This is an archived copy - GENUKI/Devon is now here.   

GENUKI Home page upDevon ContentsContents & Search
 
 

Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1881-1885

Articles taken from Trewman's Exeter Flying Post

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included:
Abbott; Adams; Alleyne; Andrews(2); Anstey; Arthurs; Atkins; Auton; Avery; Baker(5); Ball; Balmano; Balsom; Barrett; Barter; Basley; Bastin; Batten; Bearne; Beckley; Bedford(2); Beer(3); Belcher; Bennett; Berry; Besley; Bickell; Bickford(2); Billing; Bishop; Blackbeard; Blackburn; Blackmore(3); Bolt; Bond(2); Boutcher; Bovey; Bowden(2); Bowhay; Braund; Brealey; Brewer; Brock; Brodie; Brooks; Broom(2); Brown; Buchan; Buckingham; Bulteel; Burnett; Burrow; Burt; Butt; Cann; Cawsey; Chamberlain; Champ; Champowny; Chiswell; Chorley; Clark; Clarke; Cleave(2); Collins; Comer; Compton; Connet; Connor; Coombes; Cooper(2); Cope; Corin; Cory; Couldridge; Cox(2); Crawley; Creasy; Creech; Crimp; Crocker(2); Cutler; Dacie; Darkes; Davey; Davis; Dear; Delves; Downing; Duncombe; Durston; Easton; Easterbrook; Edwards(4); Ellis; Endacott; Evans; Ewings; Farley; Farrell; Fitzroy; Floud; Foot; Foote; Foss; Franks; French; Frost; Fry; Fryer; Furneaux; Gale; Galpin; Gater; Geen; Gibbings; Giddy; Gilbert; Gill; Gillard; Gilpin; Gorwyn; Goss(2); Gove; Gray; Green; Greenley; Gregory; Hall; Hallett(2); Hamlin; Hancock; Hansford; Hardinge; Harris(5); Harvey; Hatch; Hatcher; Hattin; Hawkins; Head; Heale; Heard; Hearne; Heathman; Heavens; Hepper; Hewish; Hill(4); Hilton; Hinchcliffe; Holdsworth; Holmes(2); Hooper; Horrell; Horton; Hoskins; Hurford; Huskin; Husson; Huxtable; Ireland; Isaacs(2); Jackson; Jefferd; Jerred; Jewell; Jordan; Jordon; Josland; Keeble; Kempe; Kensington; Keyse; Kingston; Kirby; Kite; Kneel; Knight; Knowles; Lacey; Lake; Lamacraft(2); Langdon(2); Langworthy; Lashbrook; Lear; Lee(2); Lennox; Ley(2); Littlejohn; Lloyd; Lock; Long(2); Longley; Luscombe; Lyne; Maddock; Madge; Martin; Maunder; McLees; Melhuish; Miller(3); Millman; Mills; Milton; Mitchell; Morgan(2); Morrish; Mortimer(2); Mortimore; Mountandon; Mudge; Napper(2); Newcombe; Newman; Norman; Norrish; Northcote; Northcott; Norton(2); Nott; Osmond; Packer; Paddon; Palfrey; Palmer; Paltridge; Parish; Parker(2); Parnell; Parsons; Pavey; Payne; Peadon; Perkins; Perriman; Perry(2); Phelps; Phillips; Pinder; Pinsent; Pollard; Pope; Portbury; Potter; Preston; Price(2); Prinn; Prout; Pyne; Quick; Radford(2); Ram; Raper; Reddaway; Reed(3); Rew; Reynolds(2); Rice; Richard; Ritson; Roberts; Robinson; Rodier; Rohrs; Rook; Rousall; Rowden; Rowe(2); Rowland; Rowsell; Salter; Sanders(2); Sandford; Savery; Scobling; Scott(2); Searle(2); Selley; Serle; Shapland; Shaw; Shepherd; Sherman; Short; Sintzenich; Skinner; Slade; Smallpiece; Smeath; Smith(2); Smullen; Snow(2); Soper(2); Southcott; Southwood; Sprague(2); Squire(2); Staddon(2); Stark; Stephens; Stokes; Stone; Stoneman(2); Stoyle; Tanton(2); Tarr(2); Tatham; Taverner; Taylor(4); Thomas(2); Tolhurst; Trickey; Trott; Tucker(3); Turner; Underhill(3); Upton; Velvion; Vidal; Vinnicombe; Vinson; Vivania (Viviani); Vodden; Voisey; Walters; Wannell; Ward(2); Ware(2); Waterfield; Watkins; Webber; Weeks; Wenley; West; Westcott; Whitborne; White(2); Whiteford; Wilding; Willcocks(2); Willey; Williams(3); Willis; Wilson; Withey; Wonnacott; Woodley(2); Wyatt; Yelland;

Wednesday 5 January 1881, Issue 6047 – Gale Document No. Y3200730655
EXETER – Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the Paper Makers' Arms Inn, Exe-lane, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of JOHN ROWDEN, a Maltster, of Cowick-street, who committed suicide by hanging himself that morning. From the evidence of the widow it appeared that the deceased was forty-eight years of age, and had worked as a Maltster in the winter, and as a gardener in the summer. Deceased had been working for Mr Salter, and she last saw him on the previous evening in the malt-house in Exe-street. On the Sunday evening he told her that he should be employed there the greater part of the night. It was unusual for him to work on Sundays, and she asked the reason of it. He replied that his work was rather behind. Deceased was generally a sober man, but his head had been in bad order for three or four years. He had been in the Hospital on account of a diseased bone in his nose. For the past three weeks he had been strange and excitable at home, and talked about his work. He had also complained of great pain in his nose. His landlord, Mr Knapman, had given deceased medicine, and had said that the disease in her husband's nose would work back to the brain. Miss A. Tucker, daughter of the landlord of the Paper Makers' Arms Inn, said that about nine o'clock on the previous evening the deceased came to the bar, and had half-a-pint of beer. She asked him why he was up there on a Sunday night, and he replied that he had come up to look round, and see that things were all right. He appeared to be quite sober, and she did not observe anything peculiar about him. Thomas Roberts, a porter, in the employ of Mr Salter, said that he was in the habit of going to the malt-house morning and evening to see to his horse. About twenty minutes after six o'clock that morning he went as usual, took out his horse, and cleaned the stable. He had occasion to go into the loft, and there saw deceased, who was in a standing position. Witness at first thought deceased was looking at something, but on going closer he found that he was hanging by the neck from a rope fastened to a beam. Witness cut the body down. Deceased was quite dead and cold. Witness informed deceased's brother, and afterwards his wife, and the police. Deceased had suffered from a disease in the nose, and had also complained of not being so well in his head since he had the fever about two years ago. Mr C. E. Bell, police-surgeon, stated that when he saw the deceased, the body was lying on the floor of the malt-house. The rope was still round deceased's neck, and ought to have been removed when he was cut down. He should think the man had been dead about two hours. The bones of the deceased's nose were to a great extent gone, and the disease might have affected his mind. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind." The widow is left with six children to maintain.

Wednesday 5 January 1881, Issue 6047 – Gale Document No. Y3200730674
TOPSHAM – A Ship's Captain Drowned. - An Inquest was held at the Lighter Inn, Topsham, last Thursday, before F. Burrows, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HORTON, captain and part owner of the ship Excelsior, of Goole, who was drowned on the previous Tuesday night by falling over the Quay, when going on board his vessel in the dark. Mr W. Dally, landlord of the Passage House Inn, said that he had known the deceased for the past thirty years. He left witness's house on Tuesday evening about twenty minutes past ten o'clock. He was sober at the time. JAMES HORTON, son of the deceased, aged twelve, said that when his father left the Passage House Inn they both proceeded to go on board their vessel, which was lying at the Quay. Witness called out to his mother to come and hold the ladder, which was hung over the side of the vessel. When his father mounted the ladder, it slipped, and he fell into the water. William Heard, fisherman, of Topsham, said he proceeded to the spot at the request of the last witness, and took the body out of the water. Dr Bothwell said that on the night in question he saw the body lying on the deck of the ship. Every means were taken to restore animation, but without avail. There was a wound on the head about three-and-a-half inches long. Witness was of opinion that the deceased received a heavy blow in falling and was suffocated by the water and mud. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The foreman and others expressed an opinion that lights ought to be placed on the Quay, as this was the second fatal accident that had taken place within a short space of time. The Jury on the former occasion made a like recommendation, in which Mr Crosse, the Coroner, heartily concurred, but no notice whatever had been taken of it by the authorities. A communication was addressed to the Railway Company for a light to be kept burning while ships were lying at the Quay, but some had been provided. As this was the second death, and as the accident might not have happened had there been a light, a Juryman thought that it was high time that something was speedily done. This view was warmly endorsed by all the Jury, whilst another juryman reminded the Coroner that two deaths had taken place at the station owing to the want of lights. Recommendations had been also made in those cases, but no notice had been taken of them. The Coroner observed that he had no power to order recommendations to be carried out, although they might have been made with perfect justice. No doubt this place was very dangerous, and something should be done in the shape of a light. It was stated that the Quay belonged jointly to the Exeter town Council, and to the Railway Company. The Coroner said that, after the expressions of the Jury, he would take upon himself to communicate with the Exeter Town Council upon the subject.

Wednesday 5 January 1881, Issue 6047 – Gale Document No. Y3200730660
ALLEGED MURDER OF A FARMER NEAR SOUTHMOLTON – Three Men Committed for Trial.
At Southmolton County Police Court on Saturday, before the Rev. J. Vowler Tanner (chairman), Rev. W. Thorold, Dr Hatherly, Mr J. Tanner Davy and the Rev. J. Bawden, three young men belonging to Kingsnympton were placed in the dock and charged with the wilful murder of RICHARD BUCKINGHAM, an aged farmer of Romansleigh. The prisoners are John Hulland, mason, Walter Leach, blacksmith, and William Symons, labourer. There was considerable excitement for more than an hour outside the Townhall, and some hundreds of people had assembled in the street to see the prisoners brought from the lock-up. Mr J. A. Thorne, solicitor, Barnstaple, appeared for Hulland. The first witness called was Mrs Lucy Bowden, wife of John Bowden, the owner and occupier of the New Inn at Kingsnympton, who deposed that five men of Romansleigh came to her house on Boxing-night with blackened faces, and sang some nigger songs. A great many people were there, and at ten o'clock she asked the policeman to clear the house. All left except the party of five from Romansleigh, who went into another room for their coals. While there a great noise and shouting took place, and threats were used by some Kingsnympton men, so much so that she sent for P.C. Blackmore, who escorted the Romansleigh men out of the house. About a quarter to half-an-hour after the body of the deceased was brought back and placed in her parlour. P.C. Blackmore deposed that he heard threatening language, the prisoner Symons being one who made use of it, and that he found the deceased lying in the road about a third of a mile from the public-house. He thought that deceased only breathed once after being lifted up. RICHARD BUCKINGHAM, son of the deceased, said he left the New Inn, as detailed by the previous witness, in company with four others, and overtook his father a little way out of the village. As he was walking along he heard someone behind say he would kill the first b….. he met. Witness told his father to go inside the hedge, and he ran on, but deceased said they would not hurt an old man like him. When about three or four land rods in advance he saw three men coming one after another; the first struck a blow, and his father fell. His father screamed, "Don't murder me, don't murder me." Andrew Crang, one of the party of "minstrels," gave similar evidence as to the threats. Dr Daly, of Chulmleigh, stated that he had made a post-mortem examination of the body. Death resulted from a blow on the head by a blunt instrument and not a fist. Mr Thorne did not address the Bench. The usual question and charge having being read, Hulland replied, "I am not guilty." Leach made a statement implicating the prisoner Hulland, and said that Hulland had promised him £5 or £10 if he would say nothing about it. Symons said, "I am not guilty." The Bench thereupon committed the prisoners for trial at the forthcoming Assizes. Symons asked for bail which was refused. The prisoners were removed to the county gaol at Exeter the same night.
THE INQUEST. - J. H. Toller, Esq., District Coroner, on Monday resumed and concluded the Enquiry into the circumstances which led to the death of RICHARD BUCKINGHAM. The Enquiry took place at the New Inn, Kingsnympton, and Superintendent Wood watched the proceedings on behalf of the police. The witnesses examined were the same that appeared before the magistrates. At the conclusion of the Enquiry, the Coroner pointed out the courses open to the Jury and explained the law to them. After about half-an-hour's deliberation the Jury found a verdict of 'Manslaughter' against John Hulland and they also believe that Symons and Leach were accessories before the fact.

Wednesday 12 January 1881, Issue 6048 – Gale Document No. Y3200730685
EXETER – Sudden Deaths. - On Wednesday last the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Fireman's Arms, West-street, touching the death of RICHARD SHERMAN, general dealer, aged 78, which occurred suddenly at his residence, No. 18, West-street, on the previous day. JOHN SHERMAN, an innkeeper, of Bridford, stated that the deceased was his father. The last time he saw him alive was on Friday, when he was in his usual health. His father had been, to his knowledge, a very sober man. ANN SMITH, the next witness, stated that deceased was her grandfather, and she had lived with him all her lifetime. Deceased was in his usual state of health until the 26th ult., when he complained of being poorly and went to bed, where he had remained for the most of his time till his death. At intervals, witness gave him a dose of salts and a little castor oil, but he refused to have anything to eat except a little broth with bread, and so continued until he expired on Tuesday morning about half past nine. She was his housekeeper, but called in no doctor, as he refused to have one. This witness gave her evidence in a very contradictory manner, and had frequently to be reminded by the Coroner that she was on her oath. Maria Smith, of Sherman's-court, was called about half past nine on Tuesday morning to go to MR SHERMAN. When she reached his room she found him lying on the floor, his head being supported by the last witness. She put him in bed, and gave him a few drops of wine, which he drank. Mr S. Perkins, surgeon, stated that he had known the deceased for a great many years, and was called on Tuesday morning, between nine and ten, to attend to him. When witness arrived he was quite dead. He examined the body and found no marks of violence, and it was his opinion that death had resulted from heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Natural causes" was recorded.

Mr Hooper on Monday held an Inquest at the Poltimore Inn, St. Sidwell's touching the death of ANN ELIZABETH WILLEY, which occurred suddenly at her residence, 33, Longbrook-street, on the previous Saturday night. Deceased was 48 years of age, and her husband, a shoemaker, said that up to within a fortnight she had always been well. After eating a hearty supper on Thursday night she was taken ill and suffered from violent spasms and vomiting until she died. Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, who was called in to attend the deceased about twelve o'clock on Saturday, said that he had no doubt that the deceased died from exhaustion, the result of vomiting and pain caused by strangulated hernia. If medical aid had been sought some hours earlier, probably life would have been saved. The disease was an extremely dangerous one. The death was a natural one. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 19 January 1881, Issue 6049 – Gale Document No. Y3200730735
AWLISCOMBE – At Awliscombe, near Honiton, on Monday, Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of MRS FRANKS, a widow, who had met with death on the previous day through a fall. Several members of the family had gone to church, and deceased had been to feed the pigs, and it is supposed she was returning to the house when her feet slipped on some ice and she fell forward on her face. The only person who saw the accident was a little boy scarcely six years old who had gone out with his mother. He states that she said "nothing" after she fell, from which it is assumed that death was instantaneous, as her neck was found to be dislocated. The husband of deceased was buried only six weeks ago on Sunday. Six young children are left orphans.

Wednesday 26 January 1881, Issue 6050 – Gale Document No. Y3200730769
COLYTON – Suicide. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Cox) on Thursday held an Inquest at the Colcombe Castle Hotel, touching the death of MISS POLLY WHITE, aged 35, daughter of MRS HANNAH WHITE, of Road Green Farm, Colyton, who was found dead, hanging by a rope in an outhouse, on the previous Monday morning. The deceased's mother, MRS HANNAH WHITE, stated that her daughter had been suffering from nervousness for some time past, and had been under the medical treatment of Dr Shapter, of Exeter. Some short time ago, deceased took a dose of laudanum, and then Dr O'Mears, of Colyton, attended to her, and from what deceased then said, she had been watched, as far as possible, ever since. On Monday morning one of the servants found the cellar door locked, and feeling suspicious as to her young mistress's safety, called one of the workmen on the farm, who knocked open the door with a crowbar, and there found deceased hanging by her neck from a beam. She had used a "cow-tie" and had slipped her head in the noose. Deceased was extricated immediately, and Dr O'Mears was sent for, who, upon arriving, pronounced life to be extinct. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that, deceased committed suicide whilst Temporary Insane.

Wednesday 26 January 1881, Issue 6050 – Gale Document No. Y3200730750
EXETER – Inquests. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the George and Dragon Inn on Wednesday, on the body of WALTER SYDNEY MOUNTANDON, aged four months, the son of a boot-finisher living at 25, Hampton-buildings. The child was one of twins, and had been sickly from its birth. Mr E. Domville expressed his opinion that, although every precaution had been taken by the parents, the child had not sufficient vitality to enable it to withstand the inclement weather. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Mr Hooper also held an Inquest the same day at the Valiant Soldier Inn upon the body of EVELYN GERTRUDE PALMER, aged eight months, the child of MR J. PALMER, residing in Magdalen-street, who died early on Tuesday morning. Mr E. S. Perkins, surgeon, said he considered death was caused by convulsions brought on by teething. – "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 2 February 1881, Issue 6051 – Gale Document No. Y3200730787
EXETER – Sad Fatality. - At the Topsham Inn, South-street, on Thursday, the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest on the body of EMILY WESTCOTT, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital under very distressing circumstances. The deceased was the daughter of a sawyer living in St. Thomas, and was at play with her brother, who was carrying her "pig-a-back," when she fell, and an umbrella stick which she held in her hand entered her throat When taken to the hospital the only injury that could be seen was a slight abrasion inside the lip, but the child could not swallow any food, and shewed symptoms of lung inflammation. She died a week after admission. A post-mortem examination shewed that there was a serious laceration of the food passage, in consequence of which nothing could pass into the stomach; and, according to Mr Cummings, the poor girl actually died of starvation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 2 February 1881, Issue 6051 – Gale Document No. Y3200730805
OKEHAMPTON – Death at a Dangerous Bridge. - An Inquest was held last Monday at the White Hart Hotel, before R. Fulford, Esq., District Coroner, on view of the body of MARIA CROCKER, who lost her life by falling from a footbridge into the river. The deceased was the daughter of a plumber, living in Rosemary-lane, and on Sunday afternoon she attended the Wesleyan Sunday School. After school the child went with a brother and a girl named Mary Furse, 16 years old, for a walk. They went down the Castle-lane, to where a footbridge crosses the West Okement beyond the Workhouse. This old bridge, which was erected by Mr S. Pike, the occupier of that portion of Okehampton Park, to connect his land with the main road, has lately been taken down, and preparations have been made for the erection of a stronger one. So far only a large square block of timber has been laid across, and when the children reached this they determined to walk over it. Mary Furze first crossed with the little boy, and then returned for the deceased. Mary Furze walked first, deceased holding by her jacket. When they reached the middle of the river deceased slipped on the water-soaked beam and fell into the water, pulling Mary Furze in with her. Owing to the recent thaw the river was running much higher than usual, and the deceased was carried by the current at a rapid rate over several natural weirs, and when she was picked out nearly ten minutes later, five hundred yards down, life was extinct. Mary Furze was rescued near where she fell in, by a man named Howard, but little the worse for her ducking. At the Inquest a question was raised as to wether the public have a right of way over the bridge. In summing up, the Coroner said he thought no blame could be attached to anyone for causing the death. But whether the bridge were private property or not, it was wrong to leave a plank like that open to the public, and without any guard rail. If the bridge continued to remain in that condition, he thought grave infliction would fall on anyone who was responsible. If the public had a right of way there, the plank should be guarded, and if they had not the entrance to the footbridge should be closed. It was stated that the public had a right, because the stepping-stones, which had been there as long as the oldest juror could remember, had been removed by the people who erected the bridge. Mr Geen, the agent for the Luxmoore Estate, on which the bridge is situated, took exception to some of the Coroner's remarks, and explained that the plank was only laid down as the foundation of a substantial bridge the day before the snowstorm, and as the snow had thawed he had on the day before the accident given workmen instructions to place rails on the following Monday. The bridge was erected for the tenants' accommodation alone, and, although he regretted the accident, he must say that the young people were trespassing The Foreman contended that they were not trespassing, as since the stepping-stones were removed the public had a right to cross on the bridge. Mr Geen explained that the stepping-stones remained where they always had been. The Coroner ultimately said if there were a dispute as to the right of way he would be the first to cross, as there was no doubt the public had a right to cross the river at that point. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 9 February 1881, Issue 6052 – Gale Document No. Y3200730838
EXMOUTH – Child Suffocated in Bed. - On Monday an Inquest was held at the Pilot Inn before the Deputy Coroner (Mr C. M. Cox) on the body of a child named PARKER. Last Saturday morning the mother woke up about seven o'clock and found the child dead. The father went for a midwife, and she, finding the child quite dead, communicated with Mr Ewen. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Ewen, and from his evidence it appeared that the child, only a week old, died from suffocation caused by sleeping too near the mother in an overcrowded bed. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 9 February 1881, Issue 6052 – Gale Document No. Y3200730836
EXETER – Horrible Discovery in St. Sidwell's. - Quite a sensation was created in Exeter on Thursday last by breaking open a tenement which had been occupied by a corpse for at least two months. The deceased was an elderly single man named NELSON PIPER BOWDEN, and he occupied one of three rooms in a house in Morgan's-court, the other two rooms being also let as separate tenements. Nothing had been seen of the old man for some time – it is said for two or three months; but not much notice was taken of his disappearance, as he was peculiar in his habits, always seemed to avoid observation in going and coming, and had on one or two previous occasions absented himself for weeks together and turned up all right. BOWDEN, the neighbours say, has before now gone away to Bristol, or some other city further north, for the purpose of visiting friends; and on his return has paid up the rent of his room, and resumed his old manner of life. This explains to some extent why no great anxiety was felt about him on the present occasion; but, looking at the horrible sequel, it is rather difficult to understand how the other inmates of the house did not find reason to make an earlier investigation of the poor old man's room.
An Inquest was held on the body at the Poltimore Inn, St. Sidwell's, on Saturday afternoon before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner.
Evidence as to the identity of the body was given by MR E. A. BOWDEN, tobacconist, of High-street, who deposed that deceased was his uncle, and must have been about 53 years of age. He was of no trade or business, as far as witness knew. Witness was not aware where deceased had been living of late, until informed of the discovery of the body. Witness knew really little about the deceased, and had not seen him for five or six months.
Mr William Morgan, dairyman, of St. Sidwell's, said the deceased occupied a room of his in Adelaide-place – sometimes called Morgan's-court. Deceased had lived in that room for many years, paying rent of 1s. 6d. a week. Witness had known him for forty years, and he believed that for thirty years of that time deceased had got his living by setting up the pins in skittle-alleys and occasionally playing himself. Witness had not seen him for many months past. Deceased was reserved in his manner. When witness last met him he might have just passed the time of day, but nothing more. Witness never went into the room occupied by the deceased, and did not believe anybody else had since he had been living there up till the discovery of the body. Witness understood that deceased would never enter the room when he saw anybody about the door in fact he seemed to take precautions against anybody seeing his room, and, indeed, none of the neighbours had ever been able to look into it. Deceased used generally to go away in the morning about ten and return late at night. Witness produced the deceased's rent-book, from which it appeared that BOWDEN sometimes paid his rent regularly by the week, and at others let it go by for several weeks together. Witness did not know that the deceased ever went away from the city for any length of time. The last time he paid any rent was on the 27th of November. He appeared to have paid pretty regularly for some time previous to that. Witness never asked him for the rent; deceased always came and paid it voluntarily. The rent paid on the 27th of November was handed to witness's wife. Witness had not seen him since, but was not much surprised at that, seeing that the deceased had on former occasions let his rent go back to the extent of eight weeks. In the course of conversation a little while ago witness's wife told him that she had heard the deceased had gone away to Reading, where he had obtained a situation as billiard-marker. A few nights ago witness's wife observed, "I wonder what has become of MR BOWDEN?" She added that she had seen nothing of him for some time. Upon this witness instructed one of his youths to get a ladder and look in at the window of the deceased's room. As they could not get a ladder they went and looked in at the keyhole of the door. This happened the night before last. His lad informed him that he could not discern what was in the room, but they thought the key was in the lock on the inside of the door. Upon that witness made enquiries next day of the deceased's friends, and, hearing that they knew nothing of him, he went to the police. Ultimately a young man named Lidster got a ladder and looked in at the window of the deceased's room. Lidster saw the deceased lying on his bed dead. He was much frightened at what he saw. Witness again communicated with the police and with MR BOWDEN, in High-street, the deceased's nephew. Deceased was a very eccentric man, avoiding all intercourse with his neighbours. There were two men and their wives occupying rooms on the same floor as the deceased's room was situated. These people never complained to witness of any smell coming from the room. In reply to a Juror as to whether no surprise was expressed by the neighbours at not seeing the deceased, witness said it was not to be wondered at because BOWSEN would often wait inside his room until the "coast was clear," so that he might get out unobserved. He was not missed by his friends from the skittle-alleys, because he had no friends particularly who would miss him.
John Lidster, a lad in the employ of Mr Morgan, said by direction of his master he, on the previous day, procured a ladder and looked in through the window of the deceased's room. He saw the deceased lying on the side of the bed with his legs hanging out over. Witness felt too much frightened to open the window. The door of the room was afterwards forced.
Mr Alfred Steele Perkins, surgeon, of St. Sidwell's, said he knew deceased by sight. About ten o'clock on Thursday morning witness was called to go to the house where the deceased lived. He went and was told there was a man lying dead there. He went up the ladder and looked in at the window, when he saw the deceased lying dead on the bed, with his legs crossed and hanging over the side. Deceased had a flannel shirt on, but no other clothing. Witness came down the ladder and with help broke open the door of the room, which was locked. On entering he found the room in a filthy condition and presenting an appearance of not having been inhabited for some time. On the bed at the extremity of the room lay the body. It was half on and half off the bed. The corpse was in a very decomposed condition. It was lying slightly on the left side with the right leg crossed over the left. The left hand was slightly extended over the edge of the bed. The bed was in places covered with mildew. The eyes were shrunken and wasted and quite gone from the sockets. There were several coats and trousers on the bed and by the side of the bed a pipe full of tobacco and some matches. By this time the police constable had arrived, and together witness and the policeman searched the room. They found about 6s. 10 ½d. In deceased's waistcoat and trousers pockets. They also discovered a piece of cheese, weighting about one ounce, and a small bit of bread. There were no other eatables and no drinkables in the room. The fire place seemed not to have been used for a very long time – it was stuffed up with rags. There were vermin on the clothes lying in the room. The body presented a very shrunken appearance, and the nails were black. It was a difficult question to answer as to how long deceased had been dead. The decomposition of the body much depended on the weather; and having regard to that and to the date when the deceased was last seen, witness should think he might have been dead at least two months. The recent coldness of the weather no doubt prevented any effluvia being noticed from the room. It was impossible to tell the actual cause of the death. There was nothing in the room to show that the deceased had made away with himself. The appearance of the body was consistent with a natural death. It would almost seem from the posture of the body as if the deceased had attempted to get out of bed and had fallen back. There were no marks of violence on the body Mr Bell, police surgeon, arrived while witness was examining the room.
In reply to a question, Mr Morgan said two old women lived in rooms above that occupied by the deceased, and in rooms on the same floor as that of deceased's lived four other people.
The Coroner observed that it was most extraordinary the deceased should have remained so long undiscovered, with people living close to the room in which he lay.
One of the Jury suggested that the house ought to be looked to by the Sanitary Inspector.
Mr Bell, one of the medical officers of the city, said the body would be immediately removed and the necessary steps would be taken as to the sanitary state of the house.
The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was "Found Dead," but how or by what means he met with his death there was no evidence to show.

Wednesday 9 February 1881, Issue 6052 – Gale Document No. Y3200730842
TOPSHAM – Sad Case of Drowning. - On Friday an Inquest was opened at the Salutation Inn, before the Deputy Coroner for this Division of the County (Mr Burrow), touching the death of MARTHA MAY BOUTCHER, aged 14, who se body was picked up in the river near the Turf House during the previous day. MRS E. L. BOUTCHER identified the body as that of her grandchild. She would have been fourteen in May, and had lived with her for the last eleven years. Just before eight on Tuesday night last witness sent her to the Post-office with two letters. The office was about two minutes' walk from her house. She anticipated that the deceased would return almost immediately, and as she did not do so she sent several persons to look for her. Nobody could find the deceased, but her scarf was afterwards brought home. Witness suspected that the deceased might have gone down near the water to see a little boy who had been staying on board the vessel Excelsior, at the Quay. The boy was called William James Horton, and was going away the next morning. Information was given to the police the same night, but the deceased could not be found. Men were also employed to watch if anyone left the vessel, as there were suspicions as to whether the deceased had been taken on board. The next day search was made, and the river was dragged. The deceased's hat was found in the Strand. On Thursday afternoon, about 4.30, the deceased's body was found near Turf, about a mile-and-three-quarters from the Quay. Deceased could have had no motive for throwing herself into the water. In reply to questions by the Jury witness said that the deceased had had no quarrel or misunderstanding with anyone. Witness had no reason to find any fault with the deceased, and she had never behaved otherwise than quite kind to her. WILLIAM ALFRED BOUTCHER, son of the last witness, said that he last saw the deceased alive on the previous Tuesday evening about 7.30 . He was present when she left the house to go to the Post-office. In consequence of her not returning witness went in search of her. He went to the Quay and inquired on board the ship Excelsior, but could get no tidings of her. Just as he was going away, a man named Pym gave witness the deceased's shawl, which he said he had found on the jetty. They afterwards went to the jetty, but could find no trace of the deceased. On the following day the deceased's hat was found in the outside dock. On Thursday, about 4.30, the deceased's body was found by a man named Valentine, a sailor on board the schooner Venus. Witness thought the deceased must have gone down near the water to see the boy Horton, who was staying on board the ~Excelsior. There had been no unpleasantness between the deceased and anyone. Witness could not form any idea as to how the deceased got into the water. He went on board the Excelsior to make enquiries about the deceased, and there was no objection made to his searching the vessel. Mr G. G. Bothwell, surgeon, Topsham, said he was called on Thursday evening to see the body of the deceased, which was lying at the Salutation Inn. He found a bruise on the nose, and blood was issuing from one nostril. The neck was red and swollen, and the upper portion of the arm red. About twelve o'clock that day he received the Coroner's order to make a post mortem examination, which he had only partly completed. He was not prepared to give a decided opinion as to the cause of death. His examination had led him to the conclusion that this was not a simple case of drowning, but there were certain symptoms of violence prior to the drowning, and he asked that the Inquest might be adjourned in order that the post mortem examination might be completed. It was resolved to her the other witnesses before the adjournment of the Inquiry. The next witness called was Henry Margery, a little boy, who said he lived at Topsham, and knew the deceased. On Tuesday night, about 7.30, he saw her walking by herself in the direction of the jetty. William Pym, waterman, of Torquay, stated that on Tuesday evening, about ten minutes to eight, he found the shawl produced on a handrail at the end of the jetty. It was hanging over the rail. He took it off and carried it about with him for about an hour. He was on the Main Quay just before nine o'clock, and heard inquiries being made for the deceased. He then gave the shawl to the deceased's uncle, WILLIAM ALFRED BOUTCHER, who was making inquiries, and he showed him the spot where he had found it. Witness did not see the deceased at all. The water at the end of the jetty was about five or six feet deep. Henry Valentine, sailor, on board the schooner Venus, said that he discovered the body of the deceased in the mud and water near Turf. Witness did not notice any marks of violence about it. Edith Swayne, a little girl, stated that on Tuesday, about six o'clock, she saw the deceased by the corner of the Quay. She asked witness to go on towards the vessel with her to wish Jem Horton good-bye. Witness refused to go, and left her on the Quay. The Coroner recommended that the Inquest should be adjourned to obtain further evidence, if possible, and also to enable the surgeon to form an exhaustive opinion on the case. Mr Ellis (a Juryman) said the case did not at present seem at all satisfactory. The Inquest was then adjourned until Tuesday.
The Deputy Coroner (Mr F. Burrow) resumed the Enquiry, at the same place, yesterday afternoon, when the following additional evidence was taken:
George Granville Bothwell, surgeon, recalled, said that since Friday last he had completed his post mortem examination. Upon opening the stomach he found no water. Although not constantly found, it was commonly present in cases of drowning. There was no water in the lungs and windpipe. The lungs were, however, much congested. There was very little mucous froth in the lungs or windpipe. The right side of the heart was congested and the liver greatly congested. He found nothing to confirm his first impression that the child had been criminally assaulted. The bruise on the face, coupled with the bleeding from the nose which considerably increased on moving the body for further examination, led him to the conclusion that the blow occurred during life. From the condition of the windpipe and lungs he was of opinion that the child was drowned immediately after receiving the blow.
To the Coroner: The blow was down the right side of the nose. In the corner of the right eye thee was more extravasation. There was also discoloration of the forehead. The blow was very marked and decided. It might have been caused by coming in contact with a boat, or by being washed against the pier, but he was satisfied that she was alive at the time. It might have been caused by her striking against a hard substance as she fell off the pier.
To the Jury: He did not consider that the blow caused the child's death, but it accounted for there being no water in the stomach, because if stunned by the blow she would not rise to the surface and make an effort to breathe. He could find nothing to confirm the conclusion at which he had arrived on the last occasion after a partial examination of the body. He did not think from the appearance of the skin that the blow could have occurred half an hour before the child came into the water. He believed that the blow must have been almost simultaneous with her coming into the water. The body had an unusually florid appearance which he thought might have been due to the blow. The mouth was tightly closed and the tongue perfectly natural. The swelling of the throat might have been caused by the tightness of the dress. Her clothes were not torn or disarranged.
It had been reported in the town that the child had said she should drown herself or do something to lead to the supposition that she was drowned if her grandmother continued to ill-treat her. Maud lee, a girl of fourteen, who had sent this rumour afloat, was examined, and admitted that she had said something to that effect, but she positively denied that deceased had ever made such a statement, or given any reason to believe that she was not well cared for and happy. The Coroner also examined another girl named Palmer, Mrs Horton, widow of the late master of the Excelsior, her son William, and a fisherman named Charles Wannell, but they were unable to give any evidence that would at all assist the enquiry.
Sarah West, a married woman, of Topsham, said she was called in on Thursday evening to help strip the body of the deceased. The clothes were very tight about her, but she did not notice anything peculiar. There was a mark on the right side of her nose and face. Some red marks about her body she thought were caused by the tightness of her clothes.
To a Juryman: The clothes were rather short for a girl of her size. She had said she would not have the clothes at a gift.
P.C. Mansfield stated that he went down to the jetty at about nine o'clock on Tuesday last week. After remaining there some time he went to the uncle of the deceased to make enquiries. He then went back to the jetty and remained searching for the body until about one o'clock. He then went with the uncle on board the
Excelsior, and after that continued the search. On Thursday afternoon, about four o'clock, the body was brought to the place where it was still lying. On searching the body he found a letter from the girl's mother, a penny, and other articles which he produced. He immediately sent for Dr Bothwell to examine the body.
To the Jury: The body had been deposited at an inn because the uncle said he had not sufficient accommodation for it at his house.
To the Coroner: It was at the instance of the uncle that the body had been taken to a public house. He said that was the best thing to do with it.
The Jury, after a short consultation, returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 16 February 1881 – Issue 6053 – Gale Document No. Y3200730857
EXETER – A Miserable End. - At the City Workhouse on Saturday, W. H. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of AMELIA VIVANIA, single, aged 42, daughter of a once well-known Italian dealer in statuary casts, who had died under very distressing circumstances. Deceased had worked as a charwoman, but had been ill at intervals for two or three years, having been treated by the parish doctor for heart disease Since Wednesday the 2nd instant, she had kept her room, and would suffer no one to come near her. On Tuesday, the 8th, a neighbour named Jane Burnett opened her door, and on seeing that she was very dirty, represented the case to Mr Hookway, relieving officer, who gave her an order on Mr Bell, the medical officer of the Guardians. The order was not presented to Mr Bell until the following day, and not being marked "urgent" another day passed before Mr Bell saw the deceased. He then ordered her immediate removal to the Workhouse. The poor woman, who was in a deplorable condition from dirt and neglect, was attended the same evening by Mr Woodman, the house surgeon, but she died next morning Mr Woodman was of opinion that death resulted from heart disease, accelerated by want of nourishment and care before her removal to the Workhouse. Mr C. E. Bell said he had attended deceased for heart disease and dropsy in the autumn, when she was in receipt of relief from the Guardians. She was then clean and comfortable. On the 10th instant, however, her condition was very bad, but there was plenty of food in the room. He inferred that the case was not a serious one when the order was brought him, inasmuch as it was dated the previous day, and was not endorsed "urgent". The Coroner said it was unfortunate the forty-eight hours should have elapsed between the granting of the medical order and the visit of the medical man, but he did not see that wilful neglect could be attributed to anyone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and exonerated Mr Bell from blame.

Wednesday 23 February 1881, Issue 6054 – Gale Document No. Y3200730893
EXETER – Sudden Death. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest at the Axminster Inn, Paris-street, touching the death of THOMAS WARD, aged 64, a waiter, lately residing in Upper Eaton-place. JANE ELIZABETH WARD said that her father had been ailing for some time past, and he had recently been under homeopathic treatment. He went to church on Sunday morning and had a hearty dinner on returning home. He seemed in his usual health until early that morning, when he was taken very ill, but he would not have a doctor called in. As he did not get better she subsequently sent for Mr Perkins, but her father died before he arrived. She had seen her father in apparently worse condition, and she thought that there was nothing serious the matter with him. Mr Alfred S. Perkins said that about 6.30 a.m. that morning he was summoned to go to see the deceased. He found him dead, but the body was warm. He believed the cause of death to be heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Melancholy Suicide. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Paper Maker's Arms Inn, Exe-street, last Saturday, on the body of SOPHIA NAPPER, wife of HENRY WALTER NAPPER, an engine-driver on the Great Western Railway, who drowned herself while in a state of unsound mind on Friday last. The deceased, who was 29 years of age, lived with her husband at No. 12, Exe-street, and it would seem that she was enceinte, and had been for some time past very depressed in spirits. She had said to her father, who resided with her, that she would go down to Double Locks and get rid of herself, and as she had, on the occasion of her second confinement, been in a similar state of mind, and subsequently attempted to poison herself, precautions were taken to prevent any mishap. For that purpose a sister of MR NAPPER'S had been in the house of late, and had slept with the deceased. About three o'clock on Friday morning MR NAPPER left home to go to work, and wishes his wife good bye as he went out. Deceased was then in bed with his sister. Soon after five o'clock the deceased's father, MR FOOTE, went to her room to see that all was right, and missed her. Search was immediately made, and it finally resulted in the discovery of the body of the deceased against the grating of Messrs. Tremlett's mills. The deceased must have got up while her companion was asleep, and having partly dressed, gone direct to the leat in which she was found. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind."

Wednesday 2 March 1881, Issue 6055 – Gale Document No. Y3200730929
CULLOMPTON – Suicide of a Boy. - F. Burrow, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest at Mr Rew's, Hayne Barton, on view of the body of REUBEN TRICKEY, a lad aged 15 years, found dead in his master's hay loft at an early hour the same morning. Deceased was at his parents' house on Sunday afternoon, and returned to his employer's (Mr Rew) between five and six o'clock, after which time he was not again seen alive. His master, on discovering about nine o'clock that he was not in the house, though he was gone again to Cullompton, and that in consequence of the snow falling his parents had pressed him to remain the night. A workman named Hart on going to a loft early the next morning, found the body lying on the floor, face upwards, underneath a chaff cutter, with his head partly down the hole through which the chaff falls – about eighteen inches by fourteen, with a string with a noose round his neck, and the weight of the chaff-cutter – 29 lb – tied to the other end, hanging through the hole three or four feet. This, of course, caused strangulation, his neck, according to medical testimony at the Inquest, being dislocated. The Jury found a verdict "That deceased committed suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

Wednesday 2 March 1881, Issue 6055 – Gale Document No. Y3200730927
AN EXETER SOLICITOR DROWNED. - A painful feeling was created in the city on Monday morning by the news that MR R. W. HEAD, solicitor, had been found drowned in the Brook at Alphington, on the previous Sunday afternoon. The deceased had been living with his father, MR R. T. HEAD, at the Briars, Alphington, and left the house soon after eleven o'clock on Sunday morning. Nothing more was seen of him alive, and between one and two o'clock his body was found lying face downwards in the brook which runs at the extremity of his father's garden. The deceased was educated at Cambridge, where he took an M.A. degree, and he was admitted a solicitor in 1856. He leaves a widow and several young children. Much sympathy is felt for the family, and particularly for the father of the deceased whose state of health has for some time been the cause of much anxiety.
The Inquest was held yesterday morning, before F. Burrow, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the Briars, Alphington. Mr Edward Maxwell Brownlow was elected foreman of the Jury. Mr B. C. Gidley, solicitor, watched the proceeding on behalf of the family.
Henry Arthurs, gardener at the Briars, was first called. He stated that he knew the deceased well, having been in MR R. T. HEAD'S service six months. On Sunday morning about quarter past eleven o'clock, witness saw deceased in the grounds belonging to the Briars, near the brook. There was nothing unusual in his manner or appearance; he was walking about just as witness had often seen him before. At half-past one witness was called by Colonel Trevelyan, who told him that the deceased was in the brook. He at once went with the Colonel to the spot indicated, and saw the deceased lying at the side of the stream, with the legs and part of the head covered with water. He was quite dead.
The Coroner: Might anyone have slipped into the brook accidentally while passing at this place?
Witness: I can hardly tell that I went and called George Greaves, who helped me to carry the body into the house.
Mr Gidley: Where did you get into the water to help out the body?
I went in below the "trunk" (an irrigation aqueduct) and walked up.
To the Coroner: The bank is high on both sides, at the spot where the body was found.
To Mr Gidley: The body was lying on the face and hands.
To the Jury: At the time he saw MR HEAD in the morning, he was walking about in the snow. He was not facing the Brook. Could not say whether he fell in or not.
A Juryman stated that there was a deep "hole" in the Brook very near the spot in question.
Colonel Harrington Astley Trevelyan said: The deceased was a relative of my wife's; I had known him since last August, since which time I had been constantly in communication with him, especially during the last month. I have been staying at The Briars for several days. I last saw deceased alive about five minutes to eleven on Sunday morning, in a sitting-room upstairs. I remarked nothing in him but what I had during the last month. I left the room to get some postage stamps, remarking that I would come back and smoke a pipe with him, to which he replied, "all right." I was absent about a quarter-of-an-hour, and when I returned he was not there. Shortly afterwards MRS ROBERT HEAD came into the room, and asked me if I had seen her husband. I told her that about twenty minutes ago he was in the room. She then mentioned that he had been seen to pass out by the back door, with his hat on, and an umbrella in his hand. It was thought likely that he had gone into Exeter to get a deed I was anxious to see; and at the request of MRS HEAD, who seemed very anxious, I went in to his office, in Exeter, to look for him. I traced footsteps which I believed to have been his as far as the turnpike road. There was no sign of deceased having been at his office, as the snow before the door had not been trodden. When I returned, MRS HEAD told me her husband had not come back. I went out to follow up the track I had traced. After some examination in the neighbourhood, I went over a style, across the field, and towards the stream. Seeing no signs of his footmarks, I thought to cross the stream, and made for what I imagined to be a bridge, but which proved to be the aqueduct referred to by the last witness. While looking for a crossing-place, I saw the deceased lying on the opposite side of the brook. I then called for Arthurs, and we took the body out. It appeared to be quite dead, but I adopted what steps I could think of to endeavour to restore animation, and sent off a mounted messenger for Dr Cumming, who arrived shortly afterwards, and pronounced life to be extinct. With regard to the position of the body, I think it was more covered with water than the last witness has described. There was a fresh bruise or dent on the forehead. The water at that spot was three feet deep. The whole of the face and the ears were under water. Deceased'[s watch was going when we took him into the house. It was twenty minutes to one. I looked around on the bank for footmarks. There was one track, seemingly caused by a man's heel; it was rather long, as though the person had slipped down the bank.
To Mr Gidley: I have been mixed up with the deceased in business matters. The business of late seemed quite to unhinge him for anything else. His father has not been able to attend to business for many weeks, so that the deceased had not only his own business but that of his father as well to take charge of. He was secretary of the West of England Compressed Peat Company. There has been a general meeting of the company in London, and a Committee of Inspection was appointed. Preparations for this inspection took up the whole of his time for the last fortnight, to the detriment of his other business.
Mr Gidley: I think he felt keenly certain remarks made by one or two shareholders at that meeting? - He felt very keenly indeed the remarks of certain shareholders regarding the management of the company, remarks which were quite unfounded. It was the constant subject of his conversation with me.
You are the chairman of the company? - I am now.
And I believe there is no ground whatever for impugning his administration of the company as secretary? - Not as far as I can judge. In fact, everything he has charge of in connection with the company is in perfect order, and the accounts perfectly correct.
Have you observed a change in his demeanour and appearance recently? - Yes, a very great change.
When you say in your evidence in chief that he appeared as usual, you mean as he usually appeared of late? As usual during the last month. He has been restless and subject to melancholy. His mind never seemed to be settled on any given thing, and he was always fancying somebody had imputed things against his honour.
He was exceedingly sensitive upon the point of his honour, I believe? - Yes, very sensitive.
Had you noticed any alteration lately as to his countenances and general appearance? - I often noticed a hectic flush in the face.
Anything like al rushing of blood to the head? - Very much like that. I have seen him fidgeting about his collar, as if to obtain relief from a sense of suffocation – as though he suffered from an apoplectic tendency.
In your judgment, was he on Sunday morning last answerable for his actions? - I should think not. We were rather looking after him I did not care for him to be out of my sight, and we had had some talk about calling in a doctor.
You mentioned that you noticed a blow on his forehead? - Yes on the left eye-brown.
Might he not have been endeavouring to cool his head by bathing, and slipped in? - His body was quite under the water. He might have had a fit and fallen in.
I suppose if he had slipped his foot on the bank and fallen in, he would have fallen in a similar position to that in which he was found? - Yes.
His position is compatible with the idea that he might have been tipped head foremost into the water? - Yes.
Mr Walter Rawleigh Trevelyan said: I am the brother of MRS HEAD, deceased's widow. I have known deceased from childhood; we were boys together I last saw him alive on February 9th, in London, on the occasion of the Peat Company's meeting. He was in a very miserable state of mind indeed. He told me it was in connection with certain slanderous reports which had reached him – accusations of an unfounded character made against him by a director of the company. He seemed to be altogether in an unsettled and restless state. His mind seemed to be very much unhinged, and he had constant rushes of blood to the head. He complained of a stifling sensation, and often took off his collar; in fact, he frightened me so much that I thought he was going to have an attack of apoplexy. I kept him in sight the whole of that day, and saw him off from Paddington.
The Coroner: Is there anything else you wish to state?
Witness: Yes. One evening, while he was in town, we took him against his will to a concert, to try and change the tenor of his thoughts. After the concert we went to the house of a gentleman, a friend of mine, and just as supper was commencing I observed this flushing in his throat and neck, the neck seemed puffed out, and a bluish tint spread over his face. I advised him to eat slowly and not take anything to drink. He followed my instructions. Soon after he left the room; and I followed him. I had noticed the tendency of blood to the head, and knew what it meant, having suffered from it myself some years ago. I had some Cockle's pills with me, and I gave him three, as I thought he was going to have a fit. I then got him home He walked fairly well, but his head and neck were frightfully flushed. On reaching home, I gave him a strong dose of Eno's Fruit Salt, which seemed to revive him in about ten minutes. Next morning he told me that I had probably saved his life. Still the tint had not visibly gone down. I took him for a walk of four or five miles, thinking it would do him good. He expressed great unwillingness to walk; but the exercise and air seemed to do him good, and he became calm and collected. The day I saw him off he complained bitterly of his honour having been impugned; and he declared most indignantly that the facts of the case would not warrant any supposition for a moment that he had not everything in clean hands. I think those were his last words to me. He used to be a man of very clear head, and was celebrated as an Alpine climber, being able to climb great heights without the least dizziness. Since this pressure of business came, and these unfounded and calumnious accusations were made, he became melancholy and sedentary in his habits. I cautioned him against it, telling him to take exercise; but he would complain that he had the whole of the business on him now, not having any assistance from his father. Witness added that one evening while smoking, deceased went off into a dead stupor and slept two or three hours, though he had taken nothing stronger than two or three glasses of claret. He believed deceased had eaten nothing the whole of the day on which this occurred. Witness used to scold him for neglecting his food. He had eaten no breakfast for some time past, taking nothing until luncheon time. Witness had always considered him to be of an apoplectic tendency. They were playmates when boys; and witness, having no brother of his own, looked upon him as one, and took great interest in him.
Mr Arthur James Cummings, M.D., of Exeter, stated that on Sunday last he was sent for to go to the Briars, and arrived there about half-past two. He found the deceased wrapped in blankets in front of the kitchen fire. The body was dead; rigidity had set in. There was an indented mark on the forehead, as if the head had lain on a stone, but the skin was not broken. The body presented the usual appearance of death by drowning, and with the exception of the small mark already described there were no signs of violence. In all probability death was caused by drowning even if there had been a rush of blood to the head. If there had been a rush of blood to the head it might have made him insensible, but undoubtedly the cause of death was drowning. He could not possibly express an opinion as to whether or not that really occurred. He had noticed latterly, when he had seen the deceased, that he appeared to be inordinately flushed, and not in his usual spirits.
The Rev. J. Ingle, M.A., Rector of St. Olave, Exeter, said he had known the deceased for thirty-six years. Deceased had done business for him, and till lately he had always found him very clear and collected, and a very good man of business. Generally saw him three or four times a week, up to and including last week. Lately he had been grieved to see a great change in him, and had spoken of it. Mr Ingle mentioned one or two instances in which the deceased's manner had been strangely in contrast with what it was formerly. Other people had told witness they had noticed the same kind of thing in him quite recently.
Mr Gidley said he should like to have the deceased's clerk examined, as the suggestion had been made that the deceased had money troubles, which was not the case.
Mr George W. Couch, examined by Mr Gidley, said: I have been MR HEAD'S clerk for nine years. Lately I have observed a very great alteration in his mental condition and his demeanour. I met him in London on the Sunday before the Peat Company's meeting. He was very much altered from what he had been when he left Exeter on the previous Wednesday. He has not been the same man since.
Q. – I believe you considered his mind was unhinged?
A. – Oh very much.
Q. – I believe he had been manager of the Brunskill Estates as Receiver for the Court of Chancery?
A. – Yes, for many years.
Q. – And he has lately passed his account as Receiver?
A. – I had his account down yesterday.
Q. – I understand there were no pecuniary difficulties of any kind whatever?
A. – None whatever; in fact, I made up his books on Saturday, the last thing before he left, including his own private cash book.
Q. – And he had a considerable balance on his private account?
A. – Yes both on his private and on his business account.
To the Coroner: I heard everything that transpired at the meeting. It is a fact that various charges were made against MR HEAD as to mismanagement, and he seemed to feel it very much. In fact he called me over to him in the midst of the meeting, and asked me if I didn't think it very hard that such charges should be made against him. He also asked me if I was called upon whether I could not state that the books were kept perfectly straight. I said of course I could, because I had kept them myself.
The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, pointed out that the question of sanity or insanity did not arise, inasmuch as there was no evidence as to how the deceased got into the water.
A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned and the Jury expressed their sympathy with the family.

Wednesday 2 March 1881, Issue 6055 – Gale Document No. Y3200730919
SUICIDE OF AN EXETER HOTEL-KEEPER. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Eq.) on Friday assembled a Jury at the Globe Hotel, Cathedral-yard, to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of the landlord, MR CHARLES LANGDON, which occurred the same morning from the effects of a fall out of an upper window into the courtyard in the interior of the hotel.
Mr Henry Brewster was the first witness called. He said deceased, who was his son-in-law, was forty-two years of age. He had for some time been under medical treatment, and on Thursday night, at MRS LANGDON's request, witness remained at the Globe. Witness believed the deceased was out of his mind, and in consequence he remained with him in his bedroom during the night. Deceased retired about twelve o'clock, and talked very incoherently. About two o'clock he got up and dressed himself, saying there were people both in and out of the room. Witness objected to deceased leaving the room, but he persisted in his efforts and kept walking in and out of the room until half-past four. About that time a servant called witness, and said she had heard a noise in the square below as if something had fallen from the window. Witness went out and knocked at the door of a bedroom occupied by a Mr Johnson, and, with that gentleman, went downstairs and saw deceased lying on his back on the paved court below, groaning, and saying he should die, and grinding his teeth. They loosened deceased's garments, put a pillow under his head, and sent the billiard-marker and under-boots to the Guildhall for assistance, and also to Mr Bell and Mr Moon. Both gentlemen arrived in a short time, but before they came deceased had expired. Deceased had given himself up to drink for the last few years. He was subject to epileptic fits, and had one on Christmas day. He then went into Somerset for change of air, and came back much improved in health, but he then renewed his drinking habits, and witness believed his last illness was due to this. In the passage leading to the deceased's bedroom was a window which was at a considerable height from the ground. Near this window at the time was a pair of steps and a board, left there by the painters, who had been at work in the house. In his walk backwards and forwards deceased would have to pass this window. Witness did not hear any noise until he was called by the servant. His belief was that deceased did not go out of the window at all, but that he went downstairs and fell in a fit. He had on the night previous gone downstairs and broken open the bar door.
Before any further evidence was taken the Jury paid a visit to the landing spoken of and examined the window there. The height above the courtyard was about thirty feet. The window was some distance above the floor. It opened as a door, and was only just wide enough for a man to force his body through.
Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he was called by P.C. Webber at five o'clock that morning, and was told that MR LANGDON had jumped out of the window. He dressed immediately, arrived at the Globe at ten minutes past five, and found the deceased lying in the Courtlage upon his back. He had just died. Witness made an examination of the body, but did not then find any marks of violence or any foam coming from the mouth, nor was there any appearance of a struggle. He suggested that if the deceased had fallen out of the window he must have come out backwards. He then had the body removed to the coffee-room, where he stripped it. He then found a bruise on the lower part of the spine, and the pelvis completely smashed in on the right side. There was a slight bruise on the head – nothing important. It must have been a very heavy fall, and from a considerable distance, to cause such a fracture; the pelvis was smashed in two, and the leg was quite free. No doubt the internal injuries were very severe.
To a Juror: No such injury to the pelvis could result from an ordinary fall whilst a man was walking. There were no indications of a fit, nor was such a thing suggested at the time witness was called. The concentration of the injury in this one spot was quite consistent with a fall from a height; the man would, of course, fall on one spot, and there would be the greatest injury.
Susan Tozer, a waitress, said she slept on the same landing as the deceased. At quarter-past four she heard MR LANGDON come out of his bedroom, after which she heard a struggle against the steps and the window fly open, and then MRS LANGDON'S bedroom bell rang. She did not hear anything more of MR LANGDON. Subsequently saw that the steps were leaning against the bell-wire from MRS LANGDON'S room.
P.C. Webber said about ten minutes to five that morning he was called from the Guildhall by the billiard-marker of the Globe and requested to come to the Hotel, as MR LANGDON had fallen out of the window. He found MR LANGDON lying in the Courtlage with a pillow under his head, breathing very hard. Witness asked Mr Brewster if a doctor had been sent for, on which the latter replied that his surgeon, Mr Webb, was ill, but they were going to send for his partner, Mr Moon. Witness suggested that they should send for Mr Bell. Mr Brewster assented, and witness ran for the surgeon. On their return MR LANGDON was quite dead. Mr Bell was there about ten minutes before the other doctor arrived.
Mr John Moon, surgeon, said he had for some time been in attendance upon the deceased, who had been suffering from excessive use of alcohol – it first produced sickness, and subsequently the ordinary symptoms of delirium tremens. That morning witness was called; he dressed immediately and went to the hotel. To his surprise he found that Mr Bell had been sent for previously. On arrival he had the body removed to the coffee-room. Deceased was quite dead. From the evidence given by Mr Bell as to the fracture of the pelvis there could be no doubt that deceased had had a severe fall – something beyond the ordinary fall of a man walking. He should, however, have expected to have found a more severe injury from a fall from the window that had been indicated.
In answer to a Juryman, Mr Bell said he was not surprised at finding that there were no further injuries than those he had spoken of, for they were very severe; he knew of three cases in which men had fallen from greater heights, and had not sustained so much injury as the deceased; one of these men fell from the roof of the Cathedral, and another from the top of the Hospital.
Mr Moon, after he had finished his evidence, said he thought it most unfair that Mr Bell had been called in by the police, as the nearest surgeon should have been sent for. He said he mentioned this because twice within a week the police had called on Mr Bell to attend upon persons who were the patients of Mr Webb and himself; there was the case in which a woman drowned herself, and now there was this case. He did not think this was fair. In cases of this kind, the nearest surgeon should be sent for. If the nearest surgeon had been sent for in the present instance he would probably have arrived in sufficient time to have been able to see whether or not the deceased was suffering from a fit.
The Coroner remarked that the Act gave the Coroner the right to call a surgeon to his aid, but he fo0und that in nearly every case the police fixed on a surgeon, which was usurping the authority vested in him.
The Chief Constable (Captain Bent) complained that the Coroner should reprimand the police.
The Coroner said he had done no such thing, but Captain Bent persisted in saying that he had, and eventually the Coroner requested him to leave the room.
Captain Bent then left, exclaiming that the Coroner had reprimanded the police.
A Juryman reminded the Coroner that the police had been sent for in this case, and that Mr Bell was the surgeon to the force. To another Juryman this appeared to be the proper course for the constable to adopt, it being well-known that many doctors would not turn out of bed in the middle of the night for chance cases of this kind.
Mr John Martin, connected with the Public Record Office of the City of London, said he was staying in the Hotel. He was awakened between four and five that morning by someone walking about. He did not take much notice of this as he knew the state in which deceased was. A short time afterwards he heard a fall, and on looking out of one of the windows of the room in which he slept he saw MR LANGDON lying in the court-yard. He went down with Mr Brewster. Witness corroborated Mr Brewster's evidence, and added that MR LANGDON'S hat, which was a hard felt one, was lying near the door of the passage leading into South-street. It was unbroken, and lay in the same position as it would have been if deceased had fallen backwards whilst walking. His opinion was that deceased did not fall from the window. He came to this conclusion from the position in which deceased was lying.
The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind", in which verdict the Coroner said he entirely concurred.

Wednesday 2 March 1881, Issue 6055 – Gale Document No. Y3200730926
EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at Lamacraft's Globe Inn, on Monday evening, touching the death of JOHN HUSKIN, a retired baker, eighty years of age, who passed away very suddenly on Sunday evening at his residence, Lethbridge Cottages, Parr-street. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said that he had attended the deceased professionally for about two years. He saw him last about two months ago, when he was suffering from rheumatism in his knee and heart disease. He was called to see him again on Sunday evening, but before he arrived life was extinct. Death resulted from failure of the action of the heart. The jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 9 March 1881, Issue6056 – Gale Document No. Y3200730957
Bradlaughism and Suicide - EDITH RAPER, 32, the daughter of a former captain of the 29th Regiment, committed suicide at Devonport in the early part of last week by taking vermin killer, which she procured so long ago as December. For nearly twelve months she had been unsettled about religious questions. She gave up her class at a Sunday school, and one evening handed the Rev. Pitt Johnson, incumbent of St Aubyn's Church, a packet of Mr Bradlaugh's tracts, saying, "There are the cause of all my trouble." On the first Sunday in February she attended the celebration of the Holy Communion, but refused to take the wine, and afterwards returned the consecrated bread to Mr Johnson by the Biblewoman. Mr Johnson wrote her a letter saying he was extremely grieved at her conduct, and that until she professed repentance for such a gross act he must forbid her approach to the Holy Table. At the Inquest on Tuesday the Jury returned a verdict of "Unsound Mind."

Wednesday 16 March 1881, Issue 6057 – Gale Document No. Y3200730993
EXETER – Died in Prison. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Cox) held an Inquest at Her Majesty's Prison, Exeter, on Wednesday last, touching the death of GEORGE GRAY, which took place in the prison the previous Monday. At the assizes in January the deceased was sentenced to six months' imprisonment, after a previous conviction, for stealing a coat in Exeter. He was 62 years of age, and was formerly in the 61st Regiment. The Governor of the Gaol (Mr Cowtan), and the medical officer (Mr Caird) gave evidence that the deceased had been on the sick list ever since his admission to the Prison, and died through a break-up of the constitution. Verdict accordingly. The Coroner explained that it was his duty to hold an Inquest upon every person that died in prison.

Wednesday 23 March 1881, Issue 6058 – Gale Document No. Y3200731046
MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Inquest. - On Thursday Mr Francis Watts, the Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Ring of Bells Inn, on the body of MR WILLIAM UNDERHILL, a carpenter, of Chagford, who met his death through being thrown out of a trap in which he was riding home from the Moreton market on the previous Tuesday. The Enquiry, which lasted nearly four hours, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased, who was greatly respected, was buried at Chagford on Friday, in the presence of a large number of friends.

Wednesday 30 March 1881,Issue 6059 – Gale Document No. Y3200731081
EXMINSTER – Suicide. - A female attendant at the Exminster Asylum, named HARRIET REED, about forty years of age, who had been in a desponding state of mind, left the establishment on Wednesday evening and was seen no more alive. As no tidings could be obtained of the deceased's whereabouts, the Canal was dragged by two men, lumpers of Exeter, named Thomas Keen and Samuel Hutchings, and on Saturday morning, about nine o'clock, they recovered the body just below the Countess Weir draw-bridge. It was at once conveyed to the Stowey Arms, at Exminster, where on Thursday Mr Coroner Burrows will hold an Inquest.

Wednesday 30 March 1881,Issue 6059 – Gale Document No. Y3200731059
EXETER – Fatal Accidents. - F. Burrow, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Buller's Arms Inn, Exwick, on the body of ELIZABETH HEARD, an elderly woman, who died last Wednesday night from the effects of an accident she met with on the night of the 12th instant. She was returning home from Exeter market in a trap with her husband and a woman named Weeks. The road at the railway crossing was blocked, and her husband drove up the line a short distance to cross in front of the goods train which blocked the way. The pony tripped in the metals and shied, causing the deceased to fall out of the trap. The pony became restive, and kicked the deceased in the forehead as she lay upon the ground. Her leg was also fractured; but Mr Moon, surgeon, said in his opinion the immediate cause of death was a fracture of the skull. Verdict: "Accidental Death."

On Saturday evening the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at Yendell's Spirit Vaults, on the body of a mason's labourer, named JOHN JOSEPH STARK, of Heavitree, aged twenty-eight years. Deceased had been employed with others in constructing an oven for Mr Tucker, baker, of Holloway-street. The oven was 8ft. by 10 ft. in size, and the arch only had a spring of five inches. As the sides of the oven were built it was filled in with rubble, and the arch which was also supported by props, built over it. Over the arch concrete a foot thick was laid. About ten o'clock on Friday evening, the oven being finished, they began to remove the core or rubble. It had been nearly all got out, and about half-past twelve o'clock the deceased entered the oven to take his share of the work. As he did so he must have knocked away one of the props, upon which the roof fell in. It was not intended that the props should be removed, but that they should be burnt out. Deceased was extricated in about five minutes, but was then dead. Mr Edward S. Perkins said he was called to see the deceased at a quarter past one that morning. He found that he had received a wound over his left eye, and extensive injuries to his spine, causing paralysis of the nerve supplying the organs of respiration, which was the cause of death. There was also a fracture of the base of the skull. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 6 April 1881, Issue 6060 – Gale Document No. Y3200731114
DAWLISH – Fatal Accident to a Waggoner. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at Ashcombe, by F. Burrow, Esq., District Coroner, on view of the body of JAMES FARLEY, aged fifty-five, a carter, in the employ of Mr French, farmer, of Ashcombe, who died under the following circumstances: On the 24th inst. FARLEY was driving along the Ashcombe-road with a cart containing a plough, the property of his master, when, from some cause, the horse bolted, and the deceased, having but one arm, lost all control over the animal. The result was that the waggon capsized, and the plough was smashed to pieces. The deceased was subsequently discovered dead under the implement. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 6 April 1881, Issue 6060 – Gale Document No. Y3200731099
SUDDEN DEATH IN ST. THOMAS. - F. Burrow, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Buller's Arms Inn, Alphington Street, St. Thomas, last Friday, on the body of an elderly man, named ISAAC SMITH, who died suddenly at his lodgings, in Alphington-street, the previous Wednesday evening. The deceased was formerly the proprietor of the beer-house known as the Royal Oak Inn, St. Thomas, and following the trade of a brick-layer. After leaving the Inn he lodged with Mr J. Sweet, butcher, of Alphington-street, where he was taken ill on Wednesday evening, and expired before medical assistance could be obtained. It appeared that he was a married man, but did not live happily with his wife, who left him on the previous Monday night He had failed in business, and had had some trouble. Mr R. J. Andrews, surgeon, was called just before eight o'clock on Wednesday night to see the deceased and on his arrival found that the man was dead. There was nothing to indicate the cause of death, and no marks of violence upon the body, except a small bruise upon the left arm. The body presented the usual appearances of death from natural causes. He thought the death might be traced to the want of proper food, neglect of himself, and the effects of drink, and considered it possible that the deceased might have suffered from heart disease, which, taken with the other circumstances, would be sufficient to account for death. The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was found dead, that no marks of violence appeared on the body, but that there was no evidence before them to show by what means death had been caused.

Wednesday 13 April 1881, Issue 6061 – Gale Document No Y3200731135
EXETER – Fatal Accident. - At the Globe Inn, Newtown, yesterday afternoon, the City Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest on the body of EMILY AMELIA PORTBURY, aged eighteen. The deceased was the daughter of MR WILLIAM JAMES PORTBURY, an accountant in the Exeter Gas Company's office, and lived with her father at 32, Portland-street. On Wednesday evening the deceased was hastily descending a flight of stairs, when she fell over four steps into the passage of the house. She was removed in an unconscious state to the sitting-room. She shortly afterwards regained consciousness, and a few days subsequently seemed to be pe3rfectly well. On Monday morning the deceased was found lying at the bottom of the stairs, over which she had previously fallen. She was unconscious and removed to bed. Mr Alfred Perkins and Mr Henderson were called in, but they were unable to restore the patient, and she died early next morning. Death was stated to have been the result of injury to the head and convulsions. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 20 April 1881, Issue 6062 – Gale Document No. Y3200731182
SANDFORD – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, on Saturday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL EWINGS, 43, farm labourer, who had died in the hospital from the effects of injuries sustained while at work on Allerdawn farm, Sandford, near Crediton. Wm. E. Thorne, the employer of deceased, stated that on March 25th EWINGS was working a drag when he became entangled in the gear, and his leg was broken before he could get the horse to stop. Witness released him, and got him carried to the house. He was afterwards removed to the County Hospital, at Exeter. Mr A. G. Blomfield, house surgeon, stated that the deceased was suffering from a punctured wound in the fore part of the left leg, the bone being broken in two places. On Thursday last he fainted while trying to raise himself in bed, and died without having recovered consciousness. Witness had made a post mortem examination, and came to the conclusion that death was caused by syncope, the result of exhaustion. The witness Thorne behaved in an extraordinary manner before and during the examination. While the brother f the deceased was giving evidence as to identification he interposed with a remark of some kind, when the Coroner requested that the witness should be left to him. Mr Thorne objected to being "snubbed." The Coroner then requested him to "hold his tongue", which he did by putting it out and holding it between finger and thumb. He was cautioned; but when giving his evidence prevaricated very much, and behaved in a most unseemly manner. The Coroner characterised Mr Thorne's conduct as disgraceful and insulting, a remark in which the Jury concurred. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 4 May 1881, Issue 6064 – Gale Document No. Y3200731236
WOOLFARDISWORTHY – Determined Suicide by a Boy. - An adjourned Inquest was held last Saturday on the body of JAMES ALFRED BECKLEY, aged nine, son of a labourer, who committed suicide by hanging. The evidence showed that on the previous Saturday the deceased's sister found him hanging by a rope in a cart shed. She called to him and "asked him if he was dead," but getting no reply ran to her mother. The lad had, in the presence of his sister, threatened to hang himself, and tied up a rope in a shed in her presence. The same day he took a knife from a drawer and threatened his life. The lad's mother said the boy had been scolded by her on several occasions for his lazy habits, and she had threatened to tell his father of his conduct, and also of his threats to kill himself. He was a very bad boy. Dr E. Rowe, who had examined the body, said death was caused by suffocation, and he believed deceased's brain was deranged. Verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 4 May 1881, Issue 6064 – Gale Document No. Y3200731249
EXMINSTER – Fatal Accident at Peamore. - F. Burrow, Esq., District Coroner, on Thursday afternoon, held an Inquest at the office of Mr Drew, Peamore, on the body of CHARLES GILLARD, aged eighty-two, lodge-keeper, in the employ of T. Kekewich, Esq., who met his death on Tuesday. About half-past two o'clock on Tuesday afternoon, a man in the employ of Mr Cornish, a butcher, of Exeter, arrived at the back entrance to Peamore House with a pony and cart. He left the vehicle standing in the roadway while he went into the kitchen. On returning he found that the bit had been taken from the pony's mouth, and that it was eating from a heap of grass. Deceased was near, weeding; and the witness supposed that GILLARD must have removed the bit in order that the pony might feed more freely. While the man was replacing it, the pony took fright at the scream of a peacock, and bolted. Unfortunately the shaft of the cart struck the deceased in the left side, and knocked him down. He was picked up dead. Mr M. Farrant, surgeon, of St. Thomas, stated that the poor man's ribs were broken, and that in all probability his lungs and heart were injured. Death, in his opinion, was instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating the driver of the cart from all blame. GILLARD had been in the service of the Kekwich family for more than half-a-century.

TEIGNMOUTH – Fatal Accident. - Mr Watts, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquiry on Wednesday into the cause of the death of THOMAS HOLE CREASY, landlord of the Golden Lion, Teignmouth, who fell from his horse when returning from Chudleigh fair, on the 19th inst. MR P. H. CREASY, dairyman, of Parson street, deposed that the deceased was his eldest son, and was twenty-one years old last August. He went with witness to Chudleigh fair. On the day of the accident his son rode a colt. When returning, witness heard a cry raised, and on turning round he saw the colt riderless. On returning to the spot deceased told him his arm was broken, but that he could ride home. By this time he saw that his son was not in a fit state to keep the saddle, and so procured a conveyance and took him home. James Pugsley deposed to seeing the deceased thrown from the colt. Deceased went over the animal's head. He got on his legs, and remarked that had it not been that his hand was in his pocket, the horse might have kicked forty times before he would have got him off. Dr Workman, M.D., said in his opinion death resulted in a great measure from shock to the system. Verdict of "Accidental death" was returned by the Jury.

Wednesday 4 May 1881, Issue 6064 – Gale Document No. Y3200731233
EXETER – Destitution and Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Windmill Inn, Holloway-street, last Thursday afternoon, on the body of CHARLES GOVE, aged 84, a carpenter and joiner, lately residing at 69, Holloway-street, who died on the previous Saturday. JANE GOVE, wife of the deceased, said that her husband had been ill for nine months, and he had been attended by Mr Harris and Mr Tosswill. About six months ago she obtained a recommend for the Dispensary, and Mr Henderson then visited him, as he was unable to go to the institution. Mr Henderson, however, had not seen him for the last six weeks. Her husband was taken worse on Wednesday week, and died on the following Saturday. He had no means of his own, and they had nothing to live on but what she worked for. They had no parish relief, but at Christmas received Freeman's gift of £5. She was 74 years of age, and worked as a laundress. Since her husband had been ill, of course, he had earned nothing, but even before that he earned very little, say 3s. or 3s. 6d. a week. She had maintained him and herself for a long time. She paid 2s. 6d. a week rent Mr W. Henderson, surgeon, said he believed that death resulted from natural causes, most probably from a form of paralysis with which old people were affected. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes". The Coroner said that it was highly creditable to the deceased and his wife, that they had not taken advantage of the relief which they might have obtained from the parochial authority. It was also most commendable that they had lived in the way they had, painful though it must have been sometimes, for no doubt they had to pinch themselves; but it was particularly creditable to MRS GOVE that she had struggled in such a brave manner, at such an advanced age, to maintain herself and her husband. The Jury heartily concurred in the remarks of the Coroner.

Wednesday 11 May 1881, Issue 6065 – Gale Document No. Y3200731287
OTTERY ST. MARY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Railway Inn, before S. M. Cox, Esq., District Coroner, on the body of a young man named JAMES TUCKER, who was found shot on the previous Saturday. Deceased after partaking of dinner, went back to his work on the estate of W. R. Coleridge, Esq., broke open a door to obtain a gun, and was afterwards found shot. He was a young man of very quiet disposition, and his parents had not the slightest reason for suspecting such a thing. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

DAWLISH – A Clergyman Drowned. - On Friday an Inquest was held at Ball's Royal Hotel, before W. Watts, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of the REV. RICHARD PARNELL, who lost his life whilst boating on Thursday. EDWARD HAMILTON PARNELL, a solicitor, in practice at 21, Fenchurch-street, London, identified the body as that of his father. Deceased was sixty-one years of age, and came down to Dawlish on Monday, May 2, for the benefit of his health. He was the vicar of North Bow, Middlesex. William Horsford, a boatman, living at Dawlish, said, I was in the Cove on Thursday about half-past eleven, when deceased and his wife engaged my boat. I asked if they would like to sail. They said "Yes," and wanted to go towards Teignmouth. As the wind was rather squally I took a reef in my sail. The wind was W.S.W. When we reached just outside "Hole Head" the wind freshened. I said, "I think we had better return." I weared the boat, or jibed, as it is sometimes called, thinking to go along quietly. A sudden squall then capsized the boat. I was holding the sail with one hand and steering with the other. We were all thrown out, ballast as well, and the boat turned completely over. Felix Matthews, a pilot, belonging to Teignmouth, said he was on board a ship when he saw the boat capsize, and the persons holding on to it. He launched a boat and made for the spot. The captain also bore down with his ship. The distance was about 200 yards. He caught hold of both the lady and the boatman. Vicary, the other man with him, caught hold of the gentleman's hair as he was sinking, but witness thought he was dead. They tried every means to restore animation, but failed. In answer to the Coroner and Jurymen, witness said he thought Horsford managed the boat as well as he could under the circumstances. It was, however, very squally, and a small open boat like Horsford's required great care in its management. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." They gave their fees to the Dawlish Hospital. At the earnest request of the Jury the Coroner was requested to write to the Chairman of the Dawlish Local Board asking them to facilitate the passing of bye-laws whereby boatmen, &c., should be required to be duly licensed.

Wednesday 11 May 1881, Issue 6065 – Gale Document No. Y3200731271
EXETER – A Sad Death. - An Inquest was held at the Morning Star Inn, St. Sidwell's, on Monday, before the City Coroner (W.H. Hooper, Esq.), touching the death of WM. GIBBINGS, a farm labourer, fifty-seven years of age, who had attempted to destroy himself on the 28th April, but cutting his throat. It appeared from the evidence that deceased had lived with his wife and a son in rooms at No. 19, St. Sidwell's. For some time past he had been too ill to earn anything, and was latterly bed ridden. On the 28th April, during the temporary absence of his wife he cut his throat with a razor, and when questioned said he did it because he was weak. He had never shown any suicidal tendency. Mr Bell, surgeon, dressed the wound, and the poor man somewhat recovered, but on Sunday he died. Mr Bell considered that death resulted from heart disease and dropsy accelerated by loss of blood. The man might have been considered in a dying state when he made the wound in his throat, and no doubt he suffered a great deal of pain from difficulty of breathing, the result of the heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 18 May 1881, Issue 6066 – Gale Document No. Y3200731324
PINHOE – A Child Burnt To Death. - On Wednesday last Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, on the body of MARY ANN BUTT, aged eight months. The mother of the deceased, who lives at Pinhoe, left the child in bed about 8.30 on the 26th April., in charge of her niece. On returning about half-an-hour afterwards she found the baby in front of the fire in flames. She immediately took steps to put them out, and had deceased conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she remained until her death, on the 10th May. A stick, partly burnt, was found touching the clothes of the deceased. EMMA JANE BUTT stated that during the time the mother was away she removed the child from the bedroom to another room on the ground-floor, where she laid it in front of the fire on a carpet. Witness put a few sticks into the fire to boil a kettle, and left the room to fetch water. On returning, a dog sprang at her and prevented her from re-entering the room. She called her aunt, who found her as above stated. She did not know how the clothes of the deceased had caught fire, but she supposed that a piece of burning stick fell from the grate and set her garments on fire. Death resulted from exhaustion, caused by the burns. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 25 May 1881, Issue 6067 – Gale Document No. Y3200731353
THORVERTON – Fatality. - An Inquest was held on Friday at Pridett's Dolphin Inn, before F. Burrow, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARK SALTER, a young man of this place, who was working for Mr Phillips, of Exeter, builder, and was engaged with others in taking down some old cob walls at Channing's Farm, when the wall at which deceased was working, suddenly gave way and fell on him killing him on the spot. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the widowed mother.

Wednesday 1 June 1881, Issue 6068 – Gale Document No. Y3200731385
HONITON – Supposed Suicide Of A Tradesman. - Yesterday about mid-day the dead body of JAMES JOSLAND, of Swann Inn Yard, Honiton, who has kept a shoeing smith's shop for many years, was found in four feet of water on his face and hands, near the Round Ball Range, Honiton. Deceased's hat and apron were found on the bank. Mr Harris miller, first observed the body, and after giving information to the police, the body was taken out of the water and removed to deceased's home. Deceased, who is 69 years of age, leaves a widow to mourn her loss, has lived in Honiton for over half a century, and was greatly respected. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved widow. An Inquest will be held today.

OTTERY ST. MARY – Inquest. - S. M. Cox, Esq., District Coroner, on Monday last, held an Inquest on the body of MR F. PALFREY, son of MR W. PALFREY, who committed suicide by hanging himself on Friday last. The deceased had apparently been in an unsound state of mind for some time, and in accordance with the Coroner's wish, a verdict of Temporary Insanity was returned.

Wednesday 1 June 1881, Issue 6068 – Gale Document No. Y3200731368
EXETER – Suicide by Poison. - An Inquest was held at the George and Dragon Inn, Black-boy Road, last Monday afternoon by the City Coroner, (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), touching the death of MR JOHN RICE IVES DUNCOMBE, a gentleman about sixty-eight years of age, who was found dead in bed at his residence, 39 Black-boy Road, on Sunday morning. Deceased, who was a private gentleman has been suffering from pecuniary embarrassments, and this, added to some anxiety respecting a suit pending in the Court of Chancery, and grief for the loss of his second wife, has caused him to be in a very desponding state for some little time. It appeared that he used to occupy his time in gardening, reading medical works, and trying experiments in chemistry, and consequent on his study of the latter subject he kept a large quantity of drugs in his possession. For some little time, however, he had made no experiments, as the whole of the bottles in his laboratory were covered with dust. On Sunday morning he obtained from his laboratory a bottle containing prussic acid, a portion of the contents of which he poured into a glass, and then placed the bottle in the wash-hand bason, afterwards swallowing the contents of the glass. On his absence being noticed a search was made, and he was found dead in his bed. Evidence bearing out the above statement was given by deceased's son, and a letter was produced which had been found on deceased's dressing table, in which he informed the members of his family that no legal claim could be made on them except for rent. Mr A. S. Perkins said he was called in to see the deceased. He had known him for some years, and always thought him eccentric. He had no doubt that death resulted from the effects of prussic acid. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

EXETER – A Militiaman Drowned Whilst Bathing. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on Monday held an Inquest at the Higher Barracks touching the death of HENRY MORGAN, a private in the First Devon Militia who was drowned whilst bathing in a leat near Duck's Marsh, last Saturday afternoon. The evidence went to show that deceased was a private in the C. Company, a native of Wiveliscombe, nineteen years of age, and an engine cleaner by trade. On Saturday afternoon with about a score of others he was bathing in a mill leat near Duck's Marsh, when someone called out that he was drowning. Corporal Hodge went to his assistance and caught him by the hair, but it was too short to allow of a firm hold, and the body slipping from his grasp sank for the last time. A private named Wilkey succeeded in recovering the body shortly afterwards by diving. It was in a hole seventeen or eighteen feet deep. Every effort was made to restore animation but without success, and Mr J. D. Harris, surgeon, who was called to assist in the operation, said death resulted from suffocation by drowning The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - In answer to a Juryman, it was explained that there was no accommodation at the Topsham Barracks, and the body of a soldier could not be taken to a public-house to await an Inquest. The remains of the deceased were buried in the new cemetery yesterday afternoon with military honours.

Wednesday 9 June 1881, Issue 6069 – Gale Document No. Y3200731416
HONITON – The Suicide of a Tradesman. - The District Coroner (S. M. Cox, Esq.), on Wednesday held an Inquest on the body of RICHARD JOSLAND, aged 69, who was found drowned in four feet of water, near the Round Ball Range, as reported last week. Evidence was given to the effect that deceased had of late been mentally affected, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary insanity."

Wednesday 22 June 1881, Issue 6071 – Gale Document No. Y3200731470
EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Acland Arms Inn, St. Sidwell's last evening, touching the death of ELIZABETH SANDERS GILBERT, who had been living in York-cottage, St. Sidwell's, with her husband, THOMAS GILBERT. The deceased rose about six o'clock yesterday morning in her accustomed health, which was very good, inasmuch as she had not been under medical treatment for the past two years. Her husband left his house early in the morning, without observing anything whatever unusual in his wife's manner. At nine o'clock the deceased had a conversation with Miss Eliza Rogers, who was in her employment as a mantle maker, respecting some business arrangements. MRS GILBERT then went into the back-kitchen to attend to her domestic duties, and Miss Rogers proceeded to the work-room, which is some distance from the back-kitchen. MR GILBERT returned from work about half-past nine and entered the back-kitchen, when to his surprise he saw his wife lying on the floor, upon her back. He went over to her and discovered that she was dead. Mr S. E. Perkins was called in, and pronounced life extinct. He now stated that he had examined the body, and had found no marks of violence upon it. In his opinion death resulted from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural causes."

EXETER – Inquests. – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Sawyer's Arms, Preston-street, last Friday, on the body of MR JOHN H. WHITE, builder, of Preston-street, who died suddenly the previous morning. Deceased was seized with illness in Sun-street, at about a quarter to twelve, and died soon after he had been removed to the house of his son with whom he lived. Mr Perkins said he considered death was caused by collapse of the heart by natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect. The Coroner said he could bear testimony to the loss of a worthy and respected citizen. The deceased was an upright and honourable man, and personally he (the Coroner) regretted his loss very much. MR HENRY WHITE thanked Mr Hooper for the kind manner in which he had spoken of his father.

On Friday morning Frederic Burrow, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Welcome Inn, touching the death of HENRY SEARLE, a shoemaker, of Moretonhampstead, aged 46 years, whose body was dragged out of the Exeter Basin on Wednesday. No cause could be assigned for the rash act except that the deceased was worried by money mattes and was in a low condition. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 29 June 1881, Issue 6072 – Gale Document No. Y3200731519
AXMINSTER – Fatal Accident. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on Thursday last held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, on the body of SAMUEL ROBERT MADDOCK, a porter in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, stationed at Axminster, who was killed whilst at work the previous morning. SAMUEL MADDOCK, gardener to Major Wyatt-Edgell, Cowley House, identified the body as that of his son. The deceased, who was a married man, was twenty-six years of age. George Skinner, a smith, said he was at work near the Axminster Station when the accident occurred. He saw the deceased riding on an empty timber truck, which, with several others, was being shunted from off the main line on to a siding. Just as the trucks got opposite to where witness was at work, he saw MADDOCK make an attempt to rise from his seat in the truck. In so doing he fell out of the truck on to the rails, and two of the wheels passed over his body. Witness went to him, and deceased looked up to him and said "Must I die?" adding, "This is a very bad job." A medical man was sent for, and he was removed to the Exeter Hospital. In answer to the Coroner, the witness said that the carriages which were being shunted did not stop suddenly but gradually. Deceased was sitting on an apparatus in the centre of the truck, which was termed a transom, and which revolved on a pivot. Mr Arthur George Blomfield, House-surgeon, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received MADDOCK into that institution shortly after eleven o'clock the previous morning. He was in a state of profound collapse, and almost pulseless. He had the appearance of one suffering from profuse bleeding. On examining the body he found cuts and bruises about the lower part of the body. There was but very slight oozing from the wounds and no external bleeding. Deceased expired about an hour-and-half after his admission. A post mortem examination showed the lower part of the abdomen to be full of blood. There were numerous and severe internal injuries, and these were, in his opinion, the cause of death. Mr H. J. Foster, Detective Inspector, watched the case on behalf of the Company, by whom special arrangements were made after the accident for the immediate conveyance of the deceased to the hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and attached no blame to anyone.

Wednesday 13 July 1881, Issue 6074 – Gale Document No. Y3200731586
IDE – Found Drowned. - The Coroner for the district (F. Burrow, Esq.) held an Inquest at the New Inn, Ide, on Monday , for the purpose of inquiring into the death of MARTHA COPE, aged forty-nine, and lately cook at the house of Mr Brewin , of Bear's Den. The deceased was last seen alive on Saturday night at about ten o'clock, when she was not in her usual state of health. Next morning she was missed from the house, and a search was instituted, when the body of deceased was found in the brook at the point where it runs through a meadow and is about eighteen inches deep. Life was quite extinct when the body was taken out of the water. The body was removed to the house of Mr Brewin. Mr Farrant, surgeon, of St. Thomas, stated that he had known the deceased and had attended her about twelve months ago for derangement of the liver, when she was also in a very excited state of mind. He had learnt that the deceased was again in a similar state on Saturday. The following morning he received a letter from Mr Brewin, stating what had happened respecting the deceased, upon which witness drove to Ide and examined the body. He found no marks of violence upon it, and it presented the usual appearance of death from drowning. In his opinion, her previous state of mind was one in which she would be likely to commit suicide. After a few remarks from the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but with no evidence to show by what means she came in the water.

Wednesday 13 July 1881, Issue 6074 – Gale Document No. Y3200731583
HOLSWORTHY – Fatal Accident. - The District Coroner (Mr Fulford), last Wednesday held an Inquest on the body of MR GEORGE WONNACOTT, of Oxenparks, Milton Damarell, near Holsworthy, farmer and shoemaker, who died on the previous day from the effects of injuries sustained whilst in charge of two horses and waggon at Thornbury. It appears, from the statements of two children who were present when the accident occurred, that the horses suddenly started off, and on WONNACOTT endeavouring to stop them he was caught in the wheels and dragged for a considerable distance on the ground. Assistance was soon at hand, and the poor fellow was conveyed to his home, where his injuries were attended to by Dr Ash, of Holsworthy, and that gentleman then ,pronounced them to be not of a very serious nature. During the night convulsions set in, and before Dr Ash arrived to see him the next morning, MR WONNACOTT died. The deceased leaves a widow and seven children. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 20 July 1881, Issue 6075 – Gale Document No. Y3200731599
EXETER – Child Drowned in the Mill Leat. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Monday held an Inquest at Yandell's Spirit Vaults, respecting the death of WILLIAM REED, a child of three years, whose body had been found in the mill leat adjoining Rosemary-lane early on Saturday morning. EMOND REED, the father of the deceased, stated that the child left the house by himself at about half-past three on Saturday afternoon. Witness was not at home at that time; at six o'clock the same evening he learnt that the child was missing. A search was immediately made, which resulted in the finding of the body in the mill leat. Witness here drew the attention of the Coroner to the dangerous state of the leat, it being very badly protected at some places, and numbers of young children had at different times fallen into it. He hoped that Coroner would state this to the proper authorities. The Coroner said he would be very willing to do this, but at the same time he pointed out that there was no evidence to prove that the deceased had fallen into the leat at the place which MR REED complained of. Sarah Carter, of Rosemary-lane, stated that about four o'clock on Saturday she saw the deceased with another little boy standing close by the water. They soon after went away, and she had seen nothing of the deceased since. Charles Taylor, a labourer, proved finding the body of the deceased against the grating of the Round Tree Mills. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said that when he saw the body on Sunday it was cold and stiff, and presented all appearances of death from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but there was not sufficient evidence to show hoe." At the close of the Inquest a Juryman again referred to the dangerous state of the leat. He had seen no less than four or five children fall into the leat in the course of a week. He thought steps ought to be taken to prevent this, and the Town Council, who owned the leat, should be acquainted with it. A private person by this time would have been prosecuted, and the Council were liable to be prosecuted for manslaughter. The Jury all concurred in this, and the Coroner said he would convey their expression to the proper authorities.

Wednesday 27 July 1881, Issue 6076 – Gale Document No. Y3200731646
TOPSHAM – Sad Accident to a Boating Party. Four Children Drowned.
A very sad disaster befell a family boating party near this place on Sunday. A fisherman, named JOHN NORTON, after dinner, took his wife and five children, together with his nephew and niece, out on the river Exe for a sail in his fishing-boat. When near Riversmeet NORTON lost his bap overboard and put the boat about to recover it. As the boat neared the hat the children in their eagerness to seize it, rushed to the side of the boat, which went over on its side, and the whole party fell into the water. NORTON being a good swimmer caught hold of two children named Mary and Alice and when he had brought both near the shore told them to hold on to a paddle. He then went to the rescue of his wife and son and succeeded in getting them ashore. Going out a third time he rescued another son, the only one of the party then visible. Of the two girls that he left clinging to the oar one disappeared, and the other was much exhausted. The bodies of three of the children were recovered on Monday, badly bitten by crabs. The youngest child is still missing. Yesterday morning Mr Burrow, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the vestry-room, Topsham, on the bodies of WILLIAM NORTON, aged fourteen; MARY NORTON, six (children of WILLIAM NORTON,) and LAURA, daughter of JOHN NORTON, aged seven. The evidence of JOHN NORTON and his surviving children bore out the facts detailed above. Robert Heard and Richard Sanders proved finding the bodies; and Mr Bothwell, surgeon, testified that the appearance of the bodies indicated death by drowning. The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said it was a most sad and distressing case, and it was the more solemn in consequence of one of the bodies being still undiscovered. When the fourth was discovered another Inquest would be necessary, but their duty now was to say how the three children had met with their deaths. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and with the exception of one, gave their fees to two the bereaved families.

Wednesday 27 July 1881, Issue 6076 – Gale Document No. Y3200731632
EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Elephant Inn, North-street, yesterday morning touching the death of JOHN PONSFORD SAVERY, aged 67, who died suddenly at his residence, North-street, on Sunday morning. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the deceased had enjoyed good health until the time of his death. A post mortem examination was made by Mr E. J. Domville, who stated that death resulted from the breaking of the large blood vessels of the stomach. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 3 August 1881, Issue 6077 – Gale Document No. Y3200731663
EXETER – Killed in the Street. - A melancholy and fatal accident occurred yesterday afternoon in the High-street, nearly opposite the Guildhall, whilst Messrs. Sangers' great circus procession was passing. At the same time a cab, driven by a man named Payne, passed out of Broadgate into the High-street. The crowd shouted to the man to pull up before coming to the corner, but he persisted in going on, and his horse almost immediately took fright at the elephants which formed part of the procession. The terrified animal dashed on to the pavement, scattering the crowd right and left. In the rush a poor old woman named MARY HILL, aged about 67, from the College Hall, was knocked down. Before she could move the horse jumped by her, and one of the wheels of the cab passed over her neck, causing instant death. Several other persons were knocked down, and escaped with slight injuries. The body of the unfortunate woman was examined by Messrs. Perkins and Bell, surgeons, who were immediately on the spot, and they pronounced life extinct. By the direction of Mr Bell, the body was removed to the Mortuary to await an Inquest.

EXETER – Death from Suffocation. - Mr Barton (Deputy Coroner for Exeter) held an Inquest at the Greyhound Inn, Paris Street, last night, touching the death of a male child aged five weeks. It appeared that the father and mother of the child, MR WILLIAM and MRS LAMACRAFT, living in Nelson's-court, Paris-street, retired to bed on Monday night, taking with them the now deceased child, who was in his accustomed health. The child was placed between the tenants. MR LAMACRAFT awoke about six o'clock on Tuesday morning, when he discovered that the child was dead. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, was immediately called, and pronounced life to be extinct. He now stated that the body was warm, and he should think the child had been dead between an hour-and-a-half and two hours. The face was very much congested, and there was an impression of the bed-clothes on the face. The appearance of the body presented the usual signs of death from suffocation. In answer to a Juryman, Mr Bell stated that the weight of the bedclothes was sufficient to suffocate a child when it had turned upon its face, as in that position it was powerless to move. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with medical testimony.

Wednesday 3 August 1881, Issue 6077 – Gale Document No. Y3200731675
LYDFORD – Fatal Accident at the Gorge. - The District Coroner on Wednesday last held an Inquest on the body of MISS ELIZA I. SHEPHERD, of Buckland-street, Plymouth, who, while walking in the grounds of Mr Rodford, at Lydford, on Tuesday, with a party of excursionists, fell a distance of fifteen feet into a stream, dislocating her neck and lacerating the spinal cord. She died immediately. The deceased lady, who was about fifty years of age, was well known in Plymouth for her generosity to the poor, being possessed of considerable property. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 10 August 1881, Issue 6078 – Gale Document No. Y3200731709
NEWTON ABBOT – Distressing Suicide. - The District Coroner, H. S. Gaye, Esq., held an Inquest at Wrigwell House last Thursday, on view of the body of MR WILLIAM FURNEAUX, a gentleman of independent means, fifty-six years of age, who committed suicide the previous day. Evidence as adduced that deceased had been very low and desponding at times lately, which was attributed to domestic affliction, some of his near relatives being ill. On Wednesday morning he got up and ate his breakfast as usual. Shortly afterwards he went upstairs, took his gun, and placing the muzzle to his mouth, is supposed to have discharged it by means of the ramrod, and thus blew his brains out. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary insanity."

Wednesday 10 August 1881, Issue 6078 – Gale Document No. Y3200731711
DUNSFORD – Fatal Accident to a Waggoner. - H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, on Monday, touching the death of JOHN HILL BEDFORD, 21, labourer. Deceased, who was in the employ of Mr May, farmer, of Dunsford, had been with a waggon and two horses to Alphington for a load of dung. He left there about half-past two in company with five other wagons driven by men in the employ of Mr Johnson, Holcombe Burnell. The wagons were in line, deceased's being second. On the journey deceased was seen walking by the side of his waggon, but shortly afterwards, on his companions turning a bed in the road, they saw BEDFORD lying on his face and hands. On finding that he was injured they conveyed him to the Hospital, where he died shortly after his admission. He did not state how the accident occurred. Mr George Blomfield, house surgeon, said deceased's injuries were such as might have been caused by the waggon passing over his thigh, one of the arteries of which was crushed and torn sufficiently to account for death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXMOUTH – An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Rolle Hotel, before S. M. Cox, Esq., on the body of RICHARD JOHN BALMANO, aged eight years, who was drowned on Friday last. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally drowned while Bathing."

Wednesday 10 August 1881, Issue 6078 – Gale Document No. Y3200731706
EXETER – The Fatal Accident in High Street. - Mr H. D. Barton (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Paper Makers' Arms, Exe Lane, on Wednesday, on the body of MISS MAY HILL, who was killed in High-street on the previous afternoon, whilst viewing Sanger's Circus procession. The room was crowded, among those present being Rev. J. C. Rowlatt, who was in the cab at the time of the occurrence. Mrs Jessie Hodge, of the College, Cathedral Yard, said deceased, who was a spinster, had lived with her about eleven years. The last time she saw deceased was when she went out at half-past one on Tuesday for the purpose of seeing the circus procession. She was about sixty-seven years old. Deceased met with an accident three months ago, and since that she had been very weak. Deceased had told her that at the time that accident occurred she felt very giddy and that was the cause of her falling. P.C. Gillard said he saw all that occurred. The horse was walking at the time. Just as the elephants in the procession came to Broadgate the horse turned the corner, and apparently frightened at the unusual sight, the animal shied and swung itself round on the left pavement, taking the cab with it. In its progress it knocked down three ladies. One of them fell into the street, one fell in against the window, and deceased fell under the horse's feet and was rolled along by the horse for some distance. He thought the horse as it passed over the body struck it with its hind legs, and the two near wheels of the cab passed over deceased's chest. The horse was shortly afterwards stopped by two or three men near. Witness went to where the body was lying and undid deceased's apparel about the neck, and at the same time noticed that she was bleeding very much from the right ear and nostrils. Deceased did not speak after he got to her. The body was removed to the Turk's Head. Medical assistance was sent for, and Mr J. S. Perkins, of South-street, soon after arrived. He afterwards had an interview with the cabman, who was perfectly sober. He was quite sure deceased was struck by the horse and did not fall from giddiness. The driver used every precaution, and in his opinion the death was the result of a pure accident. A juryman remarked that the horse was as quiet a one as there was in the city, and the driver was also a steady man. Inspector Symes gave corroborative evidence, and expressed the opinion that deceased was not killed on the spot, but that she afterwards died at the Turk's Head. The character of the driver was generally good, and the horse was very quiet. Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, South-street, said he examined the body of the deceased immediately after the accident, and was satisfied that she had received injuries in the neighbourhood of the base of the brain sufficient to cause death. Mr C. E. Bell, police surgeon, gave corroborative evidence. Rev. J. C. Rowlatt, who was in the cab at the time, corroborated the statements of the witnesses. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and entirely acquitted the cabman of any blame.

Wednesday 17 August 1881, issue 6079 – Gale Document No. Y3200731742
BRIDFORD – Two Boys Drowned. - F. Burrow, Esq. District Coroner, on Saturday last held an Inquest at Week Barton touching the death of two lads who were drowned in the river on Thursday afternoon, whilst bathing The bodies were identified as those of THOMAS TARR, a native of Woodbury, sixteen years of age, an apprentice to Mr Wm. Beer, of Week Barton, Bridford, and FREDERICK RICE, sixteen years of age, son of MR F. RICE, butcher, of Exeter (and who was on a visit at Mr Beer's, to whom he is related). On Thursday, after dinner, they went off to bathe, and they did not return during the evening, search was made for them, when their clothing was found on the banks of the river. Both bodies were subsequently found together in a deep pit at the bottom of the river. How the boys came to go in where the water is so deep is not known; they were never known to bathe there before. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing." The funeral took place the same evening in Bridford Churchyard, Rev. E. R. Gotto, the rector, read the funeral service in a very impressive manner, and many tears were shed by the large crowd present. The bodies were buried side by side in one grave.

NEWTON ABBOT – Drowned Whilst Bathing. - The Deputy Coroner (F. Watts, Esq.) on Saturday evening held an Inquest at the Seven Stars Hotel, Newton Bushel, on the body of WM. JOHN FINGLE HOLMES, aged 24, eldest son of MR HOLMES, managing clerk of Messrs. Pinsent and Sons, brewers. The evidence shewed that the deceased – who was the second clerk to Messrs. Watts, Whidborne, and Co.'s, Newton Bank – in company with his brother and several other young men, went to bathe, between seven and eight o'clock on Saturday morning, in the River Teign, near Buckland Point, about a mile from the town. Deceased got into the water just as the tide was beginning to run in, and not being able to swim, the current, which was exceptionally strong, carried him off his feet. He called for help, and the Rev. G. C. Perceval, minister of the United Methodist Free Church, swam to his assistance with his clothes on, but before he reached the deceased he had to return owing to the strength of the current, and take off his clothing. He then made another attempt to rescue the deceased, and caught hold of him by the hair of his head as he was sinking the third time. He held him for several minutes, but he could make no headway for the bank against the current; and finding that he was sinking himself, Mr Perceval had to let go his hold, and the deceased was drowned. His body was found near the spot several hours afterwards by a lighterman named Lang. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and expressed sympathy with the bereaved parents.

SIDMOUTH – Fatal Boat Accident. - The Deputy Coroner (C. Cox, Esq.), on Wednesday last held an Inquest at the York Hotel, Sidmouth, touching the death of ROBERT SKINNER, a married man, aged 27, and a fisherman of Sidmouth, who was washed ashore on the Chit Rocks, at the western end of the Esplanade the previous day. ROBERT SKINNER, father of the deceased, identified the body, and stated that his son was 27 years old. He last saw him alive between eight and nine o'clock on Saturday night last in Sidmouth. There were two or three of his cousins present, and they wished to spend an hour or two together, and asked him (witness) to accompany them, but he refused to do so. They went to a public-house to have a "parting glass." His son had had nothing to drink during the day because he had been to sea. Churchill, who accompanied his son, only arrived in Sidmouth on Saturday evening, and when he (witness) saw him he appeared perfectly sober. He never knew his son go out in a boat so late at night as he did on Saturday last. The sea was smooth on Saturday night, and the witness thought there was no danger in going out on it. The boat was a punt about fourteen feet long. On Sunday morning last his brother-in-law came to him, and asked whether he had lent anyone his boat, and he (witness) replied that he had not. He did not know then that his son had not been home all night. Witness proceeded to the beach, and was there told that his boat had been towed ashore empty at Weston, and he then suspected that "something had happened." He immediately sent out a party of five to look for the bodies, and although search was made all day on Sunday, the bodies were not recovered. Harriet Thurman, a barmaid at the York Hotel, said she last saw deceased alive with John Churchill about eleven o'clock on Saturday night. They entered the hotel, and they partook of a glass of beer each, and took away with them a pint-and-a-half of beer in a bottle. [The bottle was produced containing the beer, tightly corked down.] She did not think that they were the worse for drink, and had no idea they were going out to sea. William Semmes, a coastguardsman, stationed at Sidmouth, knew the deceased, ROBERT SKINNER. On Saturday evening, about half-past eleven o'clock, he noticed SKINNER and another man push off from the beach, a short distance from the York Hotel, in MR ROBERT SKINNER'S boat. When they were on the water, which was very smooth, they were laughing and talking. He was of opinion that both the occupants of the boat were perfectly sober at the time. About a quarter of an hour after he saw them start, and noticed someone apparently light a pipe at sea in their direction. William Piddington, chief boatman of coastguards, stationed at Weston, about 2 ½ miles from Sidmouth, stated that he was called at half-past four o'clock on Sunday morning, and told that a boat was adrift. He looked through his glass, and saw that no one was in it. He, in company with another man, then rowed out to it, and the first thing he saw was the bottle of beer (produced) standing perfectly upright under the middle seat. A wooden pipe was also on the seat. He turned the boat round, and noticed the words, "Minnie, Robert Skinner, Sidmouth." The rowlocks were abreast of each other, indicating that one man had been pulling. He first saw the boat about half-past four o'clock in the morning, and it was five o'clock when he got along-side of her. The distance from his station to the boat was a mile and a half. One of the paddles was found subsequently by Robert Harris nearly two miles further away. Samuel Ellis, a contractor, stated that he was at Rock Cottage on Tuesday about mid-day, looking over the Chit Rocks, and while there he saw a body reel in over the rocks with the waves. He called to his men to pull out the body, and the body was extricated immediately, and driven to MR SKINNER'S home. Clothes were on the body, and he noticed no marks about it. Charles Shepherd, in the employ of the last witness, proved pulling the deceased out of the sea, and identified him. P.C. Pratt stated that he searched the clothes of the deceased soon after he was recovered, and found 7s. 1d. and a pocket knife. There were bruises about the body which witness though might have been occasioned by the body being washed about. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned, and the Jury gave their fees to the widow of Deceased.

Wednesday 17 August 1881, Issue 6079 – Gale Document No. Y3200731727
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Friday evening last at the Fireman's Arms, before the Deputy Coroner (H. D. Barton, Esq.), on the body of CHARLES HENRY HEAVENS, infant child of MARY ANN HEAVENS, who was found dead in bed early in the morning of the same day. The mother lives in West-street, and went to bed with the deceased as usual at eleven o'clock the preceding night with a man with whom she was living, who was the father of the child. The man got up at seven o'clock to go to work, and soon after that she noticed the deceased's arm was discoloured. She immediately called a Mrs Tarr, who lives with her, told her there was something the matter with the child, and asked her to go for a doctor. Mr E. S. Perkins, surgeon, said when he saw the child it was dead; there were no marks of violence upon the body. He considered that the child had died from spasm of the heart. The discolouration of the arm was a post mortem mark. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Melancholy Death. - An Inquest was held at the Wellington Inn, King-street, on Saturday morning, before H. D. Barton, Esq. (Deputy Coroner), on the body of ELIZABETH CLEAVE, aged 41, the wife of a carman, residing in George's-square, who died from the effects of the bursting of a blood-vessel on Friday afternoon. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had suffered from a bad leg for nine years, but otherwise her health was good. She was no worse than usual on Thursday morning when her husband went away, but when he came home again on Friday night he found that she was dead. On Friday afternoon, Susan Blackmore found MRS CLEAVE at the house of Mrs Moore, a neighbour, with her right leg on a chair. It was bleeding very much near the ankle, and was bandaged with towels. The deceased screamed, said it was black, and that she was dying, and she expired there and then. Mr Edward Steele Perkins, surgeon of Magdalen-street, saw the deceased on Friday afternoon, about 4.15 and, on removing the bandages from the right leg, he found a wound just above the ankle on the inside of the leg. It had been bleeding profusely, and the excessive haemorrhage brought on exhaustion, which caused death. One of the large varicose veins of the leg had burst, and the woman being pregnant at the time caused greater pressure on the veins. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 31 August 1881, Issue 6081 – Gale Document No. Y3200731793
HOLSWORTHY – Sudden Death - R. Fulford, Esq., District Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest at Ashwater, respecting the death of MR RICAHRD JORDON, a farmer and small shopkeeper. On Friday last the deceased fearing some men he had employed to cut a field of corn would not be able to complete the task, went into the field for the purpose of assisting them, taking the lead with his scythe, keeping in line with his men. After some time had passed Richard Squire, who was working close to the employer, on turning round saw MR JORDON lying flat on his back dead. This was about five o'clock p.m. Dr Pearce saw him as soon as possible, but found death had taken place long before his arrival. Deceased was seventy-three years of age, and greatly respected in the district. It was thought death was caused by apoplexy, and a verdict of "Death by Natural Causes," was returned.

Wednesday 7 September 1881, Issue 6082 – Gale Document No. Y3200731842
HONITON – Fatal Accident. - Yesterday an Inquest was held before the District Coroner (Mr S. M. Cox), at the Red Cow Inn, Honiton, upon view of the body of HANNAH BURROW, a married woman, aged 76, of High-street, Honiton, who having been thrown from a trap on the 20th ultimo, died on Sunday last. MR BURROW, husband of the deceased, stated that on the 20th August he was, with his wife, his daughter, MRS HALSE, and others, riding from Broadhembury to Honiton in a two-wheel dog-cart, when the horse suddenly stumbled and fell. His wife and MRS HALSE fell out of the trap. MRS HALSE was driving. Mr Banfield's carriage passed soon after the accident, and the deceased was removed to the house of Dr Shortridge. She was subsequently removed to her own house, and attended day after day by Dr Shortridge. MRS HALSE, daughter of deceased, sated that she was driving on the day of the accident. She had frequently driven the same horse. The horse was not frightened any anything but he stumbled and fell while walking steadily down hill. She held a rein in each hand. Dr Shortridge said the deceased had received a compound fracture of the elbow, and she ultimately died from the effects of the shock to her system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 September 1881, Issue 6082 – Gale Document No. Y3200731837
TOTNES – Burnt to Death. - An Inquest has been held at Broadhempston on the body of MISS ALICE LLOYD, a lady about 32 years of age, who was accidentally burnt to death, whilst on a visit to Broadhempston for the benefit of her health. It appeared that a few mornings since, whilst dressing, MISS LLOYD, by some unexplained means accidently set fire to her clothing, and before the flames could be extinguished she was shockingly burned. Mr Symons, of Kingskerswell, was immediately called in, but almost from the first the case was considered hopeless. Mr Stamp, of Plympton, who had previously attended the deceased, was telegraphed for, and on his speedy arrival he consulted with Mr Symons, but all their effects were fruitless, the unfortunate lady expiring at midnight on Saturday. An Inquest has been held, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. MISS LLOYD was sister of the mother superior of St Raphael's Home, Bristol, and sister of Sister Mary Grace, in charge of the Convalescent home, Plympton; her father was the late judge of Bristol County Court.

TOTNES - A Suspicious Case of Drowning. - Dr Gaye, District Coroner, on Thursday last assembled a Jury at the Guildhall to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a Yorkshireman named JAMES HILTON, whose body was picked up in the River Dart on Wednesday morning. The body had been identified by a man named Robinson, but he was not present to give evidence. Superintendent Clarke deposed that he was called out at half-past six on Wednesday morning to see the body. On making a search he found some cards, a £10 "flash." note, and seventeen shillings in silver, and a halfpenny. He thought one of the half-crowns was also "flash." Nothing whatever was found upon the body to identify the deceased. He had no hat on. He saw the deceased the previous night in the street about ten o'clock. Some people came from Plymouth the previous day, and examined the body. They said a young man had gone from Plymouth to the races, but had not returned. They found, however, he was a stranger to them. Mr L. Hains, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased about seven o'clock on Wednesday morning. He examined him and found he had evidently been in the water some hours. There was a bruise over one eye and two small wounds on each temple. They were punctured wounds. He found gravel on the hands, which were partly clenched. Deceased's trousers were town on each leg, but it appeared the rents had been caused by the deceased coming against a stone or something hard, and not by a struggle. The Coroner then requested Mr Hains to make a more minute examination of the deceased to see if there were any marks of violence under his clothes. This Mr Hains did, and he then informed the coroner there were no marks of violence whatever. He considered death resulted from drowning. From the appearance of deceased's trousers he thought he might have fallen into the river accidentally. In reply to the Coroner, the Superintendent said the body was in about two feet of water. It was high tide about ten o'clock that night. Deceased appeared to be about forty years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 14 September 1881, Issue 6083 – Gale Document No. Y3200731870
NEWTON ABBOT – Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday by Dr Gaye, touching the death of ALFRED HILL, a single man, about thirty-five years of age, whose body was found in an unused clay pit at Decoy that morning. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had been employed as a porter at the Globe Hotel for several years, but lately had given way to drink and appeared ill. He left the hotel on Monday, the 29th of August, and was last seen on the Wednesday morning following near the pit where he was found. A witness, named James Hibberd, a clay-cutter, said he was passing the pit about half-past nine o'clock that morning, when he saw the body of the deceased floating in the water which filled the pit. He did not then say anything, but went on to the other men, and had his breakfast with them. He then went back into the town, and told P.C. Evans what he had seen, and with him went back to the pit and told the other men of it, and they together took the body from the water. Around the neck was tied a handkerchief containing a large stone. The Coroner, in summing up, strongly remarked on the inhuman conduct of Hibberd in leaving the body in the water so long, and said it was monstrous that he should have sat quietly a few yards off and had his breakfast. The Jury returned a verdict of "~Suicide whilst in an Unsound State of Mind", the foreman endorsing the remarks made by the Coroner on Hibberd's conduct. The Coroner refused to allow Hibberd's expenses.

Wednesday 14 September 1881, Issue 6083 – Gale Document No. Y3200731854
EXETER – Suicide. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Monday evening, held an Inquest at the North Devon Inn, Paul-street, touching the death of CHARLES CONNET, a coachman, residing in Rouse's-court, Paul-street. It appeared that the deceased was 63 years of age, and had been bed-ridden for years, having been suffering from rheumatism. On Saturday night, about 6.30, his wife left him in bed reading a prayer-book. Before leaving she gave him a razor he being in the habit of shaving himself. About eight o'clock he was found dead in bed, having cut his throat. Deceased appeared to have been of a cheerful disposition, but his great suffering is supposed to have affected his mind. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Wednesday 28 September 1881, Issue 6085 – Gale Document No. Y3200731930
SOUTH MOLTON – Shocking Death From Burning. - The Borough Coroner (Mr James Flexman) on Thursday last held an Enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MISS EVA BICKELL, which occurred early the same morning, from the effect o burns. The deceased was the youngest daughter of MR ALDERMAN BICKELL, about 25 years of age, and she had been unwell for some time. On Monday MR BICKELL placed his daughter under the care of Dr Forrester, at Barnstaple, but next morning she left the house where she was staying without the knowledge of the other inmates and took an early train back to Southmolton. She was only partially dressed, had an antimacassar over her head, and when spoken to by a gentleman from Southmolton who knew her she began talking very incoherently. Near Swymbridge she opened the carriage door and attempted to jump out, but was prevented by a commercial traveller. At Swymbridge the young lady was put in with the guard, who asked one of the passengers to accompany him, and he did so; but nothing particular occurred until she got to the Southmolton station, when she charged the gentleman who prevented her from jumping out of the train with having insulted her. It was evident, however, to the officials that there was something wrong with her mind, and she was put in an omnibus and accompanied by a friend, who happened to be at the station, to her father's house at Sunnyside. The father immediately telegraphed to Exeter for anothe3r daughter, a sister of the deceased, who returned home at once. About nine o'clock on Wednesday evening deceased retired to her room with her sister. She knelt by her beside, said her prayers as usual, and went into bed. Thinking everything would be all right, the sister went downstairs to supper, leaving a lamp burning in the room. Within a few minutes after a strong smell of something burning was apparent in the house. MR BICKELL and his daughter rushed upstairs. On getting to the room it was found to be full of flames and smoke. MISS BICKELL immediately ran into the street with the cry of "Fire." This alarmed the neighbours. Mr W. Chapple, parish clerk, living next door, hastened in and upstairs to the room, where he found MR BICKELL and his daughter enveloped in flames and smoke. After some difficulty he got hold of MISS BICKELL and brought her out with nothing on but the burning shreds of her nightdress, and evidently quite roasted alive, pieces of her flesh adhering to her clothes, and placed her in an adjoining room. He went back and succeeded in rescuing MR BICKELL, but not until he had been severely burnt. Medical assistance for MR and MISS BICKELL was obtained, and both Messrs. Furze and Sanders, surgeons, did all they could, but after three or four hours of dreadful suffering MISS BICKELL died. Mr Sanders, surgeon, stated that deceased was suffering from acute mania. MR BICKELL mentioned that his daughter had been ill for a week, and at her request he took her to see Dr Forrester, who told him that there were symptoms that she would go out of her mind owing to pressure of blood in the head. The Jury returned a verdict "That death resulted from the Shock caused by the Burns."

Wednesday 28 September 1881, Issue 6085 – Gale Document No. Y3200731918
EXETER – Sudden Deaths. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Papermakers' Arms Inn, Exe Street, on Monday evening, touching the death of JAMES HENRY MILLER, lately a wood and coal dealer, residing in Exe-street. The deceased, who was about thirty-three years of age, was formerly an engine cleaner at the railway station, but as he became subject to fits, he left the above employment. He had for several years suffered from fits. The last time he had one was about a fortnight since, when he had four fits in one day. A doctor had been attending him, but not recently. The deceased was in his usual state of health on Saturday night, when he returned home from his work, and appeared to eat his supper heartily. On going to bed he did not complain of any pain. The following morning he was found dead in bed by his uncle, HENRY SOMERVILLE. Mr J. Moon, surgeon, stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the deceased's body. He discovered from that examination that both lungs were congested. The liver and kidneys were healthy and the former showed no signs of spirit drinking. The stomach was full of partly-digested food, and there was nothing in the throat. The brain was very soft, and deeply congested, and he found a clot of blood on the left side of it. In the opinion of witness, the deceased died from cerebral haemorrhage. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Exeter Dispensary, Queen-street, last evening touching the death of JOSEPH LAMACRAFT, fifty, a labourer, of Kenton. It appeared from the evidence given by MRS LAMACRAFT the deceased's wife, and Dr Davy, that he had a recommend for treatment in the Dispensary He and his wife came to Exeter by the nine o'clock train on Tuesday morning, and although he had been in the habit of vomiting blood, he did not complain of being in pain while on the way. Deceased and his wife went to the Dispensary, and whilst in the doctors' room, he began to cough, which again caused a flow of blood from his mouth. He saw Dr Davy, who placed him in a chair, and after having obtained assistance, removed LAMACRAFT into another room, where steps were taken to stop the bleeding, but without success. The man's breathing had then stopped. Artificial respiration was then attempted, with no better success, and deceased expired about twenty minutes after the commencement of the bleeding. Dr Davy gave it as his opinion that the bleeding was caused by a rupture of a vessel in the lungs, and death resulted from internal haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

DIED ON THE ROAD - The Coroner for the district (F. Burrow, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Falmouth Inn, St. Thomas, last Saturday, on the body of JOHN BAKER, lately a drayman, employed by Messrs. Norman and Pring, City Brewery. John Denham, of Tedburn St. Mary, labourer, deposed that he last saw the deceased at the Traveller's Rest Inn,. Whitestone, on Thursday evening, about nine p.m. The deceased stopped there with the waggon he was driving in company with another drayman, and partook of two three pennyworths of gin. He might have drunk another, but witness could not say positively, as it was taken to him while in the waggon, which was a covered one. Deceased was under the influence of drink when he arrived at the Traveller's Rest, but was not drunk. Thomas Pyle, a drayman, deposed that he had known the deceased for a considerable time, and he was of temperate habits. He met the deceased at the Red Lion Inn, Taphouse, about nine p.m. on Thursday evening. The deceased and himself were on their usual country round. Witness saw him drink half-a-pint of beer at the Red Lion Inn. He was slightly intoxicated, but was able to control his horses. He and the deceased stopped at the Traveller's Rest Inn, Whitestone, the same night, and by his advice the deceased drank two three-pennyworths of gin, as BAKER said that he felt rather cold. Witness and the deceased then drove on their respective wagons, the former going ahead of the latter, as his horses had not gone so far that day. He had not seen the deceased alive since. Witness himself was under the influence of drink at the time. David Thomas, the toll-collector at the Dunsford Gate, at the end of Cowick-street, St. Thomas, said that about 10.15 and about half-an-hour after the last witness passed through the gate, the deceased's waggon drove down the hill. The gate was open, and not knowing who was in charge of the vehicle he shouted, but receiving no answer he stopped the horses. He saw the legs of a man hanging over the front of the waggon. Thinking he was asleep he poked him with an iron rod, not being tall enough to reach him with his hands, and the rod being the nearest thing at hand. Witness again shouted, and by that time several men had gathered around the waggon, and a doctor and policeman sent for. Richard Burnett, of 101, Cowick street, stated that he was attracted by the noise made by the last witness, and went into the road where he saw a waggon, to which was harnessed two horses. He saw the deceased in the position above stated, and sprang into the waggon to see what was the matter. Witness put his hand upon the face of the deceased and found some foam about his mouth. The deceased was immediately taken out of the waggon and laid upon the pavement. Restoratives were applied to his body, but he was found to be dead, although quite warm. Mr R. Andrew, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said he was called in and examined the body at the Falmouth Inn. In his opinion the deceased died from coma, accelerated by drink. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Wednesday 12 October 1881, Issue 6087 – Gale Document No. Y3200731984
EXETER – Sudden Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Black Horse Hotel, Longbrook-street, on Saturday afternoon, on the body of ELIZA TAYLOR, who was found dead in bed early that morning, at the house of her son-in-law, MR J. P RIPPON, an accountant, living at No. 50, Howell-road. Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, stated that he was called to see the deceased. He found her dead in bed. In his opinion the death was a natural one, the immediate cause being heart disease. He had previously attended the deceased, and was not surprised by her dying suddenly. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 12 October 1881, Issue 6087 – Gale Document No. Y3200731999
BIDEFORD – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held last Thursday, before Dr Thompson, the Borough Coroner, on the body of MR GEORGE TURNER, a colt-breaker. Deceased was at the races held on Northam Burrows on Wednesday, and in the evening, after dinner at the Westward Ho! Hotel, he mounted his pony and started for home. The pony was given to shying, had been sold by previous owners for that fault, and had thrown MR TURNER'S man on the previous Tuesday. Deceased was discovered bleeding and unconscious, on the road between Bideford and Westward Ho! Mr E. Rouse, surgeon, stated that death had been instantaneous, caused by a fracture at the base of the skull. Deceased was a quiet, sober man, and had only been married three months. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 19 October 1881, Issue 6088 – Gale Document No Y3200732014
EXETER – Boy Drowned At The Quay. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Sawyer's Arms Inn, Preston-street, last Saturday, on the body of RICHARD HARRIS, a little boy who met his death by drowning in the river at the Quay. Deceased's father said the boy was ten years of age. A man named Chard, in the employ of Mr Mitchell, stone mason, stated that the deceased asked to be taken across the river in Mr Mitchell's boat. The weather was very rough, and the wind took the boat down the river, and before they knew where they were the ferry boat knocked witness and deceased into the water. Chard was picked out of the water by the ferry-man, but deceased sank and was not seen again. A seaman named Hutchings proved recovering the body by dragging the river. He complained that the drags provided by the Town Council for this purpose were very unwieldy. He also stated that the father of the deceased was in very straightened circumstances, and he should be pleased to give his fees to the man, and perhaps the Jury might be disposed to contribute something. Mr Perkins, surgeon, of South-street, deposed to seeing the body of deceased at his house, in Rack-street. This witness complained that the nearest medical man was not sent for. He was not sent for until the police surgeon, Mr Bell, had been communicated with. The Coroner said decidedly the nearest medical man ought to have been sent for. If Mr Perkins was the nearest his assistance should have been called first. After the summing up of the evidence by the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 26 October 1881, Issue 6089 – Gale Document No. Y3200732050
EXETER – Suicide. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Globe Inn, Newtown, touching the death of JOHN ROBERTS, aged 78, who committed suicide on Monday. From the evidence adduced by Mary Eliza Blaney, wife of a brakesman, residing at 69, John's-terrace, John-street, it appeared that the deceased was her husband's uncle and a retired carver and gilder. Deceased, who lived with witness, had suffered from asthma lately, in consequence of which he had kept his room for the last three weeks. Witness had never notice deceased depressed in spirits except when he was in great pain, which was the case on Saturday. On Monday morning deceased was very cheerful and did not complain of pain, but asked witness to "read the deaths to him." About quarter-past two o'clock witness heard a report of fire arms, and on a neighbour expressing the belief that it was in ROBERTS' room she went up, and there saw him sitting in a low chair with his head resting on a book on the top of a commode. Blood was flowing from his nose; there was a quantity of smoke in the room and a number of matches strewn about the floor. Witness then went downstairs and fetched a Mr Bowden, who, on lifting his head, found him quite dead. By his side was a tin cup with a piece of pipe attached and a small hole at the bottom of the cup, which smelt very strongly of gunpowder. Witness had never seen the article before and was not aware that he had any gunpowder in the house. Mr C. E. Bell, police surgeon, deposed that at 2.39 on Monday afternoon, in response to a call, he went to the house of the last witness. In an upstair room he saw the deceased sitting on a low chair, with his head resting on a book on the top of what he thought was a small table. There was blood on the table and on the floor. He was quite dead. On witness examining him, he found the interior of his mouth blackened and bruised, the flesh being town from the bone. There was some loose powder in the mouth which had been exploded, but there were no marks of burning on the head or face. The cause of death was concussion of the brain, consequent on the shock by the explosion. Witness was of opinion that the powder was loose, and that he put the end of the tube into his mouth and ignited the charge at the hole at the bottom. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide in a state of Unsound Mind." The Coroner concurred in the verdict.

Wednesday 9 November 1881, Issue 6091 – Gale Document No. Y3200732118
EXETER – Sudden Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Saturday assembled a Jury at No. 1, Albion Villas, Tiverton-road, to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of MR JOHN BEER, which had occurred with shocking suddenness the same morning. The deceased was at his business establishment in High-street during the previous day, apparently in his usual health and spirits. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest it appeared that the deceased was a man of a gouty habit and had been occasionally under the medical treatment of Mr A. Perkins, surgeon. On Friday evening MRS MARY BEER and her husband retired to bed about nine o'clock. The deceased was in very good health, and there was nothing unusual in his manner. On Saturday morning a few minutes before six o'clock deceased and his wife conversed about the Fifth of November celebration, when the latter heard a noise in his throat. She immediately obtained a light, but he died within five minutes. Upon the arrival of Mr Perkins life was extinct, and he considered the most probable cause of death was embolism of the pulmonary artery – a clot having formed in the artery leading to the heart, causing immediate death. The Jury returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes, in which the Coroner concurred, and expressed sympathy with the widow and family on behalf of himself and the Jurymen.

Wednesday 16 November 1881, Issue 6092 – Gale Document No. Y3200732164
SUDDEN DEATHS IN EXETER
The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) was on Monday, called upon to investigate two cases of sudden death which had occurred in the city during Saturday night. The first Enquiry was held at the Clarence Hotel, on view of the body of FANNY JERRED, 25, a domestic servant, formerly in the employ of Mr J. E. Lake, silversmith, High-street, who was found dead in bed.
HENRY JERRED, labourer, Exeter, father of the deceased, deposed that the deceased was a single woman, 26 years of age. At the time of her death, she had only been in Mr Lake's service a few days. The last time witness saw the deceased alive was the Thursday previous to her death, when she was in very good health to all appearances.
Mrs Elizabeth Lake, wife of Mr J. E. Lake, said on Saturday morning the deceased complained of a pain in her head, and sated that she felt sick. Deceased retired to her bedroom about 5.30 p.m. on Saturday, previous to which witness asked her if she would take any tea, and she replied "no." Deceased was bathed with hot water. Later on the witness entered the deceased's bedroom, and asked her how she felt, and deceased replied that she felt better in her head. About nine o'clock witness, for the second time, asked deceased if she would like to go home, but she replied that she would not. Mr Bell, surgeon, was called in subsequently, and at eleven o'clock deceased was left for the night. In the morning she did not answer when called, and witness went into her room. Deceased's head was very low on the pillow, and, Mr Lake being called, she was found to be dead.
Mr C. Bell, gave it as his opinion that the cause of death was the rupture of a blood vessel on the brain, caused by vomiting, the vomiting resulting from a diseased liver.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

The second Inquest was held in the evening at the Paper Makers' Arms, Exe-lane, and had reference to the sudden death of ELIZABETH PAYNE, wife of a dairyman.
EDWARD PAYNE said deceased was his wife, and that he carried on the business of a dairyman, at No. 31, Exe-street. Deceased was 56 years of age. Her health recently had been very good, and she had led an active life. She had suffered from bad legs. About nine o'clock on Saturday night, when witness had just come in from selling milk, he found his wife sitting by the fire. She said, "I'll go to bed," and witness said he would go out and get some meat for Sunday's dinner. That was the last time witness saw her alive. On his return, after about twenty minutes' absence, he found she had been brought from Exe-lane on a shutter and taken into the house. Deceased was to all outward appearances dead. She had never complained during the day of feeling ill.
Wm. Marsh, a smith, living in Exe-street, spoke to finding deceased on the pathway near his door with blood running from her; and P.C. Ray, who arrived on the spot directly after, stated that he at once sent off for Mr Bell. In reply to the Coroner the policeman stated that their instructions were to send for the nearest doctor in cases of this kind. He sent for Mr Bell because Mr Bell was the first doctor he could think of. Mr John Moon, surgeon, was ultimately sent for, and he saw deceased within about half an hour of the time when she was first found. He said upon examining the body e discovered that a vein had burst in one leg and that death resulted from haemorrhage. Nothing was easier stopped, and death did not usually occur from the bursting of a vein within a long time. After hearing the evidence the witness said he was of opinion that had a medical man been called at once the deceased's death might have been avoided. The Coroner remarked that from the evidence no great amount of time had been lost, but the question as the principle involved.
The Jury recorded a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed their strong opinion that the first medical man should in every similar case be sent for, and not any particular man. In answer to several Jurors, the Coroner remarked that he thought Capt. Bent had not the power to give these instructions to the police on his own authority.

Wednesday 16 November 1881, Issue 6092 – Gale Document No. Y3200732167
WHIPTON – The Fatal Accident on the Line. - The County Coroner (Mr F. Burrow) on Friday held an Inquest at the Half Moon Inn, Whipton, on the body of GEORGE HALLETT, a ganger, employed by the London and South Western Railway Company, who was killed on the Exmouth line a few days previously. Francis Coles, a packer on the London and South western Railway, stated that on Tuesday morning he was at work on the line between Topsham and Exmouth Junction in a field about fifty land yards from the deceased, who was on the line near Hill Bridge. The 9.20 passenger train for Exmouth passed soon afterwards, and ten minutes later witness went to the spot where he had let the deceased and found him further down the line lying between the metals quite dead. His left leg was doubled completely back besides his head, his right arm was over his face, and his left arm over his breast. Witness did not see any blood, and he could not tell by the condition of the deceased where the train had struck him; there were a few small cuts on the face. Witness did not move the body, but went immediately to the Exmouth Junction and telegraphed to Exeter. Witness did not think that deceased was subject to fits, nor did he know that there was anything wrong with him. Cross-examined by a Juror – He didn't know that the deceased was deaf. Witness distinctly heard the train coming. There was a fog at the time, but it was clearing off fast. Deceased was not near-sighted. John Abbott said he drove the 9.20 train from Exmouth to exert on Tuesday. He did not see anyone on the line between Topsham and the Junction. He accounted for not seeing the deceased by dense fog which prevailed at the time. He was driving the engine reversed, the tender being first, but this would not have prevented him from seeing anyone on the line. He neither heard nor felt anything when he passed the spot. After he reached Exeter he was getting the engine ready for a journey to Salisbury when he found that one of the tie rods between the guard irons was bent, and after a further examination, in which he was assisted by the fireman, a small quantity of hair was found on the bottom of the ash-pan, and a silver watch with the outer case gone (which he produced) he found on the "bogie framing," or that part of the engine which works round the curves. He at once concluded that he had driven over someone, and he took the watch to the foreman's office, and was there told of the message which the last witness had sent. Cross-examined: The watch had stopped at about 9.30, and when witness passed the place it was 9.22. The deceased was in all probability doubled over and over under the engine, and the watch might have been dragged out of his pocket. Edward Snow, the fireman on the 9.20 train, said it was a part of his duty to keep a look-out, and the fact of his not seeing the deceased would be accounted for by dense fog which prevailed; there was also a slight curve in the line before they came to the spot where deceased was found. James Rendell inspector of the permanent way, said he had known deceased for ten years, and during that time to his (witness's) knowledge he had not lost a day's work; he was always a sober and industrious man. He had examined the scene of the accide3nt, and his opinion was that the deceased was caught by the engine under Hill Bridge, as the marks in the gravel between the metals would seem to indicate, and was carried for twenty-seven yards to the place where the body was found. In answer to a Juryman, witness said he believed two trains passed over the body before it was removed. Henry John Forster, inspector of police on the London and South Western Railway, said he was of the same opinion as the last witness as to deceased being carried by the engine for about twenty-seven yards. P.C. Curtis proved removing the body, and on examination he found a large fracture of the skull and several minor cuts on the face. There was no medical evidence, and the Coroner said he could not understand why the surgeon who examined the body had not arrived. It would have been much more satisfactory to have had his evidence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the officers of the railway company from blame.

Wednesday 16 November 1881, Issue 6092 – Gale Document No. Y3200732165
MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF A DEVONSHIRE GIRL. - Dr Danford Thomas, Coroner for Central Middlesex, on Friday last opened an Inquest at the Buffalo's Head, Marylebone-road, London, concerning the death of MISS CAROLINE ELIZA PERRY, aged 19, daughter of MR JOHN VOSEY PERRY, baker and confectioner, of Christow, near Exeter, who died under mysterious circumstances while on a visit to some friends at 46, Edgware-road. JULIA PERRY, mother of the deceased, stated that her daughter had been a governess for the last fifteen or sixteen months. She came up to London to visit her aunt at 46, Edgware-road, on the 22nd September. On Monday last witness received a telegram stating that her daughter had been sized with a fit of apoplexy. Witness at once came to London, and found that she was dead. Mrs Caroline Hudson, widow, residing at 46, Edgware-road, said she was a dressmaker. Witness went out on Monday morning, and when she returned about eleven o'clock she was told that the deceased was lying ill in the sitting-room. She went in and saw the deceased lying stretched on the couch. She was quite sensible, and said that she was very ill. The witness asked Mr Miles, a friend, who had just come in, to go for a doctor. Dr Raynor came and asked the witness to leave the room. A servant remained with the deceased, who died in about an hour afterwards. The deceased had been out once with Mr Lynch, a traveller, but the witness did not know whether she had any male acquaintance. It was the custom of the deceased to take walks every morning by herself fin the park. Emily Loader, servant to Mrs Hudson ,said: On Monday morning the deceased got up at seven o'clock, and had her breakfast as usual. Mrs Hudson went out about a quarter to nine. And shortly afterwards witness found her lying on the couch in the drawing-room, and hysterical. After awhile she asked witness for a cup of tea, and also begged that she would not leave her. She said she had done something wrong, repeating this twice. Witness asked her what she had done, and she said she would not tell. When Dr Raynor arrived the deceased said that she wanted to be alone with him, and that she wanted to lie down. She also asked the doctor to send her something, because she wanted to die. The deceased did not hint that she had taken anything to kill herself. The deceased and her aunt lived on very friendly terms. James Miles stated that he lived at 17, Sale-street, Paddington and was a valuer and dealer in jewellery. Mrs Hudson was a particular friend of his, and he was her adopted nephew. He called her aunt. He had known her about eighteen months, having made her acquaintance in business. He was a frequent visitor at the house, but had not been there or seen the deceased for a fortnight previous to last Monday. He had stopped away because there was a little jealousy, and he had determined not to go there whilst the deceased was in the house. The deceased was jealous because her aunt used to walk out with him in the evening without taking her. Sometimes the aunt used to tell her that all her money and property was left to her and at other times to him, but he believed that this was all idle talk. There was nothing wrong on Mrs Hudson's part so far as he knew. The case was adjourned in order to have the result of an analysis of the stomach.
The Enquiry was resumed on Monday afternoon, when the following additional evidence was taken: Eleanor Bartlett, assistant to Mrs Hudson, stated that on Saturday week the deceased asked her the way to the Serpentine. She seemed then rather more dull than usual. She had seen the deceased crying once or twice, but had never been told what it was about. On Monday, at half-past eight, she seemed quite well. Witness went out with Mrs Hudson at a quarter to nine, returned about half-past ten, and saw the deceased on the sofa. She said she had done something wrong, but she declined to say what it was. Dr Thomas Raynor of 79, Edgware-road, deposed that he was sent for to 46, Edgware-road shortly after ten on Monday the 7th inst. He found the decease don the first floor, lying partly on the sofa, and partly on the floor, and a servant, Emily Loader, supporting her. He understood from the general conversation that she had taken poison. He had the deceased laid on the couch and looked round to see if he could obtain any paper or bottle, but found nothing. The deceased lay on her back on the couch with her eyes shut but sensible. He asked her what was the matter, and she said she would tell him if the others left the room. He directed them to do so, and then she said she wanted him to give her something to take her to Heaven. He asked her what she had done and she said she had done something wrong and she wanted to have something to take her to glory. He could not get from her that she had taken anything. She was very excited and in a highly nervous condition. On making a post mortem examination he found nothing to cause death and no trace of injury to the coats of the stomach. The only conclusion he could come to was that the deceased had died either of epilepsy or from strychnine. Mr Alexander Wynter Blyth, medical officer of Health and analyst of the parish of Marylebone, said he had brought to him a jar containing vomit, of which he had made a careful analysis. He found it to contain 1.7 grains of strychnine, and 1.3 grains of brucine On further inspection and the use of a powerful microscope he discovered a vegetable powder which contained a mixture of nux vomica seed. Judging from the result of his analysis and the symptoms which he had heard described, he was of opinion that the cause of death was strychnine and brucine, probably with a mixture of nux vomica. In reply to the Coroner, Mr Blyth stated that such ingredients might be contained in what were called rat poisons Emily Loader was called and examined as to having said that the deceased had been seen spreading rat poison on bread and butter. She said that on Saturday week the deceased gave her money to go and buy some poison for the rats which were in the storeroom. She went to an oil shop in Seymour-place and paid 1d for it. It was a small bottle, and the deceased broke the neck of it and spread the contents on bread and butter. Witness went with her to show her how to lay it in the cupboard. It was a slice of bread cut into small pieces. Witness herself then threw the bottle on the fire. Witness here said she got two penny bottles, but she did not know what had become of the second; she never saw it afterwards. Mrs Hudson was severely cross-examined as to her knowledge of the purchase of the rat poison. She said she was fully aware of it, but had no idea it could be used for any other purpose than that for which it was purchased. The court was then cleared, and after a short deliberation, the Jury returned the following verdict. - "We find that CAROLINE ELIZA PERRY was found dying and did die from the mortal effects of strychnine contained in a bottle of rat poison, administered by herself; and the Jury further say that the deceased was at the time in a state of mental excitement produced by the unhappy conditions with she was surrounded while living with her aunt at 46, Edgware-road."

Wednesday 7 December 1881, Issue 6095 – Gale Document No. Y3200732257
EXETER – Sudden Death In The Street. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Monday morning held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, touching the death of THOMAS ALEXANDER CHAMBERLAIN, aged 55, a stonemason's labourer, lately residing in Magdalen-street. MARIA CHAMBERLAIN, wife of the deceased, stated that her husband left home on Saturday morning, about nine o'clock, in search of work. He appeared then to be in his usual good health, but he sometimes complained of pain in the chest. She heard nothing more about him until she was told that he had dropped down in a fit. Mr James Bickham Redler, commercial traveller, St. Leonard's-road, stated that on Saturday morning, about ten o'clock, deceased was engaged by the boots of the Queen's Hotel to take witness's samples round on a truck. On coming out of Mr Hadland Davis's at twelve o'clock he saw a crowd of persons round the deceased, and one man giving him some water. Witness went to get assistance, and when he returned he was told that the man had been taken to the Hospital. The deceased was very active, civil and obliging, and there appeared to be noting whatever the matter with him. P.C. Leaworthy spoke to removing the man to the Hospital in a cab, and Mr Arthur George Blomfield, M.B., house surgeon at that institution, deposed that the man was dead when admitted. By order of the Coroner he made a post mortem examination of the body, and then found that the membrane of the brain showed signs of old disease, and there was a considerable quantity of watery fluid between the brain and those membranes. The brain itself appeared to be healthy, except at one part, at the base, where it was extensively softened and broken down. He therefore believed that the cause of death was apoplexy, and he thought that death must have been instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 28 December 1881, Issue 6098 – Gale Document No. Y3200732365
EXETER - FATAL ACCIDENT AT ST. DAVID'S STATION. - At the Topsham Inn, South-street, on Friday, the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on view of the body of GEORGE GREENLEY, who was killed by an accident early the previous morning at St. David's Station. MARY GREENLEY, wife of deceased, said her husband was 32 years of age, and was a foreman shunter and had been in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company for six years. He was not a very strong man, but was always sober and temperate. He went to work on the previous night at about 5.30 and that was the last time she saw him alive; she heard nothing further of him until about four o'clock that morning, when the other foreman told her that he had met with an accident and that he had been taken to the Hospital. Charles Ford, a shunter at St. David's Station, said he was working with the deceased about three o'clock that morning in the lower end of the goods' yard putting trucks off a goods train which had arrived from Bristol. Witness went to cut off the lot for Exeter, and then called to deceased to know whether they could go ahead? He got no answer, and walked towards the engine to see GREENLEY before starting the trucks, and when he got opposite to him he heard someone groaning. Witness stooped down and looked between the trucks, and saw that deceased's lamp was crushed to pieces on the ground, and that deceased was jammed between the sides of two trucks at the junction of two lines. Deceased was standing in an upright position. With the assistance of other men the trucks were moved and he was released and immediately taken to the Hospital. George Herbert, a porter at the Station, said he helped to extricate the deceased from the trucks, and assisted him into the cab, which took him to the Hospital. Mr A. G. Bloomfield, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was admitted that morning about four o'clock and die at about nine o'clock that morning, the cause of death being the injuries he had received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and that no blame was attached to anybody. GREENLEY leaves a widow and three children.

Wednesday 28 December 1881, Issue 6098 – Gale Document No. Y3200732352
FATAL ACCIDENT AT ST. DAVID'S. – An Inquest was held yesterday morning by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY FOOTE, of St. Thomas, aged twenty-two, who died in the Hospital from the effects of an accident whilst at work at St David's Station. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 28 December 1881, Issue 6098 – Gale Document No. Y3200732368
THE MISSING GIRLS. RECOVERY OF ONE OF THE BODIES. - The mysterious disappearance of two servant girls from Exeter on the 30th November has been partially cleared up by the recovery of the body of JULIA BROOKS, from the river Exe, near Powderham Point last Friday, and there is every reason to fear that her younger companion is also drowned. The Inquest was held on Monday by Mr Burrow, District Coroner, at the Salutation Inn, Topsham, and it will be seen from the evidence below that the unfortunate girls most probably fell into the river or were blown in from the Quay when making their way to the ferry.
Mary Medland, wife of Edward Medland, St. Sidwell's, Exeter, was the first witness called. She said she had known deceased from childhood. She last saw her alive on Wednesday the 30th November, about half-past two. She said she was going by the four o'clock train to Exmouth. She anticipated getting back in time to return to her mistress's house by nine o'clock. She went away soon after three. Next morning her master, Mr Stephenson, sent to know if she had stayed at her (witness's) house for the night. She had seen the body and identified it as that of JULIA BROOKS. She was wearing the same clothes as on that Wednesday afternoon.
George Granville Bothwell, physician and surgeon, of Topsham, said that, by the direction of the Coroner, he had made a post mortem examination of the body of JULIA BROOKS. The only mark he found externally was a slight cut over the right eye, which did not go through the true skin. The appearance of the eyes showed that the body had been in the water some considerable time. There were no evidences of violence or pregnancy. From all the appearances he came to the conclusion that death was caused by drowning.
Mr S. E. Stephenson, C. E., said he lived at the Gas Works, St. Thomas's, Exeter. Deceased had lived in his service about two years. On the 30th November she asked permission to go to Crediton in the afternoon to visit an office, but she did not state for what purpose. She left the house about two p.m., and he heard nothing more of her until about eleven o'clock in the evening. She was to have been in about nine o'clock. He sent one of the men to make enquiries about her. He returned about eleven, and said she had been to Exmouth, and at Exmouth he learned that she had gone way by the train arriving at Exeter about eight o'clock. He also said that she had been seen at Exeter station when the train returned. He could hear nothing further about her. Deceased had friends on the Canal Banks named Leary. On going to see them from the station deceased would probably have gone over Exe Bridge and down the river banks. It was a windy wet night. There are no lights on the river banks the side that she would walk. It wo0uld have taken her about twenty minutes to go from the railway station to Leary's house, and from there to his house she might have gone in three minutes.
William Paulsen, sailor, Exmouth, said he knew the deceased. On Wednesday, the 30th November, he saw her at Exmouth. She came to his lodgings in the afternoon. They had been keeping company about nine months. She left Exmouth for Exeter by the 7.25 train, and that was the last he saw of her. To a Juryman: They parted on friendly terms. He went to the station with her, and saw her off.
Thomas Bevan, fisherman, Topsham, said he recovered the body of the deceased at about one o'clock on Friday last. When near the Neck they found the body of deceased, lying about thirty fathoms from the water. With assistance he removed the corpse to his boat and carried it to Topsham, where they gave it into the charge of the police. Freshets might carry anything to about that spot from Exeter. To a Juryman: The body could not have come from the Canal. It might have come from Exeter over the weir.
P.C. Richard Leyman, stationed at Topsham, produced a silver watch, stopped at 8.25, a purse containing 4s. 5 ¼d. , and other articles which had been found on the body of the deceased. He had no information as to the deceased having been seen at Exeter on her return from Exmouth on the 30th November.
Paulsen, recalled, said the photograph found on the deceased he gave her on the 30th November. She said a young girl named Rousell was to meet her at Exeter, and that they were going to Leary's.
Mrs Leary, Haven Banks, said she had known deceased about two years and a half. She last saw her alive on Wednesday, 30th November, about one o'clock. She said she was going to have her photograph taken. Deceased used to call at her house every Wednesday evening. Returning from the Queen-street Station she would be sure to cross over the ferry. Rousell was her niece and knew the deceased. She knew that Rousell met the deceased at the Queen-street Station on the arrival of the Exmouth train because one of the porters saw them there and spoke to them. The porter had told her so, but she did not know the porter's name. To a Juryman: People had been known to walk into the river by the ferry. She was of opinion hat in going to the ferry the girls somehow got into the river.
The Jury at once returned an Open Verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 4 January 1882, Issue 6029 – Gale Document No. Y3200732413
THE LOST SERVANT GIRLS. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Country House Inn, Topsham-road, before F. Burrow, Esq., touching the death of LOUISA ROUSALL, aged fourteen years, whose body was found at the Countess Weir Paper Mills on Saturday morning last. The deceased had been in the employ of Mr C. H. Fulford, of Belmont-place and disappeared mysteriously on the 29th of November with another servant named JULIA BROOKS. They were last seen together at the Queen-street Station between eight and nine o'clock, and they went away from there to visit Mrs Ann Leary, a friend, living on the Haven Banks. Nothing more was heard of them until the 23rd December, when the body of Julia Brooks was picked up on the river bank near Powderham, as reported last week. The body of LOUISA ROUSALL was found on Saturday morning in the mill leat at Countess Weir, and at the Inquest yesterday, Mr Mark Farrant, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that death resulted from drowning. There were no marks of violence on the body, and it appeared to have been in the water several weeks. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 4 January 1882, Issue 6029 – Gale Document No. Y3200732407
TIVERTON – Felo-de-Se. - A midnight funeral took place here on Saturday. The previous day a young fellow named HOLMES, employed at Sir John Amory's lace factory, cut his throat so severely that he died almost immediately. Although evidence was given showing that for the past two months deceased had been suffering from pains in the head, that he was an out-patient of the infirmary, that recently he had been troubled through being out of employment, that on the day of his death he was more melancholy than usual, and that after cutting his throat he was found tearing at the wound, yet the Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se. Three hundred towns-people followed the remains to the grave, which was dug in a corner of the unconsecrated part of the cemetery. The Rev. J. P. Carey, Baptist Minister, officiated at the funeral, which took place under the direction of the police. Much sympathy was expressed for the widow and family.

OTTERY ST. MARY – Sad End Of a Holiday. - Dr Dandford Thomas held an Inquest on Tuesday, at the Islington Coroner's Court, into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH MARCHANT STONE, 35 years old, a single woman, who was killed on the North London Railway. The brother of the deceased, a chemist's assistant, residing at 420 Holloway-road, said that his sister lived with their mother at Ottery St. Mary, Devon. They came up to town on Friday last. His sister had been ill, and was very depressed in spirits, and imagine that she was going mad. She went to stay, on her arrival in London, with a Miss Turner, at 3, Coburn-row, Bow, from whose house she was missed between eleven and twelve on Saturday night. He did not see or hear of her again until he was told that she was killed at the Highbury Railway Station, Islington. Witness thought she had intended to visit him at Holloway. He believed that she did not mean to destroy herself, and that she had not threatened to do so. John Crook, foreman porter at the Highbury Station, deposed to finding the deceased's body at eight on Sunday morning, lying across the four-foot at the extreme end of No. 1 platform. Her boot was found between the points. She was frightfully mutilated. A single ticket was found in her possession (No. 566) from Bow to Highbury. That was the last ticket issued from Bow that night. The train was due at Highbury at midnight. The Coroner remarked that in all probability deceased wandered on to the line, and had been struck by a passing engine. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Misadventure."

EXETER – Inquests. - An Inquest was held at the Turk's Head Inn, High-street, last Thursday, before W. H. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner), on the body of JOHN PACKER, aged 74, a gardener lately residing at No. 8, Pancras-lane, who died suddenly in Goldsmith-street, the previous day. The medical evidence went to show that death resulted from heart disease, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

At the Workhouse on Friday, Mr Hooper held an Inquest on the body of CAROLINE COULDRIDGE, aged 44, who died in the house on the previous morning. From the evidenced adduced it appeared that the deceased, who was the wife of WILLIAM HENRY COULDRIDGE, a watchmaker, of Guinea-street, had been an invalid for several years. She had recently suffered from an attack of erysipelas in the face, which rendered her almost blind. In consequence of her husband being out of employment she desired that she might be taken to the Workhouse. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon to the Guardians for No. 3 District, in which deceased resided, was accordingly communicated with, and he visited her on Wednesday last. After examining her, he informed her that it would be better for her to remain where she was, as she would endanger her life by being removed. She replied, however, that she would run the risk rather than remain here she was. The room in which she lay was fairly clean, and she appeared to be comfortable and cared for. An order for her removal to the Workhouse was made, and she was conveyed thither in a cab. Every possible care was taken of her, but she expired at 6.30 on Thursday morning from the effects of the disease from which she had been suffering. In answer to the Coroner, Mr Bell said no danger to the public was incurred by the removal of a patient suffering from erysipelas in a public cab. That disease was not infectious except when a person who was suffering from an open wound came near the patient Mr Rouse, the Governor of the Workhouse, said that steps were taken immediately the deceased left the cab to disinfect it. The Coroner said that the evidence adduced was satisfactory, inasmuch as it cleared up a doubt which previously existed as to whether the deceased had been well cared for before her death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural causes."

The City Coroner on Saturday held an Enquiry at the Valiant Soldier respecting the death of HENRY ISAACS, Royal Artillery pensioner, aged 40. Deceased was employed as sweeper at Topsham Barracks. Before going to his work on Thursday morning he called at the lodgings of Edward Barrett, Sun-street, to see the time, and, while looking at Barrett's watch he was taken ill. He went to the barracks, however, and while there had another attack. The ambulance men carried him to the Exeter Hospital, where he was received in an unconscious state, and he died at eleven o'clock the same night. Deceased had been discharged from the army in consequence of sunstroke while in India, and the medical evidence shewed that the immediate cause of death was apoplexy, the result of Bright's disease. Verdict "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 11 January 1882, Issue 6030 – Gale Document No. Y3200732448
EXETER - Inquests. The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, last Friday morning respecting the death of WILLIAM STADDON, aged 19, lately residing at Stoke Canon. It appeared that on the morning in question the deceased, who was a paper-maker, went to work as usual about seven a.m. at Mr Tremblett's paper mills, Stoke Canon, where he had been employed for several years. About eleven o'clock he was engaged in oiling a portion of the machinery in po9tion, and for that purpose he walked across a plank eighteen inches wide, resting on brick-work two feet in width. The plank which was a moveable one, shifted on to a roller in motion, the consequence of which was that the deceased fell upon a belt connecting different part of the machinery. The works were stopped as quickly as possible when it was found that, the deceased was frightfully injured. He was immediately conveyed in a covered van to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The House Surgeon (Mr W. A. Blomfield) there attended to him, but he never rallied from the shock produced by the accident, and died about six p.m. the same day. A post mortem examination of the body of the deceased revealed further severe injuries. It was explained that the plank referred to was not employed for the purpose for which deceased used it, but to prevent an accident while screwing down the presses. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and attached no blame to anybody.

The City Coroner yesterday held an Inquest at Gove's Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, touching the death of JOHN BLACKMORE, 63, baker and confectioner, of Teign-place, Rack-street. Deceased, who had been suffering for some time from extensive ulcerations of the legs, was found dead in bed the same morning. The medical evidence went to shew that death was the result of syncope, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

FATAL GUN ACCIDENT NEAR HONITON. - At Southcott Farm, near Sheldon, on Monday, Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner for the district, held an Inquest touching the death of WILLIAM RADFORD, aged 14, son of MR FRANCIS RADFORD, occupier f the farm. The deceased on the previous day was out rabbiting with his father and several others, and was lying out of view, in a pit, watching a rabbit-hole. Whilst he was in this position deceased's uncle (MR ROBT. STEVENS) fired at a rabbit, and on another of the party (Mr E. Snell), baker, of Broadhembury, running to the spot he found the boy lying on his face, bleeding profusely from the neck. The wounded lad was removed home to bed, and attended as speedily as possible by Dr Morgan, of Culmstock, who found a considerable number of gun shot wounds near the large arteries of the neck and the brain had been penetrated. It was, he said, a hopeless case from the first. The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said he felt bound to comment on the practice of killing rabbits in the way this party did. He thought it was a dangerous practice and likely to lead to fatal results. There was a very grave question for them to consider. If they were of opinion that in this case there had been gross negligence, it would be their duty to return a verdict of Manslaughter against ROBERT STEVENS; but if they thought contrary to that, the only alternative would be accidental death. At the request of the Jury, ROBERT STEVENS was called into the room, and, in answer to the Coroner, said that he did not see the boy when he fired. He saw a rabbit, and fired at it. After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and expressed a hope that the Coroner would caution STEVENS. The Coroner, having addressed Stevens, a Juryman remarked: The gun license should be higher, then so many people would not take them out.

Wednesday 18 January 1882, Issue 6031 – Gale Document No. Y3200732481
TORQUAY – Fatal Accident. - On Friday last the District Coroner (F. Burrow, Esq.) held an Inquest on the body of MAUD THOMAS, a little girl, who was killed the previous Tuesday by being run over. The evidence showed that Richard Knapman was driving a trap down the street at a "dog-trot," when the deceased ran out suddenly from the pavement between the horse's legs, and was knocked down, one of the wheels passing over the child's head. Dr Bothwell was called in. The child died from the effects of a fractured skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated Knapman from blame.

Wednesday 25 January 1882, Issue 6032 – Gale Document No. Y3200732496
INQUESTS – The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on Friday held an Inquest at the Axminster Inn, on the body of LOUISA BARRETT, aged 18, the daughter of a painter living in Paris-street, whose death resulted from the effects of phosphoric paste, sold by the chemists for the purpose of killing rats and other vermin. Evidence was given to the effect that the deceased girl was of weak intellect, which was aggravated at times by epileptic fits, to which she was subject. On Thursday week some unpleasantness arose between the deceased and her mother, the former, who was at times irritable, having refused to help ion the house work. She left the house, and purchased a small bottle of the vermin killer, which, according to her statement, she eat on some bread. She was seized with vomiting; but it was not until the following Tuesday that she confessed what she had done. The medical aid was of no avail; and she died on Thursday last. It was stated at the Inquest that patent medicines were not included in the provisions of the Poisons' Act, and the Coroner expressed an opinion that this was a great defect in the law. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

At the City Workhouse on Saturday, the City Coroner held an Enquiry concerning the death of EMMA HILL, a child. The mother, a married woman, wife of GEORGE HILL, an engine driver, who had worked in that capacity in India, stated that she was now an inmate of the Workhouse. The deceased was her daughter, aged three weeks, and was born in the Workhouse. The child was very healthy, to all appearances, when born. Witness slept with it on Thursday night, and went to sleep about twelve o'clock. Waking up about three o'clock she found the child was dead. The child was lying on her right side as when witness went to sleep. There was only a counterpane over her. The child had had no medicine. Witness had two other children alive. She had seen her husband since he returned to England. There had been "differences" between them, and she supposed that was the reason he did not come to see her, although he was now in Exeter. Mr J. Woodman, surgeon at the Workhouse, said he had no doubt that the cause of death was suffocation from being over-laid. In answer to questions from Jurors, Mr Woodman stated that it was not, unhappily, an unusual matter for a child to be "over laid". It was undoubtedly accidental. A verdict of death from suffocation, the result of being accidentally over-laid, was returned.

Wednesday 25 January 1882, Issue 6032 – Gale Document No. Y3200732497
EXETER - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on Saturday held a court at the Topsham Inn for the purpose of enquiring into the cause of the death of MRS HANCOCK, which took place in the hospital on the previous day from injuries received while trying to make her escape from a burning house. Deceased's husband, a labourer, stated that he left Exeter on Wednesday in search of work, and walked to Stoke Canon and Thorverton. He did not her of the fire until Thursday, when he returned to Exeter and found that his wife had been taken to the hospital. Henry Rowe, husband of the other injured woman, stated that deceased was in his room talking to him and Mrs Rowe, when they saw smoke outside the window, and finding that they could not get out of the house by the staircase, witness helped his wife and child out of the window and also assisted the deceased to get out on to a roof. They could go no further than the parapet wall, but witness saw that there was a skylight roof about fifteen feet below the wall. He crawled along the roof, slid down to a window, kicked it open, and got into Mr Brock's furniture warehouse. He gave an alarm, and was afterwards told that his wife and MRS HANCOCK had got away all right; but shortly afterwards he saw his wife being conveyed to the hospital in a cab. William Pollard, French polisher at Messrs. Brock's, stated that while he was helping to remove some rolls of carpet he heard a great crash and saw the deceased come through the skylight, with a child in her arms. She was taken up in an unconscious state. He believed she must have missed her footing and slid down over the roof. Some discussion took place between the Coroner and the Jury as to whether the origin of the fire should be inquired into; the Coroner, though of opinion that such an Inquiry ought to be made, holding that the Queen's Bench had decided that it was beyond the jurisdiction of a Coroner's Jury to undertake it. Mr Boomfield, surgeon, gave evidence as to the deceased's injuries and the cause of death; he believed that the spinal cord must have been injured, as death was the result of paralysis. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was the saddest case that had been before him for a considerable time. As to the cause of the woman's death there could be no doubt it resulted from a fall. He had mentioned before that the Jury had only to inquire into the cause of death; they had nothing to do with the origin of the fire. He could not help alluding to the fact of poor people being allowed to live in old buildings where the means of communication – as in the present case – were cut off when a fire broke out. He thought it spoke a good deal in favour of industrial dwellings for the labouring classes, where, if a fire broke out, there were plenty of means of escape. The Jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 1 February 1882, Issue 6033 – Gale Document No. Y3200732534
EXETER – Sudden Death of a Pensioner. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest last evening at the Alexandria Inn, Bonhay-road, on view of the body of EDWARD CONNOR, who died suddenly yesterday morning. The deceased, who was fifty-nine years of age, had been a soldier in the 18th Regiment of Foot, which was stationed for many years in India. During his service he rose to the rank of Sergeant, and on the completion on his term retired with a pension. For the past eight years he had been in the employ of the Town Council as keeper of the Bonhay Pleasure Ground, which appointment he filled satisfactorily until his demise. The evidence was to the effect that the deceased retired to rest on Monday evening in his wonted health. About quarter after one o'clock on Tuesday morning MRS CONNOR was aroused by hearing a moaning noise. She found that it was her husband, and he exclaimed, "Cover me up, I am dying, I am done." MRS CONNOR left the house and met P.S. Full and P.C. Ray. The latter was despatched for Mr John Moon, surgeon, who shortly afterwards arrived, and pronounced life to be extinct. He considered that death resulted from natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. The Coroner expressed satisfaction at the promptitude with which the police had acted, and he was glad to see that they had noticed his suggestion that the nearest medical man should be sent for.

Wednesday 8 February 1882, Issue 6034 – Gale Document No. Y3200732586
EXMOUTH – Recovery of a Missing Body. - An Inquest was held at Exmouth on Thursday respecting the death of HENRY LACEY, a fisherman, who was drowned on the 20th December, and whose body was not recovered until Wednesday last, when it was found beached high nearly opposite the spot where the accident happened. The remains were little more than a skeleton, but they were easily identified by the clothes. George Gray, master of the boat in which LACEY sailed, deposed that on the morning of the 20th December they were returning from off Teignmouth, where they had been fishing. There was a heavy sea on the Exmouth Bar, and a strong wind from south-south-west. He was steering and LACEY was on his knees with the sheet in his hand. In crossing the Bar between the Wreck and Fairway Buoys a heavy sea broke over them, half filling the boat with water. At the same time the sheet flew out of LACEY'S hand, and he disappeared. He immediately threw out an oar, and shouted that there was a man overboard, but he could do nothing more. It was quite dark, and they were going at the rate of six or seven miles an hour. If he had attempted to stop the boat they must all have been drowned. Corroborative evidence having been given a verdict to the effect that deceased had been Accidentally Drowned was returned.

Wednesday 15 February 1882, Issue 6035 – Gale Document No. Y3200732626
LAMENTABLE DEATH OF AN EXONIAN. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday afternoon, at the Artillery Inn, Holloway-street, touching the death of JOHN WARD, of Landsdowne-terrace, which took place under most lamentable circumstances. Evidence was adduced by ROBERT WARD, brother of the deceased, whose residence is in Kent, Mr Thomas Dimond and Mrs Dimond, and Dr Bell. From their testimony it appeared that the deceased was seventy years of age, and that since the demise of his wife and the loss of some money in a bank, he had eked out a miserable existence. ROBERT WARD, his brother, visited him about three weeks since, and the deceased was then in a very dejected state, refused to acquiesce in his proposal to call in a medical man, and stated that he preferred to live alone as he had been living than have anyone to look after him. He was then in a very weak condition, and was very eccentric in his manner. Thomas Dimond (who is an inspector of water for the Corporation) resided in the same terrace as MR WARD, and not having seen him for three weeks, and knowing that he objected to see anyone, went into the house under the pretext of examining the water accommodation on Monday morning last. He saw the deceased standing on the stairs quivering, and evidently in a dying state. On remarking that he looked very ill he shook his head, and subsequently rejoined when Mr Dimond suggested the sending for a medical man. "I can't afford it." Dimond noticed bruises about the deceased's head, and that he was very dirty, and almost in a state of nudity. Mrs Dimond very kindly made some tea and corn flour for the deceased, which he took in ravenously. She also bathed his feet, and washed his hands. Mr Bell, police surgeon, had in the meantime been sent for, and on his arrival he found the poor fellow in a weak and exhausted state. Both of his feet were mortified, and his hands were beginning to mortify. Everything was done that was possible, but he expired in the afternoon. In answer to the Coroner the Medical man said the cause of death was "exhaustion from want of proper care and food." The Coroner commended the conduct of Mr and Mrs Dimond, as also did the Jury. Verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

WOODBURY - Fatal Accident. - Mr Cox, deputy District Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest at the White Hart Hotel, Woodbury, on the body of THOMAS SANDERS, a labourer, in the employ of Messrs Ware and Sons, tanners. On Thursday about half-past twelve the attention of Samuel Anning, engine driver at the tanner, was called to the machinery by an unusual rattling of a tin which was over the fly-wheel rattle, and he went over to see what was the matter. He turned back the wheel and stopped the steam, and then saw the deceased in the pit of the fly-wheel with his left arm between the pulley by the side of the large wheel and the belt. He called for assistance, and the deceased was released and laid on some tan. The only words deceased said were "I shall die under it." As soon as possible he was taken home and a doctor was sent for. He had since asked deceased how the accident happened, and he had said all that he remembered was that he was going for some coal, when the belt caught his legging, and he caught hold of the top belt with his left hand. In answer to questions by the Coroner, witness said there was a door which led from the engine to the yard, and just outside the door there was a heap of coal which was used for feeding the engine. Inside the door, however, and running across it were the belts, which were about three feet apart, and which were connected with the pulleys next the engine, and a shaft in another part of the building. In going for coal witness always went between these belts, and this he considered the deceased was doing at the time of the accident. Witness did not think passing between these belts was dangerous. Samuel Marks, another labourer at the tanner, said he had known deceased for some time. He had been suffering from a bone in the ankle, and was a little lame, but on the day of the accident witness noticed that he walked much better than usual. On that day, just before one o'clock, he was suddenly called for, and on running to the engine he saw the deceased with his left arm between the belt and the pulley. He pulled the belt off, helped deceased out of the pit, and a doctor was sent for immediately. Mr Henry Ware, managing partner of the firm, in answer to the Coroner, said he did not think it was necessary to caution his men with regard to the machinery. Deceased was a steady and industrious man, but he had nothing to do with any machinery except the pump. Witness did not consider he was a man of ordinary intelligence, and should not have entrusted him with the care of an engine. The nearest way to the coal was through the belts, and the witness Anning had always fetched coal in this way. He had never cautioned any9one in respect to passing through these belts. The Coroner remarked that it seemed to him that at any time a man might be caught in the belts. Mr Furnivall, surgeon, said he was called to attend the deceased, and found him suffering from such severe injuries that recovery was hopeless. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 15 February 1882, Issue 6035 – Gale Document No. Y3200732621
HONITON – Sad End Of A Frolic. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr C. Cox) held an Inquest at the Star Inn last Friday, touching the death of ARCHIBALD MCLEES, aged 16, a goods clerk at the Honiton Station, and second son of the station-master, who met with his death through falling from a signal-post at the station on Wednesday. Mr G. T. White, District Superintendent for the Western Division of the London and South western Railway, watched the proceedings for the Company; and Mr H. J. Foster, Police Inspector for the Company, was present on behalf of the police. Frederick Cridland (a lad employed by Messrs. Smith and Son to sell newspapers at the Honiton Station) said that he knew deceased very well. On Wednesday deceased was on the down platform with witness and lads named Webb, Orchard, and Baker. The deceased took off Webb's hat, and threw it into the booking-office. He then ran away, and said that no-one would catch him. Two boys stood on the down-platform, and two on the up-platform. The deceased jumped off the up-platform on to the line, and then ran over to the signal-post, and up the iron ladder which rested against it. He went up to the top and stood on the iron bar just above the ladder. He stood there for about a minute-and-a-half on his right foot, looking down to the boys under, who were playing with him. While there "Phil" Webb walked about half-way up the ladder after him, whereupon the deceased caught hold of the ornamental top of the post with both his hands and attempted to put his left foot down on the iron ladder. The ornament broke off, and the deceased fell to the ground with the ornament in his hand. He did not speak, and witness ran for assistance. Mr Robert Murray, who is doing duty at the station in the absence of the station-master, in consequence of illness, deposed that he had noticed the deceased was fond of play, and had he seen him on the signal-post he should have ordered him down. Dr Shortridge said he was called to see the deceased after the accident. He found that his right fore-arm was broken, and there was a deep bruise on the left elbow. The shock caused perforation of the bowels, which was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Foreman expressing on behalf of the Jury their sympathy with the family in their sad bereavement.

Wednesday 22 February 1882, Issue 6036 – Gale Document No. Y3200732660
SIDMOUTH – Suicide. - GEORGE ABBOTT, a quiet, sober man, of industrious habits, for some time engaged as stableman and mail cart driver, in the employ of Mr John Lake, of Sidmouth, went into a loft over the stable on Thursday afternoon and hanged himself to the beam. Dr Hodge was immediately sent for, and although every effort to restore animation was adopted, it was of no avail. Deceased went to his dinner as usual, and on returning to his work wished some of his children "good bye", and was seen in the yard a few minutes before he was discovered hanging. He leaves a widow and a large family. An Inquest was held on Friday before Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, and from the evidence given it appeared that deceased had been greatly troubled by one of his sons being convicted of felony. His wife said that he was always weak minded when in trouble, and that his mother had been in an asylum. The Jury returned a verdict of suicide whilst in a state of "Temporary Insanity."

FATALITY IN A MINE. - Mr Fulford, Coroner, on Monday held an Inquiry at the New Inn, Post Bridge, Dartmoor, into the cause of death of a miner, named RICHARD HENRY STEPHENS. Just after noon he, with another, was at work underground in the Golden Dagger Mine, about a mile from Post Bridge, and whilst charging a hole the powder exploded in the face of the deceased, and he sustained frightful injuries. He was at once conveyed to the surface, and after laying many hours in great agony he expired. Much interest was taken in the result of the Inquiry, because there was a report that although a doctor at Moretonhampstead was sent for he refused to attend because the messenger had no money. It appeared that deceased literally threw away his life by a wilful disregard of the instructions laid down in the regulations, for he used an iron pricker to ram home a charge of powder instead of one of copper or wood, and caused an explosion. With respect to the refusal of the doctor to visit the deceased, William White gave evidence that as no doctor came at eight o'clock he went for one. He reached Moretonhampstead at a quarter to nine. He saw Mr Collings who said he had two cases of confinement he was compelled to attend; he had sent a former messenger to Mr Hunt at Chagford, but as he did not appear to have come, Mr Collings referred him to Mr May. Witness explained to that gentleman the nature of the accident, and Mr May replied that he had made up his mind not to go beyond the turnpike-gate unless he received his fee beforehand. Witness told him he had no money, but that it would be all right. Mr May added that he was expecting a confinement case every hour. Witness then left Mr May and returned to Mr Collings, that gentleman having promised to go the first thing next morning if Mr May could not go. Mr Collings was out, but witness received instructions to bathe the wound. The Coroner, in summing up at some length, expressed his sorrow that such an accident should have occurred through the neglect by a miner to follow instructions laid down by the Government for his own safety. He hoped this man's death would be the means of inducing minors to act with greater caution, and that the loss of that poor man's life would be the means of preventing others from using such an iron with that gritty material. He again expressed sorrow that no medical man would attend; it was a matter of great regret to hear of any gentleman ,practising the honourable profession of medicine acting as they were told one had, for his great experience of the members of that profession was that they attended people wholly regardless of their being paid, and from a sense of moral duty and a feeling of right doing. They found that the deceased met with his death accidentally; they exonerated the managers of the mine from all blame, but they thought that the conduct of Mr May, of Moretonhampstead, in refusing to come without being paid, unprofessional and much to be regretted.

Wednesday 22 February 1882, Issue 6036 – Gale Document No. Y3200732645
EXETER – Death in the Gaol. - An Inquest was held at the Gaol last Friday before the District Coroner (F. Burrow, Esq.), upon the body of a man named OSMOND, who was convicted of stealing rope at the last assizes, and ordered to be imprisoned for three weeks. In appeared that OSMOND was a pensioner from the Metropolitan police force. At the time of his conviction he was very ill – suffering from Bright's disease – and on returning to the Gaol after the trial he was at once put under the care of the doctor. It was clear from the first that recovery was hopeless, though there was a possibility of the deceased lasting for some time beyond the period of his sentence. However, he gradually got worse, and his friends were sent for, but none of them came. The sentence expired on the 13th, but deceased was too ill to be removed, and died on the following day. OSMOND was in charge of another prisoner during his illness, and appeared to have had every attention paid him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held last Wednesday, before the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on the body of CORDELIA KEEBLE, wife of a gasfitter in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, living at 25, East John-street. The husband of the deceased said she was fifty-two years of age and had been ailing for some time, having been suffering from heart disease. Witness left deceased in the house alone about a quarter past six on Monday, and that (Wednesday) morning whilst at work at Templecombe he received a telegram calling him home. On returning by the first train he found her dead. She was subject to fits, having had one about two months ago. There was no one in the house with her when she died, as they lived by themselves. Thomas Haine, a neighbour, stated that between ten and half-past ten that morning he saw an unusual number of persons gathered in front of deceased's door. On making inquiries he was told that MRS KEEBLE had not been seen, and that the dog in the house had been howling all night. The front door was locked, but the back one being opened he entered through that in company with a police officer. Witness went upstairs and tried to pacify the dog, which was howling at the top. Whilst the policeman remained below. Having quieted the dog he entered a room, but on looking around saw nothing. As, however, he was about to leave, the dog began to whine and walked anxiously about the off side of the bed. This induced witness to look the other side of the bed, and on doing so he found deceased lying, dressed, on the floor, with her hand resting against the wall. Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, who was called in to see the deceased, deposed that when he saw deceased she had evidently been dead several hours. The left side of the mouth was drawn down, but there were no marks of violence. In witness's opinion the death was a natural one, most probably caused by an apoplectic fit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 1 March 1882, Issue 6037 – Gale Document No. Y3200732697
OTTERY ST. MARY – Fatal Accident. - A serious accident happened to a young man named ROWLAND, on Wednesday last. He was driving a waggon with two horses down a steep and dangerous ill, known as "Chineway," when one of the horses started and deceased was thrown from the waggon. In the act of falling, his side, near the region of the heart, came in contact with a corner of the vehicle and he was knocked senseless across the road. He was speedily removed to the Cottage Hospital by Mr S. Blackmore and Mr J. Turner, who happened to be near at the time of the accident. He lingered until Wednesday evening. An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased, by Mr S. Cox, the District Coroner, last Friday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The remains of the deceased were buried in the parish churchyard on Sunday, after the morning service. As he was a member of the Ottery division of the 3rd. D.R.V. that body attended the funeral, and the band played the "Dead March" in Saul. In the afternoon the Vicar preached a very touching sermon concerning the deceased. The text was St. James IV. 14.

Wednesday 8 March 1882, Issue 6038 – Gale Document No. Y3200732725
EXETER – SUSPICIOUS DEATH OF AN INFANT. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) last Friday evening held an Inquest at the London and South Western Hotel, on the body of RICHARD LETHBRIDGE TAVERNER, aged nine months, the son of a dairyman living in Paul-street. JESSIE TAVERNER, mother of the deceased, stated that since the child was a fortnight old he had been fed from a bottle. Mr Moon had medically attended the child on several occasions, and the doctor gave particular instructions that she was to give him nothing but half milk and half water in the bottle, and she fully carried out those directions. She had never given the child any solid food with the exception of a little Bath biscuit, and Mr Moon had never said that was improper food. He told her to give nothing but milk-and-water, but her friends advised something more solid sometimes. When he found out that biscuits had been given Mr Moon was very angry. The child was taken ill again on Thursday morning, when she sent for the doctor, and died about noon that day. She asked Mr Moon to certify as to the death, but he declined. Mr John Moon, surgeon, deposed that he was the medical attendant of the last witness, and he had also attended the deceased. The child was born healthy, but about two months ago he was called to see him in convulsions. He found the child in the arms of Miss Bradbeer, who said he was dying and it was no use doing anything for him. There was no fire in the room, and he had it lit by his own servant. He told the mother that the child had got over the convulsions and was simply going to sleep, but his statement was not believed. He pointed out the cause of the convulsions. On the chimney-piece was a cup of thick bread-sop, on which the child had been fed, but he directed that he should have no more of it. He mistrusted the following out of his instructions, so called again half-an-hour afterwards, when he found that a lot of the bread-sop had been given to the child in his absence. He inquired where the mother was, and was told that she was in bed. He went to the door and told MRS TAVERNER to get up and look after the baby herself. He added that if she gave any more food and he found it out and the child died, he would not certify. Next day the child was comparatively well. On Thursday morning he was again fetched to see the deceased, who was said to be seriously ill. He went as soon as possible, and found the baby's hand cold and dark, and his lips dark. He was breathing heavily, and he could feel no pulse. He ran into his own house for some medicine, in the hope that the child's heart might be stimulated and that he might be saved, but in a few minutes the child died. He could not say whether improper food had since been given to the child, but two months ago the food of which he complained was most improper and prejudicial. He told MRS TAVERNER that he could not certify, and that in his opinion she should have sent for a medical man before, especially after what he had previously said to her on the subject. He considered the cause of death natural, most probably from congestion, but he did not think that under the circumstances he could have certified. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said he considered it exceedingly wrong of the mother, and highly censurable on her part, not to have carried out the instructions of the medical man. The child was delicate, and certain food was prohibited, and yet it was persisted in. The public must understand that children could not be allowed to go off in this way without proper medical aid being sought in proper time, and there was no reason in this case why that should not have been done, because Mr Moon lived next door. Protection must be extended to those who could not help themselves. He did not know whether the Jury agreed with what he had said, as he had only expressed his own view of the case. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "death from Natural Causes," without any comment. Before MRS TAVERNER left the Court the Coroner told her that she must not put her own views of what was right against those who were better able to judge than she was. He trusted that what had occurred would leave a serious impression on her mind, and act as a warning in the future.

Wednesday 8 March 1882, Issue 6038 – Gale Document No. Y3200732731
WITHERIDGE - Died From Exposure. - On Thursday last Mr F. Burrow, District Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of SAMUEL BAKER, shoemaker, late of Southmolton. It appears that the deceased had been in the Southmolton Workhouse for about nine months, and left that place on Tuesday morning, having a few days previously received a sovereign from an uncle living at Chawleigh, whither he was going. He visited several public houses during Tuesday, and was found on Wednesday morning about five o'clock lying against the hedge on the highway, about a quarter of a mile from the farm at Witheridge. He was taken into Coombe Farm, where he died within seven minutes afterwards. After a few remarks from the Coroner, in which he pointed out that Tuesday night was very wet, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from exposure.

Wednesday 15 March 1882, issue 6039 – Gale Document No. Y3200732764
TOTNES – Fatal Accident on the Railway. - Mr S. Hacker, Deputy Coroner, on Friday last held an Inquest at the Totnes Railway Station, respecting the death of WILLIAM COOMBES, stoker on the Great Western Railway, whose dead body was found on the line near Totnes on Thursday morning. After hearing in evidence an account of the circumstances under which the engine-driver of the train missed the deceased from his engine, and the subsequent discovery of his mutilated body, the Jury, with the exception of Mr R. Harris, returned a verdict of "Accidental death." The father of the deceased, who lives at Perranwell, arrived at Totnes on Friday, and returned with his son's remains to Perranwell, where the wife of the deceased is stopping.

Wednesday 29 March 1882, Issue 6041 – Gale Document No. Y3200732843
AXMOUTH – Fatal Quarry Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Ship Inn, Axmouth, near Seaton, before the Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Cox), on the 21st inst., touching the death of JOSEPH PERRY, a widower, aged 60, who met with his death on the previous day while working in a quarry at Axmouth. Deceased had been employed in excavating stone for the purpose of building Coastguard cottages at Axmouth. The evidence went to show that the stone was very loose, and Mr Hooper had cautioned the men. On Monday deceased went to the quarry to remove a large stone weighing about two tons Deceased endeavoured to move the stone with a bar, while a man named Dare was looking on. Dare saw that the stone was moving, and immediately he called out, "Look out, old man, that stone is moving." Deceased replied, "I see," and witness said "Yes; run away." The deceased ran away, but as he was doing so the stone fell and struck him on the leg, which caused him to fall. The stone then rolled over upon the deceased Dare saw another stone falling, and ran to the deceased, and removed him just in time to prevent the stone falling on him. Assistance was called, but the deceased died within four minutes. The only remark deceased made was when Dare removed the stone, and that was simply the words "Oh, dear." - The Jury were unanimous in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 29 March 1882, Issue 6041 – Gale Document No. Y3200732822
EXETER – Sudden Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, on Saturday, on the body of a labourer named JAMES LASHBROOK, who had died suddenly during the previous night. Deceased's wife gave evidence to the effect that her husband was twenty-seven years of age, and lived in Chudley's-court. It appeared from the evidence of Mr Perkins, surgeon, of South-street, that death resulted from the rupture of a large blood vessel near the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 5 April 1882, Issue 6042 – Gale Document No. Y3200732858
EXETER – Death from Burning. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), yesterday morning held an Inquest at the Princess Alexandra Inn, Bonhay-road, touching the death of SUSAN RADFORD, of Bonhay-road, laundress. On March 19th last the deceased, who was eighty-one years of age, was pouring some benzoline oil into a lamp, when she overfilled it. She was in the act of emptying the lamp again, when some of the oil spilt upon the floor, and, being close to the fire, soon caught. The flames rose to nearly four feet, and the deceased (who was very weak), became frightened, and fell into the flames. Her sister, MRS SARAH PEARSE, of Russell-street, pulled her out, and covered her with a piece of carpet. The deceased, who was very much burnt, expired on Saturday last. Mr Harris, surgeon, stated that the deceased was severely burnt about the legs. He considered the cause of death was shock and exhaustion consequent on the burns. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 12 April 1882, Issue6043 – Gale Document No. Y3200732903
EXETER – Inquests. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), at the Topsham Inn, on Thursday, assembled a Jury to enquire into the death of ELIZABETH HEPPER, lately residing in George's-street, which occurred that morning at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, from the effects of an accident sustained on the previous Friday. It appeared that on the 31st ult. a man named John Ponsford was driving a horse and waggon down Summerland-street at a trotting pace, when a little boy named Short threw a stick at the animal's head. The horse shied, and, in so doing, knocked down the deceased, who at the time was crossing the road. She was immediately removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was found that the collar-bone had been broken and a bruise inflicted on the top of the head. The deceased, who was eighty-six years of age, rallied for a time, but died from shock to the system on Thursday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and acquitted the driver of any blame.

At the Blind Institution, St. David's-hill, on Thursday, the City Coroner held an Inquest relative to the death on the previous day of OLIVER BARTER, sixteen years of age. The deceased had been an inmate of the institution for two years. He entered the institution to learn basket-making. On the day in question the deceased seemed in perfect health, and ate a hearty dinner. After dinner he went into the recreation ground for the purpose of swinging, and about a quarter of an hour afterwards he was found lying on the ground and foaming at the mouth. Mr John Wyllie, Governor of the Institution, immediately ordered him to be put to bed, and bathed his feet with warm water. The deceased was in no way subject to fits. Mr J. S. Perkins, the surgeon to the institution, was sent for, but the deceased died before he arrived. Upon examination of the body he did not perceive any indications of violence, with the exception of a mark on the nose, apparently from a fall. He also found on the right side of the head a chronic swelling, which if pressed on the brain would cause death. In his opinion death resulted from apoplexy produced by the pressure of the swelling on the head. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 12 April 1882, Issue6043 – Gale Document No. Y3200732890
EXETER – Fatal Accident To A Mail Cart Driver. - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper last evening at the George and Dragon Inn, Blackboy-road, on the body of WM. NATHANIEL SNOW, a mail cart driver, who died yesterday morning from injuries sustained through falling out of his mail cart in Exeter on Sunday evening. Evidence was adduced by ELIZA SNOW, the deceased's wife, who lives in Trafalga-terrace, James Ewings, in the employ of Mr Strong, of the Bampfylde Mews, Dr Perkins, and Mr Bloomfield (house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital). From their testimony it appeared that the deceased was 42 years of age. On Sunday last he was driving the mail cart from High-street to the Bampfylde Mews. The horse turned the corner by the Half Moon very suddenly, which caused the driver to lose his balance, and he fell into the road. This was witnessed by James Ewings, who conveyed the injured man to the hospital. Here his head was dressed, and he was allowed to leave the institution, his injuries not appearing to be of a serious character. On Monday morning Dr Perkins was called in to see the deceased at his house, when he found him in bed in an unconscious state. He examined his head and found a small wound at the back of it about a quarter of an inch in length, which was lacerated, and leading to the bone. Externally no fracture could be detected. Dr Perkins again visited the patient, accompanied by his father, on Monday evening. On Tuesday morning the poor fellow died. The medical man considered death was most probably caused by internal haemorrhage, which was the result of a fracture of the base of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 19 April 1882, Issue 6044 – Gale Document No. Y3200732945
EXETER – Sudden Death of an Infant. - The City Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., on Monday held an Inquiry as to the death of VIOLET LILIAN COLLINS, infant daughter of MR PAUL COLLINS, proprietor of the Black Horse Hotel. On Thursday morning the child, who had previously been suffering from a cough and diarrhoea, was taken unwell, and Mr Cummings, a surgeon, of Exeter, was sent for, but on his arrival the child was dead. The mother of the deceased, in her evidence, said that Dr Cummings was sent for at 5.30, and did not arrive until an hour and twenty minutes afterwards. Mr Cummings, however, states that he was not sent for until 6.30, and not more than twenty minutes elapsed before he visited the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and exonerated the medical man from blame.

Wednesday 26 April 1882, Issue 6045 – Gale Document No. Y3200732963
EXETER - Shocking Death From Burns. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.,) on Thursday last held an Inquest at Exeter as to the death of MARTHA STONEMAN, wife of a labourer, residing at Wonford, who died on Wednesday in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased was pouring benzoline oil from a bottle into the fire for the purpose of lighting it, but there happening to be a live coal in the grate, the liquid burnt into flames, setting fire to MRS STONEMAN, who in her excitement, made the matter worse by wrapping the bottle containing the benzoline up in her apron. She ran out into the garden, and some neighbours hearing her screams put out the flames, and having been examined by Dr Henderson, who was in the neighbourhood, she was sent at once to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she died from her burns and a severe shock. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Coroner remarked that the very general practice of using benzoline for the purpose of lighting fires seemed to be becoming general among a class of people who were ignorant of its inflammable nature.

EXETER – An Inquest was held last Wednesday, at the Turk's Head Inn, by Mr Coroner Hooper, touching the death of AGNES, wife of WILLIAM STADDON, a watchman on the Tramways. The deceased it appeared had been unwell for some time past and had been under the doctor's care at the Dispensary. On Monday morning early the husband said his wife woke him up and told him she was very ill. She commenced vomiting, and seeing she was very ill he went for a doctor. When he left his wife on Sunday evening she seemed in her usual health. Florence Richards, who had been staying with the deceased, said she was called by the last witness to attend the deceased and by her advice he went for the doctor, before whose arrival, however, deceased died. Mr A. Roper, surgeon, said the deceased had been under his care at the Dispensary for three months, and had been treated for an affection of the heart and chronic dyspepsia. He had made a post mortem examination and the result led him to believe that death had arisen from stoppage of the heart by excessive vomiting. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Boy Drowned in the Mill Leat. - An Inquest was held on Saturday t the Bishop Blaize Inn, by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on the body of a little boy named WILLIAM FREDERICK SOUTHWOOD, who was found drowned in the mill-leat adjoining the Commercial-road about twelve o'clock that day. The evidence went to show that the deceased, who was three years of age, left home on Saturday morning about nine o'clock with Henry Phillips, a hawker, of Water-lane, and that about eleven o'clock, Phillips, still accompanied by the little boy, went into the Round Tree Inn. After remaining there some time the deceased ran out to play, returned, and went away again. Soon after, Phillips, finding that the boy did not return as before, went in search of him, and within ten minutes was informed that the boy's body had been taken out of the mill-leat by a sawyer's labourer named Milford, just before twelve o'clock. The body was conveyed to the Bishop Blaize Inn, where it was examined shortly afterwards by Mr Perkins, surgeon, of Magdalen-street, who found no marks of violence whatever upon it. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 3 May 1882, Issue 6046 – Gale Document No. Y3200733021
COLYTON – Death of a Woman Through Violence. - The District Coroner, Mr C. E. Cox, on Saturday held an Inquest at the Colcombe Castle Hotel, respecting the death of ELIZABETH LONG, the wife of GEORGE LONG, a labourer in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company. Deceased was thirty-two years of age, and died on Thursday. Dr O'Meara stated that on Thursday morning he visited the deceased, and found her enceinte and suffering great pain. There were four or five other persons in the bedroom where deceased was, and one of them said that deceased had been assaulted, and they put down all the symptoms to that cause. Someone said she was struck in the left side. He considered that she was suffering from internal haemorrhage and from inflammation of the membrane of the intestines. Witness took deceased some medicine and then left her. He returned in about two hours and found her dying, and she died in about half-an-hour. He subsequently examined the body for external marks of violence, but could not find any. He made a post mortem examination, which showed that death had been caused by violence. George Wood, basket-maker, Colyton, stated that he lived next door to deceased, and on Tuesday, the 18th of April, he was in his garden when the deceased came to him and said that Pidgeon (who was a lodger in deceased's house) had said that he (witness) was going to "take her things." Witness called Pidgeon and asked him what he had said, whereupon he replied that deceased was telling lies. Pidgeon went into the house again, but deceased said, "that old hound shan't stop here any longer," and she pulled him out of the house and shut the door. Pidgeon tried to re-enter, and a scuffle ensued, but ultimately Pidgeon got into the house. He saw no blows struck. Mrs Searle, of Seaton, stated that deceased came to her on the 18th and complained that Pidgeon had struck her. She was in great pain, and cried very much. Witness and deceased went to Colyford to Mrs Newton's house, and while there Pidgeon entered and quarrelled with deceased and struck her twice in the cheek. Mary Newton, a married woman of Colyford, swore that deceased struck Pidgeon twice while at her house before Pidgeon struck deceased, and then he "only touched her with his fingers." The Jury found that death was caused by violence applied in some way or other to the abdomen, but in what manner there was no evidence to show.

Wednesday 17 May 1882, Issue 6048 – Gale Document No. Y3200733082
EXBOURNE – Fatal Case of Burning. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, on Wednesday, before W. H. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner) relative to the death of DANIEL PALMER EASTERBROOK, the child of JOHN POTTER, farm-labourer, of Exbourne. The deceased was four years old, and was severely injured by fire occasioned through playing with a newspaper on the 15th January. The child did not sufficiently recover under medical treatment at home, and, on the 2nd March, was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it died on Monday morning at six o'clock. Mr Arthur G. Blomfield, house-surgeon, was of opinion that the child was naturally of so feeble a constitution that it was unable to resist the great shock to the system caused by the very extensive burns it had received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 24 May 1882, Issue 6049 – Gale Document No. Y3200733126
AXMOUTH – Suicide. - On Saturday last the District Coroner (S. M. Cox, Esq.) held an Inquest upon view of the body of ELIAS PEADON, aged 58, a butler, who has been in the employ of W. T. Hallett, Esq., J.P., of Stedcombe House, near Seaton, for the past 20 years. The deceased was a married man, and his wife lives at Axmouth. He had lately complained of pains in his side and head, and from the evidence of James Tucker, under-gardener, John Parsons, coachman, and Mary Love, the cook, the deceased had not been "exactly himself." He had not joked as much. The deceased was found hanging by his neck in Mr Hallett's cart-house on Friday morning, and was cut down by the coachman, who, finding him stiff and cold, was of opinion that he had been hanging there several hours. He was in the same clothes that he wore when he waited at table on the previous evening. The Jury found that the deceased committed suicide while Temporary Insane.

SEATON – Child Scalded to Death. - On Saturday morning the District Coroner (S. M. Cox, Esq.) held an Inquest at the White Hart Inn, Colyford, about a mile-and-a-half from Seaton, touching the death of a little boy, aged 19 months, the son of JOHN HOSKINS, a labourer, of the village. It appeared from the evidence that the little fellow caught hold of a kettle of boiling water, which was standing on the fire-place, and either drank from the kettle or inhaled the steam. This was done on Wednesday, and the child, although attended by Dr O'Meara, died on the following Friday from inflammation of the windpipe. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 24 May 1882, Issue 6049 – Gale Document No. Y3200733107
EXETER – Death From Slipping on Orange Peel. - The Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on Wednesday last, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, respecting the death of MARGARET WATERFIELD, aged 76. The deceased was a nurse, and on the 20th March was employed at Mr Brunt's, St. Jams. On that day she was sent on an errand, and half-an-hour after leaving the house she was brought back in a cab. She told the cook at Mr Brunt's that she had fallen through stepping on a piece of orange peel on the pavement outside the Arcade, and that she had hurt her lip. She was immediately put to bed, and Mr Perkins, surgeon, sent for. Seeing that she had a fractured thigh, that gentleman recommended her removal to the Hospital, which was done. Mr Boomfield, house surgeon at the Hospital said that when deceased was admitted she was suffering from a broken thigh at the hip joint. Symptoms of serious injuries soon came on, and she died at last of exhaustion and shock to the system. Before recording their verdict one of the Jurymen asked if there could not be appended to the verdict a recommendation to the Authorities with regard to the throwing of orange peel on the pavement? The Coroner did not see how they were to prevent the practice, but he thought the officer might inform the Chief Constable that a death had resulted from slipping on orange peel, and then possibly he might be able to devise some further means of putting a greater check on this evil. The Jury concurred with his, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 31 May 1882, issue 6050 – Gale Document No. Y3200733145
EXETER – Child Run Over and Killed. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, on Saturday afternoon, before H. W. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner) on the body of ROBERT CHARLES BOND, aged one year and ten months, who died from injuries received through being run over in West-street on Friday afternoon. The deceased was the son of a labourer living in Coombe-street. Rupert Guppy, a toll-collector, stated that on Friday afternoon he saw a horse being driven from Coombe-street into West-street. The deceased was playing about in the road, and witness shouted to the driver to be careful. Witness ran to take the child out of the way, and just as he came up to him the little fellow was knocked down by the horse, and the wheel of the cart went over his body. The horse was walking at the time, and the driver seemed to be sober; in fact he believed he was a teetotaller. Witness picked up the child and was going towards the Hospital with him, but somebody took him out of his arms and conveyed him to the Hospital. William John Heard, the driver of the horse and cart, said the cart contained three bags of rags, one of bones, and a man named Holland. As he was driving he heard the last witness call out "Stop, stop," and he at once pulled up, but the wheel of the vehicle went over the boy exactly as he stopped. He did not see the child at all. His eye-lashes were bad, but his sight was not defective. Holland did not see the child, because he was riding with his back to the horse. Mr Arthur George Blomfield, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, stated that the deceased was received into that institution on the previous afternoon in a state of collapse. He found that there was a dark mark like a bruise over the stomach, and another across the back. The child cried and rallied slightly at first, but died about two hours after admission. The cause of death was internal haemorrhage. The Coroner having summed up the case, the Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and entirely exonerated Heard, the driver, from all blame.

Wednesday 14 June 1882, Issue 6052 – Gale Document No. Y3200733231
KINGSBRIDGE – Death From Scalds. - An Inquest was held by Dr Gaye at Widdicombe House, Stokenham, near Kingsbridge, last Thursday, on the body of EDWARD DENMAN HOLDSWORTH, aged five years, the son of MR A. F. HOLDSWORTH, J.P. On the previous Tuesday evening, during the absence of MR and MRS HOLDSWORTH, the nurse, Catherine French, finding that the lad was suffering from a cold, decided on bathing his feet prior to putting him to bed. For that purpose she put some hot water in a foot-bath, sitting the boy on the bed by the side of it while she fetched some cold water. She cautioned the lad not to move. Just afterwards she heard the lad scream, and on returning found that he had got into the bath. His feet and legs were fearfully scalded. She took him out and applied some remedies, which gave him ease, then put him to bed, and he appeared to sleep comfortably. Next morning he became much worse, and died before Dr Elliot could be called in. Dr Elliot was of opinion that the lad had died from the effects of the scalds and shock to the system, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

TORQUAY – The Recent Boating Disaster. - The bodies of the two young men, MR F. EDWARDS, son of MR EDWARDS, carriage manufacturer, Torquay, and MR H. PARKER, shop assistant, also of Torquay, who were drowned in the Bay on Sunday week, but the upsetting of their boat were recovered on Wednesday, by Messrs. Brown, who employed a steam launch and a boat and threw out grappling irons. A watch found on PARKER had stopped at half-past twelve, which was about the time when it was reported to the Coastguard at Paignton that a boat had sunk. MR EDWARDS appeared to have taken off his coat in the attempt to save his life, and the hooks caught him by the shirt sleeves, his coat having been found first not far from the body. The watch of the deceased had stopped 17 minutes past twelve. The Inquest was held the same evening at the Town Hall, Torquay, before Mr Hacker, Deputy Coroner for the District. Captain Medley, Chief of the Coastguard, was present. Mr Release, PARKER'S employer, identified the bodies. C. Tomlinson and W. Earle, of Paignton, gave evidence as to the accident. The latter said he saw the boat disappear; it was blowing hard. Saw no one struggle in the water. He and Tomlinson ran to the Coastguard Station and reported that they had just see a boat go down off Paignton Head. The officer did not believe them, and said that the boat thought to have capsized had rounded the point. Witness looked again, and as he saw nothing he thought he was mistaken. Several Jurors pointed out that witness had distinctly stated that he saw a boat go down. Witness replied that it happened so quickly, and as the Coastguard were positive, he concluded they were right, especially as they pointed to a boat going round the Point. G. Greet, Coastguard officer, said he understood Tomlinson to mean by the words "disappeared from sight," that there had been an accident, and he sent a watchman for "satisfaction." Tom Brown, boatman, gave evidence as to the finding of the bodies. The Deputy Coroner, in summing up, said the Coastguard officer had been informed of the accident by one person at least. Whether he saw the accident or not, that information was sufficient to have caused the officer to at once have gone out or sent a boat to the spot indicated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and were unanimous in censuring the Coastguard officer for gross negligence of duty.

Wednesday 21 June 1882, Issue 6053 – Gale Document No. Y3200733271
BIDEFORD – Distressing Death by Drowning. - Painful excitement was caused in Bideford on Saturday by the report that MISS JESSIE TANTON, a much respected resident, had met her death under mysterious circumstances. MISS TANTON had a business at Torrington, whither she went daily to superintend it. On Saturday morning she left Bideford by the early mail, and on the arrival of the train at Torrington it was seen that MISS TANTON was not a passenger, although her hat and basket were in a second class compartment. A search was made all along the line, and telegrams were despatched to Bideford narrating the circumstances. Subsequently three boatmen discovered, near the railway-bridge at Lancross, the body of MISS TANTON, which had been in the water and by the ebb tide had been left visible. Her right hand was in her Ulster pocket, but there were no marks of violence about the body. On inquiry it was elicited that MISS TANTON entered a second-class compartment alone, and as the train moved out of Bideford she was observed standing looking out of the window. In this position she was again seen about a quarter down the line by a labourer, and the porters and guards assert that the carriage was properly fastened before the train started. Two labourers who had been working on the bridge at Lancross examined it after the report of the accident reached them and found two heel prints on the parapet, and a smudge as if the body had been dragged along for thirty yards. During Saturday evening an Inquest was held on the body, when evidence corroborative of the above details was elicited, and in addition Miss Craig was called, who slept with MISS TANTON the previous night. Miss Craig stated that during the night MISS TANTON was restless, and did not appear to cheerful as usual, but there was nothing in her manner to create any uneasiness. The Jury, after viewing the scene, returned as their verdict that the deceased was found drowned, such drowning being caused by an accidental fall from the carriage. The deceased was insured for £1,000, and it is said that an Inspector from the office, sent down to investigate the case, is not satisfied with the result of the Inquest, and contemplates taking steps for instituting a further Enquiry. Much sympathy is felt for MRS TANTON the mother of the deceased, and for her sister (MRS CLEMORD) and her family.

Wednesday 28 June 1882, Issue 6054 – Gale Document No. Y3200733283
TRAGEDY AT DEVONPORT – A Coroner's Enquiry was opened at Devonport on Wednesday evening, on the body of a woman named ENDACOTT, who died from wounds inflicted upon her by a painter named Coran, with whom she had been cohabiting. Coran was jealous of the woman, and on Tuesday night assaulted her with a hatchet, inflicting such terrible injuries that she died a few hours afterwards. On being apprehended Coran said, "She struck me first with the hatchet, and I struck her again." When told she was dead he said, "I am sorry, but I did it in self-defence. She was a bad one." At the adjourned Inquest on Monday, the evidence of the doctor proved the assault to have been peculiarly atrocious, one of the wounds in the neck being five inches long and two inches deep, while the many injuries inflicted on the head pointed to the use of a hatchet, a poker, and a penknife. The Jury, after being locked up for two hours, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Coran, a verdict which the Coroner said he was bound to accept, but from which he most thoroughly disagreed.

Wednesday 5 July 1882, Issue 6055 – Gale Document No. Y3200733342
EXETER – Death of Two Children by Drowning. - An Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr Hooper) yesterday afternoon, at the Round Tree Inn, Frog-street, touching the melancholy death of HENRY JOHN GILL, four years of age, whose parents live in Frog-street, and AMY MORTIMORE DARKES, five years of age, whose parents also live in Frog Street. It appeared from the testimony adduced that on Sunday afternoon the two children attended the Exe Island Mission School. Before the time for the children's dismissal the little boy asked permission of his teacher, a Mrs Gillard, to leave the class. He was permitted to do so, and some other scholars left at the same time. There is a mill-leat in the vicinity of the school, to which children can easily gain access. At what are called the "dipping-steps" there is no protection, although the water there is a considerable depth and the stream runs very swiftly. It is supposed that the children fell in there. After they were missed George Philips, a labourer, dragged the leat with grappling irons without success; but both bodies were found at considerable distance from the Exe Island "dipping-steps" some hours afterwards. Mr Perkins, surgeon, subsequently examined the bodies. There were no external marks of violence, and his opinion was that death resulted from drowning. Some very strong remarks were made by the Jury upon the unguarded state of the mill-leat. The Coroner expressed his sorrow that a recommendation he had made to the Town Council concerning the dangerous state of another part of the leat had received no attention. A Juryman suggested that a request be made to the Town Council to get them to fence the spot where the children were supposed to have fallen into the water. The Coroner pointed out that such a course could not be adopted because no specific evidence had been given as to the spot where the children fell in. He suggested that the Town Council be asked to have the mill-leat properly fenced wherever there was a likelihood of danger. He further stated that a serious responsibility would rest upon the Town Council if another death ensued through the unprotected condition of the leat. The Jurymen concurred with the Coroner's expressions. A verdict was come to that the children met their death by drowning, but there was no evidence to prove where they fell into the water.

Wednesday 12 July 1882, Issue 6056 – Gale Document No. Y3200733360
EXETER – Sudden Death of an Infant. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on Monday evening held an Inquest at Yelland's Spirit Vaults, South-street, touching the death of LOUSA MARY LYNE, the infant daughter of JOHN LYNE, a labourer, residing in Quay-lane. It appeared that the child, who was one year and seven months old, had been weakly from birth, and had been under medical treatment, but had not been seen by a doctor for a week past. On Saturday evening she was put to bed as usual, and on MRS LYNE going into the room about an hour afterwards she found the child in convulsions. She called a neighbour to her assistance and ran for Mr Perkins, who came directly, but only to find the child dead. The medical evidence was to the effect that the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

EXETER – Supposed Suicide in the Exeter Canal. - F. Burrows, Esq. (County Coroner) held an Inquest on Monday afternoon at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, on the body of MRS MARY BURNETT, whose body was found in the Exeter Canal on Saturday evening last. There was no evidence to show how the deceased came in the water, and the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 19 July 1882, Issue 6057 – Gale Document No. Y3200733413
APPLEDORE – A Seaman Drowned. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the King's Head Inn, Northam, before James F. Bromham, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of RICHARD WILLCOCKS, who was drowned off Appledore, on the previous Tuesday night. RICHARD B. WILLCOCKS, labourer, of Colebrooke, near Copplestone, identified the body as that of his son, who was twenty years of age. The deceased was employed on board Mr Claude Rafarel's steam yacht Lilian. John William Berry, fisherman, deposed that about half-past nine on Wednesday night he was going off fishing when he found the body of the deceased on the beach at Appledore; and P.C. Yelland stated that he went to the assistance of the last witness and took the corpse to the mortuary, adding that on the body he found a purse containing 30s. John Slade, plumber, of Appledore, deposed that at seven o'clock on Tuesday evening two men – the deceased and John Mortimer – who were employed on board a steam yacht lying at Instow, came to his shop for some oil. He saw them go towards a slip, where their boat – a small punt – was lying. The night was very stormy, and a heavy sea running. P.C. John Parker stated that the punt was found off Instow on Wednesday morning, together with the hat of the other occupant of the boat, who has not been seen since. After a short discussion the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 2 August 1882, Issue 6059 – Gale Document No. Y3200733482
SIDBURY – Fatal Accident. - On Saturday an accident occurred here which terminated in the death of JOHN PARSONS, aged 73 years. Deceased was on the top of a hayrick when he fell off, and died within a short time. It is supposed he had a fit. Deceased was a good old labourer and much respected. An Inquest was held on Monday, before E. C. Cox, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when several witnesses were called as to the nature of the accident, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 9 August 1882, Issue 6060 – Gale Document No. Y3200733519
NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident at a Level Crossing. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on Friday last, held an Inquest at Teignbridge, concerning the death of THOMAS BICKFORD, aged seventy-two, late in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company as gate-keeper at the level crossing at Teignbridge. The Inquiry was attended, on behalf of the Railway Company, by Mr John Northcott, chief inspector, of Plymouth. It appeared that at a quarter past five on Thursday evening, William Ford, a ganger, of Newton, accompanied by another man named Thomas Wreyford, was engaged in taking a trolly-load of timber over the line from Teigngrace, intending to bring it up and unload it within six or eight feet of the gate at the level crossing. By some means the trolly went beyond where it was intended, and the result was that the pieces of timber, which projected several feet in front of it, struck slightly against the gage, which at the moment was being opened by the deceased, who had already opened the gate on the other side of the roadway. The effect of the shock was that deceased was struck in the face by the top of the gate, and he fell to the ground, sustaining a blow on the back of the head, which stunned him. The two trolly-men picked deceased up, took him into the cottage close by, where he had lived by himself, and laid him upon a sofa. Mr Grimbly, surgeon, of Newton, was sent for, and on his arriving found the deceased still unconscious. There was a contusion on the right side of the old man's lower jaw, and a wound at the back of his head. The deceased died at five minutes to nine, the cause of death being concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a recommendation that the trollies used by the Great Western Railway Company's workmen should not in future be allowed to come within 100 yards of level crossings when the gates were closed, without proper notice being given, also that some improved means of putting a brake on the trollies should be used. The Coroner promised to forward this recommendation to the Board of Trade.

HONITON – Found Drowned. - An Inquest was held last week at Hemyock, before C. E. Cox, Esq. (Deputy Coroner), on the body of AGNES BROOM, who was found dead in a pool of water near her residence on Monday. From the evidence adduced, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased had had an apoplectic fit, and had fallen into the pool, thereby causing death.

TIVERTON – Sad Death of a Medical Man. - The Borough Coroner (Mr Mackenzie) on the 1st inst., held an Inquest at the Town Hall concerning the death of GODFREY ROHRS, who expired suddenly on the previous day. Deceased was assistant to Dr J. P. McNeill, and had been in the habit of dispensing medicines. On Sunday night about 11 o'clock deceased told Dr McNeill that he had had too much to drink, and added – "Ought I not to take something to prevent the effects of the drink?" Dr McNeill told deceased to go to bed in reply, and deceased went. Early in the morning deceased was found unconscious in bed, having vomited, and he died about half-past four on Monday afternoon. The housekeeper said that in the course of the previous evening she had seen the deceased take something in a bottle from a shelf containing poisons. Verdict, "Death by misadventure."

Wednesday 9 August 1882, Issue 6060 – Gale Document No. Y3200733521
EXETER – A Man Found Drowned in the Exe. - Yesterday morning the dead body of a labourer, named CHARLES PRESTON, who lived in Stephen's-buildings, Okehampton-street, was found in the river, in the vicinity of the dipping-steps, situate in Okehampton-street. It appears that the deceased was last seen alive at eleven o'clock on Monday evening. Early yesterday morning his hat was found in the passage leading to the dipping-steps, and PRESTON not having been home during the night, it was feared that he had, by some unaccountable means, got into the water. About six o'clock a labourer, named James Wills, living in the West Quarter, assisted by Sergeant Frost, of the Devon County Constabulary, commenced grappling for the body, and within ten minutes it was recovered at a distance of ten yards from the steps towards Exe Bridge. Dr Vieland was communicated with, and, upon an examination of the body, he pronounced life to be extinct. He also gave it as his opinion that the unfortunate man had been dead several hours. Nothing, ask yet, has been elicited to show how PRESTON found his way into the water. The fact of his hat being found in the passage, however, conclusively proves that it occurred at this point. the County Coroner (Mr F. Burrows) has been communicated with, and, in all probability, an Inquest will be held today (Wednesday) at the Okehampton Inn, where the body was removed, when, it is hoped, that further light may be thrown upon the affair.

Wednesday 16 August 1882, Issue 6061 – Gale Document No. Y3200733541
EXETER – Found Drowned. - An Inquest was held at the Okehampton Inn, St. Thomas, last Wednesday, before F. Burrow, Esq., District Coroner, touching the death of CHARLES PRESTON, 46 years of age, in the employ of Messrs. Chaplin and Horne, railway carriers, whose body was found in the Exe as described in last week's paper. There was no evidence to shew how the deceased got into the river, but it is surmised that he must have gone to the dipping-steps for convenience sake and accidentally fallen in. The Jury found an open verdict of "Found Drowned," and on the suggestion of Mr Helmore, one of the number, added a recommendation that an iron cage be placed in front of these dipping-steps, where already no less than three lives have been lost.

Wednesday 23 August 1882, Issue 6062 – Gale Document No. Y3200733592
OKEHAMPTON – Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Sticklepath on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Fulford, touching the death of MR GEORGE HEALE, baker, of Okehampton, who was found drowned in a stream of water near Rockside, Belstone, on Monday. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

DAWLISH – Sudden Death. - Sidney Hacker, Esq., Coroner for the District, on Saturday held an Inquest at the London Hotel, Dawlish, touching the death of a young gentleman on the beach the same day. NIXON CHETWODE RAM, said – the deceased was his brother, and was 18 years of age last December. They were living at No. 10, Strand, Dawlish. His brother was studying for the University of Cambridge. His mother and sister were also visiting Dawlish. They came last Tuesday. His brother and himself got up about eight o'clock on Saturday morning, and they all ate a hearty breakfast. Deceased was reading until 11 a.m. Witness went on to the Gentlemen's Bathing Cove, and deceased followed him there. After they had been in the water about a quarter-of-an-hour, his brother said he felt ill and giddy, and remarked that everything looked black, and he said his heart was beating fast. They then came ashore, dressed, and proceeded towards where his mother was sitting in the Ladies' Bathing Cove opposite Cliff House. In about two minutes after they had reached the Bathing Cove deceased said, "I am getting giddy again." He then fell down on his side on the shingle and Dr Parsons was fetched. Mr A. D. Parsons, physician and surgeon of Dawlish, said: When I saw the deceased he was perfectly cold, and I considered he was dead. I tried to restore respiration at once, and then had him conveyed to his home, where I tried restoratives for about an hour. He got what may be termed artificial respiration, but he was virtually dead, pulseless, with no action of the heart. I examined the body externally. I am of opinion that death was caused by heart disease – syncope, hastened perhaps by sunstroke whilst on the beach. If he had a stimulant earlier he might have rallied. In accordance with the medical testimony the Jury at once gave it as their opinion that death occurred from "Syncope of the heart." The Jury gave their fees (13s.) to be equally divided between the Dawlish Cottage Hospital and the Dawlish Dispensary, and expressed a wish that a letter of condolence should be drawn up and sent to the distressed mother and the rest of the family. This the Coroner quite agreed with.

Wednesday 30 August 1882, Issue 6063 – Gale Document No. Y3200733627
BISHOPSTEIGNTON. - An Inquest was held at the Manor Inn, on Thursday last, by Mr S. Hacker, the County Coroner, touching the death of SARAH GILPIN, aged 68, wife of CHARLES GILPIN, labourer. ELIZABETH GILPIN, daughter of the deceased, said her mother generally enjoyed good health; that she rose on that morning about 7.30, but complained of a slight headache, which however passed off. About 8.30 she went to the butcher's to get some meat for breakfast and returned in about half an hour, when she was taken with giddiness in the head. She sat down in a chair near the door, where she spoke but once and in a few minutes expired. Dr Baker (Medical Superintendent of the Hydrophatic Establishment), said he was sent for, but on arriving at the house he found the woman was quite dead. In his opinion death resulted from disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence.

SANDFORD – Suicide. - The Deputy Coroner for the District (Mr C. E. Cox, of Honiton), held an Inquest last Wednesday at the Lamb Inn, Sandford, on the body of MRS SARAH HATTIN, who was found on Sunday evening last hanging to a nail in an outhouse adjoining her residence at Withywind, about a mile from the village of Sandford. She had been missing since the previous Wednesday afternoon, and it was supposed by her friends that she had gone on a visit to Dowrich Mills. The deceased was widow of MR JAMES HATTIN, late of Sturridge Farm, sand ford. Mr James Wright, of the firm of the West of England Iron Works, stated that he last saw the deceased alive between twelve and one o'clock on Wednesday. She was then apparently in her usual health. He was distantly related to her, she being the stepmother of his wife. The deceased was 70 years of age last birthday. She had been rather eccentric for a considerable time past, and had been especially so since her husband's death in May. She was in comfortable circumstances and lived by herself. She was quite able to take care of herself. He called at her place on Wednesday, and asked if she was in want of anything. This was his usual practice. The Coroner: He had heard from the bailiff that she was to leave the house, but, as far as he knew, this had not been communicated to her. He went there on Sunday night, and finding the door locked he called upon George Mortimore, a farm-labourer, to bring a ladder, by means of which they looked into the bedroom window. They saw nothing, and proceeded to an outhouse. On bursting open the door they discovered the deceased facing them, and hanging by the neck. She was suspended from one of the joists by the small piece of silk produced. Mr H. M. Body, medical practitioner, of Crediton, was next called, and deposed to the excitable temperament of the deceased. It had struck him very forcibly at the time he was attending her husband in his last illness. He was not at all surprised at hearing that she had committed suicide. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide while of unsound mind.

NEWTON ABBOT – Tragedy at Newton. A Man Committed for Wife Murder.
At the Newton Abbot Police-court on Wednesday before J. Vicary, Esq., a lighterman, named GEORGE MILLMAN was charged with having feloniously, wilfully, and of malice aforethought, killed and murdered his wife, MARY MILLMAN, on the previous night.
Harry Matthews, a carpenter, living in St. Paul's-road, said he knew both the prisoner and his wife by sight. The previous night, about twenty minutes to ten, he was on the opposite side of Mager's Hotel, going down Queen-street, and looking across saw a woman in the gutter, and went over. Prisoner was near her, and on witness approaching he went off. He did not hear anything said. Being further questioned, witness said he could not swear prisoner was the man, but he had on a white slop similar to what MILLMAN was then wearing. Whilst in the act of lifting the woman up a man named Harvey came to his assistance. She was living then, because he heard her groan. No one else was near at the time. He did not see any bruises until after she was taken into the back of the hotel premises, he thought her eyes were injured. He left her in charge of Harvey and went for the police.
P. Sergt. Nicholls said he went to Mager's Hotel the previous night about ten o'clock, having previously sent a constable. He found the deceased in a chair apparently dead. An assistant to a chemist was trying to restore animation, and then Dr Ley arrived. He had her removed to the kitchen of the hotel and laid on the table, when it was discovered she was dead. Witness had known her a long time, and the prisoner as well. Going out he met the latter coming towards the hotel, and told him his wife was dead, and he was to consider himself in custody for having caused her death. He was then taken to the Police-station and locked up. That (Wednesday) morning witness charged him with having murdered his wife, to which he made the following statement:- I came home from Teignmouth about twenty minutes past three, and found no one in the house, no dinner ready, and the children running about. I went to the Temple Bar, and shortly after my wife came in. I said to her – 'MARY, this is very unkind conduct of yours not to provide any dinner for me, nor to mind the children or the house. You had better go home.' She replied, 'I shall not; you mind your own business.' She drank pint after pint of beer during the time she was there. He again told her to go and attend to the children, and then if she liked she could come again. She then left in company with another woman, who was carrying her baby, being very drunk. Later in the evening he again saw her in company with another female near the Old Post0office, and said 'This is pretty goings on,' and gave her a push, and she fell, striking her head against the kerb-stone.
Richard Harvey, mail messenger, said he was near the Old Post-office the previous night about twenty to ten, and saw a woman fall down outside Magor's Hotel. He went to her and found her lying on the kerb, and her head in the gutter. A man was near her wearing a white slop, but he could not say it was the prisoner. He walked away when witness came over. Matthews came to her just as he did, and they together helped her up. She didn't speak at all; merely groaned.
At this stage Sergt. Nicholls asked for a remand, and it was granted until Thursday.
At the adjourned hearing on Thursday, before Admiral Cornish-Bowden and Mr J. Vicary, the evidence of Harry Matthews, Richard Harvey, and Police-Sergeant Nicholls was read over, the latter stating that the evidence given by Mathews was in no way like the statement made to him by the witness on the night of the occurrence. On this Mathews was asked by the Bench if he wished to make any alteration in his evidence; to which he replied that he did not, and that the statement made to Sergeant Nicholls on the night referred to was just the same as he had given to the Court. Dr Ley repeated the evidence he gave before the Coroner, and the Bench sent MILLMAN for trial at the next Assizes on the capital charge. The Court was crowded during the hearing, much interest being manifested in the proceedings.
THE INQUEST. - An Inquest on the body of MARY MILLMAN was held on Wednesday, by Mr Hacker, District Coroner, at the Town Hall, Newton Abbot.
ELIZA JANE NICHOLLS, living in No. 5 Court, Wolborough-street, and sister of the prisoner, identified the body as that of MARY MILLMAN. The deceased was married to GEORGE MILLMAN, a lighterman, and lived at No. 8, St John's-place. She was about thirty years of age, had five children, and had lived a very bad life. By that she meant that deceased was given to drink, and was very often drunk.
Harry Mathews repeated the evidence given before the Magistrates in the morning. He denied having told the sergeant of police on fetching him, that he had seen a man kicking a woman and that she was then lying in the street.
Mr J. W. Ley, surgeon, of Newton, stated that he was called at a quarter-past ten on the previous night to Magor's Hotel to see a person said to be dying. He went and found her sitting under the archway, and on being taken into the kitchen he examined her there and discovered that she was dead. He had again examined her that afternoon to see if there were any marks of violence; externally about the body there were none. At the back of the head was a bruise. He opened the body and found all the organs of the abdomen and chest healthy and uninjured. On cutting back the scalp he found no fracture of the bone. On opening the skull he saw a large mass of blood at the base of the brain, and laceration of the substance of the base of the brain. His opinion was that death was due to shock, caused by haemorrhage through the rupture of a large blood vessel, caused by injury. The brain was very much injured, and the most likely cause of the injury was a fall. He could find no signs of any blow, and he thought it impossible that the injury could have been done by a kick. Apparently she had fallen from a height or had been pushed very hard. Supposing she had been intoxicated she might have fallen a dead weight and caused the injury. He was of opinion from the membranes of the brain sticking closely to the skull that she was in the habit of drinking, but he could not trace anything to shew that she had been drinking that day. In concluding his evidence, Mr Ley called the attention of the Coroner and Jury to the fact that he had to make the post mortem examination that afternoon in a beastly stable in the hotel yard. It was a most unfit and disgusting place for such a purpose, and there ought to be a room in the town set aside as a public mortuary.
The Coroner said he was sorry Dr Ley should have had such a disagreeable place in which to do his work, and hoped the Press would take notice of the fact that a mortuary was wanted in the town.
Richard Harvey and Sergeant Nicholls repeated the evidence given before the Magistrate.
The Jury, after being absent for about half-an-hour, found that the deceased came to her death from the effects of a blow at the back of the head, but how occasioned there was not sufficient evidence to show.

Wednesday 30 August 1882, Issue 6063 – Gale Document No. Y3200733610
ROMANTIC SUICIDE IN THE CANAL - Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner for the District, on Thursday held an Inquest at the Stowey Arms Inn, Exminster, touching the death of ALEXANDRA KNEEL, who was found drowned in the Canal, near the lime-kilns, on Monday last. Mr Cater was appointed foreman of the Jury. JANE KNEEL, mother of the deceased, stated that her daughter was 18 years of age. She was engaged to a young man named Langbridge, who used to visit the house. Witness last saw him there the Sunday before Bank Holiday. Since that time he had returned deceased's photograph. Witness was not aware that the deceased had kept company with any young man since. The last time witness saw the deceased alive was about eight o'clock on Monday morning. She was then in good spirits. Before witness left home for Exeter they had a conversation about business; deceased took breakfast with her father and brother; all was very comfortable, and there was nothing unusual in her appearance. Witness returned from Exeter about 10.30., with the intention of going to Teignmouth, but not finding her daughter at home she was unable to take the journey. The Coroner: Were you aware that deceased carried the returned likeness in her bosom on the day of her death? Witness said she was not. FRANK KNEEL, brother to deceased, stated that about nine o'clock he was going up "Scratch-face Lane," when he met his sister, and asked her the way to a field where he wished to go gleaning. She was walking fast. Witness did not see her alive afterwards. Thomas Cann, solicitor's clerk, of Exeter, stated that he was walking on the Banks with the intention of going to Dawlish, and when near Countess Weir Bridge he saw a person some distance in advance of him. At first he could not distinguish whether it was a man or a woman. The person, whom he supposed to be the deceased, was about 300 yards from him. Witness's attention was drawn for a moment in another direction, and looking around the person had disappeared. On proceeding he found two notes, a pair of gloves, and a hat, lying on the Canal Bank. About three or four yards further on he saw the body of a female floating on the water; and, not being able to swim, he at once called to a young man named Pye, who was fishing a short distance off, on the opposite side. They both went to the kilns for a boat, and by the time they arrived other persons were on the spot. William E. Pye stated that the time was 10.25. He remained about three hours, while search was made for the body, but it was not found when he left. Robert Bolt, horseman to the Town Council, stated that he saw two men running on the banks; and, on hearing what had happened, he fetched the grapnel. Deceased, on being taken out of the water, was found to be fully dressed, with the exception of her hat. Mr G. G. Bothwell, surgeon of Topsham, said he was in the village a few minutes after the recovery of the body. Witness knew deceased from visiting her parents' house. She appeared a very healthy person. P.C. Hatherleigh stated that he knew deceased well. When the body was recovered it was removed to Exminster by Charles Pepperell, who voluntarily told witness that he saw deceased on the previous night outside the Stowey Arms and asked her to take a glass of beer, which she refused. Following is a copy of one of the notes picked up on the Canal Bank:-
"Charles, you are a dirty nuisance. You took me away from my young man, and then you would not have anything to say to me. When you saw it was me on Sunday night, you walked up over the hill with the other chaps, and I hope you will think of it and me. God forgive me, and take me up with him and his angels, and I will forgive you for your dirty treatment. I hope I shall be in heaven before long."
The second letter was addressed to deceased's mother. A third was produced, which had been received from W. Langbridge, containing the deceased's photograph, in which it was stated that she was "going with C.P.," which the Coroner considered an allusion to Charles Pepperell. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of unsound mind."

Wednesday 13 September 1882, Issue 6065 – Gale Document No. Y3200733693
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Gun Accident. - J. H. Toller, Esq., the Barnstaple Coroner, on Thursday last, held an Inquest at Instow on the body of a young gentleman, named HINCHCLIFFE (Son of MAJOR HINCHCLIFFE, of Worlington House), who met with his death under very melancholy circumstances. William Henry Fishley, boatman, residing at Instow, deposed that he had been in the habit of attending the deceased and his brothers while they were out shooting wild fowl. On the previous Tuesday he went out in a boat off Instow, accompanied by the deceased and two of his brothers, CHAMBERLAIN and FRANCIS HINCHCLIFFE. The latter did not carry a gun but his brothers each had one. They shot for some time, and he landed them at Graysand, where they stayed some time. They then made sail for home. As they passed West Appledore a few seagulls flew by, and the deceased fired a shot and killed the first bird. CHAMBERLAIN then killed another one. Deceased loaded, fired, and killed another bird, and at that time was standing outside the fore-thwart. CHAMBERLAIN was loading the muzzle of the gun pointing towards the bottom of the boat He placed in the cartridge, and on raising the barrel of the gun to cock it, it exploded, whereupon the deceased cried out that he was shot. Witness saw the blood flowing in a stream from the deceased's thigh. CHAMBERLAIN took a strap, placed it round his brother's thigh, and did all he could to staunch the wound. Witness immediately sailed to Appledore to see a doctor. Not finding one there, he telegraphed to Bideford for Dr Thompson. He put into Instow, and Dr Henry Pratt at once came into the boat, and saw the deceased. It was a quarter of an hour after the accident occurred that the deceased was seen by a doctor. The brothers were always very good tempered towards each other. Dr Henry Pratt, of Instow, gave evidence as to the condition of the deceased when brought to shore, and praised the pluck shown by the elder brother (CHAMBERLAIN)
in endeavouring to staunch the wound. If the course taken had not been adopted, the boy would have died in the boat. Dr Frederick Pratt, of Appledore, gave evidence as to the deceased's death, which occurred at three o['clock on the afternoon of the same day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that they did not attribute any blame to any of the persons who were in the boat. The following codicil was also added:- "That the Jury desire to express deep sympathy with MAJOR and MRS HINCHCLIFFE and family in their severe affliction.

Wednesday 13 September 1882, Issue 6065 – Gale Document No. Y3200733679
EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr H. D. Barton, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the George and Dragon Inn, St. Sidwell's, yesterday afternoon, touching the death of an old lady of seventy-two named MARY HORRELL. It appeared that the deceased had until very shortly before her demise been in the enjoyment of good health. On Monday she was a little indisposed, and one of her relatives with whom she resides at 1-, Oxford-terrace, meeting Dr Woodman, requested him to look in and see MRS HORRELL. The doctor complied, and whilst there the woman died. No medical gentleman having attended her, and Dr Woodman not having treated her, no certificate of death was forthcoming, and hence the necessity for the Inquest. Dr Woodman gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from congestion of the lungs, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 20 September 1882, Issue 6066 – Gale Document No. Y3200733723
CREDITON - Fatal Accident. - The District Coroner (F. Burrow, Esq.) held an inquest at Westacott last Thursday, on the body of a boy eleven years of age, named JOHN BOWDEN, who was killed on Tuesday through getting entangled in a thrashing machine. Mr Edward James, farmer, of Westacott, said he gave deceased permission on Tuesday morning to drive the horse around a thrashing machine, which was then making reed. On going near the machine-house some little time afterwards he was struck at the fact of the machine being stopped. He went round to inquire the reason, when a man named Merrifield called out, "The boy is caught in the machine." Witness then ran and freed the horse from the machine and helped to take the boy out. Richard Merrifield, who was working at the machine, deposed to having heard the boy cry out, and assisting in his removal from the machine. JOHN BOWDEN, father of deceased, stated that he was working near the spot when the accident occurred. The boy had a great wish to drive the horse; he had done so previously Witness cautioned him not to ride upon the top of the machine but upon the arm. After the accident he asked the boy how it happened, and was told he was trying to get upon the shafts. Mr Body, a surgeon, practising at Crediton, said he was called to the deceased about 9a.m. on the morning in question. Deceased was quite dead, his body being frightfully mangled. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 20 September 1882, Issue 6066 – Gale Document No. Y3200733708
EXETER – Sudden Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, last Saturday, respecting the death of WILLIAM CORIN, aged 67, a shoemaker, lately living in Cornish's-court, Paul-street. On Thursday evening the deceased visited the Ale and Porter Stores, Paul-street, where he was served with half-a-pint of beer. He was perfectly sober at the time, and had not been there long when he was seized with a fit. Deceased was immediately taken home, where Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, was quickly in attendance, but his services were of no avail and CORIN expired shortly afterwards, death being caused by apoplexy. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Wednesday 27 September 1882, Issue 6067 – Gale Document No. Y3200733755
ILFRACOMBE – Terrible Death by Burning. - The District Coroner (Mr J. F. Bromham), on Saturday, held an Inquest at the London Hotel, touching the death of HANNAH KEALL CHISWELL, of High-street, Ilfracombe, which occurred on the previous evening under peculiarly distressing circumstances. The body presented a frightful spectacle, being burnt completely black, and totally unrecognisable. MISS MARY CHISWELL (whose evidence was taken at her residence) said the deceased, her sister, was about seventy-three years of age, and a spinster. They had lived together all their lives. On the previous evening deceased went upstairs at seven o'clock, and a short time after witness heard her calling out "Mary, Mary!" Witness ran upstairs, and found the deceased on fire. Witness endeavoured to extinguish the flames, but was unable to do so, and therefore ran and called to Mr Cornish, who resides opposite. He hurried over and went upstairs. Shortly afterwards witness was told that the deceased was very much burnt, and later in the evening, that she was dead. Dr Stoneham was summoned, and came almost immediately. In the deceased's bedroom was a benzoline lamp, which was usually lighted by the deceased when she went to bed, and left burning all night in a basin. Mr George Cornish, deposed that when he first ran upstairs he saw the deceased lying on her side by the foot of the bed all in a flame. He took some of the bedclothes and threw on her, and thus tried to extinguish the flames, but found himself unable to do so, and, therefore, ran for other assistance. On returning with Mr Skinner he found the whole room in a blaze, and there was a great deal of smoke. They procured a good supply of water from the pump on the adjacent cabstand, and with assistance soon extinguished the flames. He then saw the deceased lady in about the same position as when he first visited the house. She did not speak to him on the first occasion, nor did she struggle, call out, or give any evidence of life. After finding her on his second visit witness got a blanket, and with the assistance of Mr Kelly, placed her on the floor in the next room. P.C. Shepherd said he visi8ted the residence that morning, and by the side of the dressing-table in the room where the fire occurred he saw a pint bottle half full of benzoline with the cork off. He saw the lamp which the deceased generally used when she went to bed, and he noticed it was full of oil. (It was here remarked that beyond doubt the deceased lady must have been engaged in trimming the lamp at the time of the said occurrence). The lamp, said the witness, was quite clean and uninjured. Dr Philip Stoneham said he found the deceased on the floor in an upstair room. She was quite dead, and, with the exception of a few burnt rags on her, she was naked. The body was frightfully burnt, and the skin was peeling off all over. On the suggestion of Mr J. C. Cornish, one of the Jurymen, their fees were handed over to the Ilfracombe Tyrrel Cottage Hospital.

Wednesday 4 October 1882, Issue 6068 – Gale Document No. Y3200733802
BARNSTAPLE – Distressing Suicide. - The Borough Coroner (R. I. Bencraft, Esq.) on Saturday evening held an Enquiry at Park Villas, Newport, into the circumstances attending the death of MR ROBERT FREDERICK KINGSTON, aged thirty-two, cashier at the National Provincial Bank, Barnstaple. It appeared from the evidence that deceased lost his wife a fortnight ago. His wife died at Shrewsbury of an induced premature confinement, and not the first which had been necessary. Prior that that deceased had been under medical treatment for eighteen months for serious illness and debility. After his return from Shrewsbury his mother and the servant noticed that he looked worse than usual and was greatly depressed. On Saturday morning he was downstairs by a quarter before eight, but soon returned to his bedroom, and about ten minutes later the report of a pistol was heard. MRS KINGSON and the servant ran to his room and found that deceased had shot himself. He had told his mother that life was a burden to him, and he could not bear it. A loaded pistol he had always kept in his drawer. Mr Pronger, surgeon, stated that when he arrived at the house he found the deceased unconscious, and there was a wound in the right temple. Consciousness never returned and death took place about two hours after. In a post mortem examination he found the bullet (produced) which was flattened in the head. It entered at the right temple, went right through the base of the brain, and was impacted in the bone at an opposite point. Several witnesses were called to speak to the state of mind in which deceased had been for several days, and the Jury, without any hesitation, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane." The Jury gave their fees to the funds of the Infirmary.

Wednesday 4 October 1882, Issue 6068 – Gale Document No. Y3200733794
TOTNES – Shocking Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday at Fursdon, Staverton, by S. Hacker, Esq., District Coroner, respecting the death of WALTER STRANGE LONG, 31 years of age, who committed suicide on Saturday, by shooting himself. Miss Matthews, with whom the deceased had been lodging for some months, stated that on Saturday afternoon MR LONG went to the post with some letters. On his return he appeared much depressed. He told witness he was very unhappy, and that he would as soon die as live, and added that he would shoot himself. She told him not to talk of such things, and he replied, "Do you think I would not?"! He then went up to his bedroom and shot himself with a revolver. He was quite dead when discovered almost immediately afterwards. Deceased had been of a very excitable temperament lately, and had threatened to destroy himself before. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

ALWINGTON – A Tragical Shooting Case. - The peaceable parishioners of Alwington were thrown into a state of alarm yesterday week by the report that ELLEN LEE, a little girl, employed by Mr and Mrs Andrew, of Winscott Farm, in the parish of Alwington, had been shot in a most cruel manner by the servant boy, Henry Mayne. ELLEN LEE is the daughter of a cripple, residing in the parish of Alwington, who is supported by the parish and about two months ago Mrs Andrew took the child from the Bideford Workhouse out of pity, and employed her at Winscott Farm to take care of the children. Yesterday week Mr and Mrs Andrew went as usual to the Bideford market, and left the children in charge of the little girl. About dinner time the horseman (Reuben Ayres), who is a son of the sexton of Alwington Church, went into the house, and met Henry Mayne coming out. The boy had informed him that the little girl ELLEN LEE had shot herself in taking the gun down from the ceiling. Ayres gave the children in charge of a man, and immediately went into Bideford market and informed his master what had occurred. Mr Andrew shortly afterwards arrived at Winscott Farm, and found the little girl ELLEN LEE in the doorway in a pool of blood, with her face downwards, and a bucket underneath her, and it seemed as if she was passing out of the doorway when she was shot. The right temple, the right eye, and adjacent parts of the skull had been blown away, the gun having been discharged close to her head. The charge had passed through her head in an oblique direction, coming out on the left side behind the ear. It was a single-barrel gun, and it had been let by Mr Andrew loaded, hanging from two hooks over the fire place in the back kitchen. Mr Andrew is a fine tall man about six feet high, and he had to stand on a stool to get the gun down from the hooks. The house is rather peculiarly built, and a child could reach the gun by going five steps up the stairs and stretching over. The police were communicated with shortly after the girl was shot, and Constable Froude took the boy Henry Mayne before J. R. Pine-Coffin, Esq., at Portledge. By the magistrate's orders the boy was given in charge of his father, who resides at Moorhead Mill, Littleham, pending the Inquest which took place in the kitchen of Winscott Farm, on Wednesday afternoon, before the Deputy Coroner for the County J. W. Bromham, Esq. Mr Thomas Kievell, of the Post-office, Alwington, was foreman of the Jury. #Dr Lincoln Thompson, of Bideford, who was called in shortly after the little girl had been shot, gave it as his opinion that it was impossible for the girl to have been shot by the gun falling. Mr Andrew and Reuben Ayres the horseman were also examined, and gave the boy Mayne a good character. The Coroner briefly summed up the case to the Jury, pointing out to them that if they came to the conclusion that the deceased met her death through being shot by the boy Henry Mayne, he would be sent for trial at the Exeter Assizes, and the chances would be that the Grand Jury would throw out the bill. The Jury took fifteen minutes to consider their verdict, and then found that the deceased met her death by being accidentally shot, and added as a rider that firearms should not be kept loaded in a house. The Inquiry lasted from half-past two in the afternoon till seven in the evening. A correspondent states that all the Jury were of opinion that the little girl had been shot wilfully by the boy Mayne, but taking into consideration there was no evidence whatever that he did the deed, they gave the verdict they did. Henry Mayne is said to be a dangerous youth, having been expelled from two Board Schools. Mr Superintendent Rousham was present to watch the case on behalf of the police. The funeral of the deceased took place on Friday. On Monday the police apprehended the boy Mayne, and he was yesterday taken before the Magistrates at Bideford on a charge of having caused the little girl's death by shooting.

Wednesday 4 October 1882, Issue 6068 – Gale Document No. Y3200733779
EXETER – Fatal Accident on the Railway Works. - The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.,) last Saturday evening held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, on the body of WILLIAM BILLING, a young labourer aged 31 years, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital from injuries received while engaged at the works of the London and South-~Western Railway, near the Exmouth Junction. The deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Brailey, contractor, was on Friday afternoon excavating in the cutting between Lion's Holt Tunnel and the Exmouth Railway when a quantity of earth fell away. Seeing his danger the poor fellow endeavoured to get out of the way of the falling mass, but tripped and fell, knocking his head against one of the buffers of the tipcart which he was loading, and receiving other injuries, from the effects of which he died soon after his removal to the hospital. The house surgeon stated that the injuries were chiefly to the spine in the region of the neck. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and cautioned the contractor to exercise greater care, as it appeared that another accident of a similar kind, though not a fatal one, had occurred at the same spot during the week. Mr Foster, who represented the London and South Western Railway Company, said that the views expressed by the Coroner should be communicated to the proper authority. At the conclusion of the Inquiry the widow of the deceased asked of the Coroner whether she could obtain relief for her children. Mr Hooper informed her that she must go to the parish; he had nothing to do with that question.

Wednesday 18 October 1882, Issue 6070 – Gale Document No. Y3200733873
OKEHAMPTON – Fatal Fall. - Mr R. Fulford, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Okehampton on Thursday respecting the death of JOHN MARTIN, gamekeeper to Mr W. H. Holley. The deceased had been to Tavistock Goose Fair on Wednesday, and in returning he had to pass over an iron bridge which spans the Ockment. He, however, got out of his path, and instead of going over the bridge he passed on one side of it fell over the brink of the river on to the rocks beneath, and was killed. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 18 October 1882, Issue 6070 – Gale Document No. Y3200733859
EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Thursday evening at the Windsor Castle Inn, Summerland-street, touching the death of MISS EMMA SHJAPLAND, who died suddenly on Thursday morning. From the evidence adduced it seemed that the deceased was landlady of No. 5, Spiller's-street. About one o'clock on Thursday morning she went to bed apparently in good health, and was soon joined by a lodger named Emma Carthew. The two slept together. The lodger was aroused about two o'clock by her bedfellow, who complained of being indisposed. Deceased drank some vinegar and applied some of it to her forehead, and went to sleep again. Miss Carthew did not wake up again until nearly two o'clock in the afternoon, when she discovered that SHAPLAND was dead. Mr Bell, surgeon, was sent for, and after examining the body, arrived at the conclusion that apoplexy was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 22 November 1882, Issue 6075 – Gale Document No. Y3200734064
OTTERY ST. MARY – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Hospital last Thursday before the Deputy Coroner (C. E. Cox, Esq.) on the body of a little boy, three years of age, named WILLIAM THOMAS MILLS, the son of a labourer living near Ottery, who was so severely burnt on Tuesday that he died a few hours afterwards. It appeared that whilst the mother was gone to take her husband his breakfast the boy was left to himself for a few minutes, and in trying to warm his feet set alight to his clothes. His sister, about nine years old, hearing him cry out, ran down stairs, and when she saw what was the matter called in Mrs Broom, a neighbour, who extinguished the flames. The mother, on her return, took the child to the Hospital, where he was attended by Dr Shortridge. The doctor said the child was much burnt from head to foot and died from the shock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and attributed no blame to anyone.

CREDITON – Found Drowned. - F. Burrow, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Ring of Bells, Crediton, last Saturday afternoon on the body of MR EBENEZER WILSON, whose body was found in the river the day previous. The evidence went to show that deceased was in very comfortable circumstances, and had been living with Mr W. Dodyridge, of High-street. On Sunday forenoon deceased left his house presumably to go for a walk. Not returning again the police were communicated with and search made. A hat was found near the river Yeo on Thursday. This led to the suspicion that deceased had by some means got into the water. He had been unwell for a considerable time. He was subject to various delusions, of which he was often heard to bitterly complain. He had lost ten shares in the late West of England Bank. Deceased was very respectably connected, and had several relatives in Exeter. The body was found by Mr Labbett in the river near Forden. It was lying face downward, and had apparently hitched in a stake. Mr John A. Edwards, surgeon, of Crediton, said he had known the deceased for many years, and had attended him professionally. He was very excitable and laboured under strong delusions; he thought his mind was disordered. He had examined the body, and believed death to have been caused by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict, "That deceased was found drowned, without any marks of violence, but no evidence was given as to how he got into the water." The deceased was buried on Sunday in the churchyard. A large number of people attended.

Wednesday 13 December 1882, Issue 6078 – Gale Document No. Y3200734196
GROSS NEGLECT OF AN INFANT NEAR AXMINSTER – Verdict of Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Talbot Arms, Uplime, near Axminster, before C. C. Cox, Esq., on the body of the infant female child of SARAH JEFFERD, a single woman. From the evidence it appeared that JEFFERD lives with a man called Thomas Rice, and on Saturday she gave birth to a child. She left Rice in bed and went downstairs, and there delivered herself. Rice subsequently awoke and went downstairs, and, at the request of JEFFERD, helped her upstairs. A messenger was sent for a Mrs Gay, and on her arrival she found the baby dead, lying by the side of its mother in bed. The mother said she told Rice to fetch someone, but she supposed that as there was a bottle of whisky downstairs he stopped to drink and forgot it. A medical man, of Lyme Regis, gave it as his opinion that deceased died through insufficient treatment at birth. The Jury retired for half-an-hour, and then returned a verdict of manslaughter against the man Rice and the woman JEFFERD. It is said that JEFFERD has had seven illegitimate children. She has been imprisoned twice for concealment of birth.

Wednesday 13 December 1882, Issue 6078 – Gale Document No. Y3200734187
TORQUAY – Alleged Manslaughter. - Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Torquay last Thursday, respecting the death of MR WM. DEAR, late landlord of the Golden Lion Inn, Union-street, Torquay, who died at Exminster Asylum on Monday weeks, from the effects of a blow in the eye administered by a man named Ernest Stephen, who had been employed as an artist at the Watcombe Terra Cotta Works. It appeared that Stephen went into the Golden Lion Inn after hours on the night of the 2nd of September last, and asked for a drink. On being reused, he became abusive, refused to leave the premises, and struck the deceased with a can in the face, injuring the ball of the eye so much as to destroy the sight. MR DEAR'S mind subsequently became so unbalanced that he had to be removed to the asylum. After being for an hour and a quarter in private consultation, the Jury returned into Court with the following written verdict;- "Died from insanity produced by worry, chiefly accelerated by anxiety as to his probably loss of sight from the effects of a blow." To this verdict the Coroner objected, on the ground that it did not state whether deceased died from natural causes or whether death was attributable to a blow. It was now 10 p.m., and the Jury again retired; when they had been absent half an hour the Coroner sent to ask if they were agreed, and was answered in the negative. Mr Hacker then said he must adjourn the Inquest, but after another period of five minutes twelve of the thirteen were able to agree, and they found that "The death of the deceased was due to insanity and that his death was accelerated by the blow given by Stephen." A Coroner's warrant has been issued for the arrest of Stephen, who decamped immediately after the assault.

Wednesday 13 December 1882, Issue 6078 – Gale Document No. Y3200734169
EXETER – Fatal Fall from a Corn Waggon. - An Inquest was held by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) at the Topsham Inn, last Saturday afternoon, touching the death of EMMA TUCKER, a widow, aged about 53, formerly living at Warrens, in the parish of Farringdon. It appeared that the deceased was working in the harvest field of Mr John Bastin, of Holbrook Farm, Clist Honiton, on Tuesday, the 15th of August. About eight o'clock in the evening she and a labourer loaded a waggon with corn, and having done this they remained upon the top of the load whilst it was being driven to the rick. Mr Basin was in charge of a couple of horses attached to the waggon and advised the woman and her companion to come down. They, however, preferred to remain, and the consequence was that directly the horses moved they were jerked off and precipitated to the ground, a distance of ten feet. The deceased complained of all the bones in her body being broken. Brandy was given to her, and she was placed under medical treatment. Her injuries were at first considered to be slight, but upon a second medical man being called in it was ascertained that they were of a more serious character than at first thought, and in accordance with this gentleman's advice the poor woman was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. She died in this institution on Friday last from exhaustion and congestion of the lungs, the result of injuries to the spinal cord. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER – Inquest. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, yesterday afternoon, on the body of JAMES STONEMAN, a thatcher, aged 70, formerly residing at Cheriton Fitzpaine. It appeared that the deceased and his wife were coming into Exeter on Friday, the 17th November. About a mile from Cheriton the horse ran away with the trap in which was MRS STONEMAN. Her husband was walking, and as the horse and trap passed at a fast rate the deceased was knocked down and sustained serious injuries to his thigh, and other parts of his body. The injured man was then conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. At this institution he temporarily rallied from the shock, but he was also seriously affected in the heart. The immediate cause of death, which occurred on Monday, was failure of the heart, doubtless accelerated by the injuries sustained on the 17th November. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 20 December 1882, Issue 6079 – Gale Document No. Y3200734210
EXETER – Sudden Death in the Street. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on Thursday afternoon, on the body of JOHN HENRY PARISH, aged about 75, a horse-clipper, lately lodging in Paul-street, who died suddenly in the street on Wednesday afternoon. Medical testimony shewed that the cause of death was the failure of the heart's action from fatty degeneration accelerated by congestive bronchitis. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Fatal Accident. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday afternoon, touching the death of ALBERT ISAACS, aged thirty-one, a farmer, of Whitstone. Deceased and his wife were thrown out of a trap on the evening of Friday, December 8th, when returning from market, the vehicle having come into collision with a wheelbarrow which had been left on the road by some children. MR ISAACS received serious injuries, and died on Sunday from pleurisy and inflammation of the lungs at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. A juryman raised the question whether the parents of the children were not to blame for sending them out after dark with a barrow, but the Coroner thought not. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 20 December 1882, Issue 6079 – Gale Document No. Y3200734226
SOUTHMOLTON – Singular Fatality. - An Inquest was held on Thursday before the Borough Coroner respecting the death of AMOS ADAMS KEMPE, butcher, who died on the previous morning from the effect of a wound in the leg, the result of an accident in the market on Saturday, the 9th inst. The deceased was cutting up a pig when his knife slipped, cutting his thigh. He dressed the wound and did not go home until an hour afterwards, when he was removed in a cart. He was attended by Mr Edwin Furze, surgeon, who was called in on Wednesday. The doctor found him in bed suffering from a punctured wound over the soephena vein. The Injury had produced blood poisoning, from which he died. A verdict to this effect was returned. The deceased has left a wife and eight young children.

Wednesday 3 January 1883, Issue 6009 – Gale Document No. Y3200734283
EXETER – Sudden Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Fireman's Arms Inn, Preston-street, on Thursday, on the body of EMILY BALL, a widow, lately residing at No. 23, West-street, who died suddenly on Wednesday morning. The deceased was about 43 years of age, and earned her livelihood by "charing." She had recently complained of a pain in her side, and her general health had not been good. The deceased had told the landlord that she was a widow of a Christian Missionary, who went abroad to the "uncultivated" people of India. She came from Plymouth, where she had been a barmaid at the Green Bank Hotel. Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, said that he had examined the body of the deceased, and was of opinion that death resulted from an apoplectic fit. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Wednesday 10 January 1883, Issue 6010 – Gale Document No. Y3200734311
EXETER – Death From the Bite of a Horse. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn on Monday afternoon, respecting the death of WILLIAM POITTER, aged 44, a coachman, which occurred in the Hospital on Saturday from the effects of a bite from a horse and other causes. CHARLES POTTER, farmer, Cullompton, said that his brother, the deceased, had been in the service of Mrs Henry Palk, Colleton-crescent, about three months. On Tuesday he saw him at the Hospital, and the deceased said that his mistress's horse had bitten him in the back on the previous Thursday. The animal had attempted to do so a fortnight before. He said that the horse jumped at him like a dog and broke his halter-chain. He did not think the bite would hurt him if his blood was not out of order. The deceased was a healthy man up to a year and three-quarters ago, when he broke his leg. His leg was crooked and he stepped on one side, injuring his spine. He was a very steady, sober man, and was not married. Emma Dicker, cook at Mrs Palk's, said that the deceased lived in the house. On Thursday, the 28th December, she saw the deceased at 6.45 a.m. and again at 8.15, and he then complained that the horse had bitten him in the back in the stable. She asked him why he did not have something done to his back, but he appeared to think little of the injury. On the following Saturday morning he said he felt rather poorly, but did not refer to his back. He could not get on with his dinner that day, and said he felt very ill and was in pain all over. In the evening he went to Mr Farrant for medical advice, and he was ill all that night and next day, and on Monday afternoon he was taken to the Hospital on Mr Farrant's advice. The horse had been bought since the deceased came into Mrs Palk's service in August last. Elizabeth Turner, a nurse, said that on Sunday morning the deceased complained to her that he was in pain all over, and she saw his back. She observed a dry mark about the size of a half-crown, and put a poultice to it. It did not look like a bite. She renewed the poultice two or three times that day. Deceased had several little boils about him, and had suffered from a bad foot for two months. The recent oil fire had shocked him very much, but he was able to attend to his duties up to the time of his being bitten. Dr A. G. Blomfield, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said that the deceased was received into that institution on Monday, and died on Saturday morning from exhaustion and shock to the system, the result of inflammation. He thought that the bite was a very slight injury indeed, and in the majority of people would not have been attended by any serious result; but there was evidence that POTTER was suffering from Bright's disease, and with the general shock to the system, from the excitement in connection with the fire on the 22nd ult., a very slight injury took an unhealthy action and was followed by this fatal inflammation arising from the bite. If he had been a healthy man he would have borne up against it, but he had a shattered c constitution, due to Bright's disease. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from Natural Causes, accelerated by the shock to the system consequent upon the bite.

Wednesday 10 January 1883, Issue 6010 – Gale Document No. Y3200734320
EXETER – Found Dead in the Road. - A drayman, named George Trapnell, was passing the road in the neighbourhood of Longdown on Monday afternoon when he noticed a man lying in the road with a pony close by, and upon examination he ascertained that life was extinct. The body was removed to Mark's Farm, which is in the vicinity. Information of the occurrence was given to Sergeant Frost, of the Devon Constabulary, and he proceeded to Mark's Farm, accompanied by Dr Vlieland. The officer searched the deceased's clothes, and found a furlough paper, upon which was written the name "PRIVATE GEORGE NORTHCOTE, York and Lancashire Regiment." The leave was dated from the 21st December until the 22nd January. No authentic particulars are to hand yet, but Sergeant Frost has been informed that the deceased borrowed the pony from Mr Hellier, of Moretonhampstead, and the officer has communicated with the police of that town to ascertain whether this is correct. In all probability an Inquest will be held at Mark's Farm today (Wednesday when further information will be elicited.

Wednesday 31 January 1883, Issue 6013 – Gale Document No. Y3200734437
EXETER – Shocking Death of an Engine Driver. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Red Cow Inn, St. David's, last Wednesday afternoon, on view of the remains of NORBOLT HATCHER, an engine driver on the Great Western Railway, who met with his death on the previous evening under very painful circumstances. Deceased arrived at St. David's about 9.15 p.m. and after putting away his train left his engine to speak to his brother, a driver on the South-Western line, who arrived at the station about the same time with a goods train from Devonport. HATCHER had to cross the line to speak to his brother, after which, in re-crossing the London and South-Western line to his engine, he was knocked down by the 9.37 p.m. London and South-Western Devonport passenger train. His body was soon afterwards picked up in a shockingly mutilated condition, and removed to the Red Cow Inn, where it was seen by Mr Moon, surgeon. The body was terribly mangled, and death must have been instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 February 1883, Issue 6014 – Gale Document No. Y3200734494
YEOFORD – A Farmer Drowned. - An Inquest was held at the Railway Inn, Yeoford, on Monday afternoon, before Mr F. Burrow, District Coroner, touching the death of MR ANDREW ROWE, a farmer, lately residing at Thorbury, in the parish of Hittisleigh. The deceased had been missing since Thursday last, and was not found before Sunday afternoon. On the Thursday evening, between six and seven o'clock, the deceased went to the house of Mr R. J. Jewell, innkeeper, Colebrook, and had a small drop of gin, and then asked for more. The landlord told him that the weather was rough, and he had better go on at once. The deceased was on horseback, and he did not consider that there was anything the matter with him. The deceased then rode away across the green. It was not dark. The deceased said that he was going home. He lived in the parish of Hittisleigh. On Saturday morning, William Snell, brought a horse to Mr Jewell and asked him if he knew the animal. He identified the horse, and Snell told him that he had found the animal but not the deceased. On Sunday afternoon about half-0past three after many hours search the body of the deceased was found by his son, WILLIAM SQUIRE ROWE, in the river quite under the water. P.C. Richard Stephen Roskelly, stationed at Coleford, assisted in recovering the body of the deceased and removing it to his house. He searched it and found a purse containing one sovereign, a knife, a nail, a pocket handkerchief and a scarf. He had noticed the place where the deceased's horse left the road to get into the fields, near the railway, and could trace the horse's footsteps close to the river. The horse must have got into the river as well, as there were marks of his going down forty yards or more and scrambling out on the other side of the river. The horse was found in a field, near the river, occupied by Mr Lee. The horse had a saddle and bridle on. The water was very high on Thursday night, being within two feet of the railway-arch. Several of the Jury thought that the deceased had been struck in the forehead while passing under the railway-arch. The Coroner said there was no evidence to show how the deceased got into the water, and recommended the Jury to return an open verdict of "Found Drowned." The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict in accordance with the Coroner's suggestion.

Wednesday 21 February 1883, Issue 6016 – Gale Document No. Y3200734561
MELANCHOLY DEATH ON THE RAILWAY. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Friday afternoon at the Acland Arms, St. Sidwell's, on the body of JOHN FRY, 34, formerly residing at Umberleigh. Miss Lansdell, the young lady to whom the deceased was said to be engaged, and who undoubtedly would have been one of the most important witnesses, did not give evidence in consequence of ill-health, caused by the news of the melancholy death of FRY. It appeared from the evidence adduced that the deceased was a Scripture Reader in connection with the Church of England. He was stationed at Sidbury for some time, but about two months since he left that place for Umberleigh. Whilst at Sidbury he was on intimate terms with Mr Lansdell's family, and became acquainted with Miss Lansdell. He was a strictly temperate man, but it transpired, from the testimony of the Rev. R. E. Trefusis, Vicar of Chittlehampton, that the deceased was suffering from a spinal complaint, which caused him at times to behave peculiarly, and to give him the appearance of a man under the influence of liquor. He came to Exeter on Wednesday, and after having transacted some little business he was seen at Queen-street Station, about seven o'clock in the evening, by a young porter named Frederick White. FRY went into the parcel-office, and when asked what he wanted by White he muttered something in an unintelligible manner, and according to White's version he seemed "awfully queer." He went out and back into the parcel-office three times, and then went on to the platform. The next thing which seems to have been heard of the unfortunate man was that the engine driver (Edward Hatcher) of the train leaving Salisbury at 4.35 p.m. noticed that the engine had driven over something about fifty yards from the west end of Lion's Holt Tunnel. On arriving at Queen-street the engine was examined, and marks of blood were found upon it. A party of men returned to the spot where Hatcher had noticed the engine had passed over something, and there the body of the deceased was found, with the head severed. At the time of passing this place a goods train was proceeding on the up line, and Hatcher thought it probably that the deceased was trying to evade the goods' train and by that means got on the road of the passenger train. Miscellaneous articles were found on the body, including a Bank of England £5 note and four sovereigns. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, and P.C. Guppy subsequently arrived, and the body was removed to the Acland Arms. After consultation the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was found dead upon the line, having met with his death by the engine passing over him, but there was no evidence to show what induced FRY to go on to the line at the place indicated.

Wednesday 21 February 1883, Issue 6016 – Gale Document No. Y3200734560
EXETER – Fatal Accident at the Queen-street Station. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Crown and Sceptre Inn, on Friday, on the body of ERNEST JACKSON, a porter, who met with his death while at work at the Queen-street Station, on Thursday night. George Charles, a brass-finisher, of St. Sidwell's-terrace, said that the deceased was twenty-four years of age, and had lodged with him for about twelve years. John Bolt, a porter, employed by the London and South Western Railway, stated that on the previous night about ten o'clock, he was in the goods shed, and gave the deceased, who was under him, instructions to "ride out" with some trucks and couple others together as they came out in order to put them in "station order." Witness went on another line with some wagons, and not seeing the deceased he called to him. He received no answer, and seeing JACKSON'S lamp on the ground he looked for him. Witness discovered the deceased lying on his back in the four-foot way nearly dead. He could not get the deceased to say how the accident happened, and called for assistance, and JACKSON was immediately taken away on a stretcher. Life was then extinct. Mr J. Mortimer, surgeon, of Exeter, said he was called to attend to the deceased, and he considered the cause of death was due to loss of blood through laceration, together with the shock produced by the accident. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 21 February 1883, Issue 6016 – Gale Document No. Y3200734538
SUICIDE OF A PLYMOUTH SOLICITOR - MR HAMILTON WHITEFORD, of the firm of Whiteford and Bennett, solicitors, Plymouth, was found early on Monday morning in the grounds of his house at Tothill shot through the head, and with a revolver by his side. He was quite dead. Deceased had been in ill-health and depressed for some months, but during the past few days had appeared better, and was much more cheerful than usual. An Inquest was held on Monday evening when the hypothesis was put forward that the deceased had fallen on the pistol and it had discharged itself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 February 1883, Issue 6017 – Gale Document No. Y3200734584
EXETER – Burnt to Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on Monday held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on view of the body of ROBERT SAMUEL GEORGE BROCK, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Friday evening, from burns received through a lamp accident on the same day. SARAH JANE BROCK, of Hamlyn's-court, St. Thomas, mother of the deceased, said he was nearly twelve years of age, and during the past six months had been subject to fits, his intellect at times being affected. On Friday evening, about six o'clock, he was in bed, and she left him in charge of a daughter aged nine, the boy then being asleep, while she went out on an errand. On her way home, about half-an-hour afterwards, she learned that the deceased had met with an accident, and had been taken to the hospital. She immediately visited the latter place and saw him, but he could scarcely speak. When she quitted the house a lighted paraffin lamp stood on the table within reach of the boy. He was in the habit of warming his hands by the lamp, as he always complained of being cold; and from what she subsequently learnt witness surmised that he did so while she was out, that the globe of the lamp was accidently knocked off, and that his nightgown caught fire by the sleeve coming into contact with the light. The daughter of the last witness, referred to above, made a statement to the effect that, hearing the Blue Ribbon Army coming up the street, she quitted the house for a few moments to look at the procession, and the accident occurred during her absence. Samuel Needs, a labourer, living in the same court, deposed that on Friday evening an alarm of fire was raised in the court, and upon entering the house of the first witness he found the front room full of smoke. Under the bed he perceived something burning, and upon dragging it out he discovered that it was the deceased, whose bedgown had by some means become ignited. He put out the flames as quickly as possible, and the boy was removed to the hospital. Mr A. Bloomfield, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, stated that he received the deceased into the institution about 7.15 on Friday evening. The boy was then conscious, and an examination showed that he was covered from head to foot with burns, none of which, however, were deep. He was suffering from a severe shock, from which he died about four hours after admission. Some months before, the boy was admitted into the Hospital suffering from fits, and his case was then regarded as hopeless. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. At the conclusion of the Inquiry the mother of the deceased fell down in a fit, and remained some time in an unconscious state.

Wednesday 7 March 1883, Issue 6017 – Gale Document No. Y3200734625
EXETER – Distressing Suicide. - A painful feeling was created in the city on Saturday morning by the sad news that MR FREDERICK BRODIE of the Spirit Vaults, Fore-street, had committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. The deceased's affairs were in liquidation, and it is supposed that his failure in business had so affected his mind as to induce temporary insanity. The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) in the afternoon of the same day, held an Inquest on the body at the Eagle Inn, Bartholomew-street. Evidence of identification was given by MR WILLIAM BRODIE, journalist, who stated that his brother had been very much depressed of late in consequence of the turn taken by his business affairs, but added that the estate shewed at least 15s. in the £. Deceased, the witness stated, was a temperate man. MISS MARIAN BRODIE, daughter of the deceased, said her father had been in a very low state for some weeks, and he had taken nothing that morning but a cup of coffee. Thomas Rudd the man who had been put in possession by Mr R. Southcott, the trustee, said the deceased would frequently sit down and cry, saying that he did not know what he should do for his wife and family. Witness saw him in the kitchen, and told him he believed the trustee would be down in the course of the day; MR BRODIE'S reply was that he "didn't care how it went now." Half an hour afterwards he heard screams, and on going to a room upstairs found that the deceased had cut his throat with a razor. Dr Farrant was sent for, but before he arrived life was extinct. MR W. BRODIE said he believed deceased had received a letter from Mr Southcott, telling him to hold himself in readiness to give up the house, and probably that was the "last straw." After hearing further evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane." The Coroner and Jury expressed their deep sympathy with the bereaved family. Deceased has left a widow and five sons and daughters.

EXETER – Fatal Fall from a Scaffold. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, touching the death of JOHN RICHARD, a mason, who sustained fatal injuries on Saturday last by falling from a scaffold in Coombe-street. It was proved by the witnesses that deceased assisted in erecting the scaffolding in question, which was at a height of twenty-five feet from the ground, and that the workmen themselves selected the materials used from amongst a quantity which was at their disposal. The pudlock, forming one of the supports, was inserted in a hole in the wall, and it was believed that the swaying of the ladder, communicating with the ground, had had the effect of dislodging this. The planks, which it supported, consequently gave way, and the deceased fell heavily to the ground. He was removed to the Hospital, where he died soon after admission from the effects of injuries to the base of the skull. One of the Jurymen said it appeared to him that the pudlocks were composed of rotten, worn-out, door-jambs, which might have been a hundred years old for all they could tell. In a very lengthened experience in the building trade, he had never seen such used before. It was elicited from one of the witnesses that the master of the men (Mr Yardley) did not at any time inspect the scaffolding. The Coroner informed Mr Yardley, who was present, that he might make any statement he felt inclined to give, but, as it might be used against him on another occasion, he would advise him not to do so, and Mr Yardley accepted the advice. The Coroner pointed out to the Jury that it was open to them to return a verdict of manslaughter or one of accidental death, leaving the deceased's representatives to secure compensation under the provisions of the Employers' Liability Act. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that they believed there was blame attributable, but it was not sufficient to amount to culpable negligence.

Wednesday 14 March 1883, Issue 6018 – Gale Document No. Y3200734683
BARNSTAPLE – Killed at a Level Crossing. - An Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Union Workhouse last Wednesday on the body of an aged inmate named CHARLES LEY, killed at Fremington Station, the previous day. The poor fellow, who was very nearsighted, had been to the Fremington limekiln for a load of lime. He had passed over the level crossing on his return to Fremington, and the donkey, which was drawing the load, was following him. The animal was nearly on the line, when the signalman at the station seeing the train approaching shouted across "Stop that donkey." LEY made a rush to reach the donkey, and at the moment the train came up and he was caught by the centre of the engine. After the train had passed it was found he had several wounds about the head, his right leg was cut off, and his left leg below the knee smashed to a pulp. He expired a few minutes afterwards. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The donkey was knocked down and so injured that it had to be shot.

Wednesday 14 March 1883, Issue 6018 – Gale Document No. Y3200734662
EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the Poltimore Inn, before Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of CHARLES HENRY WHITBORNE, aged 23, a tailor, residing at 11, Union-terrace, who dropped down dead in his house on the previous afternoon. Deceased was working in his garden early in the afternoon, when he suddenly returned to the house and was found by a neighbour lying in a pool of blood. Deceased was immediately attended to, but before medical aid arrived he expired. Mr C. Bell, surgeon, said the cause of death was the rupture of a blood vessel in the liver, and to all appearances deceased suffered from consumption. A verdict of death from Natural Causes was returned.

Wednesday 21 March 1883, Issue 6019 – Gale Document No. Y3200734721
COLEBROOKE – Fatal Fall. - The District County Coroner (Mr F. Burrow) held an Inquest at the Lower Town Cottage, Colebrooke, last Friday, on the body of THOMAS GOSS, who died on Wednesday night from the effects of a fall. It appeared that the deceased on Sunday night left the Railway Inn, Yeoford, about ten o'clock, in company with Samuel Cott and George Drew. Finding a better path they walked some distance upon the line. When they reached Waterlake Bridge deceased wished the other two good-night, and left to descend the bridge on the left hand side, the others getting down on the opposite side. Before going far they heard a noise as if from a fall, and on going to the spot they found deceased lying insensible. The police-constable and others were fetched, and deceased was taken to his home, where he died on Wednesday, never having regained consciousness. The fall would have been about fifteen feet; the coping was not more than about nine inches. Deceased was sober at the time. Mr Foster, who appeared for the London and South Western Railway Company, said no one had any right upon the line, not even the packers, after their work was done. Mr W. H. Heygate, surgeon, of Crediton, said he had examined deceased, and found the base of the skull fractured, which he had no doubt was caused by the fall. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

AXMINSTER – Concealment of Birth. - At the police-court on Saturday, before T. Barns and J. I. Scarborough, Esqrs., ELIZABETH PAVEY, aged 32 years, a domestic servant, until recently employed by Mr George Dare, farmer and butcher, of Kilmington, was charged with concealing the birth of an illegitimate female child on the 8th February, or thereabouts. the remains of the body of an infant, which had been partly eaten by dogs and rats, was found in a hedge-bank on Mr Dare's farm on the 11th instant. The result of a post mortem examination showed that they were remains of a very fine child which had been born alive, and at the Inquest held last Wednesday the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Dead." The accused was apprehended on Wednesday, and after she had undergone medical examination, confessed to Mrs Pike, wife of the police-sergeant, that the child found in the hedge was hers, and that it had died from want of proper attention at the birth. She had provided no clothes for it, because she intended going into the Workhouse, but was taken ill before she expected. Prisoner was committed for trial at the forthcoming Assizes to be held in Exeter. Other remains have since been found in the same spot, and from the evidence given at the Inquest held thereon last Monday there is good reason for supposing that they were placed there by the prisoner. Whether they were the remains of one child or two the doctor could not say positively, and he was also quite unable to say whether they belonged to an infant that had had a separate existence. An Open Verdict was returned.

Wednesday 28 March 1883, Issue 6020 – Gale Document No. Y3200734763
TORQUAY – Fatal Carriage Accident. - Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at the Upton Vale Hotel, Torquay, last Monday, on the body of MRS MELHUISH, wife of a chandler of Upton, who died on Thursday. The deceased and her husband were driving from Paignton to Torquay on Saturday week, and when near Livermead the vehicle overturned and both were thrown out upon the road. The deceased sustained such injuries as to cause her death. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 4 April 1883, Issue 6021 – Gale Document No. Y3200734782
BROADCLIST – An Inquest was held on Monday at Farringdon, near Broadclyst, before the Deputy-Coroner (C. E. Cox, Esq.), on the body of THOMAS HAMLIN, aged 56, a shoemaker, who was found dead last Friday, hanging by his neck. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had been in a desponding state for some time past. He was of an excitable temperament, and of late had been "strange". The |Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

TIVERTON – Shocking Homicide. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at Washfield, near Tiverton, respecting the death of LUCY CLEAVE, who died on the previous day from injuries inflicted by her father. The man had been under medical care for some time suffering from weakness, and three weeks ago attempted suicide by jumping into the Exe. On Tuesday he attacked his daughter with a knife, inflicting shocking injuries which resulted in her death. The Jury returned a verdict against CLEAVE of "Homicide, whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 11 April 1883, Issue 6022 – Gale Document No. Y3200734826
EXETER – Death from Misadventure. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, on Wednesday, touching the death of WILLIAM JOHN WILLIS, a child about two years of age, living in Water-lane. The mother of the deceased stated that on Wednesday afternoon, about 4.30, she gave him some broth in a basin. He ate it, and gave some to a little boy who was by his side. Soon after she heard the little fellow scream out "Mamma?" She went to him and found in his hand a phial bottle. He had drunk some of the contents of the bottle, and his mouth was all burnt white. She was told to take him to the hospital, which she did at once. He had taken the phial from behind some images on a side table. There were spirits of salts in the bottle, which had been given her husband to clean harness. She did not know it was there. JAMES WILLIS, father of the child, said the stuff was given to him a fortnight before to clean brass quickly He did not know it was poisonous. Mr A. G. Bloomfield, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he admitted the deceased into the institution about 5.30 on the previous day, and about 8.30 p.m. the same evening the child died from shock. He made a post mortem examination, and found that the membrane of the gullet was very much corroded and in some places it was entirely removed; the surface was dry and white. In the stomach there was a large thick black patch, about the size of a crown piece, and from these appearances it was evident that the child had been poisoned by a very strong mineral acid. When the mother brought the child to the Hospital, she also brought the bottle containing a few drops of yellow fluid, from which vapour was escaping. He tested it, and found that it was hydrochloric acid, which is sold under the name of spirits of salts. He thought the child must have taken a large dose. A half-teaspoonful would be enough to kill a child of that age. The cause of death was "Severe injury to the stomach and gullet," resulting from poison. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death through Misadventure."

EXETER – Inquest. - Mr H. D. Barton (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Poltimore Inn yesterday on the body of ANNIE CROCKER, aged two years, lately living in Warren's-court, St. Sidwell's. Dr Bell said the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with medical testimony.

Wednesday 16 May 1883, Issue 6027 – Gale Document No. Y3200735038
CLYST ST. MARY - Suicide. - On Wednesday at the Half Moon Inn, before the Deputy Coroner (C. E. Cox, Esq.), an Inquest was held on view of the body of GEORGE BRAUND, a mason's labourer, who was found dead on Monday suspended to a beam in a hay-loft belonging to Mr Burgoine. Charles Gosling, a carter, in the employ of Mr Burgoine, stated that the deceased was aged 32. Witness last saw him alive about mid-day in Mr Burgoine's yard, where he was repairing some walls for the owner of the property – Mr J. Garrett. The deceased asked him for his firkin to drink, and at the time seemed to be "very low." He had no reason to suspect that the deceased would commit suicide. About half-past five o'clock the same day witness went into Mr Burgoine's stable loft, and there saw the deceased hanging to a beam by his neck. A piece of cord was tied round the left wrist, the end of which was hanging down. Witness ran for assistance and a knife, and cut the deceased down. The body was quite cold. A policeman was fetched and the body was removed to the Half Moon Inn. The deceased was a single man. ROBERT BRAUND, father of the deceased, stated that during the latter part of last week his son appeared to be in a rather low state. Witness's wife was at the present time dangerously ill, and he believed that his son, who was much attached to his mother, grieved about it. He knew of nothing that could trouble the deceased except his mother's illness. The Jury were of opinion that the deceased committed suicide while temporarily insane, and returned a verdict accordingly.

WHIMPLE – The Suicide on the Railway. - Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the New Inn, last Wednesday, on the remains of a fish hawker named TANTON, which had been picked up on the railway near Whimple the previous morning. The first witness was the wife of the deceased, ANN TANTON, who stated that her husband was fifty-six years of age. On Saturday night she thought he seemed strange, but she attributed it to the fact that he had some trouble about a horse that he had bought. Before leaving home on Tuesday morning he wound up the clock, and remarked that it was the last time he should do so. ELIZABETH TANTON, a daughter of the deceased, stated that she had heard her father threaten to commit suicide on many occasions. He had been "strange" ever since he was run over. He had complained of pains in his head of late. Jessie Godfrey proved seeing the deceased standing at the spot where he was picked up dead on Tuesday morning. The deceased was writing on a piece of paper. Edward Hatcher, driver of the 6.55 a.m. train from Exeter on Tuesday morning, said that about three-quarters of a mile from Whimple he saw the defendant standing within the fence on the down side. He walked out, and threw himself on the rails when the train was about twenty yards in front of him. Witness could not stop the train, and the deceased was run over. He drove into Whimple Station and reported what had occurred. Inspector Rendall deposed that everything possible was done to avert the accident. P.C. Moore said that he searched the deceased's clothes, and found a pocket-book only. Witness found a leaf of the pocket-book in the deceased's hat with the following words on it:- "JAMES TANTON – I thank my wife for this." The Jury returned a verdict of suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity, and attached no blame whatever to the railway officials. Inspector Foster watched the proceedings on behalf of the London and South-Western Railway Company.

LONGDOWN – Killed on the Highway. - At the Lamb Inn, Longdown, on Thursday an Inquest was held before F. Burrow, Esq. (District Coroner), touching the death of ELIZABETH BEER, a woman, 67 years of age, which occurred on the previous Tuesday from the effects of injuries received through the upsetting of a carrier's van while on the road from Christow to Exeter. The deceased, who was a widow, and resided at Christow, fell under the vehicle, and was literally crushed to death. There were several passengers in the van at the time, and one or two of them got badly bruised. The deceased jumped out of the van to save herself and was the only one who sustained serious injuries. When got from under the vehicle she was carried lifeless into the very house from which more than forty years ago she was married. The first witness called was George Wills, a small farmer, of Christow, who said that on Tuesday the 8th inst. he drove the van of Mr Davis from Christow to Exeter. There were eight persons in the van besides himself, one being the deceased, who was sitting in front on the outside seat, with witness and a man named Beer. Nothing occurred until just before coming to Longdown. Witness drove the van on this occasion to oblige Mr Davis, who was with the Yeomanry. On the road to Longdown he overtook the Bridford Van, and they walked up the hill together. On the top of the hill witness got up into his van and tried to pass the Bridford van. There was plenty of room to pass, but as he attempted to do so the horse in the Bridford van "beared" right on his horse, so that he could not pass. Witness tried to pull up, but could not, and the van got in the trough, and the wheels caught in the stumps of the trees, and the van turned over. When the deceased saw the van about to overturn she jumped out, and he supposed the van fell on her. Witness was thrown out, and received an injury to his thigh, but he could not say if it was caused by the fall or by holding up the waggon. The people in the Bridford van came back and assisted in getting the deceased from under the overturned vehicle, an operation which took about five minutes. She was not dead when extricated, but she was senseless, and was much injured about the head. Directly after the accident a messenger was sent for a doctor. One or two other persons who were in the van were slightly injured. Witness considered that there was plenty of room in the road to pass, and did not call out to the driver of the van to stop. He had no particular reason for passing the other van, but they had both been going at a slow pace, and he wanted to go a little faster. Had the horse in the Bridford van kept straight on, the accident would not have happened. Witness was not driving at a greater rate than five or six miles an hour, and he could not attribute any blame to the other driver. William Causeley, the driver of the Bridford van, said he did not know that the last witness was trying to pass him. When he heard the passengers call out that the Christow van had upset, he at once went back to the assistance of the passengers. After the deceased was extricated witness helped the other passengers, and brought on some to Exeter. To a Juryman: Witness's horse did not bear off t all, and he could not say how close the other van was upon him. Witness, in answer to further observations, explained that there was a turn in the road where the accident happened, and his horse might seem to be bearing down, although such was not the case. Elizabeth Ellen Counter, Henry Peters, a miner, and Jessie Aggett gave corroborative evidence. Dr R. Riddell, practising at Dunsford, stated that on Tuesday morning he was sent for to attend the deceased. He went at once, and on his arrival found her dead. He examined her and found the entire scalp torn off and the bones at the sides and back of the head crushed on to the brain. There were also internal injuries, for blood was oozing from her mouth. He was of opinion that the deceased must have been dragged for some little distance under the van. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 23 May 1883, Issue 6028 – Gale Document No. Y3200735056
EXETER – Death From a Fall at Play. - An Inquest was held at the Victoria Inn, Victoria-road, on Monday evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq. (City Coroner), on the body of JAMES STILE YELLAND, aged 5 ½ years, son of MR HENRY JOHN YELLAND, who died on Saturday morning from the effects of an accident. The father of the deceased is an accountant, living in Victoria-road, and he stated that when he returned home on Tuesday he heard that his son, the deceased, had fallen down and hurt the back of his head, but he was able to go out to play afterwards. On Wednesday morning he also went out as usual, but in the afternoon he complained of a pain in his stomach and sickness. He sent for Dr Henderson, who attended the deceased up to the time of his death. John Sealey Rippon, a boy, residing in Victoria-road, stated that he was with the deceased on Tuesday evening, when he fell down. They were playing with other boys in Union-road, when one of them jumped on witness's back, and the deceased jumped upon the back of the other boy. The deceased and the other boy both fell off his back, YELLAND being underneath his friend. The deceased fell upon a large, sharp stone, cutting his head. He began to cry, and his sister took him home, but he came out again soon afterwards and went on with his play. Dr Henderson, surgeon, said that death arose from concussion of the head and spine, resulting in persistent vomiting and internal haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Coroner conveyed to MR YELLAND the deep sympathy of himself and the Jury in the loss he had sustained.

Wednesday 23 May 1883, Issue 6028 – Gale Document No. Y3200735073
NORTHTAWTON - Fatal Fight. - Verdict of Manslaughter.
On Thursday, at the Town Hall, Northtawton, R. Fulford, Esq., District Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of a labourer named ROBERT NORTHCOTT, which had occurred under distressing circumstances. The Inquiry lasted nearly four hours, and throughout the whole of this time the excitement among the townsfolk ran very high.
ELIZA NORTHCOTT identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her brother-in-law, a labourer, of Northtawton. He was forty-seven years of age, and left a widow and six children.
Mr John Deans, a surgeon, practising at Northtawton, said in conjunction with Dr Bennett, he made a post mortem examination, and found the cause of death to be intense inflammation, resulting from laceration of the bowels. There were no external marks or bruises on the belly. He examined the man previous to death, and found he had black eyes; his back was also very much discoloured. He complained of being in great pain on the right side of the bowels, which he said was the result of a kick received the day previous. He complained that some of his ribs were broken. After carefully examining him he found some of the ribs injured. He had no doubt that death was the result of a blow. The rupture of the bowels must have been caused by some sharp blow, such as might be produced by a kick or even the throwing of a stone.
Frederick Charles Bennett, a surgeon, practising at Okehampton, gave confirmatory evidence.
Naomi Vanstone said: I live at Broadwoodkelly, and was at the Globe Inn, Northtawton, on Monday, between five and six. I met ROBERT NORTHCOTT outside, and we went into the skittle-alley together. As soon as NORTHCOTT entered the alley he said "I'll fight, play skittles, or wrestle any man in the alley." Robert Arscott was present, and from deceased's manner I thought there might have been some old grudge between him and Arscott, for the latter said, with an oath, "What do thee want of me, BOBBY?" More words were exchanged; then they stripped for a fight. After they were ready to fight they asked each other whether they wanted anything. Before any blow was struck I tried to calm them, and said it would be better for them to sit down and drink a pint of beer together. They seemed to listen to this for a time, and got on part of their clothes again. Not caring to get mixed up any further in the matter, I went to go out of the alley, but hearing a noise I turned round and saw deceased strike Arscott. This was the first blow that had been struck. They both then got at it "rough and tumble;" they both used the feet as well as the hands. The scrimmage did not last many minutes. Both kicked very viciously. Arscott aimed a very severe blow at deceased's leg, but missed, and the toe struck the lower part of the abdomen. I thought the blow a dangerous and unfair one. Deceased, after receiving it, struck Arscott several heavy blows in the ribs, and tried to throw him down, but fell himself. Arscott held him when down. I did not see any blows struck after the fall. There were a lot of men in the skittle alley, but they were all strangers to me. I went to tell the landlord what had happened. In reply to a juror, witness said: I consider Arscott acted only in self-defence. I saw the whole, and think deceased most in the wrong; he was very wicked and insulting, and commenced the fight. Mrs Northcott, the landlady, took deceased away after the fall.
James Ellis, living at North Tawton, Albert Cole, a brother-in-law of Arscott, and John Arscott, of Newland, saw the affair, and corroborated the testimony given by Vanstone.
MARY ANN NORTHCOTT; wife of the landlord of the Globe Inn, said – Deceased is my husband's cousin. When near my house I heard a noise and found deceased quarrelsome. I begged him not to keep up a disturbance. Finding he would not listen to me I went into the house. After deceased was down I again went into the alley, and helped him to get up. I was much frightened to see him in such a state; he was covered with blood. He said nothing until he came into the house, when he made a statement, alleging that he had been kicked. I kept him in our house until he was fit to be taken home. I had not seen him for some time previous to the fight; but he must have been drinking somewhere because he was the worse for drink.
The following affidavit was then put in:- ROBERT NORTHCOTT this day before Christian Budd, M.D., Justice of the Peace for the County of Devon, on oath states as follows: I feel myself in great danger, and I state that yesterday, the 14th day of May, I was at the Globe Inn, in Northtawton, kept by John Northcott, with Robert Arscott, of Southtawton, about half-past four o'clock. He struck and knocked me down, and while down he kicked me in the belly four or five times, from which I received injuries from which I feel I shall never survive.
The Coroner, having summed up and explained the law bearing upon the case, left the matter in the hands of the Jury, who, after about fifteen minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Robert Arscott, but added that deceased had given much aggravation.
The Coroner thereupon committed the prisoner for trial upon a charge of Manslaughter. He at the same time offered to accept bail. Prisoner is about twenty-four years of age.
Later in the day Arscott was taken before Rev. R. Hole (in the chair) and Dr Budd, and charged with having on the 14th inst. "killed one ROBERT NORTHCOTT." The witnesses repeated the evidence given at the Coroner's Inquiry. Police-Sergeant Cooksley said when he apprehended prisoner at Willey Farm, Sampford Courtenay, prisoner said, "It was all his own fault. There was no killing or slaying. We got close and fell down." In answer to the Bench, prisoner declined to make any statement. The Magistrates therefore committed the prisoner for trial at the Assizes. They added that prisoner received great provocation. Bail was accepted – two sureties in £20 each.

Wednesday 30 May 1883, Issue 6029 – Gale Document No. Y3200735112
EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE AT PLYMOUTH – An extraordinary suicide took place at Plymouth on Wednesday. A young gentleman named EVANS, the junior reporter of a local paper, was found dead in his bedroom, and a post mortem examination revealed the fact of poisoning by prussic acid. In a letter lying beside him the lad, who was only seventeen years old, stated that he had been driven to the act by the refusal of his parents to allow him to correspond with a young lady named therein. He had attempted suicide a fortnight previously by swallowing nine pennyworth of prussic acid, the effect of which was only to make him vomit. On this occasion he purchased six pennyworth, and used only a small but sufficient portion of it. In a letter to his mother he begged that a lock of his sweetheart's hair might be placed upon his bosom, and that he might be buried with a crucifix around his neck, and with the full ritual in a suburban cemetery. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane.

TORQUAY – Shocking Suicide of a Plymouth Banker. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall on Thursday before the District Coroner, touching the death of MR CHRISTOPHER H. BULTEEL, whose body had been found hanging from a tree in Cockington Wood on the previous Tuesday evening. The evidence given by James West, the deceased's attendant, Dr Gordon Cumming, and other witnesses, shewed that MR BULTEEL had for some time suffered from profound melancholy, and that in consequence he was closely watched, and never allowed to go out by himself. He conversed rationally with his wife and sister on Tuesday morning, was missed shortly afterwards, and nothing more was seen of him until his body was discovered in the evening. The Jury returned as their verdict "That deceased committed suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind." The deceased was forty years of age, and leaves a wife and infant child.

Wednesday 6 June 1883, Issue 6030 – Gale Document No. Y3200735152
KINGSTEIGNTON – Drowned in a Clay Pit. - Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, on Thursday held an Inquest at the New Buildings, Kingsteignton, concerning the death of a man named LUSCOMBE, until lately employed by Messrs. Watts, Blake, Bearne, and Co., clay merchants, whose body had been found the previous day in a disused clay pit. Evidence was given as to the finding of the body in the pit, but how it got there was only matter of conjecture. Dr Ley (who had attended the deceased) and one or two other witnesses stated that he had suffered from light headedness at times, and more particularly about a year ago, and he had lately been heard to express a fear that he was going to have a recurrence of it. The Jury returned a verdict that death resulted from drowning, but how the body came into the pit there was no evidence to show. Deceased, who was a steady, industrious man, leaves a widow and five children.

SIDMOUTH – Distressing Suicide. - Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, on Saturday, empanelled a Jury to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL WOODLEY, a farm labourer, fifty-three years of age, who had destroyed himself. The body was identified by SUSAN WOODLEY, who said that the deceased was her father. Her mother died on the 17th of February. Her father had been very low spirited since her death. There were eleven children, six of them at home. She last saw him on Friday evening. Anna Tucker said deceased's wife was her husband's sister. She last saw deceased on Sunday, May 13th, when he seemed to be in trouble about his wife, and said he did not know what to do with his family; it was more than he could bear. Since her death he had been very despondent. His wages were 11s. per week. Francis Pyle, farmer, said deceased had worked for him for the last three years. He was always very industrious, but seemed to have been in great trouble since his wife's death. Walter Daniels, blacksmith, gave similar evidence. William Cobourn, a boy, said he was in a field driving out some sheep, about nine o'clock Friday morning, and looking over the hedge he saw a man lying down. He told Miss Evans, the school mistress, and then went for Mr Pyle. Dr Pullin said he was sent for, but deceased had been dead about two hours. Found a razor in his right hand; he had severed the windpipe and jugular vein. Deceased came to his surgery about two months since, and said he was in trouble; he had not slept for a week. He prescribed for him, and he seemed to get a little better, and left off the medicine. Deceased had applied to the parish for relief, but being an able-bodied man they could not grant him any, and that made him more despondent than before. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased killed himself while suffering from Temporary Insanity. The Jury and witnesses gave their fees to the children. Dr Pullin has kindly undertaken to place one of the children in an orphan asylum.

Wednesday 6 June 1883, Issue 6030 – Gale Document No. Y3200735156
NORTHTAWTON – Sudden Death. - Mr Fulford, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Gostwyck Arms, Northtawton, on Monday, relating to the death of JOHN HAWKINS BOLT, who died suddenly at Yoe Farm on the previous morning. It was the custom of the deceased to stay at the farm on Sundays during the absence of Mr Strong, the occupier. BOLT had not been in the house long on Sunday last when he was observed to be very ill, and he died before medical aid could be procured. The evidence of Mr Deans, the medical man, shewed that the deceased had been suffering from heart disease for some time, and that this was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 6 June 1883, Issue 6030 – Gale Document No. Y3200735150
SUICIDE OF A CLERGYMAN AT BRIXHAM - An Inquest was held last Saturday at Brixham, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of the REV. HENRY GEORGE GERVASE CUTLER, who committed suicide on Wednesday evening by throwing himself into the sea from the cliffs at Berry Head. The deceased was a clergyman of the established church, but unattached, and had reached his 54th year. During his very long residence in Brixham he had done occasional duty, and that very recently. On Wednesday morning his son, MR F. G. CUTLER, noticed at breakfast that his father was quieter than usual, and that at times he seemed very much depressed. His solicitor, Mr O. C. Ward, of Farnham, Surrey, had been struck with a marked change in the deceased when he saw him six weeks previously in London. He seemed to be worried about little accounts that were brought to him. In a letter which Mr Ward received from him, dated the 30th May, the deceased wished him "good-bye" and said he would not see him again in this world. His financial condition, he stated, was desperate and hope was beyond him. In the deceased's diary on the 30th May, occurred the memorandum "My dear mother died on this day, 1847," and then was written the passage "Lord now le test Thou Thy servant depart in peace." Mr Ward stated that there was no ground for the fears expressed by the deceased as to his financial position. It appears that for some time the deceased had laboured under the belief that he was in monetary difficulties. On his way to Berry Head, and only an hour before the rash act was committed, he called at the office of a solicitor to pay a small account, and finding the place closed slid the money under the door. The last person to see and speak with him afterwards was his son, MR F. G. BUTLER, who met him in the New-road, about twenty minutes to eight. Shortly after that time he was seen by two men named Perryman and Woodley on the rocks at Berry Head. Standing at a distance of about 6009 yards they saw the deceased walk along the Green until he came to the rocks, and when he was within ten feet of the edge he took off his hat, placed it on the ground, and ran forward and jumped into the sea below, a distance of about sixty feet. The men ran at once to the spot from where he had taken the leap, and saw him struggling in the sea below them, the deceased being an expert swimmer. They then went to the house of Mr Williams, which was near, to procure a rope, but on their return the deceased had sunk. Search was made for the body, but without avail, until Friday morning, when it was picked up not far from the scene of the suicide by two fishermen named Thomas Adams and Abraham Eales. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind." The melancholy occurrence has caused a profound sensation in Brixham and neighbourhood, where the deceased was well-known and widely esteemed as a man of gentle disposition and great kindness of heart. He leaves a widow and grown-up family.

Wednesday 13 June 1883, Issue 6031 – Gale Document No. Y3200735172
EXETER – Fatal Accident to MAJOR MORTIMER. - This gentleman, who was a retired officer from the 15th Hussars, and resided at Mount Radford, met with a serious accident on the 2nd inst., from the effects of which he died on Sunday night. It appeared that the deceased was out riding on the 2nd inst., and whilst passing Heavitree-bridge his horse shied at a boy and threw its rider. The Major's thigh bone was broken in two places, and he sustained a severe shock to the system. Dr Bankart attended the deceased, but the accident proved fatal. An Inquest on the body will be held at 11.30 this (Wednesday) morning at the Port Royal Inn.

EXETER – Sudden Death. - After the tea provided in the Congregational Schoolroom, Castle-street, for the members attending the Baptist Conference now being held in Exeter, an incident occurred which cast considerable gloom over the subsequent proceedings. A MRS EDWARDS, a widow lady of Kilmington, near Axminster, who had been at the social gathering, was walking in the grounds of the Rougement Castle with some of her friends, when close to the grotto she made a complaint that she was in pain. Immediately after this blood issued from the unfortunate lady's mouth, and falling to the ground she expired in a few minutes. The body was removed to the public mortuary, and an Inquest will in all probability be held as soon as possible.

Wednesday 20 June 1883, Issue 6032 – Gale Document No. Y3200735214
DISTRESSING DEATH IN EXETER. – The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at Mr Blacking's Spirit Vaults, High-street, on Monday evening, touching the death of MR GEORGE DELVES, a chemist, of 187, High-street, who was found dead in his bed on Saturday night. Mr Friend obtained permission of the Coroner to be present at the Inquest to represent the deceased's relatives. Evidence was given by Miss Ellen Clark, sister-in-law to MR DELVES, Ellen Elizabeth Levi, cook, Sidney John Baker, an apprentice to MR DELVES, Mary Spiller, nurse, and Dr Henderson. The testimony of the first four witnesses shewed that the deceased was a man of excessively intemperate habits, and that he was accustomed to keep his bed for days together as the effects of his drinking proclivities. Miss Clark stated that he very freely drank sherry, brandy and champagne. When suffering from drunkenness he took a mixture known as bromide, which a medical man prescribed for him, and in addition to this a few drops of prussic acid. This acted as a sedative, and tended to allay the effects of the intoxicating liquors. On Friday night deceased was seen by the apprentice in the dining-room; he was then the worse for liquor and in a shaky state. He retired to bed that night, sleeping in a room by himself, his wife having been confined about three weeks since. About seven o'clock on Saturday morning MR DELVES was seen going up over the stairs to his bedroom. He was then apparently inebriated. He went to his room, and nothing further transpired until about half-past six in the evening. At this time MRS DELVES requested the apprentice to go into his master's room on some pretence and see how he was. The young man found that the bedroom door was bolted, and he was unable to gain admittance. The cook and nurse then went to the door, and the former forced it open. On going into the room the apprentice saw his master in the bed and exclaimed "He's as dead as a rag!" which was confirmed by the nurse. Dr Henderson was called to attend MRS DELVES in an adjoining room, as the poor lady was suffering from hysteria, caused by hearing of her husband's death. He then proceeded to deceased's room, and saw that MR DELVES was dead. There was an odour of prussic acid, and the deceased had the appearance of having died by taking an overdose of that mixture. MR DELVES might have been dead several hours at this time. Dr Henderson made a post mortem examination, and it was his opinion that the unfortunate man died from taking prussic acid. Dr Henderson and the apprentice examined the room, and found in a drawer of a washing-stand a bottle containing bromide, and another bottle containing about twenty drops of prussic acid. Both bottles were labelled. In one part of the drawer some prussic acid had been spilt, and an odour was arising from it. In answer to Mr Friend, Dr Henderson said: Bromide and prussic acid were sometimes prescribed as a sedative. If a man's hand were shaky it was quite probable that he might pour out a few more drops of this poison than he required. MR DELVES, intending to mix the prussic acid proportionately, might have poured out too much. All the circumstances that he knew were consistent with the assumption that MR DELVES inadvertently over-dosed himself. Mr Friend addressed the Jury to the effect that the evidence all pointed to the fact that the deceased inadvertently and whilst under the influence of drink took an overdose of prussic acid. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury considered their decision, and after the expiration of ten minutes returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure."

Wednesday 20 June 1883, Issue 6032 – Gale Document No. Y3200735210
THE SUDDEN DEATH AT ROUGEMONT. - The Conduct of the Chief Constable. - An Inquest was held at the Crown and Sceptre Hotel on Wednesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of MRS JANE EDWARDS, who died suddenly on Tuesday evening last, while on the grounds of Rougemont Castle. The deceased was the widow of THOMAS EDWARDS, a farmer and dairyman, of Kilmington. She was about 42 years of age, and had no children. On Tuesday morning deceased came into Exeter to attend the Baptist Conference, and after partaking of tea in the Congregational school-rooms with the ministers and delegates, went to walk in Mrs Gard's grounds, which had been thrown open to the members of the Conference. She was accompanied by the Rev. R. Bastable, Baptist Minister, of Kilmington, and his wife. They had not long been in the grounds when the deceased was taken suddenly ill and expired within five minutes. Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, was fetched, but the poor woman expired before he arrived, and at the Inquest he said the cause of death was the rupture of a blood vessel. The friends of the deceased complained seriously of the conduct of the Chief Constable. According to the statement of Mr Bastable, on his arriving in the gardens he pushed the witness on one side, telling him to mind his own business, and ordered the body to be removed to the Guildhall. At the Guildhall Mr Bastable told the Chief Constable the body was in his custody, Captain Bent then wrung his fist in witness's face telling him that if he did not step back he would knock him into the street, which he did. Witness said he was not struck, but Captain Bent pushed him off the pavement. Mr Perkins, in course of his evidence, said that Captain Bent had come up to him in the gardens, and observed "This is a case of suspicion," to which he replied, "It is a very simple case: the woman has ruptured a blood vessel and fallen down dead." In answer to one Juryman, he said he could not quite understand what Captain Bent meant by his observation; and in answer to another, he declined to expressed an opinion as to whether the Chief Constable was sober or not. Evidence was preferred by Mr Roberts, bootmaker, as to what passed, but the Coroner said he had simply to enquire into the cause of death. They were not there to try the Chief Constable. Later, in putting the case to the Jury, he said that there was no doubt it was a very sad one, and he could only express his very great regret that the observations and acts of Captain Bent on this occasion should have been as they had heard. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and the Foreman said he had been requested to ask why Captain Bent would have the body taken to the Guildhall. The Coroner: Oh! That is one of those strange things – I won't say what I was going to say – but Captain Bent has an idea that immediately after the breath is out of the body it is his duty to have charge of it, but I believe the law casts it upon me. I am the custodian of the body. I was communicated with afterwards, and I am only sorry I was not a little earlier. I would then have given my instructions. - The Foreman: I think Captain Bent will be censured by the whole of the Jury. I cannot help putting myself in the place of these friends now here. A Juryman: I think it is a disgrace to the city. Another Juryman: I think, Mr Bastable, as a lot of citizens, we ought to apologise for our Chief Constable's conduct towards you. Mr Bastable: I don't need that. A Juryman: I have felt it myself. The Coroner: Not more than I have.

Wednesday 20 June 1883, Issue 6032 – Gale Document No. Y3200735228
EXMOUTH – A Painful Case. - Mr S. M. Cox (District Coroner) held an Inquest at the London Hotel, last Wednesday, touching the death of TIMOTHY SMULLEN, aged 45 years, and formerly in the Coast Brigade, R.A. MRS SMULLEN, the wife of the deceased, stated that the deceased had been stationed in Exmouth between seven and eight years. He had been very ill for the past two years, and suffered much pain. The deceased had been in a desponding state for the past four or five months. He had been to the Dispensary, where he was given medicine to relieve his breath. He died on Sunday evening. On Monday week the deceased told her that he had taken a powder, and that he was dying. This was about nine o'clock in the morning. Before he took the powder he asked for some coffee, which she sent to him. After he had taken the powder she fetched Mr Walker. The deceased lived for six days after he took the powder. She could not say where her husband got the powder from. She should like to know. He had not been in the habit of "doctoring" himself, and he kept no medicine-chest. On Friday last a medical man was sent for because he was worse. He sounded his chest, and the deceased lay in bed until the Sunday, when he died. John walker, a Sergeant-Instructor in the Volunteers, stated that he was intimately acquainted with the deceased. He was suffering from "Bright's disease," and had been in a desponding state lately. He suffered from pains in the head and chest. Never heard him speak about death or taking poison. On the day the deceased took the powder witness was fetched by MRS SMULLEN. He saw the deceased, who said to him, "I am dying." Witness said, "Nonsense; talk sense." The deceased said, "Yes, I am dying; I have taken a powder." Witness said, "Is it the powder which you had from the Dispensary?" but the deceased made no answer. Witness asked him why he took the powder, and he replied that he was in a low state, and his finances were low. He was driven to desperation, and he thought that taking the powder was the only way out of it. Mr Hodson deposed that the symptoms of the deceased's sufferings led him to believe that he had taken strychnine. He did what he could for the patient, and used the stomach-pump. The deceased got worse, and ultimately better. He saw the deceased on the day after he had taken the poison, when he appeared to be out of danger. On the following Friday he was suffering from shortness of breath. He considered that the deceased died from "Bright's disease." Witness asked the deceased where he got the poison from, and he replied, "Oh, don't ask me, I have got enough trouble myself, and I don't want to get anyone else into trouble; but I could not get it again for ever so much money. It was put into my head by reading that a gentleman at Liverpool had put some strychnine in some beer and died soon afterwards." The policeman present said that he had mad enquiries of all the chemists in Exmouth, but none of them had sold any strychnine. Mr Walker, recalled, said that the deceased told him that he had had the strychnine for years, and he had it to poison cats. The Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural causes," and gave their fees to the widow.

Wednesday 20 June 1883, Issue 6032 – Gale Document No. Y3200735213
EXETER – The Fatal Accident to MAJOR MORTIMER. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Port Royal Inn, last Wednesday, on the body of EDMUND MORTIMER, a retired major of the 15th Hussars, aged eighty-one years. The deceased was a bachelor, and had been living at Belfield House, Mount Radford. On the 2nd June he was riding from Heavitree towards the Whipton-road, when his horse shied at a boy coming suddenly out of the hedge, and the animal's sharp turn caused the major to lose his balance. He was found directly after the accident and removed to his residence, where he died on the previous Sunday from shock to the nervous system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and desired to call attention to the state of the piece of road in front of Victoria-terrace.

Wednesday 27 June 1883, Issue 6033 – Gale Document No. Y3200735251
FATAL ACCIDENT IN ST. THOMAS. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday afternoon, touching the death of WILLIAM NOTT, aged 60 years, late a butcher, of 67, South-street. It appeared from the evidence adduced that the deceased went to St. Thomas on horseback on Saturday morning. After transacting some business he called at the Sawyer's Arms, St. Thomas, where he had two or three drops of gin. On MR NOTT'S coming out of the public-house, George Sellick, a cattle dealer, of St. Thomas, held the horse whilst he mounted. The deceased succeeded in getting into the saddle all right, but the horse was fractious and immediately started off, throwing his rider over his neck. The poor man fell upon his head, and sustained concussion of the brain and fracture of the base of the skull. He was removed to the hospital, where he died about ten o'clock on Saturday night from the injuries he had received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SUICIDE IN EXETER – Another Inquiry was subsequently held in the same inn by Mr Hooper as to the death of JOHN ATKINS, who had committed suicide by cutting his throat on Saturday morning. The deceased, who was a plasterer, was 57 years of age. He had not been able to work for the last six months, having been ill of rheumatic, and he had been living with his son, THOMAS ATKINS, of 9, Frog-street, since the previous Tuesday. He had been "light-headed" for sometime. On Saturday morning it was discovered that he had cut his throat with a razor. He was then conscious, and in reply to P.C. Wheeler he said he had cut his throat because he had been in agonies of pain all the night, and he wished to put an end to his life. ATKINS was removed to the Hospital, at which institution he died on Sunday at noon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 4 July 1883, Issue 6034 – Gale Document No. Y3200735308
EXETER - Sad Cases of Death in Exeter. - During the past week several deaths have occurred in the city under circumstances which made an Inquest necessary.

SUDDEN DEATH OF A MAN - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Bull Inn, Goldsmith-street, on Monday afternoon, relative to the death of WALTER BREWER, a jobbing gardener, who was found dead in bed on Sunday morning last. HANNAH HUTCHINGS, a single woman, living in North-street, said the deceased was her cousin, who was a single man and about 48 years of age, and a native of Exeter. William Hampton, keeper of a refreshment-house at No. 15, Goldsmith-street, deposed that the deceased came to his house on Saturday evening last and asked to be accommodated with a bed for two nights. After paying the money for his lodging the deceased went to bed. Nothing more was heard of him for the night, but about 9.15 the next morning (Sunday) witness knocked at the door, and receiving no answer, opened it, when to his great surprise found that he was dead, whereupon he communicated with the police, and Mr Bell soon afterwards arrived. Mr Bell, surgeon, stated that at the suggestion of the Coroner he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found that death was due to chronic bronchitis and oedema of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

MELANCHOLY SUICIDE. - The City Coroner (Mr Hooper) held a second Inquest at the Pack Horse Inn, St. David's-hill, on Monday afternoon, touching the death of MRS SARAH FLOUD, widow of MR THOMAS FLOUD, solicitor, who was found with her throat cut at her lodgings at St. David's-hill, on Sunday morning. Mr F. Orchard, solicitor, Exeter, appeared on behalf of the relatives of the deceased. Bessie Pengelly, an attendant on the deceased, deposed that her mistress had been living at Exmouth, but came to reside in Exeter on the 30th May last, and took lodgings at St. David's-hill with Mrs Ball. The deceased had been in a weak state of health, but was not under regular medical treatment, suffering much from asthma. On Wednesday last the deceased went to her sister's house on St. David's-hill, and she at that time seemed to be in good spirits. On Saturday morning she went for a walk unattended, and returned about noon. Witness always occupied a bed in the same room with her mistress, who went to bed about 8.30 on Saturday night, but witness did not go to bed until ten o'clock. She found her mistress awake, and at her mistress's request she drew down the blinds. Witness could not sleep, as during the early part of the night the deceased kept walking up and down the room with her hand to her head. About four o'clock she awoke witness and asked that the window might be opened, and also requested her to repeat the Lord's Prayer, which she did. Witness then fell asleep, and on awaking about eight o'clock she found that the deceased had left the room. After searching several rooms, witness ultimately found her mistress in the drawing-room, lying on the floor on her right side with her throat cut, and apparently dead. She immediately acquainted the landlady (Mrs Ball) of the circumstance, and a lodger in the house, named Derry, fetched Mr Moone, surgeon. Mr J. Moone said he was called about 8.30 on Sunday morning to go and see deceased at a house on St. David's-hill. He found MRS FLOUD lying on her left side with her throat cut. He was of opinion that she had been dead for about an hour. Witness was shown the knife produced, and which was found by her side. It was one quite sufficient to cause death. Mr Moone then complained that the police did not, as he thought they ought, fetch the nearest medical man in these cases, and the Coroner and the Jury expressed an opinion that it was of the utmost importance that the nearest doctor should be called. Dr J. Woodman deposed that he had been the usual medical attendant on the deceased for a period of nine years. He attended her first in 1874 for injuries sustained through a carriage accident, resulting in concussion of the brain, a contused head, and a broken arm. In his opinion, the deceased had never been in the same mental condition since that accident as she had been before. He had no doubt that the deceased had suffered from a degeneration of the mind, gradually brought on from that time. She always had an impression that she should meet with a sudden death. The Coroner said that the case was a very painful one, to him especially, as he had known the deceased for a number of years. There could be no doubt, in his opinion, that at the time the deceased committed the act she was not of sound mind and understanding. After a short consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

DROWING FROM CRAMP. - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Artillery Inn, Holloway-street, touching the death of a lad named WILLIAM LANGDON, of No. 2, Centre-street, who was drowned whilst bathing on Saturday afternoon. It appeared that the deceased, aged 11 years, was bathing at Trews' Weir on Saturday afternoon. There were a number of other boys also there. The boys had all come out of the water, but LANGDON returned again to go out after a piece of wood which was sailing down the river. On getting into the middle of the river the boy was seized with cramp and sank. His companion, Charles Breading, heroically swan out to rescue LANGDON, but he was unable to as he proved too heavy for him to manage. The deceased was drowned, and his body subsequently recovered by dragging. Dr Bell, who proved that life was extinct when he was called, remarked that cramp was induced by a person going into the water twice successively. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and Breading was commended for his pluck in trying to save his comrade.

FATAL FALL OVER THE STAIRS. - An Inquest was also held yesterday at the Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, on the body of a woman named HARRIET HURFORD. The deceased was a widow, aged 55, and recently lived in Coombe-street. On the 4th of June she fell down over the stairs, and sustained injuries to her spine. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with medical testimony, which was to the effect that MRS HURFORD died from the effects of the injury received by the fall.

Wednesday 11 July 1883, Issue 6035 – Gale Document No. Y3200735328
EXETER – A Fatal Dose of Laudanum. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Black Horse Hotel, Longbrook-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN HARRIET SOUTHCOTT, a widow, 67 years of age, who died on Friday. The deceased occupied a room in the house of Mr Helson, and had lived there about three months. On Thursday last she came home in the evening the worst for liquor, and Mrs Helson, who had never seen her in that state before, helped her to bed and made her some tea. On the following morning Mrs Helson saw the deceased leave the house, and saw no more of her until the evening, when she was told MRS SOUTHCOTT was ill. The deceased, it appeared, had promised to visit her sister, MRS SEAGE, on the Friday, and as she did not come the latter went to deceased's residence in the evening to inquire the cause. MRS SEAGE found her sister lying on the bed apparently asleep. She tried to rouse her, and partly succeeded in doing so. On looking about the room she found two small bottles, both empty and labelled laudanum, and fearing that something was amiss she sent for Mr Harris, surgeon. It transpired at the Inquest that a woman, who was undoubtedly the deceased, had on the Friday bought two pennyworth of opium at the shop of Mr Tighe, and then stated that she knew its nature and was in the habit of taking it. It was also elicited that the husband of deceased had been in the habit of taking laudanum for certain complaints. Mr Harris said that the deceased must have taken considerably more opium than was supplied by Mr Tighe, which would not be sufficient in itself to cause death. He believed death was caused by cardiac syncope, resulting from the injudicious use of laudanum acting on a circulation enfeebled by age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure."

Wednesday 25 July 1883, Issue 6037 – Gale Document No. Y3200735405
FATAL ACCIDENT AT COUNTESS WEIR MILLS. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on Wednesday, by Mr Coroner Hooper, touching the death of DANIEL SEARLE, who was killed by accident in the Countess Weir Paper Mills, on the 17th inst. EMILY SEARLE, wife of the deceased, identified the body as that of her late husband. He was in the employ of Mr Martin, paper manufacturer, of Countess Weir, as a labourer, was 22 year of age, and resided at Countess Weir. Alfred Dart, a labourer at the mills, said he was working with the deceased in the boiling-house of the mill, and SEARLE was putting on the belt to a shaft. He was standing on the rag-washer, which is worked both by water and steam, and while there he slipped his hand over the shaft and fell against the belt he was putting on. The belt caught the front of his shirt, and wound him around the shaft by his clothes. He then fell down against the window, and from there on to the ground. Witness had the machinery stopped, and the deceased's clothes were disentangled from the shaft. The deceased's clothes were completely stripped from off him. Richard Haydon, manager of the mills, said the place where the deceased met with the accident was not in the lest way dangerous. All the dangerous places were carefully fenced. Deceased had put on the belt hundreds of times. The mills are inspected by Government Inspectors, who gave orders where there were any dangerous places. They have been over this part of the building. Mr A. G. Bloomfield, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased into that institution on the 17th inst., about 5.30. He was quite unconscious, and on examining him he found a small scalp wound on the top of the head, and blood oozing from the right ear. There were no other marks of violence. He remained unconscious, and died about one o'[clock on the following morning. From the symptoms he presented, the cause of death was effusion of blood on the brain, produced by a fracture of the base of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 1 August 1883, Issue 6038 – Gale Document No. Y3200735439
MURDER OF A POLICEMAN NEAR BARNSTAPLE – A shocking murder was committed at Georgeham on Saturday night, by an eccentric old man named GEORGE GEEN. About seven o'clock on Saturday evening Geen was in a room at the King's Arms Inn. He had been drinking and was making such a great noise as to attract attention outside the house. WALTER CREECH, the police constable stationed in the village, hearing the disturbance, went into the house and civilly requested him to be quiet. Geen then turned upon the constable and abused him until he left. Shortly afterwards Geen also went out, and made a great noise in the village. The policeman ordered him to go home, and he was accompanied there by a man named Bale, to whom Geen remarked that he had a knife with which he said he would kill the ___. But Bale paid little heed to this threat. Geen, however, procured an old butcher's knife, with which he returned to the village, and seeing CREECH standing in the road, stabbed him in the left side just below the ribs. Just at this time Bale and others happened to be passing, but seeing that Geen was in an excited state with the knife in his hand, blood-stained, did not care to interfere with him. The murderer made his way to his house, outside which he was seized and secured, he still holding the knife. CREECH was assisted to his house, and Dr Lane, of Braunton, promptly attended, but the poor fellow died at six o'clock next morning. He was thirty years of age, and had been five years in the force. He leaves a widow and one child. Geen is credited with being the owner of some little money, and does not work beyond attending to several hives of bees which he keeps in his garden. About five years ago he was imprisoned for being drunk and assaulting a constable then stationed at Georgeham.
The Inquest was held on Monday before Mr J. H. Toller, District Coroner. The accused was present at the Inquest. It was proved that Geen had been drinking at a public-house during the evening, and that because the deceased refused his offer of a glass of ale he became very abusive, and continued his abuse in the streets. He was heard to say that "he had a knife at home and would kill the b___," and at a later period of the evening he was seen to again accost the policeman in the street, and to plunge a knife into his side. CREECH died about six o'clock on the following morning. During the Inquiry Geen continually made remarks, and persisted in the statement that CREECH stabbed himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against the accused.

Wednesday 1 August 1883, Issue 6038 – Gale Document No. Y3200735463
WINKLEIGH – Drowned Whilst Fishing. - An Inquest was held last Wednesday evening at Nethercott House, Winkleigh, before Mr Fulford, Coroner for the District, touching the death of MR W. P. EASTON, J.P., whose body was found in the river Torridge. The deceased gentleman had been staying with his brother-in-law, Lieutenant Colonel Arnold, J.P., and on the previous Tuesday afternoon left the house for the purpose of fishing in the river Torridge. As he did not return during the night, a search was made for him next morning. The deceased gentleman's hat, fishing-rod, and basket were first discovered in a deep pool at Bridge Town, about a mile from Nethercott, and shortly afterwards his body was found in the same pool. There is reason to believe that while he was wading through the stream MR EASTON lost his footing, slipping into the pool, and being encumbered by his heavy fishing boots was unable to regain the bank. He was last seen alive about four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon by the police constable stationed at Monkokehampton when he was "playing" a salmon. The Jury returned a verdict of "
Accidentally drowned whilst fishing."

NEWTON ABBOT – Distressing Death at Sandford Orleigh. - MISS ELLEN CONSTANCE BAKER, daughter of SIR SAMUEL BAKER, died on Friday morning at the residence of her father, Sandford Orleigh, under very painful circumstances. The deceased lady had suffered from epileptic fits, as well as from religious mania, and on the 14th instant made an attempt on her life by opening the veins of her arm with a penknife. This failing she plunged a large Japanese dagger into her stomach, and from the effects of this she died on Friday morning. At the Inquest the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 1 August 1883, Issue 6038 – Gale Document No. Y3200735468
KINGSTEIGNTON – Fatal Fall in a Clay Pit. - On Wednesday an Inquest was held at Kingsteignton, by Mr Coroner Hacker, on the body of an old man named BOVEY, who met his death by falling into a clay pit on Monday evening. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 8 August 1883, Issue 6039 – Gale Document No. Y3200735510
MR TOLHURST, a cashier in a London bank, committed suicide at Walter's Farley Hotel, Plymouth, on Wednesday morning, by cutting his throat. Nothing was found to account for the rash act, and, at the Inquest subsequently held, the Jury declined to say in what state of mind the deceased was at the time he took his life.

Wednesday 15 August 1883, Issue 6040 – Gale Document No. Y3200735528
EXETER – The Boy Drowned at Exwick. - Mr F. Burrow, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Lamb Inn, on Friday, relative to the death of the lad GEORGE BLACKMORE, who was drowned – as reported last week – whilst bathing at Exwick on Tuesday last. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned while bathing."

Wednesday 15 August 1883, Issue 6040 – Gale Document No. Y3200735548
BARNSTAPLE – A Child Scalded to Death. - The Borough Coroner (R. I. Bencraft, Esq.), last Wednesday held an Inquest at Newport-terrace, on the body of ALICE MAUD SHAW, daughter of MR A. B. SHAW, Surveyor of Taxes. It appeared that on Sunday morning about eleven o'clock the child was sitting on a high chair at the kitchen table and the little girl in charge of her set about filling the child's bath which stood on the floor near the chair. She had put in some boiling water and had gone away to fetch a bucket of cold water, when she heard the child fall. She hurried back and found the baby on its face in the tub. There was a bruise on the forehead, and serious scalds about the face and shoulders, from which the child died the next evening. Mr Cooke, surgeon, said that the fall and the scalds were sufficient to cause death. Tall chairs, he said, were very dangerous for young children. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Suspicious Death of an Infant. - J. H. Toller, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest about a fortnight ago, in the hamlet of Harepie, in the parish of Tawstock, on the body of an illegitimate child, when the Inquest was adjourned to Saturday last. The mother of the child is a single woman named LOUISA AVERY, who some time ago obtained an order for 2s. a week against JOHN HARRIS, a labourer, of Harepie. HARRIS, at Christmas last, took the child and another woman, whom he has since married, has taken charge of it. At the first Inquest the father stated that the child had not wanted for anything, and that he had never been cautioned by the police. At the adjourned Inquest, on Saturday last, the following evidence was given:- Elizabeth Martin, a young dressmaker, stated that she was two days at work at MR HARRIS'S, in March last, and while she was there the child was properly fed and cared for. There was a bruise on the forehead, which had been caused by the child falling from the chair. She saw no ill-treatment. This witness was submitted to a long cross-examination by the Foreman (Mr J. Langdon) as to whether she had said at the previous hearing that the child had not been properly fed and cared for. She now denied that the child was in any way illtreated, and the Foreman gave it as his opinion that Elizabeth Martin was an unwilling witness, and one who, perhaps, had been got at. Richard Hill, of Rolestone, labourer, stated that he went to HARRIS'S for water every day, and he often heard the child crying inside, and the doors closed as if no one was home. Mrs Martha Grigg, of Uppacott, stated that HARRIS and his wife and child lived with her some time. The child was then properly cared for, but it was always pale and sickly. P.C. Howard stated that he did caution HARRIS about this child in Uppacott-lane. He had heard complaints of its ill-treatment. He saw the child when it first came to the neighbourhood, and it then looked healthy, strong, and happy. It had a miserable appearance later on. The Jury then consulted and eventually the Foreman informed the Coroner that a majority of the Jurymen were in favour of another adjournment to secure the presence of the mother. The Coroner thought the mother could not help them very much, but he gave way to the Jury, and the Inquiry was again adjourned for a fortnight. The post mortem report was handed in by Mr Paul Jackson. He was of opinion that death was due to disease of the lungs occurring in a weak and sickly child.

DAWLISH – The Recent Case of Drowning. - An Inquest was held at the Cottage Hospital, Dawlish, last Wednesday, by Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, touching the death of MARY MARGARET LOUISA COMPTON, who was drowned at Dawlish on Monday night. From the evidence of William Johns and Anne Evers, who were sitting on a seat under the railway station platform, it appeared that about 9.20 on Monday night they observed some person walk towards the sands, and then into the water. The young man suggested that it might be someone shrimping. The figure soon disappeared, and they saw something moving and floating, but the water there was not deep. A man named Pike then accompanied Johns to the water's edge, and the waves gradually brought the object therein closer, when Johns, holding by Pike, walked out and brought in the body. They both tried to restore animation. The young woman was without a bonnet. Charles Henry Piesse of 115, Strand, London, public analyst and medical practitioner, staying at Blenheim House, stated that the deceased, who had been in his service for seven weeks, was just recovering from malarial fever, she had seemed at times absent-minded, and brooding, and suffering from hallucinations. She was missed from their lodgings soon after 9 p.m. on the night in question, and on inquiry he found that the body at the Cottage Hospital was that of his servant. Deceased was a conscientious and pious young woman. MARGARET COMPTON, mother of deceased, and residing at Hornchurch, Essex, said the deceased was 26 years of age. Witness produced a letter from deceased, speaking of her arrival at Dawlish and of the great kindness of her master and mistress. P.C. Stapleton stated that on his arrival at the beach he also tried artificial respiration. Deceased had on her spectacles. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Wednesday 29 August 1883, Issue 6042 – Gale Document No. Y3200735623
SUPPOSED SUICIDE IN THE EXETER CANAL. - The body of an elderly man was seen by Mr Mears, coal merchant, in the Canal near Salmon Pool Bridge, on Sunday morning. With the assistance of a labourer, named Brewer, Mr Mears removed the body from the water, and information was given to the St. Thomas police. The deceased was well-dressed, and the body had the appearance of not having been long in the water. Subsequent inquiries shewed that the unfortunate man was called SAMUEL HAWKINS, and that his home was at Rackenford, near Tiverton. It appears that he has been to the gold mines and was possessed of considerable means. About three months since he left Rackenford and came to Exeter, where it is said he has been living in a discreditable manner, and has squandered no less than £300. An Inquest was held at the Double Locks Inn last night, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Wednesday 5 September 1883, Issue 6043 – Gale Document No. Y3200735664
NEWTON ABBOT – A Deplorable End. - An Inquest was held last Saturday evening by A. S. Hacker, Esq., District Coroner, at the Board-room of the Newton Workhouse, on the body of ELIZABETH HALL, about 50 years of age, a woman who died that morning soon after admission into the Workhouse. It appeared from the evidence that the woman formerly lived with a Mr Eggbeer, clay carrier, of Highweek-street, but left several years ago, and was married to a quack-doctor, of St Thomas's, Exeter, named HUMPHREY HALL. HALL soon afterwards died, and the woman had been a widow for some years, and latterly travelled about the country, but how she got her living was not clear. On Friday night last she called at Eggbeer's house in a wretched state, and asked for something to eat, which was given her, and also sixpence to pay for a night's lodging. She let the house just before ten o'clock, and next morning a dairyman named Dicker, on going to his field in Exeter-road, found the woman lying in the hedge trough. He roused her up, and she said she would leave. Dicker went on, and told a man named Avery of the state the woman was in, and Avery, with his wife, went and saw the woman, who asked very pitifully for something to drink. Mrs Avery went home and got a cup of tea, which the woman drank, and Avery then went for the Police constable Honey, who on arriving found that the woman could not stand, and he therefore got the assistance of P.C. Salter and removed her on a handcart to the Workhouse, where she died about fifteen minutes after being admitted. A post mortem examination of the body was made by Dr Haydon, who found that death was caused by starvation, aggravated by exposure. The body was covered with only a few rags which were full of vermin, and the surface of the body was eaten by the vermin in a terrible manner. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Starvation, accelerated by exposure."

Wednesday 5 September 1883, Issue 6043 – Gale Document No. Y3200735647
EXETER – Sudden Death on Northernhay - The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Eq.) held an Inquest last Friday evening at the Crown and Sceptre Hotel, Iron Bridge, on the body of FRANK GEORGE VOISEY, aged forty-two, late of the navy, who died suddenly on Northernhay, on Thursday night. The widow of the deceased stated that for many years he had been a naval pensioner. After his last voyage he came home from Australia with rheumatic fever. Since then he had been troubled with pains in his head. P.C. Veasey, a constable in the Devon Constabulary force, stated that he was on Northernhay about nine o'clock on Thursday night, when he heard somebody fall, and subsequently heard groans. He proceeded to the spot, and saw the deceased. He then sent for one of the keepers and a policeman. Mr Brash, surgeon, arrived soon after, but pronounced life to be extinct. The medical evidence was to the effect that death resulted from natural causes, and a verdict to that effect was returned. The Coroner and Jury were of opinion that Northernhay should not be kept open so late as nine o'clock, and that the grounds should be patrolled at night as well as by day by the city police.

Wednesday 12 September 1883, Issue 6044 – Gale Document No. Y3200735710
A MAN SHOT DEAD NEAR SIDMOUTH – MYSTERIOUS CASE. - An Inquest was opened yesterday at Branscombe, near Sidmouth, before Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner for the district, on view of the body of a labourer, named PERRYMAN, who died on Saturday from the effects of gunshot wounds. It appeared that deceased, a native of Honiton, had been engaged on some works at Branscombe, near Sidmouth, and on Saturday, about nine o'clock, after leaving work for the day, he walked a certain distance with several of his comrades. He afterwards parted with them, in order to take a near road which led across the cliffs. PERRYMAN had not proceeded alone more than a few hundred yards when his fellow workmen heard a shot fired, and simultaneously someone was heard to cry out. On following the direction deceased had taken, his friends quickly came upon PERRYMAN, whom they found to have been shot in the face and head. He lingered a short time and expired. The person by whom the shot was fired was not discovered, and the cause of the outrage is unexplained. One theory is that the deceased was shot by poachers in mistake for another person against whom they had a grudge. After evidence had been taken as to the identity of the body and the facts given above, the Coroner adjourned the Inquest for a fortnight.

Wednesday 12 September 1883, Issue 6044 – Gale Document No. Y3200735707
TOTNES – Fatalities at the Races. - At the Guildhall on Friday an Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on the body of a man named WILLIAM BAKER, who had been found in the mill-leat, Totnes, on the previous morning. It appeared that deceased was a single man, thirty years of age, belonging to Moretonhampstead, and that for the past ten days he had been working in Totnes at his trade, as a mason. The evidence went to show that deceased must have fallen into the leat on Wednesday night as he was returning from the races. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and added, as a rider, that the majority of the Jury were of opinion that there should be some protection at this spot, in the shape of railings or hurdles, provided by the Race Committee.

On Thursday just after the last race had been, a man on the course, who had been watching the event, was seen to fall to the ground. He was picked up immediately but being seen to be perfectly motionless he was carried into the paddock. Dr Gaye here examined him, and did all in his power to restore animation, but his efforts were unavailing, as life was extinct. At the Inquest it transpired on enquiry that the man had suffered from heart disease, and a medical certificate to that effect having been given, an Inquest was not deemed necessary. The deceased was called TAYLOR, and belonged to Abbotskerswell, to which place the body was removed the same night.

DAWLISH – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, last Thursday before the City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.) on the body of WILLIAM BALSOM, miller's waggoner, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on the previous day, in consequence of injuries sustained at Dawlish. The deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Woodbridge, of Exeter, on Monday took a waggon-load of flour to the premises of a baker named Hosgood of Dawlish. Whilst carrying a sack into the loft the steps on which he stood slipped from under him, and he fell to the ground. The sack first pitched on a table, and then rebounded against the deceased, striking him in the back. Finding that the deceased was injured, Mr Hosgood removed him to the sitting-room and sent for a medical man. BALSOM was afterwards, at his own request, removed to the county hospital, where it was found that he was suffering from paralysis, the result of severe injury to the spinal cord. The symptoms grew worse rapidly, and death ensued. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 19 September 1883, Issue 6045 – Gale Document No. Y3200735753
SAMPFORD COURTENAY - Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held here last Saturday, before Robert Fulford, Esq., District Coroner, on view of the body of GEORGE BREALEY, a labourer, who sustained fatal injuries while attending to a steam sawing machine on Thursday. It was proved that the occurrence was accidental, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

KINGSTEIGNTON – Sudden Death. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, at Kingsteignton, relative to the death of MR THOMAS PHILIP KNOWLES, butcher, 27 years of age, who died on Tuesday night very suddenly. The deceased was apparently in his usual health up to the time of his death, but Mr Ley stated that MR KNOWLES had suffered for some years from severe affection of the heart, and in his opinion death resulted from syncope. The Jury, of which the Rev. P. Jackson was foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 19 September 1883, Issue 6045 – Gale Document No. Y3200735731
EXETER - Sad Death of an Exonian. - Dr Diplock held an Inquest at Chiswick last Friday, touching the death of ALFRED DACIE, aged 24, a medical student at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, whose dead body was found behind a stone heap in the high road, Chiswick, on Wednesday morning. CHARLES DACIE, 22, St David's-hill, Exeter, identified the deceased as his brother, and stated that he heard from him about a fortnight ago, and had no reason to believe that he would commit suicide. The deceased had been five seasons at St. Bartholomew's Hospital. Charles Hawkes, a roadman, in the employ of the Chiswick Improvement Commissioners, deposed to finding the body in a sitting position, with the back resting against the stones. The deceased had his hat on, and his dress was not disarranged in any way. Sergeant Broughton stated that he searched the body, and found a great many fragments of letters, a photograph, several studs, a pipe and tobacco-pouch, an empty white glass bottle, but no money in his possession. Dr Dodsworth, who had made a post-mortem examination of the body, attributed death to congestion of the lungs, brought about or accelerated by exposure. In answer to Mr Powles, solicitor, who appeared for the family of the deceased, the witness CHARLES DACIE stated that the deceased was in receipt of an allowance of £8 per month, besides occasional gifts in food and clothing from his father. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 26 September 1883, Issue 6046 – Gale Document No. Y3200735803
SUICIDE IN EXETER, YESTERDAY. – ISAAC MADGE, a painter's labourer, living at 27, Stepcote-hill, cut his throat in his own house about half-past twelve yesterday, and died soon afterwards. The unfortunate man, who was about 27 years of age, has been ill for some time past and this is assigned as a reason for his act. It appeared that he was in his room with his wife, and while her attention was attracted to something else he took a razor and cut his throat. Dr Perkins, of South-street, was sent for and the man expired in his presence. An Inquest will be held today (Wednesday.)

Wednesday 26 September 1883, Issue 6046 – Gale Document No. Y3200735777
EXETER – Sudden Death at St. David's Station. – An Inquest was held at the Railway Hotel, last Wednesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, relative to the death of MARY JANE STOYLE, of Cheeke-street. The body was identified by Thomas Pengelley, of 7, Nosworthy's-row, St. Sidwell's, and from his evidence it appeared that deceased went to St. David's Station the previous evening to meet her brother-in-law. In crossing the bridge to the up platform she had a fit of coughing, and a few minutes after descending the steps she became seriously ill and died in witness's arms. She had suffered from heart disease, and Mr J. Moone, surgeon, was of opinion that death resulted therefrom. Verdict accordingly.

EXETER – Found Dead in Bed. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest at the Victoria Inn, Parr-street, Newtown, last Friday evening, on the body of ROBERT MAUNDER, who was found dead early in the morning of the same day. Elizabeth Palk of 2, Sagona-terrace, identified the body as that of ROBERT MAUNDER, a warehouseman, in the employ of Messrs. Norris, Collins, and Co., and who lodged at witness's house. She saw him alive on the previous night, about ten o'clock, and he then appeared to be in his usual health. In the morning about seven o'clock, on going to call him to breakfast, she found him in bed dead. Deceased had not been under medical care for some time. He was a very temperate man, and about sixty-two years of age. Mr Alfred Perkins, surgeon, attributed death to heart disease. Verdict accordingly.

EXETER – Fatal Accident at St. David's Station. - A melancholy fatal accident occurred at the St. David's Station on Monday night to a young man named ARTHUR VINNICOMBE, who for the past six months has been in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company as a porter. About 9.40 on Monday night a South Western Railway pilot engine was leaving the station on the Exwick side. Godfrey, the stoker, saw a man on the line and shouted to him. The engine went on its course, but neither the driver nor stoker were conscious that they had run over any person. The foreman porter, however, - Robert Harle – saw a body after the engine had passed. Assistance was obtained and a surgeon (Mr Moone) sent for. It was then found that VINNICOMBE was the sufferer. The head and body were dreadfully mutilated; in fact the officials were unable to recognize the deceased except by his clothes. Life, of course, was extinct, and Mr Moone could render no medical aid. Deceased was twenty-two years of age, and unmarried. He lodged with Mr Wyatt, Red Cow Village. Deceased's father was killed on the railway. An Inquest was held at the Railway Hotel, St. David's, last night, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 26 September 1883, Issue 6046 – Gale Document No. Y3200735802
THE BRANSCOMBE MURDER
Three persons Apprehended. Prisoners Before the Magistrates.
The enquiries made by the police into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN PERRIMAN, who was shot in the dark when returning home from his work on Saturday week, has led to the apprehension of three persons on suspicion of being concerned in the murder of the unfortunate man. The deceased was an old man, 70 years of age, and it is supposed that he was shot in mistake for some one else. The persons in custody are William Dean Dowell, who is charged with the actual murder; and Amos French and Eliza Williams, who have been apprehended as accessories both before and after the fact. Williams is the elder sister of Dowell, and French is distantly related to the others by marriage. Mrs Williams was married some years since, but about four years ago her husband was removed to the asylum. Dowell went to London and engaged in the business of a cabinet maker, but two years ago he returned to Branscombe, stating that he came home through ill health. Since then he has lived with his sister, but he has not followed any occupation. He is 31 years of age, of dark complexion, wears a black moustache, and is well dressed. His father and mother reside in Branscombe, but he did not live with them, as there had been a dispute. Mrs Williams is 25 years of age, and as three children. French is 52 years of age, has been married twice, and has several children; he is also comfortably dressed in the style of a small farmer. The prisoners resided in almost adjoining houses, and in the same row there lives a man named David Pyle. For some time after the removal of her husband to the asylum, Williams employed Pyle to work some potato plots. After a time Mrs Williams dispensed with the services of Pyle, and for the last twelve months there has been ill feeling between him and the three prisoners. Pyle not being in such good favour as formerly, has of late made certain observation prejudicial to the fame of the woman, and he alleged a short time since that he saw French place some groceries in a secret place at the back of the cottages, and soon afterwards Williams walked straight there and took possession of them. This and other things are said to have led to violent quarrels between Pyle and the prisoners on September 6th – the Thursday previous to the Saturday on which PERRIMAN was shot. On this Saturday morning Mrs Williams and her brother went to Honiton, consulted Mr Every, solicitor, and then went to Mr Stamp, the Magistrates' Clerk, with the view of obtaining a summons against Pyle on account of the names which she said he had called her. The summons was not granted, but the intervention of the police was suggested as the shortest mode of settling the dispute. On the same day David Pyle was at work harvesting at Mr J. Pyle's, at Edge Farm. PERRIMAN – the deceased – was also employed there. Usually the latter wore a very light suit of fustian, but Pyle wore dark clothes. On this particular day, however, PERIMAN was wearing clothes of a dark colour, and both were dressed something alike. Their usual path home would be the same – across the common known as Culverwell-hill. On the night of the 8th the men left Edge Farm soon after eight. David Pyle went home by an unusual road, but PERRIMAN took the less frequented path over the hill. When found PERRIMAN was lying on his side, with blood flowing from wounds in the head, breast and abdomen. He had just sufficient strength left to state that he had been shot by someone whom he had not seen, and then expired. An examination of the ground showed that someone had been lying in the ferns just under the brow of the hill, at about twenty yards from the spot on which the first drop of blood was found, and the grass had been blackened by the discharge of the gun. A path from this spot, but rarely used, bore evidence of having been traversed by the person who had lain in concealment, and the footsteps terminated at the back of the row of cottages in which the prisoners – and other persons – reside. When questioned as to their whereabouts on the 8th, French said Dowell was at his house during the greater part of the evening reading, and Dowell stated that on leaving French he went into his sister's, and at the time when PERRIMAN was shot – ten minutes to nine – he was cooking his supper. After various inquiries, however, the police arrested these men and Mrs Williams on Thursday afternoon. As Dowell last year held a gun license search was made for a gun, but none has been discovered. Powder and shot have, however, been found in Dowell's house. The prisoners were on Friday brought up at the Honiton Police Court, before Colonel Graves, county magistrate, and charged Dowell with causing the death of JOHN PERRIMAN; French and Williams with being accessories both before and after the fact. The proceedings were of a formal character. Evidence of the apprehension of the prisoners was given, and on the application of Superintendent de Schmidt a remand was granted until Monday, to enable to police to continue their inquiries in the meantime.
The magisterial investigation was resumed on Monday in the Honiton Police court, before Colonel Graves. The case for the prosecution was conducted by Superintendent de Schmidt; Mr Every for the prisoners. Dowell had a somewhat anxious appearance at the early stage of the brief proceedings, and another remand being proposed, he entered a protest against he and his sister being remanded without further evidence. As soon as the accused had taken their places in the dock, Mr de Schmidt, addressing the magistrate, said he should ask for a further remand until Wednesday, the petty sessional day. The adjourned Inquest would be held on the morrow at Branscombe, and he hoped to be able to perfect his evidence by Wednesday. He added that the police had a gun in their possession, and that further evidence was obtained on Sunday at Branscombe. For these reasons he asked the Bench to remand the prisoners. Mr Every hoped the police would have been prepared to state that day the grounds upon which they detained the accused. They wished that the fullest investigation of this matter should be made, but the sooner it could be made the better for them. The Inquest was opened a fortnight ago; and he did expect that that day the Superintendent would have been prepared with some statement which would have assigned reasonable grounds for the detention of the prisoners. At present there was not a fragment of evidence against them. Superintendent de Schmidt: We have evidence, but we don't want to produce it now. It was only on Saturday that the gun was found, and it was only yesterday that we obtained other evidence at Branscombe.
Colonel Graves: Considering that the Inquest is not yet finished, and the Superintendent having stated that he expects to be able to produce further evidence on Wednesday next, I shall adjourn this case until that day, at eleven o'clock.
It is stated that the gun, with which it is supposed the murder was committed, was found on Saturday, on the cliff at some little distance from the house in which the prisoner Amos French lives.

THE ADJOURNED INQUEST. - The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN PERRIMAN was resumed at Branscombe yesterday afternoon, before Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy-Coroner for the district. Mr Superintendent de Schmidt appeared on behalf of the police; and Mr Every, of Honiton, watched the case on behalf of the three prisoners. The schoolroom where the Inquiry was held was crowded with farmers and others.
Mr George Evans, surgeon, of Seaton, was first examined, and gave the results of the post-mortem examination which he had made. Death resulted from a gun shot wound in the chest and he produced several shots which he had extracted – one found in the pericardium. The shots appeared to have entered the body from the left side and to have proceeded in an upward direction from left to right. Judging from the extent to which the body was penetrated, two of the shots having passed quite through it he was of opinion that the wounds were caused by a weapon fired from a distance of not more than thirty yards. The weapon was probably an ordinary shot gun, and must have been fired from below by a person immediately in front of the deceased.
P.C. William Martin, of Branscombe, who was examined at the first sitting, now gave a detailed account of Dowell's proceedings on the night of the murder. Witness saw him outside his house in the early part of the evening, and at eleven o'clock was with him at the place where PERRIMAN'S body had been found. he offered to go with witness to Mr Amos Power's, of Alverway Farm, to see if either of the young Power's had been that way with a gun. They went part way. As they were going towards Mr Power's he said, "It must be someone that keeps guns that done it I don't know anyone that keeps guns barring myself and the young Powers and Mr Gill." He added: "It couldn't be me, as I hadn't got my gun at home; my gun is out to Dunscombe, at my brother-in-law's; he took it with him when he changed houses." Witness said, "Where were you all the evening? Can you account for yourself?" He said, "Yes, I never left home all the evening after I came from Honiton; where I had been with my sister to get a summons for Pile." He also said, "You know what it is for; it's about the row we had the other night; I expect you'll have a letter about it on Monday morning." Witness called up several people, and found from some of them that neither of the young Powers had been out that evening; consequently he did not go on to Mr Power's. On the evening of Monday, the 10th, about ten o'clock, witness saw Dowell come out of the Fountain Head Inn with several others. He remained in the road with the other men. About twenty minutes afterwards he said to witness: "I don't quite like it, Martin, as I've been told you've been out to my sister's to inquire about my gun, and it much frightened her. My father has been to Sidmouth today, and someone told him there that it was me that shot PERRIMAN, and that I was run away. I can account for my time all the night after coming home from Honiton, which was about a quarter to seven. The first thing I did when I got home was to go to Sarah Northcote's. I stayed there about a quarter of an hour, talking of the case I had been to Honiton about. After that I went into my house. Bessy Raffell came down, and I went down as far as the church with her. I returned, and went into Amos French's. I had a conversation with French, and also read a little book. I then went into my own house, got some sticks, lit the fire, and fried my meat, which I was eating when I heard David Pile say that someone had shot PERRIMAN." Witness went with Dowell to his house, and received from his sister some powder and shot. When witness left Dowell's house he remarked, "I am innocent; you may depend you are on the wrong scent."
William Searle, postman at Branscombe, deposed to passing Dowell's house at twenty minutes to nine o'clock on the evening of the 8th instant, but not seeing any light in the window he did not take much notice of the house.
W. H. Tidwell swore that he passed Dowell's house on the night of the 8th, but he could not say whether any lights were inside. The time was about twenty minutes to nine o'clock.
David Pile, a day labourer, in the employ of Mr Pyle, of Edge Farm, stated that he had had a quarrel with Amos French, who said that he would as soon die as live for him. He had not used the path where PERRIMAN was shot six times for the past six months. Dowell had no reason to believe that witness would use the path in question on the night of the 8th instant.
It being now seven o'clock the Coroner adjourned the Court to Monday next.

Wednesday 3 October 1883, Issue 6047 – Gale Document No. Y3200735834
The Inquest relative to the death, on the night of the 8th September of JOHN PERRIMAN, who was shot on Culverwell-hill, while walking home from his work, was resumed on Monday, before the Deputy Coroner, C. E. Cox, Esq. the Court was opened in the village schoolroom at Branscombe, at eleven o'clock, and the proceedings lasted until eight o'clock at night. Isaac French was examined as to his having said at Honiton that he knew as much about the death of PERRIMAN as anyone, but he denied that he knew who had killed PERRIMAN. There are several other witnesses to be examined. The Inquest was further adjourned.

Wednesday 10 October 1883, Issue 6048 – Gale Document No. Y3200735879
EXMINSTER – Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the Police-station, Exminster, last Friday, before F. Burrows, Esq., District Coroner, upon the body of a widow named ELIZABETH KNILL UNDERHILL, aged 55, who died on the previous Monday from the effects of poison self-administered. MR UNDERHILL, son-in-law of the deceased, stated that about seven o'clock on Monday morning last he was awakened by Mrs Marks coming to his bedroom door, knocking, and saying that she had taken poison, adding that if she had taken one packet she had taken a dozen. He immediately opened his bedroom window and called out to someone passing to fetch Mrs Sharland, who came at once, and a few minutes after her arrival the deceased became convulsed, dying in about half-an-hour. For some time past the witness had noticed that the deceased had been in an excited state, fancying that her business was going away, but he was not aware that she was behindhand in any account. About three weeks ago he observed a cut on the side of her neck, and having reason to believe that it had been self-inflicted, he communicated with the police-constable, who advised him to see the Relieving Officer with a view to having the deceased removed to an asylum. He did not do so, but his wife saw Mr Stone, chemist, of Exeter, and got some medicine for the deceased. On Monday morning, Mr Bothwell, of Topsham, was sent form, but his services were of no avail. Mrs Marks gave similar evidence, and Mrs Shapland deposed that on being called she went at once to Mrs Marks's house. She at once administered mustard-and-water, but although the deceased drank it, it had no effect. Just before the deceased died she said that she had taken poison to avoid being sent to prison. Witness had noticed lately that the deceased had been in a very excited state. Mr Bothwell, surgeon, of Topsham, deposed that he was called to see the deceased, and found her dead. The body was limp. The pupils were dilated, and there were no external evidences of convulsions. He was ordered by the Coroner, Mr Burrows, to make a post mortem examination, in which he was assisted by Dr Davy. On opening the stomach he found a considerable quantity of powder, corresponding in appearance with rat and mice poison, sold as "Stone's Muricidane," which powder witness said was stated to contain 40 per cent of strychnine. Dr Davy took away the contents of the stomach for the purpose of analysis, and he (witness) had received a note from him stating that having been assisted by Mr R. V. Turner, a practical chemist of the Exeter Dispensary, he had been able to obtain the clearest evidence of strychnine being present in the contents of the stomach. From the evidence he (Mr Bothwell) had heard, and from the result of the post mortem examination, coupled with Mr Davy's report, he had no doubt that the deceased died from poisoning by taking strychnine. P.C. Hatherley said he found five wrappers of "Stone's Muricidane" in the room where the death occurred. The Jury, after a short consideration returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Wednesday 10 October 1883, Issue 6048 – Gale Document No. Y3200735885
CREDITON – Killed by Drink. - The District Coroner (F. Burrow, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Starr Inn, Crediton, last Thursday, on the body of JOSEPH EDWARDS 30, a labourer, of Shobrooke, who was found dead at the inn on Monday afternoon. Deceased's mother stated that he spent nearly all he earned in drink. He left home on the Monday morning to go to work, and then was cheerful and as well as usual. William Webber stated that he saw the deceased in the taproom of the Star Inn on Monday He rose from his seat to go into the yard, and while he was walking across the room his legs seemed to give way under him and he fell against the "settle." Deceased said, "~Anyone would think I was drunk, but I ain't." Witness did not think he was the worse for liquor Samuel Yelland afterwards went out to look for him, and found him in the closet dead. Yelland stated that while he was with him deceased drank beer and cider, and three-pennyworth of brandy. He was "a little the worse for liquor, but nothing worth mentioning." Mr J. A. Edwards, surgeon, said he had come to the conclusion that death was caused by paralysis of the brain, no doubt the result of drinking. The habit would cause softening of the brain. the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died in consequence of excessive drinking.

Wednesday 10 October 1883, Issue 6048 – Gale Document No. Y3200735887
THE BRANSCOMBE MURDER – The adjourned Inquest on the body of the late JOHN PERRIMAN, the old man who was shot on Culverwell-hill, at Branscombe, on the 8th ult., was re-opened on Monday in the village schoolroom at Branscombe, before the Deputy Coroner, C. E. Cox, Esq. The Inquiry lasted six hours, after which the Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown. The Rev. R. Swansbrough, the Vicar of Branscombe, who has taken much trouble in connection with the mystery every since the poor old man was killed, was again present throughout the sitting.
Jemima French, daughter of Amos French, Henry S. Parrett and James Perriman were examined, but added nothing of importance to the evidence previously given. P.C. martin was recalled and gave evidence as to the finding of the gun. He was of opinion that the gun had been recently discharged. There was an exploded cap on the nipple when he found it; this he took off and put away somewhere, and now he could not find it. – (Hisses.) – The nipple of the gun appeared quite fresh. He had never said that the cap had verdigris on it. The Superintendent said that; also that he could not say whether the gun had been fired within a month or not.
After all the evidence had been taken Mr Every addressed the Jury on behalf of William Dean Dowell, Amos French, and Eliza Williams; and having dwelt on the details of the circumstances which led to their apprehension, referred to the cause which prompted Williams and Dowell to visit the Magistrates' Clerk at Honiton on the day that PERRIMAN was shot for the purpose of getting a warrant to bind over David Pile to keep the peace, and the manner in which these two persons and Amos French spent their time on the evening of the 8th ultimo. There was nothing before them, he said, to link the story of the journey to Honiton, and the return with the labourers from Edge Farm on the night of the 8th except suspicion, and suspicion was rank, and had got hold of men in the village. however, it was for the Jury to say how far the stories of the accused were pertinent to the Inquiry. They had heard their statements, and he (Mr Every) was satisfied that it was consistent, and that there had not been one particle, one fragment, or one tittle of evidence against Dowell, Williams, or French. It was not his province to suggest or to intimate crime took place; but it was clear, from the evidence of James Perriman, that a man was shooting on Culverwell-hill on the Wednesday before JOHN PERRIMAN was shot. The time was twenty minutes to eight o'clock; and what right, he would ask, had anyone shooting there at that time of night? Anyone lying prone at the spot where the fatal shot was fired would be able to see a rabbit and kill one. It was a possible theory, but he (Mr Every) would not say that it was correct, that a person might have seen a rabbit and shot at it.
After an adjournment for an hour the Coroner summed up the evidence in detail. Having dilated upon the circumstances immediately preceding and attending the death of PERRIMAN, he said it was quite possible, as Mr Every had suggested, that the affair was an accident, but it was not at all probable. If the death of PERRIMAN was the result of an accident, it was difficult to suppose that the person who had caused the death would not come forward in the face of three persons actually having been accused of the murder, and brought before the Magistrates on that charge. After referring to the circumstances which threw suspicion upon them, the Coroner remarked that with regard to Amos French it was clear that a quarrel had taken place with David Pile, the man whom the police averred was intended to be shot. Eliza Williams had been insulted by Pile; therefore she might have felt some revenge against him; but he must say, with reference to William Dean Dowell, that, so far as the evidence brought before him went, he was unable to see any sufficient motive on his part to induce him to murder Pile.
Dowell: I never was so hurt in my life. I never thought of such a thing. It is more than a man can bear.
The Coroner, continuing, said as far as the evidence went there was not the slightest proof of either of the accused having committed the crime. Dealing with Isaac French's assertion, namely, "that he knew as much as anyone and more about the death of JOHN PERRIMAN, and that the man who killed him did not live 150 yards from his door," the Coroner said that there was no doubt but that when French made the statement he was in liquor, and he ought to have been ashamed of himself. In conclusion, he said that, taking the whole of the evidence into consideration, he (the Coroner) could not see the slightest possible evidence to connect any particular person with the cause of the death of PERRIMAN.
The Jury retired for a few minutes, and then returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown."
The Coroner agreed that it was a proper verdict, and he thanked the Jury for the great attention they had given to the Inquiry.

Wednesday 24 October 1883, Issue 6050 – Gale Document No. Y3200735965
DARTMOUTH – Fatal Affray – At the Borough Police Court on Friday, before Dr Puddicombe and E. Owen, Esqrs., William Bennett was charged on a Coroner's warrant, with the manslaughter of CHARLES BOWHAY. It appeared from the evidence that deceased and another man named Bennett, a coal jumper, had a quarrel on the New Ground, on the previous Tuesday evening, when deceased struck Bennett, who returned the blow, knocking him down. He was taken up and laid upon a seat, where he remained for some time in a semi-conscious state, the general opinion being that he was under the influence of liquor. Not recovering, however, he was taken to his home in Higher-street, ,placed in a chair, and remained there until the following morning. His wife having been told he was drunk, stayed up by him until two a.m., when, as she supposed, he was still sleeping. His daughter, however, coming down about seven o'clock found her father had changed positions, and on feeling his hands, she found them cold, and it was ascertained he was dead. Medical aid was obtained, but was, of course, of no avail. Bennett was apprehended, and by the order of the Coroner, Dr Dawson made a post mortem examination. His evidence proved that the vital organs were healthy, but on examining the head he found an effusion of blood over the region of the left temple, and also over the left side of the brain, also an effusion of blood at the back of the head, but no fracture of the skull. In his opinion the cause of death was haemorrhage, pressing on the brain, the result of a fall, or blow, or both, most likely the fall. P.S. Phillips proved apprehending the prisoner, who, after being cautioned, made a statement corroborative in every particle of the evidence of the first witness. He also stated that the origin of the quarrel was his (prisoner's) failure to keep his engagement as to the removal of some dung with deceased. Prisoner had nothing to add to the statement made by the Sergeant of Police, and he was fully committed to take his trial at the forthcoming Assizes, although the Bench expressed their opinion that the affair was perfectly accidental.

Wednesday 24 October 1883, Issue 6050 – Gale Document No. Y3200735943
EXETER – A Child Burnt to Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Valiant Soldier Inn by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on the body of EMILY ELLEN ROBINSON, aged eleven, who died from burns received on Friday. It appeared that the girl lived with her mother at Wonford, and on Friday was left at home whilst MRS ROBINSON made a journey to Exeter on business. The girl bought some sweets with money given by her mother for that purpose. These she placed on the mantel-piece and afterwards when reaching for them her clothes caught fire. A boy of fourteen years named William Brown, of Quay-lane, Exeter, was passing the house just after, and saw the girl run out with her clothes all ablaze. On going to her assistance she ran into the house, and he told her to come out so as he could put out the flames, but she said, "I shan't, I shan't." He, however, caught her hold and took her out, and taking off his coat, he managed to put out the flames. He called for water, and someone brought out some, but some flour was, however, put over deceased instead. Dr Blomfield, House Surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted on Friday wrapped in a wet sheet. Her clothes were much burned. For some hours she seemed to rally, but she died on Saturday morning from shock to the system, consequent on the burns. The Jury, in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," highly complimented the boy Brown for his plucky conduct.

Wednesday 24 October 1883, Issue 6050 – Gale Document No. Y3200735963
CREDITON – A Fatal Dose. - An Inquest was held at Folly Cottage, near Crediton, last Wednesday, before F. Burrow, Esq., District Coroner, on the body of ROBERT WARE, who had died under rather singular circumstances a few days before. The deceased, a labourer, forty-one years of age, obtained some medicine from a chemist for lumbago. The physic was oil of amber and oil of juniper, and Mr Tanner, in supplying it, appears to have carefully instructed the deceased as to the quantity he was to take. WARE, however, took an overdose, thus causing death. The Coroner commented on the "extraordinary" fact that the bottle was not labelled poison, and the Jury then returned a verdict of "Death from Misadventure."

Wednesday 31 October 1883, Issue 6051 – Gale Document No. Y3200736001
THE DROWNING FATALITY IN NORTH DEVON
On Wednesday morning the bodies of MISS FRANCIS VIDAL, of Cornborough House, Abbotsham, and MISS EVELYN MAUD ALLEYNE, daughter of COLONEL ALLEYNE, of Clifton, who was on a visit to Cornborough, who have been missing for some days, were found on the rocks near Westward Ho, but the REV. S. V. W. VIDAL (brother of MISS VIDAL) and Mr Vidal's butler. The body of MISS VIDAL was the first found, and MISS ALLEYNE'S was recovered close to the same spot. They were promptly conveyed to the Ladies' Baths. Subsequently an Inquest was held on the bodies by Mr Fulford, of Northtawton, at the Royal Hotel. John Hockaday, the butler, said that on Tuesday, the 16th instant, he saw the two deceased leave MR VIDAL'S about three p.m., with the intention of going to see the tide at the cliffs at the back of Cornborough. There was then an unusually high tide, and the weather was boisterous. The young ladies were expected to return about 6.30 p.m., but as they did not do so inquiries were made. Nothing was heard of them that night, but their sticks were subsequently found on the beach below the cliffs. Their hats were also found, and on Wednesday morning, about twenty minutes past six, the bodies were discovered. He was out for the purpose of searching for them, and he found the body of MISS ALLEYNE. MISS VIDAL had a few minutes previously been found by her brother. When the young ladies left on Tuesday they were in their usual health and spirits. The Coroner having made a few remarks, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and the foreman expressed their deep sympathy and condolence with the friends of the deceased.

Wednesday 31 October 1883, Issue 6051 – Gale Document No. Y3200735983
EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Mount Pleasant Inn, Blackboy-road, last Saturday afternoon before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of FRANCIS GREEN, aged fifty-eight, a tailor, who carried on business in George-street, and lived in Mount Pleasant-road. It appeared that he was taken ill whilst walking through Exwick Fields on Friday morning, and died at his residence the same night. The evidence of Dr J. Cheese, medical attendant of the deceased, went to show that death resulted from apoplexy, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this testimony.

Wednesday 14 November 1883, Issue 6053 – Gale Document No. Y3200736061
EXETER – A Fatal Fall. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) yesterday morning, touching the death of RICHARD WEBBER, aged sixty-three years, a painter, of the Mint, Exeter. On the 5th instant whilst putting a pane of glass in a window at Mr Wills's, Okehampton-street, about twelve feet high, the window-sill gave way, and the deceased fell to the ground. He was taken to the Hospital, and Mr A. G. Blomfield, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, found that the deceased had broken his left leg, and the lower part of his body, as far up as the chest, was completely paralysed. He did not rally, and died on the 12th instant from congestion of the lungs and paralysis of the muscles. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 14 November 1883, Issue 6053 – Gale Document No. Y3200736075
THE NORTH DEVON MURDER – Inquest on the Deceased Prisoner.
Mr J. Burrow, County Coroner, on Thursday last held an Inquest at Her Majesty's Prison, Exeter, on the body of GEORGE GEEN, 69, who had died in prison while Baron Huddleston was sitting at the Assize at which he was to have been tried for the wilful murder of P.C. Walter Creech, at Georgeham, on July 28th. Chief Warder Robert Rainford stated that deceased was received at the prison on August 1st. He was then in a feeble state. Witness had seen him often since his admission, and he was generally in a low state. He had not made any complaints, but the prison surgeon had frequently seen him. He had had diet to strengthen him, but no medicine. GEEN would not have been in a fit state to take his trial. This fact was reported to the Judge on Monday, with a view to having the trial postponed, but the same afternoon, about a quarter-past four, he died. James Hoppings, a warder, said he generally saw deceased a little after six o'clock in the morning, and on asking him how he was he would usually reply, "Very poorly." One morning he replied that he was "Very bad," and witness asked him if he should send for the surgeon, but deceased replied, "The surgeon can do nothing for me; it is my mind that is bad, not my body." Witness saw that he was in a low and desponding state, and he put him on the list for the surgeon to visit. The surgeon ordered him more blankets and exercise. Deceased had spoken to him about his trial, but he told him not to look at the black side of things. The deceased said, "There is a number of persons here that will leave, but I shall not." On the Monday he was in a feeble state, and could not be tried that day. About a quarter-past four he died. The deceased had everything he wished to have. Dr Caird, surgeon at Her Majesty's Prison, Exeter, said he considered the man died from a failure of the heart's action, and decay, aggravated and hastened by protracted anxiety and shock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 14 November 1883, Issue 6053 – Gale Document No. Y3200736073
THE FATAL STABBING CASE AT TOPSHAM.
At the salutation Inn, Topsham, on Thursday, before F. Burrow, Esq., District Coroner, an Inquest was held respecting the death of ALFRED WANNELL, aged 22, a fisherman, who was fatally stabbed on the night of the 5th of November by Thomas Harris. the latter is in custody on a charge of murder. Mr W. Friend watched the proceedings on behalf of the police. Charles Collins, butcher, of High-street, Topsham, was the first witness called. He said: I saw deceased on the night of November 5th, about ten o'clock, outside the Sun Inn. He was then with ten or a dozen other young men, who were burning a tar barrel. They left the Sun Inn in a procession, and went down the street singing Salvation Army choruses. Opposite the Wesleyan Chapel I saw three men standing on the other side of the road; two of them being dressed in disguise. I saw one of the young men in the procession catch hold of the taller of the two "guys" by the sheepskin which he wore on his head. The tall man got away from the grasp of his assailant, and the short one crossed the road. The latter had a sheepskin on his head, and wore a red jacket. When he reached the asphalte pavement, George Clapp caught him by the wool of the sheepskin. ALFRED WANNELL (the deceased), who was in the procession, came back and said, "I'll see who you are," or something to that effect, and also caught the "guy" by the skin. As he did so I saw the man with the sheepskin flourishing a sword. WANNELL had got the man under his hand, and was in a slightly stooping posture, and the man was flourishing the sword underneath him. I saw him make a plunge with the sword and heard deceased say, "I'm stabbed." The man who stabbed him must have gone away in an instant. He was not there when WANNELL cried out "I'm stabbed." I said to him "Where?" WANNELL said, "Cannot you see the blood coming?" As he staggered I caught him, and laid him down on the pavement. I pulled off one of his boots – they were sea-boots reaching up to the knees. I then saw that he was bleeding. I ran to Mr Ellis's, the chemist, and then returned and helped him over to the pavement in front of Mr Ellis's shop. A light was obtained, and Mr Ellis examined the injured man. He said he could do nothing for him, and directed that he should be removed to some house. We took him to his cousin's in Rope-path, and remained with him till he died. From the time he was stabbed till he died was not more than twenty minutes, I should think. I did not then know who the short man was who had the sword. Further evidence was given by Henry Ballantine, marine; Richard Blackmore, farm labourer; Charles Clarke, labourer; and Robert Mears. Two or three of the witnesses said they heard Harris at the public-house, with the sword in his hand, say that "he put it into somebody." In the police cell Harris said to P.C. Leyman, "Well, it is the first time ever I used a sword, and it will be the last." James Shiles, farmer, Ebford, by whom the prisoner was employed, said the sword was his (Shile's) property. A verdict of "Manslaughter" was returned.

Wednesday 28 November 1883, Issue 6055 – Gale Document No. Y3200736147
EXETER – DEATH FROM LOCKJAW. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Anchor Inn, Paul-street, on Saturday afternoon, touching the death of JAMES FROST, aged 42, a shoemaker, of Paul-street, who died from lock-jaw, the result of an injury to the hand, on Friday last. William Prin, a clicker, living at 123 Fore-street, identified the body as that of the deceased, his widow being too ill to attend. The last time he saw him alive was on Sunday last, when he was suffering from an injury to his left hand. he also saw him on the 7th inst. just after the accident, and the deceased told witness how the accident occurred. He was cutting some socking leather, and a long strip was hanging down by the side, and the deceased fearing it would become entangled in the treadles of the machine, he stooped forward to clear it, and in so doing rested his left hand on the cog-wheel, and it was caught in the cogs. Witness went with the deceased to the Hospital where the wound was dressed. he did not stay there but went home again. In the evening his club doctor was sent for, and called with another doctor. Deceased was subsequently seen by Dr Cummings. He died on Saturday morning. Charles Henry Fowler, a surgeon of the Exeter Friendly Medical Association, before giving his evidence, stated that he had already given a certificate of the cause of death. The Coroner said he was the judge of the necessity for an Inquest, and he was surprised at the remark. Mr Rowden, one of the Jurors, said he and others did not think there was any cause for an Inquest, two or three medical men having been called. The Coroner said it did not matter if there had been twenty medical men called in; it was a violent death, and he was the proper authority to say whether an Inquest ought to be held or not. Mr Fowler continuing, said he was called to see the deceased. He went in company with Mr Harrison, the senior surgeon of the association, and found him downstairs with his hand bound up. they did not examine the hand that night, but saw him on the following day at the surgery. Witness then recommended that the hand should not be examined until the night. Witness went to the deceased's house in the evening and examined the hand. The palm and part of the back were much lacerated. In the centre of the hand there was a very deep hole, almost reaching the back. He re-dressed the wound, and continued to apply the proper treatment till death occurred. The cause of death was exhaustion and spasms, resulting from the injury to the hand. The Coroner said that during the whole of his thirty years experience, he had not known a more fitting case for holding an Inquest. In the case of every sudden or violent death the law demanded an Enquiry. The great object of an Enquiry was, of course, to discover whether anyone was culpable. Mr Rowden said they had been enlightened. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sympathy with the deceased's widow, which the Coroner said he fully endorsed.

Wednesday 28 November 1883, Issue 6055 – Gale Document No. Y3200736164
NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident. - Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on Wednesday last, held an Inquest at the Newton Cottage Hospital, relative to the death of THOMAS MORTIMORE, 42 years of age, who died on the previous morning from injuries received at the Bradley wool factory on Monday It appeared that a chain attached to a pulley by some unaccountable means became entangled in a machine, and whilst revolving at a high speed the chain struck the deceased in the stomach. The violence of the blow caused such injuries, that, according to the evidence of Mr Scott, surgeon, he died from peritonitis. At the close of the evidence Mr Grimbly, surgeon, thought it very unfair that Mr Scott, and not himself, should have been called to give evidence before the Jury. If Mr Scott had been a surgeon connected with the hospital he should not object, but as he was not he did feel aggrieved at the Coroner calling him. this was not the first or the second time he had been similarly treated, and consequently if in future he was called to the hospital to attend to an accident case he should object to go. The Coroner said he called the medical man who was in attendance last before the death of the man, and that was the practice of the Coroners in the County. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave their fees to the widow.

Wednesday 28 November 1883, Issue 6055 – Gale Document No. Y3200736146
EXETER – Warning to Mothers. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Thursday held an Inquest at the Hour Glass Inn, Holloway-street, respecting the death of ETHEL MARY COMER, aged ten weeks, who died rather suddenly. HELEN COMER, mother of the deceased, said she was married and lived at No. 8, Melbourne-street. She identified the body of the deceased as that of her daughter. The child was not suckled by her, as it had the thrush. She fed it on biscuits and condensed milk, afterwards changing the condensed milk to cow's milk. On Tuesday, about 12.30, the child was taken ill with convulsions. Witness was with the child, and it died within an hour. She sent out for a doctor before the child died, and Mr Henderson was in attendance. Mr Henderson, surgeon, said he found the child dead. The infant had a withered, pinched look, indicating previous suffering. He considered that the child had been suffering from thrush, irritation of the stomach and bowels with diarrhoea, and it looked as if it had been convulsed. He was of opinion that death resulted from natural causes, although it might have been accelerated by improper food. Infants so young should not be fed with anything but milk. There was no doubt that half the children who died lost their lives by improper food. The Coroner hoped the representatives of the Press would take notice of this fact, so as the public at large should know the impropriety of giving young children heavy food like biscuits. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 5 December 1883, Issue 6056 – Gale Document No. Y3200736210
CHRISTOW - Death from the Effects of a Fall. - At the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, Exeter, on Saturday, the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on the body of ELIZABETH LANGWORTHY, who died in the Hospital on Thursday last. ELIZABETH WILLS, living at Taddiford, identified the deceased as that of her mother, a widow. She was eighty years of age, and resided at Christow. On Wednesday last witness was informed that an accident had happened to her mother, and on going to her house witness found her sitting in a chair. The deceased told witness that she was attempting to unhang a pair of bellows to blow the fire when the chair on which she was resting her hand suddenly upset and she fell to the ground. Witness placed the deceased on a sofa and sent for Dr Riddell, who, finding a leg broken, ordered her immediate removal to the Hospital. Mr A. C. Blomfield, house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted to the Institution on Wednesday night. he examined her, and found that she was suffering from a fracture of the neck of the left thigh-bone, and also from chronic bronchitis. The deceased died on Thursday from exhaustion resulting from the injuries received. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE – Sad Death of a Farmer. - On Friday evening MR JOHN JEWELL, aged 47, a well-known farmer of St. Giles, North Devon, was accidentally drowned in the river Yeo, at Barnstaple, by walking over the Mill-end Quay in the dark in mistake for another direction. An Inquest was held on Saturday evening, at the North Devon Infirmary, before the Deputy Coroner (A. Bencraft, Esq.). The Jury thought, from the evidence, there was no doubt that the deceased walked over the Quay by mistake, and they returned a verdict of Accidentally Drowned, and made a recommendation to the Town Council, through the Foreman of the Jury, Mr Wadham, that the approach to the Quay and other dangerous places be protected.

Wednesday 2 January 1884, Issue 6060 – Gale Document No. Y3200736360
EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Pack Horse Inn, St. David's, yesterday morning, on the body of ROGER UPTON, aged 72, who died suddenly on the 29th December. On the day in question the deceased returned to his home very ill and soon afterwards expired. Dr Woodman, who saw the deceased after he was dead, gave it as his opinion that the cause of death was syncope, or failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 9 January 1884, Issue 6061 – Gale Document No. Y3200736405
EXETER – Sudden Death. - On Friday afternoon the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest touching the death of MRS CATHERINE BEER, who died suddenly at her residence, 4, Carlton-terrace, on Thursday morning. MR HENRY BEER, a retired farmer, husband of deceased, said she was 62 years of age. On Thursday morning deceased came downstairs, and seeing that she exhibited signs of faintness he advised her to go to bed. She, however, sat on a chair and ain a few minutes expired. A domestic servant in the employ of MR BEER said her mistress seemed unusually weak on Thursday morning. Mr Roberts, surgeon, who had examined the body, was of opinion that the cause of death was weakness of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 9 January 1884, Issue 6061 – Gale Document No. Y3200736419
EXMINSTER – Suicide of an Escaped Lunatic. - the County Coroner, Mr F. Burrows, held an Inquest at the Exminster Asylum on Monday, respecting the death of JOHN SOPER. It appeared that on Wednesday morning a party of thirteen inmates went to the Asylum in charge of a warder named Westaway. Among the thirteen was SOPER. On leaving the chapel there were still thirteen, but whether or not some other patient had taken the place of the deceased was not clear. Some time after noon he was missed. Nothing was heard of the deceased until the next morning, when as one of the Great Western Railway packers, named Miller, was walking on the line he found the body of SOPER under the bridge near the Countess Weir Lime Kilns. The remains were conveyed to the Asylum. The skull was fractured. From the appearance and position of the body Mr Fredericks, the stationmaster, at Exminster, concluded that the deceased must have laid himself in front of an approaching train. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and were of opinion that no blame was to be attached to anyone.

Wednesday 9 January 1884, Issue 6061 – Gale Document No. Y3200736405
CLOVELLY – A most distressing affair occurred on Thursday last at Westcott Farm, Clovelly, which resulted in the death of a young man named GEORGE ANDREWS, a son of MR JOB ANDREWS, draper and grocer, carrying on business in the village of Woolfardisworthy. It appears that a rabbit hunt was announced on Thursday last at the farm of Mr Stockridge, and several young men were invited to be present, amongst them the deceased, who until his untimely death on Thursday managed a small farm for his father in the parish of Woolfardisworthy. During the hunt a rabbit passed between the deceased and a young man named Warmington, of Bucks, an adjoining parish. The latter fired at the rabbit, and shot the deceased in the leg, and from the medical testimony it appears that one single shot must have struck a stone near at hand, and rebounded entering the deceased's heart, from the effects of which he died in five minutes. An Inquest was held before W. J. Bromham, Esq., Coroner for the County, on Saturday last, and after evidence had been taken the Jury came to the conclusion that deceased met his death by being accidentally shot. The deceased was interred on Sunday afternoon, amidst every token of sorrow and grief from the villagers.

NEWTON ABBOT – Distressing Suicide. - The District Coroner, S. Hacker, Esq., held an Inquest last Friday at Buckland, Wolborough Hill, on the body of MRS JANE PINSENT, wife of MR J. B. PINSENT, jun., wine and spirit merchant, of Newton. The evidence went to show that deceased was 37 years of age, and had of late complained of sleeplessness and various pains, for which she had consulted two medical men. She had also overdrawn her banking account but her brother, MR SAMUEL MAY, says this need not have caused her any trouble. Deceased lived on good terms with her husband, and dined with him in her usual health and spirits on Wednesday. It appeared that during the morning she had been into town and purchased of Mr Bibbings some prussic acid with which she said she wanted to poison a dog, and about four o'clock in the afternoon she was found in her bedroom dying and she expired in a few minutes. The result of a post mortem examination made by Mr Scott, surgeon, showed that death was caused by prussic acid. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide whilst in a state of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 9 January 1884, Issue 6061 – Gale Document No. Y3200736435
An Inquest was held at Cawsand, Plymouth, upon two men named BUCHAN and LENNOX, who were recently drowned by the filling and sinking of a bumboat. Both were naval pensioners, and were in the habit of making trips to Plymouth, about three miles off, for merchandise. The boat was heavily laden, and LENNOX'S wife was there. On rounding the point out of Plymouth Sound the boat shipped a heavy sea and foundered, the woman only being saved.

Wednesday 23 January 1884, Issue 6063 – Gale Document No. Y3200736505
BIDEFORD – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held last Wednesday before Dr. Thompson, Borough Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM VINSON, who died suddenly the previous night. Deceased was an old inhabitant, who has done great service to the town of Bideford. For many years he carried on business as an auctioneer and draper at 8, High-street, Bideford, and latterly at the Market-square. MR VINSON was for many years a member of the Bideford Town Council, and was a man of sound judgment. He had the honour of being elected mayor for the ancient town of Bideford, but had lately retired from the deliberations of the Town Council, owing to reverses in trade and other things. After evidence had been taken from the medical gentleman, Dr Thompson, who was called to MR VINSON when he was seized with illness, the Jury returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes. The late MR VINSON having been a sergeant in the 21st Rifle Volunteers, he was interred on Saturday at half-past three in the afternoon at the Chapel Cemetery, with military honours. The Rev. Mr Holmes, the minister of Lavington Independent Chapel, read the Burial Service, and afterwards offered over the grave an extemporaneous prayer for the relations of the deceased. When this was ended, the customary three volleys were fired over the grave.

Wednesday 30 January 1884, Issue 6064 – Gale Document No. Y3200736543
LUPPITT – Deaths from Burns. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, before the City Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., to inquire into the death of ELIZABETH BISHOP, which occurred in the Hospital on the previous Tuesday. GEORGE BISHOP, husband of the deceased, living at Luppitt, identified the remains. Deceased was about seventy-five years old. On the 12th inst. he was in the house and his wife was upstairs. He suddenly saw a light through the cracks of the ceiling. He went upstairs and observed his wife standing by the window, and there was a bottle containing benzoline on the ledge. Deceased had the lamp in her hand; she was going to trim it. The lamp was lighted and the bottle fell from where it was on to the floor. The oil caught fire, and she threw some things on it to put it out. the things she put on took fire, and that caught her clothes. She ran down stairs, and witness tried to take off her things as fast as he could. He put her to bed, a doctor was sent for, and Mr Shortridge arrived. On the following Friday she was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Dr Bloomfield, house surgeon, of the Devon and Exeter Hospital, deposed to receiving the deceased into that institution on Friday, the 18th inst. Both her arms were terribly burnt, and there were also extensive burns on the chest and back. There were also some slight burns son the face and legs. She died from exhaustion, occasioned by the burns, on Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 30 January 1884, Issue 6064 – Gale Document No. Y3200736541
TIVERTON – Inquests. - Mr Lewis Mackenzie, Borough Coroner, held two Inquests at the Tiverton Infirmary on Monday evening last. The first case taken was that of WILLIAM TARR, shepherd, of Bampton. On December 26th deceased, who had been suffering from bad legs at intervals for years, fell over a tub and cut his right knee. He continued work as usual, but a few days afterwards complained of illness, and was removed to the Infirmary, his leg having swollen. Mortification set in, and was followed by blood poisoning, from which the deceased died on Saturday last. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

The Coroner and Jury then held an Inquiry into the circumstances of the death of JOHN BURT, labourer, of Melbourne-street, Tiverton. Deceased had been in ill-health for the past six weeks, and on Saturday attended the Infirmary for medical advice. He entered the receiving room to be examined, and after saying "I feel a -----" fell down dead. A post mortem examination of the body shewed that death resulted from failure of the heart's action, caused by the rupture of an aneurism in the back of the heart; and a verdict to this effect was returned.

Wednesday 20 February 1884, Issue 6067 – Gale Document No. Y3200736632
EXETER – Fatal Accident at Queen-street Station. - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on Monday, touching the death of EDWIN NEWMAN, a shunter in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, who met with an accident at the Queen-street Station on the 2nd instant, which resulted fatally on Saturday. Deceased was holding the points while some cattle trucks were being unloaded, when by some means one of his feet was caught between the wheel and the axle guard of one of the trucks. He was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The great tow of the left foot was so crushed that amputation was found necessary. The patient did well for some time, but mortification set in, and it was found necessary on Friday to amputate the leg. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 20 February 1884, Issue 6067 – Gale Document No. Y3200736632
EXETER – Found Drowned in the Exeter Canal. - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, by the County Coroner (F. Burrow, Esq.) on Thursday, relative to the death of JOHN BLACKBEARD, a watchmaker, of Paris-street, Exeter, who was found drowned in the Exeter Ship Canal on Tuesday last week. HENRY BLACKBEARD, son of the deceased, said he had no reason to believe that his father committed suicide; he was of opinion that he must have accidentally fallen into the water. His father had been attended by Mr Harrison, surgeon, for dizziness. He had seen his father ramble when walking, and he had almost fallen on several occasions. It was his father's habit to walk with his hat in his hand. John Knapman, a labourer, stated that on Tuesday afternoon he was walking on the banks of the Canal, about three o'clock in the afternoon, when he saw a hat and umbrella lying on the towing-path. Witness then took the hat and umbrella, and proceeded up the banks, where he met P.S. Mitchell and another constable, to whom he delivered up the articles. The Canal was then dragged, and the body was recovered close to the place where the hat and umbrella was found. P.S. Mitchell, stationed at St. Thomas, stated that he found in the deceased's pockets, a two-shilling piece, some watch keys, and some printed cards bearing the deceased's name. The body was conveyed to the Plymouth Inn. The Coroner said it was a very simple case, and they, no doubt, would return a verdict of "Found Drowned." There was nothing to show that the deceased was in a weak state of mind, and they were therefore not justified in returning a verdict of suicide. They certainly had the evidence of the son, who stated that his father suffered from dizziness, but that did not imply that the deceased was of unsound mind. How or by what means the deceased got into the Canal they had no evidence to show. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 27 February 1884, Issue 6068 – Gale Document No. Y3200736687
SHALDON – Sudden Death. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the London Hotel, Shaldon, on Friday evening, respecting the death of EMILY JANE RITSON, aged thirty-three, who died suddenly, at her residence, Green, Shaldon, on Thursday morning. Mr Vaudrey, surgeon, who was called in soon after MRS RITSON had died, deposed that he had known her for over two years, and had attended her very frequently up to December, 1883, when she was suffering from delirium tremens. At this time he spoke very strongly to deceased and her husband about their habits. The deceased's heart, liver and kidneys were diseased, and the disease was attributable to drink. He requested her to have a nurse of his own choice to watch her, but husband and wife both declined, and from that time up to the present they had shunned him. He was of opinion that death resulted from heart disease and delirium tremens. Mr Gibbs said that on Wednesday night he was called to se MRS RITSON. He found her suffering from delirium tremens and extreme weakness. He prescribed a composing draught of a weak nature, as she was in too weak a state to take any other kind of medicine. He was of opinion that she had died of heart disease, accelerated by drink. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Wednesday 5 March 1884, Issue 6069 – Gale Document No. Y3200736733
TIVERTON – A Bad Case of Baby Farming. - Mr L. Mackenzie, Borough Coroner, on Saturday resumed his Enquiry into the consequences attending the death of HENRIETTA FLORENCE PROUT, aged one year and eight months, and the daughter of AMELIA ALICE PROUT, dressmaker, of Sandford, near Crediton. the testimony of the mother, who is twenty-one years of age, and Mrs Emma Ellis, of Townsend, Tiverton, was to the effect that the deceased was born on July 23rd, 1882, and about an hour and a-half after birth was placed in the custody of Mrs Ball, of Tiverton, who kept her for about seven months. She was then taken care of by Mrs Ellis, who is PROUT'S aunt; and prior to her death was seen by her mother twice. Though weakly at birth the child was healthy when Mrs Ball ceased to mind her, and retained good health, with the exception of having a cold, until last week, when her breath became "tight." She was worse on Wednesday, and on Thursday morning she suddenly expired in Mrs Ellis's arms without a struggle – a moment before the medical man, who had been sent for, arrived. A post mortem examination was made by Messrs. J. Reddrop and S. H. Fisher, who found that the body was not well nourished. There were seven or eight bruises on the face received during life. The right nostril was eroded; and several sores about the body. On the right hand there were numberless small sharply cut semi-circular wounds with red edges, which Mrs Ellis said were the bites of a rat. The bones gave evidence of rickets, and both the thigh bones were fractured, but softly united by cartilage. The ribs were very rickety, and the walls of the chest collapsed. The cause of death was rickets and inflammation of the kidneys, which made the heart so weak that it ceased to beat. Evidence having been given that the child had been well taken care of by Mrs Ellis, the Coroner summed up, and pointed out that these cases came under the familiar category of "baby farming." The Jury returned a verdict of "Blameable Neglect," which the Coroner said amounted to Manslaughter, against Emma Ellis. Mrs Ellis was subsequently taken before the magistrates and remanded on bail.

Wednesday 5 March 1884, Issue 6069 – Gale Document No. Y3200736713
EXETER – Sudden Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Friday afternoon held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, touching the death of WILLIAM PATRICK CRAWLEY, Fishmonger, of Coombe-street, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the previous day under peculiar circumstances. The deceased, who was forty-five years of age, was last seen alive by his wife about noon on Thursday. At about half-past nine at night he was found in a passage leading to one of the rooms of the Higher Barracks, whither he had gone to transact some business. He was perfectly unconscious; his coat and one boot were off, and a bag was under his head. He was admitted to the hospital in a dying condition, apparently suffering from an attack of apoplexy. The medical officer subsequently certified that his death arose from this cause, and the Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EXONIAN AT TAUNTON. - On Friday evening, MR J. B. RODIER, commercial traveller, of Exeter, died very suddenly at the Castle Hotel, Taunton. Deceased, who has been travelling for Messrs. J. Walker and Company, drapers, of Manchester, died at the hotel apparently in his usual state of health. In the afternoon, however, he felt slightly indisposed, and died shortly before midnight in great agony. Mr W. W Munckton, Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest for the purpose of ascertaining the cause of death. The body was identified by Mr William Shears, who gave the age of the deceased as sixty-eight years, and said he had lived at 13, St. Leonard's-road, Exeter. He was with the deceased for about two hours on Saturday week, and he then appeared to be in good health. On the following Sunday he complained of pain in the abdomen. Richard Pearce, waiter, said deceased went to bed rather early on Friday evening, and shortly before twelve came down stairs again partially dressed into the commercial-room. He asked witness for some hot water to drink, complaining at the same time of great pain in his stomach. Witness gave him some, and he drank a portion of it, but it did not seem to relieve him. Acting on the advice of witness, the deceased took some ginger-brandy. He seemed a little easier for a moment, and witness left him in the room with a gentleman who had ordered tea. Within two minutes of his leaving the room the bell was rung violently, and he returned and found the deceased on the floor on his back, breathing very hard. He saw the deceased was going fast, and sent the porter for Mr William Liddon, who came very soon afterwards. Mr William Liddon, surgeon, said when he arrived he found the deceased lying on the floor quite dead. It was his opinion that the deceased suffered from stomach affection, and that on reaching the commercial room the pain produced faintness, from which he did not recover. The Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

Wednesday 12 March 1884, Issue 6070 – Gale Document No. Y3200736750
EXETER – Sudden Death - The City Coroner (Mr H. W Hooper) held an Inquest at the Mount Radford Inn yesterday morning on the body of REBECCA SINTZENICH, of College-terrace, who died suddenly at her residence on Monday morning. The evidence of MR AUGUSTUS SINTZENICH was to the effect that on Sunday night the deceased retired to bed in her usual health. About two o'clock on Monday morning she awoke, and then had considerable difficulty in breathing. Some brandy and water was given her, but failing to recover, MR SINTZENICH sent for a medical man. The lady, however, expired before his arrival. Mr W. E. C. Nourse, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from syncope, probably resulting from fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 19 March 1884, Issue 6071 – Gale Document No. Y3200736805
EXETER – The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Golden Lion Inn, yesterday morning, on the body of NELLIE GERTRUDE FARRELL, aged six months, who died on Saturday afternoon. Dr Perkins, surgeon, gave it as his opinion that the child died from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 26 March 1884, Issue 6072 – Gale Document No. Y3200736851
NEWTON ABBOT – A Boy Drowned. - On Thursday last Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry relative to the death of EARNEST BEARNE, aged 12, son of a house painter living in Wolborough-street. The evidence shewed that the lad was accidentally drowned in the River Lemon, which runs though Bradley Woods, on Wednesday, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. A young man named W. Bearne (no relation to the deceased) was complimented by the Jury for the manner in which he had acted. Hearing that a boy was in the river, Bearne jumped into the deep water and brought the deceased out, but too late to save his life. The Coroner said he quite agreed with the Jury in their commendation. Some of the Jurymen gave their fees to the father of the deceased.

FATAL ACCIDENT TO THE CHUDLEIGH MAILMAN – A serious accident happened at Newton on Thursday evening to JOHN LEAR, aged about 65, for many years driver of Chudleigh mail cart. He had delivered his mail bags at the Post-office and was driving through Market-street on his way to the stables. On passing the vegetable market, where the Salvation Army hold their meetings, there was a great noise, caused partly by a number of boys who were congregated outside, and the noise caused LEAR'S horse, a young animal, to bolt. When near the corner where Courtenay-street joins Queen-street LEAR'S vehicle came into collision with another mail cart and LEAR was thrown violently on to the pavement. He was taken up, and removed to the Cottage Hospital, where his injuries were found to be so serious that Dr Scott and Dr Haydon, who were immediately in attendance, pronounced the case to be hopeless, and this proved to be true, as the poor fellow died within a hour. An Inquest was held on the body by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on Friday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," in which the Coroner concurred. The Jury added a rider to their verdict, recommending the Salvation Army either to conduct their processions more orderly in the future or stop them altogether. LEAR was recently married a second time, and has a young child.

Wednesday 2 April 1884, Issue 6073 – Gale Document No. Y3200736890
SAMPFORD COURTENAY – Fatal Gun Accident. - An accident of a very sad character took place on the farm of Mr J. Dayment early on the morning of the 25th ult. It appears that a son of Mr Dayment had loaded a gun and placed it in the barn, which deceased; a farm-servant, named REDDAWAY, and a fellow servant named Piper, had occasion to enter during the morning for fodder for the horses. While they were removing some hay the gun was interfered with – one report says that Piper took it up – when it exploded, and the contents entered deceased's body just below the heart. He ran round a cart, and then felling that strength was failing him, he took hold of a door for support, almost immediately expiring. He lost much blood. Piper, who was a cousin of the deceased, was, as may be supposed, overwhelmed by the sad occurrence; in fact, so affected was he that he could not, for long afterwards, give any account of how the accident was caused. He is said to have been on the best of terms with the deceased. Mr Dayment was at Okehampton Fair at the time of the accident. At the Inquest held on Wednesday, before Mr Fulford, Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict "That the death of THOMAS REDDAWAY was the result of a gunshot wound caused by the incautious handling of a gun by his fellow-servant – George Piper." The foreman added that the Jury were unanimously of opinion that Piper should be exonerated from all blame. The Jury handed their fees to the father of the deceased, who was stated to be in very poor circumstances.

TORRINGTON – Suicide of a Farmer. - An Inquest was held at Prestacott Farm, Great Torrington, last Saturday, before F. Bromham,. Esq., District Coroner, touching the death of MR WILLIAM VODDEN, which occurred under very painful circumstances the previous morning. The deceased has rented Woodhouse Farm, under the Hon. Mark Rolle, but had just changed into the present farm, also belonging to Mr Rolle. All the time he was changing farms, and some time before and since, he had been in a low and desponding condition. His manner had been such that Mr Elton Pope has been in his company of late to watch him, and the members of his family had also kept a watch over him. He told Pope he had something wrong in his head, which had been coming on for some time, and in consequence of indications of insanity his razor was put away in a drawer. On Friday morning Pope had left the deceased for a short time to consult Dr Norman as to the advisability of removing him to an asylum. Pope let him in bed. At eleven o'clock MRS VODDEN took him up a cup of tea, but on coming down stairs she heard footsteps in the bedroom and sent the servant up to see if he was out of bed. ~The girl opened the door and saw deceased in his night-shirt and standing near the chest of drawers with a razor in his hand and blood streaming from him. She heard him sigh twice and then say, "Oh, my dear children." Dr Norman said he found MR VODDEN quite dead when he arrived. the deceased had been very bad for some time and there could be no doubt that at the time he cut his throat he was not accountable for his actions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while suffering from Temporary Insanity." The deceased was only 35 years of age, and was a well-known member of the Royal North Devon Hussars, he having on several occasions won the prize for the best turn-out.

Wednesday 2 April 1884, Issue 6073 – Gale Document No. Y3200736892
EXETER – A Boy Drowned. - On Sunday morning RICHARD MUDGE, a child four years of age, the son of a labourer residing in Coombe-street, was drowned in the mill-leat, near the Bishop Blaize Inn, Commercial-road. It appears that the little fellow had been playing with some other children about this spot, and was suddenly missed by them. They informed an uncle of the deceased, who lives near at hand, that they had lost their companion, and he caused the leat to be searched, when the body of the child was found against the mill grating. Life was quite extinct. An Inquest on the body was held yesterday morning before Mr Coroner Hooper at the Bishop Blaze Inn, West Quarter. A verdict of death by Accidental Drowning was returned, and the Coroner intimated his intention of communicating to the owners of the spot where the child fell in regarding its dangerous condition.

Wednesday 16 April 1884, Issue 6075 – Gale Document No. Y3200736951
EXETER – The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) yesterday morning held an Inquest at the George and Dragon Inn, St. Sidwell's, on the body of a lady named MARY PRICE, living in the Polsloe-road. From the evidence it appeared that on Sunday night the deceased quitted her home perfectly well, and went to see her sister in Queen-street. On her way home she entered a tram, and whilst in the vehicle was seized with a fit of coughing so troublesome that she asked to be allowed to get down and go into the house of her cousin (Mrs Commin.) On alighting from the train she tottered, and a man named Tole caught her. She was assisted into the house, when she died. Mr Mortimer, surgeon, stated that in his opinion death resulted from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

Wednesday 16 April 1884, Issue 6075 – Gale Document No. Y3200736977
INWARDLEIGH – Fatal Accident. - Mr R. Fulford, Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday afternoon at the New Inn, Folly Gate, near Okehampton, as to the death of GEORGE UNDERHILL, aged 69, a farm labourer, in the employ of Mr W Burd, solicitor and Town Clerk of Okehampton. On Tuesday the deceased was employed with a pair of horses and a roller in rolling a field on Goldburn Farm, Inwardleigh. About five p.m. the horses, with the roller attached, quietly walked into the farmyard, and seeing this John Mills, a groom, went to the field, where he found deceased lying in the hedge. He asked him what was the matter, and the unfortunate man replied "The horses started kicking, and the roller knocked me down and passed over me." The deceased was taken to the farm, and Mr G. V. Burd, surgeon, of Okehampton, was sent for. The medical man found him suffering from injury to the spine, and he died on Wednesday evening. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 23 April 1884, Issue 6076 – Gale Document No. Y3200736994
EXETER – Inquest. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, on Friday last, concerning the death of JANE ROOK, late of Coombe-street. The evidence went to shew that deceased fell down some stairs and inflicted an ugly wound at the back of her head, which led to considerable haemorrhage on the brain and made her insensible. Mr Moone was the first surgeon to see the deceased after the accident, and he ordered her removal to the Hospital. Mr Blomfield, house surgeon at that institution, attributed death to cerebral apoplexy, which he thought had no connection with the accident. The Jury's verdict was "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 7 May 1884, Issue 6078 – Gale Document No. Y3200737111
UFFCULME – Run Over and Killed. – Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner, on Thursday held an Inquest touching the death of JOHN SPRAGUE ROWSELL, carter, in the employ of Mr William Ayshford Wood, of Leigh-court, which resulted from injuries received through being run over by a loaded waggon. William Tapscott, labourer, in the employ of Mr Venn, said he was in a field bordering the road leading from Culmstock on Monday afternoon when he saw deceased driving a load of hay. Just as the waggon passed the gage witness heard a groaning noise, and on running to the spot he found deceased lying on the road, and the waggon proceeding onwards. Deceased said "his inside was knocked to pieces" by the wheels passing over his body. He did not state how the accident happened, but when witness first saw him coming down Northcott-hill he was walking by the side of the horses. ROWSELL appeared quite sober at the time. Thomas Thorn, labourer, gave similar testimony. MARY ANN ROWSELL, daughter of deceased, said her father was 44 years of age, and had been in Mr Wood's employ 17 years. He was in his usual health on Monday. Death ensued about eight o'clock the same night. HARRIET ROWSELL said her husband left to fetch a load of hay from Culmstock during the afternoon, and an hour or two later she was informed of the accident. While she was attending to him in bed he informed her that he tried to get on to the shaft, but slipped, and after being dragged a few yards in front of the waggon the wheels passed over the lower part of his body. She believed the horses were not vicious. Dr Morgan, of Culmstock, who was sent form, said after death he examined the body and found contusions and excoriations on it. His impression was that the spleen and liver were injured. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 14 May 1884, Issue 6079 – Gale Document No. Y3200737128
EXETER – Shocking Death from Burning. - A young girl named ELIZABETH SERLE, sixteen years of age, daughter of a carter, living in Hick's-court, Bartholomew-street, met with a terrible death on Sunday through the incautious use of benzoline in lighting a fire. The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) enquired into the circumstances at the Valiant Soldier Inn on Monday afternoon, and after the Jury had viewed the body evidence was taken which went to show that somewhere about eight o'clock on Sunday morning the deceased went downstairs in her nightdress for the purpose of lighting the kitchen fire. A few minutes afterwards her mother heard loud screams, and on going downstairs found the deceased enveloped in flames. She did her best to extinguish them, and the poor girl in her agony rushed out of doors, when some of the neighbours came to her assistance. The garments she had on were, however, completely consumed before she could be divested of them, and the deceased was frightfully burned all over the body. She was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and died in that institution during the afternoon. It is supposed that the deceased in order to make the fire burn quickly had poured some benzoline from a lamp in the grate, and that in doing so she had spilled a quantity of the spirit on her clothing, which took fire in striking a match. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 14 May 1884, Issue 6079 – Gale Document No. Y3200737143
MYSTERIOUS TRAGEDY AT BLACKAWTON
A great sensation has been caused in South Devon by the arrest of MR HUGH SHORTLAND, an eccentric young barrister, twenty-four years of age, on suspicion of having caused the death of his wife, MRS LAURA SHORTLAND, aged twenty-two years, daughter of MR PERCY W. DIMES, of Oldstone, Blackawton. From the evidence given at the Inquest it appeared that early in April the deceased lady was married to the prisoner at Kingsbridge without her parents' knowledge and against their wish. After the ceremony MRS SHORTLAND returned to the house of her parents, and there remained until the 28th of April. On that day deceased left the house with her dog, and was never again seen alive. On the following day her body was found upright in a pond near by. There were no marks of violence on the body, and as no evidence was forthcoming to show how the young lady came by her death the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned." In the course of the Enquiry it was stated that the husband of the deceased was on his way to New Zealand, and a letter from the prisoner to his wife, dated from Brindisi, was produced. He paid a farewell visit to his wife at her father's house on the 10th of April, two days after his marriage. After that he wrote once from Ivybridge and then, after an interval, came the letter before referred to which had been forwarded from Plymouth, a circumstance explained by a statement of the writer's, that he was enclosing it in a packet to his solicitors at Plymouth. The letter was accepted in good faith, and there appears to have been no suspicion of foul play, although a feeling prevailed that a good deal of mystery surro9unded the sad event which the Jury had been summoned to investigate, and much sympathy was expressed for the family. Nothing more transpired until Modbury fair day, when the police obtained information that MR SHORTLAND had not gone to New Zealand at all, but was in hiding at the house of Wm. Ryder, a small tenement connected with a tannery, occupying a secluded position in a back street, and there on Wednesday morning last the arrest took place. MR SHORTLAND is a member of a highly respectable family established at Plymouth over fifty years, he being the son of DR SHORTLAND, and nephew of the late Mr Councillor Shortland, of Lipson House. His father was at one time secretary to Sir George Grey, when Governor of New Zealand, and Dr Shortland has since for some years resided in that colony. MRS SHORTLAND, the accused's mother, and his sisters reside at Hartley-villas, Comp-ton; and one of the young ladies is the wife of Captain Rogers, R.N. MR HUGH SHORTLAND'S connection with Modbury arises from his being the nephew of the late Mr T. J. Savery, solicitor of that town. He went to New Zealand, where his father is living, and there he is said to have practised as a barrister. He made his return to this neighbourhood known early in last December by some notorious proceedings in connection with the railway from Plymouth to Modbury, which was then being advocated, and his eccentricities created an impression that he was not absolutely of sound mind. MR SHORTLAND'S acquaintance with the Ryders was due to the fact that he was at one time clerk to Mr Savery. In journeying between Plymouth and Modbury he occasionally stayed at Mallett's Hotel, Ivybridge. He made it a practice to date his letters from the hotel, and to have letters sent there. MR SHORTLAND has been looked upon at Ivybridge and Modbury as a young man of position looking out for a wealthy wife. In that object it was considered Ryder might aid him, he having a large knowledge of the private circumstances of persons in the neighbourhood, acquired in Mr Savery's office. The fact of his addressing his correspondence from Mallett's Hotel favoured such projects, when MR SHORTLAND was at Modbury, for he could not write from or receive letters at the very humble lodging he occupied there. His letters were therefore either dated from the institute, Modbury, or Mallett's Hotel, Ivybridge, when written from different localities. The next thing of any public interest with regard to the affairs of MR SHORTLAND was his marriage, which took place, under somewhat singular circumstances, on Tuesday, April 8th. On that day MISS LAURA DIMES, a young lady twenty-two years of age, daughter of MR W. PERCY DIMES, of Oldstone, Blackawton, rode into Kingsbridge on horseback, accompanied by a groom, who was also mounted. Here she met MR SHORTLAND at the Registrar's office, where they were married. Her parents were much averse to the wedding, and she and her husband married to part; he, it was stated, to go to Mallett's Hotel at Ivybridge; she to her father's house. Although it had been given out that MR SHORTLAND left for New Zealand two days after his marriage, his correspondence connections with the hotel before referred to continued until Friday, the 2nd May, when William Ryder called and asked for MR SHORTLAND'S letters. There were then no letters there, and Ryder was asked what he wanted with MR SHORTLAND'S letters, and where was MR SHORTLAND, the remark being made that if MR SHORTYLAND had gone away Ryder could not want his letters. The man made an evasive reply, saying that perhaps the letters had better remain there. On the following Tuesday the father of William Ryder went to Modbury Fair, where certain remarks which he let drop led to suspicions being entertained as to SHORTLAND'S whereabouts, and ultimately to his arrest and that of Ryder. The senior Ryder saw Mr Ashley and said, "I've done a pretty thing; SHORTLAND is at my house." Mr Ashley asked how long SHORTLAND had been there, to which Ryder replied, "Ever since the 10th of April." Ryder also said that SHORTLAND had told him he had better go to the police. By Mr Ashley's advice he went to the police, and PC. Dunsford apprehended MR HUGH SHORTLAND at Ryder's house, which occupies a secluded position in a back lane at Modbury. On the 10th April Ryder says MR SHORTLAND came into hiding in his house at Modbury, and not a syllable transpired respecting his whereabouts from that day until Wednesday. Ryder's daughter, who is a girl of sixteen or seventeen, was sent away to make room for him. He arrived there under cover of darkness, about half-past ten at night, and although several people had been to Ryder's house in the interval, no one seems to have caught a glimpse of him, and no suspicions of any kind seem to have been aroused. It is remembered now that when Mrs Ryder, in a tradesman's shop in Modbury, heard of the death of MRS SHORTLAND, she seemed peculiarly horrified. She went immediately and bought a paper and carried it home to SHORTLAND, who, she now says, seemed "like a man shot." He appeared so "knocked down" that he hardly ate anything for the day, nor had he, she says, eaten hardly anything since. Ryder was himself away that day, and when shewn a notice of MRS SHORTLAND'S death he expressed great concern. Ryder went home with the paragraph to MR SHORTLAND. Somewhat to his surprise he found his son already there in conversation with MR SHORTLAND, and SHORTLAND, who was much affected, turned round to him and said, "I know all about it." "Look here," said Ryder, "you'll have to get out of my house at once." "I could not possibly do it," SHORTLAND replied; "why, the police would have me up for murder!" and he protested against going with considerable warmth. Ryder is a labourer in the tannery, and the fact that he has held his present situation for twenty-two years says much in his favour. He strongly affirms that MR SHORTLAND never went outside his door from the time he entered it on the night of the 10th April until Wednesday, when he left it in company with P.C. Dunsford. Ryder also testifies to the great effect the news of his wife's death had upon MR SHORTLAND. For several days Ryder seems to have lived in considerable suspense. He says MR SHORTLAND paid him for the "accommodation," and also that he feared both to turn SHORTLAND out or to keep him, in each case fearing something would happen for which he (Ryder) might be in some way accounted responsible.
On his arrest SHORTLAND was driven from Modbury to Kingsbridge, and taken before Mr W. R. Ilbert (County Magistrate) at the Town Hall, charged with the murder of his wife, LAURA SHORTLAND. Superintendent Dore gave evidence as to what transpired at the Inquest with reference to the letter, &c., and asked for a remand for a week. In reply to the Magistrate, Superintendent Dore stated that when he apprehended the prisoner at Modbury he made no statement to him. Prisoner: I have made a statement. Superintendent Dore remarked that he was not prepared to go into the case that day, and repeated his application for a remand for a week. The prisoner said he wished to make a general statement and try to shew his innocence. He was without witnesses and counsel If he had been brought before the Magistrate at Modbury he could have proved his innocence at once. The prisoner was formally remanded until Thursday, the 15th inst., at eleven o'clock. He was immediately removed to one of the cells, where he was subsequently visited by Mr Bennett, solicitor, of Plymouth, who, it is understood has received instructions to appear on his behalf at the adjourned hearing.
There is considerable reluctance in Modbury to believe that MR SHORTLAND is in any way criminally concerned in the death of his wife. The marriage was evidently an unhappy one, and it is thought possible that it was agreed SHORTLAND should go into hiding and should feign to be in New Zealand, in order to see whether the lady's father would get reconciled to the step his daughter had taken. Following on this, of course, comes the theory that MRS SHORTLAND, having to bear the brunt of her parents' displeasure, and perhaps finding out that in marrying such a man as SHORTLAND she had made a grievous error, had put an end to her own troubles. Yet, on the other hand, it has been pointed out that there is room for suspicion in the fact that on the day the poor young lady met her death she hurried home from her drive, had her horse put up, changed her dress, and then went out again as if to meet someone.
At Kingsbridge, on Thursday night, William Ryder, insurance agent, was charged with aiding and abetting HUGH SHORTLAND to murder his wife. The case was dismissed and Ryder will be a witness against SHORTLAND.
Chief Inspector Roots, from the Criminal Investigation Department at Scotland Yard, arrived at Blackawton on Monday and had a long interview at Oldstone, with MRS DIMES, mother of the deceased lady. Afterwards, in company with Mr H. Square, solicitor, Dartmouth, who is acting for the DIMES family, Inspector Roots visited the pond where the body was found, but could find no traces which would give any clue. There appeared to be some disturbance of the bed of the pond in the shallow part, which may have been caused by footprints or may not, any definite conclusion on the point being a more hazard. It is quite possible that the pond may be drained this week should nothing transpire in the meantime to render such a step unnecessary. Besides Chief Inspector Roots the country is being scoured by Superintendent Dore (of Kingsbridge), Major Brutton (Superintendent of the H. Division, Stonehouse),and others.
The body has been exhumed under an order from the Home Office, and Dr Soper is engaged in making the post mortem examination of the remains. Superintendent Dore has found some papers on SHORTLAND which, it is understood, will throw some light on the affair when their contents are revealed at the magisterial investigation at Kingsbridge, on Thursday.
The prosecution of SHORTLAND will, it is stated, be instituted by the Crown. The accused will be represented by Mr Bennett, of the firm of Whiteford and Bennett, Plymouth. It is conjectured that unless any revelations should be made in the meantime, the magistrates will have no sufficient evidence to justify a further remand.

Wednesday 28 May 1884, Issue 6081 – Gale Document No. Y3200737228
ASHBURTON – Suicide. - Last Thursday evening, JOHN MAY FOOT, a carpenter, in his 67th year, was found dead, with a rope around his neck, suspended from a beam eight feet high, in his workshop at the back of his premises in Heavyhead-lane. He had of late been afflicted and unable to work, and had been downcast consequently. An Inquest was held next day at the Golden Lion Hotel, before Mr Hacker, District Coroner, when the Jury found, as their verdict, that the deceased had hanged himself while in a fit of Temporary insanity.

BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – Killed While Bird's Nesting. - An Inquest was held at the Rolle Hotel, Budleigh Salterton, on Monday, before Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, on the body of BRUCE KENSINGTON, aged twelve years, the son of a retired officer in the Army, who met with his death while bird's-nesting on Saturday last. From the evidence of his brother and companions it appeared that the deceased went over the cliff after gulls' eggs at a point near Shag Rock, which is nearly 200 feet high, and while there the clump of grass on to which he jumped gave way, and he fell, knocking his head against the rocks, and was picked up from the water quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 18 June 1884, Issue 6084 – Gale Document No. Y3200737349
DAWLISH – Found Drowned. - An Inquest was held at the Swan Inn on Friday evening, before Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, on the body of WALTER CHORLEY, who was found drowned on Dawlish beach on the previous morning. It appeared that the deceased was 39 years of age, and with his wife had been lodging at Dawlish about five months. He left home on Wednesday morning about eleven o'clock in his usual health and spirits. He had been in pecuniary difficulty, but it had not worried him. No marks of violence were found on the body, and there being no evidence to show how the deceased came in the water, the Jury's returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 25 June 1884, Issue 6085 – Gale Document No. Y3200737397
BOW – Sad Death of a Farmer's Son. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, Exeter, last Thursday, before H. W Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, on the body of WM. SQUIRE, who had died in the hospital from the effects of an accident which happened to him on the 15th May. The deceased, who was thirteen years of age, was the son of a farmer living at Kiddicot Farm, Clannaborough, Bow. On Monday, the 15th of May, deceased was at work with his father ploughing in a field. He was leading a pony that was attached to the plough. The animal suddenly plunged, and in trying to hold it the boy slipped his foot and fell. The ploughshare caught in his waistcoat and dragged him along the ground. Just before he came to the gate he was freed, and his father then found a large wound in his side. He was taken home, and a doctor was sent for. The lad's entrails protruded, and the doctor having replaced them dressed the wound. On the 5th June the boy was removed to the Hospital. Mr A. G. Bloomfield, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said that on Saturday the deceased while under his care complained of great pain, and on Tuesday, being seized with convulsions, expired. The cause of death was exhaustion and convulsions, brought on by the accident he had received. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

HONITON – Drowned Whilst Bathing. - A man named WALTERS, aged 24 years, the son of MR WALTERS, tailor, of Honiton, while bating in the town stream on Saturday morning suddenly disappeared under water. A youth named Landsdell, who was bathing with him, at once raised an alarm, but it was quite half-an-hour before any assistance was at hand. The billiard-marker at the Dolphin Hotel, named William Tremain, jumped into the water and succeeded in bringing the lifeless body to the surface. The deceased, who is an agent for Singer's sewing-machines, and much respected in the town, was removed to his parents' home. An Inquest on the body was held at the Town Hall at seven o'clock the same evening, before C. E. Cox, Eq., when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned whilst Bathing."

Wednesday 25 June 1884, Issue 6085 – Gale Document No. Y3200737375
EXETER – Drowned in the Canal. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, before Mr Burrough, County Coroner, respecting the death of HENRY SOPER, fifty years of age, who had for many years been in the service of the Town Council as a horseman. Deceased occupied a house near the Basin Bridge, and it appears that he left home about 6.30 a.m. on Saturday in good health and spirits, and some three hours later was seen walking in Tan-lane, near the banks, by James Chapman, labourer, of Preston-street, and Mr Newberry, dairyman. Subsequently Chapman saw a hat on the banks. They immediately went to the residence of P.S. Newberry, County constable, stationed in St. Thomas, and informed him of the discovery they had made. Under the direction of that officer, the drags were procured from Double Locks, and about half-an-hour later a body was recovered from the water, which proved to be that of the deceased. With the exception of a slight graze on the cheek, probably caused by the drags, there were no marks of violence. There being no evidence to show how the deceased got into the water, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 25 June 1884, Issue 6085 – Gale Document No. Y3200737401
NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident. - On Monday evening an Inquest was held by the District Coroner (S. Hacker, Esq.) respecting the death of JAMES FENNELL REYNOLDS, aged 21, an assistant in the smithy at the Great Western Railway Works. Early on Monday morning deceased was driving a bag of coals on a wheelbarrow across the yard just as a goods train was being shunted, and being unable to get the barrow over the metals sufficiently quick he was struck by the step of a van, and falling across the metals, four or five trucks – one of them being heavily laden with timber – passed over his legs and nearly severed them from his body The poor fellow was immediately taken up, but died before reaching the Cottage Hospital, consequently he was taken to his lodgings in the Old Exeter-road. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 2 July 1884, Issue 6086 – Gale Document No. Y3200737424
FATAL LANDSLIP NAR EXETER – One Man Killed; Two Seriously Injured.
An accident of a very serious and melancholy character occurred at the railway works, near the Exmouth Junction, on Monday last, whereby one man was almost immediately killed and two others sustained injuries from which it is feared death will result. It appears that a number of men were engaged in digging and shifting soil, and that amongst them were ELI JOHN ANDREWS, James Henderson, and Phillip Langdon. Every precaution seems to have been taken to prevent any sudden collapse f the earth, but, notwithstanding this, at about a quarter to one o'clock a quantity of earth slipped from the top and covered the three men, who were filling barrows at the bottom. Assistance was promptly rendered by the other men on the works, and the poor fellows were speedily extricated. It was then seen that ANDREWS had been very seriously injured, in fact, that he could not live but a few minutes. He was immediately removed to the Victoria Inn, but it was believed that life was extinct before his removal. The other unfortunate fellows had also sustained shocking injuries, and by direction of Mr Harris, medical man, they were conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital on stretchers. On arrival there it was found that Miller was in great agony, having sustained severe injuries to his back, whilst Langdon's hip was dislocated and some of his ribs fractured. It was computed that about two tons of earth slipped.
Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest the same evening at the Victoria Inn, on the body of ANDREWS. It transpired that the deceased was a married man, living in St. Thomas, and had been employed on the works since the Devon Militia disbanded. The witnesses alleged that no blame could be attached to any one, and the sudden collapse of the soil was attributed to the effect of the heavy rain upon the earth after it had been cracked and dried by the hot weather. Mr Friend watched the proceedings on behalf of the contractor, Mr Brailey, of Barnstaple, and expressed Mr Brailey's deep sorrow at the sad occurrence. He assured the Jury that everything that man could do had been done to protect life and limb at these works. Mr Foster represented the London and South Western Railway Company. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". In this the Coroner concurred, and whilst considering that no one was responsible for the accident, advised great caution when rain followed a succession of dry weather. An accident under similar circumstances occurred not long before.

Wednesday 9 July 1884, Issue 6087 – Gale Document No. Y3200737483
COLYTON – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held last Wednesday at the Coombe Castle Hotel by Mr Deputy Coroner Cox on the body of ANTHONY CHAMP, who was found dead in bed on Monday morning. MRS CHAMP said that recently they were in great want and her husband applied to the Board of Guardians for relief. They granted 4s. a week for two weeks. At the end of the fortnight the medical man returned the deceased as still unfit for work (he having previously met with an accident.) Requiring further help he made a second application, but relief was refused. On returning from his work the Saturday previous, he got wet through, and had to keep his bed all day on Sunday. Next morning early his wife found he was dead. Deceased had left three children. The Jury returned a verdict that death had resulted from heart disease, and that in their opinion relief ought to have been granted by the Poor Law Guardians to the deceased for a longer period, to enable him to regain his health and strength after the accident to his right hand in February last.

Wednesday 16 July 1884, Issue 6088 – Gale Document No. Y3200737528
DAWLISH – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the White Hart Hotel on Thursday, before Mr S. Hacker, on the body of FRANCIS SQUIRE, shoeing smith, aged 42, who had died from the effects of a fall whilst exercising a horse. Colonel John Edward Hughes stated that the deceased had shod his horses for the past twelve years. On Wednesday the deceased came to his stables in company with his assistant to remove the foreshoes of one of his horses. when he had finished the deceased leg the animal out by the head-stall to walk along the garden path. When returning at a trot towards witness the deceased fell, witness thought through tripping in the box edging of the path. The horse bounded forward and kicked out, but witness did not think the animal kicked or stepped on the deceased, who fell on the right side (with his shoeing tools in his hand) exclaiming, "She has broken by breast-bone. She has killed me." Deceased was able to walk to the stable with assistance, where restoratives were applied; but in fifteen minutes, and before the doctor came, he died. The animal was very quiet, and witness had never known it to kick anyone. The deceased had shod the horse for the past two years. He did not see a mark anywhere on the deceased. Mr Connellan, surgeon, said the deceased was dead when he arrived. On examination he found the breast-bone entire, and no fracture of any kind on the body He thought death was caused from internal haemorrhage, which the mere fall would cause. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 16 July 1884, Issue 6088 – Gale Document No. Y3200737512
EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr H. W. Hooper, the City Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday last, at the Fireman's Arms Inn, to inquire as to the death of RICHARD HARRIS, aged 43, a lumper on the Quay, living at No. 27, West-street. HANNAH HARRIS, wife of the deceased, said that her husband was out last on Monday evening. He was in bed all day on Tuesday, and had been ailing for some time past. That morning, about 8.15, deceased was called by a man to go to work. He told the man that he did not feel very well. They arranged to start work at nine o'clock. Just afterwards her husband commenced to cough and to bring up blood, and witness ran to call his brother. When she returned her husband had thrown himself across the bed; he breathed once and died. Mr John Steele Perkins, surgeon, said he had no doubt that the man had diseased lungs, and had died from severe haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Coroner before closing the Inquiry, remarked on the state of the House in which the deceased lived. He considered it in a most disgraceful, dirty condition, and the Jury would agree with him that they rarely entered a house where the stench was so offensive and so liable to produce disease He wished to call the attention of the public authorities to the matter, through the Press, and he hoped that some immediate remedy would be adopted to suppress the nuisance. Some of the Jurymen said that the place was in such a disgraceful condition that they should not be surprised if cholera broke out there. the Inspector of Nuisances ought to visit the place at once.

Wednesday 23 July 1884, Issue 6089 – Gale Document No. Y3200737574
SIDMOUTH – Death from a Fall Downstairs. - An Inquest was held at the White Hart Inn, before Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner, on Monday, on the body of MARY ANN CAWSEY, widow, aged 68, landlady of the above inn, who was found dead at the bottom of the stairs in her house on Saturday morning. Dr Norris certified that deceased died from dislocation of the neck. There appears to be no doubt that she went to close the staircase window, and in endeavouring to do so overbalanced herself and fell to the bottom of the stairs. The verdict was that the deceased met with her death by dislocation of the neck through falling downstairs.

Wednesday 23 July 1884, Issue 6089 – Gale Document No. Y3200737552
BOATING FATALITY IN THE EXETER CANAL - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Higher Barracks yesterday morning on the body of JOHN DAVIS, aged 34, a driver in the Royal Horse Artillery, stationed at Topsham Barracks, who was drowned in the Canal on Sunday last. It appears that about two o'clock on Sunday last Edwin Hath, bombardier of the R.H.A., and Gunner Thyare and Pudney engaged a four-oared boat at the Port Royal and proceeded down the Canal to Topsham locks. Arriving there the boat was tied to a post, and the three soldiers crossed to Topsham by the ferry. They there met Drivers DAVIS and Woodhouse who returned with them to the boat. All went well until when nearing the lime-kilns, the soldiers changed rowers. The boat then capsized, and the five men were precipitated into the Canal. Three of the men could swim, and had no difficulty in getting to the bank. Heath, who could not swim, fortunately caught hold of the boat as it turned upside down, and held on to it until he was rescued by the aid of another boat. The deceased, however, immediately sank and did not rise again, and it is supposed that he must have got entangled in the weeds. His three comrades bravely sought to recover his body by diving, but their efforts were futile. A drag was procured and the body found about an hour after the sad occurrence. An ambulance waggon conveyed the body to the Topsham Barracks, and from there to the Higher Barracks. From the evidence given at the Inquest it seemed that the men were perfectly sober. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 23 July 1884, Issue 6089 – Gale Document No. Y3200737577
TIVERTON – Fatal Accident. - A young man named ARTHUR TROTT, son of an engine driver on the Tiverton branch of the Great Western Railway, employed lately as a fitter by an Exeter firm, but subsequently working for Messrs. Saxby, who have fixed the locking apparatus on the Tiverton and North Devon Railway, was proceeding on a trolley from Morebath to Bampton, when by some means his boot hitched either in a sleeper or one of the chains, and he was pitched forward on to the road. The injuries he received caused death within half-an-hour. The body was removed to Bampton to await an Inquest.

Wednesday 23 July 1884, Issue 6089 – Gale Document No. Y3200737572
TWO CHILDREN MURDERED AT PLYMOUTH. – The Parents in Custody.
A sad affair occurred at Plymouth late on Saturday, resulting in the arrest of a man and his wife for the murder of their two children. The prisoners are persons of middle age, named EDWARD BATH EDWARDS and CLARA EDWARDS. About a fortnight ago EDWARDS, who is a cabinet maker, arrived in Plymouth from London with his wife and two children in search of employment. He took a furnished back room on the second floor at No. 19, Bishop-place. At a quarter to eleven o'clock on Saturday night the other inmates of the house were aroused by the cries of MRS EDWARDS shouting "My children are dead." It appears that she had gone out about half-past seven o'clock to make some purchases with the little money which she had raised by pawning a pair of ivory earrings. She had previously put the children to bed, and when she returned at half-past nine her husband had gone out, so she went to bed in the dark. The husband returned home about half-past ten. On entering the room he lighted the lamp and prepared to go to bed. MRS EDWARDS got up and took the baby to feed it, when, to her horror, she found that the child was stiff and cold, and that there was a gash in its throat extending almost from ear to ear. Turning down the bed clothes she then discovered that the elder boy was dead too, having been murdered in the same manner. Medical assistance was procured, and the doctors were of opinion that the children had been dead about two hours. EDWARDS was arrested; he protested he had not done it. Two or three hours later MRS EDWARDS was also arrested on the charge of being concerned with her husband in the double murder. The police have ascertained that both prisoners visited public-houses in the neighbourhood in the course of Saturday evening. At the house which the husband visited he left a razor, and this had been taken possession of. There are, however, no signs of blood visible upon the weapon, and it is stated that not a speck of blood has been found on the clothing of either the man or the woman. The motive for the terrible crime – presuming it to have been committed by either of the prisoners – does not appear to be very clear, unless it be that want had driven them into a desperate state of mind. It seems to be certain that before MRS EDWARDS went out to pawn her earrings they were absolutely penniless. After her return a letter bearing the London postmark was delivered to MRS EDWARDS. This letter turns out to have been an answer from some friends in London to whom the EDWARDS'S had applied for help. It contained postage stamps to the value of 11s., but the assistance must have come too late, for if the poor woman's story to the neighbours be true, the lives of her children had been already sacrificed. At the Inquest on Monday the Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against the father.

Wednesday 30 July 1884, Issue 6090 – Gale Document No. Y3200737597
EXETER – A Boy Drowned in the Basin. - A little boy, 5 ½ years old, named SIDNEY GEORGE DAVEY, was drowned in the Basin on Monday afternoon. The boy's father, who resides in Beaufort-road, St. Thomas, took the deceased and his two brothers to see the circus procession on Monday. MR DAVEY left his children on Exe Bridge about one o'clock, and two of them returned to their home. The deceased appears to have gone in the direction of the Basin. About four o'clock, Archie Pearce, ten years of age, found a hat on the Basin Banks, which was subsequently identified as belonging to SIDNEY DAVEY. A search for the boy was instituted, and the Basin was dragged until eleven o'clock on Monday night without finding the little fellow's body. The basin was again dragged yesterday morning and the body recovered about eight o'clock by John Bastin, a labourer, of Quay-lane. There is no direct information as to how the deceased got into the water. A boy named Marchant, aged six, states that he saw Pearce push DAVEY into the Basin, and Marchant adhered to this statement at the Inquest, which was held before Mr Coroner Burrows at the Plymouth Inn, lat evening. Marchant described the spot from which he witnessed the occurrence, and as this was said to be a quarter-of-a-mile from the basin no weight is attached to his allegation. Archie Pearce was called, and he stoutly denied pushing DAVEY into the water, and said he did not see anything of him. There being no evidence forthcoming how deceased got into the water the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 6 August 1884, Issue 6091 – Gale Document No. Y3200737634
EXETER – Found Drowned. - At the Custom House Inn on Friday, the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), held an Inquest on the body of a man named HENRY MORTIMER, aged about sixty years. The deceased resided in Rack-street, and was seen early on Thursday morning by PC. Johns on the Broadstones Quay. He was not seen after that time until a lumper, named John Bastin, saw his body near the Port Royal in the water in an upright position. He took the body out, and had it conveyed to the Custom House Inn. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 20 August 1884, Issue 6093 – Gale Document No. Y3200737718
FATAL CARRIAGE ACCIDENT IN EXETER – MRS BESLEY, the unfortunate lady who met with a serious accident by being thrown from a pony carriage on Tuesday, the 12th inst., died on Sunday evening. She was unconscious from the time of the accident until her decease An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Pack Horse Inn, St. David's, on Monday. The evidence adduced shewed that MRS BESLEY and her little boy were riding in a pony trap from her residence, 6, Carlton-place, into Queen-street. On reaching the railway bridge the pony was observed to shy at a bill on some hoardings, and then suddenly bolt from one side across the road where the trap came in contact with one of Chaplin and Horne's wagons. The shock caused the occupants to be thrown into the road. MRS BESLEY was seen lying on the ground bleeding very profusely and in an unconscious state She was conveyed to her residence, where she was attended by Mr Moone, surgeon. Mr Moone found that she had sustained a fractured skull. The Coroner expressed his deepest sympathy with the family in their sad bereavement. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated all persons from any blame. Mr W. H. Chaplin attended on behalf of Chaplin and Co.

Wednesday 27 August 1884, Issue 6094 – Gale Document No. Y3200737783
FATAL QUARREL AT COUNTESS WEIR – Verdict of Manslaughter Against Deceased's Wife.
The City Coroner (Mr Hooper) held an Inquest on Friday last at the Topsham Inn, to inquire into the circumstances leading to the death of FRANCIS LEY, a paper maker, recently living at Countess Weir. It appeared from the evidence adduced that the deceased was at the house of his brother-in-law (FRANCIS LANGDON) on Sunday night, the 10th instant. LANGDON lives at Countess Weir, and is a gardener to Mr A. H. A. Hamilton, J.P. The deceased, his brother, RICHARD LEY, FRANK LANGDON, and his wife, Isabella, were sat down to supper. The deceased's wife went into the room in an excitable state, and from her appearance it was evident she had been drinking. She began to "bully" her husband, and ordered him home to look after "his half-starved children and pig." The deceased requested his wife to be quiet, and LANGDON said that if she could not come in a proper way she was to leave the house. MRS LEY then went out of the door, and was immediately followed by her husband, and the others in the room. A noise was heard between the deceased and his wife, but as it was dark what transpired could not be discerned. After the lapse of a few seconds the deceased returned towards the door exclaiming, "She (meaning his wife) has done for me!" It was then seen that the deceased had a wound in his left temple, from which blood was coming freely. His wife was upon the ground, and one of the witnesses said, although she could not see exactly what took place, she considered that his wife jumped at him and in the struggle fell down. None of the witnesses believed that the deceased fell to the ground. MRS LEY then went to her home, and her husband was assisted t his house by his brother RICHARD. The deceased went into his house and came back about five minutes afterwards. He said, "I Can't go home tonight; I am afraid she will murder me." He then went and slept at his brother's house, and on the following morning he left saying he should go and see Mr Hamilton in order to get a separation from his wife. In answer to enquiries the deceased said he did not know how he met with the blow. On Monday, the 19th, he was admitted into the hospital. He had a superficial wound about half-an-inch in length in his left temple. there were no other external wounds or marks of injury. He was suffering from lock-jaw, and from that cause death took place on Wednesday, the 20th instant. The deceased told Mr Frederick Harvey Morvill, acting house surgeon at the hospital, that the wound was caused by a fall, on Sunday night, the 10th instant. MRS LEY was in the room during the investigation, and offered to tender her evidence, saying she could account for the wound. The Coroner cautioned her that anything she said might be prejudicially used against her before another tribunal, and he therefore advised her not to say anything. The woman then said, "We both fell to the ground and my husband cut himself on the ground." This was not said in a formal way, and she then acted upon the Coroner's advice and reserved her statement. The Coroner, in summing up, said that a quarrel was an unlawful act, and death arising from any blow received at that time would necessitate a verdict of "Manslaughter" against the other person. That was the law upon the matter, the Jury had the evidence before them, and they must consider their verdict. After deliberating for about ten minutes the Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against SARAH LEY, deceased's wife.
Rumours are in circulation at Countess Weir to the effect that the deceased's wife was ejected from the house, and that a struggle ensued between the man and wife. That the wife then struck him a blow with a hatchet, thus causing the wound. P.C. Potter stated that no hatchet had been found. The deceased was a drinking man, and the home was in a wretched condition. The parties lived very unhappily together, the reason for which was assigned to be the wife's jealousy.
At the Castle of Exeter yesterday, Mr Friend said he had been engaged to defend the prisoner. He understood the prisoner was not in Court, and he had had an assurance from the magistrates that the case would not be brought up that day. The Magistrates' Clerk (Mr Drake) said it would be better to bring the case before the City Magistrates, considering the City Coroner and the Jury had convicted the woman. Mr Friend agreed that this would be the right course, and the matter was dropped.

Wednesday 3 September 1884, Issue 6095 – Gale Document No. Y3200737826
EAST BUDLEIGH – Sad Death of a Farmer. - Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner for the Eastern district of the County, on Thursday last, held an Inquest at the Rolle Arms, East Budleigh, touching the death of MR GEORGE HENRY HALLETT, aged 29, a farmer residing at Thornmill Farm, East Budleigh. On the Tuesday night previous William Clemence, farm labourer, in deceased's employ, was returning with a horse and cart from the harvest field of deceased's father, MR ISAAC HALLETT, of Penn Farm, Otterton. The deceased, witness, and his young brother were in the cart, and when passing through Otterton the horse shied at something and ran on one side of the road. Deceased was thrown out of the cart, and when picked up appeared to be suffering very much. Dr Christopher arrived from East Budleigh and saw the deceased, but the poor fellow was past recovery, and died on the following morning. Deceased was a married man, and had left a wife and four children. Dr Christopher stated that he was called to the deceased on Tuesday night. He found him suffering from a severe hurt to his head. There was also a mark across his hip as if it had come in contact with the wheel of the cart. He attributed his death to internal haemorrhage, accelerated by the shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 10 September 1884, Issue 6096 – Gale Document No. Y3200737848
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the City Workhouse on Thursday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, touching the death of HENRY PALTRIDGE, the infant son of MARY JANE PALTRIDGE, a young unmarried woman, about seventeen years of age, who for some months past has been an inmate of that institution. The child was born in the Workhouse on Saturday night, and was found dead by its mother's side on Wednesday morning. Dr John Woodman, who was called in to see the child, said that from the appearance of the body he considered death was caused by suffocation, the result of being overlaid. He had no doubt that the over-laying was the result of an accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suffocation by Accidental Overlaying."

EXETER – Distressingly Sudden Death. - An Inquest on the body of MARY LEE, a widow, residing in Summerland-street, was held yesterday afternoon, before the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), at the Elephant and Castle Inn. GEORGE LEE, landlord of the Elephant and Castle Inn, Summerland-street, identified the body as that of his mother, who was seventy years of age. Emily Wilson, aged fourteen, a native of Huxham, said she was employed as a servant at the Elephant and Castle. About six o'clock on Sunday evening MRS LEE sent her down into the yard to unloose a fox-terrier dog which had been kept in a stable, and which was making a noise. Witness released the dog from the cord with which it was fastened, and immediately afterwards the animal caught hold of her legs Witness screamed, and MRS LEE came to her assistance. Deceased took hold of witness to get her away from the dog and became hysterical, falling down upon witness. Mr Brown, a neighbour, arrived, and MRS LEE walked into the kitchen. Some brandy was administered, but she died just afterwards. The dog had run away, and had not been seen since. Witness had been treated for her injuries at the Hospital, and was now an out-patient of that institution. The dog did not attempt to bite MRS LEE. William Brown, grocer, of Summerland-street, corroborated. Mr Alfred S. Perkins, surgeon, stated that on his arrival at the inn, shortly after six o'clock, he saw MRS LEE sitting in a chair in the kitchen, supported by some neighbours. She was dead. There were no marks of violence on the body, and the probable cause of death was heart disease, arising from sudden excitement. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Wednesday 10 September 1884, Issue 6096 – Gale Document No. Y3200737869
SUICIDE OF A SCHOOLMISTRESS - Mr Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest at the Port Royal Inn on Monday, concerning the death of BESSIE SMEATH, formerly a pupil teacher at Honiton, who was drowned in the Exe below Trew's Weir Mills, on Saturday morning. HARRIET MARIA, wife of ALFRED PEARSE, railway clerk, and living at 31, Codrington-street, said the deceased was her sister, and was single. Deceased was 35 years of age, and was a certificated schoolmistress at Honiton. She came to Exeter for her holidays about seven weeks since and visited witness. Deceased suffered from "liver complaint," for which she had been under medical treatment at Honiton. Deceased was especially observed to be depressed during the past fortnight. Samuel Bricknell, dairyman, Holloway-street, said last Saturday he was at work in one of his fields, through which a path led towards Salmon Pool. This was about 11.15. He saw a young lady crossing Belle Isle Marsh. she approached the river, appeared to throw down the umbrella she carried, and "walked right into the water." Witness ran as quickly as he could to the spot, and sent his son to Port Royal for assistance. On arriving at the spot witness found he could not reach the deceased,. Soon after some men rowed down to the place and deceased was taken out of the water. Mr Blackburn (Trew's Weir Mills) gave directions as to restorative measures, in the absence of a medical man. A doctor, however, arrived before deceased's body was finally removed to Trew's Weir Mills. Witness was about 200 yards from the spot where deceased went into the water. Caleb Martin, labourer, at Port Royal, said he was called on Saturday, and he went to Belle Isle Marsh in a boat. he found the deceased in the water and saw her raise her head when he was about two lengths of the boat from her. Witness as quickly as possible took deceased out of the water and landed her in a field. A medical man was sent for, and one came in about five minutes; but deceased succumbed shortly after she was taken out of the water. This witness said he thought Bicknell or his son ought to have tried to save her when they saw the deceased in the water. The Coroner said this was a very painful case. The young lady held a good position, but she suffered from the very distressing complaint, indigestion, complicated with liver affection. This was evident independently of the testimony they had received. There could be no doubt that deceased committed suicide, but it was for the Jury to say whether or not she was at the time suffering from the bodily ailment which had been described, and whether or not she was responsible for her actions. The Jury's verdict was that the deceased took her life whilst Temporarily Insane.

Wednesday 17 September 1884, Issue 6096 – Gale Document No. Y3200737907
ASHBURTON – Sudden Death of an Exeter Lady. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Golden Lion Hotel, Ashburton, before Mr Edmonds, Deputy District Coroner, touching the death of MRS HUSSON, widow of MR JOHN FRANCIS HUSSON, of Kilmorie, Exeter, who died while dressing herself the previous morning at the residence of her brother, MR J. BERRY, where she had been on a visit. Dr Fraser proved seeing the deceased just as she had died, and he believed that death was the result of the bursting of some artery of the brain, caused by the exertion of dressing. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

INFRACOMBE – Tragic Death of a Visitor. - A shocking occurrence took place on Thursday near this place. For some time past MR BASLEY, a London stockbroker, has been staying at the Grand Hotel. On Thursday he went out in a yacht, accompanied by a boatman, for the purpose of shooting gulls. During the trip MR BASLEY said to the boatman, "You don't want me for a minute, I suppose," and being answered in the negative, went below. Shortly afterwards the sailor heard the report of a gun, and going below found MR BASLEY lying on the companion with his head shattered. He had left a letter in the cabin addressed to a friend in London. At the Inquest held last Saturday the evidence showed that the gun used by the deceased gentleman was a dangerous one, and had exploded without apparent cause on the previous Wednesday. It was further shown that previous to starting on the cruise he was in the best of health and spirits, and that the letter which he wrote in the cabin of the yacht just before the fatal occurrence was a business communication, addressed to his head clerk, in which he expressed his intention of returning to town on Monday. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Wednesday 1 October 1884, Issue 6098 – Gale Document No. Y3200738000
EXETER – Sad Cases of Death Through Neglect. - Mr Coroner Hooper held two Inquests at Mr Yelland's Spirit Vaults, South-street, yesterday afternoon, touching the death of SUSAN WILLIAMS, a widow, formerly living at 1, Pine's Cottages, Magdalen-street, and her newly-born child, both of whom died soon after the mother's confinement on Saturday last.
The Inquiry into the child's death was first taken. It appeared from the evidence adduced that on Saturday last the deceased woman was taken very ill in confinement, and on her little boy WILLIAM WILLIAMS, aged 10, asking her what was the matter she said she had broken a blood-vessel. Shortly after this a man named John Holman, a painter, living in Commercial-road, came to see MRS WILLIAMS. Holman said he would get a medical man, but she said her illness would soon pass off, and she gave no intimation that she was enceinte. Holman told the little boy to go for his aunt, Hannah Ford, which he did. When the aunt came Holman had left the room, and in reply to Mrs Ford's question deceased admitted that she was confined, and the child was in the bed – would she take care of the child? Mrs Ford declined to have anything to do with the matter, and went for Dr Roper, asking him to come and see a still-born child. When Dr Roper arrived he found the woman was in extremis. She was in the bed in a pool of blood, pulseless, and collapsed. The child was dead at the bottom of the bed. He administered some brandy to the woman, and did all that was possible to save her life, but the poor woman succumbed about twelve o'clock the same night. Dr Roper attributed the death of the woman to the loss of blood at her confinement. She died for want of proper attendance. A post mortem examination was made on the child, and Dr Roper was of opinion that the child had lived for a very short time, and with proper care in all probability the child would have progressed. John Holman said he was a married man and he had known the deceased ten or eleven months. He did not know that the woman was enceinte, in fact, she had stoutly denied it when he had spoken to her on the matter. The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said it was a very sad case indeed. The Jury returned a verdict in each case of death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 8 October 1884, Issue 6099 – Gale Document No. Y3200738041
OTTERY ST. MARY – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at Wiggaton Farm, before Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner, on the 3rd inst., touching the death of WILLIAM BOND, aged 61, who met with his death while engaged in ricking straw. Mr Samuel Tucker said the deceased was assisting in working the threshing machine, when he fell from the rick and was found lying on the ground on his back, with blood coming from his nose and mouth. Deceased never moved or spoke after he fell, and medical aid was of no avail. Other evidence was given and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 November 1884, Issue 6103 – Gale Document No. Y3200738191
FATAL EXPLOSION AT KINGSBRIDGE - A painful sensation was caused in Kingsbridge on Thursday evening by a most destructive and fatal explosion, which took place in the shop of MR BALKWILL, the chemist. It appears that Mr Balkwill, and his apprentice, a lad named CRIMP, son of MR CRIMP, miller, were preparing coloured fires to meet an anticipated demand on the 5th November. Mr Balkwill had measured six ounces of chlorate of potash and four ounces of sulphur, and while preparing the nitre he told CRIMP to pound the chlorate in a mortar. The lad not only place the chlorate into the vessel, but threw the sulphur in afterwards. It is well known that these articles are mixed for the purpose of making percussion caps, and form a heavy explosive. As soon as CRIMP had placed them in the mortar he commenced to pound them with a pestle. Two chemicals instantly exploded. The lad was at the time leaning over the mortar, which his left leg resting against it in order to steady it. He was blown to the ceiling with such force that his head penetrated the plaster. His left thigh was fractured in several places and the main arteries severed, and this in itself was sufficient to cause death. His hands and arms were reduced to a pulpy mass, and the muscles were scattered over the shop. One side of his face was completely blown away. The mortar was shattered to pieces, and nearly the whole of the bottles on the shelves were broken. The force of the explosion drove the plate-glass windows into the street, and carried the smoke to the opposite house, but did not do any damage there. Mr Balkwill was standing near CRIMP, and he is thoroughly deaf as the result of the tremendous report the explosion occasioned. It is surprising that he escaped without other injury. His little daughter was at the further end of the shop, and she also was fortunate to escape without injury. Dr Webb was called immediately after the accident, but CRIMP lived for only half-an-hour afterwards. His body was afterwards removed to his parents' residence, where an Inquest was subsequently held, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 5 November 1884, Issue 6103 – Gale Document No. Y3200738189
SUICIDE IN EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at the Bishop's Blaze Inn, on the body of THOMAS ROWE, who was found dead on Monday morning suspended by a rope to a beam in his shop in Commercial-road. The deceased was a widower, aged 58, and was living with his daughter in Odger's-row, West Quarter. His mind appeared to be affected, and he had often threatened to drown himself. On Monday morning he went to his workshop, where he was carrying on the business of a locksmith. His son-in-law subsequently went to the shop, and as the door was locked, forced it open, and there saw deceased hanging to a beam. A policeman cut the unfortunate man down, and Dr Vlicland was called. He considered the cause of death was strangulation by hanging. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Wednesday 12 November 1884, Issue 6104 – Gale Document No. Y3200738250
KINGSBRIDGE - The Late Fatal Explosion. - The Inquest on the body of EDWARD HARRIS CRIMP – apprentice to Mr Joseph Balkwill, chemist, of this town, whose death was caused by the explosion of some chemicals which he was in the act of mixing -0 which had been adjourned from Saturday last in order to communicate with the Secretary of State under the Explosives' Act, was held on Thursday, before Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner. Major Cundile, Her Majesty's Inspector of Explosives, was present. After hearing the evidence, which lasted upwards of three hours, the Jury retired to consider their verdict, and were absent about half-an-hour. On returning, the Foreman announced "that the Jury were unanimously of opinion that the deceased met his death by an explosion of chemicals, which explosion was caused by inadvertence in his employer's shop." The Coroner: That amounts to a verdict of Accidental Death. The Foreman: Yes, it amounts to that.

Wednesday 19 November 1884, Issue 6105 – Gale Document No. Y3200738283
WITHERIDGE - Suicide of a Cattle Dealer. - An Inquest was held on Thursday at Witheridge, before Mr F. Burrow, County Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM SELLEY, cattle dealer. The evidence went to show that for some time past deceased had been low spirited in consequence of crosses in business transactions, which he had attributed to depression in the markets, and lately he had been drinking heavily. On Monday last he complained of feeling ill, and afterwards purchased of a chemist two ounces of laudanum, which he said he wanted to mix with paraffin to dress his arm with for a skin disease. MRS PARISH, deceased's sister, was afterwards informed of the purchase, and her suspicions having been aroused she caused a search to be instituted, resulting in the discovery of deceased lying in a meadow in his occupation in a state of semi-consciousness. He was removed to his home, and expired about two hours afterwards, the cause of death being opium poisoning. A bottle containing twenty drops of laudanum was found in a field where the deceased had been lying, in addition to a bottle containing adulterated brandy. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Wednesday 19 November 1884, Issue 6105 – Gale Document No. Y3200738267
SHOCKING TRAGEDY NEAR TORQUAY - MURDER AND FIRE AT "THE GLEN."
Arrest of the Butler. - The residents of Babbacombe and the neighbourhood were greatly shocked last Saturday on learning that the lady of "The Glen" had been brutally murdered, and that the assassin had endeavoured to conceal the crime by setting fire to the house. "The Glen" is a thatched house, standing near the shore at the foot of Babbacombe-hill, facing the Bay, sheltered on the landward side by the thickly wooded slopes, and having attached to it extensive grounds, terraced and laid out with much taste. This charming retreat has been for a great number of years the residence of MISS WHITEHEAD KEYSE, the deceased lady, who was about 68 years of age. The place has been recently valued at £13,000, and its picturesque appearance has in years past attracted the notice of Royalty, the late Prince Consort and the Prince of Wales having landed there when on yachting expeditions. A short distance from "The Glen" is Gasking's Cary Arms, a well-known spot and in the immediate vicinity are a few fishermen's houses, whilst at the top of the hill, and near Lord Mount Temple's beautiful residence, Babbacombe Cliff, are the quarters of the coastguardsmen. In the house with MISS KEYSE there lived four servants, three females, and one man servant. Of the former, two are sisters called Neck, who have been in MISS KEYSE'S service, as cook and housekeeper respectively, for a great many years. The third female servant is named Lee, and is a half-sister to the only male servant, John Lee, who has acted in capacity of butler. The deceased lady has been described as of somewhat eccentric habits, but she does not appear to have done anything more unusual than to sit up late at night to transact her correspondence. The only notoriety which she seems to have earned by any act of her own is attributable to an extensive lawsuit entered into by her some time ago, which had for its object the removal of some capstans on the Babbacombe beach, and which did not meet with the approval of the fishermen of the locality. It appears that MISS KEYSE sat up somewhat late in the drawing-room on Friday night, and was the last person in the house to retire to rest. Between three and four o'clock on Saturday morning the cook was awakened by a smell of something burning. She got out of bed and struck a light to see whether the smell arose from her oil lamp not having been properly extinguished. Finding that it did not arise from this cause, she opened her bedroom door, and discovered a volume of smoke on the stairs. She immediately raised an alarm and roused the other servants, including the butler, who was apparently fast asleep, and not easily awakened. As soon as he discovered the state of affairs he ran out of the house to the Cary Arms shouting out to the inmates for assistance. He then returned to "The Glen", whither he was followed in five or ten minutes by Mr Gasking, landlord of the Cary Arms. After entering the house Mr Gasking saw Lee in the passage upstairs. He said to him, "What's the matter, John?" to which Lee replied, "MISS KEYSE is burnt to death." Mr Gasking then asked where she was, and Lee said, "In the dining-room." At this time the house was nearly full of smoke, issuing from three distinct places where the premises had apparently been set on fire – the dining-room and two bedrooms, one of which was that of MISS KEYSE. After being told that MISS KEYSE was in the dining-room, Mr Gasking made his way thither, and so also did Lee; they entered the room almost simultaneously. A horrible discovery was here made. Lying on the floor, with her feet to the door, was the lifeless body of MISS KEYSE, in her nightdress. There was a deep gash across her throat, extending to such a length that her head was nearly severed from her body. The right side of her head was smashed in, apparently as if a heavy blow had been inflicted with some blunt instrument. Her right leg and foot and other parts of her body were burnt and charred, and very little of the nightdress remained. There had previously been observed, at the foot of the stairs, close to the dining-room floor, a large pool of blood. With the assistance of Lee, Mr Gasking speedily removed the body, first to the back door, and subsequently, having covered it with a carpet, with the help of Richard Harris, a fisherman, to a small outbuilding, a sort of storehouse, some twenty or thirty yards from the residence. Harris had meanwhile sent for the fire brigade, police, and the coastguard, consisting of Mr Bennett, chief officer, Phillips, chief boatman, and boatmen Pryce, Pearce and Searle. With them came another fisherman, named Stiggins, and they aided Mr Gasking in pouring buckets of water, obtained from a cistern in the garden, over the fire, which was confined to the rooms in which it had been discovered. By these means the fire was extinguished by about five o'clock, and before the arrival of the fire brigade and two engines from Torquay. Lee, the butler, had left before this to give information of what had happened to COLONEL MACLEAN , MISS KEYSE'S brother-in-law, who resides at Compton, Middle Warbery-road, Torquay, about a mile and a-quarter distant. He returned an hour or two afterwards. Between nine and ten o'clock Dr Steele and Dr Chilcote, of St Mary Church, made an examination of the body of MISS KEYSE, finding that the skull was fractured and the throat so deeply and extensively cut that not only were the chief arteries divided but the windpipe was also severed. Both doctors are quite satisfied that the wounds could not have been self-inflicted. The unfortunate lady was last seen alive by the housekeeper, who retired to bed at half-past twelve, leaving her mistress in the drawing-room, where it was her habit to stay until the early morning. Captain Barbor (Superintendent of Police of the Torquay Division) with a body of constables arrived at "The Glen" early in the morning, and later in the day were joined by Mr de Courcy Hamilton (the Chief Constable of the County.) The police investigations have been made with a view to discover – first, any instrument with which the deed could have been done; and, secondly, whether any valuable property in the house had been disturbed, but in neither case has the examination given any satisfactory result. There has been no plunder of any extensive kind, nor are there any indications about the exterior of the house to show that it had been forcibly entered. As the result of some inquiries suspicion fell upon Lee, the butler, and about eleven o'clock P.S. Nott apprehended him in the grounds, and he was conveyed to the cells at the Torquay Police-station. There was a slight wound on the accused's right arm from which blood had flowed, and he explained before his arrest that this was caused by his breaking the glass of the drawing-room window to let out some of the smoke. There was also blood on the gate leading to the Cary Arms, where the accused went to rouse up Mr Gasking, and he gave a similar explanation of this, saying it was from the wound on his arm. Beyond taking a message to a relative of the deceased lady, and paying a visit to Ellacombe to see his sweetheart, the accused man was not absent from the premises between the occurrence and the time of his arrest, a period of eight hours. The whole affair is wrapt in mystery, but the theory of the police is that someone was attempting to carry off the plate, when, being detected by MISS KEYSE, they made a murderous attack upon her in order to escape detection. It is stated that the bell rope leading to the deceased's bedroom was found to be cut by the persons who were first to enter the house. All sorts of wild talk is indulged in as to the origin of the affair, which has created the most profound sensation in the district. There was plate in the house of the value of £2,000. The damage caused by the fire is estimated at £100, the articles destroyed being pictures, carpets and bedding.
John Lee, the butler, who is in custody, was in the late MISS KEYSE'S service when a lad, and had, therefore, long been known to the deceased lady. When he left her employment, he became a railway porter, and for a short time was so employed at Torre Station, on the Great Western Railway. Subsequently, he was appointed to the household of Colonel Brownlow, of Ridgehill, Torquay, as a footman. While he was employed at this establishment some valuable plate was missed by its owner, and suspicion then fell on Lee. Inquiries were instituted, and it was discovered that he had raised money on the goods by pawning them at a shop in Plymouth. This occurred about eighteen months ago – about May, 1883 – and he was then convicted of the theft and sentenced to be imprisoned with hard labour for nine months. When released, his former mistress (MISS KEYSE) came to his assistance, and with a view to give him an opportunity to redeem his character, she again took him into her service.
Hundreds of persons visited "The Glen" during Saturday and Sunday. Very few were allowed into the grounds, which were guarded by police, and consequently most of the visitors lined the boundary wall commanding a view of the house, or walked about in front of it, conversing in groups on the tragic occurrence and the mysterious circumstances by which it seems at present to be surrounded.
THE INQUEST.
The Inquest was opened in the music-room at Babbacombe Glen, the residence of the deceased lady, at eleven o'clock on Monday, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner. Fifteen gentlemen comprised the Jury, of whom Mr S. Hanbury was chosen foreman. Superintendent Barbor was present on behalf of the police.
The Coroner asked the Jury to give their most careful attention to the case, and approach the matter quite unbiased by what they had seen in the public papers or what they might have heard from persons in the locality. The Jury having viewed the body and also inspected the house and grounds, an adjournment was made to the Town Hall, where their arrival was awaited by a large crowd of spectators, who thronged the large building to the doors. The accused man Lee was brought up to the Hall shortly after eleven in a cab, and was placed handcuffed in one of the ante-rooms awaiting the re-assembling of the Jury. He was afterwards called in and acquainted by the Coroner of the position he stood in.
Elizabeth Harris was the first witness called. She said she was cook at "The Glen," and she identified the body now lying at the house as that of her late mistress.
Mr George Whitehead said: I live at Inverleigh-road, Edinburgh, and follow no occupation. The body which the Jury have viewed is that of EMMA KEYSE, my step-sister. I cannot give you her exact age, but she could not be less than sixty. The deceased lived at "The Glen" before I can recollect. I have not searched the house for any papers. I have heard that she was about to make a will about a fortnight since. I do not think that she kept large sums of money abo9ut the house, as she paid her bills by cheque. I have examined the entrance to the premises minutely, and cannot find that any forcible entry has been made. On going to the bed-room on Saturday morning I found an attempt had been made to set it on fire by a light being applied to the corner of the bed. My sister's clothes were in the room, but she had not occupied the bed the previous night. By a Juror: I know "The Glen" well. I am positive that no forcible entry was made of the house from the outside. The bed in which Lee slept that night was within about six feet from where the deceased fell. It was a moral impossibility that he should not have heard the noise in case there had been forcible entry.
Elizabeth Harris, re-called, stated – the prisoner Lee's duties are of a general kind. He slept at night in the pantry downstairs, which is situated between the kitchen and the dining-room. I sleep upstairs alone, on a floor below that occupied by Jane and Eliza Neck. Felling unwell I went to bed at five o'clock on Friday and slept until nearly eleven. Then I slept again after a short interval until between three and four in the morning, when I again awoke and smelt something peculiar as if a fire were raging. I got out, opened the door, and found the passage full of smoke. I then called the other two female servants, who, after I had shouted their names once or twice answered. I then went back to put my clothes on, and while doing so I heard Jane Neck leave her room and go to the bedroom of MISS KEYSE. After I was dressed I went to the nursery door and got some water, and when I was returning I met the prisoner, who had been aroused by the calls. [The prisoner (interposing) – That was after we called Mr Gasking.] I took the water to one of the rooms. Jane Neck called out to me to come into MISS KEYSE'S room, but I could not see her, the place was so full of smoke. When I first saw Lee he was wearing only shirt and trousers. I don't remember that he made any remark. I afterwards went downstairs, where I found the dining-room on fire. In the front of the couch lying on the floor was the body of MISS KEYSE. One side of the couch and the wall were on fire. The deceased was in her night dress, which was nearly burnt off her body. When Lee was downstairs I noticed that his arm was bleeding. He said he could not open the window and he broke the glass, and in doing so cut his arm. The prisoner is my half-brother. I wash his linen. I am quite sure I did not hear any noises during the night of Friday. The socks produced belong to the prisoner. After the fire was got under he went to Compton. To the Jury – It was five minutes after I called the other servants that I saw the prisoner. He is not hard of hearing. A person in my room could hear a noise that was caused downstairs, unless the noise was very slight. Half-an-hour elapsed between the time when I first raised the alarm and the finding of the body of my mistress. I did not know what had happened to her until I made the discovery in the dining-room. Up to that time I had feared she was smothered in her bed. I should think any scuffle or noise could have taken place at the door of the dining-room without the prisoner hearing it from the room in which he slept. If I had not gone to bed early and slept soundly in the early part of the night we should all have been burnt in our beds.
Jane Neck deposed: I lived with MISS KEYSE at "The Glen" as a parlour maid. I have been with the deceased lady since 1836. MISS KEYSE has lived there all that time. At eleven o'clock on Friday night I took the deceased some tea and toast. At that time the prisoner was in bed, and apparently asleep. After I had finished my duties I went into the dining-room at about half-past eleven and wished the deceased "good night". I left her a cup of cocoa as usual in the kitchen. The deceased when I left the dining-room was writing in her diary. If she had any letters to write she would usually write them after I had gone to bed. I slept with my sister. We were awoke by hearing cries of the last witness, and went to MISS KEYSE'S room, which I found to be in a blaze. I shouted for the deceased, but did not get any reply, and on turning down the clothes of her bed I discovered she was not there. I also saw that the bed had not been slept in. The water bottle was at the head of the bed where it had been placed earlier in the evening, and the clothes were in no way disarranged. The deceased's dress and under garments were hung up in the room. The bell pull was down. The deceased was never in the habit of using the bell. I left the room to go downstairs and met the prisoner at the top of the staircase, and he caught hold of me by the arm and assisted me. He said something about the fire – could not say what. So far as I recollect, he said "Good God! the place is on fire." I am not sure whether the prisoner assisted me all the way downstairs, or whether he went to get water. I went down to the dining-room, the door of which was wide open. The prisoner afterwards came in and in attempting to push back the shutters he got an injury to his left arm by the breaking of glass in the window. The shutters of the room were fast closed when I first went into the room. I asked the prisoner to go and call up Mr Gasking, and he went. Before leaving the room he said he had cut his arm with the glass of the window. To the Jury – The prisoner said he broke the window to let out the smoke. I found some blood on my nightdress, which I considered did not come there at the time the prisoner caught hold of me to assist me downstairs. I went and touched the body of MISS KEYSE directly I entered the room. It was quite cold. It was my duty to see the candle right and set on the sideboard in the dining-room, which I did on Friday night. It was also my duty to replenish the lamps, the oil for which was kept in the pantry closet in a can. I put it back there on Friday morning after filling the lamps. there was then some oil in the can, but on Saturday afternoon, after this occurrence, I found it to be quite empty. I purchased a gallon of oil a week before. My attention was called to the oil which had been thrown on the stairs. We were all on very good terms in the house. The deceased did not intend to keep the prisoner in her service, as she could not afford to do so on full wages; but she was trying to get him to emigrate. The prisoner told me on Saturday morning that MISS KEYSE was the best friend he had. The silver plate is still in the house in the box in the deceased's bedroom, where it was usually kept. The deceased gave the prisoner half-a-crown a week salary with food. He entered MISS KEYSE'S service last January. The prisoner was put out when his last quarterly payment was due that she did not give him more, so she gave him a little extra money. He did not use any kind of threat towards her and was content to stay on. I identify the night dress produced as mine. I wore it on Saturday morning there is blood on both arms of the dress. The prisoner touched me twice – once before the glass was broken, and once afterwards, when he was going out to get assistance. I think the blood must have come on my dress when the prisoner touched me after the breaking of the glass.
Eliza Neck said: - I live at "The Glen", Babbacombe, and have been waiting on MISS KEYSE for a number of years – more than forty. I was present at family prayers on Friday night with my sister, the prisoner, and the deceased. That was the last time I saw the deceased alive. After prayers she went up and put a water bottle on the pillow in the deceased's bedroom; also took up a jug of hot water. I put her night-dress on the hot-water bottle. The bell pull was then, so far as I can remember, suspended in its proper place. My sister and I went to bed together, about a quarter past-twelve. My sister bolted the doors of the house all except one leading to the passage, which I bolted myself. The doors were all fastened the last thing before we retired to bed. After we were aroused in the morning by the calls of the cook I went down to the dining-room. I met the prisoner coming out of the pantry into the hall, and he said "What is the matter? – this smoke is choking me." I could not see him for smoke. I found my way into the dining-room. I saw a blaze of fire running up the wall. I went to the pantry, got a jug of water and threw over it. Afterwards I saw the body of the deceased lying on the floor. A candlestick lay a little distance off – the same that the last witness had prepared for the deceased to go to bed with. I can identify the chair covering as belonging to the chair in the hall. It is covered with blood. I also identify the petticoat produced. The deceased wore it on the evening in question, but would take it off on going to bed. It was found on her body partly burnt. I cannot identify the socks produced, which are saturated with paraffin oil, as the property of the prisoner. To the Jury – I do not know that the prisoner is a heavy sleeper, or hard of hearing. The prisoner had gone to fetch assistance when the body of the deceased was found. I can identify two towls produced, which bear marks of blood, as belonging to the deceased; they were hung up in the pantry and scullery.
Elizabeth Harris, recalled, said – I didn't know where the oil was kept, and have not touched it. I saw the prisoner washing his hands early on Saturday morning in the scullery. I cannot state what the exact time was. s The wound in his arm bled very much.
Dr. Chilcott deposed – I practice in St. Mary Church, I was called between five and six o'clock on Saturday morning, and went to the residence of the deceased with a constable. I was shown the body, which was lying in a store-house adjoining the residence. The body was scorched, and there was a wound in the throat. This morning I made a post-mortem examination, with the assistance of Dr. Steele. The head of the deceased was fractured in two places. There was one wound at the back of the head – a cut wound. the other wound was more to the right of the head. The skull was fractured at that place. The wounds had been inflicted during life. The cut in the throat had severed all the main arteries right into the vertebra of the neck. There were burns about the body, which I have no doubt were caused after death. The right foot was much charred, and the hip and chest were scorched. My opinion is that death was caused by one of the blows on the head, either of which was sufficient to produce fatal results. I am quite clear that the blows on the head were given before the throat was cut. The blows must have been caused by some round instrument such as a hammer or the knob of a stick. It would require great force to give those blows on the head, from a heavy instrument. The gash in the throat was probably caused by a large knife, used with much force. The knife produced might have caused it, but rather doubt it. the marks on the paper produced are blood marks, but I cannot say without further examination whether it is human blood. In my opinion it is impossible that the deceased could have inflicted such wounds upon herself, or have come by them, or any of them, accidentally. There was a strong smell of paraffin about the flannel worn by the deceased. To the Jury – The deceased had been dead three or four hours, if not more, to judge by its being cold. The hands were tightly clenched and there was no sign of struggle before death, which must have been instantaneous. I examined the prisoner's arm at eight o'clock on Saturday morning. He came to my surgery to have it dressed. He said he got the wounds on the arm in breaking the window. There were two circular wounds, which might have been occasioned in the manner the prisoner had described. s The marks on the back of the shirt produced were blood spots which could not have been occasioned by a wound in the arm.
Elizabeth Harris, again recalled, was asked by the prisoner Lee a number of questions about her trying up his wounded arm with a handkerchief.
It being now past seven o'clock the Enquiry was adjourned.
The Coroner resumed the Enquiry yesterday morning, at eleven o'clock and the Hall was again crowded. The Chief Constable of the County and Superintendent Barbor were present to watch the proceedings. The prisoner maintained the same unconcerned demeanour which he had exhibited during the previous day. William Gasking Walling, landlord of the Cary Arms, Robert Harris, fisherman, and Dr Steele were the principal witnesses examined, and their testimony went to corroborate the evidence already given.

Wednesday 26 November 1884, Issue 6106 – Gale Document No. Y3200738330
FATAL ACCIDENT AT YEOFORD JUNCTION – Mr E. Burrow, District Coroner, on Monday held an Inquest at the Railway Hotel, Yeoford, concerning the death of BENJAMIN ANSTEY, who was picked up dead at the junction on Saturday night. Mr Hoyle and Inspector Trump attended to watch the proceedings in the interest of the London and South Western Railway Company. FREDERICK ANSTEY, platelayer, identified the body as that of his son. He last saw deceased alive on the 16th instant. Deceased was forty years of age, and by trade a shoemaker, though he occasionally swept chimneys. Mr Samuel Hoyle, stationmaster at Yeoford, said he knew deceased well. On Saturday night, about 7.35, the train due to leave Queen-street, Exeter, at 6.55, arrived at Yeoford, and deceased got out of one of the cars. Witness said, "Helloa! What's up?" Deceased replied in effect that in the train he had some conversation about the Babbacombe murder, and as the train did not stop at Newton St. Cyres when it arrived at Crediton he thought it was Newton that was reached – therefore he was taken on to Yeoford. He added that he would not have come on for a sovereign, for he wanted to be at home particularly. In reply to an inquiry as to what time he could get back, witness told him not before the 8.35 train, which was the first up passenger train. Deceased asked, "Can't I get back before?" Witness replied, "No." About an hour after this a goods train was due to leave for Crediton. he heard this leave the station, and within a few minutes after the booking clerk told witness that some one had been run over opposite the refreshment room. On going there he was met by two porters, who said, "ANSTEY, the sweep, has been cut to pieces." He saw the body lying upon the metals, and judged from its appearance that deceased had passed in front of the train on to the up-platform. Witness telegraphed to Crediton, and received a reply to the effect that a basket and hat had just been found in a truck attached to the goods train. From this witness inferred that deceased – who had been upon the down platform – crossed to the up platform, and after putting the hat and basket into the truck he tried to get in himself, and fell between the other trucks. Deceased was perfectly sober, and talked quite reasonably when he arrived. The platform was well lighted. The evidence of John Davy, driver of the goods train from Fremington to Exeter, was to the effect that he passed Yeoford at 8.27, but until he arrived at Crediton he knew nothing of the accident. He examined the train, but found no marks upon it. John Wilcocks, guard of the train, said he also examined the wheels, &c., but found nothing upon them. His attention was called to a basket and a hat in one of the trucks. This truck was a low one. P.C. Roskelly (Coleford) said he found 12s. 3 ½d. and a watch and chain on the body. The stationmaster handed witness 9s. more, which the porters had found near the body. Mr Haycroft, surgeon, Bow, said the body was badly cut. the wounds were such as might be received in falling underneath the wheels of a train. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", exonerating anyone from blame in the matter.

Wednesday 10 December 1884, Issue 6108 – Gale Document No. Y3200738416
SHALDON – Fatal Fall Over the Cliffs. - A young Frenchwoman, named FELICE CHAMPOWNY, who has lived eight years as a nurse in the family of General Lucas, of Dunmore, Shaldon, was missed on Saturday and on Sunday her hat was found on the cliffs. Footmarks in the ledges of the cliff and the bushes being disturbed lead to the belief that she accidentally slipped into the water and was drowned. The body was found by a fisherman named Rowdon on Monday afternoon between a deep fissure in the rocks close to the water's edge, and was removed to the London Inn to await an Inquest.

Wednesday 17 December 1884, Issue 6109 – Gale Document No. Y3200738434
EXETER – Fatal Accident. – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Enquiry at the Valiant Soldier Inn last Thursday afternoon on the body of CHARLES KITE, sixty years of age, labourer, of Stockland, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, of injuries he received while carrying wood at Stockland on the 26th November. Mr Bloomfield (House Surgeon at the Hospital) stated that the deceased was admitted to the Hospital suffering from a fractured right leg. The deceased died from exhaustion on Tuesday morning, the result of his injuries. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 17 December 1884, Issue 6109 – Gale Document No. Y3200738451
EXETER – Alleged Infanticide. Verdict of Wilful Murder.
The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Monday held an Inquest at the Crown and Sceptre Inn relative to the death of a male child, the body of which was found in the premises of Mr Henry Braund, draper, High-street, last Friday. Captain Bent, Chief Constable, assisted by Mr Linford Brown, watched the proceedings on behalf of the police. Mrs Braund deposed that on Wednesday, the 3rd of December, she found her general servant, LUCY ANN SPRAGUE, sitting on the end of the table in the kitchen crying. On being asked what ailed her she replied that she had slipped over the stairs on the previous day, and had not complained because she thought it would soon pass off. She gave her a cup of coffee and told her to go to bed. Half-an-hour afterwards she was seized with a fainting fit at the bottom of the stairs and was assisted to her bedroom by witness and her husband. Witness saw she was in a very weak state, and remarked to her that it appeared like a miscarriage. SPRAGUE strongly denied this, and afterwards denied that she had been pregnant. In the evening Mrs Braund sent for Mr Domville, surgeon, who examined her and expressed an opinion similar to that entertained by witness in the morning. the girl affirmed that this was not the case. The doctor subsequently asked her what she had done with "it," but she only repeated her former denial. On the following Friday SPRAGUE got up and dressed herself, but was not allowed to go downstairs. Being strongly pressed by her mother as to what had happened, she admitted that she had been pregnant about four months – the time during which she had been in Mrs Braund's service. She afterwards went home with her mother. Witness had previously heard that the girl was enceinte but she had always repudiated her charge. A search was made on the premises but no discovery was made until the 11th inst., when it occurred to witness to examine a cistern on the ground floor of the house, in which she discovered the body of a child, in about two feet of water. Police-constable Davey said he went to the house of Mr Braund on the morning in question and found the body as deposed to by the last witness. On taking it out of the cistern witness saw it was the body of a newly-born child. He thereupon wrapped it up in a cloth and removed it to the police station. there were eighteen inches of water in the cistern, which was situated in a water-closet at a height of 5ft. 8 in. from the floor. Mr E. J. Domville, surgeon, corroborated the evidence of Mrs Braund, stating that when he saw the girl there was every indication of her having been recently confined. Upon the discovery of the body witness examined it at the police station and found it to be that of a fully developed male child, above the average both in weight and size. Having made a post mortem examination witness discovered no marks of violence, but there were indications that the child had breathed, and that it had died from want of proper attention. He considered the child must have been partially alive when it was put into the water. There was evidence that it had gasped in the water. It was not possible to say whether the child had a separate existence. The Coroner said if the Jury came to the conclusion that the child was born alive the only verdict consistent with the evidence would be one of wilful murder against the mother. The Jury, after a brief consultation in private, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder against LUCY ANN SPRAGUE.

Wednesday 24 December 1884, Issue 6110 – Gale Document No. Y3200738493
DAWLISH – Fatal Fall Downstairs. - An Inquest was held last Wednesday by Mr Sydney Hacker (District Coroner), on the body of MR RICHARD S. LONGLEY, an old gentleman, 80 years of age, who died from the effects of a fall downstairs at his residence, Park Cottage, on the previous day. It appeared that at five o'clock he went upstairs to take a bason of milk to his friend, Mr Bowden, who was ill in bed, and in returning it is supposed that he missed his footing and fell heavily to the bottom of the stairs, which resulted in a fracture at the base of the skull. Mr Fortescue Webb, surgeon, very quickly attended, and did every thing needful, but pronounced it a hopeless case. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased was universally respected for his disposition. He had been a member of the Dawlish Local Board ever since the year 1866, and had generally headed the poll at each triennial election. In 1880, the votes recorded for him were 773, being the largest number for any candidate since the establishment of the Local Board.

MOLLAND – Fatal Fall Downstairs. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last at Luckesses in the parish of Molland by J. F. Bromham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MRS QUICK, aged 21, the wife of MR FREDERICK QUICK. Deceased's mother stated that her daughter had that day week been confined, and the child was still living. Her daughter was getting on very well, but was weak when the accident occurred. On Monday evening last her daughter went upstairs to fetch a lamp, taking the lamp which was in use in the kitchen with her. She shut the door of the stairs behind her, and witness did not hear anything until she heard the noise of the lamp falling. She then heard MR QUICK calling, and on going out into the back-kitchen she found the deceased in her husband's arms. She was struggling violently, with her head back. They then carried her upstairs and laid her in bed, when she drew two or three breaths and expired. The husband of the deceased, who is a shepherd in the employ of Mr W. Turner, of West Molland, said that he had been married three years, and they had two children. On Monday night, between nine and ten o'clock, just after he had got into bed, he heard someone come up over the stairs and go into the next room and then go out again. He then heard the person go down over two or three stairs, and breathe very heavily, so much that he rose up in the bed and listened. After that he heard something fall, and he jumped out of bed and ran out. He found his wife huddled up against the wall two or three stairs up from the bottom. Before he could reach her she had struggled and rolled down the remaining stairs into the back kitchen. With assistance he got her upstairs to bed, and she died almost immediately, after violently struggling. He then went and informed a neighbour and sent for a doctor. Mr E. Furse said that he was sent for to go to the house of the deceased, and on an examination found an extensive fracture of the upper part of the spine, which must have produced death very quickly. Nothing could have saved the deceased after such an injury. He thought, however, from the evidence, that the deceased must have fainted before she fell. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 31 December 1884, Issue 6111 – Gale Document No. Y3200738536
EXMINSTER – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Devon Arms, Kenton, by Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of JOHN MORRISH, a labourer, in the employ of the Earl of Devon. It appeared that the deceased was returning from Exeter with his master's waggon, drawn by a pair of horses, and when passing through Exminster he fell off the shafts on which he was riding, and the wheels passed over his body. He was at once removed to his home and attended by Dr Pycroft until he died, nine hours afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental death."

Wednesday 31 December 1884, Issue 6111 – Gale Document No. Y3200738516
EXETER – Death While Shopping. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening at the Golden Eagle Inn, Bartholomew-street, on the body of a married woman named MILLER, formerly residing in Beadle's-terrace, Exeter, who died suddenly while shopping on Saturday night. It appears that the deceased was making some purchases of china in Mr Dunn's shop, St. Sidwell's, on Saturday evening, when she was taken very ill, and began to vomit. A doctor was sent for, and soon after the arrival of Dr Hunt, the poor woman expired. she had eaten an apple just previously, which apparently had not digested. Dr Hunt stated at the Inquest that death resulted from syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Fatal Accident. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), on Wednesday last held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, South-street, touching the death of ALEXANDER NAPPER, a farm-labourer, residing at Ide. The deceased, who was 65 years of age, was at work on the previous Friday with a man named William Tincombe, at Higher Whiddon Farm, pounding apples for cider. When they were letting down the press, the short wooden handle, used to turn the windless, and which deceased had hold of slipped out of the socket, NAPPER fell off the press to the ground, and his head struck against a post. The deceased got up and recommenced to work the windless, but just afterwards he complained that he was bleeding. Tincombe then examined deceased's head, and finding it bleeding, first applied some tobacco to the wound and tied up deceased's head with a handkerchief. After that the deceased walked home, and as his head continued to bleed, he was subsequently removed the same evening to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he expired last Wednesday from the combined effects of exhaustion from loss of blood and erysipelas, which subsequently set in. The wound on the deceased's head was only a scalp wound, the skull not being fractured, and the medical evidence showed that if the parties about at the time of the accident had known how to stop the bleeding the man's life might have been saved. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 January 1885, Issue 6112 – Gale Document No. Y3200738577
OKEHAMPTON – The "Witch of Okehampton" has died in a wretched hovel in the town from cold and exposure, at the age of 75. Her correct name was HATCH, and the title given her seems to have been due to her somewhat wild appearance, and the condition in which she lived. Her bed was a paillasse, which rested on the floor; her bedclothes this winter consisted of a single sheet, and the one room which formed her home was almost destitute of furniture, and described at the Inquest as a wretched hovel. The body was greatly emaciated. For the place in which she lived she paid 1s. a week, so that only 2s. were left for her maintenance out of the 3s. a week that the Guardians allowed her. The weather being cold, it was suggested on the day previous to her death that she should have a fire, but the old woman remarked that if she lighted one there would be none for the morrow. When the morrow came she was dead. "Death from Cold and Exposure" was the verdict.

Wednesday 7 January 1885, Issue 6112 – Gale Document No. Y3200738573
FATAL ACCIDENT AT SIDMOUTH JUNCTION. - An Inquest was held last Friday at the Sidmouth Junction Hotel before S. M. Cox, Esq. (District Coroner), touching the death of ALBERT WITHEY, a porter on the railway, aged 25, who was run over and killed by a train at the Junction on the previous Tuesday. Mr Foster, of the Railway Police, watched the proceedings on behalf of the L. and S.W. Company. Mr Wm. Liley, stationmaster at the Junction, stated that on the night in question the deceased, who was a sober man, was putting fish into a passenger train which was stopped at the Junction, when the guard of the train said that a fish train was coming and that some fish could go into that. Witness informed them that the special train was a fast one and would not stop there. A porter, named Cann, having been told by witness that the special train had left Whimple, opened the gates on the level crossing and signalled the train with his hand lamp. The train passed five minutes after at the rate of from 30 to 35 miles an hour. About a quarter of an hour before the train arrived witness had told all the men, including deceased, that a fish special would leave Exeter at 5.25. After the train had passed he found a piece of a hand barrow, and further on deceased's body on the line. The train carried lights, which could be seen from 300 to 400 yards. The porter, Frank Cann, bore out the stationmaster's statement that he had told the porters that a special was coming. John Lansdowne saw the deceased and a porter named Lovering running up the platform with barrows when the special was in sight and shouted to them not to cross the line. George Sharland, the driver of the engine, said he was not aware that he had run over anything until he was stopped at Honiton and told that he had run into a barrow. He did not know that a man had been killed until he arrived at Salisbury. He whistled when he got in sight of the Junction. Lovering, the porter who was in front of deceased, said he did not hear the platform bell, and did not know that the train had left Whimple. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and made the suggestion that the whistles of the engines of special trains should be sounded for some time on approaching and passing stations.

Wednesday 7 January 1885, Issue 6112 – Gale Document No. Y3200738559
EXETER – Death Through a Fall. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Saturday held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn, on view of the body of GEORGE BATTEN, aged 23, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital the previous day. The deceased, who was a native of Torquay, was a carpenter and joiner, and last May he was working at Greenway, between Dartmouth and Brixham. He was taken home from work one day in a cab, and told his brother, THOMAS BATTEN, that he had fallen from the roof of the building – a height of twenty feet – and seriously hurt his back. He was at first taken to the Torbay Hospital, and getting better, went home, but becoming weaker was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the 13th of last November, where he was attended by Mr Bloomfield, house surgeon, who deposed that death resulted from exhaustion and disease of the kidneys due to injury to the spinal cord. Verdict – "Accidental Death."

EXETER – Sudden Death. - MR ADRIAN STOKES, a homeopathic practitioner, residing at Velwell-villas, on Thursday afternoon suddenly fell down and expired while playing a duet with Mr Reginald B. Moore, at the residence of the latter, in New North-road. A medical man was at once sent for, and Mr Moone, surgeon, who was met in Queen-street, was very quickly in attendance; but his services were useless, as life was extinct. MR STOKES, who was 69 years of age, had resided in Exeter about a month and came from Sidmouth. At the Inquest held on Friday, at the Pack Horse Inn, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, Mr Moone gave it as his opinion that death resulted from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 14 January 1885, Issue 6113 – Gale Document No. Y3200738617
INSTOW – A distressing bereavement has befallen MR and MRS G. LOCK, of this place, in the death of their youngest son, MR GEORE EDWARD LOCK, under very painful circumstances. The deceased was a member of the firm of Gibbs, Llewellyn, and Lock, he having joined it about three years since. Lately, however, there have been negotiations for a change in the firm whereby the middle partner would leave and a more promising career be opened up to MR LOCK in Newport, where he was highly respected. It seems, however, that these negotiations have occasioned him some anxiety and worry, which, coupled with the fact that the deceased has lately been in indifferent health, caused his mind to be completely unstrung, and he was found dead in his bedroom on Friday morning last. On the previous day he appeared brighter than usual, and attended to his business, making appointments for the following day. But later on he complained of feeling unwell, and while dining with a fellow-lodger at Yewberry Cottage he repeated his complaint, and said that indigestion was troubling him much. He, therefore, retired early to bed. the next morning he was found on the floor dead. At the Inquest the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was not responsible for his actions, and that he died while in a state of Temporary Insanity. MR LOCK was a lieutenant in the 3rd Monmouth Rifle Volunteers, and was popular as an officer amongst the members of his company. He was a member of the choir of St. Mark's Church, and usually attended there. It is stated that he was about to be married to the daughter of a respected Newport merchant. The remains of the deceased were removed to Instow, where they were buried yesterday.

Wednesday 21 January 1885, Issue 6114 – Gale Document No. Y3200738663
SUPPOSED SUICIDE OF AN EXETER CLERK. - The dead body of a man named HENRY COX, who mysteriously disappeared from his home in Bartholomew-street, on the 10 December last, was found in the Exeter Canal yesterday morning. It seems that the deceased, who was fifty-two years of age and addicted to drinking habits, left his home on December 10th without giving any account of where he was going. COX did not return, and after the elapse of several days his friends became alarmed at his continued absence, and information was given to the police. On Saturday morning last a man who said he was a nephew of the missing man reported the circumstances to the Bench, and asked their assistance. Nothing further transpired until a hat was brought to the Station-house on Sunday morning. The man said he picked it up in a hedge near Salmon Pool about the 10th of December – the day when deceased disappeared – but thinking that it was probably blown off someone by the wind he made no report of it. One night last week, however, he was in a public-house in Exeter, and the topic of conversation was COX'S mysterious disappearance. The man stated that he had picked up a hat, and it was suggested by the landlord that it might belong to the missing man, and give some clue of his whereabouts. The police shewed the hat to some of the unfortunate man's friends, who, to the best f their knowledge, identified it as the one COX had worn. Yesterday morning, a young man named Henry Woodhouse, a plumber, was walking on the Canal banks on his way to Exminster, when he saw what he believed to be the body of a man in the Canal between Salmon Pool Bridge and Double Locks. P.C. Payne subsequently arrived, and with the help of Woodhouse, Mr Hannaford, and a man named Hutchings, the body was taken out of the water. It was covered with green slime, and was in a terrible state of decomposition. A handkerchief, a half-penny, a bunch of keys, and a pipe were found in the pocket. The handkerchief bore the name of "GEORGE COX," which left no doubt as to the identity of the body. An Inquest will probably be held at the Double Locks Inn this day (Wednesday).

Wednesday 28 January 1885, Issue 6115 – Gale Document No. Y3200738677
EXETER – Found Drowned. - The Deputy District Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) held an Inquest at the Double Locks Inn, last Wednesday morning, on a body found in the Exeter Canal, as reported in our last week's issue. Two sons of the deceased – GEORGE HENRY COX and HENRY COX – identified the body as that of their father. They stated that he was a solicitor's clerk, but had lately been assisting his father in the stationery business. GEORGE stated that the deceased was used to walking a great deal, and that he often walked to the Lighter House Inn and returned by train. The report that got abroad that he received a note from his father stating that he would be "no more" by the time he received it was incorrect; he received a letter, but it had wholly to do with family matters. Previous to the day that the letter arrived, the deceased had about 30s or £2 in his pockets. It was also stated that the deceased had not lived with his wife for some years. Evidence having been given as to the finding of the body and the appearance it presented when examined by Mr Vheland, surgeon, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 4 February 1885, Issue 6116 – Gale Document No. Y3200738736
CREDITON – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at Park House, Crediton, on Saturday, on the body of MR THOMAS PADDON, aged 78. On Wednesday the deceased, when at St. David's Station, fell unwell, and hired a cab to take him to his home at Park House, instead of proceeding by train. Some way on the road the cabman (Ewens) got down to inquire the way to the house, and found MR PADDON dead. Mr Body, surgeon, who had known deceased, had no doubt that death had resulted from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 18 February 1885, Issue 6118 – Gale Document No. Y3200738802
EXETER – Death of an Infant from Burns. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Valiant Soldier Inn on Monday as to the death of SAMUEL ROBERT BAKER, aged two years, son of JAMES BAKER, a labourer, living in Stepcote-hill, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Saturday morning. It appeared from the evidence of the mother that on the afternoon of Thursday she went out to buy some fish, leaving the infant in charge of his sister – a girl about four years of age. Witness returned in the course of ten minutes, and when near her house she heard the girl screaming. She ran in and found the clothing of her youngest child in flames, with his sister by the side of him crying. There was a paraffin-lamp in the room, but when witness left it contained no oil. On her return she saw the lamp on the floor, and she also noticed that some oil had been spilt on the floor in front of the fire-place. There was a bottle containing paraffin in the room. Witness wrapped the deceased in a shawl and took him to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr A. G. Bloomfield, (House Surgeon at the Hospital) stated that the child, when admitted, was suffering from extensive burns on the right thigh and leg. The child was feeble, and died from convulsions on Saturday morning, the result of the burns. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER – Sudden Death. - HENRY CLARK BROWN, aged 43, a railway-porter, who resided at No. 75, Paris-street, died very suddenly on Sunday morning. At the Inquest held on Monday before the City Coroner, Mr M. L. Brown, surgeon, said he had no doubt the cause of death was a fit of apoplexy, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 25 February 1885, Issue 6119 – Gale Document No. Y3200738861
EXETER MEDICAL MEN AND EMERGENCY CASES. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on Thursday last at the Bishop Blaze Inn, as to the cause of the death of the infant son of WM. BARRETT COOPER, plasterer of Leat-terrace, Commercial-road. It appeared that the child was a month old. On Tuesday night it was fed on lunch biscuit, soaked in water and sweetened with sugar. Early next morning the mother found the child in convulsions. The father went for a doctor. Mr J. S. Perkins, of South-street, the nearest one, said he had been up all night and could not attend; Mr Moone was just gone off to see some one else; and Mr Brash said he should expect to be paid 5s. before he would go. Mr Bell, police surgeon, was then fetched, and by the time he arrived the child was dead – an hour having been lost in hunting up a doctor. Mr Bell gave the cause of death as convulsions. He could not say whether it would have been possible to save the child if a medical man had been more promptly in attendance. He thought it only fair to say that Mr Brash had been very unwell lately. The Coroner said that a medical man was not bound to attend when called. There was no law to compel him, but in this instance, when Mr Bell was called by the police, he naturally went. He believed there was an arrangement that if the police-surgeon or certain others were fetched there was a fee paid. but in other cases it was different, and it was perfectly optional whether he went or not. As they knew, it was not Mr Perkins's custom to refuse to attend when called, if able to do so. But he was an aged man. They had heard also why Mr Moone did not go; and they had heard Mr Bell suggest why Mr Brash did not go. - A Juryman said he thought a great deal of blame attached to Mr Brash for not attending without receiving the 5s. It was not always that people in the position of life of the child's father had the money by them. The Jury then returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. Mr Skinner said that it had come to his notice on several occasions that doctors had refused to attend unless 5s. was ready for them directly. The Coroner said he had never heard it before that day. Mr Skinner said he could give the name of the doctor. The Coroner said it must be recollected that the doctors were considerable sufferers, and were often called up at two or three o'clock in the morning for cases which were not urgent, and for which they never got paid. Mr Skinner said it would be better if they made some excuse instead of saying that they must have 5s. The Coroner said he did not think the line of procedure was general. He had always found medical men ready and willing to come. There might be exceptional cases, but it must be remembered that there was no legal liability on doctors to attend and that they often suffered from being called up in cases which were not urgent, and for which they got no payment.

Wednesday 4 March 1885, Issue 6120 – Gale Document No. Y3200738888
EXETER – Sad Death of a Boy, Yesterday. - An Inquest was held by Mr Hooper (City Coroner) at the Queen's Hotel, yesterday afternoon, on the body of a boy named WILLIAM THOMAS ISHERWOOD WILDING, who was found dead yesterday morning in the scullery of Mr Davey's drapery establishment, Queen-street, with his head entangled in a runner towel, behind the door. The deceased lad's father and mother live at No. 9, Iron-bridge, and his father is a labourer. The lad had been in his usual health and was a sharp, intelligent boy. He left his parents' house soon after seven o'clock on the friendliest of terms and went to Mr Davey's, in whose employ he was. He cleaned some knives and forks and boots, and helped in the shop in the usual way. About nine o'clock an assistant in the shop called the boy, and as he did not answer the cook went to search for him. She found him dead in the scullery, his knees on the ground, and the runner towel around his chin. The lad's hands and face were clean, and it appeared as if he had gone to wipe himself with the towel after washing. When P.S. Mock arrived Mr Davey said that his errand boy had hung himself. Dr Moone was sent for and on his arrival he examined the deceased. There were no cord marks to indicate that a cord had been tied around his neck, but on the front of his neck were marks which corresponded with his being hung. The lad was foaming at the mouth, and from the impression of his teeth on the tongue, Mr Moone concluded that the lad had an epileptic fit, got caught in the towel, and was suffocated. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a mysterious and curious case. There was nothing in the evidence to lead to the supposition that the lad had committed suicide. Mr Moone's opinion seemed to be the correct one, that the boy had an epileptic fit and fell on the towel. The foaming at the mouth was one of the symptoms of epilepsy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 4 March 1885, Issue 6120 – Gale Document No. Y3200738886
EXETER – Sudden Death in a Public House. - Mr coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, West Quarter, yesterday, on the body of CHARLOTTE SMITH. The deceased was the wife of the landlord of the Blackmoor's Head, West Quarter. About one o'clock on Sunday she went into the bar, suddenly fell back, and expired within a few minutes. Dr Perkins, of South-street, was soon in attendance, but life was extinct. It seems that the deceased had been in tolerably good health apparently, although she had complained of not being able to walk far without being exhausted. The medical man considered that heart disease was the cause of death, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 11 March 1885, Issue 6121 – Gale Document No. Y3200738931
EXETER – A Warning to Mothers. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Saturday evening held an Inquest at the North Devon Inn, Paul-street, as to the death of FREDERICK ROBERT WOODLEY, the infant son of MR WOODLEY, baker, of Hookway's buildings. It appeared that the child, which was only a month old, had been fed from a bottle. On Thursday the mother, by the advice of a neighbour, gave the child a little of a soaked farthing cake. Next morning she found the child dead in its cot. Dr Henderson attributed death to spasm of the glottis, caused most likely by improper food. Bread stuffs and other farinaceous foods could not be digested by so young a child, and they were very likely to produce spasms. Dr Henderson said that in cases where the mother could not suckle her child the best food for it was milk from the cow, diluted. Where this did not agree with the child the Swiss condensed milk, such as was given, was very suitable for a time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 11 March 1885, Issue 6121 – Gale Document No. Y3200738949
SUPPOSED SUICIDE OF A CHEMIST, YESTERDAY. - A sad case of the death of an Exeter chemist was reported yesterday. It appeared that about eight o'clock on Tuesday morning MR JOHN BLACKMORE, chemist, of 119, Fore-street, was found to be very ill, apparently in a dying state. A messenger was despatched for Dr Budd, but before his arrival the unfortunate man expired. The deceased was found foaming at the mouth, and there were evidences of his having taken poison, probably prussic acid. The deceased has had to be watched on previous occasions, and it is said that lately he has been in a desponding and semi-insane state. Dr Budd made a post mortem examination yesterday. An Inquest will be held this (Wednesday) morning at twelve o'clock at the Devonport Inn, Fore-street. Much sympathy is felt for MRS BLACKMORE and her family.

Wednesday 18 March 1885, Issue 6122 – Gale Document No. Y3200738990
HOLSWORTHY – Death from Exposure and Neglect. - An Inquest was held at the Holsworthy Workhouse last Friday before Mr R. Fulford, touching the death of a navvy named WILLIAM PRICE, aged thirty years. PRICE had been employed on the Halwill section of the North Cornwall Railway, and for want of better accommodation had been compelled with other men to sleep in a loft with hay, straw, and sacks for bedding. About ten days before his death he was taken ill, and on the previous Saturday was admitted to the House in an exhausted state, and a few days afterwards he died from inflammation of the lungs. Dr Symons said the man was very insufficiently clad and his death was no doubt accelerated by exposure. The doctor also condemned the loft where the man had been obliged to herd with others as unfit for human habitation, and said he considered it was the duty of the contractors to provide proper sleeping accommodation for their men. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased died from inflammation of the lungs, and that his death was accelerated by exposure to cold prior to his admission to the Workhouse." They regretted to find existing a want of sleeping accommodation for the men employed on the North Cornwall Railway. The Coroner was desired by the Jury to communicate with the contractors on the case, and to call their attention to the rider to the verdict of the Jury.

Wednesday 18 March 1885, Issue 6122 – Gale Document No. Y3200738970
EXETER – Found Drowned. - An Inquest was held at Double Locks on Saturday, before Mr H. Gould (Deputy Coroner for the District), on the body of JOSEPH NORRISH, aged 47, a porter, who has been missing for some weeks, and whose body was taken from the Canal on Friday afternoon. On the morning of the 16th February, he left his home, at No. 8, Bartholomew-street, to go to work. Some years ago, when deceased was in the army abroad, he had a sunstroke, and in the beginning of this year had a recurrence of the attack, from which he had not quite recovered. Deceased was never seen or heard of again until on Friday last when Charles Scanes, horse driver on the Canal,. saw his body floating just above Double Locks, and with assistance he got it out. The body was much decomposing, and appeared to have been in the water about a month. P.S. Blackmore sent for Mr C. J. Vlieland, who considered that deceased had met his death by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

THE SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EXETER CHEMIST. - The City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.) on Wednesday last investigated the circumstances attending the death of JOHN JOSEPH BLACKMORE, a chemist, who for several years past has carried on business in Fore-street, Exeter, and whose death occurred on the previous day. For some time past the deceased had suffered from nervous depression. He had also been physically weak, though not recently under medical treatment. Last summer he was attended by Dr Budd, and at that time was suffering from an acute state of mania resulting from an over-indulgence in alcohol. He was exceedingly nervous and desponding, but his tendencies were then of a homicidal rather than a suicidal character. It was found necessary to place him under constant surveillance. On the previous Monday night he was more than usually depressed, and complained during the day of a pain in his head. On the following morning his wife remarked that he looked very ill, and on returning to him after a few minutes' absence observed that there was something seriously wrong with him. A neighbour was called in and some brandy poured into his throat, but he gradually lost all strength and died in a few minutes. Dr Budd was called in and found that respiration had entirely ceased. In the course of a post-mortem examination the doctor found strong traces of prussic acid, and there was no room to doubt that death had been caused by poisoning. Subsequent investigation in the shop led to the discovery that a bottle of prussic acid had that morning been opened, and about two drachms of the liquid taken from it. For some months the deceased had been a total abstainer, and in Dr Budd's opinion the result of the alcohol he had taken last summer might have affected his brain, and produced the low state of mind of which he had complained. The Jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 25 March 1885, Issue 6123 – Gale Document No. Y3200739029
YEOFORD – Fatal Accident. - The District Coroner (F. Burrows, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Yeoford Station last Thursday on the body of EMMA JANE WARE, who was picked up dead upon the line t Neopardy on the previous Monday. Arthur Sims, a boy, said he knew the deceased well. On Monday evening he saw her come out of a gate at Neopardy crossing, and go on to the line. Two trains – one up and the other down – passing at the time prevented his seeing her long. When the trains had passed he saw something lying beside the line, and was afraid to go to it. Some few minutes afterwards her step-father came out with some others and recognised the body as that of his step-daughter. WILLIAM DAVEY, packer on the line, and step-father of deceased, said about seven o'clock on Monday deceased came into the garden and asked if she could help. He told her no and she left. A few minutes afterwards some other of his children ran to him, and said, "EMMA JANE was lying on the line." When picked up the deceased was quite dead; the head was completely smashed. George Sims, another packer, said he thought she was crossing the line to play with his boys, who were on the other side of the metals, and while she watched the up goods train the down passenger knocked her down. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 1 April 1885, Issue 6124 – Gale Document No. Y3200739068
BARNSTAPLE – Shocking Death. - An Inquest was held last Wednesday by the Borough Coroner on the body of a woman named ANNA HILL, aged 65 years. She had lived by herself in a cottage in Bull-court, and was found the same morning burned in a terrible manner. The features were quite unrecognisable, and the bones and greater portion of the body were burnt to cinders. The only portion on which any flesh remained were one foot and part of the shoulders. MRS HILL was seen in a public-house on Tuesday evening, but was not apparently the worse for liquor. It is supposed, however, that when filling a benzoline lamp it fell, and, coming in contact with a light, ignited her clothes. An oil can was found on the table. A verdict of "Found Burned" was returned.

Wednesday 1 April 1885, Issue 6124 – Gale Document No. Y3200739055
EXETER – Sudden Death. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday on the body of MARY ANN FRENCH, a spinster, formerly carrying on business as a grocer, at 95, Paris-street. It appeared that on Friday night deceased retired to bed, apparently in her usual health. About four o'clock the next morning she was taken very ill, and expired thin an hour. Dr Hunt was sent form, but his efforts were of no avail. He gave it as his opinion that the deceased died through heart disease. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony. The Inquest was held at the residence of the deceased in consequence of the illness of one of the witnesses. MR FRENCH thanked the Coroner for acceding to this request, and Mr Hooper replied that he was always ready to do this when a suitable room was provided as it had been on that occasion.

EXETER – Advice to Mothers. - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper,) held an Inquest at the Coach and Horses Inn, St. Sidwell-street, on Monday, on the body of WILLIAM MITCHELL, aged ten weeks, the infant son of a painter, living in Gatty's-court. The child slept with his mother on Saturday night, and when the latter woke up early the next morning she was startled to find that the babe was dead. Dr Bell was sent for, and found that life had been extinct at least two hours. The child was weakly, and he believed that he had been accidentally suffocated by the bed clothes or slight pressure from the mother. In the evidence it was stated that the child had been partly fed with his mother's milk and partly with cows' milk and biscuits. In answer to the Coroner, Mr Bell, although not believing that biscuits had anything to do with the death in this case, said mothers should either nourish their children wholly, or they should be altogether fed artificially on cows' milk. Mother's milk and Cows' milk would not go together. No biscuit food should be given a child as young as deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

Wednesday 1 April 1885, Issue 6124 – Gale Document No. Y3200739079
SHOCKING DEATH OF A BOY - Yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held at the Cruwys Inn, Cruwys Morchard, by Mr F. Burrow, County Coroner, on the body of a lad named REED, ten years of age, living with his parents, who met with a shocking death on Saturday last. In the evening REED was asked by a man named Frankpitt to hold a horse that had been detached from a waggon. He did so. Whilst Frankpitt was absent for a short time he got upon the back of the animal and trotted it about. It is believed that some chains attached to its harness irritated the animal and caused it to bolt. REED was unseated, and becoming entangled in the chains was dragged for about a mile. When he was picked up he was found to be dead, his head being stated to have been literally smashed to pieces; and the course the horse had taken was indicated by traces of the unfortunate lad's blood and brains. the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death."

Wednesday 8 April 1885, Issue 6125 – Gale Document No. Y3200739111
HORRIBLE DEATH NEAR ILFRACOMBE – An Inquest was held on Monday at Ilfracombe, on the body of a lime burner named NORMAN, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The unfortunate man about a week ago, while alone during dinner time, jumped upon a lime kiln in order to break a stone. The kiln gave way and he fell into the burning lime. His cries for help brought assistance, but some time elapsed before it was found possible to extricate him, when it was discovered that his legs up to the knees had been consumed. After lingering for a week in great agonies the deceased succumbed to the injuries he had sustained.

Wednesday 8 April 1885, Issue 6125 – Gale Document No. Y3200739098
EXETER – Infant Mortality. - Another Inquest was held yesterday at the Turk's Head Inn, on the body of an infant, named SARAH ANN MILTON. In this case the medical testimony showed that death resulted from infantile convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 15 April 1885, Issue 6126 – Gale Document No. Y3200739140
EXETER – Infant Mortality from Improper Feeding. - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Fireman's Arms Inn, Preston-street, on Saturday morning, relative to the death of JESSIE CLARA LAKE, aged two months, of 23, West-street, who died on Thursday morning. the evidence went to show that the child had been fed on corn flour mixed with water. This food Dr Brash said was too heavy for the stomach of so young a child, and probably brought on the convulsions from which it died. Infants brought up by hand should be fed only on cow's milk mixed with water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and the Coroner expressed a hope that good would result from the ventilation of this question of feeding infants.

EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Buller's Arms Inn, on Monday, before Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of MARGARET TAYLOR, of Cheeke-street, aged 83, who died last Thursday from injuries received through being knocked down in the street by a big black dog. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 29 April 1885, Issue 6128 – Gale Document No. Y3200739256
KILLED BY "STILL" LIQUOR. - Extensive Seizure of Illicit Sprits near Broadclyst.
A good deal of excitement has been caused in Broadclyst by the death on Friday last of a youth named HENRY TAYLOR, aged 18, from the effects of drinking an excessive quantity of illicit spirit, and the discovery of a large quantity of "still" liquors, with the appliances for making it, at an out of the way place known as Williard's Cottage, about two miles from Broadclyst, occupied by a widow named Coombes, and many years ago there was a seizure in the same place, when Mr Coombes was imprisoned for the offence. For some time past there has been a suspicion that the illegal trade was again being carried on, and the police authorities had the case in hand, and were about to take steps in order to ascertain if such was the case. The situation of the cottage is well adapted, surrounded as it is by an orchard and also from its desolate situation and uninviting appearance, for carrying on the illicit manufacture of liquor, and there is no doubt that it has been carried on very extensively. The Supervisor for Exeter (Mr Lilburne) returned to the city on Monday with a waggon laden with six hogsheads, from which the dregs had been emptied, and also with the "still" with which the liquor was manufactured.
The Inquest was held on Monday afternoon in the kitchen of the cottage before Mr Coroner Burrow, and there were also present the Rev. Preb. Acland and Captain Collins, of the Devon County Constabulary. The whole place smelt strongly of liquor, the dregs of which had been emptied into the court-yard. Mr Worth, of the Red Lion Inn, Broadclyst, was foreman of the Jury. The evidence went to show that the deceased, accompanied by his brother, THOMAS TAYLOR, paid a visit to Mrs Coombes on the morning of Friday for the purpose, as was pretended, of taking a couple of tame rabbits to her grandchildren. Having delivered the rabbits the deceased asked for a drink and his brother and he were supplied with a jug of cider. A jar of "other liquor" was produced by Mrs Leaworthy, a married daughter of Mrs Coombs, and each of the men had rather less than half a pint served out to them, in glass mugs. The jar was left on the table and though THOMAS TAYLOR avers that, as far as he remembers, they had no more drink, the presumption is that the men both helped themselves to a considerable quantity. About an hour afterwards Mrs Leaworthy, who was in charge of the house at the time, being anxious to lock it up requested the TAYLORS to leave. She found, however, that they were utterly helpless, and called in Mr Mortimore, a farmer, who was passing, to assist her in removing two drunken men. Mr Mortimore acceded to her request, and with some difficulty got the deceased and his brother removed into what was known as the "Pound" house. There they were left by themselves for two or three hours, when Mr Mortimore called to see whether they had become sobered. To his astonishment he found HENRY TAYLOR dead, and his brother lying beside him in a state of stupor. Medical aid was summoned, and in due course THOMAS TAYLOR recovered. Mrs Leaworthy was unable to say whether the men were drunk, but had no doubt about their being sober when they came to the house. By direction of the Coroner, a post-mortem examination of the deceased was made by Mr James Somers, surgeon, of Broadclyst, and that gentleman gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from the excessive drinking of still liquor. the brain and other organs smelled strongly of the liquor, and there were general appearances of alcoholic poisoning. There appeared to be nothing else that would account for death, which might, however, have been accelerated by exposure to cold and damp. Police-Sergeant Tucker found that a room on the ground floor had been set apart for the manufacture of the liquor. There was a still over the fireplace, and the necessary apparatus was also about the room, besides six hogsheads barrels, three of which contained cider dregs used for the purpose of the distillery. The room was locked, and great care had been taken to conceal the illicit still. A quantity of liquor was found in other parts of the house, and Mrs Coombs admitted that she was in the habit of making "a little still liquor." Mrs Leaworthy at first denied that either of the TAYLORS had tasted any liquor on the premises. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from excessive drinking of still liquor." It is understood that the Inland Revenue authorities will very shortly initiate a prosecution of Mrs Coombs for having the still in her possession – for which she is liable to a penalty of £30 and for illegally selling the liquor – for which the full penalty is a fine of £200.

Wednesday 29 April 1885, Issue 6128 – Gale Document No. Y3200739257
ASHTON – At an Inquest held at the Fisherman's Arms by the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) on the body of ELLEN COX, daughter of SAMUEL COX, blacksmith, evidence was given to the effect that deceased, who was two years of age, fell out of a bed-room window on the 12th March, and died on Friday last. Dr Riddell, who attended the deceased, said that death was caused by sudden failure of the heart, occasioned by injuries to the brain, the result of the fall, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Wednesday 29 April 1885, Issue 6128 – Gale Document No. Y3200739254
SUDDEN DEATHS IN EXETER. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning, at the Black Dog Inn, North-street, by the City Coroner, on the body of JOHN UPHAM GATER, aged seven months, son of a coachman, living in Paul-street. The father said that the child had been bad ever since its birth, but on Friday last it was taken worse, and medical aid was summoned. The child died in the presence of the medical man. Mr Moone said that he was called to see the deceased on Friday. He went and found the child lying in bed, and he expired in his presence. He told the mother that it was dying, and that he could do nothing for it. He examined the body, but found no marks upon it. He thought the deceased died a natural death. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest on Monday afternoon at the Dolphin Inn, Sun-street, touching the death of HENRY EDWARD HEARNE, aged eleven years, who died on Saturday morning. MRS HEARNE, mother of the deceased, said that he had been ill for some time and had been attending the Dispensary. She said that he had got out of bed on Saturday morning soon after six when his father was going to work. He fell forward but she caught him in her arms, and the deceased said that he felt very giddy and sick. He spoke to her and told her that one of the neighbours wanted a hammer and chisel which she thought was rather peculiar so she sent for a neighbour, named Mrs Winslade, and then went for a doctor but the deceased died before he came. Dr Kempe said that the deceased had been under his care at the Dispensary for about six weeks, he was suffering from ulceration of the throat and stomach, and general debility. He was called to see the deceased on Saturday morning and found him dead. He examined the body but fund no marks upon him, he should consider that he died from one of the ulcers breaking in the stomach. The Jury returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes.

On Monday afternoon the City Coroner held an Inquest at St. German's House, Pennsylvania, touching the death of MR PINDER. MRS PINDER said that her husband was seventy-five years of age. She went to his room with his breakfast at about nine o'clock on Saturday morning and he was then all right. At about ten o'clock she took him some water, and on going to him ten minutes later she found him lying on his back in the dressing-room quite dead. Mr Cummings, surgeon, said that he was called to see the deceased. He found the body in the dressing-room. There were no marks of violence on it and death resulted from failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 6 May 1885, Issue6129 – Gale Document No. Y3200739299
LUPPITT – Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Spurtham Farm-house, Luppitt, on Thursday, before Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner, on the body of HANNAH NORTON, wife of WILLIAM NORTON, labourer, who committed suicide on Tuesday by cutting her throat with a razor. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had been in a low state for some time, and was only recently discharged from the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she had been an inmate for three weeks. From that time she had been under the care of Dr Shortridge. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Wednesday 6 May 1885, Issue6129 – Gale Document No. Y3200739273
EXETER – Inquests. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Tuesday) morning at the Fireman's Arms,. Preston-street, by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on the body of LILY LIZETTE WILLIAMS, of Sherman's-court. The mother of the deceased was not present, and Mrs Western, a person who lives in the same house, stated that she was called at four o'clock on Sunday morning to go and see the child as it was very bad. She went and found the child dead in its mother's arms. Mr Brash, surgeon, said that he was called on Sunday morning to go to Sherman's-court to see a child. He found it in bed, along with the mother, quite dead. There were no marks upon the body, and in his opinion death resulted from natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

An Inquest was held yesterday morning at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on the body of HENRY BENNETT, aged thirty-nine, a native of Honiton, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Saturday, 2nd May. MR BENNETT, step-0brother of the deceased, said that he had identified the body of his step-brother, who lived with him at Silver-place, Honiton. Edward Wiltcher, foreman of the telegraph party working between Honiton and Chard, said that he gave the deceased and another man orders to cut some branches of the trees to clear the way for the telegraph wires which were being put up. While the deceased was on the ladder cutting away the branches he fell and pitched on his back. Witness picked him up and had him removed in a cart to Honiton where he was attended by Dr Macaulay, after which he was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Bloomfield, house-surgeon, said that the deceased was admitted to that institution on Friday, May 1st. He was then quite sensible and complained of having a pain in his neck, the entire body, excepting the arms and head, were paralysed. He died the next morning, the cause of death being a fractured spine. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SAD DEATH OF AN EXETER SURGEON.
An Inquest was held at the Beehive Inn, Teignmouth, on Monday, before Sidney Hacker, Esq., County Coroner, touching the death of FREDERICK PHILLIPS PHELPS, whose body was found on the rocks at the Ness on Saturday. FANNY PHELPS, wife of the deceased, said she lived at 12, Victoria Cottages, Exeter. Deceased was a surgeon, but had been out of practice about eight years. His age was 52. They had been staying at Teignmouth about three weeks. About two o'clock on Friday deceased, witness, and her sister, with the children, crossed the ferry and went towards the Ness. They made tea on the rocks, of some of which they partook. Deceased was sitting a few yards from the party. There was a large rock between them. They left the spot about four o'clock, her husband walking a few yards ahead of them. Deceased had been suffering from aneurism of the heart, which produced a feeling of fullness. He went on, and after witness and the children had passed through the archway they lost sight of him, and presumed he had gone to the ferry and would wait, but they found on arriving that he had not been there. Witness asked the ferryman if deceased had crossed, and the man replied "No." Witness then sent the eldest child to see if the deceased had reached home, and with her sister returned towards the rocks, but owing to the rising tide they could not go around the rocks. Assistance was the procured and a search made for the deceased but without success. Richard Roper, labourer, of Shaldon, and a man named Westlake spoke to finding the body of the deceased lyi8ng with face and hands on the ground jammed between two rocks. They informed P.C. Trewin, who, by means of a rope got the body out. Deceased's watch was lying on the beach about ten yards off, as if washed out by the swell of the tide. Dr Cardew gave evidence to having examined the body when brought home. There were several bruises on the face and head as though produced by falling on the rocks, and death had not occurred by drowning. Deceased suffered from heart disease, and witness considered the shock produced by the fall caused death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 13 May 1885, Issue 6130 – Gale Document No. Y3200739335
BOVEY - Fatal Accident at a Level Crossing. - Last Friday afternoon an old woman, named MARIA WILLCOCKS, of Wreyland, met with a frightful death on the railway near this place. The 2.15 train from Moretonhampstead to Bovey Tracey left the former station at the usual time, and had passed a mile beyond Lustleigh Station towards Bovey, to a place known as Yeo, where there is a level crossing, when the deceased, who was deaf, attempted to cross, without seeing the train. The engine driver happened to see her and blew his whistle, but without effect. The train caught her and ran over her, completely crushing her head, hands, and arms. Death was instantaneous. Her husband is a packer on the line. At the Inquest held at Lustleigh on Monday, before S. Hacker, Esq., District Coroner, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, coupled with a recommendation from the Jury that some bushes near the spot should be removed in order that persons using the crossing might be able clearly to see an approaching train.

Wednesday 13 May 1885, Issue 6130 – Gale Document No. Y3200739333
FOUND DEAD IN A RAILWAY CARRIAGE. - An Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Infirmary on Thursday before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on view of the body of MATTHEW REYNOLDS, Horse dealer, of Devonport, aged fifty-five. It appeared that on Wednesday morning at Yeoford the deceased entered a third-class carriage of the 9.20 train from Exeter. At Eggesford he complained to the guard of being unwell, and at his own request was put into a compartment where he could be quiet. He could then walk all right. At Portsmouth Arms the guard looked into the compartment and saw deceased lying on his face. He looked up, and this was interpreted as a signal that he was doing favourably. At Chapeltown, the last station before Barnstaple, however, he was found lying on his back, and was then quite unconscious. His head was supported, and two passengers got into the compartment and accompanied him to Barnstaple. William Stone, a cattle dealer, of Barnstaple, said that after deceased got into the train at Yeoford he began to beat his chest, and complained of suffering much from indigestion. He lay upon the seat, and afterwards stood up in the compartment. At Eggesford he went to another carriage, and witness saw him again at Chapeltown, travelling from that station to Barnstaple in the same compartment with him. Deceased died something over a mile from Chapeltown. Mr Stone's evidence was corroborated by John Sweet, who was his companion on the journey. Mr J. N. Cooke, surgeon, attributed death to heart disease, and a telegram was read from deceased's family to the effect that they knew he suffered from that cause. A verdict that deceased died suddenly from heart disease was returned.

Wednesday 20 May 1885, Issue 6131 – Gale Document No. Y3200739379
CULLOMPTON – The Late MR E. BROOM. - An Inquest was held last Saturday before Mr F. Burrow, District Coroner, at the Rising Sun Inn, on view of the body of MR E. BROOM, the late landlord of the house, who died on the previous day from the effects of wounds in the throat inflicted by himself. It appeared from the evidence that on Tuesday Mr R. Salter, of Wescott Farm, Cullompton, late vestry clerk, met MR BROOM, rate collector, at his house by appointment to inspect some books. This occupied some hours, Mr Salter leaving to return home about six p.m., with the understanding that he would call early the following morning to finish the work before MR BROOM went to Tiverton later in the day to meet the public auditor to audit his books. Mr Salter went according to appointment soon after 6.30 a.m., on Wednesday and knocked at the door, but the latter not been opened, he saw a friend in the street, with whom he held a short conversation. MR BROOM about that time was gone to the back of the premises, and his wife went to an upper back room window and called to her husband to inform him that Mr Salter was come. He replied, "In a minute or two." This proceeding was repeated two or three times, and the last reply appearing to her somewhat strange, she hastened to the back yard, and in the closet saw deceased with his throat cut. A carving knife was by his side. She rushed next door and alarmed Dr Potter and called Mr Salter, who speedily came and assisted deceased into the back parlour. Dr Potter sewed up the wound and helped the unfortunate man to bed, where he lingered until Friday afternoon and expired. Deceased was 57 years of age. Her husband had aroused her about two a.m. on (Wednesday) morning, saying "he should be put to jail for the books were wrong. She and all his family would be ruined, and he could not live to go to Tiverton to the audit." He had suffered great pains at the back of his head and he was in great trouble about a family affliction. Dr Potter was of opinion that death came more from pressure on the brain than from the wound, though that might have accelerated it. Mr T. Chick and Mr G. Luxton deposed to going to Tiverton with the books and to the latter being found perfectly right by the auditor. They also gave their testimony to the great suffering for months past complained of by deceased. Mr R. Rowe and Mr W. Poole also gave evidence to the same effect. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased committed suicide whilst in an unsound state of mind." Much sympathy is felt for the widow and family.

Wednesday 20 May 1885, Issue 6131 – Gale Document No. Y3200739381
TIVERTON – Death Through Neglect. - An Inquest was held on Monday before the Borough Coroner (L. Mackenzie, Esq.) on view of the body of WILLIAM ARTHURS, labourer, who died the morning before under most painful circumstances. The deceased, it appears, had lived for years in a building given him by a landowner, and being blind had allowed it to get into a very bad state of repair. The windows were completely smashed, and internally the "residence" was a total wreck. How the unfortunate man managed to exist in the place is a mystery. ISAAC ARTHURS, brother of the deceased, who identified the body, stated that deceased was fifty-six years of age, and the "house" in which he lived was given him for life. Deceased had been blind for forty years, and had lived in the "house" for over five years. Since the death of his mother, who occupied a portion of the place before her death, deceased had been accustomed to walk to Tiverton once a week to receive his relief, and had for several seasons tilled his garden and gathered the crops. He had complained of being unwell for about twelve months, but had steadfastly rejected the advice that had been tendered him to go into the Workhouse. On Sunday morning he was found by a neighbour lying on the floor in a very exhausted state, and he died before medical aid could be obtained. Mr J. Jarman, relieving-officer, stated that the deceased had been in receipt of relief for over eight years. Witness hearing of the dilapidated state of the house a week or two since, visited the place and informed deceased that he should report to the Guardians of its condition, at the same time recommending him to go into the Workhouse. This latter course he strongly objected to. The authorities had done what they could to keep him from starving, and also to restore him to a proper mode of living. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death resulted from "Natural Causes."

Wednesday 3 June 1885, Issue 6133 – Gale Document No. Y3200739447
EXETER – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Saturday, in reference to the death of WILLIAM PRINN, a spring maker, of 27, Magdalen-street. EDWARD PRINN, [?], brother of the deceased, identified the body. Witness was in company with the deceased ( who had been ailing for some time) about eight o'clock on Friday evening, in the house. Deceased went to fetch some water, and while in the passage blood issued from his mouth and nose. In witness going to him, his wife and Miss Drew were supporting deceased, who was to all appearances dead. Witness sent for a doctor, and Mr Hartnoll came. Miss Priscilla Drew, of Colleton-hill, also gave evidence of a similar character. Dr Hartnoll stated that he considered death took place from profuse pulmonary haemorrhage, or the rupture of a blood vessel in the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 10 June 1885, Issue 6134 – Gale Document No. Y3200739515
EXETER – Sad Death by Drowning. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) assembled a Jury at the Port Royal Inn last Saturday to enquire into the circumstances under which SAMUEL CHURLY BLACKBURN came by his death. The deceased, a lad of 14 years, was the second son of MR ROBERT BLACKBURN, Trew's Weir Paper Mill, and he was drowned on Friday by the upsetting of a canoe at Trew's Weir just opposite his father's residence. MR BLACKBURN said that the deceased was constantly on the river and canal, and having been brought up by the river side was thoroughly accustomed to boating. He had gone as far as Exmouth in a canoe. On Friday morning about 11 o'clock his son went on the river in his canoe, and soon afterwards witness saw the deceased struggling in the water 13 yards below the weir, and the canoe was upside down. A boy named Squire was in another canoe 50 or 60 yards lower down the river. Witness called for assistance and jumped into his boat, with his gardener and Mr Chapman, to get to the aid f his son, who was on the other side of the river. They rowed to the spot, but by that time the boy had sunk and they were unable to find the body. The water was from 12 to 14 feet there, and being at the bottom of the weir there was a current and eddy. Christopher Squire, son of MR BLACKBURN'S foreman, said that he went out on the river with the deceased. They took a canoe each, and went down the river, and then sailed back to the weir. Witness sailed down the river a second time, but the deceased said that he would return to the house. In turning, the wind must have caught the sail, and the canoe was capsized.
Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, was called, but his services were of no avail. The Coroner said that he was sure that the Jurymen and himself sympathised with MR BLACKBURN most deeply in the affliction under which he was at present suffering. The Foreman (Mr Harrison) said that they all did; and it was a very sad case. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Wednesday 17 June 1885, Issue 6135 – Gale Document No. Y3200739542
EXETER – A Suspicious Case of Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon at the Round Tree Inn by the Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) touching the death of MARY DOROTHY WILLIAMS, who was found drowned in the Mill Leat early on Sunday morning. KATE WILLIAMS, daughter of the deceased, said she lived in Rack-street. Her mother was a widower, and earned her living by selling fruit and vegetables. On Saturday night witness went to the Swan Inn, St. Thomas, to see her mother at 9.40. She saw a man named Squires and her mother talking together in the back-yard. They both had been drinking. She then drove home the cart which her mother had been driving and she did not see her mother again alive. Thomas Hatwood, living in Commercial-road, said that he saw the deceased and the man named Squires in the Bonhay-road at about a quarter to eleven on Saturday night. The deceased was walking three or four yards behind the man, he should think they both had been drinking. William Squires, labourer, living in Fore-street hill, said that he was with the deceased on the night in question outside the Swan Inn at about 11 o'clock. She spoke to him and asked him whether he was going over the bridge and he told her he was. She then went over the bridge with him and they turned down into the Bonhay-road. There he left her and went straight to the People's Club, where he stayed until half-past two the next morning. He never saw the woman afterwards. One of the Jury men, who thought it was a very suspicious case, asked that a woman might be called who saw Squires going over the bridge at about one o'clock. Mary Cridland was then called and stated that on the night in question she saw Squires going over the bridge near St. Edmund's church just after one, and she saw him stop under a lamp post, put his hand into his pocket, take out some money and count it. She then walked up the street and when she came back she met him again near Scotland House. Edward Stokes, living in West Quarter, stated that he saw the deceased and the man Squires at about eleven o'clock a few yards from the Shakespeare Inn and near the place where the woman fell in. The man appeared to be supporting the woman to keep her from falling. P.C. Ching said that he was on duty on Saturday night in the Bonhay-road. He was passing by the Shakespeare Inn when he heard a splash as if some one had fallen into the water. He ran to the bridge which crosses the leat, and turned on his lamp but could not see or hear anyone. He then raised an alarm and P.C.'s Walsh, Penworthy, and Skinner came to him. Penworthy began to search the fender and after some time the body was brought to the surface. She was then taken and laid down by the door of the mill and Dr Moon was sent for. Mr Moon, surgeon, said that he was called at about twenty to two on #Sunday morning by a policeman, to go to the Round Tree Inn to see a woman who had fallen into the water. He went immediately and found the woman quite dead. He examined the body then and again at about six o'clock in the morning, but found no marks of violence on her. He was of opinion that the woman came by her death by drowning. The Jury, who were very dissatisfied with the evidence of Squires, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," but by what means she came into the water they could not tell. Inspector Symes, who was there to watch the proceedings on behalf of the police, informed the Jury that the matter should be gone into and thoroughly sifted.

Wednesday 17 June 1885, Issue 6135 – Gale Document No. Y3200739560
NEWTON ST. CYRES – Fatal Kick from a Horse. - JOHN AUTON, a farm labourer, in the employ of Mr James, of Rew Farm, Shobrooke, on Thursday last returned with a mare from work, and had hitched her up outside the stable. On passing behind her she kicked him, breaking four ribs, and death occurred almost instantaneously. An Inquest was held at the Railway Inn, on Saturday, before the Deputy Coroner for the district (H. W. Gould, Esq.) when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased was a married man, and leaves a widow and two children. The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

WHITESTONE – An Inquest was held at the Ball Oak Farm last Saturday, before Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) on view of the body of THOMAS BELWORTHY SANDFORD, aged seventeen months, son of MR SAMUEL SANDFORD. The child had been left to play in the garden on Wednesday evening whilst MRS SANDFORD went out to milk the cows. During her absence the deceased must have strayed away, for on MRS SANDFORD'S return, he was missed, and on search being made, the father found the child in a pond at the bottom of the court-yard, quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and expressed an opinion that the pond should be railed off to prevent any future accident.

Wednesday 17 June 1885, Issue 6135 – Gale Document No. Y3200739564
FATAL GUN ACCIDENT AT CHITTLEHAMPTON - An inquest was held at Wey Farm, Chittlehampton, on Saturday, by James M Bromham, Esq., District Coroner, relative to the death of LUCY PHILLIPS, aged 13, who was accidentally shot at that place, on Friday, by a servant girl, in the employ of deceased's grandfather, THOMAS PHILLIPS, with whom she was staying at the time. About three o'clock in the afternoon when MR PHILLIPS and his daughter were absent at Barnstaple Market, deceased and the domestic servant Eliza Bawden, aged 17, were along in the kitchen. The servant had only been in the employ of MR PHILLIPS a week, but appeared to be on most friendly terms with the deceased. There was a gun standing in a corner of the kitchen, which the girl took up in play, and rested against her shoulder. The gun went off, and the charge lodged in the body of the deceased, who screamed and fell to the ground. The girl, ran for help, and found a servant man named Buckingham, and a boy called Brewer in the barn close by. Seeing the state in which deceased was, these ran off for assistance, and in the meantime the girl returned to the house, and the deceased, who was still conscious, said to her, "You have shot me, but I know you didn't mean to do it. I forgive you, as I know you love me and I love you". Dr Jackson, of Barnstaple, who was soon in attendance, said the child was dead when he arrived. He described the injuries he found on the body, and said they were such that nothing could have been done to save, or even prolong the life of the child. He also added that in addition to the severe wounds he had described, he found thirty-six shots around the wound. The jury returned a verdict that death resulted from haemorrhage of the lung caused by a severe gunshot wound, and added a rider to the effect that the jury whilst deeply sympathising with the grandfather and the parents of the child in the sad loss they had sustained, wish to record their opinion that the occurrence was a pure accident and that no blame attaches to the servant girl, who appears to have already suffered very deeply, mentally, on account of the unfortunate affair.

Wednesday 24 June 1885, Issue 6136 – Gale Document No. Y3200739588
BOATING FATALITY AT APPLEDORE - A painful sensation was caused in Appledore, Bideford, and the surroundings, on Sunday morning, when it became known that five fishermen belonging to the former place had been drowned in the estuary when returning home from Bideford on Saturday night. It appears that eight men started for Appledore in a large sailing boat and had very nearly crossed when it is supposed that the boat was caught in a squall and capsized before she could be brought enough up to the wind to save her. The shouts of the men struggling in the water in the darkness were distinctly heard from the shore, and a boatman named Short put off to render assistance. He managed to reach one man who was still supporting himself, and got him safely on board in an exhausted condition. the others had reached a smack which was fortunately within reach of the scene of the accident, and these he also took ashore. But five were drowned – SCOBLING, GIDDY, BERRY, GREGORY, and a sailor from Jersey who has been at Appledore since the Emily went ashore near at hand a week or two since. The bodies of SCOBLING, BERRY, and GIDDY have been recovered, and the others are being dredged for.
The Inquest was held on Monday before J. F. Bromham, Esq., (District Coroner). The evidence given by the survivors went to show that all on board the boat were more or less under the influence of liquor. When near Appledore one of the men named SCOBLINGS lost his hat overboard, and Edward Richards, who was at the helm, wore the boat round for the purpose of picking it up. In doing so he did not release the sheet, which was caught by the wind, and caused the boat to capsize before anything could be done. The survivors were picked up by Isaac Short who was roused out of bed at one in the morning by hearing screams, and without stopping to dress, put off in a boat to their assistance. The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said it was a very sad thing to know that five young men had been hurried into eternity in this way. With regard to the state in which the men were at the time, it seemed to him that nearly all the men in the boat had been drinking freely during the evening. There was no doubt if the boat had been full of sensible men this accident would never have happened. He could not help thinking that the man Short was entitled to great commendation for the manly and expeditious way in which he acted and the presence of mind he exercised. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Drowning," and requested the Coroner to forward the circumstances of Short's behaviour to the Humane authorities, with a view to compensation. The Coroner expressed his readiness to do this.

Wednesday 24 June 1885, Issue 6136 – Gale Document No. Y3200739584
EXETER – Found Dead in Bed. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on Friday last held an Inquest at the Windmill Inn, Holloway-street, on the body of REBECCA HARRIS, who had been found dead in bed the same morning. The deceased, who was 73 years of age, was a widow, and occupied a room in Penitentiary-court, Holloway-street. She had no relatives, and with the relief she received from the Guardians, together with the proceeds of a little school which she kept up to last Friday, the deceased managed to support herself. Mr Bells said that he received an order to visit the deceased on Saturday last. He went, and found her in bed suffering from chronic bronchitis and general debility. He prescribed for her, and Mrs Palmer, a neighbour, fetched the medicine. It was his opinion that she had not sufficient nourishment to keep her alive. He last saw her on Thursday, when she told him she was better, and talked of getting up in a day or two. He should suppose that she was attacked by a fit of coughing, which brought on an attack of faintness, from which she died. The Jury considered that in such cases as the present the Guardians should place a responsible person in charge of the patients, and when persons were too feeble to fetch their pay from the Guardian's offices an officer should take it to them, and report as to the condition they were in. Mr Bell said that two years ago the Guardians had a question before them with regard to the granting of out-door relief. Such relief was then granted permanently in cases where somebody in the house, or residing near the house, would undertake the responsibility of looking after the patients. He believed that this rule had been carried out to a certain extent; but it had worked inefficiently, as the persons who undertook this responsibility repudiated their liability when the recipient fell ill, and the Guardians had no claim upon them. He thought that it would be a salutary rule that the officer should take the money to the recipients, and then the Guardians would be in a position to know in what state they were. The Jury quite agreed with the remarks made by Mr Bell; and the Coroner expressed his satisfaction that the question was brought forward; but, at the same time, he could quite see that there was no blame to be attached to the Board. A verdict of "Death from Natural causes" was returned.

Wednesday 1 July 1885, Issue 6136 – Gale Document No. Y3200739661
OTTERY ST. MARY – Fatal Accident. - The District Coroner (Spensor Cox, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Ottery Cottage Hospital on Monday evening, as to the death of WILLIAM FREDERICK VELVION, which occurred in the institution from the effects of injuries received on the previous Wednesday. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, while walking from Tipton to Colaton Raleigh, met a man named Lake driving a horse and waggon, and asked him for a lift. The request was acceded to. Shortly after, Lake, who was leading the horse in front, heard a scream, and on turning round, saw the deceased lying on the road. The hind-wheel of the waggon had left the boy then. Lake had not seen the boy for some time, and he did not know he had been near the waggon. The boy said he did not think he was hurt much, and he walked some distance. The lad was taken to the Cottage Hospital at Ottery, where he died from internal injuries. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated anyone from blame. The Jury gave their fees to the fund being raised for the support of the Hospital.

Wednesday 8 July 1885, Issue 6137 – Gale Document No. Y3200739681
DROWNED IN THE EXE - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest yesterday, at the Crown and Sceptre Inn, North-street, on the body of JOHN POPE, who was found drowned between Tremlett's Mills and the foot-bridge in the Bonhay-road this same morning. John Lock, ,porter at the Exeter Workhouse, identified the body of deceased. Witness saw him last on Friday morning when he took his discharge. William Woodford, smith, residing at 2, Exe-street, saw the deceased about half-past nine on Monday night in the Bonhay-road. He was leaning over the rails near the Head Weir. P.S. Paul said he knew the deceased by sight. A young man named Richard Ash, residing at Sander's-court, Preston-street, came to the Guildhall shortly after six yesterday morning with two sticks and a hat which he had found near the spot where the deceased's body was recovered. The hat had the name of the Workhouse inside it. He sent it to the Workhouse, where it was ascertained that it belonged to the deceased. Witness went to the Bonhay-road, and there he saw the deceased in the water, about fifty yards from the foot-bridge. Witness sent for Mr C. E. Bell, and with assistance took the body to the mortuary. The deceased went to the Guildhall on Saturday, and asked to be allowed to lay down in the cell. He had no home. Mr C. E. Bell said he had examined the body and found no marks of violence on it. The man had then been dead several hours and death had resulted from drowning. The foreman of the Jury said that on Saturday last he had a conversation with the deceased, who alleged that he had been ill-treated by having his materials taken away. He advised him to go to the Workhouse on Monday, and gave him a shilling to get a bed. The deceased said he should "not go back there (meaning the Workhouse) or else he should e hung, because he would kill the Matron." An adjournment was suggested with a view to an Enquiry as to whether the deceased had been driven to commit suicide by any unkind treatment he might have received from anyone whilst in the House. It appeared that the chief cause of complaint was that the materials which deceased used in making mouse-traps were taken from him; and the Coroner pointed out that if the Workhouse rules forbade their use, these rules must be carried out. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 8 July 1885, Issue 6137 – Gale Document No. Y3200739679
INFANT MORTALITY IN THE CITY – The City Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., held an Inquest at the Fireman's Arms Inn last Friday relative to the death of ETHEL ANNIE MAY CANN, aged four months, daughter of LUCY CANN, a domestic servant living at Exmouth. The evidence went to show that the child was born in the City Workhouse. Since the 21st March the child had been taken charge of by Mrs Martin, of Preston-street, for which she was paid 4s. per week, and on Thursday it suddenly expired. The child had been fed on bread, milk, sugar and biscuits. Mr Perkins, surgeon, South-street, stated that he examined the child on the day named; and it was his opinion that the cause of death was spasm of the glottis. The Coroner asked whether the food was good for a child of such tender age. Mr Perkins replied that it was too varied. The Coroner: It should e one kind of food. Mr Perkins: Yes, and of a light character. The Coroner remarked that this was another case where the child had died through being improperly fed. He wished it to be distinctly understood – and he had said it more than once – that the food of young children must be light, and now Mr Perkins had told them that it must not be varied. He hoped his remarks would have a beneficial effect. He did not wish to case any reflection on Mrs Martin, who it seemed had acted through ignorance. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural causes," and attached no blame whatever to Mrs Martin. It was suggested by Mr Perkins that a pamphlet should be distributed containing directions for the feeding of children.

Wednesday 15 July 1885, Issue 6138 – Gale Document No. Y3200739748
DAWLISH – Mysterious Case of Drowning. - The District Coroner (Mr F. Burrow) on Friday last held an Inquest at the Devon Arms, Kenton, on view of the body of MRS MARY RANSON JORDAN, found in the Ken at Powderham on Wednesday morning. It appeared that deceased for a long time lodged with Mr George Avent at Dawlish. About a fortnight before her death she left there to go to Teignmouth, and on the 6th instant Mr Avent had a letter from her saying that she would be back on the following day. She did not return and on the Wednesday Mr Avent heard that her body had been found in the Ken. The deceased was seen in Kenton on Tuesday morning by Thomas Addicott at half-past six. He was at home when she knocked at his door and asked for some tea. He supplied her with two glasses of milk, and she went away in the direction of Powderham Church. There was nothing in her manner to excite attention. About three hours later deceased called at the Devon Arms and was supplied with a bottle of lemonade by Mary Trevelyan. She was also supplied with a bottle of milk and a bottle of water, and was then directed to a baker's shop as she said she wanted to buy some bread. Samuel Brewer, a gardener, of Starcross, saw deceased in the Park at 10.25. She was a stranger to the locality, and asked to be shown the way to the grounds in front of the castle. Witness offered to conduct her, but as it then began to rain, she remained under a tree, and witness, proceeding on his way, did not afterwards see the deceased. The spot was about 100 land yards from the part of the canal in which deceased was found. She frequently repeated her questions, and appeared to be strange in her manner. Joseph Elliott, labourer, of Kenton, and Henry Baker, a mason, spoke to recovering the body from the water, and Dr Pycroft gave it as his opinion that deceased must have been dead at least twelve hours when found. It was stated that the water was not deep enough to cover the body. the evidence of MISS JANET MARY CLEMENT TRELAWNY JORDAN, daughter of the deceased, went to show that her mother was 52 years of age, and a widow. On Monday, about noon, deceased requested her to call at several shops, but before she left the house to do so she discovered that her mother had gone. Witness immediately made inquiries and learnt that deceased had booked by train to Starcross. She proceeded to Dawlish by the next train, and after inquiring there drove on to Starcross. No intelligence was there to be obtained, and witness returned to Dawlish and communicated with the police. On Tuesday she again made inquiries in the neighbourhood, but could learn nothing in the locality of her mother's whereabouts. A telegram was received on Wednesday, from the constable at Starcross, stating that her mother had been found drowned at Powderham. Deceased had lately suffered from a slight depression, but was well able to conduct her affairs. Witness was aware that some time ago a person with whom deceased was intimate died of heart disease, and her mother for a time laboured under the delusion that a statement in conversation which she made relative to that disease hastened her friend's death. ARTHUR BANSON JORDAN, son of the deceased, corroborated his sister's evidence. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. Much sympathy is felt for the family of the deceased in their sad bereavement.

Wednesday 15 July 1885, Issue 6138 – Gale Document No. Y3200739730
SUICIDE OF AN ESCAPED LUNATIC. - An Inquest was held yesterday afternoon, by the Deputy Coroner (H. W. Gould, Esq.), at the Wonford Asylum, touching the death of EDWARD HARDINGE, a retired Army officer, who was found drowned at Salmon Pool, on Saturday last. The Coroner, in opening the proceedings, said people who had friends in the Institution had a right to expect that careful attention should be given to them, not that he meant to say there had been any neglect by the officials. He would therefore ask them to give their fullest consideration to the case. Frederick Adolphus Jelly, acting medical-officer at the Asylum, said that he knew the deceased, who was 51 years of age. The deceased was admitted to the Institution on the 11th of May, 1885. At the time of his admission he was suffering from delusions, and always thought that he was poor, when he was not. His memory was also greatly impaired. On admission the deceased was put into the backpart of the Institution, where they were kept under more strict supervision. When brought to the Institution his friends said that he was dangerous, but since he had been there he had always been very quiet. The deceased was not dangerous to other people nor did he exhibit any suicidal tendencies. When he entered the Institution his friends said that there were no suicidal intentions. After a time he was removed to the front of the establishment, where the patients are allowed more liberty. There were seventeen patients in this part of the building, and two attendants. The deceased was allowed out into the garden for exercise, and always had an attendant with him. To show that he was not suicidal the deceased was always allowed to shave himself in the presence of an attendant. He saw the deceased last in the cricket field and had some conversation with him, in which he seemed very rational. The deceased never expressed a wish to go outside the gates. He was missed about half-past five, when his attendant came to his (Dr Jelly's) room to enquire if the deceased was there, but as he was not there a search was instantly made, and it was found that the deceased had escaped. Warders were sent in different directions, but nothing could be seen of him. He heard nothing more of the deceased until Sunday morning, when a boy came to him and told him that a hat and umbrella had been found on the banks of the river at Salmon Pool. Orders were then given for two men to go to the spot, and at half-past three the body was brought into the Asylum. He then examined the body and found that death had been caused by drowning, but how long the body had been in the water he could not tell. The deceased must have hid himself away and when night came on made his escape from the grounds. In answer to one of the Jurymen, he said that there had been several cases of escape. Peter McLean said he was an attendant and knew the deceased, who was placed under his charge at the time of his admission. He never showed any dangerous symptoms to others and was allowed to go out with attendants. He saw him alive about 6.55 on Saturday night and he was then standing on the cricket field watching the players. He was missed about quarter to seven and four attendants were sent, one in each direction. He next heard of him about two o'clock on Sunday, and then he heard that his hat and umbrella had been picked up. He was at the place when his body was found and saw the buckle around his wrist. Joan Sobey, charge attendant, said the deceased had been in his charge, and when under his attention was in the refactory ward. the deceased never attempted to strike anyone or do anything to himself, and he never gave the least trouble. Witness saw the deceased on the day in question watching a game of cricket. William Jeffery said he had been attending the deceased since the 4th of June. It was his special duty to look after deceased. He was always very nice, and never gave any trouble. Witness never heard him say that he would commit suicide, nor had he tried to break away. He never cared to go for a walk. He last saw him alive at six o'clock on Saturday afternoon. He was then standing by him while he was watching the cricketers, but at the time mentioned he was called away by the head attendant to assist him in the house, and was away from the deceased about half-an-hour. On his return he inquired of the other attendants where the deceased was, and as he could not be seen he made a report, and a search was immediately made. He was present when the body was taken out of the water at Salmon Pool, and saw that the deceased's hand were strapped with a belt which he used to wear around his waist. In answer to a Juryman, he had left him on two or three occasions. If he left him for any length of time another attendant would be put in his place. McLean was then re-called at the request of the Jury, and in answer to the Coroner said he gave Jeffery orders to help in the house which he did. Whilst Jefferies was doing this work he went out and looked to see if the deceased was all right and found him along with some of the other inmates. He told one of the attendants named Sobey to look after him and see that he came in all right. Sobey was re-called and said that he did not receive any orders from McLean and was at another part of the ground at the time. Albert Martin Webber, bandmaster of the 4th Battalion Devonshire Regiment, after viewing the body said that he had seen the deceased many times through visiting the Asylum to see someone else. He saw the deceased on Saturday about twenty-two minutes to seven about a hundred yards from the Asylum gates on the road that leads to Exeter. He had never seen the deceased alone before. He came to the conclusion that the deceased had ran away, and went and informed the authorities of it. The deceased was walking fast, and seemed to be in a determined manner, but previous to this occasion he always seemed to look as if he was undecided where to go. Earnest Kingdon said that on Sunday morning, between eleven and twelve o'clock, as he was walking through the fields to Salmon Pool, he saw a hat and umbrella on the bank, and he called the attention of three young men that were coming through the fields. He did not stay after that but went home. the hat and umbrella which were now produced he could identify as the same that he found. William Giles, fisherman, said that the attendant Jeffery came to him at Salmon Pool, and asked whether he had seen the deceased, and he replied that he had not. On Sunday he helped to drag the river, and found the body near the Salmon Pool steps in about thirteen feet of water. Joseph Baker, an attendant at the Asylum, stated that he knew the deceased and saw him alive on Saturday last in the afternoon. He was standing in the front ground by himself. McLean called Jeffery into the house about four o'clock, but he did not hear what conversation passed. MR H. HARDINGE said that the deceased was his brother and resided at Taunton. Previous to his admission he had not seen him since 1883. When he saw him then he did not see that his mind was wrong. He could not say that his brother had any suicidal tendencies, although they thought that it was not safe for him to be alone and that was why he was put in the Asylum. He came down in June last to see what attention he was receiving and to see whether it would be safe to take away this special attendant, but after consideration found that it would not be. During the time that deceased was in the Horse Artillery he met with a serious accident by being thrown from his horse and pitched on his head, since that time he had never been himself. The Jury, after some consideration, returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind, and said that there had been a want of attention, if not neglect, by the authorities in not having him put under the control that his relatives paid for, and had a right to expect.

HALBERTON – Determined Suicide. - The District Coroner (F. Burrow, Esq.), held an Inquest at the White Swan Inn, last Saturday evening on the body of JOHN MORGAN, a native of Halberton, near Tiverton, who had committed suicide under rather remarkable circumstances. Deceased, who was forty-five years of age, was a carpenter by trade, but had latterly been engaged as a labourer. On Friday morning about 6.30 his employer, Mr Estcott, gave him instructions to fetch a horse from a field and to harness it in readiness to go to Morebath, where he had a job in hand. Finding MORGAN did not return Mr Estcott went in search and found that he had not caught the horse as directed. Mr Estcott did this himself and proceeded to Morebath. Search was made for MORGAN but without effect until it occurred to one of the company that he might have gone to Noblehandrance Farm (occupied by Mr W. Lucas), where he was sometime previously engaged in sinking a well. The searchers accordingly proceeded thither, and found MORGAN hanging in a barn quite dead. He had fastened the rope to the beam, and mounting a drag kept in the barn, placed the noose around his neck and swung off. His feet were about three feet from the ground. Evidence was given showing that deceased had for some time been characterised by a certain strangeness in his behaviour, while he had also been in somewhat low spirits. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned. Deceased leaves a widow and five children. About seven years ago deceased's brother committed suicide by throwing himself in front of the train on the railway between Tiverton and Tiverton Junction.

Wednesday 15 July 1885, Issue 6138 – Gale Document No. Y3200739752
BIDEFORD – Death from the Bite of a Dog. - An Inquest was held, last Friday evening, at the Bideford Dispensary, by Dr Thompson, Borough Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM HUXTABLE, who died from the effects of a dog's bite. Mrs cook, in whose house deceased lodged, deposed to the circumstances under which the casualty happened. On Sunday afternoon deceased went into his allotment garden, followed by his dog. The dog strayed into Pound's allotment, and was there caught by the leg in a gin set there to catch vermin attacking the strawberries. Deceased hastened to liberate the animal without taking the precaution to use a stick for that purpose; and it was while reaching down his hand to open the jaws of the trap that the animal bit him, in the fleshy part of the right hand between the forefinger and the thumb. Although it bled freely, deceased treated it lightly, saying it "was not much, and would soon pass off." He took the precaution, however, of having it cauterised by Dr Sinclair Thompson, and up to Tuesday no ill effects were visible. On that day deceased, complaining that the limb was feeling stiff, adopted the very unwise cause of bathing it in as hot water as he could endure, whereby, of course, the crust of the wound softened and removed. Some bleeding followed, and the wound was again dressed and bandaged by Dr S. Thompson. On Tuesday, subsequently to being medically treated, deceased drank freely of rum and water, and became somewhat intoxicated, avoiding beer, as he said, "it might poison the wound." On Thursday morning after breakfast the wound burst bleeding, and with an extra bandage round it he went to Dr S. Thompson's surgery, who, seeing the exhausted state of the deceased, attended to him, and afterwards ordered him to the Dispensary for the sake f the skilled nursing he would there receive. He was there given some brandy, and was put to bed, but remained cold and faint, and his sufferings became very great. The medical evidence was to the effect that the bleeding was due to the extension of the original wound to one of the arteries, and that death was not the result of hydrophobia, inasmuch as deceased evinced no fear of water. A verdict of "Accidental Death following upon the bite of a dog," was returned; and it was given as the opinion of the Jury that no reason had been shown why the dog should be destroyed.

Wednesday 22 July 1885, Issue 6139 – Gale Document No. Y3200739790
MYSTERIOUS AFFAIR NEAR CREDITON – Serious Allegations. - At a special sitting of the magistrates of the Crediton Division at Crediton on Saturday, which followed an Inquest held on the previous day by Mr H. W. Gould, the Deputy Coroner, ELIZABETH HARRIS, a young woman of nineteen, a domestic servant, formerly with Mr and Mrs Stoneman, of Great Hill Farm, Colebrooke, was charged with concealing the birth of her child, born on or about the 15th of February last. It appeared that the accused was recently dismissed from service, and she then said she would bring disgrace upon one of the family. From her subsequent statement Mrs Stoneman was induced on Monday week to send for a policeman, and on a search being made in a garret of the house, which was infested with rats, the head of a child, enclosed in a bag, was found. Subsequently the body was searched for, but without avail. Almost all the flesh was gone from the skull which was discovered, and Mr C. H. Haycroft, surgeon, of Bow, said it was impossible to decide from it whether the child was a male or a female, or whether it was born alive or dead. HARRIS'S own statement is that the child was born in February, she believed on the 14th. On Wednesday last she made a communication to P.S. Fursdon, which that officer, having warned her, took down in writing. She said that three or four days before the child was born Mr Jonas Stoneman, her employer's brother, held her while she drank something out of a glass he had. After that she believed that the child was dead, and it was born dead on a Saturday. The morning afterwards she put the child in the garret over Jonas Stoneman's bedroom and told him of it. He said it would never be found out. In August last she was going to leave her place, but Stoneman persuaded her not to, and promised her a lot of money if she would keep it quiet. In answer to Mr Friend, who watched the case for Mr and Mrs Stoneman and family, Mr Jonas Stoneman said there was not a fraction of truth in what the girl had told the police-sergeant about himself. He had never been intimate with HARRIS, and never knew she was expecting to become a mother. Being asked by the magistrates, at the conclusion of the examination of Mr Jonas Stoneman, whether she wished to make any statement, HARRIS reiterated what she had said about Jonas Stoneman giving her something to drink, adding that when it went down her throat it felt like boiling water, and that it made her teeth quite loose. Mr Friend, on behalf of Mr Jonas Stoneman, emphatically denied this statement. The accused was committed for trial at the assizes on a charge of concealment of birth.

Wednesday 29 July 1885, Issue 6140 – Gale Document No. Y3200739814
DEATH THROUGH FRIGHT. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn, Magdalen-street, by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) yesterday morning, touching the death of JOHN MAYNE BEDFORD, a carter in the employ of Messrs. Rowe. Elizabeth Voisey of Hollaway-street, stated that the deceased was fifty-two years of age and had been living with her for eleven years. He had always enjoyed good health until Wednesday the 22nd instant, when he came home about nine o'clock in the morning and said that one of the horses in the stable had bitten his thumb and kicked him in the neck. The deceased said that he felt bad and he thought he would go to bed which he did. She went to his room about an hour later and he then said that he felt much better and he should come downstairs. He had some bread and butter and tea several times during the day and went to bed about nine o'clock in the night. The deceased asked her to bring him some tea before she went to bed. About eleven o'clock she sent her nephew up to him with the tea and he seemed all right then. Early next morning she again went to see him but found him very ill. She immediately sent for a doctor who said that he had had an epileptic fit brought on through fright. The deceased was subsequently removed to the hospital. George Setter, of Okehampton-street said he was at Mr Rowe's stables on the day mentioned between six and seven in the morning and saw the deceased there. He was working on the opposite side from the deceased when he heard a noise in the stable and went to see what it was, he found the deceased lying on the floor of the stable on his right side. There were two horses in the stable at the time. He lifted the deceased into his arms and heard him mutter something to the effect that he had been bitten. With the assistance of another man they took the deceased into the yard and laid him down on some straw. the other man went to Mr Rowe's shop for assistance and he remained with the deceased until help came but he was afterwards removed to the hospital. Mr Bloomfield, house surgeon at the hospital stated that the deceased was received into that institution on Thursday, the 23rd instant. He examined him and found a slight wound on the right thumb which might have been caused by a bite, and also a small contused wound on the left jaw. When deceased was admitted on the date mentioned he presented symptoms of apoplexy not from the injuries received because they were so slight, but from fright, brought on by the injuries, and on Monday, the 27th instant, the deceased died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 5 August 1885, Issue 6141 – Gale Document No. Y3200739852
EXETER – Sudden Death. - The City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Golden Lion Inn, Newtown, last Wednesday afternoon, on the body of THOMAS ELLIS, 26, a joiner, of 36, Sandford-street, who died suddenly on Tuesday night. The deceased was at work on Tuesday for Mr Stiles, builder, of Summerland-street. About ten minutes before seven in the evening he went out for a walk as he was in the habit of doing, and was apparently well. At half-past ten he was taken home almost dead. Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, was of opinion that death resulted from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 5 August 1885, Issue 6141 – Gale Document No. Y3200739874
HONITON – An Inquest was held by Mr C. Cox, Deputy District Coroner, on Monday afternoon at Gorn Farm, Broadhayes, touching the death of WILLIAM SCOTT, aged 25, son of MR JOHN SCOTT, farmer, of Stockland. The dead body of the young man was found in the high-road on Friday morning. He was returning home with a waggon load of oil cakes drawn by two horses, and it is supposed that a fright caused by the horses running away ruptured a vessel in the heart. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 12 August 1885, Issue 6142 – Gale Document No. Y3200739923
OTTERY ST. MARY – Scalded to death in a Pan of Hot Milk. - At Westhill on Monday, before Mr C. Cox, Deputy District Coroner, an Enquiry was held into the circumstances which led to the death of RHODA IRELAND, aged two years, daughter of ROBERT IRELAND, farmer. It appeared that on the 18th of July, in the absence of MRS IRELAND, her son GEORGE took a pan of milk from off the kitchen fire and stood it on the floor as the milk was near boiling over. The deceased seems to have gone into the kitchen, and unperceived by her sister FANNY, a half-witted girl, fell into the pan of boiling milk. The poor little thing screamed loudly, and her brother was attracted to the spot, and at once pulled her out. On the mother's arrival it was found that the child was frightfully scalded. Linseed oil was procured, and the suffering child wrapped in oil and wadding. The parents, not believing the injuries were so severe, did not send for a doctor until the following day, when the child was convulsed. Dr Gray, of Ottery, was then sent for, and he attended the child until she died on Sunday. The Deputy Coroner, although not imputing any unkind feeling on the part of the parents of the child, remarked that a doctor ought to have been sent for at once. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death resulting from Accident," and the Foreman (Mr Coles) endorsed the observations made by the Deputy Coroner with reference to calling in a doctor.

Wednesday 12 August 1885, Issue 6142 – Gale Document No. Y3200739917
OKEHAMPTON – Fatal Effects of punishment on a Schoolboy. - An adjourned Inquest was held on Thursday at Sourton, near Okehampton, by Mr R. Fulford, County Coroner, as to the death of a child named JOHN HEATHMAN, after being struck on the head by Mr J. H. Arbory, master of the public elementary school at Bridestowe. Superintendent Mitchell, of the Devon constabulary, watched the case on behalf of the police, and Mr J. D. Prickman, solicitor of Okehampton, attended for Mr Arbory. It appears that the boy had attended the Bridestowe school, the master of which is Mr Arbory, who has occupied this position for eight or nine years, and was formerly a student at the Exeter Training College. According to the evidence of the parents the boy came home on the 16th July crying, and when asked the reason stated that he had been hit on the head by the schoolmaster. Since the 16th he had suffered from vomiting and drowsiness, and on the 25th Dr Burd was sent for. He could not trace any disease. The lad became gradually worse, and died on Sunday. A post mortem examination made by Mr W. C. Northey, surgeon, of Okehampton, discovered the fact that the boy's skull, an unusually thin one, had been fractured by a blow, and the injury set up inflammation of the brain. Mr Arbory denied having struck the boy on the day in question, and proved that a boy who said he saw him do so was not there at all that day. The Jury, after a long and patient enquiry, found that death was due to compression of the brain, the result of concussion brought on by a blow on the head. There was not sufficient evidence, however, for them to say how, and by whom, the fatal blow was administered. The Coroner endorsed their verdict, and said he hoped the Inquiry might be a warning to schoolmasters as to the mode in which they exercised the power given them to administer corporal punishment. He had been glad to hear from the assistant mistress that Mr Arbory never used a stick across the head of the children. Anyone doing so could and ought to be summoned for assault, as he might inflict injuries on the children which might end in death or in life-long suffering.

EXETER – Inquests.
An Inquest was held on Thursday morning, before the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) at the Topsham Inn, South-street, on the body of a man named JOSEPH PERKINS, who committed suicide at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Wednesday morning, the 5th instant. ELIZABETH PERKINS, wife of the deceased, said she lived at 20, Market-street, and identified the body as that of her husband. Deceased was about fifty years of age. He had been attended for some time previous to his death by Mr Perkins, of South-street. He had complained of pains in the chest, had been very despondent and could get no sleep. She last saw him alive on Tuesday. Mary McKnigh, a nurse at the hospital, said the deceased was in the Winchester Ward, and had been in the hospital since the 23rd of April. He appeared to be very quiet and reserved. Witness last saw him alive about half-past eleven on Wednesday morning. He was then sitting on his box by his bedside. About a quarter of an hour afterwards she was called by somebody, and found the deceased lying on his side in a pool of blood in the lavatory, with a small penknife by his side. Deceased was dead. It was no unusual thing for patients to carry knives. Mr Bloomfield, house-surgeon, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was admitted on the 23rd of April last. He was then complaining of pains in the chest and want of sleep. On an examination he found that he was suffering from heart disease, which was sufficient to account for the pain in the chest and sleeplessness. He could trace no symptoms of insanity. During the last few weeks deceased had been improving, and had slept rather better. Witness saw him in his ward on Wednesday morning about half-past ten, and noticed nothing strange about him. He was perfectly calm and collected, and told him he had still got the pain in his chest. Shortly afterwards the deceased was found in the lavatory close to his ward, with the pen-knife on his right side. Witness made an examination and found a wound about three inches long in his throat. It was a deep wound, and having opened the windpipe and cut several large blood vessels death must have been instantaneous. He should think that the deceased committed the act while in a state of Temporary Insanity, brought on by the constant worry of the pain in his chest. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, and expressed an opinion that no blame was attached to the hospital authorities.

An Inquest was held by the City Coroner (W. H. Hooper, Esq.) at the Princess Alexandria Inn, Bonhay-road, on Monday morning, touching the death of BESSIE SNOW, aged 13, who died on Friday morning last. RICHARD SNOW identified the body as that of his daughter, who had been living with her aunt. Deceased had been a delicate child from birth. Christiana Pearse said that the deceased had been living with her at Eagle Cottages, and had been with her for about two years. Deceased had been suffering from a cold and had been under a doctor for some time. On Thursday deceased had a fit of coughing, and was also sick. After some medicine had been given her she got better. On Friday deceased got up about ten o'clock and had something to eat. At about two o'clock she sat beside the fire in the arm-chair. She asked for some cherries which were bought, and she ate some of them. Witness went out after a basket which deceased wanted and was away about half-an-hour. When she came back she found the deceased was faint, with a neighbour standing beside her. Deceased spoke and asked for some medicine and also a little brandy, after which she said she felt better but a little while after she died. R. J. Andrews, surgeon, practising at Heavitree, said he knew the deceased who was rather consumptive. He was called to see deceased on Friday evening but found her quite dead. He examined her, but found no marks of violence on her, the body had been well nourished. He should think death occurred from natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

CULLOMPTON - Fatal Gun Accident. - Mr F. Burrow, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Commercial Inn, last Wednesday, on the body of CHARLES GALPIN, a lad of 16, who met with a shocking death through a gun accident. Mr Morrish stated that on Monday GALPIN, together with a younger brother, accompanied him to a field where he intended trying a gun he had borrowed. Before they started deceased cleaned and loaded the gun, which was a double-barrelled breech-loader. They then proceeded towards some land rented by witness. When they came to a highly-railed gate, in which there was sufficient space for a man to get through, witness gave the weapon, which was fully "cocked" to GALPIN to hold on whilst he got through, but before he had emerged into the adjoining land he heard the gun go off, and on looking up saw the deceased fall, exclaiming, "Oh, master, this is a bad job." When he entrusted the gun to the boy he was careful to put it in a perpendicular position, with the muzzle upward. Witness went for a doctor, but before the latter arrived the boy was dead. FRANK GALPIN, the brother of the deceased, stated that when Mr Morrish was getting through the gate the deceased placed the butt end of the gun on a rail of the gate with the view of pushing it through. He was holding the weapon by the barrel with one hand over the mouth, and in moving it somehow caught the trigger in the rail, with the result that it went off. A part of deceased's hand was blown off, and the charge entered the abdomen. Dr Potter having described the injuries the lad received, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 19 August 1885, Issue 6143 – Gale Document No. Y3200739955
BARNSTAPLE - The Bathing Fatality at Saunton - An Inquest was held last Wednesday, at Barnstaple, in connection with a sad case of drowning which took place at Saunton Sands on the previous Monday. MRS TATHAM, wife of the chief clerk at Messrs. Brady's, and her two sisters, who were on a visit to Barnstaple, went to the sands for an outing. they had tea on the rocks, and on returning found the sea had surrounded them. They took off their boots and stockings to cross a small stream, and a big wave took MRS TATHAM off her legs and carried her out with it. The sisters saw MRS TATHAM taken out to sea, but were powerless to render assistance. A gardener afterwards going down to the sands to endeavour to recover the body, saw it on some rocks, where the tide had gone back and left it. The body was conveyed to Barnstaple. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

OTTERY ST. MARY – Suicide. - Mr Charles Cox (District Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the London Hotel, Ottery, last Monday, on the body of MARY BASTIN, aged 77, who committed suicide on Saturday by strangling herself with a clothes line. A verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind" was returned.

HOCKWORTHY – Fatal Accident to a Farmer. – The District Coroner (F. W. Burrow, Esq.) held an Inquest at South Stapledown, Hockworthy, last Wednesday, touching the death of MR JAMES WENLEY, farmer and innkeeper of that place, which occurred on the previous day from the effects of an accident. It appeared that a week before deceased was returning home late at night from a stock sale. He was rather the worse for drink, and near Waterside was seen by P.CV. Eveleigh to fall from his horse. Mr Bucknell, baker, of Hockworthy, passed soon after, and drove deceased home in his trap. The injured man was attended by Dr Grigg, who found him suffering from slight concussion of the brain, and severe bruises. He lay for nearly a week in an unconscious state and then died. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 26 August 1885, Issue 6144 – Gale Document No. Y3200740009
HEAVITREE – Child Killed by a Fall. - H. W. Gould, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the district, on Friday evening, held an Inquest at the Horse and Groom, Heavitree, on view of the body of MELROSE LAMBERT GORWYN, aged two years, who died on Wednesday evening from the effects of a fall from the stairs. It appeared that the child was climbing the stairs when it fell through a hole in the balustrade on to the floor of the passage. The child was attended by Mr Head, surgeon, and he gave the cause of death as concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and advised MRS GORWYN to have the stair rails repaired.

Wednesday 2 September 1885, Issue 6145 – Gale Document No. Y3200740025
EXETER – A Boy Drowned in the Exe. - On Sunday evening a little boy named PYNE, about nine years of age, was drowned in the river just below Exe Bridge. The lad got on a framework erected by the St. Thomas Local Board for the purpose of pumping water into their carts, and over-balanced himself. Mr T. Punchard, of the Telegraph Department, who resides with his father in Alphington-street, promptly divested himself of only his coat and hat dived into the river, and after being under water for some little time, brought the body to the surface. Efforts were made to restore animation, but without success, and the body was conveyed to the Mission Hall. The deceased was the son of a widow who lost her husband – a seafaring man – a little less than twelve months since. She has two other children. A god deal of admiration was expressed for the plucky manner in which Mr Punchard entered the river. An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, on Monday evening, before Mr H. W. Gould, the deputy Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. The Jury added a rider that the Local Board should be requested to put a fence around the platform in question. A vote of thanks was passed to Mr Punchard for his gallant and courageous conduct.

EXETER – Fatal Fall. - On Wednesday last an old man named RICHARD WEST, employed as a gardener at the Northernhay Club, fell from the grounds formerly used a s a skating rink into the New North road causing injuries from which he died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. At the Inquest on Saturday, held by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.), at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, Eliza Vowles, wife of George Vowles, of 20, Waterbeer-street, identified the body of the deceased. He was not a relative of hers. Mr Arthur Blakey, manager of the Northernhay Club, said he knew the deceased, who was employed as a gardener at the Northernhay Club. On Wednesday morning last he came to him between eight and nine o'clock and asked him for the keys of the gate. Witness heard nothing more of him until a man employed at the London Hotel stables came and said the deceased had fallen from the grounds on to the road below. That was about three o'clock in the afternoon. Witness had deceased removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital in a cab. Thomas Wise, horse-keeper, employed at the London Hotel stables, stated that on Wednesday afternoon last he was in the New North-road, when he observed a basket, out of which some leaves had been emptied, fall from the grounds above on to the road, and directly after this the deceased fell from the same place. Witness should think that the wall was about sixteen feet high. Witness and another man went to the deceased's assistance and discovered that his forehead was fractured, but as to any other injuries he could not say. He assisted the deceased into a cab which was brought to convey him to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Henry Agar, another horse-keeper employed at the London Hotel, gave corroborative evidence. Mr Bloomfield, house-surgeon, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, stated that he admitted the deceased into the Hospital on Wednesday last. He examined him and found a severe wound over the centre of his forehead, and one on the right elbow joint. He rallied, and looked fairly well for a time, but died from the shock (resulting from the injuries) last night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and suggested that something should be done to prevent a similar accident.

Wednesday 9 September 1885, Issue 6146 – Gale Document No. Y3200740073
EXETER – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, by Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of an old woman named FRYER, aged eighty-three. It appeared that deceased, who lived in St. Sidwell's-terrace, slipped and fell in the street on the 1st June. She was removed to her house, but refused to send for a doctor until the 9th June, when Mr Bell was called in and found that her hip was broken. She died on the previous Monday from the effects of the injuries. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 16 September 1885, Issue 6147 – Gale Document No. Y3200740132
TIVERTON - The Borough Coroner, held an Inquest in the Town Hall, on Thursday evening, touching the death of JOHN POLLARD, labourer, aged 49, who died the previous day under singular circumstances. The evidence showed that deceased had been unwell some months, ever since, in fact, he ate some herrings which it was considered were not fresh. On Saturday he returned from work as usual and complained of being very ill, but declined to have medical assistance until Monday, when Dr Haydon gave POLLARD some medicine. On Wednesday morning deceased expressed a wish to have some tea. He drank two cups of tea an also consumed a pint of cider, and then retired to the garden, where he was taken ill, and expired in the course of a few minutes. Mr T. H. Robinson, surgeon with Dr Haydon, deposed to making a post mortem examination of the body. He found deceased had been suffering from fatty degeneration of the heart, which caused death. The Jury of which Mr G. Babbidge was foreman, returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

TIVERTON - WILLIAM CLARK, a pauper, on Thursday committed suicide by hanging himself in a stable. He was seventy-eight years of age, and with his wife had been in the Workhouse since 1879. Nothing peculiar in his demeanour seems to have been noticed during the interval by any of the Workhouse officials; but at the Inquest his wife said she had lately noticed some change in him. During Thursday afternoon the deceased, acting under directions from the porter, set about re-potting some plants. Subsequently an inmate named Parkhouse entered the stable, which is now used as a straw-house, and noticed deceased in a leaning position against the wall, with his feet touching the ground. He spoke to him, but as deceased did not answer he went up to him, and then found him unconscious. Parkhouse called the porter, who found that deceased had wound some cord round a staple in the wall, placed his neck in a noose, and so contrived to hang himself. The porter at once cut the body down, and then informed the Master, who sent him for the Medical-officer; but that official not being available, Mr Clibborn, a medical man, on a visit to Dr McNeill, was fetched, and when he arrived he formed the opinion that deceased had been dead about half-an-hour. The Master, in his evidence, said he had usually seen deceased several times a day, but had not noticed any alteration in his manner. He last saw him alive about ten a.m. on Thursday. The Coroner remarked that so far as he could see deceased appeared to have been treated by the officials of the House with more than usual kindness. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind."

Wednesday 16 September 1885, Issue 6147 – Gale Document No. Y3200740138
TIVERTON – Lewis Mackenzie, Esq., the Coroner for the Borough of Tiverton, held an Inquest at the Infirmary on Monday, on the body of THOMAS GOSS, labourer, who died on Friday from injuries received through a fall whilst riding a horse on the previous Wednesday. SARAH ANN GOSS, widow of deceased, identified the body and stated that deceased was twenty-eight years of age. On Wednesday he left his home for work at the usual time, and about ten o'clock witness carried him his lunch. She first went to the stable, but finding him absent, she proceeded on the road towards Puddington. She met a horse riderless a short distance on the road, and on looking round saw her husband lying on the ground. Deceased said the horse had just thrown him and almost killed him. She lifted him into the hedge and fetched a horse and cart and took him home. He was put to bed and Dr Llewellyn was sent for and on his arrival he ordered deceased to be removed to the Tiverton Infirmary. Whilst deceased had been in the Infirmary he had told witness that the horse he was riding wanted to go into a field gate, and as he kept pulling the animal back it reared and fell on its back, deceased being underneath. John Grant, labourer, who assisted in bringing deceased to the infirmary, stated that the horse deceased was riding was given to kicking. Deceased had stated to witness that he was riding without a saddle and with a halter. Mr A. J. G. Barter, surgeon to the infirmary, deposed that when deceased was admitted he was in a condition of partial collapse. He died on Friday night. Deceased had made the same statement to witness as to his wife. The Coroner pointed out that deceased was a sober, steady man, and his condition from the first was a hopeless one. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased leaves a widow and child.

Wednesday 30 September 1885, Issue 6149 – Gale Document No. Y3200740212
KINGSTEIGNTON - An Inquest was held on Saturday, before Mr Edmunds, Deputy Coroner, on the body of RICHARD SCOTT, fourteen years of age, who was killed on the previous afternoon. The deceased was driving a horse and clay cart, and was leaving the clay works in company with another lad, who on presently looking round saw SCOTT on the ground. Going back to him he found SCOTT with a terrible wound on the head, the wheel of the cart having gone over his head. He was taken to his home and died in a few hours without regaining consciousness. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BIDEFORD – Fatal Accident. - On Thursday last an elderly clergyman, the REV. W. WATKINS, fell from the top f the rocks by the side of the roadway, near Ford, down to the bottom, close to the water's edge. He was frightfully mutilated, and death was instantaneous. The body was found and taken into Bideford during the afternoon. It is thought that the accident happened about two o'clock, as the deceased gentleman was seen in the town about mid-day. MR WATKINS had been staying in the town for some weeks. He came from Swansea to go to Kingsley College, but did not do so, remaining at Bideford instead. In the pockets of the deceased was found nearly £10 in money, a valuable gold watch, sundry papers, and a letter from his brother, MR J. WATKINS, manager of the Bank of Llandovery, South Wales. The REV. W. WATKINS was a widower. An Inquest on the body of the REV. W. WATKINS, was held sat the Bideford Dispensary on Saturday evening. MR JONAH WATKINS, bank manager, of Llandovery, identified the deceased as his brother, who had retired from active ministry in the Church of England for a year past, and who, up to the time of coming to Bideford a fortnight since, had resided in witness's house. Deceased had been out of health, but not liable to any depression of spirits. His health having improved latterly he had left witness's house with a view to undertaking a tutorship at Kingsley College, Westward Ho! Witness had heard once from deceased on private matters since he had been staying at Bideford. In answer to the Foreman of the Jury, witness stated that deceased was not in embarrassed circumstances, nor was there the slightest reason to suppose there was anything whatever which would have prompted suicide. After hearing the evidence of Thomas Hoyle, by whom deceased was first discovered, and Sergeant Dymond of the Borough Police, the Jury thought it was clearly an accident, and they at once returned a verdict of "Death by Accidentally falling over the Cliffs." The Coroner said it was a matter for the Jury's consideration, whether or not they would make any recommendation to the responsible parties as to more effectually fencing off the cliff at this spot from the roadways; and the Foreman intimated that orders had already been given for doing this. The Jury, through the Coroner, expressed their sympathy with the deceased's brother and relatives. The remains of deceased were interred at Bideford on Saturday.

Wednesday 30 September 1885, Issue 6149 – Gale Document No. Y3200740207
EXETER – Inquests. - An Inquest as held on Thursday morning at the Round Tree Inn by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) touching the death of BESSIE THOMAS aged six weeks. WILLIAM THOMAS of St. Edmund-street, said the deceased was his daughter and slept with him. On Tuesday the 22nd instant, he went to bed as usual about ten o'clock, when the deceased was quite well. He awoke about half-past six next morning and looked to the child, which he was in the habit of doing, and found that the child was dead. He immediately awoke his wife and told her that the child was dead. The doctor was sent for. ELLEN THOMAS mother of the deceased said on Wednesday morning her husband awoke her and told her the child was dead. He immediately got out of bed and sent for a neighbour, after which her husband went for the doctor. She fed the child on biscuits and it generally ate between three and four a day. Dr S. Perkins said he was sent for to see the deceased, when he arrived he found her quite dead. He examined the child and found that the hands were clenched and the pupils of the eyes dilated. He believed the child died from convulsions. He thought the food given the child was improper and injudicious. The Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

A second Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn the same morning by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) on the body of JOHN HOOPER, aged 47, a labourer, of Sidbury, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Monday, the 21st instant. JOHN HOOPER, gardener, of Sidmouth said the deceased was his father. He saw him after the accident and deceased told him that he had been tossed by a bull whilst he was cleaning out the bull's pen. WALTER HOOPER, son of the deceased, said he was in the yard on the day in question when he heard someone scream. He ran to the bull's pen where he saw another man named John Ranklin, who told him to go for help. He did and whilst he was gone the deceased was carried into the house. A doctor was fetched who ordered the deceased to be removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. In answer to a Juryman he said the bull was fastened with a chain. William Frederick Pedlar, a member of the College of Surgeons and practising at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased into the hospital on the evening of the date mentioned. He told him that he had been gored by a bull and on examining him he found a severe wound on the lower part of the back and the right side. The deceased died on Wednesday from blood poisoning caused by the injuries he had received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Saturday, at the Globe Inn, Newtown, relative to the death of SUSAN MILLER, aged 45, who died suddenly on the previous Monday. JAMES MILLER, plasterer, 51, Clifton-road, said the deceased, his late wife, had been under medical care several times. On Thursday she was taken ill and Dr Henderson, who happened to be passing, was called in. The deceased, however, got rapidly worse, and died in the evening. Dr Henderson stated that he found the deceased in a dying condition. She could scarcely open her mouth and the glands of her neck were much swollen. She died later in the day, the cause of death, he believed, being a form of blood poisoning from disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 7 October 1885, Issue 6150 – Gale Document No. Y3200740254
OTTERY ST. MARY - The Deputy District Coroner (Mr C. S. Cox) held an Inquest at Salston Farm, Ottery St. Mary, on Friday, on the body of an illegitimate child of FLORENCE HANSFORD, a domestic servant, in the employ of Mr Lear. Supt. De Schmid watched the case on behalf of the police. After a lengthy enquiry, the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Wednesday 7 October 1885, Issue 6150 – Gale Document No. Y3200740238
EXETER – Inquest. - Mr Coroner Hooper opened an Inquest on Friday at the North Bridge Inn, relative to the death of GEORGE HERBERT CORY, aged eleven months, who died on the previous day. Mrs Babbage said the mother of the child resided in London. About six months ago she received the child from a Mrs Morbey, St. David's-hill, in a wretched condition. Witness was allowed 4s. 6d. per week to rear up the child. Witness communicated with Mr Domville, surgeon, who ordered her to feed the child with milk. In addition witness gave it a small quantity of soaked biscuit, but the child failed to thrive. On Thursday it appeared worse, and witness sent to Mr Domville, who was absent from home, a message to attend the child. Mr Brash, surgeon, was then sent for, but on his arrival the child was dead. Mrs Charity Maddocks, mother of the last witness, stated when her daughter received the child, it was in a dreadful condition. Mr Brash, surgeon, said the child was dead when he arrived. The child had wasted away, which probably might have been caused by a disease. Mrs Annie Sparkes stated that the second time she called upon Mr Domville – the first time he was not at home – to attend the child he said it was no use his coming he could do nothing as the child had not proper care and attendance nor proper food. On witness stating that the child was dying Mr Domville replied "That if it did die it would be necessary to have an Inquest."£ Mr Domville being unable to attend that day, the Jury thought it desirable that he should state his version of the case, and the Inquest was adjourned until Monday when Mr Domville said his opinion was that the child died from want of suitable food, but he did not attach blame to anyone. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

EXETER – Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, on Thursday afternoon by the City Coroner (H. W. Hooper, Esq.) touching the death of JOHN CLARKE, farmer of Saxton House, Doddiscombsleigh, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the 29th September. SUSAN CLARKE said the body they had just viewed was the body of her husband who was sixty six years of age. On the 9th September the deceased left his home at about nine o'clock in the morning in good health to go to Exeter with a cart of potatoes for the Market. She did not hear anything more of him until the evening when a man named Charles Sercombe came and told her that her husband had met with an accident by the cart tipping over near Dunchideock House and that he had been taken to the Hospital. The next morning she went to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she saw her husband who told her that a large dog had frightened the horse who tipped over the cart. George Hook, gardener, of Dunchideock House, said he was home on the day in question between four and five in the evening when his little girl came into the house and said a man had been run over. He went out and found the deceased lying in the road and the horse and cart was tipped over about fifty yards further on. the deceased asked him to lift him up, which he did, and placed him against the hedge. The deceased then said a large dog jumped at the horse's head and frightened it. He was removed to a cottage close by until a trap was got ready, when the deceased was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr W. F. Pedlar, acting house-surgeon, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased into the Hospital on the 9th September suffering from a fracture of the left thigh, a bruise on the left leg, and a small lacerated wound on the back of the arm, there were also some slight bruises about the body. He progressed favourably up to the 26th September, when he got worse and died on the 29th September from the injuries he had received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 14 October 1885, Issue 6151 – Gale Document No. Y3200740284
BOATING FATALITY AT TREW'S WEIR - A most distressing fatality occurred on the river on Sunday morning between ten and eleven o'clock. It appears that CHARLES TUCKER, a silversmith, of Okehampton had arranged to meet his sweetheart, JANE HARVEY, who was in service at Colebrooke, at the Crediton Station, to come on to Exeter on a visit to some relatives. Shortly after their arrival a boat was hired at the Port Royal for a row on the river, and after going as far as the Ferry House they turned back towards the Canal, when, finding the locks closed in consequence of the high water, they pulled back round the bend in the river towards the weir. When nearing the weir they were seen to row towards a little cove on the field side of the river. It is supposed that whilst doing so the female, who was steering, pulled the wrong cord, and the boat was immediately swept over the weir and swamped. Both occupants were thrown out, and were afterwards seen clinging to each other about 100 yards further down, shortly after which they disappeared. Although every effort was made to recover the bodies, it was not until five o'clock on Sunday evening that the body of the female was found about 150 yards from the weir, whilst that of her companion was not discovered until Monday morning. It is said that TUCKER was repeatedly warned of his danger by persons on the pathway, which he acknowledged by holding up his hand. Being Sunday a large number of people watched the operation of dragging from the banks of the river.
An Inquest was held on the bodies at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, on Tuesday afternoon by the Deputy County Coroner (H. W. Gould, Esq.) – Alfred Harvey, of Gullock's Ope, Lower North-street, said he knew the deceased, JANE HARVEY, who was his aunt, she was about twenty-five years of age. The last time he saw her was on Friday at his house. Eliza Tucker, residing at Devonport, said she knew the deceased ROBERT TAYLOR TUCKER who was thirty years of age, and was a watchmaker and had been residing at West-street, Okehampton. Robert Boobier, residing at No. 4, Weirfield Cottages, St. Leonards, said on Sunday morning last a young man and woman came to the Port Royal and asked for a boat and he told the man that he could have one. Deceased picked out a very small boat, and he tried to persuade him to have a larger one, but the deceased said it would be too heavy. They went out in the boat called the Spider and rowed up the river. He told deceased before he went out that he must mind the weir which was just below. He went into the boathouse and did not see them after that. In answer to the Coroner he said the river was flowing rather swift and a gale of wind was blowing at the time. Albert Call, residing at Bonhay-road, said on Sunday morning he saw the young man and woman in a boat near the ferry. They were coming up the river at the time, but he saw them turn and go down the river past Mr Edward's boat-house. The deceased pulling very hard, he heard someone across the river call out and tell them not to go too near the weir. He was walking down the banks and did not see the boat when he got to the drawbridge in the Canal. He met a young man and told him that it appeared as if the boat was going over the weir. They both went over the drawbridge and ran across the field towards the weir. He saw the boat turned over, and the two persons were struggling in the water, about forty or fifty feet below the weir, and the boat was in front of them about twelve or thirteen feet. The young fellow had his arms around the young woman. He saw them go under water and then rise again further on. The young man who was with him got one of the paddles and threw out to them, but they could not reach it. They both sank again, and he did not see them after that. He remained on the spot for some time. Robert John Blackburn, residing at Trew's Weir Mills, said about half-past ten on Sunday morning he saw two people going over the weir in a boat. The boat went down angle ways, and when it got to the bottom of the weir it remained motionless for about ten seconds, and then sank, the two occupants going down with it. He afterwards saw them rise about seventy yards below the weir, and about ten or eleven feet from the bank. He saw them come up clinging together, and heard the man cry out. They remained above the water for about ten seconds and then sank. William Row, residing in Coombe-street, said about five o'clock on Sunday evening he found the body of the young woman a good way down the river below the weir. She was quite dead. John Kelly, residing on the Haven Banks, stated that on Monday morning, about half-past ten, he picked up the body of the young man about 120 yards below the weir and about thirty feet from the bank. He was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a rider that a chain ought to be placed across the weir, so that if a boat should go out over the weir the occupants might be able to save themselves by catching hold of the chain. The Coroner informed the Jury that he would forward their request to the proper quarter.

Wednesday 14 October 1885, Issue 6151 – Gale Document No. Y3200740270
HONITON – On Friday afternoon, whilst WILLIAM SHORT, a porter at the station, was engaged in shunting part of a goods train, he was accidently caught between the buffers, and received frightful internal injuries. The poor fellow was conveyed to his home, where he was attended by Dr Shortridge, who at once pronounced the case hopeless. Death ensued about two hours afterwards. SHORT, who had been engaged at the station for about two years, was forty years of age, and leaves a wife and six children. An Inquest was held on the body at the Vine Inn on Saturday, before Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner. A porter, named William Ireland, in the employ of Messrs. Miller and Lilley, who was near at the time of the accident, deposed to seeing the deceased wave his hand to the engine-driver to move the train. SHORT thereupon made an attempt to get between the trucks, but almost immediately after he fell out on the opposite line. Richard Ball, another porter, who was engaged in shunting the train with the deceased, spoke to going to his assistance after the accident. Dr Shortridge gave evidence as to the internal injuries sustained, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the widow, for whom and her six children considerable sympathy was manifested. Dr Shortridge kindly gave the widow 10s.; the Coroner, 2s. 6d.; Mr Phillips the occupier of the Inn, handed her the 5s. paid to him for the room; and the witnesses 5s., their allowances.

TIVERTON – An Inquest was held last evening on the body of the male illegitimate child of MARY SANDERS, aged 16, who resided with her father in Castle-street, and of which she had given birth on Monday morning. On being spoken to as to her condition, the girl pointed out the body of the child wrapped in a newspaper underneath a chest of drawers in her bedroom.

Wednesday 14 October 1885, Issue 6151 – Gale Document No. Y3200740282
EXETER – Supposed Suicide of a Soldier. - About five o'clock on Monday morning an engine driver, named Charles Davis, when returning from St. David's Station through the Bonhay-road, noticed a soldier-s tunic, cap, belt, and gloves, with a stick, lying on the footpath between the Head and Blackaller Weirs. He at once gave information to the police, who took possession of the articles. Frank Shooter, the Bathing Superintendent, procured a grappler and commenced to drag the river, but was unsuccessful in his efforts to discover the body. The dragging was subsequently taken up by two men, named Perkins and Hannaford, and continued until dark. It was resumed again early yesterday morning, and about nine o'clock the body was found in the river not far from where the coat, &c., were found. It was then removed to the Higher Barracks, where the Inquest will be held this day (Wednesday). The clothes were identified as belonging to CHARLES SMALLPIECE, a private of the Devonshire Regiment, who resided with his wife and three children in Clarence-court, Well-lane. It appears that he left home about half-past four o'clock on Monday morning, presumably with the intention of going to the Barracks, and from that time he has not been seen. It is said that at times he was given to drinking, and that some eighteen months ago he tried to poison himself by taking oxatic acid while in the barracks. SMALLPIECE has seen eighteen years service, and had four good conduct stripes.

EXETER – Inquest. - The City Coroner (H.W. Hooper, Esq.) held an Inquest at the Topsham Inn on Monday last relative to the death of CHARLES DURSTON, aged seventy-eight years, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital from injuries received through being run over by a cab in South-street. CHARLOTTE LUCAS, daughter of deceased, gave evidence to the effect that her father – who lived with her in Sandford-street, left home on Tuesday last to visit a friend in St. Thomas, and in the evening he was brought home in a cab. Finding that he had met with an accident and that he could not walk witness had him removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased told her that he had been knocked down by a cab, and added, "Don't blame the cabman, I heard the cab coming, but before I had time to look round the cab was on me and knocked me down." The deceased was a very temperate man. John Beer, the driver of the cab, stated that about 10.15 p.m. on the day in question he was driving to the White Hart Hotel, when passing through South-street he saw the deceased crossing the roadway from George's-lane, but witness was unable to pull up before the horse knocked the deceased down. Witness could not tell whether the wheels of the cab went over him. Two gentlemen who were in the cab volunteered to get out, and witness then drove DURSTON to his home. Witness was driving at the rate of five or six miles an hour. When picked up deceased said there was no blame attaching to witness, that he heard the cab, but being a little deficient in hearing he mistook the way the vehicle was coming. In answer to a Juryman, witness said although he had no lights in his cab the streets were not dark. Mr Fredk. Pedler, acting house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that the deceased had no broken bones or bruises, and he was quite sensible when admitted to the Institution. On Wednesday morning he became unconscious, and was suffering from apoplexy. He remained unconscious until Friday night, when he expired. Apoplexy – the cause of death – was probably produced by a shock to the system when he was knocked down. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 28 October 1885, Issue 6153 – Gale Document No. Y3200740382
TORQUAY – A verdict of Accidental Death was returned on Monday at the Inquest held at the Crown and Sceptre Inn, St. Mary Church, before Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, on the body of CHARLES RICHARD ADAMS, jeweller, aged 37, who died in the Torbay Hospital, Torquay, on Friday, from injuries sustained by falling over a cliff on Babbacombe Down on Wednesday afternoon last. The evidence shewed that deceased visited the Down with the intention of witnessing a shooting match at the Wall's-hill range between Torquay and Dawlish rifle volunteers, he being acquainted with one of the Dawlish team. He lay down on the edge of the cliff overlooking the quarry, and whilst doing so he spoke to Richard Henry Bird, a carter, who was underneath. The latter advised deceased to go back, or he would fall over. In reply, deceased said Bird could not lift a certain stone, and he offered to come down and help him. Bird again warned deceased to go back, but he did not do so; and the ground being very slippery owing to the rain, deceased fell over. He pitched on his head on a ledge of rock some way down, and then rolled to the bottom, falling altogether a distance of about eighty feet. He was removed in an unconscious state to the engine-house of the quarry, having a severe cut over the eye. He was subsequently conveyed to the Torbay Hospital, where Dr Heath, the house-surgeon, found him suffering from concussion of the brain and injuries to the abdominal organs. The cause of death was peritonitis.

Wednesday 4 November 1885, Issue 6154 – Gale Document No. Y3200740425
BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday at the Rolle Arms Hotel, before Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of JOHN COOPER, a boatman, aged 69. Deceased was out in his boat on Saturday with a brother, when he suddenly let go the oar he had been pulling, fell back, and was dead in a few moments. Dr Evans testified that death resulted from heart disease. A verdict to that effect was returned by the Jury.

Wednesday 11 November 1885, Issue 6155 – Gale Document No. Y3200740457
EXETER – Inquests. - An Inquest was held at the Topsham Inn by the City Coroner (H.W. Hooper, Esq.) on Wednesday last, the 4th inst., touching the death of a porter named WILLIAM WYATT who met with an accident at the St. David's Station. SARAH WYATT, of Okehampton-street, stated that the deceased was her husband and was sixty-four years of age. On October 28th deceased went to his work as usual in the evening but on the following morning she was informed that he had met with an accident and had been taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. William Osborne, porter at the station stated that he was working with WYATT on the night of the date mentioned when deceased got jammed between the van and the cattle-pen. Witness helped him up and they both walked to the coke shed close by. Mr G. A. Bloomfield, house-surgeon at the above institution, said he admitted the deceased into the Hospital on the morning of the 29th ultimo. He examined him and found that his ribs were fractured. He died on the 2nd inst. from the injuries received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

The Coroner, during the same afternoon, held an Inquest at the Port Royal on view of the body of BETRAM H. BELCHER, an infant, who died suddenly on the 3rd inst. SUSANNA BELCHER, of Jubilee-street, mother of the deceased, said the child had been healthy but had not thrived much since its birth. She put the child to bed as usual on the date mentioned and the next morning she found it dead. Mr Brash, surgeon, was of opinion that the child died from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 25 November 1885, Issue 6157 – Gale Document No. Y3200740517
THE FATAL ACCIDENT IN ST. SIDWELL'S. - Inquest Today.
The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest this morning at the Forester's Arms, Commercial-road, touching the death of JOHN LITTLEJOHNS, who died on Saturday from the effects of injuries received in St. Sidwell's on the 11th of November. Mr Brown watched the proceedings on behalf of the deceased's family. The first witness called was:
JOHN LITTLEJOHN who said he resided in Gomer cottage, Belmont-road. The deceased was his father, and he had been in the employ of Mr Brock, of Fore-street, until about nine months before the accident. He received a telegram on November 11th to the effect that his father had met with a serious accident. He was in Bristol at the time. He came down the same night by the mail train, and found his father in bed. He was quite conscious and detailed the facts of the occurrence to him. He also added that there was not the least blame attributed to the driver of the van. In answer to the Coroner, he said that the deceased's sight was quite perfect.
William Trelease, cashier at Messrs. Garton and King's, said that he was walking down St. Sidwell's about 6.30 on the 11th inst., on the right hand side of the street, when he saw an illuminated board, preceded by a band, coming down the street. As the procession passed him he heard some persons shouting loudly, and then saw the deceased under the head of a horse which was attached to a parcel van. He appeared to be in the act of crossing the road at the time. the deceased was immediately knocked down by the horse, and the horse and van passed over his body. He also added that great praise was due to the police constable who stopped the animal.
P.C. Vicary gave evidence to the effect that he saw the deceased about 6.25 on the night in question, near the Coach and Horses. He asked him what procession it was coming down the street. Witness told him that he did not know. The deceased proceeded down the street, and when opposite St. Sidwell's Church he noticed a horse and van, in charge of a man named Mole, plunge forward, and then saw the deceased under the horse's head. He then came backwards for about nine yards and was knocked down, the van passing over his body. He immediately ran to the animals head and succeeded in stopping him. He should think that the horse was frightened by the illuminated advertisement. He had measured it, and found it to be nine feet long, five feet wide, and about six feet high. In answer to the Coroner, he said that he had no instructions to interfere with these processions.
Edward William Mole said that he was a carrier for Mr Sutton. On the night mentioned he was driving a horse and van up St. Sidwell's-street, when he saw an illuminated advertisement with a band in front coming towards him. He gave orders to his boy to jump out of the van, and he would tell him what to do. The band and advertisement was followed by a large number of people. The horse became rather uneasy when the band was passing, but on the appearance of the advertisement the horse made a sudden plunge forward, and he lost all control over the animal. At the same time he saw the deceased under the horse's head, and then saw him stagger and fall, the wheels of his van passing over him. He should think that the horse would not have plunged if it had not been that the deceased had got under its head. He also stated that the horse had passed the steam roller and bands before.
Dr Perkins said that he was called to see the deceased on the 11th inst., and found that he was suffering from a lacerated wound on the left side of his eyebrow, and had three ribs broken. He attended him until his death. He should say that the deceased died from the injuries received.
The Jury, in returning their verdict, said that they should desire the Coroner to bring the processioning in the public streets before the Town Council, and that in their opinion the verdict was "Accidental Death."
The funeral of the deceased will take place on this afternoon at three o'clock.

Wednesday 2 December 1885, Issue 6158 – Gale Document No. Y3200740550
HOLCOMBE BURNELL – Sudden Death of an Exeter Man. - The Deputy Coroner for the district (Mr H. W. Gould) on Saturday held an Inquest at the Lamb Inn, Long Down, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY SLADE, who had died there suddenly on Thursday morning. It appeared that deceased, who belonged to Exeter, had been employed picking apples for about a fortnight at Leydown Farm, Holcombe Burnell. On Wednesday night he slept in the same room with John Cosway. Next morning about four o'clock he awakened Cosway by his groaning, and in a few minutes died. Mr Vlieland, surgeon, said he had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found that death resulted from pneumonia, brought on by damp and exposure. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 9 December 1885, Issue 6159 – Gale Document No. Y320074058
TIVERTON – The Case of Death from Burning. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall on Friday evening, before Dr Mackenzie, the Tiverton Coroner, relative to the death of ALICE MAUD GALE, aged twelve months. The evidence adduced fully bore out the particulars we were able to p0ublish the other day. On Wednesday evening MRS GALE had occasion to go to a neighbouring bakehouse. She left her boy, aged two-and-a-half years, and the deceased infant together at home. The baby was seated in a low chair between the table and the fire. MRS GALE had not gone far when she heard screams. She ran back and found that the boy had dragged an arm-chair up to the table, mounted it, and upset the lamp on to the baby, who was all ablaze. The lamp was also in flames, the oil running out and saturating portions of the baby's nightdress and coverings. Mrs Chamberlain, a neighbour, was called in, and she treated the infant's burns with oil and lime water. The child was subsequently taken, by the advice of Dr Reddrop, to the Dispensary , where it received professional treatment, but it was severely burnt about the body and legs and was in a state of collapse. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 16 December 1885, Issue 6160 – Gale Document No. Y3200740637
TERRIBLE FIRE AT PLYMOUTH - Thirteen Lives Lost.
A fire occurred in Plymouth early on Sunday morning which proved more fatally disastrous than any conflagration in Devonshire for more than thirty years past. The house in which the fire broke out is situate in Looe-street, and was inhabited by 31 persons – men, women and children – 12 of whom were suffocated or burnt to death within a few minutes of the outbreak. The terrible suddenness with which the flames enveloped the building will be better understood when it is mentioned that the house is one of the oldest in Plymouth. A hundred years ago it was the town house of the Trelawneys', of Ham. Excepting the outer walls, it almost resembled a collection of fuel, the partition walls from floor to garret, being either lath and plaster or wainscoted wood. A house so constructed, and inhabited by twelve families, had as its only means of egress one narrow winding staircase, rendered more than ordinarily inflammable by the old carved wood with which it was richly ornamented. The fire was discovered about one o'clock yesterday morning, on the ground floor, a grocer's shop, in the occupation of a widow named Babbage, and it speedily spread to the room on the other side the front door, a butcher's shop, in the occupation of Mr Sprague (the owner of the house), the meat it contained being quickly and completely roasted, as also was a living dog imprisoned in the shop, which appeared to have been coiled up asleep on the floor. Immediately after the outbreak, several hose reels and engines attended; a fire escape was also promptly brought to within a short distance of the house, but owing to the extreme narrowness of the street, and the intensity of the flames, it was impossible to bring it into use. Immediately on the arrival of the fire brigades, efforts were made to arouse the inmates, but although probably less than a quarter of an hour had elapsed from the first indication of the fire, it had already done its worst, so far as lives were concerned, the whole of those who had not escaped at the first rush having perished. A dash was made by the firemen for the staircase, but those of the brave rescuers who tried to face the heat found themselves baulked, the fire having destroyed a portion of the stairs, leaving a gap they were unable to cross. A ladder was brought, and an entrance effected through the first floor window over the grocer's shop, there to find the body of MRS SPRAGUE lying partly under the bed, with a part of her nightdress burnt away, but the body little injured. Passing with difficulty to an adjoining room, they found the dead bodies of MRS KIRBY, a widow, and her brother, FRED. DOWNING, a mason's labourer, the woman undressed and the man partly dressed. Having found in another room the body of MRS NEWCOMBE, a sailor's wife, they succeeded in making their way to the second floor, in one room of which had resided a MRS BICKFORD and her four children. They found the body of one of the elder children fearfully burnt, his head having been almost completely burnt away. Less ghastly, but more widely fatal, had been the ravages of the fire in yet another room on this floor, where the whole of a family of nine, named FOSS, were dead, with the exception of the father, who had, on the first alarm, jumped from the window of his room, a distance of twenty-five feet, on to the flagstones beneath. When taken to the hospital it was found that both his legs were broken, and terrible injuries to his head and body had been sustained. He is, however, still living. Happily all the victims were suffocated before their bodies were burnt. The water supply was ample, and the force sufficient and thus the flames were brought under very quickly. Eighteen of the inmates had made good their escape by means of a ladder which was providentially in the yard at the back of the house, but those found themselves hemmed in, in dangerous proximity to the flames. A second short ladder was passed over from the next yard, and by means of this they managed, after sliding down the roof of a tenement, to get out of the danger, and were quickly housed by kind neighbours. One of the saddest of the many painful incidents is that of MRS KIRBY, who ran from room to room arousing the inmates, and thus saved the 19 persons who escaped, but lost her own life. She burst open the door of her brother's room, and went to the bed where his wife and children were asleep, when she was stupefied by the smoke and fell down by the bedside and died before she succeeded in arousing them. The occupier of the butcher's shop, who was saved, rushed out of the house with a child under each arm calling to his wife to follow, but she did not do so; and when he tried to return to fetch her the stairs had given away. The scene, she added, which ensued in the back court, while those who escaped from the house were all awaiting their turn to get out of the reach of danger, is described by one of the survivors as a very affecting one. While the elders of the company were almost frantic with the apprehension that the whole building might at any moment collapse and bury them in an instant, the children, with nothing but their night dresses on, were clinging to their parents shivering with the cold and shrieking with excitement. Consequently the removal was not affected so expeditiously as it otherwise might have been.
The effect of the fire upon the building and its contents, according to an account given in the "Western Morning News," was truly strange. Not a single room in the house escaped its ravages, and not a single pane of glass remained unbroken, yet the floors were not destroyed. The flames seem to have leaped up the staircase and through the doors and partitions – and to a lesser extent through the windows – into the various rooms. Blackened with smoke as everything was, and saturated with water as were most of the goods, it cannot be said that not an article remained uninjured, for curiously enough, a glass dome which covered some wax flowers remained intact in the middle of one of the rooms. But with thirty-one persons living in the house it may be readily supposed that the furniture and household requisites were more numerous and closely packed than would be the case in a house of its size under normal conditions. This was indeed so. With the furniture arranged in its most orderly form many of the rooms afforded scarce room to turn round, and with the disorder and confusion which result from the panic of a fire, it is rather a matter for wonder that so many managed to escape from their rooms (still less from the house) than that so few were saved. Of what the scene of confusion was really like during the terrible period the fire lasted perhaps not even the surviving actors in it themselves can form an adequate conception, and what the scene was like when all was over and the firemen had ceased after four hours' playing upon the flames, is more easily realised by a spectator than described in cold print. Bedsteads and bedding, sewing machines and chests of drawers, kitchen tables, and drawing-room ornaments, scullery utensils, and bedroom requisites were in some cases to be found in the same room; pictures fallen from their hooks, and carpets covered an inch or more deep with water, with beds and mattresses rent open, wearing apparel strewing the floors, the partition walls of nearly every room charred and broken, and the staircase with "treads" and "risers" broken and burned, "strings" ready to collapse, and a piece of the ornamental carved work here and there peeping out where almost all else was wreck, is but a poor attempt to describe the general disorder. A more detailed view led to the revelation that panic was not everywhere equally general. Whilst some must have riveted their thoughts on the one problem how to save their lives, without thought to a single garment, others must have possessed the coolness, self-possession, avarice, disregard of life (call it what one will) to well overhaul their wardrobes, and to secure what was of most value. In one room was to be seen at the foot of the bed a woman's wearing apparel, with the corset and skirt well scorched, but lying evidently just as it was cast off the night before. The extinguished candle was on a chair by the bedside. In more than one case the mattresses bore traces of having been ripped open, the quality of the bedsteads and clothing forbidding the conclusion that the said mattresses had previously been in the condition in which they were found, whilst the immediate surroundings were not such as to warrant the supposition that the fire had burned them in so curious a manner. In another room a timepiece, the glass over which was blackened by smoke, was still ticking on as though it had not just measured the last earthly moments of twelve souls, and apparently uninjured by the heat which had cracked its shade in all directions. To describe each room in detail would be difficult, even if it were desirable. Every room was like every other room in that all were wrecks. Yet there were special features about some which are worthy of mention. Upon the table in one apartment was a sheep's head, evidently intended for the pot for Sunday's dinner, but destined to be roasted by a fire never lit for cooking. The public excitement is intense, and at a meeting held in one of the principal hotels last evening, a committee to obtain subscriptions was formed, and a large sum collected.
THE INQUEST.
The terrible disaster on Sunday morning continued the great topic of conversation in Plymouth on Monday, but little was disclosed that was not revealed on Sunday. The authorities were busily occupied in relieving distress, and more than enough was received in money and clothing to meet the necessities which the fire has created.
The Coroner's Inquest was held by Mr Brian on Monday in the Plymouth Guildhall, and the proceedings excited a good deal of interest. The Mayor (Mr W. H. Alger) occupied a seat by the side of the Coroner. The Jury, consisted of twenty-three principally George-street and Bedford-street tradesmen.
The Coroner explained that he considered the Inquiry could be concluded at a sitting, because owing to the terrible suddenness and completeness of the fire there was no reason for thinking they could every get any more evidence; and there was no suspicion, so far as he could gather, of neglect or incendiarism. The Jury concurring with this view the evidence was proceeded with, and in the end they without any hesitation, came unanimously to the conclusion that the fire was accidental, and that under the circumstances everything that could be done by the police and firemen was done. They also added their tribute of admiration for the heroism of MRS KIRBY, who lost her own life in the endeavour to save the lives of the inhabitants of the house.

Wednesday 23 December 1885, Issue 6161 – Gale Document No. Y3200740654
TOPSHAM – Sudden Death. - Mr H. W. Gould held an Inquest at the Salutation Inn, Topsham, on Saturday evening, touching the death of THOMAS WEEKS, a retired captain in the merchant service. Deceased, who had attained the age of eighty-one years, was found dead in his bed on Friday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," was returned.

Wednesday 30 December 1885, Issue 6162 – Gale Document No. Y3200740715
BARNSTAPLE – Death from Over Eating. - On Saturday, at Barnstaple, an Inquest was held on the body of MRS REW, a married woman, who expired suddenly on Christmas night. It was shewn that the deceased partook very heartily in the day of goose, plum pudding and nuts, and the doctor stated that death was due to the effects of over-eating.

SAD CASE OF BURNING AT DEVONPORT - A terribly distressing accident attended with a fatal result, happened on Wednesday night to two step-daughters of MR EDWARD ST. AUBYN, steward of the manor of Devonport, and brother of Sir John St. Aubyn, M.P., for the St. Ives Division of Cornwall. The young ladies, named FITZROY, were respectively aged 20 and 18 years. Both were about to attend a ball at Plymouth, and were dressed in light dresses. The elder sister inadvertently set fire to her dress with a candle, and, hearing her screams, the younger sister rushed to her assistance, when her dress also soon became enveloped in flames. Both young ladies were much burned before the assistance of their step-father and others arrived. The younger sister died early on Christmas morning, after suffering great agony, and the elder sister is still lying in a precarious state.
An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday evening, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed deep sympathy with the relatives.

Wednesday 30 December 1885, Issue 6162 – Gale Document No. Y3200740714
DETERMINED SUICIDE AT BARNSTAPLE – On Wednesday morning it was discovered that a highly respectable young man, named MICHAEL HEWISH, manager at Mrs Williams, ironmonger, Barnstaple, had committed suicide by hanging himself. He was to have been married on Saturday next to a Miss Ryder, a lady living in the town. Tuesday night he was in her company, and with some friends, was making preparations for the wedding. He left his friends just before twelve, apparently in the best of spirits, and must have gone directly home and hung himself. His body was found hanging to a hook in the scullery, and was quite cold when found in the morning. Three years ago he was treated for an illness in which traces of insanity were discovered. An Inquest will be held this evening.

Last updated: 25 Feb 2015 - Brian Randell


Note: The information provided by GENUKI must not be used for commercial purposes, and all specific restrictions concerning usage, copyright notices, etc., that are to be found on individual information pages within GENUKI must be strictly adhered to. Violation of these rules could gravely harm the cooperation that GENUKI is obtaining from many information providers, and hence threaten its whole future.