceased was sometimes given before complete insensibility was produced, and sometimes even half-an-ounce. Death was momentary from chloroform. The operation would have been a very painful one. The Coroner addressed the Jury at some length. He pointed out that the duty of the Jury was to decide whether or not proper precaution and every care were taken during the administration of the chloroform. It appeared to him that this had been so as there were two surgeons present, both members of the Royal College of Surgeons, and the young man had not inhaled more than a drachm or a drachm-and-a-half, whereas a healthy male might safely inhale six or eight drachms. He then explained the law respecting such cases, and after a short deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death resulted accidentally. The Coroner quite agreed with the verdict and complimented Mr Cumming on the way in which he had always performed his duties since he had been at the Hospital, and expressed his sympathy with him under the circumstances that had occurred. Mr Cumming thanked the Coroner for the opinion he had expressed, and said the death had caused him a great deal of distress and anxiety, and such as could only be felt by those who were placed as he had been.

Wednesday 30 January 1878, Issue 5894 – Gale Document No. Y3200725351 EXETER – Sudden Death. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest at the Ship Inn, Martin's-lane, on Monday evening respecting the death of the landlady of the Inn, ELIZABETH YELLAND, aged forty-six, who died in the morning of the same day. It appeared from the evidence, that deceased had been suffering from a weak heart for a considerable time, and latterly from haemorrhage from the stomach and nostrils. On Sunday night she retired to her room in rather better spirits than usual, but just before six in the morning she awoke her daughter, who was in bed with her, and complained of being very unwell. After a short time the girl called the servant and her uncle, and deceased died almost immediately afterwards. Mr G. F. Webb, surgeon, was called in directly, and at the Inquest he gave evidence to the effect that deceased died from heart disease. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 20 February 1878, Issue 5897 – Gale Document No. Y3200725443 EXETER – Sudden Death At The Workhouse. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Exeter Workhouse on Thursday morning on the body of HARRIET BENNETT, a pauper, who died somewhat suddenly on the previous Sunday. At the meeting of the Guardians on Tuesday, Mr R. C. Wilkinson, complained of a want of promptitude having been shown by the officials of the House in regard to deceased. From what was then stated it appeared that the woman was admitted into the House on Thursday, the 7th instant, suffering from a bad leg; she was placed in the Receiving Ward, in which she remained until the following Saturday, when she was removed to the hospital, where, on Sunday, she died. The various grounds of Mr Wilkinson's complaint were fully investigated by the Coroner and Jury, and a verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony, which showed that death resulted from lung disease. The Jury were unanimously of opinion that not the slightest neglect could be attributed to any of the officers of the Workhouse.

Sudden Death. - An Inquest is to be held at Heavitree today (Wednesday) by R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, on the body of HENRY WITHYCOMBE, an old and much respected parishioner, who died very suddenly on Monday last.

Wednesday 27 February 1878, Issue 5898 – Gale Document No. Y3200725492 HEAVITREE – Inquest. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Horse and Groom, on Wednesday last, on the body of HENRY WITHYCOMBE, a gentleman of independent means, who died suddenly at his residence, 3, Albion-terrace, on the previous Monday. It appeared that deceased suffered from spasms, and on Sunday morning he took a dose of rhubarb, magnesia and ginger. In the course of the same morning he also took a Seidlitz powder. He had nothing to eat all that day and on Monday morning he had another dose of rhubarb, magnesia and ginger. After taking that he had a little corn flour, and subsequently a little brandy and water. He then complained of sleepiness and was advised to have a doctor, but he would not do this, saying he had never had a doctor in his life. About a quarter to twelve he went to the back of the house, and having remained there an unusually long time, a search was made for him, and he was found in the closet lying behind the door with his face against the wall, quite dead. The evidence of Dr Williams, who was called in to see the deceased, went to show that death resulted from Natural causes – syncope, the result of exhaustion. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

TORQUAY – Fatal Fall. - Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday, touching the death of a child named BASSETT. The deceased, who was six months old, was taken out on Saturday by a little girl named Coombes, who accidentally slipped and fell, and caused such injuries to the infant that he died shortly afterwards. The bad state of the footpath was alleged to have been the cause of the accident. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 6 March 1878, Issue 5899 – Gale Document No. Y3200725527 CREDITON – Sad Case of Drowning. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., district coroner, held an inquest last Saturday at Hookway on the body of MR WILLIAM HOWARD, aged 49, head gamekeeper to Major Buller, of Downes, whose body was found on Thursday in the Yeo, about a quarter of a mile from the railway station. The first witness called was JAMES TAPPER, gardener at Downes. He deposed that the deceased was at Downes on Wednesday evening. He called there about seven o'clock p.m. He had been rabbiting during the day; JOHN STEVENS was also at Downes when he called. It was brewing time, and they had some beer together; the deceased was a little the worse for drink when he came. He left about ten p.m. He walked away all right; wished them good night, and seemed quite capable of taking care of himself. He had his dog and gun with him, and went away alone. On his way home from Downes he would have to pass along a footbridge over the Yeo. Witness knew the bridge; it was a dangerous place in the dark, and that night it was very dark. Had not the least suspicion that anyone was instrumental in HOWARD'S death. The bridge is thirteen feet from the water, and be the side of the bridge at each end there is no protection whatever. There are large stones in the bed of the river. JOHN DREW, a labourer, residing at Hookway, and in the employ of Major Buller, said that about ten p.m. on Thursday night he, with several others, went in search of the deceased. They went t the Yeo, and near the footbridge, opposite Downes, found the deceased. He was lying on his left side across a large stone. His face was resting on the stone, which kept his head above the water. The water just touched his face. He was quite dead, cold and stiff. Witness saw wounds on his head, on the front and back part of it. Could not see any marks of struggling. Had no suspicion of anyone. Considered the bridge to be very dangerous at each end, especially in the dark. Mr W. H. Beygate, surgeon, residing at Crediton, said he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased with the view of ascertaining if the injuries received in the head were inflicted before the death of the deceased. He found four lacerated wounds in the head – three in front and one behind – all of which had penetrated to the skull. The wound at the back was the largest, but there was no fracture of the skull; they were not sufficient of themselves to cause death. Examined the chest and lungs and found the latter full of water, indicating that death was caused by drowning. Had no doubt that the deceased was alive when he entered the water. An open verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned by the jury, who pointed out the immediate necessity of some fencing being put at each end of the bridge to prevent a similar occurrence. The Coroner quite agreed with the suggestion of the jury, and was pleased to find from Mr Widgery, the Clerk of Works to Major Buller, that whatever recommendation was made would at once be attended to.

Wednesday 13 March 1878, Issue 5900 – Gale Document No. Y3200725551 EXETER – Inquest. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Black Hose, Longbrook-street, yesterday afternoon, respecting the death of THOMAS WOODGATES, aged sixty-one, who was found dead by the side of a hay-rick the previous day. According to the evidence of his widow it appeared that deceased, who was a labourer at Higher Hooper's Farm, went to his breakfast the previous morning apparently in his usual health and spirits. At twelve o'clock he was spoken to by the bailiff and made no complaint whatever, but within a quarter of an hour he was found by the shepherd to be lying on his right side by a hay-rick quite dead. In the opinion of Mr A. C. Roberts, surgeon, the deceased died from heart disease, but he had been suffering for a considerable time from dropsy. The Jury returned a verdict in harmony with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 10 April 1878, Issue 5904 – Gale Document No. Y3200725694 EXETER – Found Drowned. - Mr Crosse, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Double locks on Monday, touching the death of a little boy named WILLIAM HENRY BARRETT, whose body was found in the river on the previous Saturday. Deceased was the son of a mason living in the Cathedral close, and had been missing since the 6th March. The body presented all the appearances of having been in the water for a month, but it did not show any suspicious marks of violence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 17 April 1878, Issue 5905 – Gale Document No. Y3200725743 EXETER – Suicide. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest at Mrs Widgery's Spirit Vaults, Summerland-street, respecting the death of WILLIAM WILCOCKS MILLER, formerly an accountant, who committed suicide on Sunday morning by hanging himself. From the statement of the deceased's son it appears that deceased had been out of work for some time, and had been given to fits of despondency. On Saturday night deceased retired to rest in unusually good spirits; but the following morning at about six o'clock he complained to his wife of having passed a restless night. He dressed himself, and went downstairs. He was discovered about an hour afterwards in a lifeless condition suspended by the neck from a cross beam of the ceiling in a back kitchen, the door of which he had bolted from the inside. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 24 April 1878, Issue 5906 – Gale Document No. Y3200725777 SOWTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the school-house on Monday, before Dr Macauly, the Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HEAL WOLLAND, aged thirty, who was killed on Wednesday afternoon by falling from a tree, which he and others were engaged in trimming, at Bishop's Court, the seat of J. Garratt, Esq. The deceased fell only fourteen feet, but pitching on his forehead, the fall broke his neck. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Much sympathy has been exhibited towards MR WOLLAND, sen., who has been the village school-maser and parish-clerk for over a quarter of a century, and is greatly esteemed.

VIRGINSTOW – Suspicious Death. - The District Coroner and a Jury met last Wednesday at Two Slough, Virginstow, for the purpose of holding an Enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of ANN JENKINS, housekeeper to Mr Harris, which occurred suddenly on Sunday night. Mr Richard Tapley, solicitor, appeared on behalf of the parents of the deceased, and Mr C. Vicary Bridgman for Mr Harris. The body having been identified by the father of the deceased, the same witness stated that his daughter, who was twenty-three years of age, had been housekeeper with Mr Harris for over a year. He saw her last Michaelmas, when she appeared in her usual health. At that time she was not engaged to anyone, but was in correspondence with a man named Johns. The witness had since heard that his daughter was enceinte. Mary Perkins, a servant in the employ of Mr Harris, stated that the deceased appeared to be in her usual health on Sunday night. Witness occupied a room between the rooms of the deceased and Mr Harris. She heard both go to their respective rooms shortly after ten o'clock, and about midnight she heard a moaning noise proceeding from the room occupied by the deceased. The moaning or groaning was repeated, and witness got up and went to the room. She spoke twice to the deceased, but received no reply, went and lit a candle, and again went back. Still receiving no reply to her question as to what was the matter, she became alarmed, and roused Mr Harris, who came at once. He inquired what was wrong, and lifted the deceased in the bed, but she said nothing, and died after drawing one or two breaths. Medical aid and the assistance of the neighbours were called in as soon as Mr Harris became aware that something serious was the matter. Mr Thomas Harris, who tendered himself as a witness through Mr Bridgman, corroborated the statement of the previous witness. Dr Ash, of Holsworthy, said that about 2.30 on Monday morning last he was called to the house of Mr Harris, and on arriving there found the deceased dead. He had not known her before, and when he saw her she had apparently been dead about three hours. He saw that her skin was much discoloured and on examination discovered that she was pregnant. From further observations, and from what he heard, he came to the conclusion that she did not die from natural causes. The result of a subsequent post mortem examination was a discovery that the bowels were much distended from gases. There were no marks of internal violence, and the organs were uniformly healthy; but the gullet at the back of the throat was red and congested, its lining membrane raised and stripped off, and this condition extended to the stomach, which was more or less inflamed, one large black patch being almost gangrenous. The intestines were similarly inflamed. In the stomach, mixed with some partly digested food, were large quantities of coarsely powdered leaves. The appearance in no way corresponded with any known disease, but were those of some acrid poison. The deceased was between six and seven months advanced in pregnancy, and instruments had evidently been used. Police Sergeant Thomas Stone deposed to finding certain herbs in decoction, and a portion of yew tree steeped as tea; also some pills in a pocket belonging to deceased, and some powdered dry leaves. Dr Ash pronounced the herbs produced to be Irish yew, Cyprus and juniper, and the powder to be the leaf coarsely powdered. It corresponded with the substance found in the stomach. The use of these herbs was well known, and he had no doubt they had been the cause of death. Mr Edward T. Pearse, who assisted at the post mortem examination, corroborated the evidence of Dr Ash, and fully concurred in the opinion expressed by that gentleman. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had administered to herself the noxious poison which caused her death.

SILVERTON – Fatal Accident At The Railway Station. - At the Bridge Paper Mills, Silverton, on Saturday, R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, met to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of DULCIBELLA LINNINGTON DREW, the wife of MR JOHN DREW, of the above mills, which occurred on Thursday evening at the Railway Station. The Inquest was held in the school-room attached to the mills, where MRS DREW and her daughters have for a long time held a Sunday class. The class was formerly held in their private residence, but the scholars, who now number about seventy, soon grew so numerous that a schoolroom was provided especially for them. Throughout the neighbourhood much sympathy is felt for MR DREW, and his family in their sorrow for an irreparable loss. The Great Western Railway Company was represented by Messrs. Mears and Green, and among other neighbours and friends present was Sir Thomas Acland, M.P. The Coroner, in opening the Enquiry, said the Jury had a most melancholy duty to perform, but one which he did not think would give them much trouble, as, from the report conveyed to him, the case was a very simple one. He was sure they would all sympathise most heartily and sincerely with MR DREW in his great affliction and loss. There were several witnesses to be examined, and two of them he was informed absolutely witnessed the accident, so that what took place would be clearly proved. John Garland, gardener to Sir Thomas Acland, Bart., deposed that on Thursday last he was at the Silverton Station, and first saw MRS DREW going in her wagonette to the station. He afterwards saw her standing on the down-platform. About 4.40, just as the north mail was nearing the station he saw MRS DREW running rapidly across the down line on the level wooden crossing there. – The Coroner: How far was the train from the station when you saw MRS DREW running across? - Witness: It had come close to the bridge. I could not have seen it else, owing to the curve in the line. As she entered the up rail, the engine struck her. She made a sort of guard with her hands. The right front of the engine struck her, and she was knocked about fifteen feet up the line. I should think death was instantaneous. By a Juryman: The body fell a little on the right side. The Coroner: I do not wish you to describe the injuries, but were they very terrible, and such as to cause death? Witness: I did not go on the line myself, but I asked her servant to. I should have said that the Station-master called out as she was running across the line, and he says I did, but whether I did or not I do not know. The Station-master called out in a loud voice: "Oh! that woman." She could not have avoided it if she had heard, for by the time his voice reached her there must have been a collision. Q. What was her object in crossing again when the train was coming? A. My impression was that she thought it was the market stopping train, and that she would have time to cross and speak to some friends who might come by it. Mr R. Langdon, station-master, at Silverton, confirmed what the last witness had said in every particular. He could say nothing more or less. He had a conversation about 4.40 with the deceased on the up-platform about a paper. She was waiting for the down-train, which was late. It arrived about 5.25, and it was due about 4.41. Through the Easter traffic being so heavy, the down express was late, and the short train which started from Taunton after the express was consequently also late. The Coroner: If the train had been in time, this lady would have received her guests, and probably this accident would not have occurred. I should like to know if it is usually late? A. No, it is not usually late. Q. It was quite an exceptional day? A. Yes, it is one of the best trains to keep time; sometimes, in fact, it is waiting for time. A Juryman: Did her friends come? A. Yes they did. – The Coroner: Can you account for her crossing over from the down to the up line? A. I have not the remotest idea. She was there on the platform when the train was almost close, and she was then in a place of perfect safety. I did not see her come down the slope, but I saw her crossing the line. The Coroner: Is it customary for passengers to cross by the level crossing? A. Yes sir. Q. This is a dangerous place for passengers to cross. Is it intended not only for servants, but for passengers? A. Yes; it is for passengers, because they take their tickets and have to cross to the other platform to go to Exeter. The Coroner said this was a very dangerous mode of crossing, but he noticed that there was a bridge across the road which people could use. In the case where a man was killed at Cullompton he felt it his duty to recommend to the Secretary of State that a bridge should be erected, and this was done. But here there was a bridge over the road, and he did not think it so necessary. He should like to know what the witness thought of it? Witness said the bridge over the road could be used. People could take their tickets and go out and down the other side. Q. But there is a gate which prevents you getting to the down platform? A. I make the best of two evils. I keep the gate shut to keep out the children and cattle. Q. So that if anyone wishes to go to this down platform, they must go to the up-platform and cross this level crossing. A. Yes sir. The Coroner: That seems very improper, and I think some advantage may arise from the holding of this Inquest if it is the means of an alteration in this matter. You must come to the up-platform to cross to the down over this very dangerous crossing. Witness stated that the reason he first locked the gate, leading from the road to the down platform, was because a cow came down and got on the platform. The gate was also out of his control. The Coroner said that was another reason why there should be an alteration. In answer to further questions, witness said he could not compel people to go over the bridge on the public road. This was a public level crossing from one side of the rails to the other, and he could not compel people to go any other way. The Coroner: Then to my mind there is no doubt it is a very dangerous crossing. Mr Mears explained that the lateness of the train was caused by the unusually heavy traffic. The last express was the heaviest ever known on the line. It left Bristol thirty minutes late, running exceedingly heavy, and left Taunton forty minutes late. The train which followed, being put on expressly to take up passengers for stations below Taunton was, as a matter of course, also late. The "Flying Dutchman," as a rule, kept very good time, the lateness being caused entirely by the heavy traffic. The Coroner: How about the law on the matter. You are bound by law to keep your time? A. - There is no law to make us do that which is impossible. We did our very best. Two of the most powerful engines were placed on the train. The driver and stoker of the train were then questioned, but as they stated that they knew nothing of what had occurred until they got to Bristol they were not sworn. they were going at their usual pace through Silverton station, about forty-five miles an hour. They were not in the habit of sounding a whistle when passing through a station unless a train was stopping at a platform. The Coroner: When passing through a station it is very desirable to give a signal. Mr Mears said a signal was given that a train was passing through. It did not pass without the sanction of the station-master. The Coroner mentioned that at Starcross the whistle was always blown. Mr Mears said at that place there were several level crossings. The Coroner said he knew it was a very dangerous place, and he hoped, as Coroner, he should have influence enough to get it altered. He would also, if he had the authority, have the whistles blown when a train was passing through a station. It would be very little trouble. The Jury concurred with the Coroner. The witness Garland said MRS DREW did not turn her head as she ran across the line, and he did not think she knew how near the train was. Dr Potter, Cullompton, described the injuries deceased had received, and said she was very near-sighted. He did not know that she was hard of hearing. Death must have been instantaneous. The Coroner said that was all the evidence, and though the case was a very melancholy one, it was very simple. After a short consultation the foreman said the Jury were decidedly of opinion that death was purely accidental. At the same time, they suggested that it would be advisable that the Railway Company should do away with the level crossing, and provide other means for the public crossing the line. At the present time there was no waiting room on the down ,platform, and as this train was fifty minutes late, MRS DREW must either have waited this time on the platform or have crossed the level crossing again to get to the waiting room. They suggested that the level crossing should be done away with, and that accommodation should be provided on the down platform. The Jury also desired to express their sincere sympathy with MR DREW and his relatives at the loss they had sustained b y this most disastrous accident. The Coroner said he was very glad to hear the recommendations of the Jury, in which he quite concurred. Mr Mears promised that the recommendation of the Jury should be laid before the directors forthwith.

Wednesday 24 April 1878, Issue 5906 – Gale Document No. Y3200725773 EXETER - Drowned In A Ditch. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday at Turf House Inn, on the body of JOHN STANTON, a county court bailiff, fifty-two years of age, who had been missing since the first instant. It appeared from the evidence that deceased was sent to Kenton to take possession of certain premises. On the evening of the 1st of April he was in Exminster, about two miles from that village, but he was never seen alive afterwards, and on Tuesday his dead body was discovered in a dyke near the canal a short distance from turf. John Parsons, landlord of the Railway Hotel, Exminster, stated that at eight p.m., on April 1st, deceased drank a glass of whisky in his house and when he left said he was going on business to Topsham. Witness advised him not to go, as it was very dark, but he persisted in his intention. When he left he was perfectly sober. Mr Parsons stated that the place where the body was found was out of the track to Topsham. W. J. Trace, of Exminster, a juryman, stated that he saw deceased early in the evening at St. Thomas, Exeter, when he seemed to be tipsy. At a quarter to eight he saw him in the road leading to Exminster Station, when he asked if he was in time to catch the Exeter train. On telling him that the train was gone STANTON said "I have lost everything, I had better go and have a cold bath". At half-past nine witness saw the deceased a third time in the village of Exminster. He then appeared much more "reasonable". When witness saw him last he was walking towards the railway station. John Clarke, assistant at Turf locks, proved finding the body; the head was above the water, which was only two feet deep. Mr M. Farrant, surgeon, attributed death to drowning; but added that there was a slight abrasion on the right cheek and temple, which seemed to have resulted from a fall on gravel before death. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

EXETER - INQUESTS. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Anchor Inn, Paul Street, last Wednesday evening on the body of JOHN GATER, a shoeing smith aged 49, who lived in Paul's-place, Paul-street, up to Wednesday morning, when he died at the Anchor Inn very suddenly. The deceased recently broke a blood vessel, but recovered and apparently regained his former health. On Wednesday morning he visited the Anchor Inn and ordered a glass of ale. While drinking it in the taproom he suddenly exclaimed to a person who was in the room with him that he thought he would go home, as "he was dying." He then commenced to vomit blood, and before medical assistance could be obtained he died. Mr Bell, surgeon, said it was clear that death resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

On Thursday afternoon at the Anchor Inn, Exe Island, Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest respecting the death of ALBERT SOWDEN, three weeks old, who died suddenly. Mr John Perkins, surgeon, said death had evidently resulted from internal convulsions, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

In the evening of the same day the Coroner held an Inquest at the Teignmouth Inn, West Quarter, on the body of ALFRED WILLIAM PARRINGTON, aged 17. Deceased was the son of Colour-Sergeant PARRINGTON, of the 1st Devon Militia, residing in St. Thomas, Exeter. For three weeks he had been missing and nothing was heard of him until Wednesday evening when his partly decomposed body was found in one of the mill leats in the West Quarter. MR PARRINGTON, the father, stated that his son left home on the morning of the 22nd March to go to his work in the county-house of Mr James Rowe, High-street; but he never returned home, although he was seen as late as nine o'clock by a young woman named Pulman, with whom he had been "keeping company" for a few weeks, and at half-past ten by a compositor named Satterly. Deceased had been getting depressed in spirits for some months, which witness attributed to the effects of a sunstroke last summer. Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, stated that there were no marks of violence on the body, and that death was evidently caused by drowning. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Wednesday 1 May 1878, Issue 5907 – Gale Document No. Y3200725812 HALBERTON – Shocking Suicide On The Railway. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, on Saturday held an Inquest at the Swan Inn, touching the death of ROBERT MORGAN, a sawyer, thirty-five years of age, who committed suicide on the previous Thursday evening, by throwing himself in front of the Tiverton train. It appeared from the evidence that the train, which left the junction for the town shortly after six o'clock, had proceeded about half-way between the two stations, and had arrived at the canal bridge, where there is a curve and an incline, when Chalker, the driver of the engine, observed a man deliberately place himself upon the metals, at a distance of some twenty yards in front of the advancing train. The train passed over the man, who was frightfully mutilated. He was decapitated, and his body nearly severed; one foot was cut off, the other torn off; there were other indescribable injuries. The train was pulled up within about thirty yards of the fatal occurrence, and before some of the passengers were aware of what had happened; but nothing could be done, and the body was allowed to remain until assistance could be procured to convey it to Halberton. MORGAN many years ago served in the Household Cavalry, and subsequently in the Devon County Constabulary, but was discharged from both on account of his intemperate habits. Afterwards he was confined for some time in a lunatic asylum, and since then he has lived at Halberton, where he was employed by his brother as a sawyer. The man had been strange in his manner for some time before his death, and the woman with whom he lodged did not think he was accountable for his actions. "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was the verdict of the Jury.

Wednesday 15 May 1878, issue 5909 – Gale Document No. Y3200725885 TALLATON – Fatal Accident. - On Saturday an Inquest was held before S. M. Cox, Esq., District Coroner, on the body of GEORGE SALTER, who met with his death on Thursday last, through being thrown out of a cart. The Rev. R. Gildart, Rector of Clyst St. Mary, saw the deceased just before the accident, riding in the cart, when suddenly the horse stated off, and deceased was thrown out. When the vicar reached the spot he found the unfortunate man was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 22 May 1878, Issue 5910 – Gale Document No. Y3200725912 EXETER – Fatal Boating Accident. - A sad accident occurred on the Quay on Saturday evening, by which two boys, NAMED WILLIAM VENN, aged seventeen, a printer's apprentice, and GEORGE BRADFORD, fourteen, errand boy, lost their lives, and a third had a narrow escape. The particulars of the accident will be found in evidence below, which was taken at the Inquest, held before the County Coroner, (R. R. Crosse, Esq.) yesterday morning, at the Plymouth Inn, Alphington-street. John Doust, son of Joseph Doust, Exe-lane, stated that he met VENN and BRADFORD on the Quay, and was asked by them to steer a boat which they were about to engage. He accompanied them. They rowed up the river and near Gabriell's timber-yard the deceased began rocking the boat. Witness asked them to desist this, but they refused. Eventually the boat fell over, and all three went into the water. Witness swam to a pole which was held out to him from the bank. He did not observe what became of the others, but he saw a hat floating. The boat was a skiff, but it was a proper boat for three persons. The skiff was in the middle of the river when it capsized. Richard Knowles, smith, whose shop is on the Haven Banks, was informed by a man in his employ that a boat had capsized in the river. On going out he saw the boat half filled with water, and in a moment it went over. He ran to his shop procured a rope and grappling iron, and his man took a pole, at the end f which was a crook. He threw the grapple between the deceased and called to them to take the rope, but they were splashing the water to such an extent that, in all probability, they could not see the rope. One threw up his hands, but neither caught the rope. He threw it out a second time, but after they sank they did not rise. It appeared one of them could swim, and no doubt would have saved himself had not the other held on to him. There was a strong current at the time. The boat was quite capable of carrying three persons, and he had seen three men in a similar one. Samuel Hutchings, of the Royal Navy Reserve, who has been before the Coroner six or seven times to give similar evidence, deposed that he found the deceased on Sunday. VENN about four o'clock, and BRADFORD an hour afterwards. He picked them up about a hundred yards from the spot where the boat capsized. The Coroner expressed great sympathy with the parents of the deceased, which was endorsed by the Jury, who immediately after returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 22 May 1878, Issue 5910 – Gale Document No. Y3200725904 EXETER – Another Death By Drowning. - The County Coroner (R. R. Crosse, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Pack Horse Inn, St. Thomas, yesterday afternoon, on the body of a lad, aged seven years, and named GEORGE LEWIS MILFORD. From the evidence it appeared the boy, whose mother is dead, was living with his aunt, who sent him an errand on Monday, between one and two o'clock from which he never returned. Early yesterday morning the body of the lad was picked up in a gravel pit on the Freehold Land Society's Estate, St. Thomas, which is but a short distance from the shop to which the deceased was sent. Children are in the habit of playing near these pits, which are private property, and free from any kind of fencing. The Coroner said no doubt the owner would now have some kind of fencing put around these pits. As there was no evidence as to how the child got into the water, he directed the Jury to return a verdict of Found Drowned.

Wednesday 29 May 1878, Issue 5911 – Gale Document No. Y3200725932 Exeter – Sudden Deaths. - The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest on Monday at the Paper Makers Arms, on the body of JOHN BUTLAND, a mason, aged 67, who died while in a fit. A verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned.

An Inquest was also held on the body of MRS BROWN, aged 72, who was found dead in her house in Bartholomew-street. Her death was attributed to heart disease and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Wednesday 5 June 1878, Issue 5912 – Gale Document No. Y3200725981 WHIPTON - Suicide. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday at Wright's Half Moon Inn, on the body of MR THOMAS ADAMS, who committed suicide early on Sunday morning, 26th inst., at the house of his brother, Polsloe Barton. It appeared that deceased slept in the same room with two of his nephews, both of whom awoke about four o'clock, when they observed their uncle lying on the bed in a pool of blood and quite dead. A razor and a knife were found by his side. Dr Roberts, who was immediately sent for, found that he had inflicted a large wound in the abdomen, and that the intestines were protruding. He pronounced it a most extraordinary case of suicide. Deceased was certainly not in his right mind. Some years ago he was confined in an asylum for a short time. The Jury, after a few minutes consultation, returned a verdict that deceased "Committed Suicide in a state of Insanity."

NORTH TAWTON – Fatal Carriage Accident. - On Thursday evening a sad accident occurred at the Sampford Four Crossways by which MR A. C. LEWIS, an accountant in the Okehampton Branch of the National Provincial Bank of England, lost his life. The bank has a branch at North Tawton which is open on market days, and the deceased, with Mr Scivell, had been there to attend to the business on Thursday last. In the evening as they were driving home, the horse shied at a dog which jumped out of the hedge just in front of it, and both occupants of the trap were thrown out into the road. The deceased sustained an extensive fracture of the skull and other injuries from the effects of which he died on the following day. Mr Scivell escaped with very little hurt. On Saturday an Inquest was held at the Gostwyck Arms, before R. Fulford, Esq., County Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental death" was returned. Deceased who was forty-one years of age, and had been in the bank for about a quarter of a century, was very much respected, and his death has cast a gloom over Okehampton. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his death.

Wednesday 5 June 1878, Issue 5912 – Gale Document No. Y3200725982 MURDER AND ATTEMPTED SUICIDE NEAR BIDEFORD. - A painful sensation was caused in the little fishing village of Appledore on Sunday morning, by the discovery that a young female child had been murdered by her mother – ANNIE BERRY SYDNEY, the wife of THOMAS W. SYDNEY, a seaman. It appears that the young woman, who is about twenty-six years of age, had two children, one five years old and the other only six months. Since her last confinement she has been desponding and nervous, but there seems to have been no evidence of actual insanity, and little fear of her doing harm was felt. On Saturday, however, she attempted to drown herself and infant child in the Torridge. This she was prevented from doing, and was taken to the house of her mother, MRS TATEM, a widow, where she remained the night and had breakfast on Sunday morning. Subsequent to this meal the unhappy woman was left for a time to herself, and she took advantage of this to return home. Upon arrival here she seems to have placed the child on a bed, and then to have plunged a table knife, which was exceedingly blunt, into its throat near the left ear, inflicting a large and fatal wound, two inches in length. She then left the house and again attempted to drown herself, but was prevented by two sailors named Lamey. When apprehended she told the policeman how she inflicted the wound, and the knife was found concealed under a toilet cloth. An Inquest was held on Monday by Mr J. Toller, Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of "Wilful Murder" was returned.

Wednesday 12 June 1878, Issue 5913 – Gale Document No. Y3200725995 TORQUAY – Two Young Ladies Drowned. - On Thursday DORA KATE TAYLOR aged 10, and MARGARET TAYLOR, aged 9, daughters of MR TAYLOR, a clergyman staying at Babbicombe, were drowned by slipping off the rocks on which they were playing at Watcombe. Before they could be reached by bystanders they had sunk. An Inquest was held on Thursday before Mr Michelmore, District Coroner, when it appeared from the evidence of a brother of the deceased girls that they all went to Pellitor early in the morning to sail their boats. After they had their dinner, which they had taken in a basket, they put the boats into a pool between some rocks. He however accidentally let the reel of cotton which was tied to his boat fall into the sea, and in endeavouring to get his boat he fell into the water also. Being able to swim a little, he got out again, and after drying himself called to his sister DORA, who was standing on the rocks, to give him another reel of cotton. She was coming towards him when she slipped her foot and fell into the sea. He attempted to get her out, and whilst so doing she caught sight of her sister on the rock, and called to her to help. LILY endeavoured to do so, but getting too close to the edge of the rock, slipped, and likewise fell into the water. Both caught hold of him, and he made his way to the edge of the rock, but his sisters let go their hold of him. Shortly after he found he could stand, but being very tired, a wave knocked him down again, and on regaining his feet, he saw DORA lying with her face downwards on the top of the water, and LILY was sinking. He thought his sisters were in the water about a quarter of an hour. Their bodies were picked up by the Rev. William Hamerton, senior curate of Torre Church, who happened to be near by in a boat at the time and was hailed by the brother. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and much sympathy was expressed for MR TAYLOR, who is suffering from a severe illness.

Wednesday 19 June 1878, Issue 5914 – Gale Document No. Y3200726048 TOPSHAM – Suicide. - Mr R. R. Crosse, District Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday, respecting the death of JOHN LEY, who had died from a wound in the throat, self-inflicted about three weeks since. It appeared that deceased had been ill for some months, and Mr Bothwell, surgeon, was decidedly of opinion that his mind had been temporarily deranged in consequence of his bodily sufferings. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this evidence.

HEAVITREE – Scalded to Death. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, on Thursday, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on view of the body of NINA ANN SABINA CORAM, aged five years, the child of ROBERT CORAM, a labourer, living at Heavitree, who was mortally scalded on the previous Tuesday. From the statement of the child's father it appeared that between seven and eight o'clock, he was sitting by the fire having a cup of tea after coming home from work, whilst his daughter was playing around him with a ball. The plaything hopped on the chimney-piece, and she took a stool to reach it down. As she was getting up, the stool overturned, and she fell into the fire-place. In her fall she caught hold of the handle of a saucepan filled with boiling broth, upsetting the contents over herself. Her injuries were so severe that she was sent to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Hugh Gordon Cumming, house-surgeon to the hospital, said the child was received into the institution suffering from severe scalds on the lower part of the back, left thigh, arm and shoulder, and she had one or two spots on the face. She was dressed and put to bed, but she was exceedingly restless. On the following day she had convulsions, and she died on Thursday morning from the shock to the system, caused by the injuries. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

NEWTON ST. CYRES. - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, on Thursday last, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of JAMES WESTAWAY, a mason, aged fifty-two, who died on the way to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, from the effects of injuries received in an accident at the Newton Railway station. Evidence was given to show that on Thursday, when the down train arrived at the Newton St. Cyres railway station, about six o'clock, eight workmen were standing on the platform, and six of them entered one of the carriages. The whistle had sounded and the train was in motion when the deceased and another man attempted to get into a carriage. The other man succeeded, but the deceased slipped and fell between the platform and the rails, the train passing over his legs. His legs were fearfully lacerated, one being completely severed from the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 19 June 1878, Issue 5914 – Gale Document No. Y3200726033 EXETER – Singular Death. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on Saturday afternoon, touching the death of a boy named FREDERICK WILLIAM BEADLE, aged seven years. In the evidence it transpired that the lad was an illegitimate child, and was placed with a married woman named Hannah Simmons, of Frog-street, who had maintained him for a considerable time for nothing, the whereabouts of his mother being unknown. On June 3rd the lad was helping Mrs Simmons close her shop In bringing a shutter through the passage he fell, but declared he had not hurted himself. He made no complaint during the evening, but between twelve and one o'clock in the night he said he had injured himself. Mrs Simmons attended to him; but for the remainder of the night he kept crying, was uneasy, and slept only at intervals. About eleven o'clock the next morning she took the sufferer to the hospital. The only mark of injury she could see was on the back of his hand. He was always a fine, healthy boy. Mr Hugh Gordon Cumming, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, deposed that since death he had made a post mortem examination, at the Coroner's request. He first examined the body externally for marks or bruises, but could find none. The cause of death was no doubt intus susception of the bowels, causing a complete obstruction. There was nothing to show that death resulted from, or was accelerated by, the accident. Intus susception was an ordinary disease, and might come on naturally and without any injury whatever. The case was one of the highest medical interest, and the post mortem examination had greatly assisted them. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 26 June 1878, Issue 5915 – Gale Document No. Y3200726062 MANSLAUGHTER AT PLYMOUTH. – Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Naval Hospital on Thursday relative to the death of Private RICHARD MUGFORD, of the 10th Company Royal Marine Light Infantry. On the 8th instant, deceased and Private Lemon had a quarrel at the Stonehouse Marine Barracks, when Lemon knocked deceased over some steps, causing fracture of the skull, from the effects of which death ensued. A verdict of Manslaughter was returned against Lemon.

Wednesday 26 June 1878, Issue 5915 – Gale Document No. Y3200726068 EXETER – Deaths by Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Friday at the Double Locks Inn, before R. H. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of LEVY SNELL GROVES, a butler, aged 50, whose body was found in the Canal between Salmon Pool bridge and Double Locks, on Thursday. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, who was a butler, had been for some months out of employment, and for some time past had been in a desponding state. About three years ago the deceased had to be confined in the lunatic asylum at Fisherton, and of late he had in various ways shewed himself very eccentric. He was last seen alive on the evening of the 15th, and he was then going in the direction of Quay-hill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Port Royal Inn, respecting the death of CHARLES EBBLES, who was drowned whilst fishing from a boat moored near the Ballast Quay on Saturday night. The deceased was seventy-four years old, and was a tin-plate worker and brazier. On Saturday night at a quarter to eleven, he went out for the purpose of catching eels. He went into a boat which was moored to the Town Council barge, that being almost in front of his house, and that was the last his wife saw of him alive. A few hours later his body was found by another fisherman named Arthur Moore. He found the body of the deceased hanging over the side of his boat, partly immersed in the water and his legs caught under one of the seats in the boat. He had apparently been dead for some hours. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, stated that the deceased came under his treatment about three months ago as a parish patient, suffering from bronchitis and heart disease. Witness attended him until the 9th of May, when deceased told him he felt better, and thought he did not require him further. On Sunday morning at four o'clock witness was called to see the body of the deceased at his house. He had evidently been dead some hours. The clothes were wet and the body cold and stiff. There had been no struggle, and there were none of the usual symptoms of death by drowning. Witness had no doubt he fell into the water when dead (or, perhaps, when insensible), and that he died from heart disease. In fact he should not have been surprised to hear he had fallen down in the street and died at any moment. Death, therefore, he considered, resulted from, "Natural Causes." The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

The Late MR SPENDER. - The bodies of REGINALD and SYDNEY SPENDER, who were drowned at the Whitsands, near Plymouth, several days ago, together with their father, MR SPENDER, were recovered on Saturday. They were found floating in the water about a mile from where the fatality occurred. Nothing has yet been seen of MR SPENDER. An Inquest was held on the bodies at the Polhawn coastguard station, near Tregantle Fort, on Monday evening, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst bathing," and desired Mr Groser to convey to the widow and other relatives their deep sympathy with them in their great bereavement.

Wednesday 3 July 1878, Issue 5916 – Gale Document No. Y3200726119 TEIGNMOUTH – Scalded to Death. - Mr Michelmore, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Teignmouth on Monday on the body of LOUISA SMITH, aged two and a half years, who was scalded to death by falling into a pan of clothes and water, which the child's mother had just taken out of a saucepan of boiling water. After the accident three doctors were successively sent for, neither of whom went to see the child, but Dr Edwards saw the child on Wednesday and ordered a remedy. He did not see the child again until it was dead. The Coroner strongly commented on the lack of medical attendance. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 10 July 1878, Issue 5917 – Gale Document No. Y3200726153 BROADCLYST - Inquest. - Mr H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, South-street, Exeter, last Saturday morning, touching the death of RICHARD COOMBES, labourer, twenty-seven years of age, and a resident of Broadclyst. It appeared that deceased had been ailing for some time, and about a week ago was so very much worse that Dr Somers advised his removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. On Thursday he was admitted to that institution, and Mr R. F. Cumming, acting house-surgeon, deposed that the man was then in a state of coma, and was at once put to bed, being placed under the usual treatment. Deceased continued in the same state until his death, which took place early on Friday morning. Witness considered the case very obscure, and Dr Budd was of the same opinion. A post mortem examination had been made since death, and witness considered the cause of death to be acute hydrocephalus. The condition of the brain would account for the state of coma in which the deceased was at the time he was received into the Hospital. It would have been impossible to have certified the cause of death without the post mortem having been made. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural causes," adding that they considered the case a fitting one for Inquiry.

Wednesday 24 July 1878, Issue 5919 – Gale Document No. Y3200726208 EXETER – Fatal Accident At St. David's. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier inn, Magdalen-street, on Thursday evening, respecting the death of a man named SAMUEL PARR, which took place in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he had been taken after being severely injured at St. David's railway station. The deceased, who was in the employ of the Great Western Company, went to work about six o'clock on the 10th instant, and, to save himself the trouble of going around a good's train, attempted to get to the other side by crawling underneath a truck. At that moment the train started, and the wheels passed over one of his legs. Mr Cumming, house surgeon at the hospital, stated that the deceased sustained injuries to the left foot just over the ankle joint. The patient progressed favourably until the 15th instant, when it was found that tetanus (lockjaw) had set in. The foot was amputated, but the deceased expired on the following day. Death, in his opinion, resulted from tetanus. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, on Monday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, respecting the death of MR THOMAS HOWE, a gentleman of independent means, who had committed suicide by cutting his throat. Deceased lived at Austwick-terrace, the whole of which was his property. He had been at sea during one part of his life, but for some years had lived in retirement, devoting much of his time to hunting. About eighteen months ago, when out with the hounds, he fell from a horse, and sustained an injury to his head, which it is probable affected his mind, for of late he has been occasionally much depressed in spirits. On Sunday afternoon just after dinner deceased went into the garden at the rear of his house, and was observed by the servant to be walking about as if enjoying the air. At tea-time he was called, but made no answer, and on the servant going to look for him he was discovered in a semi-prostrate condition, with his throat cut almost from ear to ear. A carving-knife, with which the wound had been inflicted, was lying on the ground close at hand. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Wednesday 31 July 1878, Issue 5920 – Gale Document No. Y3200726244 STARCROSS – The Fatal Accident At The Station. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Courtenay Arms, on the body of the woman killed by the train on Tuesday. She was identified by Mr Bartlett, saddler, of Kenton, as his mother, EMMA BARTLET, of Coombe-street, Exeter, and her age was given as about sixty. She was of eccentric habits, and had occasionally been known to enter and leave trains as if she did not wish to be seen. She took a ticket on Tuesday evening from Starcross to St. Thomas, and though the train remained at the station for three or four minutes, giving all who wished to do so, ample opportunity of entering, she appears to have attempted to get into a carriage after the train was in motion. Thomas Searle, a fish hawker, of Exmouth, and William George Manley, of Castle-street, Exeter, were in the train at the time, and saw the occurrence. The train started before the woman jumped up off a seat on the platform, and in attempting to get into a carriage her foot slipped off the step and she fell down between the platform and the carriage wheels. The train was stopped as quickly as possible, but the woman was dead when extricated from the wheels, and surgical examination showed that her neck was dislocated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the railway officials from all blame. Near the spot where the deceased was extricated, a sum of upwards of 7s. was discovered.

NEWTON ABBOT. – Fatal Affray. – An Inquest was opened at the Town Hall on Saturday night, before H. Michelmore, Esq., District Coroner, touching the death of HENRY WOOD, a labourer, aged thirty-eight, who died on the previous night under somewhat suspicious circumstances. It appeared from the evidence of deceased's wife that he had been suffering for three weeks from injuries in various parts of his body. His eyes were blackened, there was a scar across his nose, and a cut on his temple which had been bleeding pretty much. He told her that he was in the stable doing up his horse, and Sam Lock came in unawares and knocked him down, kicked him in the head, and knelt on him. He shouted for his master, Mr Prince, who came and pulled Lock from him. She asked him what it was about, and he replied, "It was all about a waggon." She heard her husband say to Mr Tapson, a neighbour, "If my master had not come to my rescue and took me away Lock would have killed me." Early on Wednesday morning he left home to go to work, but was taken ill in the street, and did not rally afterwards. Mr Nathaniel T. J. Haydon, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Wednesday morning, and continued to see him two or three times a day up to the time of his death. Deceased was suffering from intense pains in the head; the pain at times seemed to be quite bewildering, and the pupils of his eyes were dilated with it. He had made a post mortem examination of the body, which was nourished and without external marks of violence. Upon his removing the skull cap a great deal of dark coloured blood escaped. The surface of the brain itself was very muscular, and contained a deal of blood. On his taking the brain out of the skull, he found about an ounce and a half of fluid in the base of the skull. There was a large clot of blood under the left lobe. The injuries to the brain might have been caused by a severe blow. With the brain in such a state as it was in it would be impossible for a person to live long. He was of opinion that the blow, which it had been stated deceased received, was sufficient to cause effusion of blood on the brain. Other witnesses were examined and the Inquest was adjourned until Monday, when evidence was produced as to the assault, the result being that the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Samuel Lock, who was committed for trial.

Wednesday 7 August 1878, Issue 5921 – Gale Document No. Y3200726275 EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held this (Wednesday) morning at the New Market Inn, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, touching the death of MRS ELIZABETH SQUIRE MARCHANT, which occurred very suddenly the previous morning at her residence in Goldsmith-street. The deceased, who was well known and greatly respected, had carried on the business of a baker and confectioner for many years, and was in her 74th year. The principal witness called was ELIZABETH BRINSMEAD, who stated that her aunt went to bed on Monday night in her usual health. The next morning she saw her in bed at a quarter past seven, and asked her how she was. Deceased answered that she was pretty well, but witness thought she did not speak very cheerfully, and said her aunt had been depressed of late. Twenty minutes afterwards on going upstairs again, she found deceased on the floor and quite insensible. Mr Webb, surgeon, said he was the deceased's medical attendant, but he had not seen her for ten days He then treated her for bronchitis and general weakness. He was called in yesterday morning and found his patient dead. She was of a very excitable temperament. In his opinion death resulted from syncope brought on by weakness. The Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

Wednesday 14 August 1878, Issue 5922 – Gale Document No. Y3200726318 EXMINSTER – Fatal Accident With A Threshing Machine. – On Saturday last the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, on the body of HENRY MUGFORD, a farm labourer, who had lived in St. Thomas. On Thursday the deceased was employed on Mr George Loram's farm at Exminster, feeding a threshing machine. The deceased had put a sheaf of corn in the machine, when some straws fell across the fly, and MUGFORD on trying to clear the straws from the wheel got his hand entangled, and his arm was drawn into the machine. A man named Mogridge, who was working with him, on seeing this called to the engine driver to stop the machine, but before this could be done deceased had been drawn so far into the machine that his head came into contact with the fly-wheel, and caused the belt to slip off. The unfortunate man was released as quickly as possible and taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Hugh Gordon Cumming, house surgeon, said the deceased was received into the hospital on Thursday evening about half-past seven. His right arm was almost crushed from his body, near to the shoulder. The lower part of the arm was entirely gone, and what remained was afterwards removed by an operation. Deceased never recovered from the shock, and he died on Friday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". Mr Walters, the owner of the machine, said in reply to the Jury, that it was possible to partially guard against such accidents, but not entirely so. At one time all his machines were guarded, but the men removed the fencing, which impeded the progress of their work. The Coroner thought an Act of Parliament had just been passed directing that all such machines should be made properly secure.

Wednesday 14 August 1878, Issue 5922 – Gale Document No. Y3200726321 MANSLAUGHTER AT PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Plymouth touching the death of a porter, named GEORGE PALMER. It appeared that deceased went aboard the French ship, Auguste and Marie, in the Great Western Docks, to see a friend, when a chain used in hauling up the coals, and which had been previously broken and tied together with pieces of rope, suddenly snapped. In falling the chain twisted itself round Palmer's deck, threw him violently against the combings of the hatchway, and dragged him down into the hold, killing him instantly. It was proved that the captain's attention had been called to the condition of the chain, but that he took little or no notice of it. A verdict of Manslaughter was returned against the captain, Joseph Leblet, and he was committed for trial on the Coroner's warrant.

Wednesday 21 August 1878, Issue 5923 – Gale Document No. Y3200726337 DAWLISH – Scalded to Death. - On Wednesday last Mr H. Michelmore, County Coroner, held an Inquest respecting the death of AMY ELIZA HOSEGOOD, aged about 2 ½ years, the daughter of MR ALFRED HOSEGOOD, baker, Brook Street. The child accidentally pulled over a bucket of boiling water on herself, and was so severely scalded that, although promptly attended to by Mr F. M. Cann, surgeon, she died in the course of a few hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 21 August 1878, Issue 5923 – Gale Document No. Y3200726334 EXETER – Inquests. The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Turk's Head Inn, High-street, last Wednesday, on the body of MARY WHITE JONES, the infant daughter of MARTHA CHOUN JONES, of Waterbeer-street. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, stated that death was evidently the result of convulsions, and a verdict was returned to that effect.

On Thursday, at the Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, Mr Hooper inquired into the circumstances attending the death of a boy named JAMES WHITE, aged 5, whose body was found in the river near the ferry on the previous day. The lad left his home for school on Tuesday after dinner, but did not return, and a little boy told the mother that the deceased had fallen into the river from a lamp-post which he was climbing. Mr Boundy, who obtained permission to make a statement, said that on the day named he saw some boys playing in a barge near the quay, and he thought that one of them, to judge b y his size and dress, was the deceased. He suggested the advisability of having a policeman to visit the spot occasionally to prevent further accidents. The Coroner explained that he had nothing to do with the police regulations, neither did he think the occasional visit of a policeman to the spot would avert such casualties. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Death from Drowning."

ACCIDENT WHILST HARVESTING. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn last evening, touching the death of an elderly pensioner, of Mary's Clist, who met with his death the previous day whilst harvesting on Sandy Park Farm. It appeared from the evidence that deceased, named HENRY HALL, aged fifty-seven, was engaged in carting wheat from a field to the stacking ground. About eleven o'clock on Monday he drove the empty cart from the unfinished rick, and shortly after the cart returned laden, but no one in charge of it. A search was made for the deceased, and he was found lying on his left side in a carriage drive, through which the waggon had been passing. He was asked how the accident happened, but he was unable to articulate. He was immediately placed in a cart and sent to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where, on examination, it was found that he was in a state of collapse, and only partially conscious. His jaw had been fractured in two places, his right collar bone broken, shoulder much bruised, and right side of his chest crushed in. Apparently some heavy body had passed over his chest and face. The Jury were inclined to believe that deceased fell from the shafts, and thus got under the wheels of the waggon. He was perfectly sober, and the horse he had been driving quiet. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 4 September 1878, Issue 5925 – Gale Document No. Y3200726417 SAMPFORD COURTENAY - Fatal Accident. – On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Sampford Courtenay Station, before R. M. Fulford, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN SMITH, a labourer in the employ of Mr Brady, railway contractor, who was knocked down by an engine, and killed, on Wednesday, whilst at work on the line. The deceased, who was about fifty years of age, was a resident of Southmolton, but had been working on the line for some months. From the evidence of Joseph Morcom, a fellow labourer, John Sharland, the engine-driver, and others, it appeared that at about one o'clock on Wednesday the deceased was engaged with a party of labourers in doubling the line between Sampford Courtenay and Okehampton. Deceased was engaged in filling one of the wagons. Morcom, whilst in another waggon, heard a train signalled, and just afterwards, on looking down, saw the deceased, who was very deaf, come from the back of the wagons and attempt to cross the line, probably with a view of getting his dinner. Morcom immediately shouted to deceased to get out of the way. Deceased heard him, looked up, and tried to jump back off the line, but the train struck him in the breast with such force that he was thrown a distance of fifteen yards along the side of the line. Deceased's fellow labourers at once went to his assistance, but found that he was quite dead. At the time of the accident steam had been shut off with a view of stopping at Sampford Courtenay, about three quarters of a mile distant. the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental death, expressing their belief that the accident had arisen through the deceased being deaf. An opinion was also expressed that persons troubled with this infirmity should not be employed on railways. Mr Rogers, who watched the case on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company, said that the deceased was not employed by the company, but by the contractor. All the company's servants were examined on this point before they were engaged.

Wednesday 4 September 1878, Issue 5925 – Gale Document No. Y3200726400 EXETER – Starved To Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the City Workhouse on Saturday morning, touching the death of the infant child of FANNY EWINGS, a single woman, living with her mother in Silver-place, Blackboy-road. It appeared from the evidence that the child when born was small but apparently healthy. The mother did not suckle the child because she had to go out to work. A Mrs Farley suckled it. SUSAN EWINGS, a widow, the grandmother of the deceased, said it was arranged that Mrs Farley should nurse the child and suckle it on account of witness's daughter having to go daily to work from eight o'clock in the morning until late in the evening. Witness took charge of the child by day, Mrs Farley coming to witness's house to suckle it on an average three or four times a day. On Saturday she discontinued nursing the deceased, because it had the "thrush." From that date witness fed the infant on new milk, of which she consumed about a pint daily. On Friday, the 23rd, the child was taken ill with diarrhoea, in consequence of which she took it to Mr Bell, surgeon, who gave her some medicine for it. He said it was dying for want of being naturally suckled. By the Foreman: Witness gave the milk to the child in a bottle, and sometimes she fed it with a spoon. Bessie Farley, wife of a labourer, living in Silver-place, corroborated, and added that the child was apparently a healthy child, but it never throve, and seemed to pine away. Both mother and grandmother were very kind to it. Mr Hookway, relieving officer for the Eastern district, deposed to having given relief to the grandmother for her daughter and child. At his (witness's) advice they were both removed to the Workhouse. Mr C. E. Bell, one of the medical officers for the Corporation, stated that he told the grandmother that the mother was bound to suckle the child if she was in good health; and he added that, if this was not done, she would be responsible for its death. Mr Woodman, medical officer at the Workhouse, stated that when the deceased was brought to the House it was very small, and in a very emaciated condition. He saw that it was dying, and gave directions to the nurse as to the treatment the mother and child should receive. Mr Woodman then detailed the results of the post mortem. The child measured 18 ¾ inches in length, and weighted 4lbs. 1oz., the average weight of a child at birth being seven pounds. He considered that death resulted from exhaustion arising from the want of sufficient nourishment, and in this Mr Bell concurred. The Jury, after a lengthy deliberation, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, being of opinion that there was no evidence of sufficient criminal neglect to warrant them in returning a verdict of manslaughter, although the case was one showing very gross neglect.

Wednesday 11 September 1878, Issue 5926 – Gale Document No. Y3200726446 BARNSTAPLE – Accidental Poisoning. - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, on Monday respecting the death of a little boy named CHARLES SQUIRE, aged two years. On Saturday the child was at play with his little sister and a boy named Basset, son of Aron Bassett, a groom in the employ of Mr Gamble, surgeon. There was a bottle containing carbolic acid on the ground, in a corner of the saddle-room, where the children were. It was not labelled, and Mr Gamble was not aware that it was there, while the groom had never used it, and did not know what the bottle contained. The boy got hold of the bottle, and passed it to the little girl, intending that they should each take a drink. It burnt her mouth, and Bassett gave it to the deceased, who drank some and immediately screamed. Bassett dropped the bottle, and it was broken. the child went indoors, and soon began to foam at the mouth. Mr Gamble was called in and applied the usual remedies for irritant poisoning. The child was subsequently taken to the Infirmary, where it died from exhaustion, consequent on the effects of the poison, on Sunday morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 18 September 1878, Issue 5927 – Gale Document No. Y3200726457 INQUEST AT ST. THOMAS WORKHOUSE. - Alleged Death Through Removal. - An Inquest was held at the St. Thomas Union Workhouse on Saturday before R. R. Crosse, Esq., the County Coroner, touching the death of a man named WILLIAM PERCY, lately living at Wonford, who was carried to the workhouse on Wednesday last, and died the following day. The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said it was their duty to find out whether or not there was any blame attached to either of the overseers at Wonford in allowing the deceased man to be removed to the workhouse, knowing at the time that he was not in a fit condition to be removed. The doctor had refused to give a certificate of death, supposing his removal to have been the cause of his death. Mr G. Timewell, the master of the workhouse, said that the deceased was received into the workhouse on the 11th instant, about 2.30 p.m. Witness was not at home at the time, but when he came back in the evening, he visited the deceased. He appeared to be in a very weak condition. Witness spoke to him, but he made no reply, and on the following day he died. Jane Rowe, nurse at the workhouse, said the deceased was admitted by Mr Scaines, the schoolmaster. Mr Havill, the assistant-overseer at Heavitree, came in the cab with the deceased. The deceased appeared to be very weak, and was obliged to be assisted from the cab into the house. Witness put the deceased into a warm bath, and then put him to bed. she gave him some gin as there was no brandy in the surgery, and, the matron being away, she was unable to get any. She believed that Mr Havill gave him a little brandy. The doctor was sent for by Mr Scaines, and he came at once. She tended the deceased until he died on the following day. Mr H. T. Hartnoll said he saw the deceased at the workhouse on Wednesday afternoon. He was in a very weak and exhausted state. Witness asked how long he had been ill, and he replied since Monday PERCY said Dr Williams had attended him, but he had not seen him since Monday. Witness noticed that the patient's breathing was very quick, and hurried. His pulse was also beating very rapidly. PERCY stated that he was in no pain. Witness examined him, and found that both lungs were congested. He considered that the deceased was dying. He ordered the nurse to give him some brandy, and was told that Mr Havill had given him some. The deceased was properly treated after he went into the workhouse. Witness declined to give an order for burial, because he thought that deceased should not have been removed in the state in which he then was, although the deceased would have died under any circumstances. He should not like to say that removing him accelerated his death, although it might have done so. The immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs. JAMES PERCY said he was the brother of the deceased, and that his brother had been living with Mrs Lowden at the Wonford Inn, about a quarter of a mile from his (witness's) house. He had not heard that the deceased was ill until Monday and did not know that he was going to be carried to the workhouse. He never knew that his brother was in want of any relief, or he would have relieved him. He visited the deceased on Tuesday, but was not told that he wanted anything, or that he was going to the workhouse. Witness did not give him anything, thinking that he did not need it. The next thing he heard of the deceased was, that he had been removed to the workhouse. Witness went there to see him. He also saw Dr Hartnoll, and told him that the deceased ought not to have been removed without his (witness's) knowledge. Mary Ann Lowden, said that she lived with her husband at the Wonford Inn, and the deceased had lived with them since last winter. For some time, lately, he had been unable to work, and had lived on their bounty. His brother knew that he was not able to work, but he never offered to relieve him in any way, nor ever came to see him until the day before he was taken to the workhouse. The deceased would never keep to his bed, but would wander out into the garden and lie on the ground. Deceased asked witness to get him an order for the workhouse, and when Mr Havill called she heard deceased ask to be taken into the Union as quickly as possible. Mr Havill said that he would, and about 1.30 he came with a cab, and took the deceased away. Deceased walked from the house to the cab unassisted. Witness considered that the deceased was in a fit condition to be removed. Mr Williams, surgeon, Heavitree, said that he saw the deceased on Tuesday, and from what he saw of him then he was of opinion that he was in a fit state to be removed the next day. Witness did not think that doing so hastened his death. Mr G. Havill, assistant-overseer at Heavitree, said that when he went to Mrs Lowden's house on Wednesday morning, he found the deceased out walking in the garden. He spoke to him, and the deceased told him that he wanted to go into the Union as quickly as possible. Witness went to fetch a cab, and returned about half-past one o'clock. The deceased walked to the cab unaided. Witness then got into the cab, and they were driven to the Workhouse. On the way witness gave the deceased a little brandy. Witness thought that the deceased was in a fit condition to be taken to the workhouse. This was all the evidence, and the Coroner, in summing up, said that at first he thought that it was going to be rather a serious case, but now all doubts were dismissed from his mind, and as far as he could see there was no blame attached to any person. He considered that Mr Havill had behaved in a very proper manner in taking the deceased to the workhouse, and had shown no neglect whatever, but, at the same time, he thought that Mr Hartnoll was fully justified in not giving an order for burial. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," the foreman stating that the opinion of the Jury was that no blame was attached to anyone, and that Mr Havill acted in a very humane manner.

Wednesday 25 September 1878, Issue 5928 – Gale Document No. Y3200726511 DAWLISH – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Townhall on Monday, before Mr Rodd, County Coroner – acting on behalf of Mr H. Michelmore – touching the death of MR H. CHEVASSE, aged about forty-four years, who recently came to Dawlish to take up his residence. Deceased, who formerly lived at Walsall, was found dead in his bed room on Friday afternoon. Dr Cann, of Dawlish, being unable to give a medical certificate as to the cause of death, the holding of an Inquest was necessitated. The doctor said he had examined the body of deceased, but found no marks of violence nor anything that indicated the cause of death. The only reason for witness's withholding a certificate of death was that he had not professionally attended deceased. He believed death resulted from natural causes, but was unable to say what those causes were. Other evidence having been taken, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident. - On Thursday afternoon an Inquest was held by Mr R. R. Rodd, Coroner, of Devonport, in the absence of Mr Michelmore and his deputy, Dr. H. Gaye, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY GERMAN, aged twenty-one, an engine cleaner employed by the Great Western Railway Company, who died that morning from the effects of injuries received whilst at his work. MRS GERMAN, who resides at Ashburton, said deceased was her son. She saw him the previous afternoon, and remained with him until his death. He was perfectly sensible, and in reply to her inquiries as to the cause of the accident, said there was no one to blame – it was quite an accident. A young man named Tothill, also an engine-cleaner, said he was employed cleaning the right-hand side of the engine "Roberts" the previous morning, and deceased had the left-hand side. He was coming around by the front of the engine to speak to someone, when he was caught between the buffer, and stoplock. He had no business going around the engine; if he wanted to pass to the other side he should have gone underneath. Dr Scott said he attended the patient at the Hospital. Dianitras was the cause of death. Other witnesses were examined, and the foreman of the yard produced a drawing to show the Jury the position of the stoplock, and how the accident occurred. He said Tothill's statement was correct – the deceased had no business to go in front of the engine, but should have passed underneath. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jurymen gave their fees to the Hospital.

TEIGNMOUTH – The Late Fatal Boat Accident. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest, on Monday, at the Mount Pleasant Inn, between Dawlish and Starcross, upon view of the body of SARAH STEER, aged 25, a married woman, who was drowned in the boat accident off Teignmouth on the evening of Saturday, the 14th instant. THOMAS STEER, husband of the deceased, said on Saturday, the 14th, he and some others hired a boat of Mr Henry Hartnoll, of Teignmouth. There were six in the party, the boat being quite competent to carry six. They stayed at Dawlish a short time. None of them were tipsy. They subsequently left Dawlish to return to Teignmouth. There was half a gallon of ale taken on board the boat, but this was not touched. Witness was sitting by the side of his wife, when the boat upset suddenly, and all the occupants were thrown into the water. The sail was down, and they were just going to pull into Teignmouth as the wind had dropped. Witness said he was thrown with the other occupants into the water on the right side of the boat. He did not know that he was in the water until he rose to the surface. Deceased said, "Oh, Tom, what is the matter?" She then sank, and witness did not see her again. The others clung to the boat, which turned over three or four times. They (the survivors) clung to the bottom of the boat until they were picked up. They were all quite quiet, when the boat turned over from no cause which he could assign. They all had a narrow escape from drowning. A Brixham fishing boat picked up the survivors. s The Coroner said the affair was a most melancholy one, and he could not account for the accident in any way. There could not, however, be a better witness than the present one, as he had lost his own wife, and would be likely to give all evidence in his power. Henry Hartnoll, owner of the boat used, said he had carried fourteen persons in the boat. All the previous witness had said was perfectly true. Could not imagine how the boat had upset, as there was no "larking," and no one moved. Did not even feel the uplifting of the boat. The Rev. H. Hutchings, resident of Teignmouth, said the boat used was a new one, and very good. William Hartwell, farmer, said he found the body at about 4.30 p.m. on Sunday about half a mile east of Langstone Point. In company with a coastguard he removed the body to that house. The Foreman (Mr Loram, of Dawlish) who had been a captain in the merchant service, remarked that he could only account for the upsetting of the boat by the rising under it of a large fish. He had known ships to be upset in this way. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 2 October 1878, Issue 5929 – Gale Document No. Y3200726531 POISONING CASE AT KINGSKERSWELL. - An Inquest was opened at Kingskerswell on Friday afternoon before H. Michelmore, Esq., County Coroner, concerning the death of CHARLES HENRY WILLS, aged thirty-nine years, retired army lieutenant, of Kingskerswell, who died under peculiar circumstances at his residence, Ross Cottage, Kingskerswell, at about three o'clock on Thursday afternoon. ROSE D. WILLS, wife of the deceased, stated that on Wednesday her husband went out for a walk, and came home late to dinner, after which he went to bed apparently well. Between one and two the following morning he got up and went into his dressing room to get, as he said, some chloroform to put into his ear, which had been aching, and subsequently went to sleep. But at about six o'clock in the morning he became very restless, and as he had feverish symptoms she sent for Mr Brown, surgeon. Deceased said nothing more about what he had done beyond the statement that he had put some chloroform into his ear. He took this from a small medicine chest which he always kept in the wardrobe, and which was labelled "Poison. Medicines." Deceased had never been desponding, nor had he ever said that he took anything to make him sleep. she had been married to deceased for sixteen years, and never had any suspicion that anyone had any ill-will towards him, or that he would ever think of destroying himself. A relative of the deceased's and the servant gave similar evidence. Mr David Brown, surgeon, of Kingskerswell, said he had known the deceased for about four years, having attended him professionally on several occasions during that period. He had long suffered from a fractured bone in one of his arms, and on Saturday last he obtained some blistering fluid from witness to apply to the injured arm, which he used in witness's presence. Saw deceased on Sunday, when he said he was relieved. On Tuesday morning deceased sent to him for a renewed supply of tonic, which he supplied. On Thursday morning witness received a message, between six and seven o'clock, to the effect that deceased was dangerously ill. On going at once to the deceased he found him with his face and chest livid, lying on his back, breathing heavily, and apparently in a very deep sleep. The pupils of the eyes were greatly contracted, and the pulse very low. MRS WILLS then made the same statement which she had made in her evidence. He roused deceased up, and asked him what he had taken, to which deceased replied, in a conscious manner, "Nothing, nothing," and then relapsed into sleep. There was no smell in deceased's breath of opium or alcohol. In the right ear was a small piece of cotton wool, which smelt of chloroform. Witness then ran into deceased's dressing-room, where he found the small medicine-chest (produced) open, and also on the table, closed and capped, a bottle of chloroform (produced). Could see nothing else in the room of the kind. Deceased got worse, and witness came to the conclusion that he had been poisoned by opium or its alkaloids. Witness poured strong coffee down deceased's throat, and walked him about the room. Deceased, however, soon dropped down, and witness put him back into bed, sending for Mr Symons,, a resident surgeon, and together they kept deceased alive for a time by artificial respiration. Dr Huxley, of Torquay, who formerly attended deceased, was also sent for, and shortly arrived, and the usual remedies were applied. Mr P. Q. Karkeek, surgeon, of Torquay, was sent from Torquay upon the return of Dr Huxley. Before leaving Dr Huxley searched in the dressing room, and under the cotton wool in the small box (produced) he found the box of pills produced, which were labelled "half-grain morphia pills," of which the box now contained nine. this pill-box was stamped with the style of "J. W. Cocks, pharmaceutical chemist, Torquay." Such pills were unfortunately too commonly sold for the relief of pain and to produce sleep. The effect of morphia or opium upon different constitutions was very varied. It was dangerous for people to take pills of that sort without medical advice. Deceased died on Thursday, at about three p.m., up to which time he was never more than partially conscious after replying "Nothing." Together with Mr Karkeek and Mr Symons witness had that day made a post-mortem examination of the body, which he detailed. It was his opinion that deceased died indirectly from the effects of poison. A half-grain morphia pill was a dangerous one to keep a box of, and to take without medical advice. The enquiry held on Friday evening was adjourned until Monday in order to secure the attendance of Mr J. W. Cocks. At the resumed Enquiry on Monday Mr John Cocks pharmaceutical chemist, Torquay, was called, and said he had known the deceased for about five years, during which time he had constantly supplied him with medicines. On the 3rd of July last he sold deceased a box of morphia pills, similar to the box produced, which contained twenty-four half grain morphia pills of Cox's make, Brighton. Deceased had never before bought any such pills of him. He came to witness some days before the pills were supplied and asked for two dozen Cox's half-grain morphia pills. He did not keep these pills, and was obliged to get a gross. When deceased ordered the pills, witness said to him, "It's a full dose, captain," to which the deceased replied, "I know it. I have been having such pills from Dr Brown, and I don't want to be constantly troubling him for them." The supply was duly entered in his ledger, and he marked the box "Poison." Deceased had always conversed with him like a man who knew a good deal of medicine, and he was not an ordinary customer. He had furnished pills double the strength of those in the box to other customers, but this was from a prescription. Was well aware of the danger of such pills. Had supplied deceased with sedative medicines on various occasions previous to supplying the pills. Amongst these medicines had been syrup of chloral hydrate of double strength and laudanum in one ounce bottles. Deceased had told him that he suffered from sleeplessness. The chloral hydrate was given under medical advice. Mr John Trevor, solicitor, of Bridgwater, uncle of the deceased, said deceased had at one time, shortly after taking his commission in the army acted as doctor on board ship while taking a number of convicts to Bermuda. The Coroner in summing up, characterised the case as a sad and important one. Mr Cocks, however, had satisfactorily explained the circumstances under which deceased purchased the pills, and had shewn that he had not sold them without giving proper caution. The evidence had been sufficient to show that there was no reason for deceased's taking the pills with the intention of committing suicide. If the Jury thought that deceased took the pills unwittingly, and only for the purpose of alleviating pain, they would say so. After a brief deliberation the Jury returned a verdict as follows:- "We find that the death of the deceased, CHARLES HENRY WILLS, was caused by an over-dose of morphia, contained in pills taken by him for the purpose of allaying pain and procuring sleep." The Jury added that they hoped the press would warn the public against taking morphia pills without first consulting a medical man, and recommended that a label should be attached to the boxes bearing the words:- "One only to be taken at a time." The Foreman further added that the Jury desired to express their thanks to the medical men for the manner in which they had attended to an conducted the case. With this the Coroner expressed his hearty concurrence, as also with the verdict returned.

Wednesday 23 October 1878, Issue 5932 – Gale Document No. Y3200726635 EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, last Friday, before H. W.Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of THOMAS PALMER, a carter, aged thirty-eight, who died in the Hospital on the previous day from the effects of injuries received on the 10th September. On that day deceased drove a waggon containing barrels of beer to Crediton Races, and returning home late at night he slipped his foot and fell, the front wheels of the waggon going over his leg. He was taken to the Hospital, where it was found that he was suffering from a lacerated wound on the outerside of the ankle, and the foot was very much swollen. Under the treatment received deceased at first progressed favourably, but afterwards blood poisoning ensued and deceased died early on the morning of the 17th. Mr Cumings stated that deceased was a very unhealthy man, and was suffering from heart disease. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER – Sudden Death Of A Commercial Traveller. - MR GEORGE SHAPCOTTE, commercial traveller for Mr Quick, leather merchant, Exeter, died very suddenly at Wadebridge on Saturday morning. An Inquest was held the same day before Mr Hamley, County Coroner, when the following evidence was taken:- Mr Lee, hotel proprietor, deposed that MR SHAPCOTTE slept at his house on Friday night, and on Saturday morning did business with various person in the town before ten o'clock, when he had a cup of tea taken to him in the commercial room, but had nothing to eat. No notice was taken of him until about eleven o'clock, when he was seen coming from the stables to the house, and he then appeared to be in his usual health; but one of the servants who went to the commercial room about twelve o'clock saw him on the floor. She called Mr Lee, and he immediately sent for Mr Wilkins, who attended in a few minutes, and after examination, pronounced MR SHAPCOTTE dead. The medical testimony at the Inquest was that the deceased died of apoplexy. Mr Quick, who arrived from Exeter during the Inquest, spoke of the deceased having had a previous attack, and stated that when the telegram reached Exeter announcing his death it caused but little surprise, as sudden death was anticipated. The Jury returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 6 November 1878, Issue 5934 – Gale Document No. Y3200726699 EXETER - Sudden Deaths. - H. W. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner), held an Inquest at the Greyhound Inn, Paris street, on Saturday afternoon, touching the death of SAMUEL MARTIN, a dairyman, aged 56. FREDERICK WILLIAM MARTIN, son of the deceased, said his father was a widower, and was addicted to drink. Samuel Sprague said the deceased called as usual with milk at his house, in Paris street, that morning, about 7.45. He called "Milk," and witness went to the door. The deceased said he did not feel well, and asked witness to give him a cup of tea, which he made and gave to him. The deceased took the cup, drank about half the contents, and then sat down. Witness saw he was very ill, and that he was likely to fall, and so he supported him. MARTIN never spoke afterwards, and died in witness's arms, before Mr Bell came. Witness thought the deceased only had a fit. He had been at the house about a quarter of an hour before he died. Mr Charles Edward Bell, surgeon, St. Sidwell's, said he knew the deceased, and had no doubt he died from heart disease. Verdict – "Death from Natural Causes."

On Monday the City Coroner held an Inquest at the Black Dog Inn, on the body of WILLIAM WATERMAN, aged forty-five years, an engineman, employed at the Baths and Wash-houses, who died suddenly on Saturday morning. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said that he attended the deceased for the first time in December 1877. He was suffering from disease of the lungs, and spat blood. Witness had tended him almost continually up to the 23rd of October last. The deceased was a patient of the Exeter Dispensary. Witness examined the deceased's lungs occasionally, and found that there was a large cavity in each lung. The deceased used to work at Mr Lloyd's tobacco warehouse, but, by witness's advice, he left that situation, and went to work as engineman at the Baths and Wash-houses. On Saturday morning witness was called upon to visit the deceased. When he arrived, WATERMAN was sitting on a chair quite dead. The cause of death was haemorrhage of the lungs, arising from consumption. Verdict – "Death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 20 November 1878, Issue 5936 – Gale Document No. Y3200726782 BOVEY TRACEY. - Fatal Accident. - Dr H. S. Gaye, Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest at Moorside last Saturday, on the body of MISS JANE MONTGOMERY CAMBLE, aged fifty-nine, who came to her death under the following painful circumstances. The deceased was driving in her pony carriage on Thursday afternoon, when from some unexplained cause the animal started off at a gallop, and on turning a corner on the road leading to Ilsington, dragged the carriage on to the bank. The consequence was that it turned completely over, and MISS CAMBLE was thrown on to her head in the road with such violence as to cause injuries from which she never recovered. Dr Taylor, of Bovey, who was called to attend the deceased, found evidence of a fracture of the base of the skull, which, in his opinion, was the cause of death, and a verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned. The deceased lady was well known and very highly esteemed in the locality.

HONITON. - Fatal Fall. - Mr McCaulay, Deputy-Coroner, held an Inquest at the White Hart Inn, on Thursday evening, touching the death of GRACE LAKE, wife of THOMAS LAKE, hairdresser, High-street, who had met her death by falling downstairs the previous night. It appeared from the evidence that MR LAKE returned home between nine and ten o'clock on Wednesday night and found the house fastened up. After trying for some time to make his wife hear, he obtained the assistance of P.C. Harper, and broke the door open. They had no sooner done so than MRS LAKE fell to the bottom of the stairs with the lamp in her hand. Witness picked her up and put her on a couch, and Harper at once went for Dr Shortridge, but she never spoke after, and died at quarter past seven on Thursday morning. Dr Shortridge stated that on Wednesday evening, about eleven o'clock, he was fetched by Harper to go and see MRS LAKE, when he found she had fallen on the crown of her head, and that she was unconscious, in which state she remained until the following morning, when she died. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Wednesday 20 November 1878, Issue 5936 – Gale Document No. Y3200726771 REWE – Suicide Of An Ex-Police Constable. - The dead body of a man named ROBERT HUNT, late a constable in the Devon County Police, was found on Monday morning hanging in a loft on Mr May's farm. The deceased, who was fifty-four years of age, had been staying with his brother, HENRY, a labourer in Mr May's employ, up to the 9th instant, when he disappeared. The loft in which the deceased was found was used as a straw-store, and a considerable quantity was kept there. HENRY HUNT had been to the loft every day during the week for straw for the bullocks, but did not see his brother, who was hid behind the heap of straw, and was only discovered through the straw becoming low. The deceased had been in the County Constabulary for twenty-one years, and was last stationed at Halwell, in South Devon, where e was savagely attacked by six men, and was so badly injured in the head that he had done no duty since, and had been partially demented. Four of the men who assaulted the poor fellow were sentenced by the magistrates to six months' imprisonment, and the other two men had four months each. At the last Quarter Sessions, on the recommendation of the Chief Constable and Police Committee, the deceased, who was a first-class constable, was granted a pension for life from the Constabulary Superannuation Fund of 2s. a day, that being somewhat less than two-thirds of the amount of his pay. The recommendation was made in consequence of HUNT having become "incapable of discharging the duties of his office, owing to injuries which he had lately received whilst on duty." The deceased was so infirm in mind that he would not receive his last pay, and his wife had to take it and sign for it. He had received none of the pension, it not having yet become due. He leaves a wife, who resides at Clysthydon, but no family The body was removed to the house of deceased's brother, to await an Inquest.

STOKE CANON - The Late Distressing Suicide. - The County Coroner (Mr Crosse), on Thursday last, assembled a Jury at the Stoke Canon Inn, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELLEN HOPKINS, a young single woman belonging to Silverton, who committed suicide on the previous Tuesday evening by throwing herself into the river Culm, adjoining the Stoke Canon Bridge. The first witness called was Mr Gardner, landlord of the Half Moon Hotel, at Exeter, who deposed that the deceased had been in his employment about nine months. In consequence of an anonymous letter which he received a short time ago concerning the deceased's character, he had an interview with her, in the course of which she admitted that certain imputations against her character contained in the letters were correct. Witness then gave her a week's notice to leave his employment, and from that time up to the day she left, which was on Tuesday morning, he noticed a strangeness in her manner. She was very slovenly in her dress, whereas she had previously been very neat in this respect. John Smith, baker and butcher, of Stoke Canon, stated that on Tuesday last he was driving from Exeter in his trap. His apprentice, William Heale, was with him. A cab, which was going towards Stoke, passed them near Mr Tremlett's Mills, at Stoke Bridge. After the vehicle had passed, the lad Heale called his attention to a woman standing in the road, and who had evidently jumped from the cab, the door of which was open. The cab went on its way, and witness also drove on. He had passed the deceased when she ran after the cart, caught hold of the shaft, and said to him, "Do pray let me get into your van." This she repeated several times, and she appeared to be in a very excited state. Witness pulled up, and the deceased forced herself into the cart. Witness said, "You are the woman who jumped out of the trap," and she replied, "I fell out." She asked if he would drive her to Silverton, but witness said he could not. He promised, however, he would try and overtake the cab. He drove on rapidly, and when near the cab deceased caught hold of the reins, and in an excited manner said "Let me out here." That was just on the crown of the Stoke Canon Bridge. Before he could pull the horse up, deceased jumped from the trap. She walked back very fast to the end of the bridge, where there is an unprotected place leading into the river. Witness shouted to her, but she walked into the water. He got out of the cart and shouted to her "go back," but before he could render any assistance she had plunged into deep water, and was carried down by the stream. The water was at the time very high. Witness called for assistance, and Mr Harris, a wheelwright, was soon upon the spot. Mr Harris ran down the bank, and after plunging into the water almost up to his shoulders succeeded in dragging the body out with a pitch-fork, which he carried. They placed her upon the bank, brandy was procured, and they did what they could to restore animation. In witness's opinion the woman was in so excitable a condition as not to know what she was doing. The Coroner said the spot where the fatality occurred ought to be railed off. Any stranger who might come that way could easily drive into the river. The foreman said the spot used to be railed off by the county authorities, but it had lately been neglected. The Coroner said he hoped some steps would be taken by the county authorities. John Heale, the lad who was with Smith, corroborated the latter witness's statement, and added that he saw the woman jump out of the cab. John Smith, re-called, said he was present when the body was searched by the constable, but nothing was found upon her. The jacket was produced, the pockets of which were in such a position that a purse of money might have dropped out of them. Philip Webber, cabman, of Exeter, deposed that on Tuesday, about a quarter past five, the deceased hired his cab from the St. Lawrence stand, to go to Silverton. Witness did not notice anything strange in her manner. At the turnpike-gate she changed sovereign to pay the toll, and witness saw her receive the change, but whether she put it in her purse he could not say. On the road he overtook Mr Smith's vehicle, and at her request, drove on fast, and passed it. Witness drove as far as Silverton, where he got off the box of his cab to inquire where to drive. He then found the cab empty. He was subsequently told that a young woman had been drowned. Mr Harris, wheelwright, of Stoke Canon, corroborated the statement of the witness Smith with regard to taking the deceased from the water. He added that when taken out her pulse was slightly quivering, but they could not restore animation. William Puddicombe, surgeon, of Silverton, stated that on examining the body, he could discover no marks of violence. Life was perfectly extinct. Witness knew deceased, having attended her professionally about four years ago for an attack of typhoid fever. That illness might have affected the brain, and after hearing the evidence, together with his previous knowledge of the deceased, he was of opinion that her mind was affected at the time of the occurrence. The Jury returned verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 20 November 1878, Issue 5936 – Gale Document No. Y3200726769 EXETER – Found Drowned - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday, at the Bishop Blaze Inn, Commercial-road, on the body of THOMAS SPARROW, aged about fifty, who was found drowned in the mill leat near Messrs. Surridge's Mills, West Quarter, on Tuesday night. Verdict "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 27 November 1878, Issue 5937 – Gale Document No. Y3200726810 REWE – The Suicide Of An Ex-Policeman. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Crosse) held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Royal Oak Inn, Rewe, on the body of ROBERT HUNT, lately a constable in the county police force, who committed suicide by hanging. The Rev. P. Williams, Rector of Rewe, was foreman of the Jury. MARY HUNT, wife of HENRY HUNT, brother of the deceased, deposed that on Thursday night, the 7th instant, deceased came to her house and told her that he felt very poorly, and often complained of being bad in his head. She observed nothing unusual in his manner with the exception that he was depressed very much. Next day he asked for a Testament, which was given him, and from it he read beautifully several chapters. He was very much dejected, and kept on saying he should never see his "poor boy" again. On the following day (Saturday) she missed him. HENRY HUNT, brother of the deceased, who is a farm labourer, gave corroborative evidence, and deposed to find the body hanging in a loft behind some straw. P.C. Williams, of Stoke Canon, stated that from information he received on the 18th instant he went to an outhouse on Mr May's farm, and there saw deceased suspended from the ceiling by a rope. Witness untied the rope, but deceased was quite dead, and the body appeared to have been hanging for some considerable time. On searching the body witness found a purse containing a two-shilling piece. Witness stated that on the 1st instant he was going to Exeter to receive his pay, when he met deceased, who asked him where he was going? Witness told him, and deceased said he would accompany him. They went by train, and on the way deceased commenced rubbing his face, and said to him, "No one knows my troubles." At Stoke Canon station, deceased asked witness what was the fare to Exeter, and witness told him 3 ½d. Deceased took out sixpence, looked at it, and said that it was not enough. Deceased got on the line just as the train was approaching; witness and the station-master called to him to get out of the way, but he took no notice, and witness rushed on the line and pulled deceased back, or else he would have been knocked down by the train and killed. Mr Edwin Morgan Puddicombe, surgeon, Silverton, said that on Monday last he went to Rewe and saw deceased, and he was of opinion that deceased had been hanging for many days. The cause of death was "strangulation," and the Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of "Temporary Insanity."

HEAVITREE – Superstition and Suicide. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Horse and Groom Inn, Heavitree, on Saturday, touching the death of SUSANNAH COLLINS, aged forty-eight, of North-street, Heavitree, who committed suicide by hanging herself on Thursday. The deceased was a widow woman with eight children when she married her second husband, who had three children. WILLIAM COLLINS, a painter, living in North-street, Heavitree, said he was married to the deceased about the 22nd August last. On the 21st instant he left home about 6.30 o'clock to go to work at Cowley Bridge. He remained there until five p.m. At the Heavitree turnpike-gate, on his way home, he was told of his wife's suicide. For two months past she had been rather more strange than usual, yet he was not apprehensive that she would take her life. She firmly believed that she was "bewitched," and she worked up her mind to a great pitch. she believed that someone had done her some wrong, and it preyed on her mind and affected it. He thought this was what instigated her to commit suicide. He had an idea that his wife believed him to be the "wizard," but had he been sure that it was anyone else, he would have put Captain Bent on his track. She was not accountable for her own actions. When he left his wife on Thursday morning she appeared to be in her usual state of health, and nothing peculiar was apparent. In reply to a Juryman, he said it was not true that the deceased had been subjected to ill-treatment at his hands, and he should be glad if anyone would come forward and vindicate his character. Two of the Jurymen said they had seen no black eyes or other marks of ill-usage about the woman during the last two months. Witness, in answer to further questions, said the only one of the deceased's children that he had turned out of doors was her eldest daughter, aged twenty-two. This was in consequence of a family disturbance, and the daughter packed up her things and left. He did not believe that any other member of the deceased's family had ill-used her. Elizabeth Boucher, a near neighbour of the deceased, said she had known MRS COLLINS for years. Since she had been married the second time she had noticed that her manner was strange and altogether different from what it was before. On Thursday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, witness poke to the deceased at the pump, and she noticed that she looked very strange. About half-past four her little boy came into her house and said that BILLY COLLINS had told him that the deceased had hanged herself in the stairs. She communicated with a man named Johnson, and as they could not get an entrance by the door he climbed in at the window. He admitted witness by the front-door. They found MRS COLLINS hanging in the stairway quite dead and cold. She fetched a knife and a man named Bayment cut down the body. Witness never knew that any one had ill-treated the deceased. Witness believed that the deceased was out of her mind, and unaccountable for her actions. The deceased never told witness that she believed she was "witched." Robert Johnson, and Robert Bayment gave evidence as to finding the body and cutting it down. ELIZABETH ANN ROGERS, eldest daughter of the deceased, said she had observed a great strangeness in her mother's manner ever since she had first known MR COLLINS. her mother was under the impression that she was bewitched. COLLINS had told the deceased that these things he had done, and he could do them again. He also said that he could bring his wife low in Heavitree, together with all her children. Witness never knew MR COLLINS ill-treat her mother; she could never get her mother to say that he did or did not. She last saw her mother on Wednesday, when she said to witness, "Oh, my dear, he said I am finished for Heavitree, and am ruined for life." Mr A. W. Kempe, surgeon, 2, Wilton-place, St. James', Exeter, said he was called to see the deceased soon after she was discovered. He removed the rope which was tied in a running noose. It was then tight enough to have caused suffocation, had she not been dead. From the appearance he thought the body had been hanging about an hour, and he was of opinion that the act was a suicidal one. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

Wednesday 11 December 1878, Issue 5939 – Gale Document No. Y3200726876 SUICIDES IN EXERTER An Inquest was held last Friday at the Po[?], St Sidwell's, before the City Coroner, (Mr H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on the body of a married man, named GEORGE PARISH, aged 39 years, residing in Longbrook-street, who committed suicide by hanging himself early the same morning. The Coroner, on entering the room, and before swearing in the Jury, asked the summoning officer (Sergeant Hosgood) the reason of the Inquest being held there when it had been ordered at the Bristol Inn. Sergeant Hosgood asserted that the Inquest was ordered at the place where they were assembled. The Coroner: We won't discuss the matter at present, I can dispense with your attendance. Sergeant Hosgood: Then I am to go sir. The Coroner: I have been waiting at the Bristol Inn for the Jury for some time. The warrant will speak for itself; if you had read it you would have seen that the Inquest was to have been held at the Bristol Inn and not at the Poltimore. Sergeant Hosgood: I can assure you, you are wrong. The Coroner: That is sufficient. It will be my duty to report this to the proper authorities. FANNY PARISH, the wife of the deceased, said about half-past eight that morning, on going into the scullery, she saw her husband lying down with a rope around his neck, and quite dead. Witness and deceased had always lived happily together. Lately he had been in trouble about some money matters which seemed to have depressed him. He was a plasterer, and a very temperate man. William Norton, assistant warehouseman at Messrs. Jones, wine and spirit merchants, deposed to being called in and finding deceased as described by last witness. FREDERICK PARISH, residing on the Friars, brother of the deceased, said for the past four or five weeks deceased appeared to be very strange in his manner. In summing up, the Coroner said he was sorry to have had occasion to remark on the state that Sergeant Hosgood was in. It was a very unusual circumstance indeed. Several of the Jurymen expressed a hope that the Coroner would overlook the affair. The Coroner said that as far as he was concerned it was a very serious question. He was especially sorry because Hosgood was a very respectable and steady man. The Jury concurred. The returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity. Deceased leaves two children.

On Saturday afternoon Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the London and South-Western Railway Hotel, Paul-street, on the body of ISAAC JOHN WEST, boots and ostler at the hotel named, who committed suicide by hanging on Friday evening. ANNIE WEST, sister of the deceased, and also a servant at the London and South-Western Railway Hotel, deposed that her brother was nineteen years of age last birthday. She saw him on Friday afternoon about 4.15 and he then appeared to be in his usual health and spirits. He went out with a gentleman's horse and trap, and when he came back he shook her hand, and she did not see him alive afterwards. When he squeezed her hand she asked him not to press it so hard, as it was sore. He said, "All right, my dear," and that was all. She did not know that he had lately had anything to distress his mind. She had heard that he was entitled to some property, but she did not know for certain. He was generally a steady and sober young man. Her brother was engaged to Miss Fanny Yolland, and was to have been married next Saturday. Before coming to the London and South-Western Railway Hotel her brother was at the Museum Hotel, Queen-street, where Miss Yolland was also in service. Henry Coles spoke to finding the deceased hanging from the rafters in a loft and cutting down the body. It hung three feet clear of the floor, and a pair of steps stood close by. The following letter which he had received that morning was found upon the deceased:- Cheriton Fitzpaine, December, 1878. My dear Jack, - Just these few lines in answer to your kind letter which I received this morning, and I am sorry to hear you caught such a bad cold, but I hope it is better now. I was surprised to hear that you got to Crediton so early; you must have walked very quick. My dear, I have not the slightest objection to your brother and sister, if you wish it. I was thinking about coming in on Friday, but I think I will let it stop until Tuesday. I do miss you dreadful; I hardly know how to find myself, it is so lonely here. I shall leave it to you to fix the time. Give my love to Annie. Mother sends her kind love to you. Good bye, my dear, with love and kisses, your affectionate, Fanny. Then followed a number of crosses, meant for kisses. - Mr Henry Elmore, proprietor of the hotel, said the deceased had been in his service since the 6th of August, as boots and ostler. He was always rather eccentric, and his manner was peculiar. He seemed to be what was commonly called "a little short." At times he appeared very vague, while at others he was cheerful. At times he would also work very well, but at others he did not do his work at all well. Sometimes, when witness complained that certain work was not done, the deceased would stare at him and at the work, but not do it until afterwards, when he felt inclined. At other times, when the neglect of work was spoken of, he would attend to his duty immediately. He had sulky fits, and on those occasions they called it one of his "sullen days." Witness thought the deceased had been troubled of late about his marriage. He believed the deceased made the acquaintance of his betrothed at Mr Jury's, whose service the girl left about a week ago. They intended to have been married that day week. One day last week the deceased had asked permission to go out, and witness was informed that he went to see another young woman, who chided him about marrying somebody else. He, no doubt, was troubled about the two women, and, not being of strong mind, it had an effect upon him. He was of weak intellect. It was reported that the deceased attempted to destroy himself while at Mr Jury's, but witness could not say whether that was true or not. His sister had told witness that they had some property at Sidbury, under the trusteeship of their uncle, and that they came to it when he attained the age of twenty-one. On Friday the deceased told his sister that he had the will, but he afterwards called her into the room and said he had burnt the document. He had also told her that one day he had enlisted for a soldier, but he had bought himself out again. Witness said this could not be, as at the time the deceased never went out of the house. All this tended to show that his mind was not evenly balanced. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 24 December 1878, Issue 5941 – Gale Document No. Y3200726933 EXETER – Sudden Deaths. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Nelson Inn, Spiller-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH TUCKER, an old woman, who died suddenly during the previous day. William Heywood, a porter, living in Russell-street, stated that deceased was a single woman, and lived alone at 4, Summerland-crescent. She was 78 years of age, and on Sunday morning he was in Spiller-street, and there saw the deceased. A man named Rolestone, a driver of a horse and cart, was supporting her, she having been taken suddenly ill. With the assistance of Stone, witness removed her to his house. She died, however, before she arrived there. Mr Woodman, surgeon, stated that he had known TUCKER for many years. He last saw her alive on Friday. She had been failing in health for many months past. Death was attributable to failure of the heart's action, accelerated by the excessive cold weather. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

A second Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper, at the Nelson Inn, on the body of HENRY COLES BOND, aged four months, the infant son of MARY BOND, wife of a labourer, living in Cheeke-street. The deceased, a sickly child, had been suffering from a cold for some time past, and on Saturday night as it seemed to get worse, the mother stayed up with it until half-past three on Sunday morning, when it died. Mr Bell, surgeon, who was called in after death, gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Wednesday 1 January 1879, Issue 5942 – Gale Document No. Y3200726970 EXETER – Sudden Deaths. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest on Friday at the Pack Horse Inn, on the body of MR PATES, a chemist, of Fore-street. It appears that on returning to his brother's house, after having been to the Cathedral, the deceased was seized with spasms of the heart, and died in a few minutes. In accordance with the medical testimony a verdict was returned of "Death from Natural Causes."

Subsequently in the same room, Mr Hooper held an Inquest on the body of ALFRED HERBERT MOORE, an infant, aged five months, the son of MR E. J. MOORE, residing at 7, Woodbine Cottages. the child, it appears, was suffering from a bronchial attack, and about 5.30 that morning, after having passed a very restless night, he was attacked with convulsions, which terminated fatally. Mr Webb was sent for, and pronounced that death had resulted from natural causes. Verdict accordingly.

On Saturday the Coroner held an Inquest at the Star and Garter Inn, touching the death of WILLIAM JAMES ROBERTSON, aged six months, the infant son of a moulder, residing at Exe Bridge Terrace, Bonhay-road. The child was one of twins, had been unhealthy from its birth, and was not expected to live. On Friday he had a slight cough, but was better when put to bed. On Saturday morning, on awaking, the mother found the child dead. Mr L. H. Tosswill was called in and pronounced that death had been brought on, in all probability, by an attack of bronchitis. the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 8 January 1879, Issue 5943 – Gale Document No. Y3200727018 OKEHAMPTON - Fatal Accident. - The district Coroner (R. Fulford, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Fountain Inn, on Friday, touching the death of CHARLES SMALE, aged twenty-five, a navvy, who was killed the previous day on the railway between Okehampton and Sampford Courtenay. The line has recently been doubled between these two stations, and the deceased was walking in the six-feet way when as he was passing some ballast trucks on the one line he was caught by the engine of a passenger train which came up on the other, and thrown with much violence under the trucks, receiving such injuries that death soon ensued. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 15 January 1879, Issue 5944 – Gale Document No. Y3200727042 TOPSHAM – Sudden Death. – R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest at the vestry room on the body of MARY JANE SMEATH. Deceased was sixty-seven years of age and lived alone. On Saturday morning Mrs Jane Hooper, one of the district visitors, had occasion to go to her house with some wearing apparel, when on entering, she found deceased lying on the floor of the kitchen apparently dead. Mr George Rothwell, surgeon, who was called in, stated that he believed deceased died from natural causes, most probably heart disease, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

SOWTON – Fatal Accident. – Dr Macaulay, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Cat and Fiddle on Monday, respecting the death of a little boy aged seven-and-a-half, named WILLIAM HENRY FROOM. The deceased came from Exmouth and had been staying at his grandfather's during the holidays. On Thursday he went into the barn where his uncle was thrashing, and whilst there was kicked by one of the horses. No one saw the occurrence and when picked up the child was dead. There was a slight bruise behind his right ear and another on his shoulder. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and thought no blame attached to anyone.

OTTERY ST. MARY - Inquest. - On Monday Dr Macaulay, Deputy Coroner of the district, held an Inquest at Mr Patch's Cotley Farm, on the body of SARAH ANN HARDING, aged twenty-six, who died suddenly on the previous Tuesday. Deceased was the wife of a labourer living at Metcombe and had three children. Dr Gray stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body and found that death resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

TEDBURN ST. MARY – Death Accelerated by Filth. – An Inquest was held at Frankfort Farm, Tedburn St. Mary, on Wednesday, before Mr R. R. Crosse, District Coroner, on the body of ALFRED GUSCOTTE, a parish apprentice in the service of Mr William Seward, occupier of the farm. Mr Champion, clerk to the St. Thomas Board of Guardians, appeared to watch the case on their behalf, and Mr Floud was present to represent the relatives of the boy. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, who was an orphan, and was considered to be not quite right mentally, was bound to Mr Seward by the St. Thomas board of Guardians four or five years ago. He suffered a good deal from chilblains, and they had been so bad lately that he had done no work whatever. The boy had been very strange in his manner for a week before his death, which occurred on the previous Sunday morning, but said he was not ill. On Saturday he ate his meals with his usual appetite. He went to bed at six o'clock, and being apparently unwell, his bread and milk supper was taken upstairs to him. He was visited some time afterwards, but it was then found that he could not rise in bed. He was assisted to rise, and then a hot-water bottle was placed at his feet, the bed was warmed, and a glass of gin-and-water was given him. He asked for more, but his request was refused. Mr Body, surgeon, of Crediton, stated that he was called to see the boy about a week before his death. He was then suffering a great deal from chilblains on the hands and feet, and he had a bad sore on the hip. He found no indications of bruises by beating, but he did find one which appeared to have been produced by a fall on the ice. The deceased's bedroom was in a most dirty and offensive state. He believed that the deceased was not right in his mind, and from all he saw he thought it his duty to write a very strong letter to the Guardians and Sanitary Authority, calling attention to the case, and urging that something should be done. the state of the room was such as was likely to breed fever. He never knew such a case before. The deceased's leg was swollen after death, and one of the blood-vessels was plugged up, causing blood poison, but death was accelerated by the filthy state of the body. No evidence was produced to shew that the deceased was ill-treated, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 15 January 1879, Issue 5944 – Gale Document No. Y3200727027 EXETER – fatal Accident. – H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday, at the Topsham Inn, South-street, respecting the death of ANN LYNE, aged fifty years, the wife of a shoemaker. The deceased had been employed as a "sorter" in the Trews Weir Paper Mill and on the 12th December a woman named Trump was handing her a cup of tea across a machine when her arm caught in the cogs, and as MRS LYNE was trying to release her was caught in a similar manner. Both women were taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital and at first MRS LYNE seemed to be recovering; H. C. Cumming, house surgeon, said she was a very delicate woman, and the wound getting worse lock-jaw set in about ten days ago, which caused her death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 5 February 1879, Issue 5947 – Gale Document No. Y3200727140 FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE RAILWAY. - On Monday an Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, Exeter, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on view of the bodies of JOHN SQUIRES, twenty-three, late of Braunton, and EDWIN ASHILL, twenty-four, railway labourers, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital from the effects of injuries received on Friday last whilst employed on the works now in progress between Okehampton and Bridestowe stations for doubling the line. It was stated that on Friday last the men were employed with others shovelling earth from the side of a cutting into a waggon. They were standing on a "benching" six feet from the ground and about eight feet below the top of the cutting. Owing to the late frosts having hardened the ground at the surface of the embankment, the men had excavated the earth from the points at which they were standing, with a view to loosen the earth. Whilst at work a large quantity of earth, probably loosened by the thaw which so suddenly set in, fell upon them, sweeping them to the line beneath. They were removed by train to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where SQUIRES expired the same evening, and ASHILL died the following morning. The medical evidence was to the effect that death resulted from internal injuries. The Jury, though they had no wish to cast blame upon anyone, suggested to the foreman of the works the desirability of seeing in all future cases that the men did not excavate the ground so far in before they had removed that above them, and thus make an accident of this nature impossible. The Foreman promised to pay every regard to this suggestion. He had been connected with the railways and public works for a period of over thirty years and never before had an accident happened to any team under his charge. He did not see the deceased on the morning in question or he should certainly have prevented their running into the danger they had done. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 12 February 1879, Issue 5948 – Gale Document No. Y3200727178 DARTMOUTH – Fatal Shooting Accident. - On Saturday Lieutenant JAMES R. J. SIMPSON, R.N., in company with a friend named Cleland, was shooting about two miles from Dartmouth, and in the evening, returning home across some fields, Mr Cleland climbed a hedge and was followed by MR SIMPSON, who placed his loaded gun by the side of the hedge while climbing. He had got up on the top and was drawing the gun towards him muzzle uppermost when the weapon exploded, and the whole of the charge was lodged in his body. MR SIMPSON fell back and died before medical assistance arrived. He was about twenty-four years of age, had served on board the London at Zanzibar, and was several times mentioned in despatches for the courage and energy displayed by him in connection with the suppression of the slave traffic on the east coast of Africa. An Inquest was held on Monday before R. N. Prideaux, Esq., Borough Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 12 February 1879, Issue 5948 – Gale Document No. Y3200727153 EXETER – Child Burned to Death. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., the City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on Saturday, concerning the death of GEORGE NORSWORTHY, an illegitimate child, aged three years. It appears that the mother of the child, whilst at work, was in the habit of leaving the deceased in the care of a woman named Gillard, who rents apartments in the same house. On the 22nd ult the mother was returning to her home when she heard her child screaming, and on going upstairs she found the little fellow in Gillard's room in flames. The child was in the room by itself, Mrs Gillard having gone out for a few minutes. With the assistance of Lydia James, another tenant, the mother soon extinguished the flames, but not before the child was much burned. The poor little fellow was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he remained until his death, which took place on Thursday night. Mr H. J. Cummings, the house surgeon, gave evidence to the effect that the cause of death was the shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their opinion that there was no criminal negligence on the part of the woman Gillard.

Wednesday 26 February 1879, Issue 5950 – Gale Document No. Y3200727240 BROADCLIST – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Crosse on Friday last at Westwood, on the body of JOHN MILLER, blacksmith, who died early on Thursday morning in bed with his father. Deceased did his usual work on the previous day, had tea about six o'clock and as was his custom went to bed without any supper. Soon after midnight he groaned or what his father thought, snored rather unusually and before a light could be got he ceased to breathe. Mr Somer, surgeon, considered death to have been the result of apoplexy. Deceased was about thirty-five years of age, and leaves a wife and three young children, the youngest about three weeks old.

Wednesday 19 March 1879, Issue 5953 – Gale Document No. Y3200727346 OTTERY ST. MARY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on the body of the late MR JOHN HELLIER, of Tipton, on Thursday last. It appears that deceased met with his death by a blow received from a chaff cutter, which he had been repairing at Mr Wreford's. The Coroner was Dr Macauley. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." MR HELLIER was much respected, and he had been sexton of Tipton Church for a number of years.

Wednesday 19 March 1879, Issue 5953 – Gale Document No. Y3200727349 SUICIDE IN EXETER - A great deal of painful excitement was created in the city last evening by a report that MR H. G. BEAL, landlord of the Country House, had shot himself, and unhappily this proved only too true. It appears that MR BEAL has been out of health for some time and the loss of his wife at Christmas last preyed so much upon his mind that he was not always accountable for his actions. A few weeks since he made an ineffectual attempt to destroy himself by taking poison, and had since been carefully watched. Arrangements were being made with a view to his getting out of the business, and the valuation for that purpose was made yesterday. He was very excitable during the day, and between five and six o'clock he was in his bedroom. His brother and Mr Cross, a former landlord of the house, were with him, and whilst they were talking together he called out "Good bye, Harry." At the same time they heard the report of a pistol shot, and on going over to where deceased was sitting they found that he had shot himself in the breast with a revolver. Dr Budd and Mr Roper, surgeon, were called in, and the unfortunate man received every attention, but he gradually sank, and died about two hours afterwards. An Inquest is to be held this morning.

Wednesday 26 March 1879, Issue 5954 – Gale Document No. Y3200727386 SOUTHMOLTON – Fatal Case of Burning. - On Monday an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before Mr J. Flexman, Borough Coroner, on the body of SARAH CROCKER, a single woman, aged sixty-seven, a charwoman, who died on the previous Thursday from the effects of burning. It appeared that on the 14th instant deceased had a fit, and fell into the fire. There was no one in the house at the time, and when found she was in a very wretched state. Mr Furse, parish doctor, was sent for, and prescribed oils for the burns she had sustained on her face. A Juryman remarked that he did not see any necessity for holding an Inquest, as the deceased had been attended by a medical gentleman. He also wanted to know why it was not held before. The Coroner said that that was his business. He was not going to submit to being called to account by a Jury. Their business was to find how the deceased came by her death. The Jury subsequently returned a verdict, "That deceased fell into the fire while in a fit, and the shock to her system caused death."

Wednesday 2 April 1879, Issue 5955 – Gale Document No. Y3200727418 TEIGNMOUTH – Fatal Fall. - An Inquest was held on Monday, before Dr Gaye, District Coroner, on view of the body of THOMAS HEXTER, a jobbing mason, who, whilst at work on a scaffold in front of East Cliff House on Saturday, became giddy, fell to the ground, and sustained a fracture of the skull, from which he died the same evening. The deceased, an elderly man, has been ill for some time, and only resumed work on the previous Tuesday. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 9 April 1879, Issue 5956 – Gale Document No. Y3200727457 EXMINSTER – Death Of An Infant Through Neglect. - An Inquest was held on Thursday at the Stowey Arms, Exminster, before R. R. Crosse, Eq., District Coroner, on the body of the illegitimate child of MARY JANE WEST, a servant girl, seventeen years of age, who was confined in the St. Thomas Union Workhouse on the 19th February last. Jane Rowe, a nurse at the St. Thomas Workhouse, said she attended the mother of the child in her confinement. Soon after birth thrush set in, and the infant began to pine away. The deceased was dry nursed. The mother of the child was perfectly capable of nursing it, but at her own request it was fed from a bottle. Witness could not say whether or not the Guardians of the Workhouse knew that children were dry-nursed in the House. The deceased was well-fed with milk and biscuits, and properly taken care of in every respect. Witness believed that the thrush was the cause of the child's pining away. On the 19th March the mother and the child were discharged from the Workhouse. The Coroner and Jury expressed disapprobation of the custom of allowing infants in workhouses to be dry-nursed, when the mothers, as in this case, were capable of nursing their children in the natural way. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, of Exeter, said that on the 22nd March the deceased was brought to him by her aunt. Witness examined the child, and found that she was very thin and emaciated. He was of opinion that the food administered by the nurse, namely milk and biscuit, was very improper, and was the cause of the thrush. In all probability if the child had been suckled by its mother, it would have lived, as it was a well-formed child, and not subject to any disease. He had twice refused to give a certificate of death to the Registrar. He believed the cause of death was exhaustion from want of proper nourishment. Margaret Gale, a widow, of Exminster, was called, and stated that she received the deceased to nurse on the 22nd March last. After she had had the child eight days it died in convulsions. Witness did not believe the child had been properly nourished previous to the time when she took the care of it. The mother of the child was also examined. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from exhaustion, caused by the want of proper nourishment, and from convulsions. They thought the authorities of the St. Thomas Union Workhouse were to blame.

Wednesday 16 April 1879, Issue 5957 – Gale Document No. Y3200727493 TEIGNMOUTH – Fatal Accident on the Teign. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at Shaldon before Dr. H. S. Gage, District Coroner, on view of the body of SAMUEL SERCOMBE, a sailor, aged thirty-seven, who was drowned in the river Teign on Thursday night. Deceased was "poling" a barge for the purpose of getting it into deep water, when he overbalanced himself and fell into the water. It was between nine and ten o'clock at night and very dark. An old man named Pitts, who was also on the barge, flung deceased a rope, which he caught hold of, but Pitts could not pull the deceased up, although he tried hard to do so. Deceased said his hands were getting benumbed, and he could not hold on much longer. Pitts then went for a boat, but by the time he returned to the spot the deceased had disappeared. His dead body was washed up the next morning at a point abreast of Bishopsteignton, and about a mile and a half from where the fatal occurrence happened. The poor fellow, in his struggles, had kicked off both his boots and got one arm out of his jersey. He leaves a widow and several children. A verdict was returned to the effect that deceased was drowned by accidentally falling into the river Teign.

TOTNES – Singular Fatality. - An Inquest was held at Staverton on Saturday, before Dr Gaye, District Coroner, touching the death of GEORGE MANLEY, a single man, thirty-six years of age, who se body had been found in a sitting position in a pool of water about three or four inches deep. The Coroner said he had no doubt that deceased fell into the pit, and seized with cramp, and died from exposure. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 23 April 1879, Issue 5958 – Gale Document No. Y3200727531 EXWICK – Distressing Suicide. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest at Connibear's Bullers' Arms Inn, Exwick, on the body of JOHN BRIMSON, a tanner, aged sixty-five, who was found drowned on Saturday evening in the grating of Mr Mallett's mill. MARY ANN BRIMSON, deceased's wife, who lives in St. Thomas, identified the body as that of her husband. She stated that the deceased for about thirty-seven years had worked at Mr Francis' tannery, St. Thomas, but about two months since, owing to the slackness of trade, he was discharged. This appeared to have preyed upon his mind very much. He went to work at gardening, but on account of illness he was obliged to give it up. She did not observe anything strange about him until last Thursday evening, when he returned home after dark, and on her speaking to him she noticed that he was very strange in his manner. On the following morning he got up at his usual time and went out, but she did not observe anything peculiar about him, with the exception that he refused to take his food. On Saturday morning, just after eight o'clock, he went out, and on her calling him back he refused to come, and she did not see him alive afterwards. She believed he was not accountable for his actions. In answer to Mr T. P. Helmore, witness stated that deceased had often threatened to commit suicide by drowning himself, but she had not heard him use that threat for some time. William Floyde, a miller, proved finding the body in the grating of Mr Mallett's mills. P.C. Thomas Johns said he searched the deceased, but only found a few matches. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity. The foreman of the Jury (Mr Mortimore) informed the Coroner that some of the fencing where the deceased was supposed to have gone into the water was in a very dilapidated condition, and both the Coroner and the Jury suggested that it would be advisable for the owners of property there to see to it, so as to prevent any accident.

Wednesday 30 April 1879, Issue 5959 – Gale Document No. Y3200727571 OTTERY ST. MARY. - Alleged Infanticide. - An Inquest was held at the King's Arms Hotel on Monday morning, before S. M. Cox, Esq., District Coroner, relative to the death of the newly born female child of a young singlewoman named MARY JANE FINCH, living with her parents at Wiggaton, near Ottery. The child was born on Friday morning and died after an existence of seven hours. From appearances which the doctor observed on the body, suspicions of foul play were aroused, a certificate of death was refused, and the matter was placed in the hands of the police, who had the body removed to the Town Hall. It appeared from the evidence that the girl had no one with her when the child was born. Her mother and a neighbour went to her between three and four o'clock in the morning, when they found the baby. Mrs Wilson, the neighbour called in, had often acted as a midwife, and she took the child from the bed. It was alive, but there were dark marks on the neck, and blood was coming from the nose and mouth. Mrs Wilson nursed the child until about ten o'clock the same morning when it died. Dr Grey was called to attend the child, but did not arrive until two hours after it was dead. In his evidence he spoke of the bruises and excoriations which he noticed about the child's neck when he first saw it, and he also detailed the results of a post mortem examination which he afterwards made. His opinion was that the appearances pointed to an attempt at strangulation. He thought it very improbably that such injuries would have been caused by any efforts of the mother to deliver herself, but he could not say that it was absolutely impossible. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against MARY JANE FINCH. The Coroner was sorry to say that he did not think they could have arrived as a court of the first instance at any other conclusion. The witnesses were bound over to appear at the next Assizes, and the Enquiry, which had lasted over four hours, then terminated.

Wednesday 30 April 1879, Issue 5959 – Gale Document No. Y3200727574 TEIGNMOUTH – MR CHARLES SHERIDAN SWAN, ship-builder, of this place, was crossing with his wife from Calais to Dover on Saturday, when he fell into the water, not far from the landing stage, and was drowned. At the Inquest an open verdict was returned, there being no evidence to show how the deceased came into the water.

Wednesday 30 April 1879, Issue 5959 – Gale Document No. Y3200727556 EXETER – Sudden Deaths. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Fireman's Arms Inn, Preston street, before the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on the body of WILLIAM RICE, aged 61, who died suddenly at his house in Preston-street, on Thursday night. The deceased was a joiner, in the employ of Messrs Garton and King, ironmongers, High-street. He was also the sexton of St. Mary Major's Church. His daughter, MARY ANN RICE, saw him alive on Thursday night, at a quarter-past nine, and then he appeared to be in good health; but an hour later she was fetched to go to see the deceased and found him in bed dead. Mr Perkins surgeon, South Street, was of opinion that deceased died from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

On Monday evening the Coroner held an Inquest at the Axminster Inn, Paris-street, on the body of WILLIAM BLACKMORE, aged 31. Deceased lived with his sister in Paris street, and on Sunday, just before dinner time she found him lying on his face in the back yard quite dead. He had been subject to fits for nine years, and Mr Henderson, surgeon, said the cause of death was epilepsy. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 7 May 1879, Issue 5960 – Gale Document No. Y3200727608 BOVEY TRACEY – Fatal Fall From A Horse. - Dr Gaye, district Coroner, held an Inquest at Yarde Farm, North Bovey, on Thursday, on the body of MR E. CUMING, farmer, of that place. The deceased was riding home from Lustleigh on Tuesday in company with Mr S. Ballamy, butcher, of Moreton. When about a mile on the road the deceased was thrown from his horse, and received such injuries that he died soon after removal to his home. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Effects Of A Carriage Accident. - Dr Gaye, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Townhall on Monday concerning the death of MRS JOHN PINSENT, junr., which took place on Saturday from the effects of injuries received in a carriage accident ten days before. The deceased and MRS PINSENT were driving through Devon-square when their pony was frightened by two boys with a hand truck, and starting off at a furious pace brought the carriage into violent collision with the wall of a house at the corner of Queen-street. The boys in their evidence said the pony had started before they came in sight. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Coroner, at the request of the Jury, reprimanded the boys, and cautioned them against driving a hand-truck down an incline at a rapid pace in future, it being a very dangerous practice, and likely to be attended with serious result.

Wednesday 7 May 1879, Issue 5960 – Gale Document No. Y3200727605 EXETER – Death Of A Child From Burning. - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Topsham Inn, South-street, by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on the body of a child named ELIZABETH ADAMS, whose parents live in Preston-street. The mother, MARY ADAMS, stated that deceased was four years of age, and lived at home with her. She occupied two rooms on one landing. On Friday morning her four children, including the deceased, came home from school. Witness having fed them lit the fire; and, as she had occasion to leave the room, left the deceased in charge of her eldest child, who was eight years of age. About a quarter-of-an-hour afterwards she returned, and found her house surrounded by a large number of persons, and was told the deceased was badly burnt and had been taken to the Hospital. Witness immediately went there and saw the deceased who was severely burnt about the body and legs. She believed that the child's clothes must have caught fire whilst she was standing near the fireplace. In answer to the Coroner, witness stated that the firegrate was a rather low one. Robert Morrish, labourer, said he lived in the same house as the last witness. Just before one o'clock on the day named, on hearing screams, he went down into MRS ADAMS' room, where he saw the deceased 'all in a blaze." He took off his coat and wrapped it round the child, and with assistance succeeded in extinguishing the flames. Other witnesses were called who gave similar evidence, and in reply to questions by the Coroner, said they did not know that the child's mother was addicted to drink. Mr H. G. Cummings, house-surgeon at the Hospital, stated that when he received the child into the institution on Friday, it had severe burns over the body and right arm. He had the wounds dressed, but shortly afterwards the child got into a state of collapse, and died in convulsions on the following morning. The Coroner told the Jury that the reason he had asked the witness whether the mother of the child was addicted to drink was because reports were current that the woman was not sober at the time the accident occurred. The witnesses had stated that MRS ADAMS was sober, and no evidence whatever had been adduced to show that she had neglected the child in any way. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 14 May 1879, Issue 5961 – Gale Document No. Y3200727644 UPTON PYNE - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, on Thursday, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., the City Coroner, concerning the death of a waggoner named WILLIAM BREALEY, aged twenty-five years, who had been brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on the previous Tuesday. It appeared from the evidence that on that day the deceased's master, Mr Tozer, a farmer, of Bickleigh, near Tiverton, sent him with a horse to Newton St. Cyres to fetch a waggon. On returning home through Upton Pyne the animal started off at a furious rate, and the deceased, who was standing on the shafts with the reins holding in his hand, was thrown out. The house surgeon at the Hospital said that he found that the deceased had a wound over the right temple, exposing a bone of the skull to a great extent, and a fracture of the lower jaw and ribs on the right side, besides other injuries of a serious nature, sufficient to cause death. It was stated that the horse that the deceased was driving though young was a very quiet animal. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

OTTERY ST. MARY – The Alleged Child Murder. - At the Town Hall on Monday, before W. R. Coleridge, Esq., MARY JANE FRENCH, a young single woman living at home with her parents at Wiggaton, a hamlet about two miles from Ottery, was charged with having wilfully murdered her illegitimate child on the 25th April. At the Coroner's Inquest a fortnight since the Jury after an Enquiry lasting more than four hours found a verdict of Wilful Murder against the prisoner.

Wednesday 21 May 1879, Issue 5962 – Gale Document No. Y3200727667 EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening at the Sawyer's Arms Inn, Preston-street, on the body of JOHN HILL, aged 27, a private of the 2nd (Queens') Regiment who had been invalided home from India, and died suddenly the same morning at the house of Elizabeth Richards. The evidence went to show that deceased was suffering from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural causes."

EXETER – Fatal Accident. - Last evening an Inquest was held, before Mr Coroner Hooper, at the Fireman's Arms, West-street, on the body of GEORGE HOWARD, four years of age. The evidence of the child's mother, SARAH HOWARD, wife of a labourer, living at 41 Preston-street, showed that the boy left home the previous evening, and Mrs Emily Coombes, living in a house adjoining the Fireman's Arms, shortly afterwards saw the boy at play, when, on endeavouring to get a stick he had been using, and which had been knocked under waggon, he fell on his back, and his head came near the drag of the wheel. She at once called out to the waggoner, who was driving slowly, and he alighted lifted the child, and carried it home, when the poor fellow fainted. John Chamberlain, employed by Messrs. J. L. Thomas and Co., said on passing through West-street, with a horse and trolly, he noticed several boys in the road playing "cat." He called to them to get out of the way, and they all ran, except one, whom he did not notice until the horse knocked him down and kicked him under the ear with his fore leg. Mr J. S. Perkins, who was called to see the child, said he found blood issuing from its nose and ears, the left collar bone broken, an abrasion of the skin passing obliquely under the right ear, and the jaw on the same side dislocated, and a small abrasion of the skin in the middle of the chin. He had no doubt, death was due to a severe injury at the base of the brain. The Jury, without any hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental death," and fully exonerated the driver of the trolly from any blame.

Wednesday 28 May 1879, Issue 5963 – Gale Document No. Y3200727715 BARNSTAPLE – Boy Drowned. - On Wednesday evening the Borough Coroner (I. Bencraft, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Park Hotel on the body of a boy about 4 ½ years of age, which had been found floating in the river Taw the same afternoon by Mr Farley Sinkins, of Exeter. The body was identified as that of HENRY KNILL, who had been missing for more than a fortnight, and was supposed to have fallen into the river whilst at play. Mr Farley Sinkins, a vocalist of Exeter, was sculling up the river Taw when he saw a black object in the river, and on rowing towards it he found it to be the body of a very fine boy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The Jury and also Mr Farley Sinkins handed their fees over to the father of the deceased, he being a labouring man with a long family.

HOLSWORTHY – Mr Fulford, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Clawton Bridge, near Holsworthy, on Monday, respecting the death of JAMES PERKIN, a miller, residing at Beare Mills. At a late hour on the previous Wednesday night, PERKIN, who was a widower, returned from Holsworthy Market in such an intoxicated condition that he had to be helped upstairs by his daughter. It is supposed that he afterwards got out of bed and fell backwards downstairs. About four o'clock on Thursday morning he was found at the foot of the stairs, unconscious, and with his head in a pool of blood. Mr E. T. Pearse, surgeon, of Holsworthy, said death resulted from a fracture of the skull, with concussion of the brain. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 May 1879, Issue 5963 – Gale Document No. Y3200727712 EXETER – Shocking Death Of An Infant. - An Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, last Friday afternoon, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on view of the body of DANIEL WILLIAMS, the infant son of THOMAS WILLIAMS, a chandelier polisher, living in Rouse's-court, Paul-street. From the evidence of the mother, ROSE WILLIAMS, it appeared that the child was eleven months old. On Thursday evening, about nine o'clock, she laid the child down, and stood a lighted paraffin lamp over its cradle on a shelf made for the purpose. She then left the house to return a pan which she had borrowed of a neighbour, and was absent about ten minutes. On her return she found that the lamp had burst and the cradle was all ablaze. The lamp burned brightly for about a quarter of an hour before she left the house, and she noticed nothing wrong, but it turned out afterwards that she had filled it up with benzoline instead of petroleum. Witness said she sent a little girl named Sandercock to fetch the oil from the shop of Mr Parkhouse, and the child afterwards told her that she was positive she asked Mr Parkhouse for paraffin. The bottle was labelled petroleum. Witness stated that two months since Mr Parkhouse sent her half a pint of benzoline instead of petroleum, and admitted the mistake when it was sent back to be changed. The mother's statement was confirmed by the production of the bottle, and the little girl, although not sworn on account of her tender age, stated that she asked for half a pint of paraffin for a big lamp. Mary Sandercock, the mother of the girl, said she assisted in getting the baby out of the cradle, and carried it to her own house close by, where it died about ten minutes afterwards. Mr Parkhouse, who had been sent for by the Coroner, was then questioned. He could not remember serving the child on the night in question, but admitted that the bottle contained benzoline, and said it was his usual practice when he served benzoline in a bottle marked petroleum to put a fresh lable on it. He could not say in this case whether the mistake was his or the child's. The Coroner, in summing up, said it would be for the Jury to consider wether Mr Parkhouse had been so far negligent as to make him criminally responsible. the Jury returned a verdict of death from Accidental; Causes, and added that they hoped Mr Parkhouse would exercise more care in the future.

EXETER – Sad End Of A Drunkard. - On Friday evening, at the Cowley Bridge Inn, before the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Eq.), an Enquiry was held into the circumstances attending the death of EDWARD DAWSON, a commercial traveller, about forty-four years of age, whose body had been found the previous afternoon lying in a pond in the "Little Stoke Woods." The body was identified by Mr Carpenter, landlord of the Nelson Inn, Spiller-street. He said that on Tuesday, the 29th of April, just before six o'clock in the morning, deceased came to his house and called for threepenny-worth of brandy, which was supplied him. He was under the influence of drink before he had the brandy. Deceased remained until half-past nine, and in the meantime drank five more threepenny-worths of brandy, but only paid for the first. Deceased was wearing a gold albert chain. He came again to the house next day about ten o'clock, but the chain was then missing. Witness afterwards found that he had pawned the chain at Mr Brooking's for £2. Deceased asked if witness would let him remain in the house until he could get some money from his friends in Staffordshire. Witness consented, and at deceased's request wrote to his wife for a remittance of £5. In reply he received a letter from Mr E. Sanders, stating that the deceased had driven his wife out of her mind by his "bad and unmanly conduct," that she was so ill as to require three persons to attend upon her, and that in the opinion of the doctor she was in a dangerous condition. When the letter arrived deceased had left the house, and witness never saw him afterwards. Deceased had previously asked witness to go to Mr Gardner's Half Moon Hotel, High-street, for some luggage which he had left there. Mr Gardner, however, refused to part with it because deceased had not paid his hotel bill, and said he should write to the firm he represented and advised witness to do the same. On telling deceased that Mr Gardner had declined to give up his luggage he said he should go to Mr Elmore, of the London and South Western Hotel, where he had put up many years ago, and see if he could get some money. At his request witness went to Mr Elmore, who stated that he had known the man for many years, but he had given him a great deal of trouble, and he should have nothing to do with him. While deceased was at witness's house he suffered from delirium tremens, and was delirious when he left. He never saw the deceased before the 29th ult., and had no knowledge of where he was going when he left. Evidence as to the finding of the body was given by Laura Phillips, daughter of the landlord of the Elephant Inn, a man named Clarke, who was employed in breaking stones on the road near the spot, and P.C. Guppy. The body was lying face down in the pool, with two coats and a hat on the bank near by. All the money found on the deceased was a threepenny-piece and three half-pence. Two pocket-books were found in the coat; one contained the deceased's address, "EDWARD DAWSON, 60 Ashwood, Longton, Staffordshire Potteries, representative of S. Smith, Longton" and in the other book was a quantity of poetry. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, St. Sidwell's, stated that the body presented the usual appearance of death by drowning. It was in an advanced state of decomposition, and appeared to have been in the water over a fortnight. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 28 May 1879, Issue 5963 – Gale Document No. Y3200727703 EXETER – Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the Crown and Anchor Inn, Newtown, on Thursday evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, touching the death of a gardener named WILLIAM MAYNE, which took place the same morning under the circumstances detailed below. It appeared that deceased left his house in John-street, Newtown, about six o'clock in the evening, to work in a green adjoining the Newtown Infants' School, where he had been employed some time. A woman named Stone, who was engaged in cleaning the schoolroom, saw him enter the water closet between seven and eight o'clock. At about eight o'clock the woman, somewhat surprised at his absence, called him, but received no reply, and she opened the door of the water closet, when she saw the unfortunate man hanging by his neck by a rope attached to a chain which was suspended to a beam somewhat over six feet from the ground. Her screams attracted to the spot two lads, and they cut down the body, which was conveyed to the deceased's residence. Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, was sent for, and on his arrival pronounced life t be extinct, although the body was still warm. The deceased, who was about sixty years of age, leaves a wife but no children. Deceased was a shareholder in the West of England and South Wales Bank, having thirty shares in it, and ever since the Bank failed he had been in a very desponding state. Nevertheless when he was requested to pay the "call" he readily did so. Since then, however, he had been more depressed at the large amount of money he had lost. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 4 June 1879, Issue 5964 – Gale Document No. BC3200727732 NEWTON ABBOT – A boy named CHAPLE, nine years of age, son of a widow living in Quay-road, fell into the canal under a bridge in the Kingsteignton-road, and was drowned on Saturday last. The Inquest was held the same evening, at the Queen's Hotel, before Mr Watts, Deputy-Coroner, a verdict was returned that deceased was Accidentally Drowned.

Wednesday 4 June 1879, Issue 5964 – Gale Document No. BC3200727742 NORTH BOVEY – An Inquest was held by Mr Francis Watts, the Deputy Coroner for the Totnes district, on Saturday last, on the body of MR WILLIAM FRENCH, a gentleman living at Hookner, in this parish, who died suddenly in his own house, on the Thursday previous. A post-mortem examination was made, the result of which proved that the deceased died from "fatty degeneration of the heart," and the Coroner directed the Jury to find a verdict accordingly.

TORQUAY – A Fatal Spree. - An Inquest was held by Mr Watts (Deputy Coroner) at the Police Court, on Wednesday, relative to the death of PATRICK O'NEILL, aged 19 years, a seaman, belonging to the schooner Elizabeth Davey, OF Fowey, Hanson, master. It appears that on Monday evening ,after the crew had discharged a cargo of coal and ballast in the harbour, the deceased, together with a seaman, named David Gray, commenced washing the decks. While thus engaged, they went "skylarking," Gray ultimately knocking the deceased in the side of the head with his broom, knocking off his cap. After washing the decks, the two went below, apparently in good humour with each other. Both young men were laughing at the occurrence, and had tea together. Early the next morning Gray called to the captain, and said the deceased was dying; and before a doctor, who had been sent for, arrived he died in the forecastle. Gray told the captain that during his skylarking with the deceased he struck him on the side f the head with his broom, and, on being subsequently taken into custody, he repeated this statement to the constable. A post-mortem examination made on the body by Dr Richardson, of Torquay, and Dr Gaye, of Newton Abbot (the district Coroner), revealed an extensive fracture of the skull, which the medical men said could only have been caused by a blow delivered with considerable force. The cause of death was effusion of blood on the brain. The Coroner adjourned the Inquest to allow the police to procure the attendance of two men, who were said to have seen the blow struck.

Wednesday 4 June 1879, Issue 5964 – Gale Document No. BC3200727728 EXETER – Death From Burning. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon at the George and Dragon Inn, Blackboy-road, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on view of the body of ELIZABETH MARTIN, who died early the dame morning from the effects of severe burns received on the previous day. The deceased was seventy-four years of age, and lived with Mrs Ann Horspool at No. 2, Blackboy-road. It appeared from the evidence that deceased has for the past twelve months been subject to fits; on Friday morning between eleven and twelve Mrs Horspool left her sitting by the fire whilst she went out for a quarter of an hour, and on her return some people were bringing deceased out of the passage. They said that she had been burned and they were going to take her to the hospital, but Mrs Horspool would not allow her to be removed, and she was then taken upstairs. The injured woman never said how the accident happened, but it is supposed that she must have fallen on the fire. A domestic servant named Coles was the first to enter the house when an alarm was raised, and she found the deceased standing in the corner of the kitchen with her clothes all on fire. She called in a sailor who made an ineffectual attempt to put out the flames with his hands, but a cabman who followed with a sack was more successful. Mr Hunt, surgeon, said he had attended the deceased professionally for years. She was subject to fainting fits and April last he attended her for some time. When he saw the deceased about noon on Friday he found that she was badly burnt, especially about the lower extremities and the left arm. Death was caused by the shock to the system. It was not at all likely that she fell on the fire in a fit because she spoke sensibly to the girl Coles. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 11 June 1879, Issue 5965 – Gale Document No. Y3200727785 TOTNES - Fatal Accident. - The District Coroner (Mr Gaye) held an Inquest on Thursday at Belleigh Farm, Dartington, touching the death of the late occupier, MR EDWARD SKINNER, who was killed on the previous Tuesday night by being thrown from his horse while returning from Totnes Market. The horse he was riding was about twelve years old, but was at times rather fidgety. Deceased had been accustomed to ride it for some time. About ten o'clock in the night the horse returned riderless. Young MR SKINNER then went a little way down the lane, but saw nothing of his father, and he went back, mounted the horse and rode towards Totnes. Just after getting into the turnpike-road, about a mile from the farm, the horse stopped, and it being a light night, he saw deceased lying on his back in the middle of the road, quite dead. Miss Whiteway, daughter of the landlady of the Queen's Arms, Dartington, stated that she saw the deceased about a quarter-past-nine. She served him with three-pennyworth of gin, which he drank without getting from his horse and then went on. He was sober and cheerful at the time. Mr A. J. Wallis, surgeon, Totnes, proved that death was caused by a fracture of the base of the skull. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 18 June 1879, Issue 5966 – Gale Document No. Y3200727816 TOTNES – Suicide. - A man named SAMUEL RICHARDS, formerly a letter carrier at Totnes, but lately out of employment, has committed suicide by hanging himself. Some months since he was dismissed from the Post-office for irregularity, and since that time he has been very desponding. After dinner on Friday he went into the back yard, and ten minutes later was found hanging by the neck from a beam in the closet. Life was extinct. The widow is left quite destitute with five young children. Deceased was thirty-seven years of age, and had been some years in the post-office when he was dismissed. At an Inquest, held on Saturday, before Dr Gaye, District Coroner, a verdict of "Temporary Insanity," was returned.

EXMOUTH – Fatal Boat Accident. - An Inquest was held at Lympstone on Friday, before Mr Cox, District Coroner, respecting the death of EDWARD THOMAS LYTTON and FRANCIS HORSFORD, two young fishermen, who were drowned by the capsizing of their boat off Exmouth. The accident occurred about two o'clock on Wednesday morning, and it was stated that the coastguard men were aware of it. Edmund Smith, a fisherman, stated that when the boat capsized he went to the coastguard station, and on arriving there saw some of the men launching a boat. He followed them in his boat, and a short time afterwards met them returning. He, however, went on, and discovered the deceased's boat, which he brought in. Finding that the men were not in the boat he went to the coastguard station, and appealed to some of the men to accompany him. At length he pushed off alone, but his search was unsuccessful. In his opinion the coastguard were afraid to venture out, and he would not give 2d. a dozen for all the coastguardsmen there. George Bradford, a fisherman, proved finding the bodies of the men at noon on the following day. LYTTON was in a stooping position, with his head in the water, and his feet entangled in the net. His back was out of the water, and he appeared to have been only recently dead, as there was no water in the body. HORSFORD was completely entangled in the meshes of the nets. In his opinion, prompt action on the part of the coastguard men would have saved the life of LYTTON. The body was not stiff when taken out of the water. Witness (speaking warmly) said he considered there ought to be a light at the coastguard station to enable fishermen to come on shore by night. _ (Hear, hear.) - When there were any accidents the coastguard ought to fire a gun and launch their lifeboat. It was no place for "the parcel of punts about." No coastguard men had been summoned to attend the Inquest, and the Coroner, in summing up, said there might have been an amount of cowardice on their part, but hardly, he thought, amounting to criminal neglect. It would be unsafe for the Jury to add to their verdict any expression of censure The best plan was to publish the facts through the medium of the Press, and then the public would be able to judge for themselves. Great praise was due to Smith, who braved by himself such peril in endeavouring to save his fellow-creatures. He could not help admiring the man's spirit, and he hoped such noble fellows would long be found along the coasts of England. Great praise was also due to the other witnesses who had rendered help. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 18 June 1879, Issue 5966 – Gale Document No. Y3200727802 EXETER – Suicide. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Buller's Arms Inn, Exwick, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN SHILSON, which had been found on Saturday in the mill pond at Exwick Barton. The deceased, a youth of eighteen years of age, was the son of a farmer living at Spreyton in the parish of Bow, and had been living as an apprentice with Mr Rattenbury, draper, of Fore-street, Exeter, for about eighteen months. His employer had occasion to speak to him on Wednesday about a matter affecting his conduct. What passed appeared to have a depressing effect on his mind and he told one of the milliners that he felt very uncomfortable. He left the shop soon afterwards, his employer having directed him to go to Mrs Rattenbury's and there write a letter to his parents. He was not seen alive afterwards, and on Saturday morning his hat and some clothes were found on the bank near the mill pond at Exwick by Thomas Dawe, of Exwick Barton. He recognised the clothes as belonging to the deceased, whom he had known for several years, and at once informed his parents, and they caused the mill pond to be drained, when the body of the deceased was found. Mr J. Quin, M.D., proved that death was caused by drowning. Mr Rattenbury stated that twelve months ago the deceased had an attack of rheumatic fever, during which time he was delirious, and he had been very sensitive and excitable ever since. Verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

EXETER – Fatal Accident At St. David's Station. - The city Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn yesterday afternoon, on the body of HENRY OSBORNE, aged thirty-two, a shunter in the service of the Great Western Railway Company, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital from the effects of injuries received the previous day whilst in the discharge of his duty at St. David's Station. From the evidence of another shunter named Parrish, it appeared that deceased was helping to shunt the 11 p.m. train. they had shunted the trucks on to the line leading to the goods shed, and had to "knock" three other trucks against them. Witness detached three trucks from the engine, and OSBORNE gave the signal to "knock" them back. This was done. Witness saw OSBORNE jump on to the side of the end truck, and that was the last witness saw of him until after the accident, when witness saw the deceased sitting on a piece of timber close by the truck where the accident had happened. Deceased told witness he had been caught between the buffers. Deceased had extricated himself unaided. By the direction of Mr R. Chapman, station inspector, deceased was put into a cab and conveyed to the Hospital. Mr Cumming, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, stated that he received the deceased into that institution about mid-day. He died at about eight o'clock the same evening. Witness had made a post mortem examinations of the deceased, and discovered extensive internal injuries, which, in his opinion, were the cause of death. Mr William Green, Superintendent of Police on the Great Western Railway, who appeared to watch the case on behalf of the company, gave the deceased an excellent character for sobriety and industry. It was the duty of men employed in shunting to wait until the trucks had stopped, and the practice which had caused the death of the deceased (viz., of getting between the trucks whilst in motion) was a dangerous one. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 25 June 1879, Issue 5967 – Gale Document No. Y3200727840 EXETER – Boy Drowned. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Princess Alexandra Inn, Bonhay-road, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, touching the death of a little boy, seven years of age, named GEORGE HEAL, who was found in the mill leat behind the Powhay Mills, on Friday night. It appeared that deceased was the son of JAMES HEAL, a groom and gardener living on the Cowley-bridge road. On Friday he was sent to school, on Mount Dinham, with an elder brother, aged about nine years. As they were late they did not go in, but went for a walk instead. They went down Peep-lane and into the Bonhay-road, and along by the side of the river as far as the first weir. There they stopped to watch some men who were fishing. The bigger boy (JOHN HEAL) stood still to look at the men, but his little brother ran about playing. When JOHN turned around to look for his brother, he could not see him anywhere. He, in company with the men who were fishing, searched for the boy for some time, but, as he could not find him, he returned home and told his father, who went with him to the Bonhay-road, and they made another unsuccessful search. George Reed, a miller, in the employ of Mr Edmund Brown, Powhay Mills, deposed to finding the body in the mill-leat, when he went to clear the fenders. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said that about 11.30 p.m. on Friday, he was fetched to go to the Princes Alexandra Inn. He went there and found the body of the deceased laid in front of the kitchen fire. He appeared to have been dead for some hours. Witness examined the body, but found no marks of violence. The pupils of the eyes were dilated, and in the mouth were some grains of sand, which shewed that the child was alive when he entered the water. The cause of death was drowning. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Wednesday 2 July 1879, Issue 5968 – Gale Document No. Y3200727879 A FATAL GUN ACCIDENT occurred on Sunday afternoon at Mr G. Harding's Farm, Southam Barton, in the parish of Heavitree. It appears that a lad named Hellay loaded one of his master's guns on Saturday evening for the purpose of shooting a hawk which he had seen hovering over the chicken, but failing to get a shot at the bird he placed the gun in a cart and forgot all about it. Finding the gun there on Sunday afternoon he took it up and put it across his shoulder for the purpose of taking it indoors. He had no sooner done this than the gun ,which must have been loaded, went off. A young blacksmith, named WM. PAGE, who had come to the farm on a visit to one of the servants, was standing close by and received the whole charge in his face. The boy on seeing what had happened ran off for medical assistance, but the poor fellow's injuries were so severe that he died before Mr Williams arrived. An Inquest will be held at noon today.

CLAYHIDON – Alleged Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held at Clayhidon on Wednesday, before S. M. Cox, Esq., District Coroner, on view of the body of HENRY BARBER, aged sixty-two, a travelling umbrella mender, who died at the Merry Harriers Inn, from the effects of an assault committed on him by a farm servant named Fred. Broom. ELIZABETH BARBER, ten years of age, daughter of the deceased, stated that her father lived at South Broom, near Bruton, Somersetshire, and was a travelling umbrella mender. On Friday last they started from home on a journey in the country. They stopped at Taunton that night and they started again on Saturday morning. On Saturday night they reached the Merry Harriers Inn, where they had some liquor, being joined whilst there by her brother JOHN, who is a private in the 1st Somerset Militia. After the departure of her brother, the deceased and witness went to an adjoining linhay to pass the night. Her father at this time was not drunk, although he had been drinking. While they were in the linhay Fred. Broom came in and ordered her father out. Subsequently they went outside, where she heard Broom knock her father down, and whilst he was on the ground he received other blows. When Broom and some lads who were with him had gone, witness tried to raise her father from the ground, but she could not succeed, and accordingly went to the public-house near and told the landlord what had occurred, but he told her to go home. Next morning her father was removed to the Merry Harriers, where he died. Henry Saunders, labourer, deposed that he went to the linhay with Mr Bale's two sons and the prisoner Broom on Saturday night. They carried a candle, and on seeing the deceased they asked him to leave, threatening that if he did not do so to fetch the policeman. The deceased refused to move, and took up something, with which he tried to strike witness. The candle went out, and he then left, after having offered to share his bed with the deceased or provide him with a better one. The defendant followed them out of the linhay, saying that if he could kill one of them he could manage the other three. Witness ran away, and could not say whether the deceased struck anyone or not. Witness did not know whether Broom struck the deceased, but the prisoner afterwards told him that he knocked the man down, as he was in danger of his life, and if he had not protected himself the deceased would have struck him with the soldering-iron. He only struck the deceased in self defence. P.C. Bowman was present when the deceased expired, and he proved apprehending the prisoner on the charge of killing the deceased. Broom admitted that he struck the old man, but he said he did it in self defence. Dr Mackey, of Churchingford, proved that death was caused by the injury to the head, and that the deceased had also suffered from a diseased heart. The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Frederick Broom, but some of them were in favour of finding a verdict of Wilful Murder. After the Inquest, the deceased was buried at Clayhidon by the rector, the Rev. W. W. Clarke. The coffin was carried by a sergeant and eight privates of the 1st Somerset Militia, and the remains were followed by the son and daughter of the deceased. At Cullompton Police Court, on Thursday, before G. M. Marker and T. Twiner, Esqrs., Fred. Broom was brought up on remand, charged with killing HENRY BARBER, and the Bench, after hearing the evidence given above, committed the prison for trial at the Assizes.

Wednesday 2 July 1879, Issue 5968 – Gale Document No. Y3200727893 SIDMOUTH – Killed By A Bullock. - An inquest was held at the London Hotel, Sidmouth, on Saturday, before the District Coroner (S. M. Cox, Esq.), touching the death of CHARLES FOILE, eighty-five years of age, who met his death on Thursday morning in consequence of the injuries sustained on the previous Tuesday through being attacked by a bullock on the Esplanade. It appeared from the evidence that the bullock in question was going through Sidmouth, in charge of a boy. The animal walked in front of the deceased, and remained there a few seconds looking at him. Deceased put up his stick to frighten the bullock away, but the animal rushed at him, knocked him down, and gored him. The boy in charge endeavoured to knock the bullock down with a bar, and in doing so fell, and the bullock fell upon him. The animal then ran away, and in his course attacked several persons. The evidence of Dr Pulling, who was called in to attend the deceased, went to show that the poor old man sustained a fracture of the left shoulder and broken ribs. Four ribs were broken on the left side, and two on the right side. The deceased died, unquestionably, from the injuries he received from the bullock. The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said it was a very clear case indeed, and he did not consider any remarks from him were required as to what their verdict should be. It was for them to consider whether there was any blame resting upon anybody. The bullock did not seem to be a wild beast, and it did not appear that any special care was required in the matter. There seemed to be no reason why the bullock got so wild, and the only thing one could suggest was the parting company from another bullock. If they did not consider there was any blame attached to anybody they must return a verdict of accidental death. The Inquest would be made public, and it was for them to consider whether there was any necessity for any by-laws to be made with reference to the manner and time which animals should be driven through the town. If they thought it was an exceptional case, there was no reason for such by-laws. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added, "That, in consequence of this accident, the Jury recommend the Local Government Board to pass by-laws to ensure greater precautions being taken in future for driving bullocks through the street."

Wednesday 9 July 1879, Issue 5969 – Gale Document No. Y3200727925 OTTERY ST. MARY – Fatal Accident. - Dr Macauley, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the King's Arms Hotel, last Friday, on the body of SAMUEL PALFREY, aged 51, a waggoner, for many years in the employ of Mr John Digby, builder. The deceased about three weeks since was engaged in drawing two very heavy stones from the railway station to his master's yard. His son, H. PALFREY, was engaged with his father in unloading the stones, and feeling that the waggon was overbalancing, they both jumped off. The deceased jumped off backwards coming in contact with a keen edged stone, and broke his leg. He was removed to the Cottage Hospital. Dr Gray stated that the deceased had been under his care in the Cottage Hospital for the last nineteen days. It was deemed necessary to amputate his leg, but soon gangrene set in, and he was obliged to amputate the second leg, at the thigh, to prevent the disease spreading. However, the deceased, had, from the very first, suffered from some acute disease in the stomach, and he had died from that, and natural exhaustion, just after the second operation. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

HEAVITREE - The Late Fatal Gun Accident. - The County Coroner (R. R. Crosse, Esq.), held an Inquest at the royal Oak Inn, Heavitree, on Wednesday, on view of the body of CHARLES WILLIAM PAGE, who was accidentally shot on the previous Sunday afternoon. William Ealey, a page, in the employ of Mr George Arden, said on Sunday afternoon he was with the deceased in a field near the house, and whilst there he remembered having left a loaded gun in a cart in one of the lodges the night before. He said to the deceased, "I had better carry it in or else I shall get into a row." Witness, in company with the deceased, went to the outhouse, and witness took the gun from the cart. The deceased stood just outside the outhouse. In taking the gun from the car it went off, and the contents entered the deceased's head and face, and the poor fellow fell back dead. As it was raining at the time, witness pulled the body into the outhouse. He then picked up the gun, took it into the house, and searched for the servants. In reply to a Juryman, he said the gun was loaded with a cartridge which witness got from his master's room. He was not allowed to take the gun or the cartridge. Witness left the gun full cocked in the cart. There was a lot of sticks in the cart. To the Coroner: He was not "larking" at all when the gun went off, and what happened was purely an accident. A Juryman: Did you say to PAGE, "If you don't take yourself off I will shoot you?" Witness: No, sir, I didn't; I said nothing at all. Elizabeth Smeardon said that she was cook at Mr Arden's. She knew the deceased to be a very great friend of Ealey's. She last saw the deceased and Ealey together on Sunday afternoon, just after three o'clock. John Oxenham, a labourer, said that on Sunday afternoon, Ealey came to him and said that he had accidentally shot the deceased. Witness went with Ealey to the outhouse, where he saw the body of the deceased. Witness sent for the doctor and a policeman. Witness had known the boy Ealey for about three years; and, in his opinion, what occurred was purely an accident. Mr W. J. Williams, M.R.C.S., M.D., said that on Sunday afternoon he was fetched to an outhouse at Mr Arden's, where he found the body of the deceased. Death had been instantaneous, caused by the gun-shot wounds. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The foreman of the Jury thought that Ealey should be reprimanded for taking the gun without his master's permission, and he was accordingly cautioned by the Coroner.

Wednesday 9 July 1879, Issue 5969 – Gale Document No. Y3200727914 MURDER AND SUICIDE AT PLYMOUTH. – A terrible murder and suicide occurred at the Newmarket Hotel, Plymouth, on Monday. ALFRED GREGORY, of the Queen's Hotel mews, Chester, cut the throat of a married woman, HARRIET LAWRENCE, wife of a man-of-war's man, at present at Portsmouth, and then cut his own. Both died almost instantaneously. The woman and man had been living at Chester as man and wife. The woman, when her husband was coming home from China, returned to Plymouth and wrote to GREGORY to think no more about her and to send her things, as she had become reconciled to her husband. GREGORY arrived in Plymouth on Saturday night and had an interview with the woman on Sunday morning. They went to the hotel together where the deed was committed. At an Inquest held in the evening, a verdict of "Wilful Murder" was found against the man for the death of the woman and of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind" for his own death.

Wednesday 9 July 1879, Issue 5969 – Gale Document No. Y3200727922 SHOCKING SUICIDE AT STONEHOUSE - An adjourned Inquest was held at Plymouth last Thursday, before Mr Rodd, County Coroner, respecting the death of ELIZABETH ANN WARE, aged twenty-one years, whose body was picked up off Devil's Point, Stonehouse, on the 27th ult. the deceased had been for about eighteen months a domestic servant in the employ of Mr Miller, stationer, of Plymouth, and it appeared from the evidence of Frederick William Barton, a Marine on board the Indus, that he had been "keeping company" with deceased for three or four months. He met her by chance on Thursday evening, the 26th ult., and – although he knew she was in a situation – they passed the night together in a refreshment house. He left her in bed soon after five in the morning, and she did not then seem in low spirits. He did not see her again. He declined to answer questions put to him by the Jury as to what made her stay out the night with him, and also as to whether he had promised her marriage. Other evidence was given as to Barton asking for a bed for himself and wife at a refreshment house; the deceased left there in the morning just before six. She was soon afterwards seen at the point named with three Marine corporals, who thought she was not "exactly right." She was also seen by a coastguardsman, when she appeared to be doing up her hair. A little later a man found her jacket and her hat on the grass, and her body was subsequently found in the water below the point. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned. Deceased was the only child of a widow.

Wednesday 23 July 1879, Issue 5971 – Gale Document No. Y3200727997 DAWLISH – Fatal Railway Accident. - MR W. W. NORTH, a young gentleman nineteen years of age met with a very shocking death on Friday night whilst travelling from Huddersfield to Dawlish to join his mother. He was in the train due at Dawlish at eleven p.m., and it appears that shortly after leaving Taunton he leant out of the carriage window to communicate with a friend in the next compartment when he was caught by the wood work of a bridge and instantly killed, his body being dragged out of the window on to the line. His mother, MRS TETLEY, went to the Dawlish station to meet him. As he did not arrive she made enquiries of an official, who said there had been an accident, whereupon she posted to Exeter, where her worst fears were confirmed. She went to Taunton next morning (Saturday) and the Inquest was held the same afternoon when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. After the Inquest the body was removed to Dawlish. It is said that a person was killed in a similar manner at the same bridge not very long ago.

Wednesday 6 August 1879, Issue 5973 – Gale Document No. Y3200728053 AN EXETER COMMERCIAL TRAVELLER KILLED ON THE ROAD. A very distressing accident happened on Wednesday last in the neighbourhood of Milverton, by which MR JAMES MALLETT, of Alphington-road, Exeter, traveller in the employ of Messrs. Gardiner and Sons, ironmongers, of Bristol, was instantaneously killed, and his little boy, about twelve years of age, out for a day's pleasure, had one leg broken and sustained other damage. It appears that MR MALLETT was driving a young horse, which he had only very recently purchased, and on the way from Bishop's Lydeard to Milverton the animal was frightened by some smoke coming through a hedge; it then broken away into a gallop and defied all efforts to bring it again under control. The trap was only brought to a stand by coming in contact with the hedge, the occupants were then thrown out, the four-wheeler overturned, and the driver and horse both killed. MR MALLETT and his son were removed to the Globe Hotel, Milverton, where an Inquest was held on Friday morning, when the following evidence was taken. Alfred Gardiner said he was an ironmonger, residing in Nelson-street, Bristol. The deceased had been in his employ for seventeen years, and for the last eight years as canvasser and traveller; he was about thirty-seven years of age. On the 6th of July last he left Bristol for his journey in the west. On Thursday last deceased went to Bristol by train and returned to Taunton the same evening. He drove a four-wheeled phaeton and a horse about five years old, belonging to witness. It was a mare about sixteen hands high, and always appeared quiet. He bought her and had been using her for about three weeks. STANLEY MALLETT said he was the son of the deceased. He was travelling with his father on Tuesday night and slept at the Globe Hotel, Milverton, leaving there about half-past eight the following morning. they went through Halse to Fitzhead, and from thence towards Milverton. Coming down Pound-lane to get into the road the horse saw some smoke in a field at the top of the lane, and suddenly started off at a full gallop down the hill into the main road and straight across into the hedge. Deceased was pulling her back all the time, and then he either jumped out or the trap threw him out. Witness was thrown out, and the trap turned over right on its side with the horse. Witness's left leg was under the shaft and the horse was upon the shaft. Deceased was on the off or driving side. Witness could not see him. A woman was passing, and with assistance got them conveyed to the Globe Hotel in a trap. This was about half-past twelve in the day. Thomas Criddle stated that he lived at Preston. On Wednesday last about mid-day he was in a field near Pound-lane burning refuse. He saw a horse and trap with a gentleman and a boy in it. The gentleman was driving slowly along the lane towards Preston. Witness saw them going on towards Fitzhead in the morning Ann Rowing said she lived at Preston. On Wednesday last, about half-past twelve o'clock, two little boys spoke to her, and in consequence of their information she went to Pound-lane. She saw the deceased's son, who cried out, "Oh, ma'am, I think father is dead." The deceased was behind the trap lying in the hedge in rather a sitting posture; he was insensible. Soon afterwards witness and his father were removed by Mr Langdon, a butcher, of Milverton, and Mr Ash, bailiff, in a cart to the Globe Hotel. Mr Randolph said he was a medical practitioner residing at Milverton. On being summoned to the Globe Hotel to see the deceased he found him on a bed lying on his back, unconscious, pulseless, in a cold clammy sweat, groaning fearfully, and in a state of great restlessness. His right arm and leg were paralysed, and his violent struggles assumed an epileptic character, requiring two or three men to keep him on the bed. Deceased remained in this condition for about half an hour after his arrival at the Globe Hotel, when he expired. On examination after death witness found no external injuries with the exception of some slight abrasions on the face. He examined the skull, but could discover no fracture, neither could he discover any fracture of the ribs. In the absence, therefore, of post-mortem examination his opinion might be said to be conjectural, but from the character of the symptoms during the short period of his sufferings witness entertained no doubt from epileptic convulsive struggles, the perfect unconsciousness, together with the paralysis of the right side, that death was occasioned by the rupture of some vessel or vessels in the brain, that in all probability there was considerable extravasation of blood, and hence the cause of death. The injuries which caused his death might be caused by his head coming into violent contact either with the road or with the hedge. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence, of "Accidental Death." The body of the deceased was conveyed the same afternoon by rail to his residence in Alphington-road, Exeter. The son of the deceased still remains at the Globe Hotel, unable to be removed. Deceased leaves a widow and two children.

Wednesday 6 August 1879, Issue 5973 – Gale Document No. Y3200728070 FATAL RAILWAY ACCIDENT NEAR HONITON - A very lamentable accident occurred last Wednesday on the South Western Railway, between Honiton Station and Sidmouth Junction, causing the death of a farmer, and one of the horses with which he was carting hay. The deceased, MR JOHN MAEER, was about sixty-six years of age, and occupied a farm known as Heathfield, close by the railway. He was also a member of the Honiton Town Council. Shortly before two o'clock on Wednesday deceased was crossing the line with a load of hay drawn by two horses, just as the fast express from London came up. The train was late, and going very fast to make up for lost time, so that the driver, although he saw the obstruction, and at once reversed the engine, was unable to slacken speed sufficiently to allow the vehicle to clear the metals. The engine dashed into the waggon, smashing it to pieces. The shaft horse was killed almost instantaneously, and the driver received such serious injuries that he died where he fell close to a hayrick by the side f the line. The body was removed to the farm house, where Dr Macauley, district Coroner, opened an Inquest on the following Friday. Mr Glanvill, Mayor of Honiton, was foreman of the Jury. Mr Tweed, solicitor, attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the deceased's family; and Inspector Rogers represented the Company. After viewing the body the Court adjourned to the White Lion Inn, Honiton, where the following evidence was taken:- Henry Farrant, a labourer, in the employ of the Railway Company, said on Wednesday afternoon he was on duty between the bridge and the level crossing by the deceased's house. About half-past one o'clock, whilst he had stopped for dinner, he heard the express coming down. He turned his head, and then saw MR MAEER'S fore horse coming out of the gateway on to the line. Witness looked back again, and saw the engine coming just under the bridge. just as the engine got outside the bridge, the driver sounded his whistle. That was done about the spot he showed Mr Glanvill. Mr Glanvill: That is more than ninety feet from the bridge. Witness, continuing, said he saw the engine strike the shaft horse. He did not see any attempt made to urge the horses on or get them back. The horse in the shafts and the fore wheels of the waggon were both struck. To the Foreman: The whistle was sounded when the train was some distance outside the bridge, but it was not half way between the bridge and the level-crossing. To Mr Tweed: The level-crossing was about 300 yards from the bridge, and he though the train was about 100 yards off the bridge at the time he first heard the whistle. Henry Brooks, a ganger on the South Western Company's line, said at the time of the accident he was about sixty yards above the level-crossing. He heard the driver sound his whistle, and looked up. The train passed before witness had time to look round to the level-crossing. As the train passed the crossing he looked to the rear of it and saw the deceased lying in a ditch and a horse lying in the four-foot space of the up line. He called the other men to his assistance, took deceased into his house, and sent for a doctor. Witness heard the train coming before he heard the whistle. When he heard the whistle he looked up and saw the train about 150 yards above the level-crossing. By the Coroner: It was the "brake-whistle" he heard sounded, between the bridge and the level-crossing. The "danger-whistle" was sounded almost as soon as the train got from under the bridge. To a Juryman: It was impossible for MR MAEER to have got his horse and waggon off the line after the whistle sounded. Walter Ridet, driver of the engine, said that on Wednesday last he was driving the 11.15 fast train from Salisbury. They left Salisbury twenty-one minutes late. Everything went straight until they got below Honiton. When about 150 yards from the level crossing he saw a horse coming on the line. As witness was looking another horse followed. The very moment he saw the first horse witness opened the whistle, shut off steam, and held out his hand for the fireman to apply the brake. Immediately upon that they came into collision with the waggon, and after that the train was stopped as soon as possible. He should think they went a mile or a mile and a quarter before the train was pulled up. The train had to be driven at forty or fifty miles an hour all through, and he did not think they were going more than forty-five miles an hour. To the Coroner: With all the brake-power on he thought the train might be stopped in 600 yards. He mentioned to his mate to put on the brake, but he could not do so in time, and immediately after the collision the engine oscillated so that it took them all their time to hold on. Witness did not know whether the engine had left the rails or not. Witness did not sound the brake-whistle, but one of the guards did. To Mr Tweed: The train was about thirty-six minutes late at Axminster, and about thirty-eight minutes late at Honiton. He did not believe the train was going at the rate of more than forty-five miles an hour. When the train was 150 yards off a man standing on the line might have got out of the way, but a man with a waggon and horses could not have done so. Witness sounded the smaller whistle because it was close at hand. To the Coroner: It was not usual to sound the whistles at crossings of this description. The whistle would be sounded at highway crossings and where the crossing was behind a curve. There was no curve at this crossing, the line being level for about two miles. Joseph North, the foreman, was also examined, and bore out the statements made by the driver, and James Arnold, the guard of the train, also gave evidence. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death was the result of an accident, and they intimated that they considered means should be taken to notify the approach of trains at level crossings.

Wednesday 13 August 1879, Issue 5974 – Gale Document No. Y3200728094 TORQUAY - Fatal Accident to a Somnambulist. - Mr F. J. Watts, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Police Station, last Friday, on view of the body of JOHN PATRICK SAUNDERS, painter, who died from injuries received in falling down a flight of stairs whilst walking in his sleep. The deceased was fifty-nine years of age, and had been known for some years to be afflicted with somnambulism. On Tuesday night he went to bed about eleven o'clock, and shortly afterwards his son was aroused by a cry from his mother that "He's fallen over the stairs." The son at once went to his father, but found he had ceased to breathe, having broken his neck. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death through falling down stairs."

20 August 1879, Issue 5975 – Gale Document No. Y3200728126 EXETER – Child Suffocated in Bed. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Bishop Blaze, in Commercial-road, on Monday, on the body of the infant child of JOHN FRENCH, a chimney sweep, who was found dead in bed. The evidence of Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, went to show that death was caused by suffocation, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER – Distressing Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the Victoria Inn, on Saturday morning, before H. W. Hooper, Eq. (City Coroner) on the body of MARIA NEWCOMBE, aged 29, the wife of CHARLES THOMAS NEWCOMBE, a commercial traveller. CATHERINE HAMERTON, sister of the deceased, said that she resided at 61, Victoria-road, and the deceased had been staying with her for the past three weeks. She had been in a desponding state for some while, but the doctor said it was weakness. There had been nothing to upset her mind that witness was aware of, and she lived happily with those about her. MR NEWCOMBE was away on a journey, but in his absence the deceased's daughter slept with her. The deceased had been ill, and she was away at Stockleigh for four months for change of air. Witness left her alone in the house on Friday morning, her daughter being at school. About one o'clock the child fetched witness to go home, and, on arriving there, she discovered her sister hanging at the top of the stairs to the balusters above. Her feet were nearly touching the stairs, and she appeared to be dead. Witness called her husband and also her cousin, Mr Hayes, who assisted to cut the deceased down. Mr Hayes said that when the deceased was cut down she was dead and cold. She was hanging by an ordinary rope tied round her neck. He last saw the deceased on Thursday night, when she was in her usual health and spirits. Mr C. W. Hamerton said that his sister-in-law was sent to Stockleigh on account of her weak state of mind, but since her return she had been much better. There were other similar inmates of the house at Stockleigh. Mr C. H. Roper, surgeon, stated that he had been the medical attendant of the deceased for more than twenty years, but he had not seen her for months. Lately she had become very different in her habits, and did not like staying at home. She had failed in her appetite, and felt weak. Her illness was a great source of anxiety to her husband, who got people to stay with her in the house in his absence. By witness's advice deceased was removed for change of air, and her husband sent her to Stockleigh. She was, however, clearly not a person to be put away in an ordinary asylum. She was always very lively, an excellent wife, and a very nice person. Dr Drake also saw her about Christmas, and he, too, advised a change. He did not believe that the suicide was premeditated, but a sudden whim of the moment. She had promised to go out and meet her sister in the evening. The illness had undoubtedly weakened her mind. Death was the result of strangulation. The deceased had locked the front door, and was in the midst of household duties when she hanged herself. The deceased was a most temperate woman before her illness but then she took a little neat spirit at times when she felt depressed. A verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide while in a state of unsound mind was at once returned.

20 August 1879, Issue 5975 – Gale Document No. Y3200728140 CHUDLEIGH - Fatal Accident. - Mr F. Watts, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Clifford Arms Hotel, Chudleigh, on Friday evening, on the body of JOHN BERRY, aged twenty-eight, a clay-cutter, in the employ of Messrs. Watts, Blake, Bearne and Co., clay merchants, of Newton Abbot. The deceased lived at Chudleigh, but had been to work at a place called Lappathornes, in the parish of Kingsteignton, and on Wednesdays was crushed by a heavy fall of gravel. His injuries were so serious that medical aid was of no avail, and he died at six o'clock the same evening. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 27 August 1879, Issue 5976 – Gale Document No. Y3200728178 UFFCULME – Shocking Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the Commercial Hotel on Monday before Spencer M. Cox, Esq., District Coroner, touching the death of MR JOHN CHORLEY, butcher, who had committed suicide by cutting his throat on the previous Saturday morning. Dr Dickenson said he had known deceased all his lifetime. He was fifty-seven years of age. Three weeks ago on Sunday last deceased fell from a ladder, and witness had since treated him professionally. He was at the time of the accident quite delirious from the effects f the fall, and witness considered he had slight concussion of the brain, as he complained of severe pain in the head. On Saturday morning last, about half-past eleven, he was sent for to go to the house of deceased at once. On his arrival there he found him in an upstair room. He was being supported by his eldest daughter and Mr Hellyer. He noticed a razor n the window and a basin in front of deceased, which contained about three pints f blood. There was a deep wound in the throat, and deceased was dead. Since the fall above spoken of deceased appeared to suffer from great mental depression, and witness did not consider him to be responsible for his actions. ELIZABETH CHORLEY gave evidence as to her father's mental condition of late. On Saturday, about five minutes before the occurrence, she heard him say he could not live. She never saw him depressed before the fall from the ladder. He spoke to her and went upstairs, and she followed him. She found him sitting at the foot of the bed. Her mother and Mr Hellyer came to her assistance, and held her father until he died. Other evidence was given as to the deceased's peculiar manner before the occurrence, and the Jury at once returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

Wednesday 27 August 1879, Issue 5976 – Gale Document No. Y3200728164 EXETER – Inquests. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on Thursday at the Round Tree Inn, West Quarter, on view of the body of WILLIAM THOMAS COOK, aged fifteen months, who was drowned in the mill leat on the previous day. The parents of deceased live in Ganniclift's Court, Frog-lane, and the hoses there abut upon the mill leat, from which they are separated by small gates. On Wednesday, shortly before one p.m., MRS COOK left her child for a few minutes with Mrs Ganniclift, a neighbour. When she returned she missed the boy, and a search being made for him he was found in the water close by the grating at Surridge's Mill. The body was taken out of the water by William Bolt, a millwright, and efforts were made to restore animation. Mr Perkins, of South-street, surgeon, was called, and he said that when he arrived the child was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The Jury thought something should be done to make the gates opening on to the leat more secure against children, and the Coroner promised to bring the matter to the notice of the Feoffees of St. Edmunds, the owners of the property.

The same day Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, touching the death of JOSEPH HELLYER, aged about 71 years. On Tuesday, the 12th August, deceased tripped over a stone, and although he felt a severe pain, refused to have the advice of a medical man until the following Thursday, when he was removed to the Hospital. Mr Herbert Lillies, assistant house-surgeon, on examining the deceased, found he had received a severe fracture of the thigh bone, and the injury terminated fatally. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

On Saturday afternoon the City Coroner held an Inquest at the Wellington Inn, King-street, on the body of ELIZA FOYT, aged 48, living in Coffin's-court, Smythen-street, who was found dead in bed by her husband. The testimony of Mr Brash was to the effect that death resulted from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 3 September 1879, Issue 5977 – Gale Document No. Y3200728201 EXETER – Fatal Accident. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday morning at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on view of the body of ROBERT POMEROY, aged twenty-five, a shoemaker, of Whimple, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the 1st inst. It appeared from the evidence that deceased fell down over his doorstep when returning home between one or two o'clock on the morning of the 21st ult. He was very drunk at the time, and fell over backwards on to his head. He was still under the influence of liquor when admitted to the hospital, and there was a small contused wound on the back of his head, but Mr Cumming, the house surgeon, did not consider him in any danger. On Saturday a change took place in his condition, and he died the same evening in a fit of convulsions. A post mortem examination showed that death resulted from inflammation of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 3 September 1879, Issue 5977 – Gale Document No. Y3200728204 CREDITON – Found Dead. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest last Wednesday at the Ring of Bells Inn, on the body of ELIZABETH HOWARTH, aged fifty-eight years a spinster, who was found dead on the previous Sunday. Deceased lived alone, and as nothing was seen of her on Sunday morning, Mrs E. Newcombe, a neighbour, tried the front door, and receiving no answer to her repeated calls, informed a Mr Jennings, who effected an entrance into the house. On going upstairs witness found deceased dead in bed. There was plenty of food in the house. Richard Jennings, a plumber, corroborated. Mr J. A. Edwards, surgeon, deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased, which was greatly emaciated. There were no marks of violence upon it, and the stomach contained nothing. Witness was of opinion that death was caused by cessation of the heart's action from debility and want of proper nourishment. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 10 September 1879, Issue 5978 – Gale Document No. Y3200728247 EXETER – Inquest. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Globe Inn, Newtown, on Wednesday morning, on the body of PETER ANDREWS, who died suddenly on Tuesday while at work in a brickyard in Newtown. It appeared that deceased was fifty-one years of age, and lately worked in Mr Hancock's brickyard. At dinner on Tuesday he complained to his wife of a pain in his legs, and said he felt tired, but he went to work as usual in the afternoon. He had not been at work an hour when he was seen to fall down, and before medical assistance could be procured he was dead. Mr J. Perkins, surgeon, said the deceased had been under his treatment for the last fifteen months. The cause of death was heart disease. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 17 September 1879, Issue 5979 – Gale Document No. Y3200728267 EXETER – fatal Case of Burning. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier, on Saturday morning, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of ANN TOTHILL, aged 75 years, who died in the Hospital from the effects of injuries received through being burned on the 5th instant. The deceased lived in one of Duke's Almshouses, Heavitree. She occupied one room, and lived alone. She had been paralysed for about six months past. On Friday night the 5th instant, about eleven o'clock, Elizabeth Gidley, of No. 2, Duke's Almshouses, heard screams and cries of "Fire," coming from No. 4, and on going to the house she found the deceased in bed enveloped in flames. A benzoline lamp was lying burning on the floor, and the carpets were on fire. Mrs Gidley threw the carpets out into the garden, and got the deceased out of bed. She told her neighbour that the lamp had fallen from the table on the bed, and that it caught the bedclothes. Dr Williams was called in and by his directions the deceased was removed to the Hospital. Mr Hugh Gordon Cumming, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said that the deceased was admitted into the institution on the night of the 5th instant. She was suffering from severe burns in the right leg and thigh and in the left knee. She was in a very weak state, but was perfectly conscious. Her wounds were dressed, and she was got to bed, where she laid until Thursday night, when she died. Death was caused by the injuries which she had received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

Wednesday 24 September 1879, Issue 5980 – Gale Document No. Y3200728302 EXETER – Found In The Canal. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Turf Inn, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, on the body of MR SAMUEL WARE, which had been found in the canal on the previous Saturday. Deceased was a native of Chard, and a gentleman of independent means. James Westcott, mason's labourer, of Exeter, was the first witness, and he stated that he met deceased at the Exeter Cattle Market on Friday. They had a glass of beer together, and afterwards proceeded to Exminster by rail, had more liquor at the Railway Hotel, visited Powderham Church, and then walked to the Turf Inn, where they had tea. During the afternoon deceased had several glasses of gin and water, as many as seven or eight three-pennyworths. Witness left deceased at Turf quite tipsy about seven o'clock and did not again see him alive. William Godbeer, sexton at Powderham, said that deceased came to him on Friday, in company with the last witness, and asked to be shown the tomb of one Nicholas Ware, who, he said, was his great grandfather. Deceased was quite sober when witness saw him. Mr Canning, a solicitor, of Chard, identified the body as that of SAMUEL WARE. Witness saw him last on Thursday, when he gave him a paper relating to the valuation of certain property. Thomas Newman, mason, of Topsham, saw deceased leave the Turf Inn on Friday night. He walked upright, and seemed capable of taking care of himself. Witness found the body floating between Turf and Topsham locks, about 5.30 on Saturday morning. He gave information, and had the body conveyed to the Turf Inn. Mr Mark Farrant, surgeon, aid the body, which bore no marks of violence, presented the usual appearances of death by drowning. Bessie Collings, daughter of the lock-keeper, corroborated the evidence of Westcott as to the time deceased remained at her father's house, but said she did not think he drank more than four glasses of gin and water. Witness saw him leave the house alone, and he was not so tipsy but that he could stand or walk. Her mother offered to send someone with him, but he refused; and he also declined to remain a little longer till he became more sober. Deceased had spectacles on when he came to the house, but after he had left, the spectacles were found in the tap-room, with his walking stick, which her father had taken from him in order that he might not break the glass. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", and requested that the landlord might be reprimanded for allowing the deceased, seeing the state he was in, to leave his house without his spectacles or his walking stick, and without taking steps to see that he got away from the canal in safety. The Coroner, addressing the landlord, said it was manifest from the evidence that the deceased arrived at Turf House sober, that he had many glasses of gin and water, that he was quite drunk at one time during his stay in the house, and that he was partially drunk when he left. He thought (the landlord) was to be blamed for allowing the man to leave his house without stick or spectacles, and in such a condition that if he (the landlord) had reflected at all he must have anticipated that the poor fellow would find his grave in the waters of the canal. – (Hear, hear.)

Wednesday 1 October 1879, Issue 5981 – Gale Document No. Y3200728353 COLYTON – Fatal Accident. - The District Coroner (S. M. Cox, Esq.) held an Inquest at the railway station last Friday, on view of the body of LWILLIAM HIDE TOWNSEND, aged nine years, who was killed at the station on the previous day. Inspector Norris watched the proceedings on behalf of the South Western Railway Company. Caroline Stockland, nurse to MRS TOWNSEND, said she was standing in the garden and saw deceased about a quarter to one o'clock (mid-day) swinging upon a large box which was standing on the platform. The box, which was about five feet high, suddenly turned over, fell upon him and crushed him. She ran quickly for assistance, and MR TOWNSEND and porters lifted the box from the deceased. Other witnesses were called who said the box in question was an empty glass case that had been placed on the platform in readiness for conveyance to Exeter, and when left there was standing quite firm. The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said they had heard the evidence given, and it was for them to say whether there was such an amount of negligence as would justify them bringing in a verdict of manslaughter. If they thought anyone had been guilty of gross negligence, it was for them to return that verdict. The Jury were unanimous in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 8 October 1879, Issue 5982 – Gale Document No. Y3200728374 EXETER – Sad Fatality. - Mr R. R. Crosse, County Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday morning at the Prince Albert Inn, St. Thomas, on view of the body of SAMUEL SLADE, of Prospect-place, who met with his death under the following circumstances:- On Saturday last deceased was at work at a bench in Mr Pillar's saw mills, with another man, named William Wadlam, whose duty it was to receive the pieces of wood as they came from the saw. It seems, however, that instead of removing both pieces of the plank which was cut, one of the pieces was allowed to fall from the bench. The plank, which was about four feet in length, instead of falling on one side of the bench, turned over upon the revolving saw and was hurled with considerable force against the deceased's head, striking him to the ground. Mr Mark Farrant, surgeon, of St. Thomas, was sent for, and on his advice the deceased was conveyed to his home. The man had been employed at the mills for about two years, and was spoken of as a thoroughly competent workman. His assistant, Wadlam, had not much experience of his work, not having kept regularly at it. Both men were perfectly sober at the time. On Mr Farrant's arrival the deceased was insensible and suffering from an extensive fracture of the skull. The brain was considerably lacerated and was protruding from the left temple. Death ensued during the afternoon of the same day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but expressed an opinion the Mr Pillar should employ more experienced men. They also thought there was some neglect on the part of Wadlam, in not removing the piece of wood from the saw. Deceased leaves a widow and seven children.

Wednesday 8 October 1879, Issue 5982 – Gale Document No. Y3200728388 NEWTON ABBOT - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Globe Hotel on Monday, before Mr Gaye, District Coroner, on view of the body of the proprietor of that establishment, MR WILLIAM TAYLOR BRACEWELL, who died very suddenly on the previous Saturday evening. It appeared from the evidence of Mr James Stookes, auctioneer, of Kingskerswell, and Charles H. F. Memery, a waiter, that deceased was in his usual health on Saturday afternoon, when he dined with Mr Stookes and Mr Wilkinson at half past four. After dinner he went upstairs with Mr Stookes, he was then laughing and joking in his usual manner. Deceased went into his bedroom and threw himself on the bed with his clothes and hat on. He laughed and joked when he was on the bed and appeared to be in his ordinary health. He sometimes laid down for an hour or more after dinner, and on Saturday he was left undisturbed until six o'clock. He was then found quite dead. George Worth, the boots at the Globe, said his master ate and drank very freely, and about six weeks ago he had a fit which lasted about three hours. Mr J. W. Lee, surgeon, said he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found that death resulted from congestion of the brain. The whole surface of the brain was congested, and there was great softening of the brain. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes." The Jury gave their fees to the Cottage Hospital.

Wednesday 8 October 1879, Issue 5982 – Gale Document No. Y3200728392 MORETONHAMPSTEAD – Fatal Accident. - On Monday afternoon a young man of this place, named SAMUEL WILLS, met with a serious accident, which terminated fatally at five o'clock the following morning at his residence. It happened by WILLS endeavouring to get on a traction engine whilst in motion, when he slipped his foot and fell between the wheels, sustaining frightful injuries. An Inquest will be held today.

Wednesday 22 October 1879, Issue 5984 – Gale Document No. Y3200728455 EXETER - Inquest. - The County Coroner (Mr R. R. Crosse) held an Enquiry on Friday at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, on the circumstances attending the death of JOHN SEARLE, a butcher, aged 55, whose body was picked up in the Canal on Wednesday evening by a plumber named Pearse. It was then in an advanced stage of decomposition and presented the usual appearances of death from drowning. From the evidence it appeared that on the 4th instant the deceased got up earlier than usual and went for a walk. He visited the house of his cousin, John Cann, and during the two or three hours he was there, said that during the whole of his life he was never "so down in the world." He went to the Passage House Inn, at Topsham the same day, and made similar complaints to the landlord (Henry Dalley) about poverty. He then appeared in good health and quite sober. After having partaken of two glasses of ale and some bread and cheese, he left, and was not seen alive afterwards. A pipe, a farthing, and two handkerchiefs were the only articles found on the deceased. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Wednesday 22 October 1879, Issue 5984 – Gale Document No. Y3200728458 DUNSFORD – Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday last week an Inquest was held at the New Inn, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., touching the death of WILLIAM WOLLACOT, a mason, residing in this parish. Joseph Puddicombe, the first witness called, said that he and the deceased were in the employ of Mr Bond, builder, of Dunsford. On the previous Saturday afternoon, about four o'clock, deceased and himself were engaged in carrying a large stone, weighing nearly two cwt., on a hand barrow up over a plank, when the deceased missed his footing and fell to the ground on his back, a distance of eight feet. The stone fell on his forehead, causing instant death. They were perfectly sober at the time. Mr N. Seward, junr., who saw the accident, gave corroborative evidence, and in answer to the Coroner, said no blame was attributable to any one. After the Inquest the deceased was interred in the parish church churchyard, when the Burial Service was most impressively read by the Rev. G. Arden. The deceased belonged to a Friendly Society and about thirty of the members, wearing the badges of their order, followed the remains to the grave to pay a last tribute of respect to their departed brother.

Wednesday 29 October 1879, Issue 5985 – Gale Document No. Y3200728498 SIDMOUTH – The Recent Fatal Boat Accident. - The District Coroner (Mr Cox) held an Inquest here last Thursday on the body of ALFRED GOVIER, fisherman, who was drowned whilst out after mackerel in Ladram Bay on the previous Monday. Robert Skinner, junr., stated that in a squall the boat, Mary Ann, in which he and the deceased were engaged fishing, capsized and sank immediately. He was himself drawn under the water, and only saw deceased once, when he pushed a floating piece of wood towards him. Deceased, however, did not grasp it, but went down, after which he saw nothing more of him. John Bartlett deposed to having picked up Skinner. He saw no one else there. Skinner told him that GOVIER had "gone." Skinner was in an exhausted state when he picked him up. Richard Beavis stated that he found the body of deceased by dragging for it about half-past six on Monday evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." The fees of the Jury were given to the deceased's mother.

Wednesday 12 November 1879, Issue 5987 – Gale Document No. Y3200728577 BLACK TORRINGTON – Death From Incautious Use of Benzoline. - Robert Fulford, Esq., the District Coroner, held an Inquest at East Chilla on the body of an aged woman named ELIZABETH DOWN, who died on Saturday morning from the effects of serious burns. It appeared from the evidence of Thomas Johns that the unfortunate woman had been at her son's house after some benzoline. On the way the can leaked on her apron. After she returned she must have placed the lamp too near whilst pouring the benzoline from the can into a bottle, and the benzoline ignited. The poor woman, in endeavouring to stifle it with her apron, was quickly one mass of flames and was frightfully burnt. Dr Owin, who was in attendance the same evening, said she died from the effects of the shock. The Coroner said this should be another warning for people to be very careful in the use of benzoline. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 12 November 1879, Issue 5987 – Gale Document No. Y3200728581 THORVERTON – Melancholy Suicide. - The District Coroner (R. R. Crosse, Esq.) held an Inquest at Dunsailer last Saturday on the body of MR GEORGE LAKE, a dairyman and small farmer who died on the previous day from the effects of a self-inflicted wound in the throat. It appeared that deceased having shown symptoms of unsoundness of mind, his friends were on the point of removing him to an asylum. This intention was, however, not carried out, but his friends appear to have watched him, and kept everything out of his way with which he could inflict injury on himself. But on Thursday he managed to get possession of a small knife, with which he severed the windpipe, and died on the following day. From the evidence of the medical men and others, the Jury were unanimous in their verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 19 November 1879, Issue 5988 – Gale Document No. Y3200728612 CULLOMPTON – Sudden Death. - Mr F. Burrow, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Rising Sun Inn, last Thursday afternoon, on view of the body of MR J. GILLARD, who died the same morning from the effects of a fall. It appeared that he was descending the stairs when he slipped and fell on the floor, his head coming into contact with a portion of the banister, inflicting a severe wound. When found he was bleeding profusely from the mouth, and nearly, if not quite dead. The medical testimony was to the effect that deceased had ruptured a blood-vessel, and probably died from that cause, as spots of blood were seen some steps higher up from where deceased fell. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was given. Deceased, who was seventy-one years old, was well-known as an expert driver in the old coaching days on the Exeter, London, and Bath roads. He for years kept an hotel in the neighbourhood of Ivybridge, but for twenty years past had been living here retired.

HOLSWORTHY - Fatal Railway Accident. - R. Fulford, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at Hollacombe, on Monday, touching the death of CHARLOTTE GERRY, aged 64 years, wife of RICHARD GERRY, packer on the London and South-Western Railway. The body had been found by deceased's son, lying between the rails at 8.15 a.m., immediately after the passing of the 8.10 a.m. train from Holsworthy, on Friday, the 14th instant. George Kimmins, driver of the train, deposed that outside deceased's hut he felt a slight shock of the engine, and said to the stoker, "Whatever is that?" The stoker replied, "I think it is old MRS GERRY, as I saw her on the bank." Witness could not see anything on the line, as he was turning a curve. Samuel Vanstone, the stoker, said as he was turning a curve at Hollacombe, he saw the deceased feeding some chicken on the side of the line opposite her hut, and did not see her any more until the train had passed on, when he saw her lying between the rails. Dr Pearse, of Holsworthy, gave evidence as to the condition in which he had found the body, and the Jury then returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and suggested that in future there should be a whistle from the engine before passing the hut. Inspector Rogers, of the London and South-Western Railway, said he would convey the request to the authorities.

Wednesday 26 November 1879, Issue 5989 – Gale Document No. Y3200728635 EXETER – Fatal Fall. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., the City Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, on the body of JOHN PERRY, a labourer, of Broadclyst, aged seventy-nine, who died from injuries he received from a fall. On the 26th September the deceased, accompanied by his wife, came to Exeter with a view of purchasing several articles. After they had done this they went to the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, where they partook of a little refreshment. They had not been there long before the deceased went out on an errand, and just as he was about to cross the road from Goldsmith-street to the Inn, on his return, he slipped his foot on the pavement and fell heavily to the ground. He was removed in a cab to the Hospital, where he was attended by Mr Hugh Gordon Cummings, the house surgeon. Upon examination it was found that he had fractured his thigh and also had a large sore on his back. He lingered on in a weak state until early on Wednesday morning, when he died from exhaustion. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 3 December 1879, Issue 5990 – Gale Document No. Y3200728688 POISONING CASE AT BIDEFORD - (MARY PERRY) - A great deal of excitement was created in Bideford last week by the death of a servant girl from an over dose of arsenic. The circumstances of the case led to all sorts of rumours, and it will be seen from the subjoined report of the proceedings at the Inquest that the Jury were locked up all night without being able to agree to a verdict on the facts before them. The Inquest was opened on Thursday at the Dispensary before Dr Thompson, the Borough Coroner and a Jury of which Mr Thomas Martin was chosen foreman. The first witness called was Annie Greenoff, a servant, in the employ of Mr Gortwaltz. She stated that the deceased had been a servant there two months. Deceased had often been low spirited. About three weeks since the mistress complained of the deceased not sending in the dinner as it ought to have been sent in. PERRY afterwards told witness she thought she should do away with herself. On Monday last deceased asked witness to go out to Mr Cadd's for a small quantity of arsenic, giving her a small bottle to put it in. She said she was anxious to get rid of the spots on her face. Witness went to Cadd's, gave Mr W. Cadd the bottle, and asked for a small quantity of white arsenic. He said he supposed it was to kill black beetles with, and told her to come for it the next day. On Tuesday the deceased was alternately in low and in good spirits, and in the evening she asked witness if she was going to Cadd's for the bottle? About seven o'clock witness went to Mr Cadd's, saw Mr William Cadd, who gave her the bottle in paper, saying at the time, "Don't poison yourself." She did not sign any book or paper. When witness and deceased went to bed, the latter placed the bottle in a box by the side of the bed. There was a label on the bottle, with the word "Poison" on it. Witness said to deceased "What are you going to do with that, MARY? It is poison." Deceased laughed; and, in a lively tone, said she was going to put some on the spots on her face. A fellow servant subsequently took the bottle from the box, but the deceased got it back, and put it in a drawer, and they all went to bed. At breakfast next morning PERRY was taken sick, and continued faint for some time. Later on the deceased admitted that she had taken some of the arsenic, and about nine o'clock in the evening she died. To a Juror: The doctor was sent for in the morning when, after breakfast, the mistress heard what had occurred. Elizabeth Cossier, parlour maid, gave corroborative evidence, adding that when the deceased continued to be sick in the morning, the mistress gave her some brandy and water. PERRY afterwards went to bed – Dr Rouse stated that on Wednesday morning he was called in, about ten o'clock, to see the deceased. In answer to questions she said she had taken a teaspoonful or more of arsenic. Asked why she had taken it, she said she had heard a lady say it was good for spots on the face. There was no chance of her recovery, and she died as stated. The post mortem examination showed that death was from poisoning by arsenic. Mr W. Cadd, chemist and druggist, spoke to supplying the first witness with three-pennyworth of arsenic. He did not give it to the girl when she first called, because he had not then time to attend to her. Next day, on handing it to her, it was properly labelled, and the entry made in the book produced. – The Coroner said there had been a deviation from the Act of Parliament, and chemists could not be too careful with poisons. the Jury could not agree as to their verdict; eight were for returning a verdict of died from taking poison, and four for a verdict that the deceased was suffering from temporary insanity when she took it. The Coroner remained with the Jury till one o'clock on Friday morning, and then left. At five o'clock he returned, and they then asked for an adjournment for further evidence. This was agreed to, and at ten o'clock the Inquest was resumed, when Mrs Gottwaltz was examined. She stated that deceased had been for two or three months her cook. She had appeared depressed, as if something was preying on her mind. Witness had asked her several times if she was ill. Deceased replied that she had a headache. Deceased was a good-tempered girl and anxious to please. On Monday she complained of suffering from neuralgia in her head, and witness gave her some whiskey-and-water to drink. On Tuesday she seemed better, and did her work cheerfully. The girl seemed to be quite responsible for her actions. The Jury, after a brief deliberation, returned a verdict "That deceased died by an overdose of arsenic." The Coroner remarked that it did not lay with the Jury to take any action against Mr Cadd, the chemist, who supplied the poison, and who admitted having sold the arsenic without getting the girl to sign the book, and without colouring the poison. the matter of colouring was not important in this case, but had the girl taken the white powder in mistake for starch, or anything uninjurious, it would have been very serious. The Jury could scarcely, he thought, let the matter pass without some cognisance. The Jury, however, declined to express an opinion on the subject.

Wednesday 10 December 1879, Issue 5991 – Gale Document No. Y3200728708 FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE EXE. - A very distressing scene was witnessed last Thursday afternoon by the hundreds of persons who had assembled on the bridge and along the Commercial-road to watch the skaters and others who had ventured on the ice which had covered the river for several days. Everything had gone well until shortly after four o'clock, when two lads, between twelve and fourteen years of age, foolishly attempted to cross from the St. Thomas side to a spot near the Alexandra Oil Stores. They were JOHN POLLARD, of the Broadstones, West Quarter, and Charles Lee, of Frog-street. Having crossed in safety, trying the ice as they went, they set out to return. The ice at this point is never very sound, owing to the force of a stream which runs into the river close by from the West Quarter. The boys had nearly reached the centre of the river when P.C. Johns, of the Devon County Constabulary, called out to them from the bridge and warned them to go back. POLLARD turned round to see who was calling to him when he fell through the ice. Shortly afterwards, Lee, who was making the best of his way back, also fell through and disappeared. Several efforts were made to render the boys assistance by pushing out planks and ropes to them, but the ice was so rotten that one or two persons who started to the rescue broke through and were compelled to return before they could render any effectual help. POLLARD, however, managed to secure one of the planks, but before he could be reached his hold relaxed and he was carried away by the force of the current beneath the ice and beyond hope of recovery. An apprentice named William Wreford, in the employ of Mr Bradbeer, brushmaker, had meantime gone to the rescue of Lee, who was nearest the shore, struggling desperately to get a footing on the ice, which kept breaking away around him. Wreford also went through before he had gone far, and had to break his way up to the spot where Lee was struggling. Having succeeded in doing this he got the boy on to his back, and he returned with great difficulty to the edge of the secure ice, where with the aid of planks and ropes both were safely landed, but in a very exhausted condition and benumbed with the intense cold. All who witnessed the rescue were loud in the praise of his gallant conduct, and a subscription was at once set on foot for presenting him with a testimonial. The circumstances are also to be brought to the notice of the Royal Humane Society. The body of the unfortunate boy POLLARD was recovered on Friday morning by P.C. Johns, and three labourers who were employed by him to assist in dragging the river. The Inquest was held on Saturday at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, and resulted in a verdict of Accidental Death. The deceased was employed at the Iron Foundry of Messrs. Huxham and Brown, and it is stated that they have offered to defray the expenses of the funeral.

Wednesday 24 December 1879, Issue 5993 – Gale Document No. Y3200728799 EXMOUTH – Death From Poisoning. - R. R. Crosse, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest last Friday at the London Hotel, Exmouth, on the body of JESSIE MARIE PEARSON, late governess at Colonel Bazelgette's, in that town. On Wednesday night at ten o'clock, the unfortunate young lady was seen by one of the servants – Jessie Gidley – in her usual state of health. On the following morning, when the girl went to the bedroom with a supply of hot water for a bath, she found MISS PEARSON groaning and apparently in great pain. She was at once despatched for Dr Langly, who arrived t the house at about eight o'clock. Mr Langly at once perceived that it was a case of poisoning, but although every means were used which the circumstances called for, the unhappy young lady was too far gone, and death very shortly ensued. Two one-ounce phial bottles were found on the mantelpiece labelled "Laudanum," and they were empty, and an empty wine-glass was standing on a table near the bed. The laudanum had been purchased by deceased at Mr Bickford's on the 16th, and as the two bottles were empty it is presumed that the whole of the two ounces were taken on the following night. Deceased, whose home was at St John's Wood, London, had arranged to leave for the Christmas holidays on the following morning, but had given notice of her intention not to return, assigning as her reason for so doing that the little boy of whom she had charge did not appear to like her. the correspondence between the deceased young lady and her friends clearly showed that during the three months she had been at Colonel Bazelgette's she had been most kindly treated, and that there could have been nothing in her life there to have caused anything like depression or unhappiness. The Jury returned a verdict that death had been caused by taking laudanum whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Wednesday 24 December 1879, Issue 5993 – Gale Document No. Y3200728777 EXETER – Inquests. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on Saturday, at the Sawyer's Arms, Preston-street, on the body of MARY DRISCOLL, aged 44, who died rather suddenly on Thursday night at her residence, Preston-street. From the evidence of Mr Perkins, surgeon, South-street, it appeared that the deceased died from heart disease, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

On Monday morning Mr Hooper held an Inquest at Mr Pearce's Devonshire Arms, on the body of MISS JANE EVERY, aged 63, of 236 High street, who died suddenly on Saturday. In accordance with the evidence a verdict of death from Natural Causes was returned.

In the afternoon of the same day an Inquest was held at the King's Head, St. Sidwell's, on the body of the infant child of ELIZABETH GITSHAM. The child died just after birth, and Mr Bell, surgeon, thought that if a doctor instead of a midwife had attended the mother the child would have lived.

MELANCHOLY SUICIDE - An Enquiry on the circumstances attending the death of MARY NORMAN, 67 years of age, a resident of Paragon-place, South-street, was made at the Fountain Inn, on the Quay, on Monday evening, before Mr Coroner Hooper. It appeared that the deceased's husband last saw her alive on Friday evening, when she left home. the man went to bed, expecting her return, but as she did not come back he grew anxious, and on Saturday afternoon gave information at the Police station. Eventually, on Sunday he offered some men 7s. 6d. to drag the river. This was done, and the body was found near the Ferry during the afternoon. He had had no angry words with his wife to account for her going away so mysteriously. Two days before he let her have £5 he had received from a charity, and also his wages on Thursday, and he had since been informed that she had lost the purse containing the money. this had in his opinion preyed upon her mind, and led to self-destruction. Other evidence went to show that deceased had spoken excitedly during Friday evening, and appeared to have been drinking. From remarks she was heard to make, the loss of the money had affected her brain. A unanimous verdict of "Suicide, whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned, and approved of by the Coroner.

Wednesday 31 December 1879, Issue 5994 – Gale Document No. Y3200728833 THE WIFE MURDER IN NORTH DEVON. COMMITTAL OF THE ACCUSED. - At the Town Hall, Torrington, on Wednesday, before J. G. Johnson and A. R. Hole, Esqrs., FRANCIS WILLIAM WEST was charged with the wilful murder of his wife, by shooting, at Wear Gifford, on Sunday, the 21st December. Mr G. D. C. Hamilton (Chief Constable of Devon) and N. Chapple, Esq. (Mayor), were accommodated with seats on the bench. Mr Henry Rogers, of Helstone, appeared for the prisoner, and, on the charge being read, informed the Bench that the prisoner pleaded not guilty. Mary Knight, nurse, was first examined, and after repeating the facts of the case as already published, she stated, in reply to the bench, that she had never heard the report of firearms before. She did not leave her room, because she was busy with the children. She had heard her master threaten to beat her mistress. Cross-examined: She was afraid of her master only when he was drunk, because she was afraid he would hurt her mistress in case of a scuffle. Elizabeth Parr and Dr Jones repeated the evidence given by them at the Inquest, and the latter, on being examined by Mr Rogers, stated that the same result would have followed whether the rifle had been discharged accidentally or otherwise. From the evidence which he had heard, he was of opinion that the prisoner was not morally responsible for his actions on the night in question. Constable Harvey and Superintendent Rousham gave evidence as to the finding of the body and their apprehension of the prisoner, after which Mr Rogers strongly appealed to the Bench on the questions involved in the charge. The prisoner, after hearing the whole of the evidence read over by Mr Doe, the Clerk, and having been cautioned in the usual way, said, "I am not guilty." The Chairman remarked that they had given the evidence and Mr Rogers's address their careful attention, and, although it was a very painful duty on their part, yet, for the ends of justice, they had no alternative but to commit the prisoner for trial for the Wilful Murder of his wife. Prisoner was removed to Exeter by the mail train the same night. The Inquest was held on the previous day at Hazelwood Cottage, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Coroner, and the Jury, after a long and patient hearing, having found a verdict of Wilful Murder against FRANCIS WEST, he was committed for trial on the Coroner's warrant, at the next assizes.

Wednesday 31 December 1879, Issue 5994 – Gale Document No. Y3200728818 EXETER – Inquest. – H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the George and Dragon Inn, Blackboy-road last Saturday afternoon, on the body of ALBERT JAMES MACDONALD, aged five months, who died from convulsions on Friday night at the house of his parents in Albion-place, Tiverton-road. Mr Bell, surgeon, was of opinion that death resulted from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 14 January 1880, Issue 5996 – Gale Document No. Y3200728880 EXETER – Fatal Case Of Burning. - The City Coroner ( H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on Wednesday morning at the Crown and Anchor Inn, Newtown, on the body of an infant seven months old, named ALFRED JOHN HILLS, who died on the previous day from the effect of burns. MRS HILLS, the mother of the deceased, said that she was the wife of HENRY HILLS, a pensioner in the R.H.A. The deceased was seven months old. On the 22nd of December, about seven a.m. she was trimming a small benzoline lamp in the bedroom. The deceased was out of bed, and was sitting on his brother's knee. Witness was holding the lamp in one hand, and the oil-can in the other, and a light was standing near on the table. Suddenly the lamp she was trimming caught fire. She threw it on the floor, and called to her husband to put it out, at the same time taking deceased in her arms, to take him from the room. When she got to the door she found herself in a mass of flames, her dress having caught fire. The deceased was badly burnt about the lower parts of the body and witness herself was severely burnt about the hands. Her husband succeeded in putting out the flames and a medical man was sent for. Mr J Woodman, surgeon, stated that he attended the child, and death resulted from the effects of severe burns. The Coroner remarked that this was a very sad and lamentable case, and sympathised with the parents in their loss. As far as he could see, there was no blame attributable to anyone, but what occurred was purely accidental. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 21 January 1880, Issue 5997 – Gale Document No. Y3200728931 BARNSTAPLE - Suicide in the Workhouse. - The Borough Coroner held an Inquest at the workhouse, last Wednesday, on the body of JOHN CURTIS, aged 21, a native of Marwood, and a shoemaker, who committed suicide the same morning. CURTIS had been unable to obtain work, and had several times been obliged to enter the workhouse for that reason. On this occasion he had been an inmate for about three months, and had been in such a desponding state of mind that he would rarely reply when directly addressed. CURTIS had obtained leave of absence several times in order that he might try to obtain employment, and was out for that purpose on Tuesday. He returned unsuccessful and would speak to no one, but he ate his supper and went to bed. On Wednesday morning he was ordered, with a little boy for his companion, to go to work in the shoemaker's shop of the workhouse. About eleven o'clock, when he had finished the work on which he had been engaged, he drew the sharp shoemaker's knife which he had been using across his throat. The boy jumped out of the window and informed the porter of the circumstance. Dr Cooke and Dr Jackson were quickly in attendance, but death must have been nearly instantaneous, so severe was the wound which CURTIS had inflicted. A verdict of "Suicide in a fit of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Wednesday 21 January 1880, Issue 5997 – Gale Document No. Y3200728919 OKEHAMPTON – Alleged Death From Poisoning. - An Inquest was opened on Monday, before R. Fulford, Esq., District Coroner, at the White Hart Hotel, respecting the death of LILIAN DREW, aged five years, daughter of MR SAMUEL DREW, auctioneer, of Okehampton. The circumstances of the case, as explained by the Coroner to the Jury, were of a somewhat peculiar character, and the Enquiry upon which they were about to enter was a serious and important one. By law it was the duty of the public authorities to report to him, as Coroner of the district, when a death occurred where a medical certificate as to the cause of death was refused. It had been reported to him by the police in this instance that the deceased had been attended to up to the time of her death by Dr Waters, whose duty would have been to have certified as to the cause of death, but that gentleman had refused to give a certificate, and this left him no alternative but to hold an Inquest. The child was seen not only by Dr Waters, but by Dr Northey, and they would be called upon to give their opinion as medical men as to the cause of death; and assuming it to be the case that death had resulted from the effect of medicines administered to it, not by medical authority or by medical sanction, although a doctor was in attendance, it would be for the Jury carefully to consider the circumstance. Calomel, mercury, and antimony were medicines in skilled hands, but were really poisons when administered by persons unskilled in their use, and persons unskilled in their use, and yet presuming to use them, were, in the eyes of the law, guilty of a very serious offence. If the death of this child resulted from poisonous drugs administered by unskilled hands, then this Inquiry would assume a very serious aspect, and, therefore, he must impress upon them that they were entering upon an important investigation. If the parents of this child had been poor and could not easily obtain medical aid there might be some excuse, but having a medical man in attendance and adopting other courses than those suggested by him, attached a very great amount of responsibility to the parents. The deceased, it seemed, had been suffering from measles, which had been extraordinarily fatal in this locality, and the opinion of Dr Waters was that the child had died through salivation with mercury, the drug having been administered by unskilled hands, and without his authority or consent. SAMUEL DREW, the father of the child, stated that the deceased was five years old. She was taken ill on January 1st, and Mrs Edwards, a nurse, attended to her. On the 6th instant he sent for Dr Waters, and that gentleman continued in attendance upon the child up to the time of her death, which occurred at noon on Sunday. To his knowledge, nothing beyond what was prescribed by Dr Waters had been administered to the deceased. On Wednesday last the child's head was swollen out of shape. Dr Waters told him not to be alarmed about the swelling, that her pulse was better, that she was in a fair way of doing, and there was no need of his calling again. The doctor did not call again, and on Friday night his wife came to him, and told him the child's teeth were dropping out. His opinion was that the deceased had been deeply salivated, and early on the following morning he telegraphed to Tavistock for Dr Northey. Shortly afterwards Dr Waters called to see the other children, three of whom were suffering from the measles. He asked the doctor's opinion of the deceased, and the reply was that it was a very bad case, but that he still had hopes of the child's recovery. Up to that time not a word was said about any wrong treatment. Dr Northey came shortly after four in the afternoon, and was met by Dr Waters, between whom there was a private conference. After visiting the children Dr Northey came to him and told him it was very likely he would lose two of them, the deceased being in his opinion, deeply salivated, so deeply that he was afraid the jaw-bone would drop off. Dr Waters then inquired if Mrs Edwards had administered anything. Personally he was not aware that she had, but hearing what Dr Northey said he made inquiries, and found that Mrs Edwards had given the deceased a powder. He sent into the kitchen and found on the mantelpiece five or six powders made up in small packages. One of these he gave to Dr Waters and asked for an analysis. The powder was tested and was retained by Dr Waters, who said he should have to further analysed. Dr Waters said he was called in to attend the deceased on the s6th January. He did so, and found her suffering from measles complicated with inflammation of the windpipe, which was a complication they did not often meet with. He prescribed for the child, and continued to visit her until the 13th instant, on which day he considered her better, as far as the inflammation of the wind-pipe was concerned, but he noticed for the first time a slight swelling of the face. He asked whether the medicine had been continued, and also whether anything besides his medicine had been given, to which he received a negative answer. As the swelling was so slight and the inflammatory symptoms showed signs of improvement, he took little notice of it. He called again on the 15th, when the face and neck were more swollen, and he again asked whether anything other than his medicine had been given. He was told no. Under the circumstance she was quite unable to account for the swelling, as no mercury whatever had been administered by him. He had a lurking suspicion that mercury had been given, but in the face of such a direct negative reply to his questions he was somewhat at a loss to account for the symptoms. He went again on Saturday and found that the child's face was swollen beyond measure, and was informed that several of the teeth had dropped out. From this and other symptoms he came to the conclusion that the suspicions he had entertained were fully confirmed by the state of the patient. He was about to suggest that another medical man should be called in when he was informed that Dr Northey had been sent for. What MR DREW had stated with reference to conversations said to have passed between them as to the condition of the child was utterly false. When he met Dr Northey he expressed the belief that the child was suffering from extreme salivation. They saw the deceased, and Dr Northey concurred in the opinion that had been expressed. He then asked MRS DREW how many powders had been given the child, and she replied, "Three or four." MR DREW brought him a white powder, and he made a rough test of it, the result being to confirm his opinion. The child died on Sunday morning whilst he was in the room. He was of opinion that death arose from exhaustion produced by mercurial salivation. Dr Northey of Tavistock, gave confirmatory testimony. The Enquiry was then adjourned to allow of a post mortem examination being made. At the adjourned Enquiry yesterday Mrs Edwards was represented by Mr Brian, of Plymouth, and MR DREW, by Mr Toby, of Exeter. The hearing of the evidence of several witnesses occupied about four hours. The Coroner, having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that the child died from measles and other natural causes.

Wednesday 21 January 1880, Issue 5997 – Gale Document No. Y3200728916 EXETER – Suicide at Trew's Weir. - W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Nelson Inn, Spiller Street, last Thursday, on the body of WILLIAM BAIRD, aged seventy-four, a tea dealer, residing in King William-terrace, St. Sidwell's. CLUNESS BAIRD, son of the deceased, stated that his father left home on Tuesday morning, about nine o'clock, to go to Woodbury, where, he said, he had business. For the past six months the deceased had appeared to be in low spirits. On Wednesday afternoon, witness's mother, who is an invalid, sent for him, and requested him to go to the Port Royal, she having heard that deceased had fallen into the water. He went, and found the deceased lying in a very exhausted state in one of the houses near the Trew's Weir Paper Mills. Witness procured a cab, and the deceased was taken to his home. A medical man was sent for, but deceased expired the same evening. Rosamond Smith, wife of William Smith, foreman at the Trew's Weir Paper Mills, stated that about two o'clock on Wednesday afternoon she saw deceased cross the bridge near the mills He immediately returned, mounted the iron rails of the bridge, and threw himself into the water. She called for assistance, and her husband jumped into a boat and brought him out. He was taken into an out-house, wrapped in flannels, and brandy was administered to him. Deceased at that time was sensible. William Smith, husband of the last witness, deposed to taking the deceased out of the water. He said Mr Blackburn actively assisted in restoring animation, and that deceased appeared to have been drinking. Mr C. E. Bell, police surgeon, said he attended the deceased on Wednesday, and later in the evening he was taken to his home, and when witness subsequently saw him he was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of suicide whilst in an unsound state of mind, and commended Mr and Mrs Smith for their prompt action in the matter.

Wednesday 28 January 1880, Issue 5998 – Gale Document No. Y3200728954 EXETER – Coroner's Inquests. - The City Coroner ( H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Black Horse Inn, Longbrook-street, last Saturday morning, on the body of HAROLD REGINALD HOCKEY, aged about six months, the infant son of MR HOCKEY, Castle-terrace, St. David's. On Thursday morning the deceased was seized with a violent fit of convulsions, and died before the arrival of a medical man. Dr Roper stated that spasmodic croup was the cause of death. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

The same afternoon, Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, upon the body of a child named THOMAS HOLDEN, aged seven months, who, according to the opinion of Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, died suddenly from convulsions on Friday morning, and a verdict was returned in accordance with his testimony.

The Coroner on Monday held an Inquest at the Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, on the body of SUSANNAH DART. Mr Perkins, surgeon, South-street, was of opinion that death resulted from natural causes, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Mr Hooper subsequently held another Inquest at the Courtenay Arms, Mary Arches-street, on the body of PHILIP TRETHEWY, infant son of ELIZABETH TRETHEWY, whose death was also found to have resulted from Natural Causes.

CREDITON - Fatal Accident. - Mr Frederick Burrow, deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Friday at the Dock Inn, respecting the death of FREDERICK K. LEACH, which resulted from injuries received whilst working at Mr Dart's saw mills. On the previous Monday deceased was engaged with another man in placing a piece of wood beneath a circular saw. From some cause the wood rebounded while he was forcing it inward with his body instead of his hands, and struck him so severely that he died on the next day, though the visible injury was only a slight abrasion of the skin. Mr Alexander, assistant to Mr Edwards, surgeon, expressed his belief that deceased died from internal collapse, and the Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death." On the suggestion of Mr Moon, the Jury gave their fees to the parents of the deceased, who live at Witheridge.

Wednesday 18 February 1880, Issue 6001 – Gale Document No. BC3200729065 HEAVITREE – Attempted Concealment of Birth - Mr F. Burrows, of Cullompton, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Ship Inn, Heavitree, last Friday, on the body of the infant child of SARAH BIDDLECOMBE, a single woman, aged 24, cook in the service of Mr Robert Skinfield, 1, Mansion-terrace, Heavitree. BIDDLECOMBE is the daughter of the organist at Silverton, whose native place is Uplyme. About a months since she obtained a situation as cook in the house of Mr Skinfield, and entered on her duties on the 3rd instant. Nothing was noticed at that time, but, on the following Thursday the suspicions of the housemaid, Elizabeth Pike, were aroused, and she communicated with her mistress. The girl was taxed, but she denied that anything was the matter. The housemaid and the cook slept in the same room, and on Tuesday night the former observed that the latter was unwell. When she awoke at six o'clock on Wednesday morning, she found BIDDLECOMBE on the floor very ill. Afterwards they both went downstairs about their work, but the cook was ailing all the morning, and Pike at last accused her of having become a mother. She denied the charge until her room was searched, when in her box was found the body of a newly-born female child wrapped in a blanket and sheet. The box was kept unlocked, but it was then discovered to be securely fastened with rope. Mr A. J. Cumming, surgeon, of Exeter, was sent for, and BIDDLECOMBE made the admission to him, but denied that she had had a child before. On Thursday, Mr Cumming made a post mortem examination of the body, and found the child to be full grown, but to have been still-born. Subsequently BIDDLECOMBE admitted that her first child was kept by her grandfather at Uplyme. She said that the child was prematurely born, and she had made no preparation of clothes whatever. The Jury returned an open verdict to the effect that the child was found dead – still born.

Wednesday 18 February 1880, Issue 6001 – Gale Document No. BC3200729045 EXETER – Death by Drowning. - An Inquiry was held at the Shakespeare Inn, Bonhay-road, yesterday afternoon, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, touching the death of HARRIET ELLIOTT, who was found in the mill-leat early on Monday morning. HENRY DARE, a plasterer, identified the body as that of his late sister. Deceased had been a widow for two or three years. The last time he saw her alive was on Saturday, at her house in St. Sidwell's. He enquired after her health, and she replied that she was very well. She appeared to talk strangely, but she was not given to intemperance. Witness had known her as an excitable woman, and she had become more so since her husband's death. Her business, that of a greengrocer, had lately been in a low condition. George Miller, twelve years of age, lately employed by MRS ELLIOTT as errand boy stated that about seven o'clock on Monday morning he saw the deceased enter her office where she stayed about a minute, and she came out with her bonnet on. She had also a seal-skin jacket and a waterproof with her, which witness helped her to put on. Deceased told witness she was going out to buy a few flowers. Witness told her it was raining, to which deceased replied, "All right." She then went out, and returned soon after for an umbrella and a small basket, when she left, and witness saw no more of her. She was in the habit of leaving home early in the morning. William Densham, fireman, in the employ of Mr Parkin, Bonhay Foundry, stated that about eight a.m. on Monday he was on the bridge crossing the leat, when he saw the body of a woman in the water. She was floating with her face downwards. Witness jumped into the water, and brought her to the bank. She was then breathing. An alarm having been raised, a medical man was sent for, and Thomas Upright and John Lowden came to witness's assistance. Deceased had a basket in her hand at the time; the wind was blowing very high. The medical man did not come until half an hour after the deceased was taken out of the water. Mr Farrant was at first sent for, but, he not being at home, Mr Andrews came. Mr Richard James Andrews, surgeon, of St. Thomas, stated that upon his arrival, Which was about half-past eight o'clock, he saw the body of the deceased lying at the Shakespeare Inn. She was then dead, but had not been so very long. He considered that death arose from drowning. The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said he deeply sympathised with the friends of the deceased, he having known her and her late husband and family for a great number of years. One special feature in the case was that deceased, at so early an hour in the morning, should be in that park, so far away from her home. The Jury returned an open verdict of Death by Drowning.

Wednesday 3 March 1880, Issue 6003 – Gale Document No. Y3200729123 EXETER – Fatal Case of Burning. - On Friday last an Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, before H. D. Barton, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the city, on the body of an elderly woman, named BETTY DELVES, who died from the effect of burns. WILLIAM DELVES, a labourer, living at Morchard Bishop, identified the body as that of his mother, who was eighty-five years of age, and lived in Trinity-street. Witness last saw her alive at Christmas, and she was then in good health. Louisa Serle, a little girl, stated that she lived next door to the deceased, and used to take her a cup of tea every morning. The deceased lived alone, and had no one to attend on her. On Tuesday evening, the 13th of January, witness took her a cup of tea, and made up her fire. The deceased was then in bed. When witness went in next morning, about 7.30, she found the deceased in bed, and the fire was out. She told witness that she got out of bed during the night, and fell into the fire-place, and that she had wounds all over. Witness saw that the deceased was very much burnt about the head, and she went for her mother, Sarah Serle. Mother of the last witness, gave confirmatory evidence. Mr E. A. Brash, one of the medical officers of the Corporation of the Poor, deposed that on the 15 ult. he visited the deceased. He found her suffering from a large burn on the top of the head, another large burn on the right shoulder, and a smaller one on the other shoulder. Witness attended her up to her death on Wednesday evening last. The cause of death was exhaustion, brought on by the shock of the accident, and by the discharge from the wounds. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 24 March 1880, Issue 6006 – Gale Document No. Y3200729237 EXETER – Child Burnt to Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the Devonshire Arms, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of HETTY BLANCHE MALLET, aged three years and eight months, who died the same day from the effect of burns received on Sunday. MR HENRY MALLET, dentist, Bedford-circus, stated that the deceased was his daughter. She slept in an upper room of the house with the nurse-girl. On Sunday morning, about eight o'clock, witness heard screams proceeding from the attic, and on going there he discovered the child standing in the middle of the room. Her nightdress was burnt up to the waist, and the child was also badly burnt. Witness instantly despatched a messenger for a medical man. The cook was in the room at the time. Mary Webber, the cook, stated that hearing screams proceeding from the upper part of the house, she ran into one of the attics, where she saw the deceased enveloped in a mass of flames. Witness wrapped her apron around the child, and succeeded in extinguishing the flames. The deceased told witness that, seeing a box of matches in the window, she got out of her cot, took the matches, and struck one. She did not say in what manner her clothes caught fire. At the time of the accident the nurse was downstairs at work. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, stated that he found the child badly burned on the left side of the body, from the foot to the arm-pit. The right arm and leg were slightly burnt, as was also the stomach and chest. Witness dressed the wounds, and the child seemed to rally a little during the day, but died at noon on Monday from the shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 April 1880, Issue 6008 – Gale Document No. Y3200729286 FENITON - Killed On The Railway. - Mr S. M. Cox, District Coroner, on Saturday held an Inquest at the Greyhound Inn, Feniton, respecting the death of a young farm labourer, named WILLIAM NORTON, who was killed at Fenny Bridges, on the London and South-Western Railway, on the previous Monday. Mr H. J. Foster, detective inspector, watched the case on behalf of the Railway Company. MARY ANN NORTON, mother of deceased, stated that her son was twenty years of age. He was discharged from the Marines in 1877. Since then he had been in service, and latterly had worked at a thrashing machine for a farmer. He received no pension, and had been out of work for a month, and was much depressed on the morning he was killed. Witness had noticed his despondent state for several weeks since he had had no work. After breakfast on Monday morning deceased went out to look for a situation. When he left he shook hands with witness and his grandmother and said "good-bye."£ Witness did not think he was going to commit suicide. Samuel Kingswell, a fireman on the London and South-Western Railway, said he was on the express train on Monday last, that left Exeter at 10.05 in the morning, and soon after leaving the Sidmouth Junction Station, he noticed the deceased He was then about 150 yards away, and on the train approaching him within twenty yards, the deceased walked in the middle of the four-feet way. Witness immediately blew the whistle and asked his mate, the driver, whether anybody "got out his side." He replied "No." Witness then remarked "We have run over somebody." The train was stopped as soon as possible, and Mr Riddett, an inspector, who was travelling, got off, and went back. A second did not elapse between the time he saw the deceased step in front of the train, and the time the deceased must have been struck. Mr Walter Riddett, inspector of the Locomotive Department, deposed to going back and finding the body of deceased, which was very much mutilated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 April 1880, Issue 6008 – Gale Document No. Y3200729311 INQUESTS IN ST. THOMAS. Found Drowned. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Welcome Inn, St. Thomas, before F. Burrows, Esq., (Deputy Coroner) on the body of THOMAS PERRIMAN, dairyman of Hawking's-buildings, St. Thomas, who was found drowned in the canal on Monday morning. SARAH PERRIMAN, deceased's wife, stated that the deceased left home about 9.30 p.m. on Sunday, saying that he was going to look at his cow, as he did not think the animal was very well. Witness said she would stop up until he came home. He left home and went down Water lane, which leads to the linhay in which the cow was kept. Witness stopped up all night, and early the next morning went to the linhay and found the door locked with the key outside. Witness went inside, found no one there, and after milking the cow returned home. PC. Johns was the first to tell her that her husband had been found in the water. Deceased had suffered a great many losses, and had been very weak and melancholy. She had never heard deceased say anything about destroying himself. Lucy Haydon, a married woman, said she had lived next door to the deceased for about five years. Last Sunday witness was in deceased's house, and whilst there she noticed that deceased was acting in a very strange way. He wandered from one room to another, and seemed perfectly bewildered. He went out to milk the cow about four o'clock, and returned home with the milk; but between eight and nine, after eating his supper, he left the house again, and witness did not see him alive after that. In answer to questions, witness stated that sometimes deceased did not seem to know what he was talking about. He was a comparatively poor man, and had lost a lot of cattle, and this cow which he said he was going to see on Sunday night was the only one he had left. P.C. Johns stated that he found the body of the deceased on Monday morning, just before six, in the canal a little below the Welcome Inn. the spot where he found the body was not a quarter of a mile from the deceased's house. The deceased was quite dead, though the body was warm. With the assistance of a man named Lang, witness got the body into a boat, and conveyed it to the Welcome Inn. Witness then went to the house of the deceased, in order to inform MRS PERRIMAN of the finding of her husband's body. Some person in the house handed him a memorandum, in pencil (memorandum produced) which read as follows;- "Come as quick as you can, for your mother is distressed. Father is found drowned in the canal." Witness said this note was in an envelope The envelope had been sealed, but had been broken open by someone. The envelope was addressed "MR PERRIMAN, Hawking's buildings, St. Thomas's." Witness showed it to MRS PERRIMAN, who said it was deceased's writing. MARY ANN MARSH, Exe-street, daughter of deceased, said she last saw the deceased on Tuesday, the 23rd ult. He came to her house, and appeared to her to be in a very wandering state, and quite lost. Witness thought that since deceased lost his last cow it had preyed upon his mind. The note produced by P.C. Johns was shown to the witness, but, though she believed it was deceased's writing, she could not swear to it. The witness thought the note she saw was addressed to "Mrs Harris, Plymouth," another of deceased's daughters. Lucy Haydon was again called, and said that the letter she saw was addressed to the daughter at Plymouth, and not to MR PERRIMAN himself. Mr M. Farrant, surgeon, said that at the request of P.C. Johns he inspected the body which had no marks of violence on it, but had the usual appearance of death by drowning. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned." - The foreman (Mr Thomas Simmons) informed the Coroner that the Jury wished their fees to be given to the widow of deceased.

A second Inquest was held immediately afterwards at the Plymouth Inn, Alphington-street, and before the Coroner, on the body of JOHN CHOWN. The deceased, who was found in one of the ponds of the Exeter Nurseries, was in the employ of Dr Woodman, and had worked at the Nurseries for a long time, one of the Jurymen stating that the deceased had been employed there just on thirty years. ELIZABETH CHOWN, wife of the deceased, said she saw him last on Monday night. He came in from his work, and, on asking him what was the matter, he replied he was very poorly, and felt sleepy, but would go out and see if it was all right. He had been away about an hour when witness's son came in, and witness, feeling uneasy about deceased, sent her son out to look for him. Her son returned some time after, and told her that her husband's body had been found in the pond. RICHARD CHOWN, son of deceased, gave corroborative evidence. Whilst looking for his father in the Nursery grounds he saw something in the water, which made him run immediately to the office. Dr Woodman and Mr Shears then proceeded with him to the pond. Witness got into the water, and discovered the body of his father lying on his back with his face upwards. The body was taken to Dr Woodman's house, and witness assisted in trying to restore animation, but without success. William Langdon Shears, accountant, bore out the last witness's statements, and also said that every means was tried to restore animation, but without success. Dr Woodman said on being called by deceased's son, he immediately proceeded to the pond, and saw the body in the centre of the pond, amongst the lilies. After deceased's son had taken the body out of the pond no time was lost in carrying the deceased into his (witness's) house, and for nearly two hours he constantly used means to restore animation, but all was unavailing. In witness's opinion the deceased, when trying to fill a pail found in the water, was seized with an apoplectic fit. The deceased had complained to his wife of being poorly, and witness believed that such a fit was the cause of deceased's death. The water in the pond was not deep enough to drown anyone without some such cause as he had ascribed taking place. He had always known the deceased to have been a very temperate man, and had never known him to have been the worse for liquor during the eight years he had worked for him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 7 April 1880, Issue 6008 – Gale Document No. Y3200729289 EXETER – Inquest. - At the Barnstaple Inn, last Thursday, H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of HARRY WARMINGTON, the illegitimate child of LOUISA WARMINGTON, a domestic servant, living in Ford's-buildings. It appeared from the evidence of the mother that the child was seven weeks' old, and had enjoyed good health until the Sunday previous, when he appeared to be suffering from a slight cold. She sent to a chemist and got a pennyworth of "Syrup of Squills." There were no directions on the bottle, and she gave the child half a teaspoonful then and a few drops each day until it was all used, but it did not appear to have any good effect. She then got some "Cough mixture," and administered three or four doses daily. Early on Thursday morning the child had convulsions, and Mr Harris, surgeon, was sent for. He came, but the child died about a quarter to seven the same morning. Mr Harris, a surgeon practising in Exeter, deposed to being called to see the child. It was his opinion that the child died from convulsions supervening bronchitis, but it might have been averted under more judicious treatment and he thought medical aid should have been resorted to. the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Wednesday 14 April 1880, Issue 6009 – Gale Document No. Y3200729327 EXETER – Fatal Canoe Accident on the Canal. - Mr F. Burrows, District Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday morning at the Welcome Inn, Exeter, on the body of JOHN PENNY, a young man who was drowned in the canal on Saturday evening through the upsetting of a canoe. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, who was twenty years of age, was a native of Liskeard, and had been employed about a month as assistant at the establishment of Messrs. Green and Son, drapers, of High-street, Exeter. On Saturday afternoon he went boating on the canal with two other shopmen named Frederick Tapper and Charles Colebrook. They each hired a canoe at Mr Edward's Port Royal Inn, and started for Double Locks. Tapper and Colebrook passed the second drawbridge safely, and shortly afterwards Colebrook, turning round, noticed the deceased in the water. They at once landed and ran back to the drawbridge, but PENNY had disappeared. Tapper jumped into the water and attempted to dive in search of his comrade; but his clothing impeded his exertions and becoming exhausted, he gave up the search. Colebrooke had in the meantime procured a rope from a farm house near, but it was of no assistance. A labourer, named Crump, discovered the body and brought it to the surface. Efforts were made to restore animation, but without success, and the body was conveyed to the Welcome Inn. There was a bruise on the forehead, from which it appeared certain that the deceased (who was above the average height) had struck his head against the edge of the bridge, and was thus knocked out of his seat. Dr Torbook, physician, of St. Thomas, said that in all probability the blow caused paralysis, and deceased would have sunk without being capable of making an effort to save himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended that greater caution should be observed by boating men in passing under the drawbridges. Messrs. Tapper and Colebrooke were complimented by the Coroner on their well-intentioned efforts to rescue their unfortunate comrade.

TOPSHAM – A very sad and fatal accident happened yesterday morning at the Patent Phoenix Peat Firelighter Company's Works, near the Quay, to a young girl named THERESA PYM, aged about fourteen years. It appears that the deceased was employed with her sister to do up the firelighters into packages and label them. She was performing this ask between nine and ten o'clock yesterday morning, and during the temporary absence of the manager (Mr Gardiner), deceased left her work and proceeded to a part of the room where the end of a main shaft protrudes to a distance of a couple of feet into the room. The unfortunate girl is supposed to have been reaching something from a shelf close by this shaft, which was in motion, when her clothes caught and she was dragged under the machinery. Her head came into violent contact with the floor, and before the engine could be stopped she received such severe injuries that when released she was quite dead. The Deputy District Coroner (Mr F. Burrows) held an Inquest at the Globe Hotel, Topsham, yesterday afternoon, and after hearing the evidence of several witnesses, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 21 April 1880, Issue 6010 – Gale Document No. Y3200729372 OTTERY ST. MARY - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the Kings Arms Inn, before S. M. Cox, Esq., District Coroner, touching the death of JAMES BOWLES, of Cullompton, who, it appears, met with his death from injuries received from a horse on the 5th instant. From the evidence of Mr Wilmington, of the Fairmile Inn, it would appear that he (witness) sent to ask Mr Huxtable to render assistance with him in order to beat the animal off from the poor man. This was refused, and also to lend a conveyance for the removal of the poor fellow to the Hospital. For this, the Jury passed a vote of censure on Mr Huxtable's conduct. The man, after his removal to the hospital, soon died, and he leaves a very large family. Mr Huxtable has since written to say that he knew nothing of the accident, and that Mr Wilmington had made statements which were not true. Assistance was given to Mr Wilmington by one of the writer's sons and a relative, and after the horse had been driven off they picked the man up and conveyed him to the inn. Mr Huxtable thought it strange that his son and others who witnessed the accident were not summoned before the Jury.

Wednesday 28 April 1880, Issue 6011 – Gale Document No. Y3200729408 TOTNES – Fatal Fall From A Window. - An Inquest was held on Friday, at the residence of the Rev. James Powning, on the body of ELIZABETH TOZER, a domestic servant, who was killed the previous day by falling from an upstair window, which she was cleaning, to the ground, a distance of about twenty-five feet. Evidence was given that she had been cautioned to be careful, and that a moment afterwards she was seen in the air. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 April 1880, Issue 6011 – Gale Document No. Y3200729390 FATAL ACCIDENT TO A DEVONSHIRE MAGISTRATE A fatal accident occurred on Friday evening to the REV. ARTHUR CRAWFORD BASSETT, of Watermouth Castle, near Ilfracombe. He was riding along a road near his residence when the horse stumbled, and MR BASSETT was thrown off and his neck broken. Death was instantaneous. The deceased was the eldest son of the late MR ARTHUR DAVIE-BASSETT, of Watermouth, who died in 1870, by HARRIET, daughter of MR THOMAS CRAWFURTH, N.B. He was born in 1830, and was thus in his 50th year, and was one of the largest landowners in North Devon. He was educated at Eton, and matriculated at Oriel College, Oxford, succeeding to the family estates on the death of his father ten years ago. Since then he has let Watermouth castle to Captain Williams, R.N., and had led a retired life in a residence which he built on another part of the estate. He was a justice of the peace for the county, and lord of the manor of Berrynarbor. MR BASSETT, who was never married, led a very retired life, but in his capacity as magistrate he was a regular attendant at the Combmartin Petty Session. A sister of the deceased was married to Captain Williams, of Pilton House, Barnstaple. An Inquest was held on Saturday before J. H. Toller, Esq., District Coroner, when the following evidence was taken:- Mr J. S. Catford, photographer, of Ilfracombe, stated that he knew the deceased, and that he was a Clerk in Holy Orders. He saw him the previous day about twenty minutes to three o'clock in the afternoon. Witness had been to Berrynarbor at work taking photographs, and he was returning towards Watermouth Castle on his way back to Ilfracombe. He had with him a horse and a four-wheel closed carriage and his assistant, Joseph Dendle. Witness was driving with his assistant on the box-seat. The carriage contained his chemicals and his photographic apparatus, but this latter was not visible. When he came about half-way between the saw-mills, and the carriage-drive leading to Watermouth castle, he saw the deceased about thirty feet ahead of him, on his grey horse, coming towards him. He was apparently falling from his horse, and did not seem to have any command of him as he was catching hold of the saddle, and apparently very much frightened. He was at times nearly off the saddle. The horse was galloping, and passed witness on the proper side. Witness's horse was consequently rather restive, but he drew up as quickly as possible. In answer to a Juryman (Mr W. Harding) witness said the deceased's horse was running away. Witness, continuing, deposed that when he stopped his horse, his assistant got off and ran to the deceased. By the time he was going to the deceased, he met his assistant returning, and he told him that the gentleman had been thrown, and that he thought he was dead. Witness ran back to the deceased, and by that time two men were carrying him to his house, and he assisted them. Finding he could do no more, he returned. Joseph Dendle, assistant to Mr Catford, also deposed that the horse was running away before he came to Mr Catford's carriage, and that the deceased appeared to have no control whatever over the animal, which was going at a furious rate. Henry Thorne said he was a labourer, and was at work the day before in the carriage-drive of the Castle. The deceased passed him on his horse all right, but a minute or two afterwards he heard the horse go off at a gallop, and, on going to the hedge and looking over, he saw the horse galloping up the road with no one on him. He ran down into the road, and he there saw the deceased lying in the road, and the last witness being present. The deceased was not bleeding much, but witness could see that he had had a very heavy blow upon his head. Richard Lewis, a farmer, said he knew the horse that the deceased was riding at the time of his death. He was a very troublesome horse, and very dangerous to ride. He had thrown the deceased on two previous occasions, on one of which the horse came down with him and rolled over him. Mr Henry R. Foquett, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, said he had examined the body, and found a fracture of the skull and a dislocation of the neck. There was a small wound at the back of the head, corresponding with the fracture which caused his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 May 1880, Issue 6012 – Gale Document No. Y3200729426 EXETER – Inquests. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on Wednesday afternoon held an Inquest at the Oat Sheaf Inn, Fore-street, on the body of SUSAN EDITH SEAMOUR, the infant child of CHARLES and SUSAN SEAMOUR, St Olave's-square. The child was three months old, and on the previous Tuesday morning was found dead in bed. Dr Perkins was called in to see the body, and in his evidence he attributed death to convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

On the evening of the same day, Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Mount Pleasant Inn, Blackboy-road, on the body of SUSANNAH ROSAMOND, who died suddenly the same day. ELIZABETH CHAPMAN, sister of the deceased, stated that the latter was seventy-one years of age, and was a single woman. She lately lived as a servant in the employ of Mr Bustard, nurseryman, Polsloe-road. Mr Thomas Bustard deposed that deceased was his housekeeper. About a quarter past seven that morning he was induced to go into deceased's room, finding that she had not got up at her usual time (half past six.) Witness found her lying with her face downwards on the bed, quite dead. He heard her coughing about six o'clock the same morning, but he took no notice of this, it being a frequent occurrence. Dr W. J. Williams, of Heavitree, was called to see the deceased, and he deposed that death resulted from an apoplectic seizure. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

On Friday the City Coroner held an Inquest at Holmes's Sun Inn, Sun-street, on the body of a youth, named WILLIAM ATTWELL, who died rather suddenly that morning. The deceased, who was a native of North Tawton, was about fifteen years of age, and was in the employ of Mr Hodge, baker, of South-street, to learn the business of a baker. About five o'clock that morning he was discovered by a journeyman baker, named Boffett, to be very ill. Brandy was at once administered to him, but it had no effect, and he expired shortly afterwards. The evidence of Mr Perkins, surgeon, of South-street, was to the effect that deceased died from heart disease, and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Wednesday 12 May 1880, Issue 6013 – Gale Document No. Y3200729467 EXETER – Inquests. - An Inquest was held on Friday morning at the George and Dragon Inn, Black-boy-road, before the City Coroner (HG. W. Hooper, Esq.), on the body of FREDERICK SOWDON, 2, Portland-villas, Black-boy-road, who died on Thursday evening from injuries received through jumping from a window. Miss Ann Hooper identified the body, and said that the deceased was a retired draper, and was thirty-five years of age. Since retiring from business the deceased had been to New Zealand, and in September last he came to Exeter to reside. He had been in rather a bad state of health since he came home, and during the last fortnight had appeared very strange and restless. The deceased had been under the care of a nurse for the past fortnight, and arrangements were made for his removal to the Wonford Asylum. Witness was with the deceased on the afternoon of the 6th instant until about five o'clock. He was then very quiet. After tea witness left him, and about six o'clock she was in the room adjoining the deceased's, when she heard a smash of glass. Witness ran downstairs, and found the deceased lying in the court, about thirty feet below the window. He was then in a dying state, and was unconscious. The doctor was sent for, and the deceased was taken upstairs and laid on a bed. He died before the doctor arrived. Ann Aggett, the nurse, said the deceased had been very restless for the last fortnight, and often talked in a strange manner. After the deceased had his tea on Thursday witness left the room for a few moments, when she heard a smash. She immediately ran back to the deceased's room, and found that he was not there. The window was broken. Witness next saw him lying in the court below, as described by the last witness. By a Juryman: Witness believed that the deceased knew that steps had been taken for removing him to the Asylum. Mary Barnes, a servant, deposed hearing the smash, and running out and lifting the deceased up. Mr William Henderson, surgeon, said he had lately attended the deceased for a chronic lung disease. He exhibited no symptoms of insanity during the early part of the year, but about six or seven weeks ago a marked change took place as regarded his mental condition. He was very desponding, and his insanity assumed the form of monomania. He had given strict orders that the deceased should not be left for a moment. On Thursday witness was called to see the deceased about six p.m., and found him in the court dead, having received a fracture at the base of the skull, which was evidently the result of a fall from the top window. Witness had previous given instructions that all the windows should be secured with screws. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

The Deputy Coroner for the district (F. Burrow, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Plymouth Inn, Alphington-street, St. Thomas, on Friday morning, on the body of JAMES SCOINES, a labourer, of West Sandford, Crediton, which was found floating in the river on the 4th instant. The first witness was William Jerred, Mary Arches-street, who deposed that he last saw the deceased about a fortnight ago at the North Bridge Inn, St. David's-hill, where they had some beer. They left the inn together between six and seven o'clock in the evening. Deceased then went to witness's house. Whilst there he fell down and hurt his back, and stopped there the night in consequence. He got up the next morning about ten o'clock and left the house, saying he was going to Alphington, and would be back about dinner time. Witness had heard nothing of him until Wednesday, when he learned that his body had been discovered in the river. He was ,perfectly sober when he left the house. WILLIAM SCOINS, son of the deceased, said he last saw his father alive about a month ago, when he called at his house at Exminster. When deceased went to Exminster he generally walked beside of the river. Mr Stafford Lambert Gorwyn, residing at Countess Weir, deposed to the discovery to the body in the river. P.C. Cockram stated that he searched the body of the deceased. He found two pawn tickets (Messrs. Linscott), and two pocket-knives. There was some difficulty in finding a place to deposit the body, as the landlords of two or three public-houses refused to take it in. The Coroner remarked that there should be a mortuary for use on such occasions. Mr Mark Farrant, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said that he examined the body. It was in an advanced state of decomposition, but there were no marks of violence. It seemed to have been in the water for some days. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

On Saturday morning Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of THOMAS DENLY, aged fifty, a labourer, of Kennford, who died in the Hospital a day or two previously from injuries received on the 4th ult. by being thrown from the back of a colt. On the day in question the deceased was riding the colt for the first time, when the animal threw him, and while the man was on the ground it placed its foot on the lower part of his stomach, inflicting severe internal injuries. The deceased was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died from blood-poisoning, the result of inflammation to the injured parts. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 19 May 1880, Issue 6014 – Gale Document No. Y3200729497 EXETER – An Inquest was held yesterday on the body of WILLIAM HARRIS, a coachman, aged forty eight. The evidence showed that on the morning of May 4th the deceased was driving a break in the Polsloe-road, when the horse bolted and came into contact with a wall. Deceased was thrown to the ground, and subsequently conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Cumming stated that when the deceased was received into the institution he was suffering from an injured foot, which was of a serious character. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 26 May 1880, Issue 6015 – Gale Document No. Y3200729535 EXETER – Sudden Death. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the City Workhouse last Saturday morning, on the body of GEORGE RICHARDS, an inmate, who was found dead in his bed. It appeared from the evidence of John Bowden, another inmate, that the deceased, got out of bed about four o'clock on Friday morning, and left the room. He returned shortly afterwards and went to bed again. Finding he did not rise at the usual time, witness went to him and discovered that he was dead. Mr J. Woodman, surgeon to the Workhouse, said he was of opinion that death resulted from syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Wednesday 26 May 1880, Issue 6015 – Gale Document No. Y3200729541 OKEHAMPTON - Alleged Illtreatment of a Child in the Workhouse - R. Fulford, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest at the Gostwyck Arms, Northtawton, last Monday on the body of a child named JOHN ALBERT BREALEY. The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said he considered it his duty to have the case fully investigated, as various rumours were afloat that the deceased had received illtreatment while in the Okehampton Workhouse. The Jury having decided that a post-mortem examination was necessary, the Inquiry was adjourned for two hours for the purpose. On the hearing being resumed, the mother said she had two children before being married to the father of the deceased. She and BREALEY could not agree abo9ut the children, and he left her after they had lived together ten months. Witness then took the deceased to her husband's mother, who refused to receive it, but witness left it on the table. She subsequently went into the Workhouse, and the baby was brought there, but witness refused to take charge of it while there, and on leaving with her other two children left the deceased behind. She received a letter on May 8th that her child was dying. She went and found that it had bruises on the face. It had always been healthy. The Master of the Workhouse (Mr Nethercott) stated that when the child was admitted on March 27th it appeared to be in pain; and the Matron gave similar evidence. It was alleged that the child had proper care. Marie Smale, an inmate, said it was part of her duty to assist in the sick ward. She left the deceased on a bedtie on the floor, with another child by its side. She was not away a minute, but when she returned she found the other child lying across the deceased, on the face of which there was a stool. The medical evidence was to the effect that there were bruises on the body which were such as would have been caused by a stool, but that the child was not healthy when admitted to the Workhouse. After the post-mortem examination, Drs. Waters and Dean gave it as their opinion that the bruises had nothing to do with the cause of death, which resulted from natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect, and the Foreman stated further that they considered no blame whatever was attached to the authorities of the Workhouse. They, however, were unanimous in expressing grave and severe censure on the mother for leaving the child as she did, believing that her unnatural conduct contributed in great measure to his premature death. The Coroner said that he entirely endorsed the verdict of the Jury, whom, he thought, would agree that a full Inquiry had been very necessary. He had been connected with the Workhouse for twenty years, and he took the greatest interest in the poor people – (hear, hear) and he could assure the Jury that there was no Union where the inmate were treated more kindly than in the Okehampton Workhouse. – (Applause.)

Wednesday 2 June 1880, Issue 6016 – Gale Document No. Y3200729570 EXETER – Inquests. - Drowned in a Tub. The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Round Tree Inn, Frog-street, on Wednesday evening, on the body of EMMA MARY STREET, a little girl, who had been accidentally drowned in a tub on the previous evening. SAMUEL STREET, father of the deceased, said that he resided in Exe Island, and the child was two and a-half years old. On Tuesday evening last, about half-past seven, the deceased went into the court in front of the house with her brother, a little boy about five years of age. In the court was a tub about two-thirds full of water. While there her brother left her and went into the Exe Island. Some time after he ran into the house saying that his sister was "drowned in the tub." Witness ran out, and found the deceased lying in a tub, with her head touching the bottom. He lifted her out and carried her indoors, during which time she breathed once. Witness sent for a medical man, and Mr Andrews was soon in attendance, but the child died before his arrival. The deceased was a delicate child. Mr R. J. Andrews, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said that death was the result of drowning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Sudden Death. - On Friday morning an Inquest was held at the George and Dragon Inn, Blackboy-road, on the body of JOHN PFAFF, aged 56, who died suddenly on the previous morning The deceased was a native of Germany, and a retired watchmaker of this city, residing in Springfield-terrace, Old Tiverton-road. He had been unwell for a week past, and complained of a pain in his back, but he had no medical advice. He also suffered a great deal from asthma. On Thursday morning about ten o'clock he went into his bed room to wash, but he fell backwards before he commenced. His wife heard the fall, and she ran upstairs. She found him lying on the floor on his back, and with assistance she lifted him on the bed, but he expired during the process. All his relatives – two or three brothers and sisters – had died suddenly within the last seven years, and the recent decease of his last sister had much affected him. Dr. S. S. Perkins said that death resulted from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by the same Coroner at the Elephant Inn, North-street, on Monday, on the body of HARRIET MORRISH, the wife of WILLIAM MORRISH, butcher, of North-street, who died suddenly on Saturday night. The deceased was sixty years of age, and from the evidence of her husband and Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, there appeared to be no doubt that she died from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 9 June 1880, Issue 6017 – Gale Document No. Y3200729620 APPLEDORE - Found Drowned. - Mr J. H. Toller, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Bell Inn, on Monday, respecting the death of MR EMMANUEL MARSHALL, a retired shipowner, which occurred under the following circumstances. On Saturday afternoon the deceased was observed looking over the wall of a cornfield; about ten minutes afterwards a young man named Tucker went to the New Quay slip, when he saw a walking stick and hat together, and then discovered the body of a man floating in about five feet of water five feet from the shore. Mr Tucker called his father, who was in the cornfield with a Mr Mill, and when they came he entered the water and brought the body ashore. It appeared lifeless, but he ran for Dr Pratt, who came at once. He found the body head downwards, and having altered that position tried to resuscitate the body, but to no effect. Dr Pratt stated that the deceased suffered from shaking palsy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", and recommended that copies of rules for the treatment of those apparently drowned should be applied for, and posted up for the benefit of the public.

Wednesday 16 June 1880, Issue 6018 – Gale Document No. Y3200729636 EXETER – Found Drowned. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Fountain Inn, on Saturday afternoon, respecting the death of JAMES EDWARD BROWN, aged five years, whose body was found in the river at the Quay. It appeared that between five and six o'clock on Friday evening the deceased was playing with two other little boys on the banks of the mill-leat under the old city walls, when his foot slipped and he fell into the water. His playmates were too small to render him any assistance, and about half-an-hour afterwards his body was picked up near the stern of a vessel in the Quay. The mother of the child, a married woman living in Victoria-place, Coombe-street, alleged that if the deceased had received proper attention when he was taken from the water he would have recovered. John Bastin, a lumper on the Quay, replied that the child was quite dead when taken out of the water. Mr W. A. Budd, surgeon, gave evidence to the effect that death was caused by drowning. In summing up the Coroner said that there appeared to be no grounds for the allegation made by the mother that the deceased had not received proper attention. As far as he could see no blame was attached to anyone. A Juryman remarked that the place where the child fell into the water was very dangerous, as there was no fencing or anything to prevent such occurrences. The Coroner said he would visit the place, and if he found it was dangerous to the public he would report accordingly. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 16 June 1880, Issue 6018 – Gale Document No. Y3200729654 SALCOMBE – Fatal Fall Over The Cliffs. - An Inquest was held at Splatt Cove on Thursday, before Dr Gaye, District Coroner, on the body of GEORGE LUFFMAN, gamekeeper to Captain Bennett, Sand Hill, who was killed by falling over a cliff. Mrs Stone, wife of a gardener at the Moult, said she saw deceased leave his home on Thursday morning about eleven o'clock. In the afternoon, while on her way to Salcombe, through the Moult footpath, she saw LUFFMAN under the shrubs, his body being towards the cliff. She ran and told Langmead and Parker, who were coming up the path, that Luffman WAS CERTAINLY GOING OVER THE CLIFF. They at once went to the spot, but he had fallen over. P.C. Nankivel said that on Tuesday he went to the Moult and found deceased lying on the rocks dead. Witness had him conveyed to his home at Splat Cove. Had made inquiries and found that deceased had been supplied with beer in two public houses. Witness searched him, and found one bottle containing beer and another with a small quantity of rum in it. Evidence was given that deceased appeared to have been sober a short time before he fell. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 23 June 1880, Issue 6019 – Gale Document No. Y3200729675 SUICIDE IN THE EXE. - F. Burrow, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday at the Okehampton Inn, St. Thomas, respecting the death of ABRAHAM WELLAWAY, a jobbing gardener, who committed suicide on Saturday last, by drowning himself in the Exe. The evidence went to show that between seven and eight o'clock on Saturday evening the deceased was at the Okehampton Inn, and sat on the left of a man named John Dunrich, who gave him a glass of beer. The deceased drank a part of the beer, and suddenly rose up, saying, "I'll go and drown myself." Immediately the deceased left the room, but Dunrich, thinking he meant nothing serious by the remark, and knowing that he was in the habit of saying such strange things, took no notice. Dunrich further stated that the deceased appeared to have been drinking, adding that he was nearly always one way, and that was under the influence of liquor. Thomas Wellington said that shortly before the deceased left the Okehampton Inn, as he said to drown himself, he told witness that he had got constant work with a Mr Kerswell, at Asylum-hill, at 18s. per week, and was going to begin on Monday Just afterwards the deceased stated that he was going to drown himself, and went out of the room. The deceased was always peculiar, but he appeared to be in a very good temper, and no one thought he meant anything. Mary Bale, with whom the deceased lodged, said that two months ago he had rheumatic fever, and since then had not been quite the same. For the last fortnight he had come in tipsy and gone out tipsy, and could not have told night from day. During the last fortnight he had hardly eaten sixpennyworth of food. After leaving the inn, deceased appeared to have walked straight across the road and jumped into the river. Two men, named Henry Tucker and Henry Oatway, hearing the alarm that was raised, ran to the spot, and jumped into the water after the deceased, but failed to get him. Oatway was very much exhausted by his endeavours, and had to be assisted out of the water by Tucker. A boat belonging to Mr Ruston was near at hand, and two men named Smith and Galpin got into it, and by means of the drags succeeded in recovering the body, In answer to a Juryman, these witnesses said that water came from the deceased's mouth after he was taken into the boat, but they did not notice any sign of life. Mr A. W. Kempe, surgeon ,said that hearing of the occurrence, he went to the spot, which he reached before the body was found. When deceased was taken into the inn, witness went there and used means to bring him round. Finding life appeared to be extinct, he ordered the removal of the body to the Brewhouse, where he and two other medical men continued their efforts to restore life for about half-an-hour. In answer to a Juryman, Mr Kempe said that if the deceased vomited after he was in the boat, it would be a sign that life still remained; he, however, did not see it. The deceased could not have moved his arm after he was taken into the Brewhouse. the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind".

Wednesday 7 July 1880, Issue 6021 – Gale Document No. Y3200729745 EXETER – Sudden Death. - On Saturday the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Hour Glass Inn, Melbourne-street, on the body of KEZIAH WELLINGTON, who died suddenly at her house in Colleton-buildings, on Thursday evening. The deceased was the sexton of Holy Trinity Church, and was seventy eight years of age. Dr W. Henderson said he had attended her for some months for an attack of paralysis, and he came to the conclusion that death was caused by an apoplectic attack, which occasioned paralysis of the respiratory organs. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Sudden Death. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Wellington Inn, King-street, on Monday, respecting the death of ANN CHAPLE, the wife of CHARLES CHAPLE, an umbrella vendor, residing in Smythen-street. It appeared from the evidence that on Saturday last the deceased, who was sixty years of age, complained of a pain in her head, and later in the day she was found in her room lying on the floor with her head under the table quite dead. The medical evidence went to show that death was caused by heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 7 July 1880, Issue 6021 – Gale Document No. Y3200729763 HONITON – Melancholy Suicide. - An Inquiry was held on Wednesday at Leeton Farm, in the parish of Broadhembury, BEFORE Mr S. M. Cox, respecting the death of MR CLEMENT PYLE, a farmer, aged sixty-five, who was found dead early on the previous Monday morning, hanging by the neck from the rails of the back staircase of his own residence. Evidence having been given as to the finding of the body, MR GEORGE PYLE said the deceased, his brother, had been "breaking up" for a long time. Deceased had given notice to quit his farm owing to his inability to work. After transacting certain business in the bank in Honiton a short time since, deceased wrote to witness as follows: - "Dear Brother, - When I was at the bank with you I signed two papers, I fear I have done wrong, as I think I have signed away money. Do make inquiries. My mind was in that state I did not know what I was about. From your affectionate brother, CLEMENT PYLE. " Witness saw his brother afterwards, and endeavoured to assure him that his money was all right; but deceased said people were watching him, and would take his money away. The Jury were of opinion that the deceased committed suicide while Temporarily Insane, and a verdict was returned accordingly. The deceased leaves a wife, but no children.

Suicide. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Cox) held an Inquest on Saturday afternoon at Ware Farm, about five miles from Honiton, touching the death of ELIZABETH GAY CHOWN, aged 66, who, it was supposed, had cut her throat with a pocket-knife on the previous morning. Deceased lived with her brother W. N. CHOWN, and on Friday morning, having been missed for some time, a search was made which resulted in her being found in her bedroom, sitting in a chair with her throat cut. P.C. Partridge said he had taken the deceased home on Wednesday, after she was found on the railway, and told MR CHOWN that he was to look after her, as there was something wrong. He also handed him a note from Superintendent Barber. While walking home, the deceased said she was a professor of religion, but it had made her as hard as a stone. She continually spoke of suicide, and expressed a determination to destroy herself ultimately. Dr Grey who was sent for to attend the woman deposed that, while sewing up the wound, the deceased struggled to get away from him, and said, "I hope I shan't recover, because if I do I shall do it again." The deceased died about two hours afterwards from loss of blood and the shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict, "That the deceased cut her throat whilst Temporarily Insane."

Wednesday 7 July 1880, Issue 6021 – Gale Document No. Y3200729761 CREDITON – Suicide. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Thursday before Mr F. Burrow, Deputy Coroner, on the body of EUNICE BULFORD, aged seventy, who committed suicide the previous day by hanging herself to a bedpost. A verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Wednesday 14 July 1880, Issue 6022 – Gale Document No. Y3200729796 NEWTON ABBOT – Suicide by Poisoning. - Mr F. Watts, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Town Hall on Monday afternoon on the body of MARY ELIZABETH PUTT, 34, single woman, who was found dead that morning. Deceased was the daughter of MR PUTT, miller, of Torbrian, and worked as a dressmaker at the establishment of Mr Badcock, draper, of Courtenay-street. She lodged at No. 10, Gladstone-place, with MRS ALGAR, her married sister. About six o'clock on Monday morning, this sister, hearing a noise in deceased's bedroom, went in and found deceased lying unconscious. Mr Ley, surgeon, was sent for, but on his arrival he pronounced life to be extinct. On Police Sergeant Nichols searching the room he found a glass and bottle, both of which contained a small quantity of carbolic acid. The result of a post mortem examination showed that deceased had destroyed herself by taking carbolic acid, and that she was in an advanced state of pregnancy. The Jury returned a verdict of suicide during a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 14 July 1880, Issue 6022 – Gale Document No. Y3200729780 EXETER – Inquests. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Globe Inn, Newtown, on the body of FLORENCE MAY, aged nine months. The evidence of the medical-officer (Mr Kempe) showed that death was caused by measles, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was accordingly returned.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the King's Head Inn, St. Sidwell's, yesterday afternoon, on the body of HENRY BLACHFORD, aged five months, the infant son of GEORGE BLACHFORD, plasterer, of Wood's-court, Summerland-street, St. Sidwell's. Mr Bell, surgeon, considered that the cause of death was convulsions. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Mr Bell stated that he had attended the deceased child for whooping-cough, but not for measles. He said a very wrong impression prevailed among persons that measles could be safely treated at home, but it was often the case that medical aid was not called in until the child was past treatment. The Coroner thought it could not be too widely known that children should not be allowed to die simply because the assistance of medical men were not called in when necessary. The Jury concurred in this remark.

Wednesday 21 July 1880, Issue6023 – Gale Document No. Y3200729808 TAVISTOCK - Three Men Drowned in a Mine. - Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, opened an Inquest at the Bedford Hotel, on Thursday evening, concerning the deaths of THOMAS ALLEN, aged thirty; JOHN CLOAK, thirty-eight; and HENRY HILL, forty-three, miners, who were drowned in East Wheal Crebor on the previous Tuesday through an overflow of the river Tavy. The Coroner, after commenting upon the peculiarly sad circumstances attending the deaths of the men, stated that it would be necessary to adjourn the Inquest in order that he might communicate with the Government Inspector of Mines. The Coroner expressed his regret that Dr Le Neve Foster had been appointed to another district, and expressed the hope that his successor would be as courteous and competent. The Jury having viewed the bodies the Enquiry was adjourned until next Thursday. The Foreman of the Jury (Mr J. J. Daw) mentioned that this was a case needing some support from the general public. CLOAK had left a widow and seven children, one only ten weeks old; ALLEN a widow and five children, the youngest fourteen months; and HILL a widow and one child.

Wednesday 28 July 1880, Issue 6024 – Gale Document No. Y3200729851 TAVISTOCK – Suicide of a Farmer. - Mr R. R. Rodd, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Dinnathorne Farm, in the parish of Whitchurch, last Saturday morning, on the body of the late occupier, MR HENRY OXENHAM, aged 46, who had committed suicide on the previous day by hanging himself. Elizabeth Ann Reddcliffe, domestic servant at the farm, said it was usual for MR OXENHAM to go to Tavistock market on Friday mornings, but on the previous day, as the deceased was in low spirits, he did not go. He remained in bed until nearly two p.m., when he came downstairs into the kitchen, and told witness to put the horse out to grass. She did so; and on her return she found that her master had left. She took no notice of this, as she thought he had gone for a walk, but as he had not returned at six p.m., a search was made and he was found in the hay loft hanging. James Reddcliffe, farmer, of Whitchurch, said the deceased, whom he had known for the last twenty years, was always in good health up to within the last two or three months, when he had been very strange and low-spirited. On Friday evening witness called at Dinnathorne Farm, about six o'clock, and was told that the deceased had been absent about four hours. He went to look for him and found him in the hay loft, hanging to the key-piece by a bullock rope. Witness immediately cut the body down, but it was found to be dead and nearly cold. The feet of the deceased were about a foot from the ground, and witness supposed that in committing the act the deceased stood on a box which was in the loft, put the noose around his neck, and then kicked the box away. The deceased was in good circumstances, and was not suffering from any money or other trouble. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 28 July 1880, Issue 6024 – Gale Document No. Y3200729849 EXETER – Death from Suffocation. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at Mr Hexter's Wine and Spirit Vaults, Fore-street, on Friday evening, on the body of ELIZABETH LEY, aged seventy-nine, the wife of EDWARD LEY, bill-poster, No. 10, the Mint. MARY HAMMETT, daughter of the deceased, stated that she took some dinner to the deceased, who was upstairs. She then left her, and came down, but soon after, hearing a knock on the floor, ran upstairs again. She found the deceased sitting in a chair, holding on to the window. The food had fallen on the floor, and the deceased was black in the face. Witness took hold of her, and slapped her on the back two or three times. She also put her finger down her mother's throat, but could discover nothing lodged there. She called the neighbours, and medical assistance was sent for. Mr C. E. Bell was sent for, but the deceased expired before his arrival. In his opinion, death resulted from suffocation, caused by some hard substance getting lodged in the windpipe. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Suffocation."

Wednesday 4 August 1880, Issue 6025 – Gale Document No. Y3200729900 UFFCULME - Shocking Death of a Volunteer in the Camp. – Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Farmers' Hotel, Uffculme, last Thursday, on the body of GEORGE STREET, aged twenty-seven, a member of the Ottery Rifle Corps, who died from the explosion of his rifle in the camp on the previous evening. The deceased was encamped with the Third Battalion of Devon Rifle Volunteers at Uffculme, and was much respected, although of a very reserved disposition. Instead of attending the athletic sports, which was to take place in an adjoining field on Wednesday evening, the deceased preferred to stay in his tent to clean his rifle. There had been a battalion drill earlier in the day, but the deceased's rifle had been examined at the finish with the rest, and was supposed to be unloaded. However, the sports had hardly begun before the report of the deceased's rifle was heard, and on proceeding to his tent, a comrade found him lying on his back shot dead. The charge, or whatever it was, had entered the left jaw, had penetrated the head to the left temple, taking a piece of the skull through the canvass above, and making several holes. His brains were blow out, and blood was scattered about the tent. An empty cartridge-case was extracted from the rifle, but whether it was of a bullet or a blank cartridge there appears to be considerable doubt. The sports were at once stopped, and the body conveyed from the camp on one of the jumping hurdles. The subscriptions for the sports and the fees of the witnesses were handed to the parents of the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the deceased was buried at Ottery St. Mary. Major Sir J. H. Kennaway, Bart., M.P., and Lieut. Warren were present at the Inquest.

Wednesday 4 August 1880, Issue 6025 – Gale Document No. Y3200729906 TORQUAY – Fatal Fall From The Cliffs. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr F. Watts) held an Inquest on Saturday at the Hospital touching the death of SAMUEL LUXTON, aged seven, son of JOHN LUXTON, labourer, of Church0street, Ellacombe. The deceased lad was playing with other boys on Thursday near the quarry at the back of the Palk Arms, when, getting too near the edge of the cliff, he fell off and pitched on his head from a distance of nearly thirty feet. On being taken up the poor boy was found to be frightfully injured, and he died soon after his admission to the Hospital, where he had been conveyed directly after the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 4 August 1880, Issue 6025 – Gale Document No. Y3200729885 EXETER – Killed on the Railway. - Yesterday morning about ten o'clock two porters going along the Railway from St. David's in the direction of St. Thomas came across the mangled remains of a man who appeared to have been cut to pieces by the 9.30 a.m. up train. The body was removed to the Royal Oak Inn, Okehampton-street, where it was identified as that of CHARLES HEDGELAND, a book-hawker, formerly resident in Summerland-street. The deceased was a middle-aged man, and no longer ago than the 26th May he attempted to commit suicide by throwing himself into the river Exe. He was then rescued by a young man named George Holmes, and taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he remained under treatment until the 14th June, when he was taken before the city Magistrates, and charged with having attempted to destroy himself. He then pleaded that he had been greatly affected by the loss of his wife, and upon his pro9mising not to repeat the offence he was discharged with a caution. The man's conduct has since been very strange, and there is no doubt that he committed suicide. The body has been examined by Dr Andrews, and an Inquest will probably be held some time today.

Wednesday 11 August 1880, Issue 6026 – Gale Document No. Y3200729922 EXETER – Killed on the Railway. - Frederick Burrow, Esq. (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Royal Oak Inn, Okehampton-street, last Wednesday, on the body of CHARLES HEDGELAND, who was found lying dead between St. David's and St Thomas Stations on the previous morning. Superintendent Green watched the proceedings on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company. MAHALA HILLS, of 23 Summerland-terrace, sister of the deceased, said that she last saw deceased alive on Friday at her house. He was then in very low spirits. He said he had come to bid her good-bye, as he was going to London on Saturday. Deceased had lived with her up to within the last fortnight, when he left to go into lodgings. Her brother's wife had left him about three months ago, and since that time deceased had been in a very unsettled state of mind. Within a day or two of his wife's leaving him deceased attempted to commit suicide by throwing himself into the water. He left witness's house to go into lodgings at her request, because his wife's friends were continually coming there and creating a disturbance. Deceased, who was about forty years old, was a book-vendor. P.C. Johns had known deceased for several years. For the last week or two witness had noticed that he had walked about in a very peculiar manner. Mary Ann Kerswell, landlady of the Royal Oak Inn, said deceased called at her house on the Tuesday morning about nine o'clock and had a glass of ale. Witness did not at that time notice anything peculiar in his manner. Evidence having been given as to the finding of the body on the line, JOHN HEDGELAND said the deceased was his brother, and he had been under the impression, since his wife had left him, that people were watching him. On this account witness told him to go to London. Mr R. J. Andrews, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said when he examined deceased's body he found both the legs and the right arm fractured. There was a large wound on the head. The injuries were such as would be caused by a locomotive passing over the body, and were sufficient to cause instantaneous death. Rev. H. E. Reynolds said about a month ago a man named Gay called upon him with a letter begging for money on behalf of the deceased. Witness gave the applicant some money, and then went and asked deceased's sister where he was, and was told that as there had been a row deceased had left her house. Witness afterwards saw deceased with Gay, but he always avoided witness. Witness saw Gay on the previous night on Northernhay, and was then told what had happened. Gay informed witness that HEDGELAND was determined to commit suicide, and was as sane as he (Gay) was. Witness requested Gay to appear to give evidence at the Inquest, but he replied in an offensive manner that he should not attend. He thought that he ought to appear in order that the public might know what state of mind deceased was in. The Coroner concurred in this, and expressed his willingness to adjourn the Inquiry if the Jury wished, in order that Gay might be made to attend. The Jury, however, thought this was unnecessary, and returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Wednesday 18 August 1880, Issue 6027 – Gale Document No. Y3200729970 HONITON - Suicide on the Railway. - Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest in a cottage about a mile above the Honiton tunnel, touching the death of JOHN STUCKLEY, a carpenter, of Honiton, aged fifty years, whose body had been found on the South-Western Railway, early on Saturday morning last. Mr Hoskinson watched the case on behalf of the company. William Pike, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Wilmott, deposed that he last saw the deceased alive at half-past nine o'clock on Friday night, near a railway bridge above the Honiton tunnel. Witness was fetching a bucket of water, and a man, whom he had since recognised as deceased, passed him. Witness spoke to him, and the deceased answered "Good night" in a low voice. Esther Lyddon, wife of a labourer, of Offwell, stated that she had known the deceased for the past twenty years. She saw him on Friday night last, and he looked in great trouble. She had heard his wife say that her husband had been ill, and was very bad in his head. Henry Stitson, gardener to the Rev. J. G. Coplestone, of Stockland, said he knew the deceased, and had noticed him pass his house several times lately. About six o'clock on Friday morning he saw him in a linhay, and he looked like a man that was ashamed to be seen. Thomas Morey, foreman of the packers, said that at four o'clock on Saturday morning, on coming along the line, he saw deceased lying on the railway. The shoulders of the deceased were tight against the outside metal of the down line, and his head was lying in the four-foot way. The body was in a "dip," and the hands of the deceased were under him, apparently paced there with the endeavour to keep the neck on the line. He removed the body and the head, and sent for a police-constable. P.C. Martin said he had known the deceased for seven years. He was a carpenter. He had noticed him about Wilmington for several months. The last time he saw him alive was on Thursday morning last about half-past two o'clock. Witness walked along the road with him, and asked him why he was out that time of the morning. He replied that he had been to Weymouth to look for work, but he could not get any, and he was returning to Honiton. On Saturday morning witness was fetched, and he proceeded to the spot where deceased lay. The body was warm, and was removed to an empty cottage near. He searched the body, and found only a few tools and two or three tobacco-pipes. EMMA STUCKLEY, wife of deceased, said she last saw her husband alive on the 7th of August, when he left his home at Honiton to go to Weymouth to look for work. Her husband was under the doctor's care in April last, owing to his suffering from an overflow of blood to the brain. He had been in a bad state of mind since last March, and two years ago deceased was out of his mind. after a few remarks from the Coroner, the Jury unanimously returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 25 August 1880, Issue 6028 – Gale Document No. Y3200730014 TOTNES – Fatal Accident at the Railway Station. - Mr F. Watts (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest last Saturday on view of the body of WALTER THOMPSON, a guard on the Great Western Railway, who died at the Globe Inn, the same morning, from the effects of injuries received at Totnes station about three weeks ago by his head coming in contact with the pillars supporting the station roof as he was leaning out of his van. It was stated by Mr W. Smith, inspector of permanent way, that the distance from the rails to the posts supporting the roof was two feet ten and a half inches, and from the window of the van from which deceased was looking the posts were one foot ten and a half inches distance. Leaning out so as to be able to see the breaks, he found he would be two feet from the van window, and would consequently cover the posts by an inch and a half. In reply to the Coroner, Mr Smith said it was not necessary for a guard to look at his breaks to see if they were properly working; an experienced man would be able to tell without. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," expressed the opinion that the posts supporting the roof were too near the rails. The Jury gave their fees to the widow, as did also the medical and other witnesses.

Wednesday 25 August 1880, Issue 6028 – Gale Document No. Y3200729999 EXETER – Fatal Fall. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at Lamacraft's Globe Inn, Newtown, last Thursday, respecting the death of ELIZABETH GREENSLADE, a widow, aged 77, who died from injuries caused by a fall. On the 28th May, while deceased was tying back a grape vine in her garden in Clifton-street she fell off the chair on which she was standing, breaking her left leg just below the knee. Mr A. Perkins, surgeon, St. Sidwell's, was at once sent for, and he attended her up to the time of her death. About a month since mortification set in, from which she died on the previous Tuesday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER – Sad And Fatal Accident. - On Monday the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn on view of the body of MRS SNELL, aged 56, wife of MR THOMAS SNELL, builder, of Lower Southernhay, who died through a dislocation of the neck, caused by a fall down some steps. The evidence went to show that on Saturday evening the deceased was watering some plants placed on a roof which was approached by a flight of steps when she suddenly fell to the ground and broke her neck, death being (according to the medical evidence of Dr Roper) instantaneous. The unfortunate woman also fractured her arm near the wrist, and received a large scalp wound on the left side of her forehead, extending to the top part of the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 1 September 1880, Issue 6029 – Gale Document No. Y3200730037 EXETER – Suicide at Cowley Bridge. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on Thursday last held an Inquest at the Cowley Bridge Inn, touching the death of ELIZA JANE HOOPER, a servant girl, aged sixteen, who had committed suicide the same morning by throwing herself into the backwater near Cowley Bridge. In opening the proceedings the Coroner remarked that it was the first time during his experience of twenty-seven years in the office that he had ever had a full Jury of twenty-four, although that number was always summoned. Mr W. H. Sawdye was foreman of the Jury. It appeared from the evidence given that deceased was a native of Crediton, and had been in the employ of the landlord of the Cowley Bridge Inn (Mr Beer) as a domestic servant for about five months. She appeared to like her situation until about two months since, when she sent home word to her parents that they must get her another situation, as she was very unhappy with Mr Beer. The reason for her sending home that message was because both Mr and Mrs Beer had complained of her dirty habits, and told her that if she did not keep herself more tidy she would have to leave. On Saturday deceased again sent home word to her stepmother, by a woman named Elizabeth Daw, that she was to get her another situation, and the stepmother sent back word to the effect that she was either to remain where she was or go into the Union. This seemed to have preyed upon the girl's mind, as since then her manner had been strange. About seven o'clock that morning she was observed by Mr Beer, who was near, milking a cow, to go through the garden at the back of the premises. Shortly afterwards a packer on the railway named John Manley heard groans, and upon looking into the water saw deceased in some stagnant water, about 200 yards from the Inn. He ran to the spot and took deceased out, but life was extinct. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, was sent for, and on arriving he examined the body, but found no marks of violence. The body, which was in a very dirty condition, presented all the signs of death by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 8 September 1880, Issue 6030 – Gale Document No. Y3200730088 TEIGNMOUTH – Drowned Whilst Bathing. - On Saturday evening Dr S. Gaye, the District Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of SIDNEY STEVENS, an Oxford under-graduate, who was drowned whilst bathing off the sea-wall on Saturday morning. It appeared that deceased was suddenly knocked off his legs by a large wave and immediately sank. Successive efforts were made to rescue him by his brother and by the Rev. H. C. Deshon, Vicar of East Teignmouth, but, unhappily, they proved ineffectual. Mr Deshon's gallant attempt nearly cost him his life, and but for the assistance rendered him by a man named Alfred Dyer, who threw him a rope, it is probably that two lives would have been lost instead of one. Mr Deshon's exertions were thankfully acknowledged by the father of the deceased, and the praiseworthy promptitude of Dyer, the railway employee, who threw Mr Deshon the rope which enabled him to get ashore, was also recognised. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 8 September 1880, Issue 6030 – Gale Document No. Y3200730086 BURRINGTON – Killed On The Railway. - J. H. Toller, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest at Burrington last Friday, on the body of a platelayer named EPHRAIM ISAAC, who was killed on the previous Wednesday night by the train leaving Barnstaple at 8.16. The line in the parish of Burrington, between the Portsmouth Arms and Southmolton-road stations, is being relaid, and on the evening named the deceased was engaged to signal the trains to go slowly over the new metals. Mr William Hynam, farmer, stated that he saw the deceased on Wednesday evening, about eight o'clock, sitting on the metals by a crossing-gate, near the spot where the accident occurred. He told witness that he was there to signal the trains and look to the gates. Whilst the conversation was proceeding, the up train was heard coming. Witness said "I should not like to sit there another five minutes, Isaac," to which he replied, "Nor I, sir, as it would cut a man into a hundred pieces." Deceased then got up with the lamp in his hand, and signalled the approaching train. Thomas Poole, the driver, stated that he noticed the caution-signal at Portsmouth Arms, and proceeded slowly, and looked for the man in charge. He did not see him, but felt the engine go over something on the left side. At Southmolton-road he examined the engine, and saw on one side a portion of a nail bag. At Eggesford he further examined the engine, and found blood, &c., on one of the wheels. William Sanders and Charles Henry Taylor proceeded down the line, and a few yards below the cross-gates found portions of the deceased's body, which had been fearfully mutilated. A nail-bag, upon which it was supposed the deceased had been sitting, was found, cut into two pieces, and a signal-lamp was lying between the metals. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 15 September 1880, Issue 6031 – Gale Document No. Y3200730120 EXMOUTH – Distressing Boat Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Rolle Arms Hotel, Exmouth, last Friday, before Spencer M. Cox, Esq., of Honiton, District Coroner, on the bodies of JOHN MANN and EDWARD POTTER, who lost their lives by the capsizing of a pleasure boat, abreast of Exmouth bar on the previous Wednesday, under circumstances which will be found detailed in the following evidence:- John Perriam, a pilot, was the first witness. He stated that he was on board the pilot cutter on Wednesday, anchored off the Maer Rocks, and waiting for water to go over the bar. He saw a boat come away from Orcombe Point with three men in her, but he could not distinguish who they were. The boat was lugsail rigged with one sail up, and when about a quarter-mile from the cutter she turned over. He at once shouted to Edward and John Tupman and Pym, who were lying down in the cabin, that a boat had capsized, and in order that not a moment should be lost got ready the cutter's punt. The three pilots started at once, and thinking four would be too many for their small boat he stayed on board the cutter. Meantime he saw Barrett's yacht, which was coming in the same direction, luff round and make for the over-turned boat. Before the punt could get there the yachtsmen had succeeded in picking up Bradford, the boatman, and MANN In reply to the Coroner as to the cause of the accident Perriam said it was done by the jibing of the sail, but he could not say whether or not the sheet was fastened. Edward George Tupman, another licensed pilot, stated that immediately on hearing from Perriam that a boat had capsized he jumped into the punt with his brother and W. Pym (two other pilots) and pulled in the direction pointed out by Perriam. On nearing the boat he could only see one man clinging to it, who proved to be Nares. They at once took him aboard, and then saw another body floating at a distance of about eighteen feet, and having pulled the man into the boat discovered that it was POTTER. Apparently he was quite dead. They immediately turned their boat to the shore and met the coastguard galley, which took them in tow and landed them near the coastguard station. In reply to the Coroner as to whether the sheet was fastened, he said whether it was or not it would not remain fastened in the water, as it was merely attached to a shunt cleat. Andrew Barrett, a fisherman, stated that on the day of the accident he was returning with a pleasure party from a cruise. When off the double leg buoy he heard cries of distress, and on looking round saw a boat on her side and three men clinging to her. He immediately hauled his wind and tacked in the direction of the boat, then at a distance of about 100 yards, and in passing threw a rope amongst them, which was caught by Bradford, who was then hauled aboard. He then made another tack, and succeeded in picking up MANN with a boat-hook. Nares then swam towards Barrett's boat, but as the pilots would arrive at the spot before he could make another tack he bore away for the harbour for medical assistance on MANN'S behalf. George Bradford, the boatman, stated that POTTER, Nares, and MANN engaged him on Wednesday for a shrimping expedition. They left Exmouth at ten a.m., and landed at Orcombe, and, after shrimping until about two o'clock, left for home. After hoisting the sail he asked Nares if he could steer, and, on being answered that he could, gave him the sheet and the tiller, and employed himself in picking shrimps from the weed. Their lug said was reefed, but there was no more wind than a boat could carry whole sail. About three minutes after they started the sail jibed before the men could shift their position, and the boat capsized. The Coroner: What happened then? Bradford: All four of us were thrown into the water, and I saw MANN, who could not swim, trying to take hold of Nares by the neck, but he pushed him away. The Coroner: Can you swim? Bradford: A little sir. The Coroner: A little. Then you had better learn. A Juror: I think it is Bradford's modesty, for I believe he can swim well. The Coroner: He is here to tell the truth, and the whole truth. In answer to Mr Emanuel Ware, a relative of MANN, the witness said he was not a licensed waterman. Q. – Did you think you were justified, as a waterman, in giving up possession and handing the boat over to a stranger whom you had never seen before? A. I didn't give it up – the gentleman took charge of it himself. Q. Do you think it was a proper course for you to give up the charge of the boat? A. Yes. As soon as the gentleman got into the boat he took the helm. In answer to the Foreman, Bradford said that Nares had steered the boat when they were going out in the morning. Henry Putt, coastguardsman, said when the alarm was given he and others of the coastguard went out in the galley, and finding they could not be of any other service they towed in the pilot's boat. They afterwards fetched the capsized boat. The tack was fast, but the sheet was not fast. Did not see any marks on either of the deceased. There was a rumour that another man was missing, but after witness's crew had been searching for some time they found that this rumour was incorrect. Mr Maberley, surgeon, said he was called when the body of POTTER was landed, and efforts were continued for over half-an-hour to restore animation, but there were no signs of life. Dr Turnbull said he was called when MANN'S body was landed. He thought he heard a few flickering beats of the heart, and they were attempting for over half-an-hour to restore life, but their efforts were useless. The Coroner remarked that there could be no doubt as to the manner in which the unfortunate deceased met their death – the only question was whether there was any gross negligence amounting to manslaughter. The Jury were of opinion that there was no such negligence, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." MR POTTER, one of the deceased men, was in his younger days a noted swimmer, and had in his possession a Bible which was presented to him by the Rev. C. W. Wightman, formerly of Exmouth, in recognition of his having saved that gentleman's son, Henry Wightman, from drowning in the Passage Way at Exmouth in 1843. Soon after that occasion a boat capsized, with two ladies and a gentleman on board, when crossing the Ferry, and POTTER succeeded in saving the gentleman and one of the ladies. MR POTTER, who was fifty-six years of age, had been in ill-health for some time, and it is supposed that the shock to his system deprived him of the power of swimming. Mr Nares, was one of the survivors of the Princess Alice disaster, and on that occasion he swam ashore with a woman on his arm whom he thought to be his wife; but on discovering his mistake he again made for the wreck, hoping that he might still save his wife. Since then he has married the lady whose life he was the means of saving.

BRADNINCH – Fatal Machinery Accident. - The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, last Wednesday on the body of a lad named JOHN THORNE, whose parents reside at Bradninch. There was no witness in attendance who saw the accident; but a sworn statement by the father, of an account related by the only person who witnessed it, was taken. It appears that deceased was in the employ of Messrs. Drew, Hall, and Co., of Kensham Mills. On the 10th August last he was engaged in feeding paper between some rollers, when one of his fingers was caught between them and severely crushed. He consulted and was treated by Dr Stephens, of Bradninch. The pain became very excessive, and he was sent to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The acting house surgeon found that he was suffering from spasms of the muscles, his teeth were clenched, and his head drawn back. A consultation of the medical-officers was held, and it was decided to amputate the inured finger. The operation was performed by Dr Bankart. After this he progressed favourably for a while. On the Saturday, however, the symptoms returned, and deceased gradually sank, dying at about a quarter to two o'clock the following Tuesday afternoon. Mr Norman Rushworth, surgeon, who is acting in the place of Mr Cumming, was of opinion that deceased, who had been under his care, died from tetanus, resulting from the injuries received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". One of the Jurymen said he thought that in mills like the one in question the machinery was often defective, and that children were sometimes employed to do the work of men. The Coroner concurred.

Wednesday 22 September 1880, Issue 6032 – Gale Document No. Y3200730150 CORONER'S INQUESTS. - Suicide of a Prisoner. - The Deputy County Coroner (Mr Frederic Burrow) held an Inquest at the Exeter Gaol on Thursday on the body of FREDERICK JONES JOSLIN, a joiner, aged 54, who committed suicide on Wednesday by strangling himself. Richard Rood Richards, assistant warder, stated that about 7.45 on the previous morning he gave deceased his breakfast. Witness did not observe anything strange in his manner. On the contrary, he appeared to be very calm and cheerful. George Head, also an assistant warder, stated that on the previous morning, about nine o'clock, he was on duty in the upper portion of the gaol, and on going his rounds he looked into deceased's cell and observed him lying underneath the bed. Witness then opened the cell-door, and saw that the hind leg of the iron bedstead was resting on deceased's windpipe. Having reported the case to the Chief Warder and the Governor, witness went for a medical man. The Chief Warder (Mr Alfred Jerman) stated that he received deceased into the Gaol on the evening of the 30th August, he having been committed for trial on a charge of forgery. From that time up to the time of deceased's death witness had visited him two or three times a day, but never observed anything strange in his manner. Did not know anything of deceased's antecedents. On hearing that deceased had committed suicide, witness visited the cell, and with the Governor's assistance drew deceased's head from under the leg of the bedstead and placed him on the bed. Stimulants were administered, but all efforts to restore animation were fruitless. The weight of the bed was 2cwt. 3qrs. The Governor of the Gaol (Mr Edwin Cowtan)( confirmed the last witness's evidence. He also stated that about two o'clock on Tuesday afternoon he, in company with the Mayor of Exeter and Mr Moore-Stevens, J.P., who were acting as visiting justices, visited the cell in which deceased was confined, and asked him if he had any complaint to make, which he replied in the negative. Witness never observed anything strange in deceased's manner or behaviour. He had generally conducted himself well, but on Monday he was brought before witness for a slight breach of the rules, for which he was ordered to be deprived of the slight indulgence given him, the effect of which would be that he would not be allowed to see any of his friends for a week. Deceased had also received two letters from his wife, in which she stated that she had been unable to raise sufficient money to engage counsel to defend him, and advised him to plead guilty to the offence for which he was indicted. Mr John Delpratt Harris, surgeon, stated that about nine o'clock on the previous morning he received a message to go to the Gaol. He did so, and saw deceased lying on his back in his cell quite dead. He was of opinion that the actual cause of death was strangulation. P.C. Johns stated that deceased within the past few months had done scarcely any work, but had been wandering about. On the 28th August witness apprehended him on a charge of forgery, and the way to the Guildhall he said, "I don't care what you do with me; I have not been a man since my wife and children were burnt alive." - The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity. About twenty two years ago deceased's first wife and two children were burnt to death when he lived in a cottage near St Thomas Church.

DEATH BY DROWNING – Mr Burrow held a second Inquest the same afternoon at the Double Locks Inn, on the body of GEORGE TOWELL, aged 46, a bargeman, lately residing at Topsham, who was drowned by falling into the Canal on Wednesday evening, near the Locks. Edward Glitton, master of the barge Edward and Frank said that deceased was employed all day on Wednesday with witness in loading a lighter on the Canal. He left the deceased at the Double Locks, and went on towards Topsham, about 3.30. When he left him he did not think that TOWELL was drunk. They had spent about three hours in the Inn. He was surprised when he was told in the evening that the deceased was drowned. The deceased was not a drunkard, and he could swim well. He often stopped behind at the Inn, and joined the barge further down. He had never noticed anything strange about him. Charles Scanes, horseman on the Canal banks, said that he had known the deceased many years. He was at the Inn with him for about an hour on Wednesday afternoon, and when the deceased left he did not appear to be the worse for liquor, "leastways not so as to be unable to take charge of himself." He went out with his oilskins on his arm. Witness hard no splash in the water. Some time afterwards the deceased's hat was found in the Canal, and his oilskins on the banks. The man who found them said that he feared TOWELL was drowned, but witness said he had gone on. He suggested that the deceased had gone to sleep on the bank, and commenced a search for him, but could not find him. He had often seen men asleep on the bank. Men afterwards dragged the Canal, and witness remained until they found the body, and he helped to land it. Deceased must have been in the water more than an hour. It was a very rough and wet day, and there was scarcely anybody about. The wind blew very hard. The deceased was not an intemperate man. He was a little the worse for drink on Wednesday afternoon, but he was capable of walking and taking care of himself. Probably the wind blew him into the water. Mr Mark Farrant, surgeon, St. Thomas, said that he examined the body, which presented the usual appearance of death by drowning. William carter Hannaford, landlord of the Inn, said that he saw the deceased leave the house shortly after he was spoken to by Glitton, and soon after the lighter went through. He appeared to be quite capable of taking care of himself, otherwise he should have accompanied him to Topsham, or detained him, as he did keep men under similar circumstances. The body was recovered from the Canal some eight landyards from the Double Locks about 4.30 – an hour or more after he left the Inn. Witness at once sent a man for the police. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 22 September 1880, Issue 6032 – Gale Document No. Y3200730153 SIDFORD – A Boy Killed. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Cox) last Friday held an Inquest at the Rising Sun Inn, Sidford, about a mile-and-a-half from Sidmouth, touching the death of EDWARD THOMAS WELLSMAN, who was knocked down by a horse on Wednesday last, and killed. Isaac Dimond, farmer, of Sidford, stated that on Sidbury Fair-day he sent a boy, aged thirteen, and named Richards, who was in his employ, on horseback for the purpose of carrying a note to his son, who lived at Sidbury. Witness put the boy on the mare, and told him if there were any noise at the Fair, or any music being played, to get off the animal and lead her through the Fair. Subsequently his son-in-law came back with his horse, and said, "This is a bad job, the mare has run away with the boy, and knocked down two or three children, and killed a boy." P.C. Harper stated that on Wednesday last, about half-past one, he was in Sidbury village and saw Richards riding a mare furiously. The boy had no control over the animal. Witness held up his hands and tried to stop him, but he could not, and he then got out of the way. The animal proceeded, and jumped in among some children who were playing in the road, and knocked down three. Witness noticed all of them get up except the deceased, who was picked up and carried into the Red Lion Inn, and after breathing three times the boy died. There was a blow over the left eye. The boy Richards said he rode his master's mare on the Sidbury Fair-day, and on nearing Sidbury she suddenly ran away, and he could not pull her up. The mare had run away with him before, but he did not tell his master of it. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 29 September 1880, Issue 6033 – Gale Document No. Y3200730181 ILFRACOMBE – Fatal Accident. - The District Coroner held an Inquest here last Thursday on the body of JOSEPH FOLEY, of Swansea, the young man who was drowned while attempting to rescue Mr Turner and Miss Kipper of Bristol, from a place where they had been overtaken by the tide. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and at the Coroner's suggestion added a rider strongly censuring the lady and gentleman "for placing themselves in such a perilous position, whereby the death of deceased was caused."

Wednesday 29 September 1880, Issue 6033 – Gale Document No. Y3200730172 EXETER – An Inquest was held by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), at the George and Dragon Inn, Blackboy-road, last Saturday morning, on the body of ERNEST HOOPER, aged three years and ten months, the son of WILLIAM BURT HOOPER, of Kendall's-buildings, Blackboy-road. The child it appeared had been suffering from measles, but the mother called in no medical assistance, as she thought the child was not ill enough to require it. The only medicine she had given him was saffron tea. About one o'clock on Saturday morning the child became worse, and died in convulsions before the arrival of Mr Bell, for whom she had sent immediately. Mr Bell, surgeon, said that in his opinion the death was a natural one, resulting from congestion of the lungs, following the measles. The treatment of giving the child saffron tea, which had been adopted by the mother, was, in his opinion, utterly useless. The Coroner said that it was a pity medical aid had not been resorted to sooner, but there was no blame attached to anyone. Verdict – "Death from Natural Causes."

On Monday Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the South-Western Hotel, Paul-street, touching the death of RICHARD PITTS, a journeyman shoemaker, of Crediton. The deceased had been in Exeter since Thursday, and at nine o'clock on Saturday morning he left for a walk. Whilst in Paul-street he fell down and died almost immediately. Dr Budd was called, but by the time he arrived life was extinct, and death appeared to be due to a rupture of one of the organs connected with the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural causes" was returned.

Wednesday 6 October 1880, Issue 6034 – Gale Document No. Y3200730205 DARTMOUTH – The Dangers of Shooting Galleries. - An Inquest was concluded on Thursday at the Torbay Hospital, Torquay, before Dr Gage, District Coroner, respecting the death of HARRY FORSEY, a youth of seventeen, from injuries received by the incautious use of fire arms at a shooting gallery in Dartmouth on the 26th August. On the evening of the 26th, whilst standing in front of the saloon hanging up glass bottles with a string to be shot at, the deceased was shot in the back from a rifle on a board behind him, at a distance of about twelve or fourteen feet. After a few minutes deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death, resulting from a gun-shot wound," and they added a rider calling the attention of the police authorities to the construction of shooting galleries and the weapons used at them. The Jurors gave their fees to the father of the deceased.

Wednesday 13 October 1880, Issue 6035 – Gale Document No. Y3200730253 TOPSHAM – Sudden Death. - Mr F. Burrow acting for the District Coroner, held an Enquiry at the Railway Inn, Topsham, on Saturday, touching the death of RICHARD SHERMON, aged about 50, the landlord of the inn, who was found dead on Thursday evening at the foot of the Railway Bridge in Monmouth-street. Catherine Gorman, housekeeper to the deceased stated that on Thursday afternoon he left his house to go to see Mr Prouse at the Lighter Inn. He was not very sober when he left, but in witness's opinion he was quite capable of taking care of himself. Andrew Squire, landlord of the Steam Packet Inn, said that the deceased called at his house on Thursday evening. He drank two three-pennyworths of gin, and left about ten minutes past eight o'clock. He was a little worse for drink, but was able to take care of himself. John Mogridge stated that about 8.15 on Thursday evening, as he was about to go on the railway bridge in Monmouth-street, he stepped on something soft. A man named Newman came up, and having struck a match, they discovered it was the body of the deceased. He was quite dead. Witness remained by the body, while Newman fetched a policeman. William Newman gave corroborative evidence. P.C. Stoneman said that he sent for a doctor, and had the body removed to the deceased's house. Mr G. G. Bothwell surgeon said he had examined the body and was of opinion from the deceased's appearance that he fell down and died in a fit. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Dead."

Wednesday 13 October 1880, Issue 6035 – Gale Document No. Y3200730238 EXETER – Supposed Suicide in the Canal. - Mr F. Burrow, Deputy Coroner for the District, on Saturday held an Inquest at the Welcome inn, Haven Banks, touching the death of GEORGE WEST, aged 26, whose body was found in the Canal on the previous day. Deceased had been in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company for the last four years, and was a steady, sober man, with nothing peculiar about him. On Friday afternoon, he called at the Welcome Inn and had three pennyworth of brandy. When he left he walked down by the Canal in the direction of Double Locks. He appeared then quite sane and sober. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned." WEST, who was unmarried, was a native of Ashton.

Wednesday 20 October 1880, Issue 6036 – Gale Document No. Y3200730288 TOTNES – fatal Railway Accident. - On Saturday evening Dr Gaye, District County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Wellington Inn, Ipplepen, on the body of FREDERICK HILL, a carpenter, aged 42. On Friday afternoon HILL had been to Torquay, and left that town by train, arriving at Kingskerswell a few minutes after eight o'clock. From thence he started to walk home to Ipplepen, a distance of about three miles, it being noticed at the time he started that he was not sober. Later on the body of the deceased, frightfully mutilated, was found on the bank adjoining the railway at Dainton Bridge, near Dainton Tunnel, in the direction of Totnes. It is conjectured that the deceased was struck by the up mail train which passes just before nine o'clock at a very swift rate, and blood and human hair were found on one of the vans of the train. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and gave their fees to the widow, who is left with four children.

Wednesday 3 November 1880, Issue 6038 – Gale Document No. Y3200730342 EXETER – An Inquest was held yesterday morning, at the Sun Inn, Sun-Street, before Mr Coroner Hooper, touching the death of ROBERT GILPIN, aged 79, formerly a carpenter, residing at Tudor House, East Teignmouth. On the previous morning the deceased was found dead in bed, at the residence of his grandson, MR ROBERT GILPIN, jeweller, South-street, where he had been staying for a few days. Dr Henderson was of opinion that death resulted from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 3 November 1880, Issue 6038 – Gale Document No. Y3200730337 EXETER – Suspected Murder Of An Exeter Girl. - Spencer M. Cox, District Coroner, on Saturday held an Inquest at Woodbury Road, respecting the death of MARY ANN HARRISON, an Exeter girl, eighteen years of age, whose body had been found on the beach of the estuary of the Exe, near the railway station, under circumstances which led to a suspicion of foul play. The body was identified by ELIZABETH HARRISON, mother of the deceased, a charwoman living in Mary Arches-street, who stated that she last saw her daughter alive on Saturday, the 9th instant, when she left home, as the witness supposed, to take a walk, but she said nothing as to where she was going. She had never threatened to commit suicide. MRS ELLEN HARVEY, a sister of the deceased, stated that she saw her at eleven o'clock on the same night at the Oat Sheaf Inn, Fore-street, when she was in the company of a woman named Stapledon and three Norwegian sailors. The two women had been fighting. Deceased, who was crying, said she was going to spend the night with Stapledon and the sailors, and asked witness to tell her mother she should not be home again until Sunday morning. Nothing had been seen of her since. Betsey Stapledon, a laundress, stated that the deceased was at the Oat Sheaf Inn on the Saturday night in company with a woman named Hall and a soldier. HARRISON, who was the worse for drink, wanted witness to fight, but she refused, though she afterwards did fight with the woman Hall. Witness left the house, but returned shortly afterwards with a woman named Lorey and three Norwegian sailors. The soldier who had been drinking with deceased had left, and one of the sailors sat down with her, and treated her to drink. At eleven o'clock deceased and the sailor went up the street. On the following Monday witness and the deceased's mother went to the Norwegian ship, which was then lying at Exeter Quay, and questioned the sailor in whose company deceased had left the public-house. He said he did not know where she went after he left her. Mr H. W. Furnivall, surgeon, of Woodbury, described the condition of the body as revealed by a post mortem examination. The only mark of violence was a slight jagged wound on the scalp, but this he was decidedly of opinion was caused after death, and that the woman met her death by drowning. The wound on the head might have been caused by the body striking against some object while floating in the river. The body had evidently been in the water several days. The Jury, acting upon the Coroner's instructions, returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned," leaving it to the police to follow up any clue that might be found as to the immediate cause of the poor woman's death.

Wednesday 10 November 1880, Issue 6039 – Gale Document No. Y3200730394 NEWTON ABBOT – Child Burnt to Death. - Dr Gaye, District Coroner, on Friday held an Inquest at Higher Staple-hill Farm, near Newton, touching the death of CATHERINE CULL SEGAR, 5 years of age, the eldest child of MR JOHN SEGAR, junr. The deceased and some younger children early on Thursday morning saw where the nurse put a box of safety matches. During the absence of the nurse the deceased climbed a chair and reached the box, some of the matches of which she struck and set her night dress on fire. MRS SEGAR, hearing screams, ran upstairs and found her child in flames, and dreadfully burnt about the body. Medical help was called, but the little sufferer died during Thursday night. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 24 November 1880, Issue 6041 – Gale Document No. Y3200730458 CREDITON – Fatal Fall Into A Well. - Mr Burrow, deputy-coroner, on Friday last held an inquest at the Dock Inn, on the body of a girl named FANNY LEE, who was drowned in a well the previous night. The girl, aged about fourteen years, was a servant to Mr S. Gillard, a baker, &c., the Green, and is the daughter of a labouring man living at Cockwell. The jury, after viewing the body, inspected the well where the girl was drowned. It is situated at the rear of Mr Gillard's premises. The body was identified by GEORGE LEE, a brother of the deceased. Mrs Ann Gillard deposed that between five and six o'clock on Thursday night she asked the girl to empty a pan. finding she did not return, witness sent one of her children to find, and then sent another older child. She afterwards went herself. Arnold in answer to her, said that he had not seen the deceased or heard her. Witness asked him if the boards were up, and he said yes. She then said, "It is all over; she is down the well," at the same time directing Arnold to procure a lantern and get assistance. It was a very rough night and dark. Samuel Stone deposed that he had known the deceased for years. About a quarter to seven some person called at his house and said a girl was down a well at Mr Gillard's . He procured some ropes, and went there with the view of getting her out. When he arrived people were there grappling. He got a ladder and went down, and, by putting ropes round his body, he succeeded in drawing up the deceased. She was then quite dead. Mr S. Gillard, baker, said the deceased was his servant, and had been so for about a month. He had told Arnold that he might take up some water in the daytime by buckets and a pulley. He had no authority to do so by night. The place was quite safe if the boards were down. John Arnold an apprentice in the employ of Mr Gillard, stated that he went into the court between five and six o'clock to draw water for baking purposes. He had drawn up water many times by night. His master never told him not to draw water at night. He drew up one bucket, when the handle broke, and he went into the cellar close by to mend it. He had a lamp and took it with him. It was very nearly dark. When he went in he left the boards of the well open. He put on the handle of the bucket, and came out and drew two buckets of water more. Assistance was obtained and he went down the ladder, but did not see anything. He had no light when he was drawing the water a second time. The jury returned a verdict that the deceased accidentally fell into a well, and was drowned, but they desired that the Coroner should call in both the master and apprentice and censure them for the neglect shown by them. The Coroner conveyed the censure as desired. The jury gave their fees to the parents of the deceased.

Wednesday 24 November 1880, Issue 6041 – Gale Document No. Y3200730462 EXETER – Suicide Of A Prisoner In Exeter Gaol. - An Inquest was held in Her Majesty's Prison, at Exeter, yesterday morning, before F. Burrows, Esq., Deputy District Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN POPE, a cattle dealer, formerly of Newton Tracey, who whilst undergoing sentence for horse and cattle stealing in North Devon, had committed suicide in his cell by hanging himself to the gas pipe. Mr George Mudge, of St. Thomas, was selected foreman of the Jury. Mr Edward Cowton, Governor of the Prison, was first examined. He stated that the body which the Jury had just viewed was that of JOHN POPE, aged fifty-four, who was admitted to the Prison on the 23rd June. At the Bideford Quarter Sessions, July 14, deceased was convicted of stealing four bullocks, and was sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment. Whilst undergoing that sentence he was tried at the Winter Assize for Devon, on November 6, and convicted of stealing a pony, for which he was sentenced to seven years' penal servitude. This sentence and the one of twelve months were, by the direction of the Judge, to run concurrently. On Saturday, the 20th, about six a.m., a report was made to the witness that deceased had hanged himself. He saw deceased immediately after. The body, which had been cut down by the officer, was still warm, but quite dead. Witness ascertained that a messenger had been sent for the medical officer of the Prison at the same time as the report was brought to himself. It was here suggested by one of the Jurors that they should have an opportunity of inspecting the cell occupied by the deceased, in order that they might better understand the evidence that would be given as to the manner in which the suicide was effected. The Governor assented, and said that would be the most convenient time, as the prisoners were then in chapel. The Jury then proceeded to the deceased's cell, No. 4 on the ground floor, to the left of the main entrance. The gas-pipe to which the unfortunate man had hung himself, is a piece of half-inch lead service tubing, attached to the wall by hold-fasts, about six feet from the ground, so that there was only barely room for the body to hang clear of the floor. The rope which the deceased had used consisted of two or three lengths of oakum "junk" tied together. It was explained that when the suicide was discovered the little table was lying on its side on the floor, from which it would appear that deceased had supported himself on the table until he had secured the rope to the pipe, and then kicked it from underneath him. George Wilson deposed: I am the assistant warder of the ward in which the prisoner was confined. On Friday night, shortly after half-past seven, I assisted in taking from his cell the oakum on which the deceased had been engaged, and also his clothes. Deceased spoke rationally, and made some remark about his stockings in reply to an observation from another warder. I observed nothing peculiar in the man's appearance or conduct. The oakum and clothes were removed, and the cell locked. A few minutes after six o'clock on Saturday morning I opened the deceased's cell for the purpose of giving him his clothes, when I noticed that the bedclothes were strewn about the floor, and that his table was lying on its side. I could not see the deceased until I got inside, when I found him hanging to the gas-pipe. I called to another officer who was passing to bring a lantern. He brought a light immediately, and I cut him down. Deceased was hanging by a rope, which I now produce. The rope was so short that his head was close to the gas-pipe. By the time I had cut him down the chief warder had arrived, and the medical-officer was sent for. The body was warm, but on examination the region of the heart and wrist I came to the conclusion that he was quite dead. There was no indication of a pulse. The rope is a piece of the old oakum "junk" which he had been given to pick the day before. To the Coroner: I cut down the body as soon as I possibly could. A Juror said he supposed it would have been impossible for the deceased to have hung himself without the rope, and asked how he came into possession of it unknown to the prison officials? Would he not be searched before his cell was locked up for the night? The Governor said he might perhaps be able to explain. The "junk" was sent into the prisoners' cells in lengths, and it was their duty to pick it; but he prisoner seemed to have kept back the pieces in question, and hid them somewhere, just as he had endeavoured to keep back his stockings. Even without the rope a determined man would find no difficulty, inasmuch as he could tear up his shirt, blankets, or sheets, or any other part of his bedding to make ropes Every endeavour had been made to prevent suicides by prisoners in their cells; but if a man was determined on self-destruction there were no possible means of preventing it except by keeping sentry over each prisoner. He had even known cases in which a prisoner had tried to strangle himself under the blankets, while a man had been watching him in his cell. He could assure the Jury that every possible precaution was taken to prevent such occurrences. A Juror: How often are the prisoners visited at night? The Governor: The cells are never unlocked till morning; but there is a watchman on duty through the night, and there are warders sleeping close at hand to be called if necessary. I am rather surprised that the weight of this man did not break the gas-pipe. If that had been done, it would have interfered with the gas, and it would have attracted the attention of the night watchman. A Juror: Is the gas kept burning in the cells? The Governor: No. Only in the corridors. Alfred Jerman, Chief Warder of the prison, said: I received information of the death of the prisoner from Halse, the Prison baker, who told me that I was wanted at No. 4 cell. I stepped across to the cell, and saw the deceased lying on the floor, and Assistant Warder Wilson, with a knife in his hand, trying to cut away the cord from deceased's neck. I assisted him by lifting the head up. I felt the body; it was warm, but there was no pulse. On my way to the cell I met an officer and sent him for the surgeon, who arrived in less than twenty minutes. I also sent an officer to inform the Governor. I searched the cell, and on the floor under the cupboard I found a slate with a written statement upon it; also a small piece of brown paper containing two verses of a hymn copied from the prison hymn-book. He had an opportunity of using writing materials in consequence of having received permission from the Governor to prepare a statement as to the manner of his defence at the Assize. By the prison rules he was permitted the use f an ordinary school slate. The writing on the slate was as follows:- "Good dear relations and friends I wish you all well. If I had Justice I should have seen you again in July. Young Turner swore false as ever a man swore true about the pony's nose. Crook, the police boy, swore false about the letter. Parsons swore false about the price of the pony. Friend, my solicitor, did not half instruct my council. He ought to have cross-examined Friend the landlord about our conversation. It was about his brother's horse. Friend the landlord did not tell any lies. I am not guilty of stealing that pony. How was I to know living 12 miles of. He was coming home at 2 o'clock in the morning. Where could be. Their was 4 hours from the time I left Dolton before Turner came home. I might have bought it of the man that stole it. Their was plenty of time for the pony to have changed hands a time or two, but it was agreed thing with Friend the lawyer and they Turners. If I had defended myself I should have got of. Parsons is a trator. He to greedy after money to honest. That the members of his club knows. I believed I was witched by Symons the blacksmith when I first went to live at Newton Tracey. I supposed I am accused of a lot. I wonder, they did not accuse me for embezzling the money from the Newton Club. Mr Dene accused me for stealing the donkey. I make no wonder at it as he only gave me half the value of it. I don't like to leave the the ever faithful. Christ have mercy upon me. He has promised to forgive me all my sins, and will receive my soul in his everlasting habitation. the Lord will set a mark on Turner as he did on Cain. I am tired of this perjured world. My blood will cry aloud from the ground on some of you. All the jail officials have been very kind." Witness, in continuation, said the brown paper contained two verses of a hymn, and one of these verses had been scratched on the floor of the cell directly underneath where the deceased's foot would hang. It commenced – "Be near me when I'm dying." To the Governor: I should suppose the writing on the slate was made the evening before. The Governor explained that whenever he visited the convicts in their cells, he made it a practice to examine their slates, as prisoners sometimes endeavoured to communicate with one another in that way if they had the chance. Mr T. W. Caird, prison surgeon, said in consequence of an urgent summons he visited the prison about half-past six on Saturday morning. he was shown the body of the deceased. It was quite dead. The mark of the rope on the windpipe was so deep as to lead him to suppose that the death was very speedy. William Bartlett, timber merchant, of Hatherleigh, expressed a wish to give evidence. He said he had known the deceased for twenty years. He was a native of Hatherleigh. Formerly he was a gentleman's servant, having been a coachman in Lady Rolle's family, but of late years he had been doing business as a horse dealer. Witness had never noticed anything peculiar in his manner before his apprehension and trial at Bideford. He was there charged with stealing four bullocks. Witness was present at the examination before the magistrates, and saw the deceased in his cell. There were marks on his neck. Witness said, "How came those marks there?" and he replied, "I tried to hang myself the other night when I was taken into custody, I must have been witched to have done what I done." He admitted that he had stolen the bullocks. He said he "had had horse shoes, and had taken every precaution to keep the witches out of his place, but had not been able to do so." Witness told him he was very sorry to see him in that position, and he replied, "I hope I shall soon be out of it again." Deceased's family was highly respected in Hatherleigh, and nothing was known against the deceased himself before this. From what had transpired and from what he had seen of the deceased since his apprehension, witness believed that his mind must have been affected. To the Jury: I am no relation of the deceased. I married a cousin of his. I have reason to believe that another member of the family is affected mentally. It was known to the police at Bideford that he attempted to commit suicide there. It was published in the papers. A Juror asked the Governor if he was brought acquainted with the fact? The Governor: Oh, yes. The police made a report to that effect, and he was under supervision from the time of his commitment to his trial; but after that his conduct was so satisfactory that the chaplain, the surgeon, and myself considered there was no further necessity for particular supervision, except that he should be observed with care. From the date of his sentence to the time he committed suicide, he has been in a cell by himself. The Deputy Coroner said the Jury had now heard all the evidence. There were two courses open, either to find a verdict of felo de se, or that the decease committed suicide while in a state of unsound mind. He thought after the evidence of Mr Bartlett they would hardly feel justified in returning a verdict of self-murder, but would be inclined to take the more charitable view. The case was really such a simple one that no further observations from him were called for. A Juror remarked that he thought the "junk" might be cut up into shorter lengths. The Governor said the usual length was from twelve to fourteen inches, but it was quite possible of course that a piece a little longer might have been overlooked. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

BRADNINCH. - Death From Burning. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, last Thursday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner), touching the death of ANNIE JACOBS, aged 34, wife of WILLIAM JACOBS, innkeeper, of Bradninch, which took place in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased, who was the wife f an innkeeper at Bradninch, had on a previous occasion narrowly escaped death through an accident with benzoline, and since then she had not used the spirit. On Monday night she was proceeding to bed by the light of a petroleum lamp when from some cause it exploded. Her clothes were set on fire, and she received such severe burns that she died from the effects of them on Wednesday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 24 November 1880, Issue 6041 – Gale Document No. Y3200730447 EXETER – Sudden Death of a Pensioner. - At the Dolphin Inn, Market-street, on Monday afternoon, H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of HENRY WYATT, aged 39, late a pensioner of the 19th Foot Regiment, lately living at No. 1, Preston-street. The wife of the deceased said on Saturday morning her husband complained of giddiness, but he refused to have a doctor, saying that he had been far worse when out in India. On Sunday morning he asked for a cup of tea, which she gave him. He put it aside, however, and when she asked him why he did not drink it he made no reply. He vomited something like blood, and she then sent for a doctor. Mr Perkins, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Sunday morning shortly before eight. He went with all speed, but on reaching the house he found the man to be dead. His opinion was that death was caused by a convulsion. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

EXETER – Fatal Accident at St. David's Station. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on Monday, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, touching the death of WM. RICHARDS, aged 59, which had resulted from a somewhat singular accident at St. David's Station, on the previous Friday. Deceased was a baker, living at Lapford, and on Friday he came to Exeter for the purpose of fetching some yeast. He went to the St. David's Station, accompanied by his grand daughter, a girl of twelve, and he carried with him a sack in which was a barrel full of yeast weighting 36 lbs. He had obtained the yeast at the City Brewery, and he reached the station a few minutes after four for the purpose of catching the train which would take him home. The North Devon platform is situated in the middle of the station, and to reach it he had to cross the bridge. He was mounting the stone steps, when the barrel, which he was carrying on his right shoulder, was seen to "lurch" over. He did not release his hold, and, as an eye witness stated, the barrel pulled him over the balustrade, and he pitched on to the stone platform below. Reckoned from the top of the balustrade he fell a height of eleven feet; and when picked up was insensible. The man appeared to have been drinking, but there was no evidence to show that he was intoxicated. He was conveyed in a cab to the Hospital, where he died on Sunday afternoon about two o'clock. Death resulted from the injuries he received by the fall – those injuries consisting of a scalp wound four inches long, a fracture of the spine, and a severe hurt to the lungs. He also became paralysed in the legs and lower part of the body up to a level with the breast. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 8 December 1880, Issue 6043 – Gale Document No. Y3200730528 TOPSHAM – An Uncertified Death. - F Burrow, Esq. (District Coroner), on Friday last held an Inquest at the Salutation Inn, Topsham, touching the death of JOHN ROWE, which had occurred under rather peculiar circumstances. The deceased had suffered for years from a complaint in the throat, and had been attended by various medical men. On Friday, the 26th ult, he complained of pains in the throat. Several days elapsed before any professional man was called in, but on Tuesday, at the request of the deceased, Mr Ellis, a chemist, of Topsham, attended him, and gave him some medicine to gargle his throat, and some of another kind which was to be taken every three hours. On Wednesday the deceased appeared to be much better, but the same night he was taken worse, and died about three o'clock on Thursday morning The chemist was sent for, but did not go to see the deceased, and ultimately Dr Bothwell was fetched, but the deceased died before his arrival. Under these circumstances the doctor refused to grant a certificate as to the cause of death, and the present Enquiry became necessary. ELIZABETH ANN ROWE, wife of the deceased, stated that on Friday last her husband complained of having a bad throat. He suffered from quinsy every year. On previous occasions he was attended by a medical man. On Tuesday evening he felt worse, and he sent for Mr Ellis, a chemist, to see him. The latter ordered linseed-meal poultices to be applied. He also sent a gargle and some medicine. The deceased took the medicine and the gargle on the same evening. The medicine was ordered to be taken every three hours, and this order was complied with. On the following morning Mr Ellis visited deceased again, and he said that he was to continue taking the medicine and use the gargle, and he ordered witness to send to his shop for some more. Mr Ellis again came to see the deceased between nine and ten o'clock on Wednesday night. The deceased at that time seemed better. Mr Ellis then ordered that he was to discontinue the use of the gargle, as some of the ulcers in his throat were broken. The medicine was to be continued; the deceased, however, took no more of it that night. During the night he was very restless, and in the morning about 2.45 he died. Witness awoke, and found him out of bed standing. He asked witness to knock him on the back, and he then threw himself on the bed. Witness first sent for the chemist, and afterwards for Dr Bothwell. The deceased did not speak subsequently. He had great difficulty in breathing, and appeared to be choking. He died before the medical man arrived, which was almost immediately after he was sent for. The Coroner: When Mr Ellis first came to see the deceased did he make any statement at all asking you to call in a medical man? Witness: Mr Ellis told me on Tuesday evening that my husband was very ill, but that if there was any necessity for me to have medical advice he would let me know, but he did not tell me to do so at the time. A Juryman: Had you known he was so dangerously ill would you have sent for Dr Bothwell? Yes, sir, I should. It was not my wish at all for him to have a chemist. The Coroner: When you sent for Mr Ellis on Thursday morning, did he come? Witness: No, sir, he told my niece to go back, and afterwards return and let him know how my husband was; but I did not do this, but sent for Dr Bothwell. A Juryman: Did he give any reason for not coming? No sir. A Juryman: Perhaps by his not coming he meant you to send for a medical man. Witness: Yes, sir; I believe that was what he meant me to do. SELINA ELIZABETH ROWE, niece of the last witness, said she went to Mr Ellis's house on Thursday morning, and asked Mr Ellis to come and see her uncle at once, because he had been taken worse. Mr Ellis told her to go back and tell her aunt to send for a medical man, and afterwards let him (Mr Ellis) known how the deceased was. He did not say he would come if he was wanted. Maria Parker stated that she had known the deceased for some years. About 3.15 a.m. on Thursday she was called to see him, and on reaching the house she found he was dead. On the Monday previous witness saw him, and she advised him then to have a doctor, but he said he did not want one as he should soon be better again. A Juryman: Are those bottles on the table the same as you saw at the deceased's house? Witness: Yes. Did you say to the police that if you had seen them in the deceased's room before Dr Bothwell arrived you would have thrown them away. Witness: No, I did not say that; I said I would have put them away, because I know medical men don't like to see other medicines in the house. Mr Frederick Ellis was the next witness called. He said that he was a chemist, carrying on business at Topsham. He did not know the deceased until he saw him on Tuesday evening. He was called to see him on that evening When he saw the deceased MRS ROWE was present, and on being asked why she did not call in a medical man, she replied, "Oh, we don't want the doctor, because we have seen him much worse before." Witness told her that if deceased continued bad, or got worse, they had better get a medical man to attend him. MRS ROWE seemed to make light of it, and thought there was no emergency about the case. Witness spoke to the deceased on the same subject, and the latter replied emphatically, "I don't want a doctor, and I won't have one." At witness's request, MRS ROWE sent to his shop, and he sent the deceased some gargling medicine and a simple mixture to be taken every three or four hours. On the following morning witness again saw the deceased. His wife told witness that she thought he was a trifle better. The deceased also said that he felt better. The same evening witness visited the deceased, and the latter then appeared to be much better. He told witness he was able to sleep, and that he had taken a little beef broth. The medicines had been repeated on the Wednesday, with a slight alteration in the gargle. About three o'clock on Thursday morning the girl came and asked witness to go down to the deceased at once as they were afraid that he was dying. He told the girl that he could not go to see the deceased, and she had better get a doctor as soon as she could. The Coroner: Do you consider that the cause of death was quinsy? Yes; suffocation, which was the result of quinsy. A Juryman: If there had been any danger, y9ou would have had a medical man fetched? Witness: If I had thought that the man's life had been at stake, I would have fetched Dr Bothwell myself. Dr Bothwell: On examining the throat what state did you find the tonsils in? Witness: Inflamed, but not to a great extent. The tonsils were not swollen, nor were they much inflamed. In what state was the soft palate? Rather soft, but not particularly so. How was the uvula? It was whitish. Dr Bothwell: Where then was there any obstruction? At the larynx. Was there any ulceration of the tonsils or soft palate? No. Then what do you mean by saying that the ulcers had broken? He told me something had broken in his throat, and I concluded it was the ulcers. Where there any patches at all on the tonsils? No. Where do you think the ulcers were if the tonsils were not enlarged? I should think at the back of the larynx. Was it an ulcer or a white patch? It was an ulcer. Did you do anything to it? No. I am a registered chemist. In answer to a Juryman, Mr Ellis said that his visits to the deceased was not professional ones, but simply for his own satisfaction. Dr G. G. Bothwell said that he was called on Thursday morning last to go to the deceased. He went at once. He found him lying on the bed dead. From the evidence he had heard that day witness was of opinion that the deceased died from diphtheria and not from quinsy, but he could not say definitely without making a post mortem examination. This concluded the evidence, and, after a short consideration, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 15 December 1880, Issue 6044 – Gale Document No. Y3200730549 EXETER – Fatal Accident At The Round Tree Mills. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of HENRY WELLINGTON, a miller, thirty-eight years of age, who met with his death the previous day while at work at the Round Tree Mills, Bridge-street. Mr G. H. Shorto watched the proceedings on behalf of Mr W. Bastick, the deceased's employer. It appeared from the evidence that deceased was engaged in oiling the bearings of the upright shaft on the second floor, when he became entangled in the machinery. His arm was dragged between the spur wheel and the bevel wheel of the lay shaft, the cogs passing over and mangling it in a frightful manner. Hearing his cries, a man named John Middleweek, who was also at work in the same room as the deceased, immediately went to his assistance. By this time WELLINGTON had fallen to the floor in an exhausted state. Other persons employed by the firm arrived on the spot, and the injured man was conveyed in a pony and trap to the Hospital. Before that institution was reached WELLINGTON expired from loss of blood. Mr Bastick said the Government inspector had always expressed himself pleased with the way in which the machinery was protected. It was impossible to fence that part where deceased was at work, and lubricators had been put up to obviate the necessity of oiling the bearings whilst the machinery was in motion, and he had given instructions that the lubricators should not be filled when the mill was at work. The Coroner said there appeared to be no want of care on the part of Mr Bastick. The deceased was doing something to the machinery, no doubt, and got entangled in it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased has left a widow and five children to mourn his sad fate.

EXETER – Fatal Fall Downstairs. - The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Buller's Arms, St. Sidwell's, last Thursday, touching the death of WILLIAM DAVEY, a dyer, residing at 7, Gill's-buildings, Cheeke-street. ELLEN ZANE DAVEY, of 80 Paris-street, stated that the deceased was her uncle. He was eighty-three years of age. On October 2nd last she saw him in bed. He said he had fallen down-stairs, and that no one had been to see him for eighteen hours, and that he had been continually knocking. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, stated that death resulted from exhaustion, accelerated by bed sores. The deceased ought to have been in the Workhouse instead of living by himself. The Coroner concurred with this view, and Mr Lamacraft (the foreman and a Guardian) said that if the Guardians had been made aware of the case they would have ordered the deceased's removal to the Workhouse. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 22 December 1880, Issue 6045 – Gale Document No. Y3200730602 PINHOE – Fatal Accident. - F. Burrow, Esq., Deputy District Coroner, last Saturday evening held an Inquest at the Heart of Oak, Pinhoe, on the body of JOHN WATERS GREAR, 71 years of age, who had died from injuries whilst received walking on the road on Wednesday evening. The Enquiry was fixed for five o'clock but the Coroner being detained by another Enquiry at Cheriton Bishop it was eight o'clock before he arrived. From the evidence given by two men in the employ of Mr Parkin, ironfounder, of Exeter, it appeared that on Wednesday afternoon, just before five o'clock, they were going to Poltimore with a cart containing a number of iron rods. Close by the railway bridge on the Exeter side of Pinhoe they noticed a horseman coming towards them at a trot. At the same time deceased, who was bent and crippled, was walking along behind the cart. As the horseman came up they saw that it was Mr Edward Pearse, son of Mr S. Pearse, ironmonger, of Fore-street. He had no sooner passed the cart than a noise was heard, and on looking around Mr Parkin's men saw the deceased, Mr Pearse, and the horse lying on the road. The horse soon struggled on his legs again, and was unhurt. The deceased and Mr Pearse were placed in the cart, and taken to the Heart of Oak. By the time they arrived here, GREAR had sufficiently recovered to get out of the cart, and walking across the road without assistance, he said he did not think he was much hurt. He, however, had misjudged his strength, and had to be assisted home. Mr Pearse requested that medical assistance might be at once obtained for GREAR, and a messenger went to Broadclist for Dr Somer. Meanwhile Mr Pearse was taken home in a cab. The messenger who went to Broadclist not finding Dr Somer, subsequently came to Exeter, where he obtained the services of Mr A. S. Perkins, who arrived at midnight. The deceased was then unconscious, and remained so until the afternoon of the next day when he died. Death was due to concussion of the brain. It appeared that the old man stepped out from behind the cart just as Mr Pearse came up, and literally walked under the horse's knees, so that the animal stumbled, and all rolled together. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. They exonerated everyone from blame, and gave their fees to the widow. Mr Pearse is progressing favourably under the care of Mr Webb.

Wednesday 29 December 1880, Issue 6046 – Gale Document No. Y3200730637 NEWTON ABBOT – Mysterious Death of a Lady. - On Friday last the Deputy Coroner (Mr F. Watts) held an Inquest at the residence of Dr H. S. Gaye, County Coroner, on view of the body of ELIZABETH EMILY GAYE, aged forty-two, wife of DR GAYE , who died on Friday morning. DR GAYE stated that on Thursday evening he went out to dinner, leaving his wife in her usual health and spirits. He returned about eleven o'clock, and went to his bedroom about half-an-hour later, and found his wife in bed breathing very shortly. He spoke to her, but obtaining no reply examined her and discovered that she was unconscious. By the side of the bed he found a tumbler which had contained carbolic acid, and he thought there was something wrong and sent for Dr Scott, in the meantime using the stomach pump himself. Dr Scott and himself tried all in their power to restore the deceased, but without avail, and death took place in a short time. The deceased had not suffered from mental derangement, and he believed she must have taken the acid in mistake for a sleeping dose. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure."

Wednesday 29 December 1880, Issue 6046 – Gale Document No. Y3200730642 LYMPSTONE – A Fisherman Drowned. - The District Coroner (Mr Cox) held an Inquest at the Railway Inn, Lympstone, yesterday morning, on the body of WILLIAM NORTHCOTE, a fisherman of Lympstone, which had been picked up in the river on Christmas Day. WILLIAM EDWIN NORTHCOTE, son of the deceased, said his father was about sixty-three years of age. Early on Wednesday morning he left home for the purpose of fishing, and did not return in the evening, but as that was not unusual, no search was made for him. On Friday witness took a boat, and proceeded to look for the deceased. Witness found his boat anchored in mid-stream in the New River or Bonhay, on the side nearest Starcross; and this led him to believe that his father had landed. Between three and four o'clock on Christmas morning he again went out to search for the deceased, this time being accompanied by others, and found the body in the new river or Bonhay, near Powderham. It was in three feet of water. Witness was under the impression that the deceased was proceeding over the steps towards his boat when he slipped and fell into the stream. Other evidence having been given to the effect that deceased was sober when last seen alive between six and seven o'clock on the Wednesday evening, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The Jurymen gave their fees to the widow of the deceased.

Last updated: 12 Feb 2015 - Brian Randell


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