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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1889-1893

Articles taken from Trewman's Exeter Flying Post

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

Note: On the 14 March 1889 an announcement appeared from the Exeter Total Abstinence Society: - "A resolution thanking the Coroner of Exeter (Mr H. W. Hooper) for discontinuing the holding of Inquests in Public-houses in the city, has been passed by the Exeter Total Abstinence Society."

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs.]

Names Included:
Adams; Addams; Allen; Armstrong; Arscott(2); Ash(2); Ashford; Astleford; Atkins; Austin; Ayres; Baines; Baker(5); Balkham; Ball; Bamsey; Barnett; Barratt; Bartlett(2); Basten; Bastin(2); Bawdon; Bayly; Beck; Beer; Bendiere; Bennett(2); Bent; Berry(3); Bess; Best; Bickel; Bidgood(2); Biggs; Birkmyer; Bishop; Blackmoore; Blackmore(2); Blight(2); Bond(2); Bowden(2); Bowditch; Bradbeer; Braund; Bray; Brice; Bright; Brooke; Broom; Brown(3); Browse; Buckland; Bullen; Bulow; Buroughs; Butler; Caines; Callaway(2); Cambridge; Canham; Cann; Cannicott; Carmagh; Carter(4); Casling; Causeley; Chalmers; Channon(2); Chanter(2); Cheriton; Chick; Chipling; Clampitt; Clare; Clark; Clarke(2); Claxton; Clemo; Coaker; Cole; Coles; Collicott; Collings(2); Combstock; Coombe; Coombes; Cornall; Cotterell; Coulson; Cousins(2); Cox(2); Crang; Craze; Cresswell; Crocker(2); Crossman; Crouse; Cullum; Curry; Dacie; Dart(3); Davey(2); Davis; Day; Dean(2); Delay; Dendle(2); Denham; Denner; Denselow; Desborough; Dew; Dixon; Dodd(2); Doidge; Downey; Downing; Dummell; Dunn; Dymond; Eagles; Eales; Ebdon; Eddles; Edmonds; Edwards(3); Ellershaw; Ellery; Ellis; Elmslie; Elston(2); Emmett; Endacott; Evans(3); Facey; Flay; Fleet; Floyd; Foley; Follett; Ford(3); Forrester; Francis; French(2); Frost(2); Fry(2); Fuke; Fuller; Gahn; Gant; Gard; Gardiner; Gent; Gibbs; Gidley; Gigg; Gilbert; Giles; Gill; Gillard(2); Gillord; Gollop; Goodenough; Gortley; Gosling(2); Gould; Goulding; Grant(2); Gray(2); Green; Greengrass; Greenslade(2); Gregor; Gregory; Gubb; Haines; Hall(3); Hallett(2); Hamlin; Hammett; Handford; Handley; Hannaford; Hardingham; Harris(2); Harrison; Hart; Harvey; Harwood; Hawke; Hawker; Hawkings(2); Hawkins; Hayman; Hayward; Hebbes; Hedgeland; Hellier; Helmore; Henderson; Hendy; Hewett; Hewitt; Hexter; Hicks; Hill(5); Hillman; Hitt; Hockady; Hodge(2); Hogg; Holland(4); Holman; Hook; Hookway(2); Hooper(3); Hopkins; Hoppins; Hore; Horn; Horner; How; Howard; Howe; Howells; Hurford; Hurnd; Hutchings(2); Huxtable; James; Jarvis; Jetter; Johns; Johnson; Jones(2); Josland; Keen; Kellaway; Kellow; Kelly; Kennedy; Kerswill; Key; Kidd; Kift; Kingdom; Kingdon; Knapman; Knight; Lake(3); Lamb; Lamble; Lamsley; Land; Lang; Langworthy; Lavers; Leach; Leaman; Leat; Lee(2); Lendon; Lethbridge(2); Lewarn; Leworthy; Ley; Litten; Liverton; Loman; Lousada; Lovett; Lowe; Lower; Luff; Lunn; Lyne; Maers; Mallett; Mann; Manning; Marshall(3); Martin(4); Matthews; Maunder(2); Maynard; McDonald; Merry; Metherell; Miller; Mill; Mills; Milne; Milsom; Milton; Mitchell; Molland; Moore; Morgan; Morrish; Mortimore; Mott; Mudge; Muirhead; Muxworthy; Narramore; Neal; Nightingale; Noakes; Noon; Nottle; O'Leary; Osborne; Osmond; Oxenham; Paddon(2); Palk(2); Palmer; Parker; Parkhouse; Parkinson; Parr; Parsons(2); Partridge(2); Passmore; Patten; Patey; Paul; Payne(3); Pearce(3); Pearse; Pearson; Peckham; Penchard; Pepperell(2); Perkins; Perry; Peterson; Petherbridge; Phillips; Pike(2); Pill(2); Pim; Pinn; Piper; Plummer; Pook; Poole; Pope; Powell(2); Pratt; Price; Priest; Puddicombe; Pugsley; Purnell; Pye; Pym; Rabbage; Radmore; Rainey; Ray; Reade; Redway; Redwood; Reed; Rew; Reynolds(2); Rice(3); Richards(4); Robins; Rockett; Rogers(3); Rook; Roper; Rowden; Rowe(2); Salter(2); Samson; Sanders(4); Scantlebury; Sclater; Scoble(2); Scott(2); Seagrave; Searle(2); Seldon(2); Selwood; Sercombe(2); Sergeant; Setter; Seward; Short(5); Simmons; Skinner(2); Skoines; Sloman; Smale; Smith(5); Smyth; Snell; Snook; Spettitude; Spiller; Splatt; Spring; Spurway; Squires(2); Stamp; Stanley; Steer; Stentiford; Stephens; Stevens(2); Stockman; Stone(3); Stoneman; Stratton; Stueat; Sweet(2); Symons; Syms; Tait; Tapp; Taye; Taylor(2); Teed; Thomas(2); Thompson; Thorn; Tidball; Tolley; Tomkins; Tope; Tothill; Tottenham; Tout; Towning; Train; Tremlett; Trent; Trottman; Tuck; Tucker(3); Tunstall; Tupman; Turl; Turner(2); Underhay(2); Underhill; Vallance; Vanstone; Veals; Venn; Vian; Vickery; Wakefield; Wakeham; Walling; Walters(2); Ward; Warne; Warner; Warren; Watkins; Weary; Weatherdon; Webber(4); Webster; Weller; Westcott; Western; Wharran; White(3); Whiteway; Whitfield; Whitford; Widdicombe; Wilkins; Williams(8); Willmett; Wills(2); Winsor; Witton; Wolland; Woodley; Woodsell; Woodward; Worth; Wotton; Wreford; Wright; Wroth; Wyatt(2); Yeo; Youldon

Tuesday 1 January 1889, Issue 6751 – Gale Document No. Y3200740733
SAD ACCIDENT AT CREDITON - Last evening Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the White Hart Hotel, Crediton, on the body of MARY BLIGHT, aged 84, who died on Thursday last. From the evidence given by Mrs Forward, it appeared that the deceased resided by herself, and on Christmas-eve fell into the fire, and was burnt. Witness applied some oils. Mrs Pollard and Mrs Avery were present. The burns were in her right arm and face. She was conscious and spoke to witness, who offered to telegraph for her daughter, but deceased said "Don't do it." She was put to bed, and never spoke afterwards, but died on Thursday morning.
Mrs Tucker stated that she lived next door to the deceased. About 2 p.m. on Monday she heard deceased cry out. Witness went at once and found her on the floor in front of the fire. She lifted her on to a chair and went for some neighbours. She asked what was amiss and was told that "something had taken her across her back, and she was unable to rise." This was two hours before the deceased was burnt. Mrs Forward and Mrs Wilkie came and remained a little while. Saw Mrs Forward leave, but did not see Mrs Wilkie do so. About four o'clock she heard a scream and rushed in and found the deceased enveloped in flames. Immediately on seeing this witness called Mrs Avery and Mrs Pollard, who assisted in extinguishing the flames. Deceased, who spoke, did not say how the accident happened. Mrs Pollard stated that when she was called, she took a rug and wrapped it round the deceased and extinguished the flames. Mrs Forward, recalled, said she omitted to state that she went to deceased's house at two o'clock, and left her with Mrs Wilkie, who corroborated the evidence given by the previous witness.
Mr W. Scott Campbell, surgeon, practising at Crediton, who was called to attend the deceased, stated that he found her sitting in a chair with her right arm and face very much burnt. He believed deceased had an obstruction from a blood clot which caused her to fall. Paralysis set in the day after the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Friday 4 January 1889, Issue 6753 – Gale Document No. Y3200740806
EXETER – The Feeding of Children. - This afternoon the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest, at the Police Court, on the body of a child named ALICE PEARSE, residing at Wesleyan Court, St. Sidwell's. Evidence was given by the mother to the effect that when she awoke on Thursday morning last she found the deceased dead at her side. She had been accustomed to feed the child with tea and biscuits three times a day but not under medical advice. Dr Bell deposed to finding the child dead, but no marks of violence were on the body. Death was due to convulsions, which, considering the child was sick, might have been caused by undigested food. In summing up, the Coroner commented on the danger of feeding children with biscuit eyes. A Juryman, however, remarked that a medical gentleman had recently given his opinion as otherwise. The Coroner said so he understood during his absence, but he was very much surprised to see that he should have given such an opinion, as it was in no way shared by the general medical profession. If a small quantity was given, if the child was exceedingly weak, and then given under medical advice, he did not mean to say it may not be beneficial, but to say that they could give it as a general food to children of very tender age, such as those who came before them. He thought it was too broad, misleading and dangerous, and if he could bring home anything to the parties he should certainly make an example of them. Dr Bell's opinion was asked on the subject, and he said that if a child was nursed from the breast it required no other food whatever until it was eight months old. If they gave a child biscuits or food of a starchy nature it did not digest. If the child was not able to be nursed from the breast the next best thing was cows' milk and water.

Saturday 5 January 1889, Issue 6754 – Gale Document No. Y3200740854
FATAL ACCIDENT AT ST. DAVID'S STATION. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Monday touching the death of ROBERT WILKINS. Mr Hawkins was chosen foreman of the Jury, and the body having been viewed, the following evidence was taken. THOMAS WILKINS, brother of the deceased, who was 33 years of age, identified the body. He was a labourer, employed on the Great Western Railway. On the 13th December, the day he sustained an injury, witness saw his brother. He had been to the hospital and came out again. Deceased said he was at work putting down the brake of a waggon at St. David's Station when his foot slipped on the rails. He fell and sustained an injury to his left arm. As witness was speaking to him, his arm burst out bleeding, and he advised him to go back to the Hospital, which he believed he did. William Warren, porter in the goods transfer depot, at St. David's, said on Thursday, the 13th December, witness was working with a man named Pollard, transferring some goods. They required another empty truck, which was being shunted back to a steam crane. WILKINS was standing in one of the sidings near the truck, which was on the narrow gauge. Deceased went to pull down the brake of the truck, placing his left hand on the corner and using the brake with his right. He took two or three steps backwards from the truck and slipping his foot fell. Witness at once went to his assistance. Deceased got up without aid and was taken to the mileage office by Pollard and another man named Shepheard. He was subsequently taken to the hospital in a cab. The truck was shunted in the ordinary way, and was going at a steady pace. By the Jury: The occurrence took place about 12.30. The rails were slippery, rain having fallen. Tom Pollard, a contract porter, engaged at St. David's Station, gave corroborative evidence. He called out to WILKINS to put down the brake. He described the manner in which deceased fell, and said his head was struck by the grease-box. In cross-examination, witness said he believed deceased was a teetotaller. Mr Russell Coombes, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said deceased was received into the Hospital on the 13th December. Witness saw him some time during that day. He had a wound on the inner side of his left arm. It was quite possible there may have been a slight wound on the head, but witness did not see it. The injury on the arm was a contused wound on the inner side of the elbow. He went on very well until the 25th December when other symptoms set in, and he died on the 28th. By the Jury: We did not see him when he was first admitted. He was first made an out-patient, but on his return he admitted having had something to drink. He was made an in-patient. It was mentioned by one of the Jury that it was given in evidence that deceased was a teetotaller and the witness said deceased admitted to him that he had had something to drink. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Both the Coroner and the Jury complained f the awful draught they experienced in the room in which the Inquest was held, and the House Surgeon promised to have it remedied. Superintendent Hannaford and Inspector Rodgers watched the case on behalf of the G.W.R.

Saturday 5 January 1889, Issue 6754 – Gale Document No. Y3200740831
MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF A NORTH DEVON FARMER - An Inquest was held at the Dolphin Inn, Thorverton, yesterday, by Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM HOWE, late of East Liscombe Farm, East Anstey, who has been missing since November 29th, and whose body was found in the Exe on Wednesday near Thorverton. MARY ANN HOWE, of East Liscombe, East Anstey, identified the body as that of her son. He was a single man, aged 27, and used to reside at home with her. She last saw him alive on the morning of Thursday, November 29th. The day previously deceased told her he thought he should go to a sale on the Thursday at Hawkwell, in Dulverton parish, and about a mile from East Liscombe. He went after dinner, but witness did not see him after the morning. The Deputy Coroner: Had he any trouble on his mind? Not that I know of, and assuming that he had he would not take it very much to heart.
Mr John Burrows, stationmaster at Dulverton, said he saw deceased at the Carnarvon Arms Hotel, close by the station, on November 29th, between 7.30 and 8 p.m. He was seated in the bar, smoking, but witness did not see him drink anything. He asked when the train went to East Anstey, and witness replied that it went at 7.59. Subsequently witness saw deceased come out of the hotel, but did not notice which way he went.
By the Jury: Deceased had undoubtedly been drinking but talked rationally. By the Coroner: Could not say whether deceased came from East Anstey by the 7 p.m. train. Mr W. Westcott, an uncle of deceased, said he last saw his nephew alive on November 29th at Hawkwell Farm. There was a sale there. Frederick Pike, a railway packer, living at Thorverton, deposed to finding the body of deceased on Wednesday morning, about 11.15., underneath the railway bridge. P.C. Dymond said that no evidence could be obtained as to how the deceased got into the river. Mr King-Lewis, of Thorverton, surgeon, deposed to examining the body, which presented the appearance of having been a month or more in the water, but at such a distance of time he could not say positively whether death was actually caused by drowning. The Deputy Coroner, having summed up, suggested a verdict of "Found Dead," and the Jury, after a momentary consultation, returned their verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 7 January 1889, Issue 6755 – Gale Document No. Y3200740870
THE SOUTH TAWTON MURDER. Latest Particulars of the Crime. - As briefly reported in our Saturday night's issue a horrible wife murder and attempted suicide was perpetrated at a farm called Tar Mill, on the extreme side of the parish of South Tawton and adjoining North Tawton on that day. It appears that ARSCOTT, who is 65 years of age, has been for some time jealous of his wife, who is eleven years younger than himself. ARSCOTT has threatened to do for her several times during the past week, and on Thursday she noticed that his razor was not in its usual place and consequently she was much frightened. She told some of her children of it and on Thursday and Friday night fearing what might occur she took her young children with her, and slept at her daughter's house about a mile distance. On Saturday morning she returned with her daughter and children to Tar Mill. On her arrival she did not notice her husband, and she and her daughter entered the house and went upstairs. She then saw that the razor was on the table. After being down some little time ARSCOTT entered the house and went upstairs but did not stay long. On coming down he met his wife and daughter in the passage. He at once seized the unfortunate woman, and attempted to murder her. They both fell, and the daughter laid hold of her father and prevented him doing the intended deed but only for a few moments. The daughter, in her endeavour to rescue her mother, had her fingers cut. Whilst she was grasping him the poor woman managed to get away. She succeeded in getting as far as a dung-heap across the yard, and whether the murderer caught her or whether she fell it is not known, but the daughter saw him rush after her and do the dreadful deed. She at once ran away, taking the children with her. She went to a house about 300 yards distant, called Pickets Ford, and saw a man named Anstey, who at once despatched a man to North Tawton for the police and a doctor. The Police-Sergeant, W. Kimble, hastened to the farm; on his arrival he saw the murdered woman lying by the dung-heap on her left side. Life was extinct, and the body was quite cold, the head being nearly severed from the body. Nothing of the murderer was seen in the yard, and on the sergeant entering the house he went into the kitchen first; not seeing anyone there, he proceeded to what was originally a parlour, but now used as a lumber room. There he found ARSCOTT lying in a pool of blood. He at once raised him, and ARSCOTT tried to tear his throat, saying it was not bleeding fast enough. The sergeant saw it was a deep cut, and put him in such a position as to keep the head resting on the throat. Dr F. S. Hawkins arrived shortly afterwards, and complemented the Sergeant for the way he was treating the man. Mattresses were got and laid before the kitchen fire, and ARSCOTT placed in such position so as to enable the doctor to examine the wounds. Mr Hawkins spared no pains to save the man's life, and stayed with him up to 12 p.m., and saw him again several times on Sunday. It is now considered that he will survive. It appears that ARSCOTT has for a number of years been of a jealous disposition, but not so bad as during the past week. On New Year's Day, as was the usual custom, the majority of the family met at the house. Things appeared pretty well between the pair, although he said something to a married son named ROBERT about his mother. This son who lives at North Tawton, on going to his work on Saturday morning, called at the farm and saw his father. They had some conversation, and on leaving ARSCOTT said "This will end bad." The son knowing that his mother was not home, and thinking things would not come to such a terrible end, proceeded to his work. ARSCOTT was employed at the farm as hind or bailiff for the owner, Mr W. Hern, of Jacobstowe. ARSCOTT, who has lived there for a great number of years, having the entire management of it. The pair have been married about 34 years and have a long family living, viz., three sons and eight daughters, most of whom are married. The poor victim was always looked upon as a most industrious person, and always clean in her appearance. She was well known at North Tawton, which place she used to visit frequently, having a married son living there, also a daughter in service. She also made it her market place for the sale of poultry which she reared. Tar Mill is an isolated house close by the river Taw, and is an old-fashioned place. The house faces the south, and the dung-heap on which the crime was committed is exactly opposite, some fifteen or twenty paces, where pools of blood are to be seen. The sight in the house is a horrible one; in the inner room is laid the corpse of the woman on a table, and on the floor are three pools of blood, which came from the murderer. The room is watched by the police, and no one is allowed to enter it.
THE INQUEST
EVIDENCE OF THE MURDERER'S DAUGHTER – A Shocking Story. - The Inquest on the body of the murdered woman, MARIA ARSCOTT, was opened in the Gostwyck Arms, North Tawton, by Mr G. L. Fulford (Deputy Coroner for the district). Superintendent Roberts watched the Enquiry on behalf of the police. Mr Thomas, stonemason, was chosen foreman of the Jury, who, having been sworn, the Coroner, in opening the Enquiry, said: Gentlemen, we are assembled here on a very serious and important Enquiry, and I trust you will give it your very careful and earnest attention. The Inquiry is as to the cause of death of MARIA ARSCOTT, the wife of THOMAS ARSCOTT, and your duty will be twofold. First of all you will have to enquire as to the cause of the death of the woman, and secondly by whom the act was committed that caused her death. There will be several witnesses called before you, whose evidence will be very clear on the matter, especially that of the daughter, ELIZABETH POWLESLAND, who accompanied her mother to Tar Mill Farm on Saturday morning, and witnessed the act. As to the motive for the act, it will not be within your province to consider; that will be considered by another tribunal hereafter. I will now ask you to proceed with me to Tar Mill, and there view the body, accompanied by one ARSCOTT, the son of the deceased, who will identify the body as that of his mother, MARIA ARSCOTT. We will the return, and evidence will be taken. The Jury then left the hotel in a brake, and drove to Tar Mill Farm, where the body was viewed. On their return the following evidence was taken:-
ROBERT ARSCOTT, who was visibly affected, said he identified the body just viewed as that of MARIA ARSCOTT, who was 54 years of age. She was the wife of THOMAS ARSCOTT, living at Tar Mill. My father is a farm labourer.
ELIZABETH POWLESLAND, wife of James Powlesland, labourer, of Yendacott Farm, South Tawton, and daughter of the deceased, said: On Friday last my mother came to my house at Yendacott with her three children about mid-day. She said she had come to ask me to let her sleep there that night. Is said, yes she could. I asked her what was the matter at home. She said that 'LIZA, my eldest sister, and ROBERT, my brother, were in the house to take away the things, and she could not stop to see them taken away. My mother stayed with us that night. In the afternoon we were talking together, but I cannot say anything we said in particular. On Saturday morning she said she must go home, as she had a few things she wanted to do. She asked me to go home with her as she did not care to go by herself. We got to Tor Mill at half-past eight, having walked down. I saw my father there when we came into the court. He was going out of the yard with the horse and cart, away from us, having his back turned towards us. I did not see him look round. We went into the house and sat down by the side of the fire and had some tea together. After that I said, "I shall go home." She said I was to stay until I had seen father, and speak to him and then I should hear what sort of a temper he was in. I did as she asked me and stayed. My mother did a little sewing, and then went up to what we called the parlour to see if the razor was in its place. She was not long in the parlour, and brought out the razor and showed it to me, and said it was wrapped up in its place where it was always kept. She carried the razor back to the parlour again to put it in its place. She came back into the room and said she had put it away until father had had his shave on the Sunday. We had been in the house an hour before father came in. When he came I was stood at the fire, and my mother was at the table. Father did not say anything until I said, "Well, father; how are you this morning?" He said he was all right. He went to the fire and warmed his hands. He remained there two or three minutes. I noticed nothing unusual in his manner when he came in. He then went into the parlour. I thought he was going in to get a bit of tobacco, as I have seen him many times before. He was not long in the parlour, and came out again into the kitchen. He had the razor in his hand open. Mother was still standing at the bottom of the table close by the door, so that she would be the first person he would meet coming in.
What did your father do? - He went forward to my mother and put his hand round her neck.
Did he say anything? - He said, "Your time is come," speaking to my mother.
Where were you? - I was by the fire.
What did you do? - I rose and went forward to where they were.
Did you say anything? – I said, "Oh father what are you going to do.
Did he make any reply? – No, and I caught hold of his arm he had round mother's neck.
I suppose you tried to pull his arm away? – Yes.
Did you notice if he had anything in his other hand? – Yes, the razor.
Did you succeed in pulling his arm away? – Yes.
Could your mother get free? – Yes, she did.
Where did she go? – She went out into the passage.
Did your father do anything to you? – Yes, he pushed me away and said I was to let him alone.
Did he swear in pushing your off? – Yes.
Where did he go then? – After mother into the passage.
What position was your mother in? – She was lying on the ground in the passage.
Where was your father? – I think he was right on her then.
Was he trying to keep her down? – I think he was with one hand.
Had he still the razor in his hand? – Yes.
Did your mother speak? – Yes, she said, "Oh, Lizzie, hold him back."
What did you do? – I caught hold of the hand in which he had the razor.
[By Telegraph.]
I tried to pull him off, and succeeded in doing so. Mother, on becoming free ran into the yard but kept falling. Father pushed me off, and followed mother. I went after him, and saw mother fall on the dung-heap. Father got up to her, and, I believe, knelt down by her side, with one arm around her neck. I tried to pull him away, but could not, and I saw him cut her throat with the razor. I saw the blood trickling down over father's hand. I then ran away to Anstey's. When I came back mother was on her face and hands, as if she had rolled over.
By the Jury: Heard mother say she was in bodily fear of father.
Earnest Call proved going to the house about ten o'clock and seeing the body on the dung heap. He afterwards went into the house with a policeman, and saw ARSCOTT lying in the parlour on his face.
Sergeant Kemble corroborated the last witness as to finding the body. The murderer's razor is covered with blood. ARSCOTT was tearing at the wound in his throat. Witness asked him what was the matter and he replied that he could not make it bleed fast enough.
Dr Hawkins proved attending to ARSCOTT'S wounds, and examining the body of the woman, who had an incised wound in the neck six or seven inches in length, extending from a point beneath the left ear obliquely downwards, and about two inches from the middle line of the neck, dividing on the left side all the deep vessels, and on the middle line the windpipe and gullet, and exposing the vertebrae. There was also an incised wound two inches long on the right side of the chin, and two small cuts on the thumb. The razor produced could cause the wounds.
ROBERT ARSCOTT, re-called, said he had heard quarrels between his father and mother, but not before last week. On the morning of the murder his father said to witness, "It will come to a bad end, but it's all her fault." The quarrels were caused by jealousy. His father was low spirited, but not passionate that morning.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder."

SAD SUICIDE AT JACOBSTOWE
Mr G. L. Fulford, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday at Lower Cadham farm, Jacobstowe, on the body of GEORGE CROCKER, who was found in the river on Friday morning. From the evidence of the wife, it appeared deceased left the house at 7.30 on Friday morning. He was very depressed, and although she called to him he would not come back. He had been ill, and for over six months had had a wound on his face. James King, a farmer, said that on Friday morning, at 9.30, he was walking by the side of the river, when he saw the deceased lying on his face, near the centre of the stream. His slippers were on the bank. He had a bruise by the side of the nose, and could not have fallen in accidentally. He as from ten to twelve feet from the bank. Mr H. H. Parsloe, surgeon, in practice at Hatherleigh, said he had attended the deceased. He saw him about six week ago, and found him suffering from melancholia, and ordered his removal to the Hospital. The deceased said he was perfectly miserable, and he (Mr Parsloe) could hardly get him to speak to him. He had examined the body, and was satisfied that he died from drowning. The nature and situation of the disease Mr Crocker was suffering from would be likely to cause great depression. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind."

Wednesday 9 January 1889, Issue 6757 – Gale Document No. Y3200740921
SUDDEN DEATH OF A CHILD IN EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Exeter Police-court on Tuesday, on the body of LILY COX, aged 11 months, who died this morning. MARY HOLE, a married woman, residing at 35 Coombe-street, identified the body as that of her daughter. She was previously married, and this was a child by her first husband. The deceased was born healthy. She had fed it on boiled bread and milk. No medical man had ever attended it. On Sunday morning last the child was taken unwell, and witness thought it had the measles. She gave it a linseed meal poultice in the evening. On Monday morning the child seemed worse and witness gave it some saffron and warm milk. She continued to give her this at intervals, until 6.15 the next morning, when witness heard something in her throat, and sent for a neighbour and the doctor. Witness had one child now living, aged two years and a half. Mr Henry Baston Hannison, surgeon, practising in Exeter, said he was called to see the deceased this morning about 6.15. He was then at Countess Weir, but upon his return at a quarter to seven, he at once went, and found the deceased dead in bed. She was still warm. He examined the body, and found no marks of violence. The left hand was clenched. He could not say if the deceased had had the measles, as the marks usually disappeared after death. He considered the child died in a convulsion. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 10 January 1889, Issue 6758 – Gale Document No. Y3200740931
MYSTERIOUS DEATH AT CULLOMPTON - Mr Coroner Burrow held an Inquest at the Railway Hotel, Cullompton, last evening, touching the death of JOHN PERKINS, who was found dead in a linhay near the Hotel, on Tuesday. The first witness called was Charles Hawkins, dairyman, who deposed to hearing the report of a gun while he was working in a field in the vicinity. About 4.45 witness went to milk his cows, and in his linhay he found a body, which he did not recognise at the time, it being dark. It was in an apparently sitting posture on the rail of the cow crib, but leaning back, while the feet appeared to be touching some hay on the ground. Both hands were thrown back at the sides. Between the legs there rested a gun, stock down-wards and the lock towards the deceased. In cross-examination witness said it was possible that deceased was waiting in the linhay to shoot small birds. He had never heard deceased make use of any desponding expressions. Mr Matthews, the landlord of the hotel, said he knew deceased well, and never heard him say anything to excite suspicion of his intentions. About 10.30 a.m. on Tuesday, deceased called and borrowed witness's gun, as he had often done previously for the purpose of amusing himself by shooting small birds in the vicinity. About ten minutes later he returned, remarked that he felt cold, had three pennyworth of brandy, and then borrowed six cartridges. At 5.30 Hawkins called and said deceased was in the linhay, and that he feared there had been an accident. They then went together and informed Supt. Collins. Cross-examined: Witness admitted that the gun had been in use for twelve years, and might not be quite safe. The right-hand barrel, which was the one which killed deceased, used to go off very easily, the sudden jarring of the stock on the ground might send it off, but about two years ago witness had had the lock altered in consequence. Mr Collins, Superintendent of Police, John Walter Stone, porter at the Railway Station, and John Henry Stone, employed at the Cullompton Gas Works, also gave evidence, and agreed that they should not think deceased a man likely to commit suicide. Mr Peter Plumpton, brother of deceased's widow, gave evidence as to seeing deceased the morning of the occurrence and saw nothing unusual in his manner. Sergeant Baker proved searching deceased. In the left hand coat pocket he found five loaded cartridges, and in the right hand pocket an empty one. In other pockets there were three papers of no importance, some coins, a key, three carpenter's pencils, &c., all of which he now produced. Dr Lloyd, Cullompton, said he had attended deceased for six years, but had never suspected his intentions. He went, by request of Superintendent Collins, and saw the body in the linhay in the position described. There was a very large ragged wound in the neck passing under it from right to left, which witness at once concluded was caused by the discharge of a gun. There was a slight blackening at the back of the left hand. Witness, on re-examining the body that afternoon, found that the skull was completely smashed in from the same cause. By Mr A. Burrow: Deceased was an excitable man, but witness had never noticed any trace of insanity in him. The room was cleared, and after about twenty minutes' consultation, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased was found dead through the discharge of a gun, but that there was no evidence to show how the discharge was occasioned.

Wednesday 11 January 1889, Issue 6759 – Gale Document No. Y3200740963
A CHARGE AGAINST THE AUTHORITIES OF THE HOSPITAL - The Officials Exonerated.
Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this afternoon on the body of WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND, aged 23, who died at that institution on January 9th. THOMAS HOLLAND, labourer, of Harpford, identified the body as that of his son. He was a married man, and resided at Crediton. The deceased was admitted into the Hospital three weeks ago, suffering from heart disease. Dr Body was attending him at Crediton. Witness had seen him several times since he had been at the Hospital. He died on Wednesday evening last. Cross-examined by the Coroner: Witness had made no remarks about the treatment his son had received during the time he was in the Hospital. EMILY HOLLAND said the deceased was her son. She had seen him occasionally during the time he had been in the Hospital. He had told her they would not give him what he wanted to eat. He asked witness to bring him some sweets, but the nurse said they were not allowed, as they might do him harm. Witness brought some sponge cakes with her, but the nurse would not allow the deceased to have them. After his death witness asked the house surgeon for a certificate, but he said he could not let her have one as the deceased died from fever, and he must make a post mortem examination in order to find out the cause of the fever. Witness refused to allow him to make an examination, as she did not think it necessary. Mr Russell Coombe, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he admitted the deceased into that institution on December 20th. He was suffering from a swelling in the left side, which was considered to be an enlarged spleen; and both lungs were congested. He was treated for that until December 31st, when signs of pleurisy set in. Between the 3rd and 4th January he developed signs of another abdominal disease, which was not very clear. He had a very high temperature during the last ten days of his life. He died on January 9th. Witness was applied to by the wife and mother for a certificate of death, but he refused to give one, as he thought a post mortem examination would be necessary to enable him to certify the cause of death. He could not have done so without. The mother refused to allow him to make a post mortem examination. She said as he did know the cause of the deceased's death, he might have given medicine which was not for his complaint, and might have killed him. Witness had since made a post mortem examination of the deceased, and found large deposits in his spleen, and his stomach was ulcerated. The liver and kidneys were enlarged. There were no traces of typhoid fever. The lungs were congested. The heart was healthy. The deposits in the spleen were the cause of death. The Coroner said it was clear that Mr Russell Combe could not give a certificate without having first made a post mortem examination. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and exonerated the Hospital Authorities from all blame.

Friday 11 January 1889, Issue 6759 – Gale Document No. Y3200740949
THE SOUTH TAWTON TRAGEDY. - Inquest on the Murderer and Suicide.
As already reported, the South Tawton murderer, ARSCOTT, expired on Wednesday from his self-inflicted wounds. The Inquest on the body of the murderer and suicide was held at the Gostwyck Arms, North Tawton, yesterday, by Mr Fulford, Deputy Coroner, Rev. H. Rattenbury was chosen foreman of the Jury, who drove out to Tar Mill in two breaks to view the body. The first witness called was ROBERT ARSCOTT, who identified the body as that of his father, who was 65 years of age. On Monday week deceased sent for witness. He went the same evening and wished him a happy New Year. He replied, "It's a bad job." Asked what for, he complained of his wife's conduct with Thomas Hern. His wife was present, and denied the allegation. Deceased said it would end bad, and he intended to give up work. In answer to a Juror, he said he never saw anything improper between his mother and Hern. ELIZABETH POWLESLAND, wife of James Powlesland and daughter of deceased, repeated the evidence she gave at the Inquest on the body of her mother on Monday, she having witnessed the murder, and vainly attempted to prevent her father cutting her mother's throat. Police-Sergeant W. Kimbel deposed that after the murder he found ARSCOTT in the parlour lying on his face and hands with his throat cut, and lying in a pool of blood. Near him was a razor. One of his fingers was in the wound, and he said he could not get it to bleed fast enough. They had to hold his hands all the time to prevent him tearing the wound. Ernest Call also gave evidence. Frank Penwarden said when they turned deceased over and propped him up some one remarked that he could not have done it more than ten minutes. Deceased replied "It's false. I did it immediately I came in." Witness asked him what made him do such a thing, and he replied "I was drove to it. I have had forty years of it." Dr Hawkins described the injuries deceased had inflicted upon himself, and gave it as his opinion that he was of perfectly sound mind. Dr Burd, of Okehampton, also gave evidence. William Hern, deceased's employer, said he did not believe ARSCOTT had been in his right mind for years. He was very excitable when he had had anything to drink. MRS ARSCOTT told him her husband was jealous of him and Tom. Thomas Hern, nephew of the last witness, said on Saturday before the murder deceased wished him a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. On January 3rd he heard loud talking in the yard at Tar Mill, and deceased challenged him to say whether his wife had not behaved indecently with him. He said she had not. Deceased called him a liar, and he, feeling irritated, hit him by the side of the ear. Deceased ran away, and MRS ARSCOTT said, "Run away; he has gone to get a fork to run you through." Soon after deceased came with a fork, but on witness taking up a stick he dropped it. Mrs Peach, who attended deceased after he cut his throat, said she asked him twice if he was not sorry for what he had done. He said he was not; only sorry he was there like that. His mind seemed clear. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst of Unsound Mind.

Wednesday 12 January 1889, Issue 6760 – Gale Document No. Y3200740999
BUDLEIGH SALTERTON - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Britannia Inn, Knowle, on the body of JOHN ELLIS, who was found dead in the road. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 12 January 1889, Issue 6760 – Gale Document No. Y3200740982
SAD DEATH OF A CHILD FROM BURNS - An Inquest was held at the Huntsman's Arms, Hittisleigh, yesterday, by the Deputy Coroner for the District (Mr H. W. Gould) to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ERNEST DART, aged three months. ELIAS DART, residing at Hittisleigh, identified the body as that of his son. Witness said on Sunday, 16th December, about 4.30 p.m., he left home, and on his return about six o'clock he was told by a neighbour that his wife had had a fit and fallen into the fire with the deceased. His wife was lying on the floor in a fit at the time he saw deceased, who was injured on the hand and heel. He applied linseed oil to the burns, and two days after his wife took the deceased to Dr Body of Crediton. His wife was subject to fits, and had been in the Hospital two or three times for burns received whilst under the influence of them. Hannah Lobey, wife of Henry Lobey, farm labourer, said she resided next door to the last witness. On the 16th December she heard the children screaming that their mother had fallen into the fire. She went into the kitchen, where she saw the mother and deceased in front of the fire. Deceased's head was nearly in the fire, and the hand quite so. The mother was unconscious. She took the child, whose clothes were on fire, up and put out the flames. She knew MRS DART was subject to fits. There was no one in the house besides the mother and three children. The father arrived home sometime after. Mr Leslie Powne, surgeon, of Crediton, deposed that on the 19th December the mother brought the deceased to him. He prescribed for the child and told her to bring it again in a few days. She did not, however, bring it and he did not see her until the 2nd instant. She then told him that the child had been better, but was then much weaker, and the severe part of the burns was in much the same condition. He did not see the child again alive. He had seen the body and found no marks of violence beyond the burns. He attributed death to shock to the system caused by the burns. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 18 January 1889, Issue 6765 – Gale Document No. Y3200741094
THE LYNTON COACH ACCIDENT. - Inquest on MR LOWE - Last night Mr J. F. Bromham, the District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Foxhunters' Inn, Loxhore Cot., on the body of MR LOWE, timber merchant, of Bristol, who was killed through an accident to the Lynton coach on Wednesday evening. The foreman of the Jury was Mr Michael Yendle, of Loxhore Barton. The father of deceased, MR CHARLES HOSKINS LOWE, timber merchant, of Bristol, said deceased was named ALFRED CHARLES HOSKINS LOWE, and was one of the firm. He was on a journey in North Devon, and witness first became acquainted of the accident by reading the morning newspaper. His son was thirty years of age, and had left a widow and one child. George Moon, the driver, said that he had driven the Lynton coach in connection with the South Western Railway for twelve years. On Wednesday he left Barnstaple, the two outside passengers being the deceased and a gentleman named Harris, also of Bristol. Three other gentlemen were inside passengers. The vehicle he was driving was the winter omnibus. At Loxhore Cot the passengers walked up the hill, and just on the top the deceased and Harris got up again. As the 'bus was turning two well-known sharp corners The Horses shied a little. This took the 'bus against a large stone which projected over the water-table. The 'bus ran a little way in a tilted position, and then fell over. Had the passengers been inside he believed it would not have capsized. All three were thrown off. Witness was thrown into the hedge unhurt. He got up and saw Harris, who said he was afraid MR LOWE was under the 'bus. Assistance came, and the 'bus was lifted, when the deceased was found there quite dead. A policeman came, and the body was removed to the Foxhunters' Inn. The evening was dark and misty. The stone was placed there to keep vehicles from going into the water-table, but it projected awkwardly into the highway. In answer to the Coroner, witness said he was perfectly sober. Mr C. E. R. Chanter, of Barnstaple, who represented the proprietors of the 'bus (Messrs Jones, of Lynton) asked several questions, which were satisfactorily answered. Mr Edward Harris, of Bristol, deposed to the horses making a start and the 'bus striking against the stone. While the vehicle was running along on the side wheels, he missed the deceased, who must have fallen or jumped off. Witness and the driver were thrown off, and subsequently, on righting the 'bus, the deceased was found under it quite dead. The other passengers had walked on, and did not return. His opinion was that the driver was perfectly sober, and no blame was attributable to him. In answer to Mr Chanter, witness said he knew the driver, having gone the journey with him dozens of times, and he always considered him a very steady driver. W. Huxtable, labourer, and P.C. Richards also said the driver was quite sober. The constable remarked that he had never seen him otherwise. Both said the stone was dangerous, and ought to be removed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that they did not think any blame was attributable to the driver, and they thought the road ought to be straightened and the stone removed.

Saturday 19 January 1889, Issue 6766 – Gale Document No. Y3200741132
DROWNED IN TEN INCHES OF WATER - Mr J. F. Bromham, District Coroner, at West Anstey, North Devon, held an Inquest on Monday on the body of MARY LETHBRIDGE, who drowned herself in ten inches of water on Friday evening last. The evidence of her brother, JAMES ELWORTHY, was that deceased had been suffering in her mind, owing to the death of her husband, and some time ago she tried to hang herself. She had been receiving parish pay, and had six children. On Friday last the Relieving Officer called and told her that her pay was stopped, and that she and the children would have to go into the Workhouse. The pay came from Bristol, where she was chargeable. The news affected her considerably. He was away on Friday, and on reaching home in the evening he heard that deceased was missing, and, on searching for her, he found her in a stream near the house. She was quite dead. Medical evidence being given, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Saturday 19 January 1889, Issue 6766 – Gale Document No. Y3200741138
FATAL CARRIAGE ACCIDENT AT SHALDON - A melancholy fatal accident occurred at Shaldon just after nine o'clock last night. An invitation ball was given at Ness House, the residence of Col. and Mrs Brine, and three ladies, MRS PRICE, of Westcliffe, Teignmouth; Mrs Preston Cooke, Elmhurst, Teignmouth; and Miss Lee, sister of the last named, were being driven there to spend the evening. When near Undercliff the horse shied at a barrow on which was placed a basket of white clothes. The horse and carriage belonged to Mr Northcott, and were being driven by a man named Baker, who could not control the animal, and it jumped off the low wall on to the beach. The carriage was overturned and the occupants thrown together with much violence. Baker was able to regain his feet and hold the head of the horse, and some Coastguardsmen, seeing the accident, ran and helped the ladies out. MRS PRICE was seriously injured, but the other two were able to walk. The injured lady was taken to the residence of the Rev. Marsh Dunn, where she was attended by Drs. Corbould and Austin, their efforts, however, were unavailing, and the unfortunate lady died a few minutes after being taken into the house. An Inquest was held at Shaldon this afternoon but the result was not forwarded by our correspondent in time for publication.

Monday 21 January 1889, Issue 6767 – Gale Document No. Y3200740148
SAD DEATH AT THE HIGHER BARRACKS. - Inquest this Afternoon. - This afternoon Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest in the Reading-room at the Higher Barracks to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a boy named THOMAS CLAXTON, who died yesterday morning from injuries received on the previous day. The first witness called was MARGARET CLAXTON, wife of PATRICK CLAXTON, private in the Devonshire Regiment, now stationed at the Higher Barracks, who identified the body as that of her son, who she said was eight years of age and resided with her at the barracks. About half-past five on Saturday evening he came home, having been out to play. He appeared drawn together, and his hands were clenched. He said he had hurt his chest, having been playing with the roller, which knocked him. She put him to bed, when he commenced to vomit. She, however, thought there was no danger, as he was able to speak, and also walked about, several times getting out of bed to drink. Yesterday morning, shortly after seven he ate some bread-and-milk, but in consequence of his appearing to get worse she sent for the hospital sergeant. The latter, on looking at the deceased, sent for Dr Bryan, who came immediately, but deceased only lived an hour and a half later. Alfred Bond, aged eight years, residing n the Barracks, made a statement to the effect that he was at play with the deceased and another boy on Saturday night under the Granary, with an iron roller which CLAXTON was pulling. By some means the deceased was overpowered and jammed with his stomach against the wall. Thomas Michael Bryan, surgeon-major, of the Army Medical Staff, said he was called on Sunday morning to go to the hospital at once. After seeing the sergeant, who told him that he thought the deceased was dying, he went and saw him. After examining him very carefully, and hearing the history of the case, he came to the conclusion that the boy was suffering from some internal injury. He saw he was in a perfect collapse, and after prescribing for him he saw him again within an hour. He was then in a dying state. The deceased no doubt died from an internal injuries, but what that was he could not tell without a post mortem examination, but some internal organ had no doubt been ruptured. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death," at the same time recommending that the roller in question should either be chained or placed somewhere in safety where children could not get at it. The Coroner promised to bring the matter before the proper authorities.

Monday 21 January 1889, Issue 6767 – Gale Document No. Y3200740157
THE CARRIAGE ACCIDENT AT SHALDON - Inquest on the Deceased.
On Saturday an Inquest was held at West Cliff by Mr Sidney Hacker (Coroner), on the body of MRS PRICE, of Teignmouth, who died under circumstances already reported. Mr G. Pedley was chosen as Foreman. Frederick Charles Wood, 9, Grove Villas, Teignmouth, and cousin of the deceased, was the first witness called. He stated that her age was about 63. She was the widow of COLONEL PRICE, of the East Indian Army. The last time he saw her alive was on Thursday, when she appeared in her usual health. On Friday night, in consequence of a message, he went to Shaldon, and saw the body of deceased lying in a house owned by Mr Wills. From there he had it conveyed to her residence, West Cliff. Mary Ann Elms, lady's maid to deceased, said the deceased left her house on Friday night about a quarter to eight to attend a party at "Ness House," Shaldon, the residence of Colonel Brine. She was very bright and cheerful. Edward White Baker, residing at No. 7, the Strand, Teignmouth, and in the employ of Mr John Northcott, of Brunswick Mews, said on Friday night he received orders to be at West Cliff at a quarter to eight to take MRS PRICE to Shaldon, also to call at "Elmhurst" and take up Mrs Preston-Cooke and Mrs Lee, From "Elmhurst" he drove to Shaldon by the way of the bridge. All went well until opposite "Undercliff" – the residence of the Rev. Marsh Dunn – where the horse shied at a barrow laden with white clothes, and made a clean jump over the embankment on to the beach below, a distance of about three feet, taking the carriage with him. The carriage turned completely over. As soon as he recovered himself he ran to the horse's head and held it while a coastguard and another man helped the ladies out through the top of the carriage, which had to be broken open for the purpose. Mrs Cooke and Mrs Lee were both on the top of the deceased. The latter, on being taken out, asked for her slippers, and on them being brought to her she asked to have them placed on her feet. A chair was obtained, and the deceased was conveyed to a house close by, where she died in about ten minutes after the accident. By the Coroner: The lamp near the spot was not lighted, although the night was dark, and there was no wall to prevent the horse going over. The width of the road was 13ft. If there had been a wall there was no doubt but the horse would have shied the other way on seeing it. Witness was perfectly sober. James Leslie, a coastguardsman, stationed at Shaldon, stated that about eight o'clock he saw a horse and carriage coming towards him, and when near Undercliff the horse, without any warning, shied and jumped clean over the wall on to the beach. The carriage pitched about six feet from the wall, falling on its side. Witness also corroborated Baker as to his being perfectly sober, and said he acted with coolness. Corroborative evidence was also given by Mr John Mole, of Shaldon. Mr John Austin, surgeon at Teignmouth, who was just behind the cab in which the deceased was riding, and who attended after the accident happened, said there was no serious wound or fracture, and in his opinion death was due to syncope caused by shock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but added a rider that it was desirable that a wall should be placed at the spot where the accident occurred, and that the lamp, which was a public one, should be kept burning by night. The Jury also wished to express their deep sympathy with the bereaved relatives, which the Coroner promised to convey. The cabman was exonerated from all blame.

Monday 21 January 1889, Issue 6767 – Gale Document No. Y3200740144
THE CASE OF DROWNING IN THE CANAL - Inquest This Day. - Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Ship Inn, St. Thomas, this afternoon, on the body of CHARLES HENRY HORE, aged six, who was drowned in the Exeter Canal on Saturday afternoon. WM. STEVEN HORE, brushmaker, residing in St. George's-square, Stepcote-hill, identified the body as that of his son. Witness last saw him at home about twenty minutes past three on Saturday afternoon. He was then playing with a ball. Witness was called by a boy about four o'clock, who told him his son had fallen in the water. He went with the boy to the spot, on the Canal Banks, and there saw men searching for the body. He remained there until the body was found. James Clark, a boy, living in St. Thomas, said on Saturday afternoon he was passing along the Canal banks by the saw mills, and saw the deceased in the water on the opposite side. Two small boys were on the bank on that side. He saw the deceased struggling, and witness ran for a man called Campbell, who jumped into the water after the deceased. Witness saw the deceased sink. Campbell could not find the body. He heard no screams. Henry Thorne, a boy, of St. Thomas, said he was with the last witness when he saw the deceased in the water, and gave corroborative evidence. Bertie Mott, aged six, who was not sworn, said he went down with the deceased and two other boys to the Canal Banks on Saturday afternoon. They were playing, and the deceased slipped off a stone into the water. Nobody pushed him. Percy Webster, a little boy, said he was with the last witness and the deceased when the accident occurred. The deceased was previously throwing stones into the water. P.S. Egan, stationed at St. Thomas, said the body was recovered from the water at twenty-five minutes to five on Saturday afternoon, after it had been in about an hour. When witness arrived on the scene of the accident, which was a few minutes after it happened, he was told that a man named Campbell had taken off his coat and gone into the water after the deceased, but was unsuccessful in saving the boy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 22 January 1889, Issue 6768 – Gale Document No. Y3200741175
REMARKABLE SCENE IN THE EXETER CORONER'S COURT. - This Afternoon. - This afternoon the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Enquiry at the new Police Court to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of RICHARD LYNE, residing at No. 11, Gattey's-court, St. Sidwell's. HENRIETTA LYNE, widow of the deceased, identified the body, and said her husband, who was 57 years of age, went to work this morning about half-past seven. He had been suffering from a violent cold for the last week. About nine o'clock this morning she heard he had dropped down. On her way to the place where deceased was at work she met him in an exhausted condition, and near St. Sidwell's Church. On getting him home, she gave him a little brandy and water, which he drank, and with the assistance of a neighbour he was put to bed. He then complained of his feet being cold, and she went down to get some hot water. When she returned to the bedroom she saw him draw one breath. She immediately went to a neighbour, and when she got back to the bedroom he was dead. He had been suffering in his leg for some time, and for the last five or six months he had not been well.
Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he had known the deceased for many years. This morning he was called to go to his house about half-past nine. On his arrival he found the deceased in bed, dead. He examined the body, but found no marks of violence, and the deceased no doubt died from heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 23 January 1889, Issue 6769 – Gale Document No. Y3200741198
FATAL ACCIDENT AT DEVONPORT - A labourer named KELLOW, while at work yesterday afternoon in the tunnel under Devonport Park, was accidentally killed. The work on which he was engaged was shoring up the sides of a heading with planks, which were being placed in a horizontal position. The attention of George Jones, another labourer, was directed to the deceased by seeing blood flowing freely from his head, which, on closer examination, was found to be crushed between two planks. It is supposed that a large quantity of earth suddenly fell on the uppermost plank, and that before deceased could get away his head was caught between the pieces of wood. Mr Gard, surgeon, who was sent for, pronounced life extinct, and the body was removed to the police mortuary to await an Inquest. Deceased, a native of Truro, was 45 years of age.

Thursday 24 January 1889, Issue 6770 – Gale Document No. Y3200741218
FATAL TRAP ACCIDENT AT AXMINSTER - Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy Coroner), held an Inquest yesterday at the Police Station, Axminster, touching the death of JOSEPH CHICK, landlord of the Axminster Inn, Axminster, who died from the effects of injuries received by being thrown out of his trap on Friday, while returning home from Chard. Evidence went to show that the deceased drove to Chard on Friday accompanied by a boy named Dimond, in order to see a horse of his that was there ill. He drove a quiet bay mare, and on arriving at Chard went to the King's Head stables to see the horse already mentioned. They left on the return journey about 6 o'clock. About a quarter of a mile from Tytherleigh the trap collided with a waggon drawn by a couple of horses, tandem fashion. Both the occupants were thrown out and the waggon horses bolted. On arriving at the top of the hill the waggoner told Mr Francis Charles, farmer, of Knowle St. Giles, near Chard, of the accident. Mr Charles was driving with his brother-in-law, Mr Geo. Miller, and, proceeding slowly along, they saw a hat lying on the right-hand side of the road, and about two yards further on they saw a man lying on the ground. Mr Miller got out and said, "This looks something serious." The trap was turned completely upside down, and the horse was not to be seen. Deceased was placed in Mr Charles's trap and driven to the Lytherleigh Inn, where he was afterwards seen by Dr Barnes, who found him suffering from concussion. He was removed to his own house, where he died on Tuesday morning. Deceased was very near-sighted, and was in the habit of wearing green spectacles. On Friday night it was very foggy, which made everything indistinct. Evidence was given by Mr J. Willicombe (step-son of the deceased), the lad Dimond, the landlord of the King's Head, Chard (Mr Joseph Morris), Mr Charles, Mr Miller, Joseph Denning (the carter), and Dr Barnes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and considered that the cause of MR CHICK and the waggoner coming into collision was because neither carried lights. The waggoner was severely censured by the Coroner for not returning to the scene of the accident after it occurred.

Wednesday 25 January 1889, Issue 6770 – Gale Document No. Y3200741243
SUDDEN DEATH AT TEIGNMOUTH – Last evening Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry touching the death of MARY DART, who was found the previous day at 8, French-street, in a dying state. Mr George Small, landlord of the Railway Hotel, where the Inquest was held, was chosen foreman. The first witness called was SAMUEL DART, who said he was a labourer. Deceased was his wife, and aged 59 years. They lived at the above address by themselves. She had complained of illness some time since when she had a kind of a fit. She was then taken to the Infirmary and appeared afterwards to be crippled in her hands. On Tuesday she was in her usual health, but on Wednesday morning she did not seem quite as well. He left her after breakfast, about nine o'clock, when she was about her work. When he went home, about half-past twelve, he found her lying on her right side in front of the fireplace with her head in over the fender, not sufficiently near to burn her. He got assistance. Deceased had been washing, and it seemed as if she had been doing something to the boiler where she had some clothes boiling, as the cover was off and a boiling stick in the boiler. She was quite unconscious, but breathing. He was in the house when she died, which was about ten or fifteen minutes after. Maria Bailey said she lived opposite, and about eleven o'clock witness went to deceased's shop, when she seemed in her usual health, and answered in the affirmative her question as to whether her husband was in work. The Rev. James Veysey, vicar of St. Michael's, said he was visiting in French-street, and on seeing some excitement he went to the house and saw DART supporting the head of deceased on his knee. She was not then dead, but was unconscious, and died shortly afterwards. Dr George Henry Warren Thomas, said he was called to deceased's house in French-street, when he found her lying on her back in a little room quite dead. Her face was congested, and her eyes closed. She had a bruise on her left breast. The cause of death, he should think, was heart disease. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Monday 28 January 1889, Issue 6773 – Gale Document No. Y3200741299
SUDDEN DEATH AT NORTH MOLTON - On Saturday an Inquest was held at Little Rapscott Farm, Northmolton, by Mr J. F. Bromham (County Coroner), on the body of THOMAS FOLLETT. From the evidence of the widow, it appeared that the deceased, who was a farmer, and 69 years of age, had not been in good health lately, and that she and her husband slept in separate rooms. On Thursday the deceased went to bed about nine o'clock. When MRS FOLLETT went in to call him the next morning at eight o'clock she noticed something was wrong, and ran at once to a neighbour and called assistance. James Newton, a farmer, came in and found that FOLLETT was dead. He had been suffering from dropsy, and had been medically attended. Dr Kendall said he had examined the body of deceased, and had no hesitation in saying that he died from syncope, consequent on heart disease. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Saturday 2 February 1889, Issue 6778 – Gale Document No. Y3200741427
DARTMOUTH – The Late Accident at the Paint Works. - PETER PETERSON, who met with an accident at the Paint Works, breaking his thigh, on January 12th, died this morning at Crowder's Hill. Although every attention has been paid him by Dr Soper, combined with careful nursing, he never appeared to gain strength, his great age being much against his recovery. Particulars of the accident appeared at the time in the "Evening Post." The Inquest was held this morning before R. W. Prideaux, Esq. (Borough Coroner), at the Guildhall, Mr J. H. Sparke being chosen Foreman of the Jury. After viewing the body and hearing the evidence of Thomas Criddiford, John Cole, Sidney Millman, and Dr Soper (the medical attendant of the deceased), the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 2 February 1889, Issue 6778 – Gale Document No. Y3200741422
THE SAD SUICIDE OF A LADY AT TORQUAY - Inquest Last Evening. - An Inquest was held at Mencoffer Villa, Kent-road, Torquay, last evening, by Mr Lynder Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of MISS SYBELLA KATHERINE PECKHAM, aged 56. Deceased has suffered for seven years from bronchitis, and had visited Torquay during the past three winters for the benefit of her health. She came down from Guildford in October last and stayed at Mencoffer. On Christmas-day she had an epileptic fit and her sister was sent for. She continued to be in a very weak state, and her sister remained in attendance on her. On Sunday morning last she came downstairs to the dining-room and commenced reading. After a time she laid aside her book and went to the window, but as it was raining the sister said they would not go out. They looked at the pictures on the wall, and deceased appeared to be in her usual state, but without the slightest warning she picked up a knife from the table and inflicted two cuts on her neck. One severed the windpipe, but the other was not so serious. Her sister, whose head was turned in another direction at the time, looked round casually, and was horrified to see what she had done. She immediately seized her by the right arm, took the knife away, and called for assistance. The housemaid came in and the cook fetched Dr Boreham, who did all that lay in his power to stay the bleeding, and with the help of Dr Gordon Gumming, conveyed the unfortunate lady to her bedroom. Here she lingered until Wednesday evening, when death ensued. Both medical gentlemen considered that MISS PECKHAM was suffering from the effects of the epileptic seizure, which caused sleepishness and pains in the head. She appeared to be quite rational up to the time the wounds were inflicted, and afterwards expressed by writing on a slate a hope that her friends would forgive her, as no one knew what her depression had been. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Tuesday 5 February 1889, Issue 6780 – Gale Document No. Y3200741497
SUDDEN DEATH AT MOUNT RADFORD – The Inquest. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at 22, St Leonard's-road, Mount Radford, on Monday, on the body of MRS JUDITH MATTHEWS, aged 76, who died on the previous day. MR WM. MATTHEWS identified the body as that of his late wife. Her health had been very fair for a person of her age. She went to bed about 10 o'clock on Saturday night. About 2.30 the next morning the deceased awoke and told witness she felt faint, and asked him to get her some water. He got her some, and she drank it, and then died immediately. Witness sent for Mr Norse, and he came at once, and said she was quite dead. Mr Wm. Edward Charles Norse, surgeon, practising in Exeter, said he was called to see the deceased at three o'clock on the previous morning. He went and found the deceased in bed quite dead. She appeared to have been dead about half-an-hour. He examined the body, and found no marks of violence. He considered the cause of death was failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 6 February 1889, Issue 6781 – Gale Document No. Y3200741516
TORQUAY – Sudden Death. - A case of sudden death is reported from 5, Park Crescent, Torwood. The deceased is ANNA JANE TOPE, 68, widow, who was last seen alive at ten o'clock last evening, and found dead in bed this morning at eight o'clock. Dr Hexley has attended the poor woman in the past for heart disease. She has obtained her living hitherto by following the avocation of dressmaking. Mr Coroner Hacker has been communicated with, and an Inquest will probably be held tomorrow.

Mr Hacker yesterday held an Enquiry on another sudden death at St. Marychurch, where JOHN HILL, 63, tailor, was found dead in bed by a fellow lodger named Mark Webber. Medical evidence was given by Dr Finch, and a verdict of "Natural Causes" returned.

Thursday 7 February 1889, Issue 6782 – Gale Document No. Y3200741535
MYSTERIOUS CASE OF DROWNING - A farmer named BRICE, employed on the farm of Mr J. H. Merson, Kitton Barton, Holcombe Rogus, was found drowned in a pond on the estate under mysterious circumstances a few days since. At the Inquest held by the District Coroner, Mr F. Burrow, LL.D., several witnesses were called, but no cause could be assigned for suicide. In the end the Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Friday 8 February 1889, Issue 6783 – Gale Document No. Y3200741573
THE RECENT FATAL ACCIDENT AT WITHYCOMBE – Inquest This Day. - Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest today, at the Holley Tree Inn, Withycombe, touching the death of JAMES MARSHALL, who met his sad end under circumstances detailed in the evidence below. Mr H. Woodcock, was chosen foreman of the Jury, and the body having been viewed the following evidence was taken. Joseph Jarman, carter, in the employ of Mr Heath, of Bystock, in whose service the deceased was also engaged, said on Tuesday last he went to Exmouth to get some coke with his waggon. Deceased was employed on the same work with another waggon. They returned together in the afternoon, deceased had the biggest load. Witness was walking by his waggon, and deceased was standing on the shafts of his. He had no reins, and could not have had command of the horses. The horses attached to deceased's waggon galloped up to witness who was in front, and he then thought something had taken place. He looked back and saw deceased lying in the road. He went back to him but he did not move hand or foot. There were some marks on his face, as if the wheel had gone over him. The accident happened near a hill. Deceased did not move, and appeared to have been killed on the spot. Deceased's waggon was fitted with a drag, but witness's was not. They never used their drags going down this hill if the road was laid with stone, as it was now. The Coroner said he thought a drag should have been used, but a Juryman said the incline was so short it was not necessary. The Foreman said there could not be any danger if a driver was at his horses' heads, a drag would only act like a plough, as the road was usually rough. Sophia Matthews, wife of Gilbert Matthews, farmer, deposed to witnessing the accident. She saw the waggon going down the hill. The man was running between the horses, holding on the trace chain. As the horses rounded the bend in the road they went faster, and the deceased stumbled and fell, the wheels of the waggon going over his neck. She ran up to deceased. He did not move, but breathed for a few seconds. By the Coroner: Drags were generally used for going down the hill, but the road at present was very rough. Gilbert Matthews, husband of the last witness, said his wife called to him when she saw the accident, and he went up to the deceased. He was not dead but quite unconscious. Witness sent for a doctor, but the poor fellow was dead before he arrived. Robert Farrant, manager of Mr Heath's farm, on which the deceased worked, said the wagons used were provided with drags, he did not give the men instructions to use the drag down this particular incline; he should not have used one himself if he was coming down it. The Coroner said he thought the witness should give instructions to his men to keep a drag on their wagons. If it had been used in this instance, the waggon would not have come at such a great pace down the hill, and probably the accident would not have occurred. The witness Marshall was re-called, and said deceased's waggon was fitted with a drag, but he did not use it. Dr Shopland proved being called to the deceased on the day of the accident. He was dying when witness arrived. The lower jaw was fractured as also was the base of the skull. Witness always used a drag when driving a four wheeler down the hill, but in the present state of the road he thought a drag would have ,ploughed up the road. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 9 February 1889, issue 6784 – Gale Document No. Y3200741615
TEIGNMOUTH – The Fatal Accident Near Bishopsteignton. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of MR JOHN LAKE, of Radway, Bishopsteignton. From the evidence given it appears that deceased was riding on a spirited colt in a road adjacent to his property, and whilst passing through a gateway the animal bolted, at the same time the stirrup broke, with the result that deceased was thrown off. MR LAKE was immediately taken home, but notwithstanding the efforts of the medical men, he expired on the Friday evening. Medical evidence was given to the effect that deceased died by receiving injury to the brain, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 9 February 1889, issue 6784 – Gale Document No. Y3200741590
THE DISCOVERY OF THE BODY OF MISS CARTER – Inquest, This Day. - This morning Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the new Police-court on the body of MISS ISABELLA CARTER, which was discovered in the mill leat, Bonhay-road, yesterday afternoon, as reported in our last evening's issue. The first witness called was FRANCIS JOHN HORWILL, baker, residing at 74, Sidwell-street, who identified the body, and said deceased was a single woman, aged 41 years. She had resided with him for the last eleven or twelve years, being a sister to his wife, and usually assisted in his shop. For about a fortnight before her disappearance she had suffered from neuralgia and pains in the head, but otherwise she was generally in a good state of health. On the 15th of last month she left home about a quarter to eleven, saying she was going for a walk. They, however, heard nothing of her during that day, and consequently they endeavoured to discover her whereabouts. They, however, failed to get any clue until the Monday following when a muff which was supposed to belong to her, was picked up opposite the Bonhay Pleasure-grounds. After that nothing was heard until yesterday, when he was informed that a body had been found in the water. On his going to see it, he identified it as that of his sister-in-law. She appeared to be cheerful before she left the house on the 15th January. John Maunder, carpenter, residing at Crediton, deposed that yesterday about two o'clock he was at work at Mr Carthew's Powhay Mills, Bonhay-road, and on going to the grating he saw the body of a woman lying on its side. The water was about from two to three feet deep. He called for assistance, and a police constable was afterwards fetched, and the body taken from the water, and conveyed to the mortuary. P.C. Pethybridge said he was called yesterday, about 2.30 by the last witness to go to the Powhay Mills, where he saw the body in the water, in a very decomposed state. With the assistance of another constable it was taken from the water, and afterwards to the mortuary. He searched the pockets, and found 4s. 6d in silver 4 ¼d. in coppers, four small keys, a pair of scissors, and a small paper from Mr M. Stocker's, chemist, marked "poison." The paper had contained salt of lemon. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he was called yesterday afternoon to go to the police-station to examine a body that had been found in the water, which he recognised as the body of MISS CARTER. It was very much decomposed, and had evidently been dead for some time. There were no fractures and no external marks of violence. Death was due to drowning. There were no salts of lemon on the deceased, only the paper. Witness stated that salts of lemon was some times used for getting ironmoulds out of linen, and Mr Horwill said that that was no doubt the purpose for which the deceased bought it. The Coroner said there was no evidence as to wither the deceased committed suicide or whether she fell in the water. He thought the best thing they could do would be to return an open verdict. The Jury, of which Mr Howard was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Monday 11 February 1889, Issue 6785 – Gale Document No. Y3200741625
BURNT TO DEATH AT ASHBURTON - At the Cottage Hospital, Ashburton, on Saturday, an Inquest was held by Mr Fraser, of Totnes, Deputy Coroner for the district, touching the death of ELLEN CLARKE, aged 26, mill operative, who was received into the Hospital on the 27th ult., suffering from burns, caused by the ignition of a bottle of benzoline oil, which she was using for lighting her fire. Evidence having been given by Elizabeth Williams, Harriet Luscombe, and Jane Ham, neighbours of the deceased, who went to her assistance, Dr Gervis stated that death was caused by the effects of the burns and the shock to the system. She died on Thursday night, eleven days after the occurrence. The Coroner commented strongly on the dangerous practice of lighting fires with oil, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 13 February 1889, Issue 6787 – Gale Document No. Y3200741675
DARTMOUTH – Sudden Death of an Infant. - Mr R. W. Prideaux held an Inquest this morning at the Guildhall, on the body of ELSIE FLORENCE MAY FLEET, aged three months, the illegitimate child of HENRIETTA FLEET, found in bed dead by the side of its mother, yesterday morning. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Parr was chosen Foreman, having viewed the body, the Coroner said he should not have had an Inquest but from the fact that no doctor had been called in, and the child being illegitimate. The first witness called was HENRIETTA FLEET, mother of the child, who stated the child was in its usual health the night previous, but in the morning it was found dead. This was corroborated by the grandmother of the child. Dr Cropfield, surgeon, said he was called to see the child and found it dead. There were no marks of violence, but on the body was a rash similar to measles. His opinion was that the child had died from natural causes or suppressed measles, most probably the former. There was, in his opinion, no cause for a post mortem examination. The Jury gave a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Friday 15 February 1889, Issue 6788 – Gale Document No. Y3200741719
FOUND DROWNED AT DEVONPORT – About nine o'clock this morning a man named Day saw, from his boat, a body lying on the shore under Mount Wise, where, apparently, it had been left by the tide. Day carried the news to the police-station, and Inspector Webber at once had the corpse removed to the mortuary. The body has been identified as that of EDWARD THOS. PATTEN, a naval pensioner, 65 years of age. PATTEN left home about five this morning, but this was not an unusual circumstance. It is surmised that he accidentally fell into the water. An Inquest will be held this evening.

Tuesday 19 February 1889, Issue 6790 – Gale Document No. Y3200741793
THE SAD DEATH BY EXCESSIVE DRINKING AT SIDBURY - Yesterday Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Hunters' Lodge Inn, near Sidbury, for the purpose of enquiring into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE BERRY, a young man, who died on Thursday at Nimcombe Farm, Sidbury, through drinking a quantity of raw spirit as previously reported. Superintendent de Schmidt watched the case on behalf of the police authorities. THOMAS BERRY, father of the deceased, identified the body. Evidence having been given to the deceased's attending at Nimcombe Farm where he drank the liquor, Dr F. H. S. Pullin was called, and said he was requested to see the deceased. On arriving at the cottage he saw such a sight as he had never seen before, or hoped to see again. The last witness was in convulsions on the floor, and BERRY was sitting in a chair dead. Lockyear was in most violent convulsions, and without medical aid would have died. Having given the result of his post-mortem examination, he said death was the result of irritant poisoning. The first cause was alcoholic poisoning, the second being irritant poisoning. Other evidence having been taken, Edward Burroughs, of the Star Inn, Honiton, stated that he was instructed to supply the refreshments at the sale at Mincombe Farm. He took gin and whiskey with him, seven gallons of gin and a gallon and a half of whiskey. It was always customary at sales to have liquor go round before the sale commenced and after the lunch. They had cider with the lunch. It was usual to make the gin and water in a big cup, about a gallon at a time. The Coroner: How much water do you put with a quart of gin? - Witness: I don't think that is a fair question. - The Coroner: I must ask you to answer it. - Witness: About two quarts to two quarts and a half, or, perhaps, three quarts. – The Coroner said that a man ought to be as careful in distributing liquor at a sale as in his own house, and this sale seemed to have been the cause for a great deal of drunkenness. In summing up, he said the features of the case were very shocking, and he trusted he should never again have to hold an Inquest on such a disgraceful case as this seemed to be. The Jury returned a verdict that "Death was due to irritant poisoning, caused by excessive drinking of raw spirits, a large portion of which had been surreptitiously obtained." A Juryman: We ought to add, sir, that we find no blame whatever attaching to Mr Burroughs. The Coroner: I am bound to take what the Jury have to say, but I must adhere to the strictures I have made that there ought to have been more care taken. The Foreman: Perhaps you haven't been to any sales, sir. I was there, and I don't see how Mr Burroughs was at all to blame.

Thursday 21 February 1889, Issue 6792 – Gale Document No. Y3200741841
SAD CASE OF DROWNING NEAR ILFRACOMBE - Dr Slade King, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Hele, near Ilfracombe, yesterday, on the body of an infant named NORMAN GIBBS. ANNIE A. GIBBS stated that deceased was her son, and was sixteen months old. On Monday about one o'clock she saw him in the kitchen of her house. He went out shortly afterwards, and when witness missed him she went in search of him, but could not find him. She heard Nathaniel Lewis calling out, and on running up to him found the deceased by the side of the stream. She tried to restore animation, but could not do so. She sent at once for Dr Gardiner, who came out in ten minutes, and said the deceased was dead. William John Lewis said he heard from MRS GIBBS that her little boy was missing, and went out to look for him. He saw something in the stream, and took it out, and found it was the missing child. He was quite dead. When he first saw the body it was turning over in the stream. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning."

Monday 25 February 1889, Issue 6795 – Gale Document No. Y3200741918
NEWTON ABBOT – Mr Sidney Hacker this morning held an Inquest at the Town Hall on the body of JOHN BAWDON, retired farmer, who was picked up dead on Saturday morning last a short distance from Newton Abbot on the Torquay-road. Evidence was given by the widow, ELIZABETH ANN BAWDON, to the effect that deceased left home in his usual health on Saturday morning last, to go to Aller, some two miles from the town, to pick some flowers. Julia Perrell, landlady of the Temple Bar, deposed to deceased coming to her house the same morning when he stayed about twenty minutes and drank some warmed ale. George Mogridge, telegraph messenger, stated that on the morning in question he was sent to Aller with a telegram. On the road he saw deceased, who was lying on his back near the hedge. Witness informed two young men, who felt deceased's pulse, and formed the opinion he was dead. Witness then returned to Newton and gave information to the police. Police-Sergeant Tucker, of Newton, gave evidence to the effect that he went to where deceased was lying. Deceased's hat and stick were near him, and in each hand was a quantity of grass pointing to the conclusion that deceased had felt himself falling and had clutched at the hedge. Mr R. H. Cyrimbly, surgeon, who made a superficial examination of the body, stated he found no wounds except a slight abrasion on the nose. He could only account for death by failure of the heart's action. MR LOOMAN BAWDON, draper of Newton, stated deceased was his uncle, and was aged 71 years. The Coroner briefly summed up and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BLACKAWTON - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest on Saturday, at the Old George Inn, touching the death of ETHEL ROSE LAMBLE, aged three months. The mother deposed that the child was ill for some days, but she did not think it was ill enough to send for a doctor. She seemed very ill the night it died. Dr Harris, Dartmouth, who made a post mortem examination, found that death was due to acute pleura-pneumonia. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Tuesday 5 March 1889, Issue 6802 – Gale Document No. Y3200742094
SEATON – Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Beach Hotel, Seaton, yesterday, by Mr C. Cox, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of an elderly gentleman named MR CHARLES ELLERSHAW, who on Thursday last, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a penknife. After hearing the evidence of his brother, the REV. JOHN ELLERSHAW, and other witnesses, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind. Deceased, who was at the age of 44, made a similar attempt on his life at Brussels about seven years ago.

Thursday 7 March 1889, Issue 6804 – Gale Document No. Y3200742140
INQUEST AT TORQUAY THIS DAY - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest this morning at nine o'clock, at the Half Moon Hotel, Torquay, on the body of JAMES ROOK, 50, cabman, who was found dead in his bed yesterday morning at 19, Lower Union-lane. The evidence was very simple, to the effect that deceased went to bed the previous night as usual, and at 7.30 yesterday morning was found dead. Dr Thistle was called in vain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 9 March 1889, Issue 6805 – Gale Document No. Y3200742183
THE SUICIDE IN ST. THOMAS – The Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday on the body of JEFFREY GOODRIDGE COLE, at the residence of the deceased, City View, St. Thomas, by Mr Deputy Coroner Gould. The body having been viewed, the following evidence was taken:-
ELLEN MILFORD, widow, of Fortescue-road, St. Thomas, and sister-in-law of the deceased, identified the body viewed by the Jury. COLE was a commercial traveller and twenty-eight years of age. Witness last saw him alive on Tuesday night. He was then in the kitchen of his house. He seemed very excited, as if he had got something on his mind. She knew he was in trouble, as she had heard from Mr Body, of the Devon and Cornwall Bank, Tiverton. She advised him to see that gentleman, whom she thought might settle matters. She did not know the nature of his trouble, as he kept his own secrets. She saw him on Sunday, when he was very restless, and complained of his head. He walked from room to room, unlocking and locking the doors and exclaiming, "My head! my head!"
SELINA COLE, wife of the deceased, said she was with the deceased on Tuesday night, and that was the last she saw of him. He wished her "Goodbye," saying the police were after him. She asked him to go and see Mr Body, and she, feeling that someone was watching the house, went to her mother's house to sleep. Therefore, the deed was done in the house on Tuesday night. She did not see him alone again.
By a Juror: She left the house solely because the police were watching it. Deceased did not threaten to take either her life or his own. He was of a very excitable nature, especially so when in drink.
P.S.Egan said on Wednesday morning, in consequence of information received from the manager of the Tiverton branch of the Devon and Cornwall Bank, he went to the house of deceased to arrest him on a charge of forging and uttering three promissory notes of £50 each on that branch. He arrived at the house at about two o'clock in the afternoon. On ascertaining that deceased was in the house, and after knocking at the door, he procured a ladder, and entered through a back window which was open. The window as that of the next room to which deceased slept in. On entering deceased's bedroom he found his clothes on the floor. The bed was quite warm as if a person had slept in it. Having looked under the bed and in the room adjoining, and failing to find deceased, he went to a room, the door of which was bolted on the inside. He knocked, and receiving no answer, looked through a chink in the door and saw deceased lying on the floor in a pool of blood. Witness called to Constable Rattenbury, who was outside, to take the ladder and enter by the window. He did so, and opened the door, letting witness in. On entering he found the deceased on the floor in a sitting posture. Six feet away, on the left-hand side of the deceased, the revolver (produced) was found. On opening the revolver, he found that one chamber had been recently discharged and contained an empty cartridge. He also found a box of cartridges in the downstair room. There should have been fifty in the box, but there were now only forty-nine. Previous to Wednesday morning, the police had no intimation of the man's business, and they had not watched the house on Tuesday.
By a Juror: All the doors were locked on the inside and it was impossible that anybody could have gone in and committed a murder. Deceased had nothing on but his shirt.
Dr Vlieland proved being called to see deceased at about three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon. On his arrival he found COLE lying in a pool of blood, as described by the last witness. He was quite dead but the body was warm, and he should say death had taken place quite recently. Blood was issuing from the mouth and nose, but there were no other external marks. On examining the interior of the mouth witness found a small wound passing through the soft palate, and placing his finer in the wound he found it went upwards towards the base of the skull. There was a smell of powder in the mouth. The wound could have been caused by a pistol shot, and was undoubtedly self-inflicted, as a wound of that nature could not be caused by anybody else without injury to the teeth. Death must have been instantaneous.
The Coroner, in summing up, said after the evidence of the doctor there could be but little doubt that deceased came by his death by his own hands. Then they would have to give their opinion as to the state of his mind at the time. COLE knew he was about to be arrested and possibly saw the police outside the house. That being the case, they must decide whether he was responsible for his actions.
The Jury found a verdict that the "Deceased committed suicide whilst Temporary Insane."

Tuesday 12 March 1889, Issue 6807 – Gale Document No. Y3200742246
INQUEST AT THE COUNTY PRISON – A Juryman Fined. - Mr W. H. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest today, at the Devon County Prison, touching the death of JOHN HAWKE, convict, who died in the Institution on Saturday last. The Deputy Coroner explained and said he thought the Jury would have but little difficulty in coming to a verdict, as it was evident that deceased died from natural causes, but an Inquiry was rendered necessary by reason of the death taking place in a prison. One of the Jury, Mr Henry Bailey, not being in attendance, a mason named Richard Mardles, who happened to be at work in the prison, was sworn in, and the absentee was fined £5, but the Deputy Coroner said he would not put the fine in force until Mr Bailey had had an opportunity of explaining his absence. Major Cowtan, Governor of the prison, identified the body as that of JOHN HAWKE, farm labourer, 56, who was convicted at the Bodmin Assizes, 18th July, 1888, for having carnal knowledge of a girl under the age of thirteen years. He was transferred to this prison on the 14th of August, 1888, to complete his sentence of eighteen years' penal servitude. He complained about eight days since of ill health, and having been seen by the medical officer was removed to the hospital. He was a well-conducted and industrious man as a prisoner, was never reported for any misconduct or breach of the rules, nor ordered any punishment from the date of his admission until his decease. The news of his death had been communicated to his sons, but no member of the family was present that day. Dr Caird, medical officer of the prison, said deceased had been attended once or twice for a slight cold, and on March 2nd, finding he was suffering from a shivering attack, he had him moved to the Hospital, where he remained nursed day and night until he died. He saw deceased twice daily, and he was put on hospital diet and treated with every care. On Sunday afternoon, with his deputy (Mr Domville) and Mr Russell Coombe, of the Hospital, he made a post mortem examination of the body. They found that the deceased had an abscess in one kidney and an enlargement of the other, together with low form of pneumonia. Death was caused by a chill being caught on a kidney disease of an insidious form. James Hoppings, night nurse, and formerly warder at the Prison, said he attended deceased during his illness from six in the evening until six in the morning. He was with him when he died at 2.15 on Sunday morning. Just before that time he took some brandy and milk and did not complain of being in pain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 13 March 1889, Issue 6808 – Gale Document No. Y3200742264
THE DISCOVERY OF A MAN'S BODY AT NEWTON ST. CYRES - An Inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) at the Railway Hotel, Newton St. Cyres, yesterday afternoon, inquiring into the circumstances of the death of a labourer named JOHN POOK, whose body was found by Sergeant Fursdon, of Crediton, near Newton St. Cyres, on Sunday. JOHN POOK, of Dawlish, son of the deceased, said that he last saw his father in January. Since then he had had a letter from him, and he appeared to be comfortable. Mrs Sims, of Hookway, where the deceased resided, last saw him on Wednesday. Mrs Haydon stated that early on Friday morning deceased said he had to see Mr C. Brooke at half-past nine, but must go to Crediton go get shaved first. This was about eight o'clock. Mr Pethebridge stated that on Friday about 8.40 he saw the deceased at Dunscombe Cross. They wished each other good morning, and he saw him no more. Other evidence was given to the effect that on Saturday night deceased's absence was reported to Sergeant Fursdon, who, with P.C. Kemp, went at ten next morning in search of him. They found the body in the river near the station. Charles Frost, a porter on the London and South western Railway, stated that on Sunday afternoon he found a tobacco-fox, and pipe, which were identified as deceased's. An open verdict of "Found Drowned," was returned by the Jury.

Thursday 14 March 1889, Issue 6809 – Gale Document No. Y3200742285
THE THREE TOWNS – Sad Death of a Marine. - On Tuesday evening a fatal accident occurred to a private in the Royal Marines, named THOMAS MATTHEW KELLY. It appears he was at the St. James Hall, Union-street, Plymouth, being a little the worse for liquor, and shortly before ten he left in company with a civilian to have some more drink. On returning he proceeded up the gallery stairs when he lost his balance and fell backwards. His injuries were so serious that after being in the Royal Marine Hospital a few hours he died. Last evening Mr R. R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body. The evidence went to show that the deceased was about 22 years of age, and had been in the service about two years and a half. The Coroner said he thought the Jury would see from the evidence that there was nobody to blame but the poor fellow himself. There appeared no doubt that, in consequence of his being under the influence of drink, he had lost control of himself, fell backwards, and received the injuries which caused his death. There seemed to be no reason to suppose that the construction of the staircase had anything whatever to do with the accident. The Foreman thought perhaps the Jury would consider that the staircase was not wide enough, and that in its present state there might be other accidents there. The Coroner observed that there was no evidence against the construction of the staircase, and a Juror suggested that a wider staircase would be still more dangerous. The only way to get a drunken man upstairs safely was to carry him up. The Jury agreed to a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Friday 15 March 1889, Issue 6810 – Gale Document No. Y3200742306
THE QUESTION OF INFANT INSURANCE - Inquest in Exeter – This Afternoon. - This afternoon Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Police Court to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM ALBERT SKOINES. ANN SKOINES, wife of ALBER SKOINES, residing at 4, Waterloo-place, Spiller-street, identified the body as that of her son, aged four months and a fortnight. She fed it on Swiss condensed milk. The child's life was insured in the Prudential Insurance Office, in the sum of £1 1s., the contributions being 1d. per week. The insurance money would not, however, be received unless the child had been insured three months. She had not kept up the payments and therefore did not think she would get the money. The child had not been healthy since its birth. The child was medically attended by Dr Kempe when it was three weeks' old, but it was perfectly healthy when she insured it. Yesterday the child appeared ill, and she thought it had an inward convulsion, whereupon she sent for a doctor. The messenger shortly afterwards returned, asking if she had the 2s. 6d. to pay or whether it was a parish case. She sent her immediately to Dr Bell, and told him to come as quick as he possibly could. Her brother then came in, and he also went after him. When he left the child was alive, but on returning with the doctor he was dead. By the Coroner: She sent for Mr Bell at about half-past one, and he arrived five minutes past two. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, residing in St. Sidwell's, said he was called yesterday afternoon at ten minutes to two to go and see MRS SKOINES' child, at 4, Waterloo-place. He asked the little girl, the messenger, if she knew what was the matter with it, and she said "No." He asked her if she had a doctor's order from the relieving-officer, to which she also replied in the negative. He said if the mother was not getting parish pay and had not an order she had better get one, and he would see the child in the afternoon. He had hardly turned away from the door, when a man came up and asked him to go to the same place, saying the child was very ill and he thought the child had a convulsion, whereupon he went immediately, and got to the house at five minutes past two. The child was then dead. He never remembered saying a word about a half-crown. Half-a-crown was not his visiting fee. He did not refuse to go because of the half-a-crown. A juryman did not think it was right that the working classes should have to go for an order. The child might die in the meantime. The Coroner pointed out that that was the law, and they had to keep it. A Juryman: Then I think the law ought to be altered. The Coroner, before concluding the case, said the cause of so many deaths of infants was, in his humble opinion, attributable to improper feeding, and the facility given to Infant Life Assurance. Now, with reference to improper feeding, it was, he was ready to admit, very difficult to distinguish between cases where food of an improper nature was administered, more especially by the humbler classes from ignorance of its effects or wilfully from a desire to be free from the burthen of young infants, whilst the parents were living upon a scanty means of subsistence. With reference to infant life insurance, particularly among the humbler classes, he considered it a subject requiring most thorough investigation, and prompt and effectual legislation. The lives of young children, except under very exceptional circumstances, ought not to be made the subject of life insurance under the age of seven years, and the insurer should satisfy the office by declaration or other means that he or she had an interest in the life of the assured. That he knew to be the opinion of some at least, if not the general body of his brother coroners of this county, and by a vast number of the coroners of England. He expressed his satisfaction at the recent action of the Guardians of the Poor and the Town Council on bringing this question, as he had before attempted to do, before the general public, and he hoped that ere long a subject of such deep importance might receive the attention of the legislature so that where cases of a flagrant character came before the Court they might by law be empowered to inflict severe and condign punishment on the offender, and he should be at all times ready to lend his aid to give evidence or otherwise to attain so desirable an end.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," exonerating Dr Bell from all blame.

Saturday 16 March 1889, Issue 6811 – Gale Document No. Y3200742340
BOVEY TRACEY – Before Colonel Walcott, J.P., a magisterial enquiry was held at the Dolphin Hotel, Bovey Tracey, on Tuesday afternoon, when CHARLOTTE WARREN, domestic servant, in the employ of Mr William Leaker, baker and confectioner, was charged with the wilful murder of her infant male child on the 11th inst., at Bovey. Evidence was given by P.C. Slee, who stated that from information received he took the body of a male infant child out of the river Bovey near the bridge at Bovey at 7.20 a.m. on the previous morning. Subsequently he went to Mr Leaker's shop, and in the closet at the rear found a quantity of blood and other matter. He asked WARREN, who was then engaged with her work, if she had been poorly, and she replied in the negative. She admitted, however, having had a miscarriage on Sunday at midnight, but denied that the child found in the river was hers. The Enquiry was then adjourned till Tuesday.
Subsequently an Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, on the body of the child. Witnesses were called as to seeing the body in the river and P.C. Slee gave evidence similar to that given at the magisterial inquiry. The doctor's testimony (Dr H. Goodwyn) showed that the child had a separate existence.

Monday 18 March 1889, Issue 6812 – Gale Document No. Y3200742360
THE SAD DEATH OF A BOY IN ST. THOMAS - Inquest this Day. - This morning, Mr Deputy Coroner, H. W. Gould, held an Inquest at the Turk's Head, St. Thomas, to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES HENRY HOLLAND, who was drowned in a gravel pit as reported in our last Saturday's issue.
GEORGE WILLIAM HOLLAND, residing at No. 10,. Clevedon-street, St. Thomas, compositor, identified the body as that of his son, who he said was five years of age the 29th of last March. He last saw him alive on Friday the 15th, about twenty minutes to two, when he left home to go to school, which was situate at the end of Union-street. William Hall, a boy aged 8 years, residing at 8, Clinton-street, St. Thomas, said he met the deceased coming from school on Friday evening last about five o'clock. In company with two other boys named Wills they went to a field for the purpose of playing. The deceased afterwards went and lay down near a pond in order to get a stick out of the water when he fell in. He did not see him fall in, but was told so by one of the other boys. He saw him in the water, but did not hear him cry out. Mr Vlieland, surgeon, said on Friday last, about six o'clock, he was called to attend the deceased, whom he found in a field not far from his house. Life was extinct. There were no marks of violence and the body had the usual appearance of death being due to drowning. Frederick Lockyear, of 22, Clarence-street, dairyman, deposed that he was delivering milk in the vicinity of Clevedon-street on Friday evening about twenty minutes after five, when two boys came to MRS HOLLAND'S house and said her boy was drowned. He went to the pond in question and recovered the body from the water. The deceased appeared to him to be dead, and all efforts to restore life proved fruitless. The field was private property, belonging to Mr Cummins. This was all the evidence, and the Coroner thought the Jury would have very little difficulty in arriving at a verdict. They must all exceedingly regret the painful circumstances under which the accident took place, and he was sure they would extend their sympathy to the parents of the poor boy. The pit was private property, and boys had no right there. He, however, thought it would be desirable to have the pit fenced, as it was a very dangerous place. Although the field was fenced around, boys would go there for the purpose of playing. He thought they might make a recommendation to the owner, asking him to have it fenced. They could not compel him to do it, but a recommendation might have some influence, in order to prevent similar accidents in the future. The Foreman thought the Coroner's suggestion a good one, which was endorsed by several other Jurymen. A verdict of "Death by Accidental Drowning" was returned.

Wednesday 20 March 1889, Issue 6814 – Gale Document No. Y3200742412
SAD ACCIDENT AT POLTIMORE – Inquest. - This afternoon Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquiry at the Police-court, on the body of JOHN PROWSE BOWDEN, lately residing in Parr-street, who died from injuries received whilst at work at Poltimore on Thursday last. ROSE BOWDEN identified the body as that of her father. She said he was 62 years of age, and by trade a plasterer in the employ of Messrs Garton and King. On returning from work on Thursday evening he complained of being weak and exhausted, having fallen from a ladder eight feet from the ground. He was attended to by Dr Barstow up to the time of his decease, which took place yesterday. John King, engineer, deposed that the deceased had been in the employ of his father's firm for nearly forty years. He was a temperate man. Witness saw him just after the accident occurred, when he told him that he was on a ladder and fell off, pulling it with him. Mr G. Stanley Barstow, surgeon, deposed that the deceased's left temple and left leg were bruised, as were also his right ribs, which might have been caused by the ladder falling on him. He prescribed for him, and the next morning when he saw him his brain seemed seriously effected. Mr Cumming also saw him on Monday, and he concurred with witness's opinion that deceased had received a contusion of the brain, from which he died. From what he had heard, the deceased had previously at times appeared a little deranged. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 21 March 1889, Issue 6815 – Gale Document No. Y3200742421
SAD DEATH OF A WOMAN AT BRANSCOMBE - An Inquest was held by Mr C. E. Cox at the Mason's Arms Inn, Branscombe, yesterday, touching the death of MRS ELIZA J. BUTLER, wife of the sub-postmaster, who died under sad circumstances. Evidence was given by MR GEORGE J. BUTLER, husband of the deceased, who said that his wife was in her 38th year. She had been depressed for some time, but had not been in ill-health, and he knew no cause for her low spirits. She suffered from delusions, and about two months since he called in Dr Callaghan, who had been attending her ever since. The doctor said from the first that she must be watched, and this had been done, but she never threatened or attempted to do herself any injury. On Tuesday morning he went about his usual work, and shortly after six called his wife to breakfast. At that time he thought her better and more cheerful than usual. Shortly afterwards he heard a great noise in the bedroom, and on going upstairs found her full length on the floor in a pool of blood with a carving knife by her side. He went for the doctor, who came in about an hour, but his wife was dead before he arrived. BESSIE FARRANT, a niece, gave corroborative evidence, and said the father of the deceased destroyed himself in very nearly the same way. Evidence was also given by MR FRANK BUTLER, son of the deceased and P.C. martin. Dr Callaghan stated from the first that deceased should be watched, and he believed his instructions were well carried out. He thought it necessary because her father committed suicide, and not on account of any special symptoms in MRS BUTLER which led him to suppose that she would make an attempt on her life. She was depressed, and subject to delusions, but did not think she required to be put under restraint. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned by the Jury. Great sympathy was expressed with the husband who is left with four young children to bring up.

Friday 22 March 1889, Issue 6816 – Gale Document No. Y3200742447
TEIGNMOUTH – Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Mr Sydney Hacker, Coroner, in the Delamore Rooms, Bishopsteignton, touching the death of MISS L. E. HALL, who suddenly expired on Tuesday evening. From the evidence given, it appears that Drs. Little and Broughton made a post mortem examination on Wednesday, and gave their opinion that deceased died from exhaustion, through an internal cancer. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned by the Jury. The funeral of deceased took place today.

Saturday 23 March 1889, Issue 6817 – Gale Document No. Y3200742471
INQUEST AT THE HOSPITAL, THIS DAY - An Inquest was held by Mr W. H. Hooper, at the Hospital, this afternoon, touching the death of MARY ANN BICKEL, of Heavitree, who met her death through an accident. Mr W. Godsland was chosen foreman of the Jury. ROBERT BICKEL, an engraver, of 6, Church-street, Heavitree, said the deceased was his mother, and she was the widow of JOHN BICKEL, a mason. She lived at the same residence as her son. On the 23rd of January last she was in the house and on going from the kitchen to the back-yard she tripped, and fell over a step that she had to cross. Witness was not home at the time of the occurrence, and he did not see deceased until the next day. On his first seeing her she told him what she had done. A medical man was sent for just after the accident, and by his advice his mother was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Sarah Anstey deposed to being sent for and attending to deceased. Mr Russell Coombe said that on the 23rd January deceased was admitted into the hospital suffering from injuries to her left leg. Death was due to the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 23 March 1889, Issue 6817 – Gale Document No. Y3200742493
SAD SUICIDE AT TORQUAY - Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at the Torquay Police-court yesterday, on the body of THOMAS CARTER TOMKINS, 56, retired auctioneer. EUGENE CARTER TOMKINS, son of the deceased, said he left a widow at Ealing. He formerly carried on business at Saltburn-by-the-sea. Jane Warner, deceased's landlady, said he went to bed on Tuesday night, appearing cheerful. The next morning witness sent her son to his room with a cup of tea, and as the deceased did not come down during the day, she went to his room and knocked at the door. As she got no reply, she and her husband entered the room and found deceased dead in bed. She thought he drank spirits. There were several bottles, including the one which had contained the chloral, on the table at the bottom of the bed. William John Rawling, assistant to Mr Bathe, gave evidence as to supplying an ounce of syrup of chloral, which contained eighty grains. He instructed the deceased to take the eight part at bedtime. He did not label the bottle "poison". The Coroner reminded witness that he was required to do so under the Pharmacy Act. Witness added that on the following day the deceased called and said he felt much better after taking the first dose. Frank Evans Cave, one of the house surgeons at the Torbay Hospital, gave the result of a post-mortem examination. Death was caused by the chloral indirectly, although the extensive heart and lung disease was sufficient in itself to account for death. P.C. Coles deposed to finding a number of cards and letters on the table in the deceased's bedroom. On the back of one of the business cards he had written the following:- "I have parted with everything I value. I am sick, weary, in pain, and disheartened. At least I die a classic death, and this rock is a grand tombstone." T. C. TOMPKINS. One of the letters was as follows: - "Dearest Jennie, - My love for you has been my ruin. Your unkindness has been my death – yes, has killed me, and my death is at your door. See me buried! The £10 funeral money from the Oddfellows' Lodge is payable only to you. My love has lasted to the end. Good-bye. – TOM. My riches now consist not in the greatness of my possessions, but the fewness of my wants." This letter was addressed to Mrs J. Harris, Lower Union-street, Torquay. The Coroner read the deceased's will and a letter addressed to Mrs Warner, his landlady, in which the deceased thanked her for her kindness, admitted he owed her 39s. and for sundry cups of tea, and said Mrs Harris would have £10 insurance money from the Oddfellows, and she would pay her. Mrs Jane Harris, widow, confectioner, 14, Lower Union-street, said she had known deceased for many years. He came to her house on a visit for a week, but stayed there sixteen months. As he was of drinking habits, and his conduct otherwise disagreeable, she had to turn him out of the house. She denied having had any correspondence with him. She received one note from him which she returned. The Coroner having summed up the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide by taking chloral in a fit of Temporary Insanity, and added a rider drawing attention to the violation of the law by the omission of the chemist's assistant to label the bottle of chloral poison. The Coroner remarked that the police would take notice of the rider, and if they thought it necessary to take steps, they would, no doubt, do so, now that the matter had been made public.

Thursday 28 March 1889, Issue 6821 – Gale Document No. Y3200742563
NEWTON ABBOT - Sudden Death. – At Newton Abbot last evening, MR JOHN BERRY, senior member of the firm of Messrs. Berry Bros., woollen manufacturers, of Buckfastleigh and Ashburton, and who employs a large number of hands at their factories at these places, died suddenly at the Queen's Hotel. It appears that the deceased gentleman had been to the Newton Market, and was leaving to catch the 5.10 p.m. train to Buckfastleigh. He was in a hot perspiration in trying to catch it, and had to return to the Queen's Hotel. On reaching the Hotel he felt suddenly ill, and prostrated himself over a table in the Hotel. Dr H. S. Davies was at once sent for, but MR JOHN BERRY died before his arrival. Heart disease is apparently the cause of death. Deceased was well known in Devonshire, and the South Hams district especially, while he had extensive business relations with firms in the United Kingdom generally. He was between 50 and 60 years of age, and much respected by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. An Inquest on the deceased was held today, when a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Friday 29 March 1889 Issue 6822 – Gale Document No. Y3200742591
INQUEST AT TORQUAY – THIS DAY - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at Upton Vale Hotel this morning on the body of FREDERICK RICE, aged eight months, son of JOHN RICE, grocer, of 7, Daison Cottages, Upton, Torquay. MRS JAMES RICE, stated that deceased was the youngest of three, and she had nursed it herself, though lately she had given it bread and milk. She was washing it about ten o'clock yesterday morning, when it began to cry and went off into a fit. It was put into a bath of warm water, but did not recover, and died in a few minutes. Deceased was insured in the "Prudential" at 1d. per week, and she would be entitled to 50s. on its death. Mrs Mary Tapley, residing at 12, Daison Cottages, wife of Barnard Tapley, with whom she had not been living for ten years, corroborated, and Dr Thistle proved being called just before eleven, when he found the child had died from teething convulsions. The Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Taylor was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Monday 1 April 1889, issue 6824 – Gale Document No. Y3200742651
SUICIDE OF AN INVALID AT TORQUAY - A confirmed invalid, named JOSEPH R. BISHOP, of No. 3, Hazelwood-terrace, Ellacombe, committed suicide late on Friday night by jumping from his bedroom window into the road, a distance of nearly 40 ft. He sustained such sever e injuries to his head that he died in a few minutes. MR BISHOP had threatened to destroy himself several times. An Inquest was held on the deceased at the police station on Saturday afternoon by Mr Sidney Hacker, district Coroner, and a verdict that deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity was returned by the Jury.

Saturday 6 April 1889, Issue 6830 – Gale Document No. Y3200742759
EXETER – Death from Measles. - This morning the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at No. 93, Clifton-street, Newtown, to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of FLORENCE HILLMAN, aged two years and six months. MRS HILLMAN identified the body. Deceased, she said, was taken unwell last Wednesday week, showing symptoms of measles. She gave her saffron tea and brandy and milk, and deceased greatly improved in health until last Thursday, when she was attacked with bronchitis. The following morning she sent for Dr Mortimer, but before his arrival the child died. Her life was insured in the Prudential Assurance Company. Mr Mortimer, surgeon, deposed that he was called just before eight yesterday morning to see the deceased, but prior to his arrival at the house he was told it was dead. He had examined the body, but there were no marks of violence, and it presented the usual appearance of death resulting from bronchitis following measles. In answer to a Juror he said saffron tea did no good, either did it do any harm. They might give a child as much as they liked. In measles no medicine was required until bronchitis presented itself. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 13 April 1889, Issue 6836 – Gale Document No. Y3200742904
DEATH FROM MEASLES IN EXETER - At the Exeter Police Court this morning the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquiry touching the death of GEORGE PARKHOUSE, a child aged one year and eight months, who died on the previous day. WM. PARKHOUSE, carter of 8, Russell-street, St. Sidwell's, father of the child, identified the body. The child had been more or less ill since birth, and was attended in the summer by Dr Cheese for congestion of the lungs. Yesterday morning the child was taken ill, and a doctor was sent for. Mr Bell arrived, but the child died either shortly before or after his arrival. The child's life was insured, but witness was not sure in what office. The insurance was for £10, but the child must be insured twelve months. He did not suppose he should get anything, as the child had only been insured three months. He had five other children, all of whom were insured in the same office. Mr Bell, surgeon of this city, proved being called to the child at twelve o'clock on the previous day. He found it lying dead in the grandmother's arms. He examined the child and found that it had been suffering from measles, and had died from convulsions brought on by that disease. The Coroner said this was another insurance case, but he had no doubt that the law relating to infant insurance would soon be altered. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BARNSTAPLE - The Fatal Accident. - At the Mermaid Inn yesterday Mr R. Incledon Bencraft (Coroner) held an Inquest of WM. BRAUND, who met with his death whilst in the employ of Messrs. Smyth Bros., tanners. After much evidence and the Coroner having summed up the Jury returned a verdict that deceased met with his death accidentally, and that no blame was attached to anybody.

Monday 15 April 1889, Issue 6837 – Gale Document No. Y3200742938
DEATH FROM AN ACCIDENT - A man named GEORGE STEER, of 44 years of age, died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday morning from injuries received through an accident. It appears that STEER was employed by a farmer named Lee, of Yeoford, and on last Saturday week the wheels of a waggon passed over his right thigh, and yesterday morning it was found necessary to amputate the limb. The unfortunate man, however, died yesterday morning at the institution from exhaustion. The body awaits an Inquest tomorrow morning.

Wednesday 17 April 1889, Issue 6839 – Gale Document No. Y3200742977
THE SAD SUICIDE AT DARTMOUTH – Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Dartmouth Guildhall, yesterday, by Mr R. W. Prideaux, on the body of WILLIAM SCOBLE, who was found dead at the London Hotel as previously reported. Samuel C. Widdicombe, lessee of the Dartmouth market, identified the body. He said deceased was a pork butcher and was about 47 years of age. He last saw him on Saturday night about half past ten. He was then tolerably sober, but he was of intemperate habits. He appeared in trouble about his brother. He gave evidence as to the deceased being found hanging to the staircase with a rope around his neck dead. John Henry Reynolds and P.S. Stentiford also gave evidence. The latter said deceased had a brother in a lunatic asylum. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT DARTMOUTH - Mr Coroner Prideaux held an Inquest at the Dartmouth Guildhall yesterday, touching the death of ISAAC BALL, who met his death under circumstances reported in our last evening's issue. GEORGE BALL, blacksmith, residing at Under cliff, identified the deceased as his son, who was four years and six weeks old. Witness last saw him about dinner-time on Monday. At two o'clock he went to school, and generally returned a little after four to have something to eat. About six p.m. witness's wife began to get uneasy about the child, and eventually gave information to the police. About twenty minutes to eleven o'clock he saw the body of the child in Russell's boat, opposite the Porters' Rest. He took him up and ran home with him. Mary Jane Hannaford said she saw deceased on the New Ground about 5.30 p.m. on Monday, opposite the Coal Lumpers' Rest. He was playing alone. He was not near the edge of the quay. Henry Russell, boatman, proved finding the body with his boat-hook, and pulling it into his boat. The deceased was quite dead. There was about 18 in. of water where he found him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found dead in the water, but how deceased came into the water there was no evidence to show, probably by misadventure."

Wednesday 17 April 1889, Issue 6839 – Gale Document No. Y3200742978
THE END OF A FLOWER SELLER'S LIFE - A Death-Bed of Straw. - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Ship Inn, Newton Abbot, touching the death of MARY ANN ROPER, a widow, aged 66, who died on Sunday in a hovel in No. 10 Court, Wolborough-street. Elizabeth Hall, wife of a fisherman, residing at 3, Myrtle-row, Stentiford's-hill, Torquay, said she had known the deceased several months, and up to five weeks ago she resided at Pimlico, Torquay. She was in receipt of 2s. a week parish pay, besides which she earned something by selling ferns and water cresses. She left Torquay at that time and went to Newton, and witness received a letter from her every week asking her to forward her pay to the Jolly Sailor Inn, where she was lodging. Last Friday she received a letter asking her to send the money to No. 10 Court, and informing her that she wanted to be back in Torquay again, as she was ill, and still getting worse. Joseph Jones, a pedlar, residing in No. 10 Court, said he had known deceased three weeks, having made her acquaintance at the Jolly Sailor Inn. The Sunday week previous she told witness she had no money to pay for her lodgings, and he told her she might share his room such as it was, and he would charge her nothing for it. She had a bad cough, but went on the Monday and Tuesday following fathering flowers, which she sold and bought some food with the money. The remainder of the week she was unable to go out. A doctor was sent for, but deceased died at half-past two on Sunday. Mr J. E. Webber, relieving-officer, said the last witness called him on Saturday. He went to the house and found the poor woman lying on a bundle of straw in the corner of the room in a wretched condition, with nothing but rags to cover her. Seeing she was very ill he went for Dr Davis, and they returned together. By that time the people had made the room a little tidier, and covered the poor woman with a sheet. The bed that Jones and his wife slept in was in the same room, but not a bit of covering on it. If he had been applied to earlier, and she had been well enough to be removed, he should have given her an order for the House. Dr Davis confirmed what had been stated by Mr Webber, and added that the poor woman, when he saw her was almost pulseless and apparently dying. She had evidently been in a bad condition for several days, was badly nourished, and very dirty. She also had a very bad cough. Death was due to bronchial pneumonia. Charles A. Tozer, relieving officer, of Torquay, said he had known the deceased for years, during which time she had had relief "off and on," but regularly for the past two months. She was always troubled with a bad cough, and witness advised her to go into the House, but she declined. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a miserable state of affairs that in a town like that a woman should be allowed to die on a bundle of straw in a miserable garret under such distressing circumstances. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 18 April 1889, Issue 6840 – Gale Document No. Y3200743012
TOTNES – Suicide of a Postman. - A postman of Totnes named JOSEPH SKINNER committed suicide yesterday morning. It appears that about half-past six o'clock a workman named William Sims, in the employ of Messrs. Bentall, Lloyd, and Co., was engaged with some casks near the leat, and close to the bridge, when he saw a walking stick and a postman's hat lying on the banks. He at once proceeded to the residence of Police-Sergeant Nott, and the leat was dragged, with the result that the body of the deceased was found about an hour and a half afterwards. The remains were removed to the Dartmouth Inn to await an Inquest. The deceased was noticed at the Totnes Mills about half-past five o'[clock, and just before six was seen near the spot where he is supposed to have jumped into the water. Deceased was over fifty years of age, and had been in the Post-office employ about thirty years. Domestic trouble is believed to be the cause for the rash act. SKINNER lost his wife a short time since, and had lately resided with his son-in-law at Jubilee-cottages, South-street. At the Inquest on the body, held last evening, it was stated that the deceased was a man of peculiar temperament, and had been depressed since his wife's death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

Saturday 20 April 1889, Issue 6841 – Gale Document No. Y3200743038
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A LITTLE BOY AT NEWTON - An accident, rendered all the more sad by its sudden occurrence, attended with fatal results, happened on Thursday afternoon. WILLIAM GEORGE HAMMETT, a boy of ten years, son of MR GEORGE HAMMETT, a respected police constable of Newton, went to play, as was his wont, in the East-street School playground, about 2 p.m. on Thursday. Accompanied by other playmates, who, as a new form of amusement, suggested their jumping over a rope, he fell in with the idea. A rope was procured, and HAMMETT and his schoolfellows commenced jumping. After some little time had passed, during which the lads merrily acted on their proposal, HAMMETT'S turn to jump arrived. He jumped, but his foot, catching in the rope, he was thrown violently to the ground, pitching on his head. He got up and bathed his bruises, after which he seemed to recover from the shock of his fall. Going home a little later he related the occurrence to his parents, who did not at first attach any importance to the accident, but thought the lad would soon recover. Their hopes, however, that their son would speedily recover were doomed to be suddenly shattered, as the lad suddenly grew worse a short time later, and, after a medical gentleman had been sent for, he died about 9.30 the same evening. his death, naturally, came as a great shock to the anxious parents, who, it should be mentioned, have only resided in the town about two years, having come from Kingsteignton, but who are much esteemed and respected.
An Inquest was held this (Saturday) morning by the Deputy Coroner, Mr S. Edmonds, touching the circumstances attending the death of the deceased lad. G. HAMMETT, police constable, father of the deceased, was the first witness called. He stated he last saw his son alive on Thursday evening. He was in his usual health that morning. About 4.30 p.m. he received information that his son was ill. He went home and found deceased unconscious. When the lad went home his mother did not entertain a serious view of his mishap. He never regained consciousness, and witness remained with him till 9.30 p.m. when he died. Frank Hamley, a lad living in East-street, ten years of age deposed that on Thursday he was playing with HAMMETT in the school playground. HAMMETT in jumping hitched his foot and fell on his hands. When he got up his head was bleeding. There was a good deal of blood. He asked witness to take him to a public conduit to wash the wounds, which witness did. They then went to the Park, deceased complaining of his head en route. Arrived at the Park HAMMETT laid on the ground about a quarter of an hour. He got up and then began to race. After running, he again felt unwell, and laid down. A boy named Frost asked HAMMETT to mind a bottle of barm, and afterwards struck deceased on the head with a handkerchief containing grass. HAMMETT complained of feeling worse, and asked witness to take him home, which he did. James Woodfin, living at No. 7, The Grove, a lad of 15 years, stated that he was going to work shortly before 2 o'clock he saw HAMMETT and Hambley, who asked him to hold a rope for them to jump. He did not comply with the request, and HAMMETT caught hold the rope while Hambley jumped. When HAMMETT jumped he fell on the ground on his head. When he got up he began to cry, and on looking at him witness saw it was bleeding. The jump was about 2 ft. 6 in. in height. Richard Frost, a lad living in Stair's Cottages, said when he saw deceased in the Park he was looking very ill, and was holding his head. The evidence of Dr Ley was to the effect that he examined the deceased about 5 p.m. and found a wound about the size of a pea on the side of the head, three inches above the ear. He was breathing heavily. Witness could find no evidence of fracture. He saw him two hours afterwards and symptoms of compression of the brain were plainly marked. Death was undoubtedly due to rupture of a blood vessel caused by the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerating the deceased's playmate from all blame and expressing their sympathy with the parents in their loss.

Saturday 20 April 1889, issue 6841 – Gale Document No. Y3200743054
THE FATAL ACCIDENT NER YEOFORD - The Inquest. - On Tuesday morning the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE STEER, who died in the institution on Sunday last as already reported. JANE STEER, residing at Neopardy, in the parish of Crediton, identified the body as that of her husband, who, she said, was 45 years of age. He was employed as a farm labourer by Mr Lee. On Saturday the 6th inst., he left home about seven in the morning, being then in his ordinary health. His occupation that day was sewing potatoes, and she was in the field with him until five o'clock in the evening, when she went home. The next thing she heard about him was that he was being brought home in a cart. She went to meet him, and deceased was afterwards conveyed to Yeoford Station. At the latter place he was seen by a medical man, who advised his removal to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was taken. She knew nothing of the accident. James Rendle, labourer, residing at Neopardy, said he knew the deceased, and was at work with him on the 6th inst. Deceased left the field to go home about 5 o'clock, riding on the shafts of a waggon. The horse was going at a slow pace when he left. Witness followed a few minutes after when he heard a cry. He immediately went to where the waggon was and found the deceased lying across the road on his right side, the horse having gone on further. The deceased was conscious and remarked "that he was torn to pieces." Witness on looking more closely saw that he was bleeding from the leg and also from the side of the face. Deceased afterwards said that he fell off the shaft and the horse knocked him along. Where the deceased was driving was a steep field, and the waggon was not dragged. It was unusual not to drag a vehicle going down over the field in question, but there being not much weight in the waggon at the time he supposed it was not thought necessary. Reginald Martin, Assistant House-Surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased at the institution on the 6th instant, at 7.30 p.m. He had a compound fracture of the left thigh, and he was also suffering from shock. He was put to bed, and progressed favourably for the first two days when a change for the worse took place, and he died on Sunday morning last. Death resulted from exhaustion. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 2 May 1889, Issue 6850 – Gale Document No. Y3200743286
DEATH OF A CHILD IN EXETER – Inquest this Afternoon. - This afternoon the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper), held an Inquest at the Police Court on the body of a child named CHARLES GRAY. JESSIE GRAY, wife of WILLIAM GRAY, a labourer, of No. 1, Silver-lane, identified the body as that of her child. She said deceased was two years of age. Had had something growing in his back for the last eighteen months. He had been attended by Mr Bell, who last saw him about a month before his death, which took place this morning before medical aid could be called. The Coroner: Was his life insured? - No, sir. I had him insured, but I let the insurance run out. - In what office? - The Wesleyan. - In how much money? - A penny per week. - What was that to cover? - I forget. - When did you let it run out? - Several months ago. - Are your other children's' lives insured? - No, sir. - Mr Bell, surgeon, said about six weeks ago the mother brought the deceased to him, when it was suffering from disease of the spine. He advised her to get a recommend for the hospital for the child, and he had not seen it since until this morning, when he was called, but on his arrival at the house the child was dead. He had examined the body, but there were no marks of violence, and death was due to convulsions, consequent of the disease from which the child suffered. He might mention that the mother, although in poor circumstances, always looked after her children well. The mother added she had taken deceased to the hospital and it had been attended by Dr Bankhart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Friday 3 May 1889, Issue 6851 – Gale Document No. Y3200743299
SAD SUICIDE AT DEVONPORT – Mr Vaughan, Devonport borough Coroner, held an Inquest at Ford Workhouse last evening on the body of ELIZA SIMMONS, 53 years. Deceased lived at 11, Clowance-street, and on the 27th February was found with her throat fearfully cut. She had a table-knife in her hand, and was very weak from loss of blood. Mr F. Everard Row, police surgeon, sewed up the wound, which was about five inches long and very deep, the windpipe being nearly severed. There was also a cut on her wrist, inflicted, apparently, after the wound in the throat. Twelve days afterwards deceased was admitted to the Workhouse, and was placed in the infirmary, where she remained under the care of two nurses, Mr Row seeing her sometimes two or three times a day. Stimulants and strengthening food were administered artificially, and she progressed favourably until the 11th March. Mr Row then noticed that both the air and swallow tubes were slowly closing, and recommended an operation, believing that if the throat were re-opened, and an artificial air tube inserted the woman might have a chance to recover. She, however, refused to undergo the operation, desiring to be "let alone." Ellen Evel, a neighbour, said deceased, who had to work very hard for her living, had said to her, "I should now be sitting in my easy chair if it had not been for Mr Hutchings," with whom her husband had placed his savings. She seemed to be very down-hearted at times, and said she was tired of her life. The Coroner: Had she any money to live on? - Witness: Only what she worked for. - Did she say how much she had lost by Mr Hutchings? - I never heard her say. She went out scrubbing and ironing, and any work of that sort she could get. The Jury found that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, and desired to publicly recognise the skill and care which |Mr Row had shewn in treating the case.

Monday 6 May 1889, Issue 6853 – Gale Document No. Y3200743361
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – Inquest. - This afternoon the City Coroner, (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at No. 27, Elmside, Blackboy-road, to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZABETH MARSHALL, whose death we reported in our Saturday's issue. Mr H. H. Lamacraft was chosen foreman of the Jury. J. G. SANDERS, master mariner, identified the body as that of his mother-in-law. On Saturday he and his wife received a telegram at Antwery saying deceased was ill, and on their arrival home they found she was dead. Witness's wife had always lived with deceased and she was in perfect health when she left her. Deceased was a temperate woman. William Henry Prowse, assistant city surveyor, residing at 28, Elmside, deposed that he knew the deceased, and had been in the habit of seeing her frequently. When he last saw her alive she was in very good spirits. On Friday he and the neighbours became anxious at not having seen her for some time, and witness went to the back door and knocked. Receiving no reply, he forced the door open and proceeded upstairs. On going in one of the bedrooms he found her lying on the floor dead. She was partially dressed. He then communicated with the police. Mr Bell, surgeon, deposed that he was called by P.C. Sullock to see the deceased. He found her lying on her left side dead. There were no marks of violence, and in his opinion death was due to failure of the heart's action. A verdict of "Death from natural causes was returned."

Tuesday 7 May 1889, Issue 6854 – Gale Document No. Y3200743377
A WOMAN BURNT TO DEATH IN EXETER - Inquest This Day. - Mr W. H. Hooper, the City Coroner, held an Inquest at the New Police Court, Waterbeer-street, this morning, touching the death of SUSAN BECK, who was burnt to death on Sunday last under circumstances already reported. Mr Lyons was chosen Foreman of the Jury, which consisted of eighteen Jurors. MARTHA JEFFREY, living t Torquay, widow of THOMAS JEFFREY, shoemaker, said deceased was her sister, SUSAN BECK, who was the widow of JOHN BECK, a china dealer. She was seventy years of age, and lived in King-street, in the parish of St. George. She knew nothing of the accident. William Quick, general dealer of the West Quarter, said he had known deceased twenty-five years. She lived in King's-street in rooms. She was not a relation of his, but acted as housekeeper for him. He last saw deceased about a quarter to nine on Saturday night at the Teignmouth Inn. She had been out selling oranges, and had a couple of glasses of beer with witness. She left witness just before nine, and went home. He had not seen her alive since. On Sunday morning he went o her house between half-past eight and nine o'clock. He went up in order to ask her to send his dinner to the bakehouse. He tried to enter by the street door, but could not. He knocked, and a Mrs Woodhouse, answering him, called out to the deceased twice, "MRS BECK; MRES BECK." She (Mrs Woodhouse) then told witness that the deceased would be down to his house in a few minutes, and he went home. About 10.30 he sent up again by a Mrs Carter, and she returned saying the deceased would be down in a minute. She was on the way, but she (Mrs Carter) must have missed her. Witness stayed in all day, and in the evening about 6.30 he went to deceased's house again. He walked right upstairs to her room and called out to her. He pushed open the door, and finding the place was full of smoke, he called out "Fire?" and "Murder!" and asked someone to come up. The witness was visibly affected while giving his evidence. The Coroner: Was the woman addicted to drink? - Witness: She had a little drop occasionally. - Mary Woodhouse, wife of Richard Woodhouse, a plasterer, of 11, King-street, said she rented the whole of the house, which contained six rooms, from Mr Strang, at a rental of 62. per week. The deceased rented a furnished apartment from witness paying 1s. 6d. per week for it. She occupied the top back room and lived all alone. Witness last saw her on Saturday morning about 6.30 when she went downstairs to go out. Witness called her and gave her a cup of tea. She did not see her again. Deceased went home on Saturday night about 9.30. Witness heard her and called out "is that Granny Beck?" She replied yes, and witness asked her to bolt the door. She did so, and called out "good night missus, God bless you." She seemed sober in her answers, but witness did not see her. On Sunday morning before she was up the last witness went and asked her to call MRS BECK. She did so, and believed she answered her. Witness told Quicke she would be down in a minute. When Quicke went in the evening, he went upstairs, and came down again, calling, "Fire," "Murder," "My mother's burning." Witness's husband went upstairs, burst open the door, and found deceased. A policeman was sent for. There was a fire place in deceased's room, but witness did not think she had had a fire there for two months. Deceased always told witness that she burnt a candle, and not a lamp, as she had warned her not to burn oil. Witness did not smell anything burning that day. The other tenants in the house were a Mrs Powell, Mrs Guppy, witness and her husband, and their son and his wife, seven in all. Elizabeth Powell, a single woman, who occupies a room next to that used by the deceased, said she had not seen the deceased for days, but she had heard her. On Saturday night, between nine and ten o'clock, she heard the deceased go up the stairs. She called out, "Good night." She did not carry a candle, as she was used to the stairs. Witness did not smell any fire, nor did she hear the deceased all day on Sunday. When Quicke's messenger reached the house on Sunday morning witness saw her, and receiving no answer on knocking at the deceased's door they came to the conclusion she had gone. P.C. Guppy said on Sunday evening, about 5.50, he was on duty in Preston-street when he heard cries of fire, and saw people running towards King-street. He went to No. 11 in that street, and there he saw Quicke, who said, "Mr Guppy, MRS BECKS upstairs burnt to death." Witness went up the stairs, and there saw a Mr Woodhouse and a neighbour throwing water in the room, which was full of smoke. Witness went in, and at the top of the room, lying on the floor, between the side of the bed and the chair, was the body of the woman. Witness took her by the hand and moved her, but found she was quite dead. He should say she was fully dressed, but her clothes were burnt. He despatched messengers for the police, fire brigade, and stretcher, and then went up stairs again. Eventually the body was taken to the mortuary. Witness searched the room in company with Superintendant Pett, and Sergeant Sullock. They found that the bedding was burnt, and amongst the burnt straw of the palliass found a small kettle, and a glass bottle oil lamp. In the lamp was a small quantity of oil. They also found a box of matches and some coppers. In the cupboard in the room were several empty bottles. Witness afterwards saw Quicke and asked him what time he last saw the deceased and he replied on Saturday night about eight o'clock. Witness could not find the key of the door and asked Quicke where it was. He said he had it as deceased gave it to him on the night previous, with two others. Witness went back to the house and found that both the keys (produced) fitted the door. Witness also saw the woman Carter, who said, when she was in the landing calling MRS BECK she knocked the door and not getting any answer she looked in the keyhole, the room was then perfectly clear. Mrs Powell also looked through the keyhole and found the room clear. Witness asked Quicke how old deceased was. He said he couldn't tell now, but he used to be able to tell by the policy. Witness said, "Was she insured then," and Quicke replied "She was sometime ago, but I have let her run out for a long time." Witness should not think deceased had been to bed. Mr Perkins, surgeon, South-street, said he was called on Sunday evening a little after six o'clock to go to King-street to see deceased. On going down Preston-street he was told to go to the Mortuary. He went and there saw the body which he examined. There were no marks of violence nor could he detect any smell of spirit or beer. He found the body exceedingly burnt in various parts, nearly all the clothes being entirely burnt off. The right leg and thigh were exceedingly burnt. The left leg was very little touched. The abdomen was entirely burnt and black. A portion of one of the arms was burnt, the face much blackened and swollen. Death was undoubtedly due to burning. In answer to a juror, the witness said he could not say how long the woman had been dead when he saw her. The body was warm when he saw it at the mortuary. In answer to a Juror Quicke was re-called, and said the life policy on deceased had run out about eighteen months. The Coroner said there was no direct evidence as to how deceased came by her death. She was found dead but how or by what means she came by her death, they had no evidence to know. She was evidently all right on the Saturday night and up to eleven o'clock on the Sunday morning, and it must have been after that the fire occurred. However, they had the facts before them, and it was for them to judge. The Jury, after a short consultation, returned an open verdict. Mr Strang, the owner of the house, asked to be allowed to make an explanation. The "Western Times" had made a statement on the previous day which was entirely untrue, except so far as it dealt with the death of the poor woman. They had taken on themselves to give the dimensions of the room – which were wrong – and had stated that there were seven tenants in the house. That might easily be construed into twenty-five or more people, if each tenant was a man with a wife and two children; whereas, as a matter of fact, there were only seven persons in all residing in the house. The paper had, however, inserted a paragraph to say that the statements were not correct, and he (Mr Strang) was willing to have the house inspected.

Saturday 11 May 1889, Issue 6858 – Gale Document No. BA3200743462
A DANGEROUS ROAD IN TORQUAY – A Cabman Killed. - An Inquest was held at the Torbay Hospital last evening by Mr Sydney Hacker, District Coroner, touching the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM WILLS, 58, cabdriver, of 4, Chester-place, Torre, who died on the previous day from injuries received in a cab accident on Braddon-hill on May 2nd. GEORGE ALFRED WILLS, cabdriver, of 4, Higher-terrace Mews, said the deceased was his uncle, and was employed by Mr F. U. Webb, cab proprietor, of Lansdown Mews, Torre. On the previous Monday deceased explained how the accident happened. He said he had just dropped his fare, and was mounting the box when the carriage turned over, fell on him, and e was dragged for some distance. Deceased was quite sensible when the conversation took place. Witness had since seen the carriage, and he thought it not fit for public work. It was so constructed that it was liable to lurch when going around a corner. Such carriages were seldom placed on the stand. Elizabeth Turner, of 3, Higher Braddon, proved seeing the accident. Deceased mounted the box, and endeavoured to turn the horse, but the wheels of the carriage seemed to lock, and the vehicle turned over, deceased being underneath. The horse plunged and dragged deceased and the carriage for about twenty yards. When picked up the man appeared to be greatly injured, and he was subsequently conveyed to the hospital. John Henry Rowe Collins, carpenter of 2, Higher Braddon-street, also gave evidence. He said the road was very much out of the level, and he thought this accounted for the accident. Mr Heales, House-Surgeon, at the Torbay Hospital, said the deceased was admitted on the 2nd instant. He was suffering from a lacerated wound of the scalp six inches long. It was a very ragged wound, and part of the scalp had been torn away. Both bones of the left leg were fractured, and there were several bruises on the body. Inflammation set in on the 4th inst., and he died on Thursday, 9th inst., about seven o'clock in the evening. Death was caused by the injuries and exhaustion brought about by the shock to the system. Mr F. U. Webb, carriage proprietor, said the deceased had been in his employ for a large number of years. The carriage deceased drove had been in use for eleven years, and was not at all of an uncommon description. He attributed the accident to the condition of the road. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and added a rider to the effect that the attention of the Local Board be called to the dangerous condition of the road. The Jury gave their fees to the Hospital.

Tuesday 14 May 1889, Issue 6860 – Gale Document No. Y3200743536
DETERMINED SUICIDE AT PLYMOUTH – Cut his Throat and then Drowned Himself. - An Inquiry was held at Plymouth yesterday touching the death of JOHN TRAIN, aged 72, who was found in the water at Sutten Pool. Mary Ann French, wife of a fisherman, living at 35, New-street, identified the body of the deceased, and said he lived in the same house with her. On Saturday night, at about a quarter to ten, she heard a noise in the room of the deceased as if something had fallen to the floor. The wife of deceased had been dead six or seven months, and he had been strange since that time. William Brett stated that at ten o'clock on Saturday night he was asleep on board a trawler, which was lying at Vauxhall Quay. At half-past four on Sunday morning he went ashore, and after he had been on the Quay about five minutes he discovered a body floating near the vessel. He obtained assistance, and the body was brought ashore. He afterwards perceived that the throat was cut. Inspector Wood stated that when the occurrence was reported to him he went to the room of the deceased. He found the furniture packed up as if ready for removal. On the floor, about three feet from the bedstead, he found a razor covered with blood. His opinion was that the deceased cut his throat while he was sitting on the bedstead, and then fell on the floor. He found spots of blood on the stairs, and also in New-street. Mr Wolfeslen proved holding a post mortem on deceased. Examination of the internal organs led him to believe that death had resulted from drowning. He believed that deceased could have walked without assistance after cutting his throat from his house to Vauxhall Quay. The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said that it appeared the man had thrown himself into the water after ineffectually attempting to cut his throat. The Jury were of opinion that the deceased attempted first to cut his throat and then drowned himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Wednesday 15 May 1889, Issue 6861 – Gale Document No. Y3200743554
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - Yesterday the Borough Coroner (Mr R. I. Bencraft) held an Inquest at the Globe Inn, Queen-street, touching the death of a child, aged one year and ten months, daughter of WILLIAM HENRY SPURWAY, basket-maker, of Aze's-lane, which was briefly recorded in our last night's issue. The father of the deceased child said it was scarcely two years old, and had always been somewhat delicate. She suffered chiefly from bronchitis. On Sunday night the infant was attacked with tightness on the chest, and they applied poultices and oil, and on Monday she appeared to be better. That (Tuesday) morning, however, between five and six o'clock, when witness got up to go to work, the child seemed worse, and on his returning at breakfast-time he found she was dead. They did not call a doctor until that morning. The child was insured in the Prudential Office, and had been for about eighteen months. The premium was 1d. per week, and on the child's death witness became entitled to about £3. His other child was also insured. Mr J. W. Cooke, surgeon, stated that on being called to the child he found it lying in a cradle downstairs and it had just died. The deceased was a thin, delicate child, and frequently suffered from bronchitis. He attended for that complaint about three months ago. There were no indications of the child having died from other than natural causes, and he thought it very probable that bronchitis was the cause of death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Friday 17 May 1889, Issue 6863 – Gale Document No. Y3200743595
THE ALLEGED CHILD MURDER AT BARNSTAPLE - A Scene Between the Coroner and the Jury. - The Inquest on the body of the child FREDERICK PULSFORD SMYTH, whose death, under such painful circumstances, was recorded in our last night's issue, was held yesterday evening before Mr R. Incledon Bencraft, Coroner. Mr W. A. Roberts, appeared on behalf of MR PULSFORD and family. MR JOHN PULSFORD, statuary mason, deposed that just before six o'clock that morning his daughter ADA came to his room and told him that "FREDDIE is at rest – in Heaven." He asked where the child was, and she answered "In the bath." He found the child in 15 inches of water, quite dead. He went for Dr Harper. His daughter seemed to think she had put the child to bed. There was no doubt her mind was wandering, and that she did not know what she was doing. MRS SMYTH was dotingly fond of the child. Mr J. Harper and Mr J. W. Cooke, surgeons, also gave evidence. The latter said he had attended MRS SMYTH since her return from the Cape. She suffered from sleeplessness and melancholia, and was in a despondent condition. He was called to see her that morning, and he found she was quite insane. She seemed to think she had done her duty and remarked that the child was gone to Jesus, and was happy. Inspector Eddy deposed that he saw MRS SMYTH about nine o'clock. She said, "My God! What have I done? I have not killed my baby have I? I don't believe I have; I am sure I have not;" and then begged her sister and the nurse to try and wake the baby. He afterwards charged her with murdering her child, and she replied, "If I have, I hope God will forgive me. I know God is merciful, and I do not know why He allowed me to do such a thing." She subsequently said the child could not sleep for several nights, and that she thought she had sent him to sleep with Jesus. She appeared to be insane.
Some further conversations having taken place, in which one of the Jurymen said something about the state of mind of the mother.
The Coroner informed the Jury that they were going astray, and he must keep them straight. Their inquiry was not as to the state of mind of the mother; there was no doubt as to that; but he was bound to say they were not there to arrive at any such conclusion.
A Juror asked to be enlightened as to what they were there for.
The Coroner said their duty was to say what was the cause of death.
Mr Roberts demanded, as solicitor for the wife, to address the Jury, as the result of that Inquiry might be that she would be indicted.
The Coroner: She must.
Mr Roberts warmly replied that the Coroner had no right to prejudge what the magistrates would do.
The Coroner said there must be another tribunal.
A Juror said a great deal would depend on what they did.
Mr Roberts said it was scandalous for the Coroner to say what the magistrates, for whom he acted as clerk, were bound to do.
The Coroner explained that he meant that if it came before the magistrates they would have no right to inquire into the state of the woman's mind.
Mr Roberts still considered that the Coroner had no right to prejudge what the magistrates would do. He then went on to address the Jury ,saying that the Jury could bring in either of these verdicts, wilful murder, manslaughter, or that death resulted from misadventure and he thought, looking at the circumstance of the case, nothing was more likely than that the death was the result of misadventure, and he asked the Jury to return a verdict to this effect.
The Coroner then summed up to the Jury and reminded them that there was no evidence of misadventure, and said that if they came to such a verdict he should be as pleased as surprised to record it, but it would be their verdict and not his.
The Jury were considering for three hours, and at nine o'clock the Coroner reopened the court to the public. He said he regretted that although the Jury had been consulting nearly three hours they were unable to come to any verdict on the subject, and therefore he adjourned the Inquiry to the next Assizes for the county of Devon, when he should report to the judge what had taken place. It would then be for the judge to deal with the matter. He (the Coroner) had no power to discharge the Jury himself, but the judge would have such power, and would be able to take any other steps. Therefore they must consider the Inquiry adjourned to the next Assizes, of which the Jury would have due notice. The Foreman, on behalf of the Jury, moved a vote of condolence and sympathy with the bereaved family, which the Jury unanimously adopted.
It is understood, says a correspondent, that the Jury were unanimous in not returning a verdict of Wilful Murder, but differed as to whether the verdict should be one of "Misadventure" or "Found drowned in a bath." The Jury were equally divided on the point. The discussion was at times of a heated character, and more than one Juryman questioned the right of the Coroner to remain in the room during the deliberations. The Coroner asserted that it was his own court, in which he had a perfect right to remain. It is expected that MRS SMYTH will be brought before the magistrates today at the police court on a charge of wilful murder.

Friday 17 May 1889, Issue 6863 – Gale Document No. Y3200743591
THE IMPROPER FEEDING OF INFANTS - Another Child Death in Exeter. - Mr H. W. Hooper, the City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Guildhall this morning touching the death of ALBERT EDWARD WEBBER, a child, four months old, who died under circumstances detailed in the evidence below. BERTHA WEBBER, wife of ROBERT WEBBER, labourer, Sadler's-lane, in the parish of St. Edmund's, said the deceased was her child and was four months old. She nursed the child herself up to the time it was taken ill. She then went to Mr Harris, and had fed it on nothing else but milk and the medicine he gave her. The child was suffering from bronchitis, and died on Monday evening at 5.30.
The Child's Life was insured for 30s. in the Wesleyan General Office. The child had been insured about three months. She did not think she would get the insurance money as she had let the payments lapse. She had, however, had the money from the office on the previous day. She had not tried to keep the matter secret, nor had she applied to have the child buried by the Corporation. In answer to further questions the witness said she had fed the child on bread and sugar before Mr Harris saw it. When he saw it he told her that was too heavy a food for the child to digest. Mr Harris, surgeon, residing and practising in Exeter, said he was called to the child on April 30th. He found it in pain, and told the mother he thought this was caused by its not being able to digest the food which she told him she had given it. It was suffering from diarrhoea, probably brought on by the fermentation of the bread it had eaten. The child had the appearance of being clean and well looked after. He had seen the body since death; there were no marks of violence. The cause of death was internal bronchitis, occasioned by the irritation consequent upon improper feeding. The Coroner drew attention to the fact that this was one of those cases which would possibly be dealt with ere long by Parliament.
It was very pernicious to his mind that children of tender years should be the subject of life insurance. And then, as to the feeding, in his opinion no child ought to be given anything but milk until of the age of five months. It was a very improper proceeding to feed children as they were now, and if done wilfully it would be the subject of an Enquiry. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and Mr Stone (a Juryman) expressed the opinion that if they were to hold an Inquest on every child that died in this way in the city their time would be fully occupied. The Coroner said he did not think so, and explained that when notice to the registrar contained facts that necessitated his following an Enquiry he must do so. He did not want to multiply the cases, but the subject was one which at present was occupying the attention of the country. Mr Stone said it was a stigma on the character of the working classes to think that they will feed their children in an improper manner in order to get a paltry 30s. Anybody who had had anything to do with funerals would know that there was nothing to be made out of it. The Coroner said he could not listen to this, but Mr Stone said he came there to express his opinion, and should do so. Another Juryman said he thought the improper feeding was more the result of kindness than otherwise; and another gave it as his opinion that gentlefolks did not understand working people. The Coroner interrupted the discussion by reading the inquisition, and the Inquiry terminated.

Tuesday 21 May 1889, Issue 6866 – Gale Document No. Y3200743676
SUDDEN DEATH OF A CHILD AT SEATON – The Doctor and the Coroner. - Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest at the Clarence Hotel, Seaton, yesterday, on the body of a child named MURIEL TUNSTALL, who died on Saturday morning. HENRIETTA TUNSTALL, mother of the deceased, and wife of WILLIAM GEORGE TUNSTALL, an accountant, of Mere, identified the body, and said deceased was ten weeks' old. Dr Evans deposed to being called at 6.30 on Saturday morning to go to the deceased child. On his arrival he found that the child was dead. He inquired of the mother if the child had had anything like convulsions, and he could not get anything like information which would satisfy him as to the cause of death in any way. He made a post mortem examination of the body, by order of the Coroner, on Saturday. He found a mark – about half-an-inch – on the right cheek, and a small mark on the forehead. There were some slight marks about the nose, but he noticed that there was little trace of them left that (Monday) morning. He saw no other marks about the body externally. The Coroner: Could you form an opinion from the aspect of the marks as to how they might have been caused? - Witness: The upper mark might have been caused by the pressure of the fingers of the child. – The Coroner: During a convulsive fit, or otherwise? - Witness: At any time immediately before death. The marks were now much more apparent than they were before the death of the child. If the child had lived the marks would not have been noticeable. At any rate, he was perfectly satisfied that the marks were superficial.
The Coroner: No marks of violence? Witness: Certainly not. In case the witness had not seen the child, could he certify that death was due to convulsions on seeing the body afterwards? - Witness replied that he should not have given a certificate. The Coroner said he had had a certificate handed to him which was open to a great deal of comment. It was given by a doctor, who certified that the cause of death was convulsions. He (the Coroner) asked what opportunity had that doctor, who resided at Mere, of having a personal knowledge that the child died of convulsions; he considered that he had no right to give that certificate. Addressing MR TUNSTALL, the Coroner said: "And you can tell him so, MR TUNSTALL, if you see him." - MR TUNSTALL: All right, sir – The Coroner said that the case was one for inquiry. He thought Dr Evans had done nothing but his duty, and he hoped he would continue to do so. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 22 May 1889, Issue 6867 – Gale Document No. Y3200743701
SUICIDE IN EXETER THIS AFTERNOON - This afternoon an elderly man named CHARLES BERRY, of Regent-street, St. Thomas, committed suicide by throwing himself into the canal from the Salmon Pool Bridge. The deceased who is a married man with a family, is well known in the neighbourhood, and both yesterday and today he entered the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks. Whilst there this morning he seemed depressed and talked about his debts. Shortly after this he was seen in the Canal by some children, and on being taken out of the water life was found to be extinct. The body was taken to the Welcome Inn, where it now awaits an Inquest.

Thursday 23 May 1889, Issue 6868 – Gale Document No. Y3200743722
SAD ACCIDENT AT THE SAINT THOMAS'S WORKHOUSE – Inquest – This Day. - This morning Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the St. Thomas Union Workhouse to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of an inmate named RICHARD YOULDON. Jessie Ellis, nurse, identified the body. She said deceased, who was formerly a mariner, was 86 years of age, and had been an inmate for some time. He was under her care and was in the habit of going out. On Sunday week last she was informed by the wardsman that the deceased had met with an accident, and on going to his assistance she found him sitting in a chair in an unconscious state. He had sustained a cut to his head, besides bruises on other parts of the body. Deceased shortly after became conscious, and having dressed his wounds, she had him put to bed. The following morning and during the week he was attended by a medical man, and he remained under his care until his death, which took place on Sunday last. He was not subject to fits. John Bradford, workman, deposed to finding the deceased at the bottom of some stairs with his head between his legs, in an unconscious state. He heard a noise just previous which made him proceed to the spot. He called the nurse's attention to him, and she went and dressed his wounds. Deceased never told him how it occurred. Mr H. T. Hartnoll, medical officer to the Workhouse, said the deceased was placed under his care in the infirmary about three years ago, suffering from general debility, and he had constantly attended him since. His mind was affected by old age. On his visiting the infirmary on Monday the 13th inst. he was informed of the accident. He examined the deceased's wounds, and saw they had been properly dressed. On the following Wednesday he observed that inflammation had set in to the wound on the head, and from that time deceased began to sink. He attended to him daily until the following Saturday, when he saw there was no hope of his recovery. Death arose from shock to the system, the result of the injuries. The Coroner, in summing up, said the stairs which the deceased had appeared to fallen down over were very narrow, and it occurred to him that a railing might be placed there with advantage so that patients might not be placed in jeopardy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider conveying the Coroner's suggestion to the Guardians.

Friday 24 May 1889, Issue 6869 – Gale Document No. Y3200743752
SUICIDE IN THE EXETER CANAL – Inquest this Afternoon. - This afternoon Mr W. H. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Welcome Inn, Haven Banks, to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES WILLIAM BERRY, whose body was picked up in the Exeter Canal, as already stated. ANN BERRY, residing in Oxford-street, St. Thomas, identified the body as that of her husband, who, she said, was 66 years of age, and carried on the business of a coal dealer. She last saw him alive on Wednesday morning last, about half-past nine, when he left home to go down to the stables. The next thing she heard was that the deceased was drowned. He had been unwell for some time, and on several occasions his mind appeared to wander. He had had a great deal of trouble, owing partly to illness and the death of one of his sons. He was also owed money, which seemed to worry him. She had, however, never heard him threaten to commit suicide. He was troubled with faintness, and the morning he left home she advised him not to go out. Some time since he was kicked in the head by his donkey, which seemed to affect him. Charles Williams, a boy, residing in Bartholomew-street, said on Wednesday afternoon he, in company with his brother, was walking down the banks of the Canal when they saw the deceased near the Salmon Pool drawbridge. After going further down the banks their attention was drawn to something in the water by a gentleman. Witness saw the body of a man, and immediately sent for a policeman. On returning the body had been recovered from the water, and he then found it was the man they saw a short time previous. Fredk. Westcott, labourer, residing at the Round Tree Inn, Frog-street, deposed that on Wednesday afternoon, between three and 4 o'clock he was proceeding up the canal banks, when a gentleman pointed to the deceased in the water, and told him to fetch a boat, which he did. The body was afterwards taken from the water. The deceased's coat and hat were lying on the bank. P.S. Egan deposed to searching the body after it was taken from the water, and finding 5s. 6d., 3s. 4d., and a knife. Mr Vlieland, surgeon, said he examined the body on Wednesday evening. There were no marks of violence, and it presented the usual appearance of death having resulted from drowning. The Coroner in summing up said there was no direct evidence how the deceased came into the water, whether accidentally or not. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 25 May 1889, Issue 6870 – Gale Document No. Y3200743801
SAD SEQUEL TO THE INCOME-TAX SALE IN EXETER – Alleged Manslaughter. - On Monday morning the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Guildhall to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM CHANNON, butcher, of Bridge-street, whose decease we reported in our Friday night's issue. Mr Friend represented the Railway Passengers Assurance Company, and inspector Short, of the City Police, and Sergt. Egan, of the Devon Constabulary, also watched the proceedings.
ANN CHANNON, widow of the deceased, identified the body. She said her husband was forty-seven years of age, and by trade a butcher. He had not been strong for some time, having been under medical treatment by Dr Farrant, both before and after Christmas. He died on Friday morning last, having been taken ill about four o'clock with diarrhoea and vomiting. He had complained during the week of a pain in his head. On Monday last, he attended the income tax distress sale at Alphington-street, and on returning to told her he had been struck in the head with a mangel, which was thrown at him, by whom he did not know. There was then visible a bruise on the right side of the head. He said it pained him very much, and made him dizzy for the time. By Mr Friend: She was fully aware that her husband's life was insured in the Railway Insurance Accidental Office, and she was also aware that the agent was Mr Brewer, stationmaster of St. Thomas. She had not made any communication to him until this morning. The skin of the head was not in any way broken. There might have been a swelling, but she did not see any. Deceased treated it lightly. The last time he was attended by a medical man was about Christmas last. John Sweet, coachman, residing in Okehampton-street, said he had known the deceased for sixteen or seventeen years. On Monday last he saw him attending a sale at Mr McLaren's in St. Thomas, under a distress by the Inland Revenue authorities. The proceedings took place in a little yard behind the house, the auctioneer being Mr Wills. He should think there were about 200 people present. During the sale small bags of flour were thrown about. He saw deceased struck by a mangel on the right side of the head, but he did not see who threw it. Deceased was about a yard from him, and on being hit exclaimed "That's a hot one for me." He then walked away, and witness followed. He appeared to be in great pain then. After having a glass of ale together deceased went home. The mangel might have been a little larger than his hand. Witness saw deceased again late in the evening, but he did not complain. On the following day, however, he spoke of the pain the blow caused him, and he repeatedly complained during the week. He last saw him alive on Friday morning in bed. – By Mr Friend: He appeared to be more and more in pain every time he saw him. - By Inspector Short: He could not tell whether the mangel came from the garden or the yard. – Inspector Short: Should you say it came from a distance by the force? – A: I should say about five yards. – A Juror: Who were the things thrown towards? – They were thrown to those there to receive them. They were thrown towards the auctioneer. He considered it purely an accident that it came into contact with MR CHANNON'S head. There was no malice shown towards deceased. William Henry Oliver, innkeeper, residing at the Ship Inn, 43 Alphington-street, said he knew deceased, and saw him about half past eleven on Monday evening last, when they went from witness's yard into deceased's garden, to see whether they could stand to throw bags of flour at the bailiff and auctioneer. Deceased knew the flour was going to be thrown, and he gave people leave to go in his garden to throw it; but CHANNON did not throw any. The flour was in the garden in a box. When the auctioneer (Mr Wills) went into Mr McLaren's yard deceased said he would go with him, or else he (the auctioneer) would swear that it was him in his garden throwing it. He believed the flour came from Mr McLaren's, but he would not swear to that. CHANNON had nothing to do with getting it. It was, he believed, sent by Mr McLaren. He did not see any mangel. He was standing 30 ft. away on a roof. – A Juror: Did you throw any flour? – No sir. – The Coroner: Did you hear anything about yellow ochre or rotten eggs? – Witness: Yes, sir. MR CHANNON proposed that some yellow ochre and any rotten eggs that could be found should be mixed with the flour, but none was used. James Rattenbury, of the Devon Constabulary, stationed at St. Thomas, deposed to seeing the deceased at the sale above referred to on Monday last, when he complained to him of having been struck in the head. He appeared perfectly sober at the time. Later in the day he again saw him, when he said he had been struck with a mangel. Witness visited the yard on the following day and searched, but was unable to find any portion of the mangel. He had also searched his garden, but was unable to find any mangel. Mr Farrant, surgeon, residing in St. Thomas, said on Friday morning last he was called to attend the deceased. He found him in bed, and he died almost immediately on his arrival. He was informed by his wife that he had been suffering from diarrhoea and vomiting, accompanied by a severe pain in his head. Having heard that he had sustained an injury to his head, he examined it, but found no marks of violence. On the following day, by the Coroner's orders, he made a post mortem examination, being assisted by Dr Mortimer and Mr Vlieland. The skin at the side of the neck and head had become discoloured by decomposition. On removing the scalp no contusion or fracture of any kind was visible, but on opening the head he discovered distinct signs of acute inflammation of the membranes of the brain, with considerable effusion of turbid serum beneath the aerachnoid. There was no trace of extravasation of the blood, and the brains were healthy. On opening the chest the heart and bowels were normal, and the lungs, kidney, and liver natural. He had known deceased for about twenty-five years, and last attended him for three weeks in October last, when he was suffering from a little congestion of the liver and indigestion. Having heard the evidence as the injury, and after carefully considering the condition of the brain, as ascertained by the post mortem examination, he was of opinion that the deceased died from sereval effusion, following some acute inflammation of the membranes of the brain, and that such a condition might be the effect of concussion, the result of the blow.
Mr Friend: Was he of temperate habits? – A: I never knew him the worse for liquor. I should not say he was a teetotaller. – Mr Friend: Is there any other way in which you think death might have been brought about except by the injury you have described to us? – Mr Farrant: Nothing that I could say. Both Mr Vlieland and Mr Mortimer agreed in what he had said. – A Juror: Do you think his life would have been prolonged if this had not happened? - A: Yes. I think he would in all probability have been living now. This was all the evidence. The Coroner, in addressing the jury, said the case was one of considerable importance, and he thought it right that an Inquiry should be held when notice was given him of it. He also directed that a post mortem examination should be made in order to prove to a certain extent what the cause of death was, and he thought the Jury had been clearly shown what it had arisen from. As he had said before it was a matter of serious consequence against somebody, because these people were in this yard throwing these things about, and he was bound to tell them they were engaged in an unlawful act. If the deceased had come by his death by the blow it was alleged came from that mangel, it was desirable that the one who threw it should be discovered, because if it was so he was bound to tell them it amounted to manslaughter without a shadow of doubt. He believed they would agree with him that there would be n harm whatever in adjourning the case for a day or two, or a longer time if they liked, in order that further enquiries might be made, so that they might come to a right, proper, and legal result. He thought the Jury would agree with him that it was a matter of serious consequence. These people were there obstructing the law. This man in St. Thomas, it appeared, refused to pay his income-tax, and the distraint gave rise to great irritation. It was doubtful whether CHANNON was not a party in getting up the affair and assisted in throwing turnips about. It became a question where two men were engaged together whether the death ensued of one from a wrong act of the other. That man, if he could be discovered, who threw the mangel which had caused the death of the deceased, he was bound to tell them, in the eye of the law was guilty of manslaughter. He thought it would be no harm to adjourn in order that inquiries might be made by the police both in St. Thomas and Exeter, and he trusted that the party might yet be found who was guilty of the act of throwing this mangel. It was decided to adjourn the Inquiry for a week, and the Jurymen were bound over to attend at the Guildhall on Monday next, at 10 a.m.

Monday 27 May 1889 , Issue 6871 – Gale Document No. Y3200743817
THE SAD DEATH OF MR CHANNON – Adjourned Inquest – This Day. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an adjourned Inquest at the Guildhall this morning on the body of WILLIAM CHANNON, butcher, of Bridge-street, who met his death under circumstances already reported. Mr Friend watched the Inquiry on behalf of the Insurance Company, and the Chief Constable and Detective Dymond on behalf of the police. George McLaren, a baker, residing in Alphington-street, said he remembered the 13th May, on which day a distraint sale was held, at his house under a warrant for £1 12s. 6d. income tax. The sale took place in the yard at the back of his premises, and Mr Wills was the auctioneer. He saw MR CHANNON there that day. The sale-yard was separated from deceased's yard by a brick wall. Previous to the sale witness placed a number of little bags of flour on his counter. There were about forty there in all. He did not suggest that anything should be mixed with the flour. He said nothing about yellow ochre and rotten eggs. He told Mr Oliver the bags were there. All the bags were taken away, but he did not see who took them. His wife had been told it was Oliver. He saw the deceased at the sale, and after it was over he (deceased) told witness that he had had a severe blow on the head with a mangold or turnip. The flour he mentioned was not paid for. It was not flour, it was sack shakings. Witness produced a specimen bag of flour which he said did not weight a pound. By the Jury: CHANNON did not go into his place for the flour. If a witness at the last hearing said so he was mistaken. He was not paid for the flour. – By Mr Friend: He thought it unfair to sell his pony, and so intended to give the auctioneers a little flour. He had told one or two that the flour was there if they wanted it. He did not tell the deceased this. – By the Chief Constable: The flour in the bags was called "sack shavings" it could not be used for anything. - John Phillips, a labourer, Alphington-street, said he attended the sale on May 13th. He was in the yard. He saw things being thrown about including flour, but could not say who was throwing it. It was being thrown from both sides of the yard. He saw something come from the angle of MR CHANNON'S garden and strike him. He did not particularly notice what it was. It would not be possible to look over the wall without being raised. He had been in deceased's garden and knew that in the corner named there was a slope. It was from this direction that he should think the missile he saw came. It looked like a mangold or turnip, but he could not say positively that it was. CHANNON remarked, "I've got a hot one; a regular hot one. He did not see him (deceased) throw anything. – By a Juror: He saw only one man in CHANNON'S garden, but he could not say who it was. – By Mr Friend: He was standing within four feet of the deceased when he was struck. He did not know how the person got into the garden. He was not asked to go in. – By the Chief Constable: He saw John Carter standing on the top of a ladder. That was the only man he recognised. There was a wall round the garden, and to take aim at any particular person you would have to mount on something. Frank Tothill, carter, of Okehampton-place, said he was at the sale on the day in question. He had a stable adjourning the deceased's garden. He was out with a colt of his that morning and just as the sale commenced he returned. He saw MR CHANNON in his own garden with some other men. He heard him say come along we will have a game with these people here. I'll go round with the auctioneer or they will say I've thrown it as it is in my garden. There were several men in the garden that he knew. The men he knew were named Wills, Carter, and Holland. He saw the deceased struck and thought it was with a bag of flour, but he put up his hand and said "This is a hot 'un." He did not know if there were any turnips or mangolds in the deceased's garden, but he did not think so. – By the Jury: He did not think any flour was thrown until CHANNON had left his garden. He (witness) had no mangold in his stable. - By the Chief Constable: Witness threw some water before the sale commenced. When deceased was struck Carter was on the ladder, as mentioned by a previous witness. He was the only man in the garden at the time. Witness did not see him throw anything. Some other men were on the wall in another garden. Tom Carter, who was cautioned by the Coroner, said he was a labourer lodging at the Round Tree Inn. He remembered the sale which he attended. He was on a ladder in MR CHANNON'S garden from which he could see the sale. He went into the garden by the front way from Cowick-street. He was there at work for the deceased. There were twelve or fourteen other people there. MR CHANNON let them in himself. He said to them, "Here you are, you chaps; you can fire a lot of flour. Here it is for you to fire as you are minded." MR CHANNON gave the men the flour, but witness did not see him throw any himself. . He was in the garden during the first part of the time that flour was being thrown, but afterwards left. Witness threw one or two bags of flour before he got on to the ladder. He did not throw any hard substance, turnip, mangold, or anything of that kind, nor did he see anybody else. The men in the garden with witness, he believed, were all sober. He was sure there was neither turnip nor mangold in the garden. There were some potatoes growing there. The deceased was sober at the time. – By the Jury: He was sure that flour was thrown before deceased left the garden. Most f the flour was thrown before the auction commenced. – By the Chief Constable: He could not say who the men were in the yard. He saw Wills there, but could not name any others. When he got up the ladder witness only looked on. He did not throw anything from there. This was the whole of the evidence, and the Coroner in summing up, thought the Jury would consider with him that it was desirable, as he said at the last sitting, that they should have a little more time to consider this matter.
It now seemed altogether that MR CHANNON was really and virtually particeps criminis. In this matter he aids in supplying flour for the purpose of an unlawful act, the resistance of this sale for income tax. A general melee takes place, and the people getting annoyed, vent their vexation on the auctioneer and the people who assembled. They had had evidence before them that the sale was being held. A large number of people attended, and a general kind of melee and row seems to have taken place, and it did seem strange that MR CHANNON who took a leading part in this performance should be fatally struck. They had evidence that he was struck with some hard substance, other than the flour, which they were told was thrown. Of course he could not tell from whence that substance came, but the probability is that it came over the wall of the garden. Looking at the position in which the deceased was standing it seemed that the missile must have come over the wall and struck him on the right side of the head. It also seemed probable that it could not have been thrown except from the corner of the garden where the ground is raised, and which would enable a person to get up and look over into the yard. In the course of this disturbance and riotous assembly the deceased seems to have unfortunately come by his death, and there was no positive evidence of whom or by whose agency the blow was struck. There was no doubt that the blow caused death, but in order to fix the crime of manslaughter – which meant if a man came by his death by an unlawful act – they must have further evidence. If any evidence could have been brought there to show by whom that blow was struck they would have been justified in returning a verdict of manslaughter against the persons, but as there was no positive evidence against one, two, or three persons, it was for them to say whether there was anybody legally responsible. He was bound to tell them that if they found a verdict of manslaughter, he could not see how there could be a conviction. He was disposed to think that the proper verdict would be that deceased came by his death from a blow from some hard substance, but by whom administered there was not sufficient evidence to show. That was his view, but of course they were the judges, and would take their own view of the case, but he felt bound to tell them that at present there was not sufficient evidence to fix the crime of manslaughter. The essence of their Inquiry was to ascertain the cause of death, but of course the matter did not end there. It was perfectly competent for the police to bring the matter before the magistrates if anything further was disclosed. The room was cleared, and after a short deliberation, the Jury came to an unanimous verdict that death was accidental, and expressed the opinion that the missile was thrown at the auctioneer or bailiff, and not at MR CHANNON.

Tuesday 28 May 1889, Issue 6872 – Gale Document No. Y3200743853
OKEHAMPTON - Sudden Death of MRS LEACH. - Mr W. Burd, Coroner, held an Inquiry yesterday, concerning the death of MRS LEACH, particulars of which appeared in the "Evening Post" of last evening. JOHN LEACH, who identified the deceased as his wife, said she had for some time past been subject to violent pains in the head which caused giddiness and prostration. Mr G. V. Burd, surgeon, stated that the deceased came to him on Saturday suffering from neuralgia and desired to have a tooth extracted. He told her the tooth she pointed out had nothing to do with neuralgia, but she still wished to have it out. After the operation she washed out her mouth and then swooned away. Every endeavour was made to bring her round, but at 11.30 p.m. she expired. Dr E. H. Young, M.D., stated that he was called to see the deceased, whom he found in an unconscious condition. His opinion was that death did not ensue from anything connected with the extraction of the tooth, but was most probably due to the breaking of a blood vessel at the base of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict that the death of the deceased was due to apoplexy.

Tuesday 28 May 1889, Issue 6872 – Gale Document No. Y3200743852
SUDDEN DEATH IN A TRAIN - Inquest this Morning. - At Newton Abbot railway station this morning, Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of MARIAN MUIRHEAD, a lady, aged 77 years, formerly of 6, Westbourne Park, London, who died in a train between Teignmouth and Newton yesterday. MISS MUIRHEAD left Bath, where she had been stopping for a short time, by the 11.35 train yesterday accompanied by her niece, Miss Jane Bankier. Her object was to go to Stoke, Devonport, where she purposed staying with some old friends for a change, but shortly after the train left Teignmouth she died. She was consumptive and was subject to attacks of bronchitis and chronic dyspepsia, and had lately had an illness, the journey to Devonport being attempted at her own request because she generally found relief in change. Dr Scott, of Newton, who gave evidence in the case, expressed the opinion that death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 29 May 1889, Issue 6873 – Gale Document No. Y3200743867
SAD SUICIDE OF A YOUNG MAN NEAR OTTERTON - The Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday on the body of the young man PAYNE, who committed suicide by hanging himself in a loft at Sea View Farm, near Otterton, on Saturday last. No evidence was given showing why he did the rash act. No one, it seems noticed anything strange in his behaviour to cause them to suspect he would do away with himself, although his parents said some time ago he used to seem strange. The Jury returned as their verdict "That deceased committed suicide whilst Temporarily Insane." The Jury gave their fees to deceased's friends.

STRANGE OCCURRENCE NEAR BIDEFORD - On Monday night the body of JOHN BICTON HUTCHINGS was found in a well adjourning the village of Northam, scarcely a quarter of an hour elapsing between the time deceased was seen alive and comparatively in good spirits, and the time of the discovery. An Inquest was held last evening before the County Coroner, J. F. Bromham, Esq., at the King's Head Hotel, Northam. WILLIAM HUTCHINGS identified the body as that of his father, who was 47 years of age, and a carpenter by trade. He last saw his father alive about 6.30 the previous evening, when he said he was going for a walk down "Bone-hill." Shortly after seven o'clock witness's sister came and told him his father had been found in Holy Well, drowned. Mrs Hannah Braunton, who lives close by the well in question, stated that HUTCHINGS came into her house and stayed chatting for about a quarter of an hour on Monday evening, from a quarter to seven until seven o'clock, or thereabouts. Then he got up and went out, saying he had to measure the entrance to the well, so as to make a door for it. Just afterwards HUTCHING'S daughter came looking for her father, and almost the same minute witness heard a child say there was a hat and stick close by the well. Witness told Mr Wilkey to go and look, and he went and discovered deceased in the well. Mr Wilkey deposed to finding deceased floating in the water in the well, face downwards. The well was approached by a kind of entrance passage, and witness did not think deceased could have fallen in unless he first entered the passage. P.C. Champion spoke to being called, and Dr Pratt gave evidence that death was due to drowning. The Jury, after private deliberation, returned a verdict of "Death by Accidental Drowning."

Friday 31 May 1889, Issue 6875 – Gale Document No. Y3200743921
A PEDLAR FOUND DEAD IN A LINHAY - A pedlar named FRANCIS LETHBRIDGE was found dead in a linhay in Glass House-lane, Countess Weir, about 10 o'clock this morning. Dr G. G. Bothwell was sent for, and he said he considered the man had been dead for some time. The Coroner was communicated with, and an Inquest will be held. The pedlar's certificate was issued at Saltash, Cornwall.

Wednesday 5 June 1889, Issue 6879 – Gale Document No. Y3200744011
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE THEATRE WORKS - The Inquest on the body of MARK EBDON, who met with a fatal accident at the Theatre works yesterday, as reported in our last night's issue, was held this afternoon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital by Mr H. W. Hooper. The first witness called was JULIA EBDON, of No. 14, Kendalls Building. The body which the Jury had just viewed was that of her late husband. He was 43 years old, and by trade a bricklayer in the employ of Mr Dart, a builder, of Crediton. He was at work at the Theatre yesterday, and went away about ten minutes to six in the morning in his usual health. She heard of the accident at about a quarter to one, and went to the Hospital. When she arrived there her husband was in the shed-house dead. Nathaniel Hannaford, a labourer, living in Ewing's-lane, West-street, said he knew MARK EBDON. He was working with the deceased yesterday at the Theatre Works. ERBDON was on the scaffold taking down brickwork in the New North-road, and lightening an arch. The scaffold was inside the barricading, and deceased was standing about fifteen or sixteen feet from the ground. Witness was on the scaffold with him, and he saw deceased hammering away at the arch, and suddenly the arch gave way and deceased fell with it. None of the arch fell on de eased, who was perfectly sober at the time. Witness ran off the scaffold and went to the deceased's assistance. Deceased was lying on his face and was unconscious, and with some other men engaged on the works they took deceased to the Hospital. EBDON was alive when they reached the Hospital. He told deceased that the arch was cracked, and would give way. A Juror asked what sort of scaffolding the deceased was working on, and the witness said it was securely fixed. Mr Dunn, who appeared for the relatives of the deceased, asked if the scaffold was touching the archway. The witness replied that it was not. Deceased, when spoken to as regards the cracked condition of the arch, said he would tighten it. In answer to Mr W. J. Dart, witness said he did not fall with the deceased as he was engaged at the other end of the scaffold. He heard Mr Dart ask if everything was safe about ten minutes before the accident occurred, and EBDON replied that it was. The Coroner said he could not see that there was the slightest neglect on the part of Mr Dart. Dr Coombe, house surgeon t the Hospital, said he received the body of MARK EBDON about twenty minutes past twelve. Deceased was not breathing at all when he saw him, and he believed him to be dead. Deceased's soft parts of the forehead was turned down over his forehead. The frontal bone was extensively fractured and was quite sufficient to cause death. A large quantity of blood flowed from deceased's mouth and nostrils. The Coroner said he was extremely sorry that he was called upon once more to hold an Inquiry over a death which had taken place at that ill-fated spot, the Theatre. He was bound to say that he did not think there was any blame attached to anyone, or that there had been any neglect. Mr Dart said he desired to state that deceased was a most sober and industrious man, and had been employed by them for about sixteen years. Everybody on the works regretted the sad occurrence, and every precaution was taken to prevent accidents at the theatre. Mr Passmore (a Juror) asked if it was not an unusual thing for Mr Dart to go and ask EBDON if everything was all right? There seemed to be some suspicion about it. Mr Dart said he was very intimate with EBDON, more so than any other workman engaged, as he had been working with him. He merely spoke to him then as he had several times previously in the day. In answer to Mr Dunn, as to why EBDON was employed about that kind of work when it should have been done by a labourer, Mr Dart said he thought it advisable to put a practical man on the work of removing the arch, as a labourer would have created a deal of harm and also a lot of work. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that there was no blame attributable to anyone.

Tuesday 18 June 1889, Issue 6889 – Gale Document No. Y3200744263
DEATH FROM IMPROPER FEEDING AT HEAVITREE - This morning Mr H. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Horse and Groom Inn, Heavitree, on the body of the female infant child of ANN ROGERS. The mother of the deceased, a married woman, of Heavitree, said her child was a healthy one, and died on Sunday morning. About four o'clock on that morning the deceased woke its mother by screaming, and seemed to have a convulsed fit. Her husband went for a neighbour named Sarah Hooper who immediately went for Dr Andrews. The child lived about twenty minutes afterwards, and died just before the doctor arrived. The child was fed on soaked biscuit and from the breast. She gave the deceased about half a biscuit on the previous morning, and she had nothing but the breast up to its death. She had the sole care of the baby, which during the last few days had been fed on biscuit twice a day. Witness had had nine children, and only three were living, three having died since June last year. Sarah Hooper said she was fetched by the last witness's husband on the morning in question about four o'clock, to go and see the child, as it was in a fit. She went and saw deceased in its mother's arms, and clasping his hands very close. She went for a doctor, and on returning took the child in her arms. It gave one gasp, and died. Dr Andrews, of Heavitree, said on his arrival at the house he found the child dead. It appeared to have been convulsed. There were no marks of violence on the body. He had since made a post-mortem examination. The lungs were in a highly congested state, and a small quantity of food in the stomach, which seemed to be biscuits, was undigested. He should attribute death to the congested state of the stomach, due to improper feeding. The child ought not to have been fed on biscuit, but from the breast, or else on cows' milk. The Coroner, in summing up, said it appeared from the doctor's evidence that death resulted from improper feeding, and he wished it to be a caution to the mother as to the treatment of infants. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 22 June 1889, Issue 6893 – Gale Document No. Y3200744354
PAINFULLY SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – On Monday Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at 4, Barnfield Crescent, Southernhay, touching the death of MR WM. JOHN SMITH HOOPER, who was found dead at the above residence on Monday morning. ELIZA HOOPER identified the body as that of her late husband. He was 74 years of age, and had retired from business some years. In the last week or two he had not been very well, but was able to get about, and on Sunday was out in the lawn. She last saw him alive in the dining-room on Monday morning about five minutes past ten, after breakfast. Not seeing him for some time she became anxious, and made inquiries. The deceased was subsequently found in the closet. James Mare, gardener to Dr Shapter, deposed to finding the deceased. Dr Shapter said he knew the deceased, and had been attending him for some years past. Latterly he had been suffering from loss of appetite, indigestion, and a pain across the chest. He saw him in the morning about 10.15 in the closet. There were some faint traces of life in him. He tried to restore him, but could not, and MR HOOPER died almost immediately. He should think death resulted from failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 27 June 1889, Issue 6897 – Gale Document No. Y3200744446
THE SAD SUICIDE AT EXETER – Inquest This Day.
This morning the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an inquest at the Guildhall to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of YOUNG BOND, who committed suicide yesterday, as reported in our last evening's issue. MRS BOND, residing at Crediton, identified the body as that of her late husband, who she said was 56 years of age. He was by occupation a butler, but was out of service, and had no fixed residence. He was last employed by Lady Carmichael for about a month. On the 29th May he arrived at Crediton, where he stayed about four weeks, going to Exeter at times. She last saw him alive on Monday at Avery's court, Crediton, and on the following morning he left by the nine o'clock train to come to Exeter. His health had not been very good, and he had been under medical treatment during the time he was at Crediton. He had been greatly depressed, she thought in consequence of Losing Money by Horse Racing. He had no mans except what he obtained by being in service. Samuel Staddon, a tailor, residing at Belmont-road, and carrying on business in Goldsmith-street, said on Tuesday evening, about six o'clock the deceased, whom he did not know, called at his shop and asked him to if he could recommend him a place where he might get a bed. Witness accompanied him to Miss Gitsham's refreshment house next door. On the following morning she called him, and asked him if he knew the gentleman whom he had recommended as he requested to be called at seven o'clock and she had several times knocked at the door, but had been unable to make him hear. It was then nearly twelve, and he recommended her to have the door opened. Two police officers came, and he went upstairs with them. While they were engaged in opening the door Miss Gitsham came up and said she was sure something was wrong as blood was coming through the ceiling. On going into the room he saw the deceased lying on his face and hands in a pool of blood. He was undressed, and the bed appeared as if it had been slept in. He saw no knife or razor. Emily Gitsham, residing at 9 Goldsmith-street, said the deceased came to her shop on Tuesday evening about six o'clock with Mr Staddon, and asked if he could be accommodated with a bed. Witness replied in the affirmative. After he was shown to his room he came down and said that would do, and as he had not been in Bed for Three or Four Nights he would go and get a parcel and return early. He came back in about half an hour, and then went to bed. She noticed nothing unusual in his manner at the time. He requested to be called at seven the next morning, but on the servant going to the door at that hour she failed to get an answer from him. Thinking he was tired, she allowed him to sleep on. At eleven o'clock he was again called, and on account of no answer being received the door was forced open by two constables. Bessie Francis, servant, in the employ of the last witness, said she slept on the same floor as the deceased. She went to bed at eleven o'clock and on passing his door she heard him breathing very hard. About half an hour afterwards she heard him get out of bed and lock his door. Sergeant Salter, of the Exeter Police Force, said yesterday, about 12.15 the servant girl at Miss Gitsham's came to the police station, and in consequence of what she said he immediately went to Miss Gitsham's shop. He proceeded to the deceased's bedroom, where he found the door locked inside. He knocked several times but on receiving no answer, with the assistance of P.C. Boobier he burst it open. He then found the deceased as described by Mr Staddon. He fetched Dr Bell, who examined him and found his throat cut. Not far from his feet was found a razor (produced) covered with blood. He examined the clothes and found several letters, testimonials from different people Speaking Highly of the Deceased.
Among them was one from Miss Carmichael, 12 Sussex's-place, Regent's Park, dated 30th March stating the GEORGE BOND was one month in Lady Carmichael's service, and left on account of a rearrangement in her household. He was honest and respectable. Witness, continuing, said he also found a book, produced. On the cover was printed "L. Moore and Co., Exeter. Programme of racing for the week commencing June 10th, 1889. L. Moore and Co., turf commission agents, Exeter. Registered telegraphic address, 'Despatch, Exeter.'" The following note was also found upon him: - "From A.B.W., Thursday, lost Lord Lorne, 12s. 6d; Trayles, 8s. 3d; Rada, one and two, 6s. 3d; Pioneer, 3s. 8d; Amphion, 3s - £1 13s. 8d. Sir, - Will you please send it on. I shall wire each. – G. Bond, Avery's Court, High-street, Crediton." Deceased had a silver watch, two copies of the "Sporting Life" of the 1st and 25th June, 5s. 6 ½d., several bottles containing medicine, a travelling rug, one collar, and a rope. The Coroner mentioned to Sergeant Salter that in cases of this kind it was desirable before the body was removed to communicate with him, as it was better for the jury to see the body and its surroundings. He was not finding fault as no doubt it was desirable that the body should have been removed in the present instance. Mr Bell, surgeon, said he was called yesterday about 12.20 to go to Miss Gitsham's. He described the position in which the deceased was lying. He said his right hand was under his head, and his left arm stretched out, deceased being in a large pool of blood. He was cold and appeared to have been dead some time. The razor was also lying on the floor, covered with blood. He turned the body over, and found A Large Wound in the Throat from left to right, three inches in length. The windpipe was hanging out of the wound. Death was due to haemorrhage from the wound. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was certainly a very sad case. That the man had a good character was shewn by the letters which were found upon him. But he was as they had heard in a nervous and depressed state when Mr Staddon went with him to Miss Gitsham. Whether his mind was off its balance was for them to say. It appeared, according to what was found upon him, that he was concerned in betting transactions, which certainly was no very creditable state of thing as they had heard in another Court during the past week. He thought these commission agents and others who were in the habit of drawing money from persons, many of whom were unable to afford it, who, when they get into difficulties found themselves as this man might have possibly found himself. The Chief Constable here spoke to the Coroner, who, continuing, said he was very glad to hear with regard to the A.B.W. which the jury saw just now on a piece of paper that there were very many initials of that kind referring to transactions between A.B.W. and commission agents. What they had to consider was whether the man's mind was so unbalanced from any circumstances which surrounded him at the time of his death which would warrant them finding a verdict which was usually done when it was considered that a man committed suicide while in an unsound mind. He also suffered from derangement of his liver, and that was a very painful thing, and brought about such a state of mind that rendered a man at times unable to distinguish between right and wrong. There was some doubt as to who the deceased was, but Inspector Wreford took some trouble, and succeeded in finding out his relatives.
The jury returned a verdict to the effect that "Deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity." The sister of deceased stated that her brother was about to be taken to an asylum just before he died.

Tuesday 2 July 1889, Issue 6900 – Gale Document No. Y3200744563
FATAL ACCIDENT AT EXWICK - This afternoon Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the body of WILLIAM WILLS, who died at that institution on the 30th June. THOMAS WIULLS, cellarman, of 30, Albion-street, St. Thomas, identified the body as that of his late brother. On the day in question as he was leaving a hay field at Exwick the deceased said he would ride the mare they had to their home. He proceeded about 500 yards from the fields on its back, when it threw him off, deceased falling on his head. When picked up he was unconscious, and was conveyed to his home, 30, Albion-street. The next morning he was worse, and by Dr MacKeith's advice he was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr Russel-Combe, house surgeon, at the above institution, proved admitted deceased. On examination it was found that he had fractured his skull and lacerated his brain. He died from these injuries on Sunday last. Frank Tughill, carter, the owner of the horse, also gave evidence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 2 July 1889, Issue 6900 – Gale Document No. Y3200744562
SUDDEN DEATH AT ILFRACOMBE - Dr Slade King, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at No. 8, Adelaide-terrace, Ilfracombe, yesterday, touching the death of MR JOHN WARD GOODENOUGH, aged 66, a gentleman of independent means, who died suddenly on Sunday morning. Henry Knight, an attendant at Brislington House, Bristol, identified the body, and said deceased was a person of unsound mind, and a patient of Dr Fox. He last saw him alive in bed at 9.30 on Saturday night. In the morning at 7 a.m. he went to his room with water, and missed him from the bed. He then found him in a sitting position in a corner of the bedroom dead. Mr E. Griffith, the head attendant at the house, corroborated. Dr C. H. Fox stated that he considered death was due to syncope or a convulsive fit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

THE SHOCKING SUICIDE AT TOTNES - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest yesterday at the Guildhall, Totnes, on the body of JOHN SELWOOD, formerly manager of the Totnes Coffee Tavern, and who resided at Fore-street, Totnes. JAMES SELWOOD, builder, identified the body of the deceased. He was 36 years of age. He had been in ill-health for a long time past, and was much depressed in spirits. Evidence was given by Henry Smith, a railway porter, William Parsons, engine driver, and John Davis, fireman, employed by the Great Western Railway Company, to the effect that about 8 o'clock on Saturday evening the deceased was seen sitting on the bridge of the tramway from Totnes station to the Quay. Just after the train went back, Smith, who was on one of the trucks, noticed after the train had passed by the body of the deceased on the rails, his head having been cut clean off. Deceased's hat and stick were on the parapet of the bridge. Dr Currie said the deceased had suffered for some time from phthisis. He was very melancholy, and had delusions of people being down on him. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide while Temporarily Insane.

Friday 5 July 1889, Issue 6902 – Gale Document No. Y3200744626
THE BATHING FATALITY AT STARCROSS - Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of JAMES ROWE, 16, of Starcross, who was drowned whilst bathing on Monday. The evidence having been given, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

SUICIDE AT THE ASYLUM AT EXMINSTER - Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest, yesterday, at the Devon County Asylum, at Exminster, touching the death of an inmate of the institution, named CLARA ENDACOTT, 22 years, who was found dead on the 1st instant. Mr G. S. Sanders, the superintendent of the Devon County Asylum, identified the body. Deceased was admitted on the 10th January last. She was suffering from melancholia, with a suicidal tendency. Instructions were given the nurses that deceased was to have continuous supervision. Agnes Sanders, an under nurse, said that the deceased got up on the day in question, and, after dressing, went out, but witness did not see her go. Jane Marsh said she heard one of the patients go out on Tuesday morning, and she afterwards heard another patient in her ward say that there was a woman lying outside the window dead. Witness looked out and saw the deceased lying in the yard below. She called another nurse, and they went down to the deceased. She did not appear to be quite dead. Her pulse was beating, but she did not appear to be breathing. Eliza Prist, a patient in the asylum, also gave evidence. Mr Clapp, assistant medical officer, said that ENDACOTT, when he saw her, was dead. He found bruises about the shoulders, and at the back of her left wrist. A post mortem examination revealed internal injuries, which were sufficient to cause death, and which were injuries likely to be received by a person falling down a considerable height. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 6 July 1889, Issue 6903 – Gale Document No. Y3200744649
FOUND DROWNED AT DEVONPORT – A mason named RICHARD EVANS, about sixty years of age, was found dead this morning at Bearscove, Dartmouth, supposed to have been drowned. There was a wound on his temple. An Inquest will be held, most probably, this evening. Deceased has been rather irregular in his habits for some time, and suicide is considered to have been committed. The body was picked up by a man named Peek, and taken to the Mortuary. EVANS has been an inmate of the Totnes Union for a few months, and only returned to Dartmouth yesterday.

Monday 8 July 1889, Issue 6904 – Gale Document No. Y3200744683
INQUEST AT NEWTON ABBOT - Dr Fraser (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at Newton Abbot on Saturday on the infant child of MARY OSMOND, widow. Evidence was given to the effect that the child was removed on the day of its birth to Compton, and subsequently to Newton, where it died after having suffered from convulsions. Mr Nesbitt, surgeon, of Newton, deposed to attending deceased at the house of Elizabeth Heath, who had the child under her charge. It died on Wednesday and he had since held a post-mortem examination. The body was well nourished, and there was no organic disease of the lungs. He gave it as his opinion that death was due to acute inflammation of the stomach. The Jury, of whom Mr P. Heawood was foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Tuesday 9 July 1889, Issue 6905 – Gale Document No. Y3200744702
KILLED BY THE KICK OF A HORSE - An Inquest was held at Cadhay Barton yesterday by Mr Deputy Coroner Cox on the body of JOHN AYRES, who was kicked by a horse on Saturday. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was in the employ of Mr A. Marshall, and on the day of the accident was engaged in breaking in two young colts. John Wilson said about five o'clock he saw the deceased and assisted him to catch one of the colts, which had broken loose, after which deceased led them to the field. James Snell, of Ottery St. Mary, said he was passing on the road at the back of Cadhay, and saw the deceased lying there, and sent for medical assistance. Dr Reynolds said he was informed that a man was lying dead at Cadhay. He at once proceeded to the spot, and found the deceased quite dead on his arrival. Deceased had a large scalp wound, and his skull was fractured. The blow was quite sufficient to cause death in a few minutes. After the summing up by the Coroner, the jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave the widow their fees. MRS AYRES was also presented with the fees of two witnesses, Messrs. Marshall and Snell, half-a-sovereign by the Coroner, and Mr Marshall gave her the fees for the room.

Wednesday 10 July 1889, Issue 6906 – Gale Document No. Y3200744731
Sad Drowning Fatality at Crediton – Inquest this Day
This afternoon Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an inquest at Park Farm, Crediton, on the body of PETER PARKER, who was drowned whilst bathing on Saturday last. GEORGE PARKER, labourer, in the employ of Sir Redvers Buller, identified the body as that of his son, who was ten years of age. He last saw him alive about half past one on Saturday in the garden. The next thing he heard of him was that he was drowning in the water. Percy Moore, aged 3, of Crediton, deposed that about two o'clock on Saturday last he went down to Bull Marsh for the purpose of bathing in the River Yeo with some other boys. The deceased, who could not swim, was one of the first to go in. Just before going into the river he stepped in some mud, and on washing it off in the water he slipped into deep water. Witness saw the deceased struggling, and sink, and rise three times. He endeavoured to reach him, and went in up to his neck, but he could not swim, and did not succeed.
Walter Godsland, aged eight, proved seeing deceased in the water, and sink, but he was too far away to reach him. JAMES GORE, also of Crediton, a sweep, deposed that on Saturday last he was going down to bathe, when the last witness came up to him and said the deceased was drowning. On proceeding there he found another man with a hook trying to get the body out, but did not succeed. Witness then dived into the water and brought the deceased out dead. The body was laid out on the grass. The water where the deceased was found w3as about seven or eight feet deep. Dr J. A. Edwards, of Crediton, said he saw the deceased at his home on Saturday. He examined him, and found that he was dead, and the body presented every appearance of drowning. The Coroner summed up, and said the boy Moore acted in a persevering manner, and did all that he could under the circumstances. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning."

Thursday 11 July 1889, Issue 6907 – Gale Document No. Y3200744750
A LAD DROWNED IN THE CANAL. - Last evening, about 5.30, a report was current in Topsham, that one of MR ROBERT WARNER'S children had been drowned near his home in the Canal. It appears that the lad, who lives with his parents at the Topsham Locks, was returning home from school, and when near the drawbridge of the Canal, accidentally fell into the water. Several gentleman, who were close by fishing, tried to rescue him, and called on the ferryman, Mr Little, who was near, and who immediately jumped into the water, but unfortunately came into contact with the chain of the drawbridge. By this time the father of the lad had arrived, and succeeded in getting his son out with the aid of a grabbling iron. Dr G. G. Bothwell was immediately sent for, but after trying for twenty minutes to restore life his efforts were of no avail. The Coroner has been communicated with, and an Inquest is expected to be held tomorrow.

Friday 12 July 1889, Issue 6908 – Gale Document No. Y3200744762
BOY DROWNED IN THE EXETER CANAL - Inquest This Day. - An Inquest was held at the Vestry-room, Topsham, today, by Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) touching the death of ROBERT WARNER, the lad who was drowned in the canal on Wednesday last. The Jury, having been sworn, were conveyed across the river to the house on the canal banks, where the body was lying. On their return the following evidence was taken:- ROBERT WARNER, lock-keeper, Topsham Lock, was sworn, and said he was generally known as WARNER, but his right name was ROBERT JOSEPH HOWARD. The deceased was his son, and was christened ROBERT HOWARD, he was five and a half years old. He last saw him alive on Wednesday about 5.15 when he left the house to see another boy named Hunn. At 5.30 witness heard this last named lad call out, "MR WARNER, your little BOBBY is in the water." He went out, but did not see deceased until he subsequently recovered the body himself with grappling irons. Leonard Hunn, aged 11, said on the day in question he was fishing in the canal when he saw the deceased throwing stones in the water about two or three yards from the bridge. Deceased fell into the water while throwing stones. Witness was about two yards off at the time, and immediately called to his father, who was on the other side of the canal. He also called the last witness. Deceased had lent him a fish-hook, but they had no quarrel about it. He crossed in the boat with the deceased, and did not see him go into his house. William Hunn, brother of the last witness, who was with him when he crossed the ferry, said he believed the deceased did go into his father's house after he crossed. Henry H. Hunn, father of the two last witnesses, ,proved being called by his son Leonard when the lad WARNER fell into the water. He dropped his fishing line, ran across, and saw the little fellow under the water on his back. Witness called to the ferryman Little, who dived in the water but overshot the body. Archibald Little, ferryman at the Topsham Ferry, proved being called by the last witness to the scene of the accident. He saw the boy under the water and jumped in after him, but went too far ahead of him. He hitched his foot in a chain on the bridge, and it took him two minutes to clear it. The Jury commended Little for his promptitude in endeavouring to save the lad. Dr Bothwell deposed to seeing the body directly it was recovered. He spent about twenty minutes endeavouring to restore life, but was unsuccessful. There were no marks of violence on the body which presented the appearance of death from drowning. The Jury, of whom Mr J. W. Pensford was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Drowning," and the Coroner added his meed of praise to that of the Jury to Little for his praiseworthy conduct. Had he arrived early they would probably not be engaged as they were that day.

Friday 12 July 1889, Issue 6908 – Gale Document No. Y3200744769
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – This afternoon Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court on the body of EMELIA CHARLOTTE SOPHIA SWEET, a married woman, who died last evening, formerly residing in the Mint. Deceased was taken ill about half-past five, and died before medical aid could be obtained. Dr Perkins said it appeared as if deceased had been only half fed, but on enquiry he found she had plenty of food. He attributed death to syncope. The Jury returned a verdict that death resulted from "Natural Causes."

Monday 15 July 1889, Issue 6910 – Gale Document No. Y3200744836
FATAL ACCIDENT AT DARTMOUTH – MR BENT, of Exeter, Drowned. - This morning, about ten o'clock, a fatal accident happened at Dartmouth. It appears that MR BENT, son of CAPTAIN BENT, late Chief Constable of Exeter, arrived on Saturday in a small yacht, named the Pint, the property of Mr Frank Bradbeer, also of Exeter, who was also on board. This morning he was leaning over the side, and Mr Bradbeer had just spoken to him about hoisting the mainsail, the Pink being about to proceed for Starcross. Mr Bradbeer had scarcely turned round when he heard a splash in the water, and on looking in the direction saw that the deceased had fallen overboard, and immediately sunk. His hat remained floating. Efforts were immediately taken to find the body, which was picked up shortly after noon, and an Inquest will be held this evening.
[BY TELEGRAPH.]
A Press Association telegram says: While hoisting a sail on board a small yacht in Dartmouth Harbour today, a young man named JOHN BENT aged 23, son of the late Chief Constable of Exeter, was seized with a fit, and fell overboard. Before any assistance could be rendered the unfortunate gentleman was drowned. His body was recovered about two hours afterwards. An Inquest was held and a verdict of "Accidental Drowning" returned.

Tuesday 16 July 1889, Issue 6911 – Gale Document No. Y3200744851
FATAL ACCIDENT AT BARNSTAPLE - A child named BROOM, the son of a dairyman, about three weeks ago fell into a pan of scalding milk. Medical aid was sought but the poor little fellow lingered on until yesterday when he expired. At an Inquest held yesterday the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 22 July 1889, Issue 6916 – Gale Document No. Y3200744970
SAD DEATH OF A WOMAN AT TORQUAY – The Jury Censure the Husband and Daughter. - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest on Saturday at the Half Moon Hotel, Torquay, to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of EMMA MARTIN, 54, wife of EDWIN MARTIN, mason's labourer, Spring Steps, Pimlico, Torquay. On the afternoon of Whit-Monday deceased fell down the steps leading from Pimlico to Union-street, sustaining a severe flesh wound on the forehead, from the effect of which she died on Saturday morning. As no medical man could be found at the time of the accident deceased was taken to the Torbay Hospital, where the wound was dressed by Dr Cave, who put two stitches in it, and told deceased to come to him again on the following day. She did not visit the Hospital again, however, until eight days after, when the house surgeon found the wound was in a very bad state, and through neglect the bone had become exposed. In reply to the Coroner, Dr Cave said he did not think the woman was suffering from concussion of the brain or he should have detained her. She did not seem to like the idea of remaining in the institution, and he did not press her. Death was caused by inflammation of the membrane of the brain. The husband of deceased was closely questioned by the Coroner and Jury as to why he allowed his wife to remain seven days without medical aid. MARTIN replied that he did not like to see the wound, and was under the impression that she was getting better. Other evidence was given, including that of Mrs Rooke, who visited MRS MARTIN daily, but did not see the wound, as it was always bandaged when she went into the room. The Coroner said the husband was responsible, and if his wife was dangerously ill it was his duty to see that she had proper medical aid. She ought to have been either forcibly removed to the Infirmary or the assistance of a medical man obtained in time. The Jury had to consider the position of the parties, and if they thought there was more ignorance than carelessness a verdict of accidental death only ought to be returned, but if they thought that culpable carelessness had contributed to or caused death, it would be for the Jury to find a verdict of manslaughter against the person guilty of such carelessness. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider to the effect that they considered that the husband and daughter deserved censure for not bestowing proper attention upon the deceased after receiving medical directions concerning her.

Tuesday 23 July 1889, Issue 6917 – Gale Document No. Y3200745002
INQUESTS AT TIVERTON - The Coroner for Tiverton borough, Mr L. Mackenzie, held two Inquests at Tiverton Infirmary, yesterday afternoon. The first inquiry was relative to the death of MARTHA PETHERBRIDGE, aged 24, who committed suicide on Saturday under circumstances already reported. The evidence showed that the deceased had been in turn a servant, factory employee, and laundress, and at the time of her death she was living with her step-sister and the woman's husband in Chapel-street. She had had two illegitimate children; and on Friday night she told a neighbour that she was "like it again" and would drown herself. At the time she was under the care of Dr Cullin, and appeared light-headed. The next day she was in the front sitting-room alone when a fall was heard; and on persons going to her assistance they found she had cut her throat with her brother-in-law's razor. She died almost immediately. The post mortem examination failed to show that the deceased was enceinte. Her mother had been under restraint. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

The death by drowning of a little boy named ALBERT DAVEY, was then the subject of Inquiry. Deceased, aged three years, had been living with his grand-parents on the banks of the factory leat. On Saturday afternoon he was playing about the place and must have fallen into the water, for a moment later Dr Reddrop had his attention called to a body floating down the stream. He jumped in and rescued the child who happened to be the deceased, and though he tried for an hour afterwards to restore animation he failed to do so. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", and complimented Mr Reddrop on what he had done.

Wednesday 24 July 1889, Issue 6918 – Gale Document No. Y3200745016
A CHILD BURNED TO DEATH - Mr Incledon Bencraft, Coroner, held an Inquest last evening at the Carpenters' Arms, Barnstaple, on the body of GEO. HENRY FORD, aged ten months. From the evidence it appeared that on Saturday night last the deceased was on the floor in the back kitchen. An elder brother, named FRANK, aged 13, was in the room, and had upset some benzoline on the floor. The mother took up the baby, and then told the other boy to take a match and throw it on the oil. The mother stood back amusing the child with the sight of the flame, but there was a small put in the stone-floor, which held the oil and which, as soon as the fire got to it, flew up in flames. There was oil on the clothes of the baby, and the flames immediately ignited it. The mother ran screaming into the back-yard, trying to put out the flames with her hands. She was much burned about the hands and arms, and in her fright let the child fall on the ground. The father then rushed out from the front room, and taking up the child, which was burning, placed it in the trough and turned on the water tap. Dr Jackson, who was sent for, soon arrived and dressed the wounds, but after much suffering the child died on Sunday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 25 July 1889, Issue 6919 – Gale Document No. Y3200745032
SUDDEN DEATH OF A SAILOR AT TEIGNMOUTH – Inquest This Afternoon. - An Inquest was held this afternoon at the Teignmouth Infirmary by Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES CHRISTOPHER MILLS, who on Tuesday night last was removed from the 9.45 mail train at the Teignmouth Station and taken to the Infirmary, where he expired about five minutes after being admitted. Mr Frank Tucker was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The Great Western Railway Company was represented by Inspector Hockaday. After the Jury had viewed the body, the first witness called was Joseph Jefferson, a native of Cumberland, and master of the barque Hannaman, now lying at Plymouth. He deposed that the name of the deceased was JAMES CHRISTOPHER MILLS, and he was chief mate of the barque witness commanded. He was about 50 years of age. The last time he saw him alive was on Tuesday evening about six o'clock, when he left the vessel to travel by train to South Shields. The deceased had sailed with him about two years, and he held a master's certificate. The deceased was often ill on board ship, and witness thought he suffered from asthma, his breathing at times being very bad. When in America the deceased went to a doctor, who informed him that he was suffering from heart disease. On the homeward voyage MILLS was unable at times to get about his work owing to his difficulty of breathing. William James Cowen, booking clerk at the Teignmouth Station, stated that on the night of Tuesday last the guard of the 9.45 p.m. train informed him that a man was ill in the train. They both went to the deceased, who was vomiting badly, and he requested to be removed from the train, which was done. The deceased, upon being questioned as to what his illness was, replied that he was suffering from heart disease, whereupon witness obtained a cab and had him conveyed to the Infirmary. P.S. J. Richards, stationed at Teignmouth, stated that on Tuesday night he went to the infirmary and found the deceased dead. In the presence of Drs. Johnson and Austin he searched the clothing, and found a master's certificate which went to show that the man's residence was 27, Taylor-street, South Shields. George Henry Austin, house surgeon at the Infirmary said deceased was brought to the Infirmary on Tuesday night about 10.5, and he died about five minutes after being admitted. Witness had made a post mortem examination, and found that the large artery leading to the heart was slightly weak, and in his opinion death resulted from "cardiac syncope." The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Friday 26 July 1889, Issue 6920 – Gale Document No. Y3200745063
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE BRICKWORKS - Inquest This Afternoon. - This afternoon Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of HENRY GILES, who died from injuries he received at the brickworks of Messrs. Hancock and Son, yesterday, as reported in our last evening's issue. Mr Harding was chosen as Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was MARY JANE PRATT, residing at 45, East John-street, with her aunt, wife of the deceased, who identified the body. She said the deceased was fifty-eight years of age and was employed at Messrs. Hancock and Son as a clay-digger. She last saw him alive on Wednesday night about half-past eleven, when he was at home, and in his usual good health. William Bartlett, a clay-digger, in the employ of Messrs. Hancock and Son, said he knew the deceased, and was at work with him yesterday in company with othe3r men. Witness was loading a trolley with clay while the deceased was digging. The earth was slightly overhanging the deceased and instantaneously it fell. The debris did not exactly bury him, only covering him up to the waist. He was, however, knocked against a trolley which was sent around with the force, and witness was also struck. As soon as he was able to get up he saw the position GILES was in, and with the assistance of his comrades deceased was extricated. He did not speak, and he was afterwards conveyed on a door to a shed, and afterwards in a cab to the hospital.
A Juror: What was the distance from the surface to where you were working? - A: From thirty to thirty-five feet. - Is it usual to work at that height? - I cannot answer that question. I do not know whether it is lawful. It has been usual to do so during the time I have been working in the yard. Mr Hancock said it was nearly perpendicular. - The Coroner remarked that he had seen it himself today. – Mr Hancock said they had been working there when it was 50 feet, and in some places he had seen it 100 feet. - Mr John Hancock, brick and tile maker, residing at 18, Clifton-hill, said he knew the deceased, he having been in his employ for 10 years. During that time he had always been a very steady and industrious man. He arrived on the scene immediately after the accident occurred. After being taken to the shed deceased said, "Put me on my feet," but that was the only remark he made. Witness had owned the brickyard for thirty-two years, but no fatality had ever occurred there before. A slight accident happened once, but only injured the man's ankle. The earth on this occasion did not come from the top, but from the face. - By a Juror: He did not know of any regulation as to what height it should be worked. He could show them where it had been worked 150 feet high. Mr Reginald Martin, assistant house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased yesterday about a few minutes before nine. He was very collapsed but conscious. He was immediately taken to his bed and examined. His right hip was dislocated, and he had a deep cut over the right eye, and a deep flesh cut in the chin. From his collapsed condition it was presumed that there was some internal injury. A post mortem examination was made, and it was discovered that one of his right ribs was broken and piercing the lung, and his small intestines were broken and ruptured in several places, and these injuries were sufficient to cause death. Deceased died yesterday about two o'clock. This was all the evidence, and the Coroner, in summing up, said he could not see that there was any blame to be attached to Mr Hancock. Under the circumstances, he did all he possibly could by getting brandy and other things, and having the deceased removed to the Hospital. It was one of those unfortunate things which did occasionally happen. He did not think there was blame attached to anyone; but they had the facts of the case before them, and it was for them to consider their verdict. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," attaching blame to no one.

Wednesday 31 July 1889, Issue 6924 – Gale Document No. Y3200745149
FALLING IN A FURNACE - Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest last evening at the Town Hall, Dawlish, on the body of ALFRED G. KERSWILL, aged three years and nine months, the son of MR JAS. KERSWILL, gardener. The mother of the deceased said she was washing in the back-yard and had left to get tea in the kitchen, when the child climbed on to a bag of coke and then on the furnace, when he accidentally slipped in. His both legs and face were somewhat scalded. From the evidence of Mr A. de Winter Baker, surgeon, the deceased died from the effects of the scalds, followed by shock to the nervous system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Friday 2 August 1889, Issue 6926 – Gale Document No. Y3200745185
SAD DROWNING FATALITY IN EXETER – This morning Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, on the body of ELIZABETH ANN LITTEN, aged seven, who was found drowned in the Exeter Basin on Wednesday evening. FRANCIS LITTEN, of Water-lane, smith, identified the body as that of his daughter. He last saw her alive at twenty minutes to six on Wednesday evening at his home. About twenty past six a girl named Helstone told him that she was drowned. His little boy, aged 5, said to witness that they were at the Basin together, and as the deceased reached over the bank for something she fell in. He was present when the body was recovered from the water. Dr C. Vlieland stated that he saw the body soon after it was recovered. Deceased did not seem to have been dead very long. From his opinion death resulted from drowning. Carrie Helston, aged 7, said she was near the Basin, and the deceased's brother told her that his sister had fallen in the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 3 August 1889, Issue 6927 – Gale Document No. Y3200745246
A FATAL STABBING CASE AT TORQUAY – Inquest Last Evening. - Last evening Mr Sidney Hacker (County Coroner) held an Inquest at the Torbay Hospital touching the death of CHARLES GARD, who met his death by stabbing under circumstances already reported. Mr Thomas Taylor was appointed as Foreman of the Jury. Mr Carter watched the case on behalf of William Townsend, who was at the Inquiry in the custody of the police. ROSINA GARD, wife of the deceased, was first called. She said her husband was 36 years of age. She spoke to being fetched to the Infirmary to see deceased. She asked who did it, and Townsend said "Me: it was not intentionally." Alfred Way, clerk, residing at No. 2, Pennsylvania-terrace, stated that on Thursday he was in the Clarence bar, when he saw Townsend sitting down in the bar eating some bread and cheese. Just after he arrived a man named Gardener, a railway porter, came in, and subsequently GARD and a man named Kinch. There was a general conversation going on. Something was eventually said which led GARD to go over to where Townsend was sitting and catch hold of his whiskers. Townsend turned around and faced GARD, at the same time giving him a slight blow in the face. GARD then commenced to jump around in a boxing attitude. Townsend was still sitting down and made no effort to defend himself. After GARD had knocked Townsend's hat on one side he went to the mantelpiece to take up his glass to drink. Suddenly he said, "You have pricked me; you must be a fool to play with a knife in your hand. I didn't know you had one." After repeating these words several times, Townsend said, "Bother the knife; I wish I never carried one," at the same time shutting it up and putting it in his pocket. GARD, who had remained with his arm on the mantelpiece, suddenly became very pale. After drinking from his glass deceased unbuttoned his waistcoat and inserted his hand. On taking it out it was covered with blood. The landlord, Mr Rowland, said, "Charlie, you had better come inside; I will stop that for you." Deceased then walked into the bagatelle room followed by Kinch, in whose arms he subsequently fainted. Mr Rowland obtained some lint, which he placed on the wound. The knife had apparently entered just below the left breast, and blood was flowing copiously from the wound; in fact, the flannel vest was saturated. After staunching the bleeding, Mr Rowland sent for medical aid. Townsend meanwhile tried to get deceased to speak, saying, "Did I do it intentionally? Did I mean it?" Deceased did not at first answer, but subsequently he said "No, Will." A doctor eventually arrived, and after examining deceased ordered him to be conveyed to the Hospital. The wounded man was placed in one of Pickford's wagons. Witness accompanied him, and in the evening he said, "Let me die; what must I did like this for?" Mr Rowland, who was in the waggon, asked deceased if Townsend did it intentionally, and he distinctly replied, "No, Rowland." He heard no angry words. John Palmer, Harry Kinch, James Gillard, James Gardner, and William Henry Rowland, landlord of the hotel, gave corroborative evidence, and P.C. Greek proved arresting Townsend. Mr Cave, house-surgeon at the Torbay Hospital proved admitting deceased to the hospital. He had a hopeful opinion of the case at first. Harriet Peck, nurse at the Torbay Hospital, said deceased told her he had received the wound through sky-larking. The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was one of homicide, and the question the Jury had to consider was whether the deceased's death was due to excusable homicide – homicide by misadventure – or whether to homicide amounting to manslaughter. The Jury retired at a quarter to eight, and after fifteen minutes deliberation returned a verdict of "Homicide by Misadventure."

Saturday 3 August 1889, Issue 6927 – Gale Document No. Y3200745226
ALLEGED MURDER IN EXETER – Inquest, This Day. - The alleged murder of a woman in St. Mary Arches-street, Exeter, is still the sole topic of conversation in the lower part of the city, and, in fact, interest in the matter is pretty general throughout the whole place. After yesterday's magisterial proceedings the excitement was only intensified, especially by the statement that the man, Henry Brealey, would offer to give evidence at the Enquiry before the Coroner today.
The Inquest on the body of the dead woman, ELIZABETH REDWAY, was held in the parade room of the new Police-Court, Waterbeer-street, this morning, by Mr Coroner W. H. Hooper. Mr W. H. Dunn watched the case on behalf of the prisoner Brealey, who was present in custody of the police. A Jury of seventeen was empanelled, and Mr Francis Burrington was chosen Foreman of it. In swearing the first four Jurymen, the Coroner commenced to administer the oath for witnesses, but discovering his mistake, corrected himself. The body having been viewed the following evidence was taken.
HARRIET THOMAS, aunt of the deceased, and wife of WILLIAM THOMAS, living at Broadstone, identified the body as that of ELIZABETH REDWAY, who was a single woman, aged 39. She was a charwoman, and resided in St. Mary Arches-street, with a man named Henry Brealey, a joiner and carpenter, who was a native of Northtawton, and belonged to the militia. Witness last saw deceased alive about three weeks ago.
At the conclusion of the witness's evidence, Mr Dunn leant forward and spoke to the Coroner, who told him he could not allow him to make suggestions, and if he wanted to appear for the prisoner he must ask his leave. This Mr Dunn did, and the Coroner acceded to the request, but said he could not allow Mr Dunn to make suggestions.
Elizabeth Holman, charwoman, living at 8, Mary Arches-street, said on Tuesday night last at five minutes to ten she was called by a woman named Eliza Tiley, who resided in the same house, occupying a room on the same landing as witness. Tiley called to her to go to deceased's room which was on the next landing and see if everything was "All right with LIZZIE," as she had not heard anything since she cried out "Murder." Witness went up and rattled the door, and said, "Harry open the door." She repeated this three times, but could not get no answer. Witness then said "I want to see if LIZZIE'S all right" as she had heard them quarrelling, and heard Brealey walk across the room to strike the deceased.
Q: Did she cry out murder? - A: Yes, once. "Murder," that was all I heard.
Q: Was the door locked? A: Yes, sir, and Brealey said "LIZZIE is all right, and asleep."
Q: What did you say? A: I said no she isn't, and if you don't open the door I shall call a policeman.
Q: Did he make any reply when you aid she was not asleep? – A:Yes, he said " Yes, she is."
Q: Did you ask him again to open the door? – A: Yes.
Q: What did he say? – A: He said "No I shan't."
Q: Well, what then? – A: I sent a little girl, Kate Parsons, for a policeman.
Q: Did he come? – A: She came back and said she could not find one, and I sent her out again.
Q: Well? – A: She came back with a policeman.
Q: Did you open the door? - A: No, we couldn't and the policeman asked twice to have it opened.
Q: Was an answer given? - A: No, sir, he opened the door then.
Q: Did you enter the room? – A: Yes.
Q: What did you see? – A: I saw the deceased lying on the bed.
Q: Dressed or undressed? – A: Dressed, sir.
Q: How was she lying? – A: On her back sir.
Q: Was she living or dead? – A: Dead, sir.
Q: Where was Brealey? – A: Sitting on another bed in the room in his shirt sleeves.
Q: Did he say anything? – A: He tried to rouse her, and said she had had a fit.
Q: Yes? – A: And I told him to let her lie on the pillow as she was gone.
Q: Did he make any reply? - No, and we sent for a doctor.
Who came? – A: Mr Harrison.
Q: How long was it before he came? – A: About a quarter of an hour, sir.
Q: Are you in the habit of seeing them daily? - A: Yes, sir, three or four times a day when I am home.
Q: Has the woman any children? - A: No, sir.
Q: Did ever you hear them quarrelling? – A: Oh, a great many times, but they always made it up again.
Q: Was she addicted to drink? – A: No, sir.
Q: What are Brealey's habits, is he addicted to drink? –A: Yes, sir.
Q: Had you seen her on Thursday evening before this? – A: Yes, sir, half an hour before.
Q: What did she say? – A: She said the b…… (meaning Brealey) had only given her 1 ¼d. out of 2s. 9d. he had earned, and asked what she could do with that.
Q: And it was after this you heard the noise? – A: Yes, sir.
A Juror (Mr Trapnell): Was she subject to fits at all? - Witness: No, not at all, she had one once, but that was through some drink she had given her.
Q: Is he a married man? – AQ: Yes.
Another Juror (Mr Hampton): Did you hear the cry of "Murder" before or after the fall? – A: Almost together.
Another Juror: Can you hear every sound in your room from her's? - Yes.
Q: You heard her fall? – Yes.
Q: And you found her on the bed? – Yes; but heard him carry her across.
Q: You heard him lock the door? – Yes.
Q: Is it their custom to lock it every night? – A: Yes; I believe so.
Mr Dunn: What was the last time you saw Brealey before this? – A: About twenty minutes to nine.
Q: Where was that? -A: Upstairs in his own room.
Q: Was he drunk or sober? – A: He was not sober.
Q: Was he drunk? – A: Not so drunk as he is sometimes.
Q: He nodded to you? – A: Yes.
Q: He was not too drunk for that? – A: No, sir.
Q: The last thing you heard was the quarrelling? - A: Yes, sir.
Q: What sort of language did the deceased use?
A: She only said you ……, you have earned 2s. 9d. and brought home 1 ½d.
Q: And then you heard prisoner rise up? Yes, sir; quite plain, he went three or four steps, then I heard the blow, and with the same she fell on the floor.
Q: And then she called "murder?" - Yes, sir.
Q: Did you hear anything else besides murder? - No sir.
Q: You remember her having one fit once before? - A: Yes, sir.
The Coroner: But she said that was through drink.
Mr Dunn: Was it drink or a fit? - A: Drink, sir.
Q: Did you ever hear of her having another fit? - A: No sir.
Kate Parsons, aged twelve years, said she lived with her mother at Mary Arches-street, I the same house in which the deceased resided, and on the same landing. On Thursday night, about ten o'clock, she heard Brealey and REDWAY having angry words. She heard Mr Brealey lock the door, and the deceased screamed "Murder," and shortly after she heard a fall. Witness asked Brealey to let her come in saying she believed he was killing her, but he made no answer. She had seen her a minute or two before, when witness went into deceased's room to light her lamp. Brealey was there then. Brealey failing to give her any answer she ran downstairs, and on returning she saw Mrs Holman and Mrs Tiley, who told her to fetch a policeman, which she did, and he returned with her.
By a Juror: She never went upstairs and called Harry before when they had been having a row.
The Coroner: Did you ever hear such a row before, or ever hear her call "murder?" - Witness: No.
Mr Dunn: Did you hear REDWAY say anything besides "murder?" - A: No.
Q: Did she cry out, "Harry, Harry?" – A: No.
Q: Were Mrs Holman and Mrs Tiley excited over the matter? - A: Yes, sir.
Mr Russell (a Juryman): Was it after you heard the cry "murder that the door was locked, or before? - A: It was locked before she cried "murder."
Another Juror: You saw MRS REDWAY in the room when you went in to light the lamp? – A: Yes, he was sitting in front of the fire. I don't know whether they were quarrelling, but he locked the door after I came out.
Eliza Tiley, wife of Edward Tiley, labourer, said she lived in one room in 8 Mary Arches-street, on the same landing, below Brealey's room, and on the opposite side of the building. She knew both of the parties. On Thursday night she was lying in bed and heard Brealey go upstairs about 10 o'clock. She heard deceased call out to Brealey "You half starve me you ….." He said "I don't want you to holloa to me," and then struck her a blow which witness heard. She also heard deceased scream "Murder" once, but heard nothing afterwards.
Q: Did you consider that an unusual occurrence? A: Yes sir, it was very unusual.
Q: Did you call anybody? – A: I said to myself "My Lord he has knocked her so she can't speak."
Q: What then? – A: I called to Mrs Holman as I sat up in bed and asked her to go up and see if LIZZIE was all right. Mrs Holman said she would do so, and called up over the stairs, but there was no answer. She went right up to the door, shook it, and asked Harry to open it. He said, "No, I shan't." I then got up myself, and went up and asked him to open the door. He said he would not, as they were both in bed. I said we would fetch a policeman, and he made no answer.
Q: Have you ever heard any of these noises before? – A: I have heard them quarrelling, but I never heard him strike her before.
Q: Did you ever know her have a fit? –A: No, sir.
A Juror (Mr Trapnell): Was Brealey in bed when you went into the room? – A: No, sir, he had his trousers and waistcoat on.
Another Juror (Mr Russell): Did you hear a fall? A: No, sir, I heard the blow, but could not say what he did it with.
Q: Was she dressed? –A: Yes, but her clothes were undone in front.
Q: Was there any water about as if anybody had tried to restore her? – No, sir.
Another Juror (Mr Trapnell): Did you hear Brealey moving about the room while you were outside the door? – A: When I went into the room I asked him why he did not let me in before as we might have brought her round. He said he did not want anybody to interfere with him.
The Coroner: Was he drunk or sober? - A: He was not so drunk as he sometimes is, but he had been drinking.
Q: He was not too drunk to know what he was about? –A: He looked all right when I went into the room.
Q: He was sensible? –A: Oh, yes, quite sensible.
The Foreman: If she had been ill you would have gone up? – A: Oh, yes, sir.
Mr Dunn: Your room is under Mrs Parsons's? – A: Yes, sir.
Q: And you only judge of what took place by the noises you heard? – A: Yes, sir.
Ellen Fildew, wife of Charles Fildew, living at Coombe-street, said she had known the deceased for eleven years. It was three years since she had seen her. She never knew or heard that she was subject to fits. She was a sober and quiet woman.
Mr Bowden (a Juror): Have you known her as a temperate person or as irritable? Was she always calm? – A: Yes, sir.
Q: Not aggravating? – A: No, sir.
Mr Dunn: Was she in delicate health? – A: No, sir.
Q: Has Mr Brash attended her for the last four years? – A: I cannot say. Witness afterwards said she remembered Dr Brash attending her niece in Facey's Court at the birth of a child.
Q: Do you know if she ever lived in Rack-street? – A: Yes, sir, she lived with me.
Q: Do you remember this man (Brealey) being sent for on one occasion because the woman had a fit? – A: No, sir.
Q: Occasionally she went to the Workhouse? – A: Yes, sir.
A: Did she get on very well there? –A: She got on well enough.
Q: Was there not a certain amount of temper shown to the officials and she could not get on well with them? –A: I cannot say.
Q: You say she was a sober, quiet, temperate woman: - A: Yes, sir.
Q: You deny that she was a violent woman?
The Coroner: She has said so.
P.C. Yeo said that on Thursday night, about ten o'clock, he was on duty in Mary Arches-street. He was fetched by the girl Parsons to go to No. 8. The girl said a man had knocked a woman down, and they thought she was dead. He went to the house, and proceeded to the third floor. He knocked at the prisoner's door, and found it locked. After knocking a second time he opened the door. He saw on the bed the deceased woman lying on her back. She was dressed in her ordinary daily garments. Prisoner said, "She has only got a fit, she'll be all right in a minute." Witness felt her pulse and considered she was dead. He sent to the nearest doctor, and Mr Harrison came and pronounced her to be dead. Brealey said, "She was sitting on a chair and had a fit and fell off." Witness cautioned him and sent to the station. Inspector Wotton came to the house and witness afterwards took Brealey to the police station.
A Juror: Was Brealey drunk when you went into the room? - A: He was not drunk.
Q: Did the room look in a disorder, as if there had been a row? –A: There was nothing there to indicate it.
Mr Dunn: Did he refuse you admittance? –A: No: I knocked twice, and he opened the door.
Henry Barscombe Harrison said: I am a surgeon residing and practising in Exeter; I was called on Thursday night a little after 10.15 to go to 8, Mary Arches-street. I went there and saw the body of ELIZABETH REDWAY lying on the bed partly dressed with her arms by her side and her legs extended. I examined her and found she was dead. I examined the body and found a slight mark on the left cheek bone, but no abrasion, the eyes were bright and the pupils dilated. The mark looked like the mark that would be caused by a blow. The mouth was partly open. I have since, by the Coroner's order, made a post-mortem examination, assisted by Dr Bell. I found all the organs of the body healthy. There was a swelling in the left cheek bone, and on removing the scalp there was an extravasation of blood a little to left side of the occiput. There was no disease of any of the internal organs. The swelling and extravasation of blood would cause concussion of the brain, and I believe that was the cause of death. There was nothing else on the body to cause death.
A Juror: Were her hands drawn as if she had had a fit? – A: No, they were lying straight out.
The Coroner: There was no indication of fits whatever.
A Juror: Is it your opinion that death was caused by a blow or a fit? - A: I should say from a blow. Concussion of the brain was the cause of death, but whether that was caused by a blow or a fall I could not say. It looked like a blow.
Q: Might it have been caused by a fit? – A: Yes, sir.
Other evidence having been given, and the Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter." The medical testimony went to show that there were no signs of deceased having had a fit, and she died from concussion of the brain, the result of a blow in the back of the head. There were two distinct blows, one on the cheek bone, and another behind the head. It is considered that deceased was knocked down in front, and in falling received the bruise at the back.

Saturday 3 August 1889, Issue 6927 – Gale Document No. Y3200745225
A BARGEMAN DROWNED AT BARNSTAPLE - "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned by the Jury at an Inquest held last evening at Barnstaple on the body of CHARLES CROUSE, a bargeman, who is supposed to have fallen off his barge and was drowned.

Tuesday 6 August 1889, Issue 6927 – Gale Document No. Y3200745265
FATAL FALL IN EXETER - Inquest – This Day. - At the Exeter Police Court, Waterbeer-street, this afternoon, Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of WILLIAM HEWITT, who met his death last evening under circumstances detailed below. Mr. Webber, commission agent, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of WM. HEWITT, who resided in Spiller-street, was 72 years of age, and by trade a general labourer. He had worked for Mr Densham, wood dealer and was a widower. Henry Shepherd, 29, Spiller-street, said deceased lodged at his house, and had done so for ten years. He saw him on the previous evening, when they sat in the kitchen talking and drinking tea together. About half-past eight deceased went upstairs to bed, and a few minutes afterwards witness heard a noise as if he had fallen. He called out, and receiving no answer went upstairs, and on the landing found deceased lying. He called for assistance and several persons going upstairs they found HEWITT insensible. Deceased went upstairs without a candle, in fact he never used one. Emanuel Densham, wood dealer, Spiller-street, proved seeing the deceased on the previous evening at six o'clock, when he left him to go home. Deceased was a sober man and had worked for witness 33 years. Dr Bell proved being called to see HEWITT on the previous evening. He found him reclining in the arms of the last witness. He was then alive, and having had the room cleared witness had him put to bed, but he died within a couple of minutes. There was a small wound at the back of the head which was the only mark of violence, and that probably resulted from a fall. Death was due to shock, there was no fracture, and the wound was almost a superficial one. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 8 August 1889, Issue 6929 – Gale Document No. Y3200745310
SUICIDE AT TORQUAY - A quarryman, named GEORGE RICE, about 40, residing at 6, Daison-cottages, Upton, Torquay, last evening committed suicide by cutting his throat with a knife. He has been suffering from heart disease and dropsy for the past twelve months, and rather desponding. His wife GRACE found him sitting on a chair in his bedroom about half-past nine last night, with his throat cut, blood flowing profusely. She called P.C. Greek, the constable in the Torre sky-larking case, and he sent for Dr Thistle, and took charge of the knife. Help was unavailing, and the man died by a quarter to eleven. The Coroner has been communicated with, and will hold an Enquiry this evening at six o'clock at the Upton Vale Hotel.

Monday 12 August 1889, Issue 6932 – Gale Document No. Y3200745395
DISTRESSING CASE OF SUICIDE AT BARNSTAPLE - A Medical Man Hangs Himself. - A distressing case of suicide occurred at Barnstaple today, DR FORESTER, an old medical practitioner in the town, having been found hanging to the post of his bed by means of a handkerchief. He was discovered by his wife's lady's maid, who went to his room for the purpose of carrying him his usual morning's cup of coffee. MRS FORESTER was immediately called, and she endeavoured to restore animation by means of rubbing deceased's chest. In the meantime she sent for Dr Harper, who had visited the deceased on the previous day, and Mr Bossen, the family solicitor, who was with him until late the previous evening. On their arrival, artificial respiration was tried, but without avail. According to the evidence of Dr Harper, Mr Bossen, and MRS FORESTER given at the Inquest this afternoon, the deceased had been very depressed for some time past, and on the previous evening he was in an unusually low state. Dr Harper had attended him, and had recommended change; but deceased had got the impression that the medical gentleman did not consider him so ill as he was. MRS FORESTER stated that deceased had recently made some unfortunate speculations, and his daughter married a short time ago, and these circumstances had somewhat upset him. He had also fallen downstairs and hurt his head, whilst visiting a patient sometime since. In the opinion the family solicitor, who was well acquainted with deceased's affairs, there was no real ground for his troubles. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased strangled himself whilst Temporarily Insane, and expressed their deep sympathy with the deceased's family. Deceased was sixty-one years of age, and was for some years house-surgeon at the North Devon Infirmary. He subsequently obtained the degree of M.D.
Another account says: - Great sensation was caused at Barnstaple today by the suicide of DR HENRY FORRESTER, a well known and highly respected medical man in practice in High-street. Surprise is universal as he was of a cheerful disposition, and always had a kind and friendly word. It appears that he has been suffering from melancholia for a few weeks since his daughter's marriage, although there was nothing in that circumstance to cause anything but happiness. He was found this morning hanging to a short bed-post by a handkerchief. Mr Bosson, his family solicitor, was first on the spot, and then Dr Harper. The body was still warm, but it was too late for resuscitation. An Inquest was held today by Mr Incledon Bencraft, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 15 August 1889, Issue 6935 – Gale Document No. Y3200745461
INQUEST THIS AFTERNOON – An Inquest was held this afternoon at the Guildhall before the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) touching the death of the infant child of EMILY POWELL, of Coombe-street. EMILY POWELL, the wife of THOMAS POWELL, a labourer, living in Chudley's-court, Coombe-street, said the body which the Jury had just viewed was that of THOMAS POWELL WESTCOTT. She was called WESTCOTT before being married to POWELL. The child was twelve months old. She had no other children. The child had never been healthy. The Coroner: It appears healthy enough now. – Witness, continuing, said she had the doctor to it three times when it was five months old. The child slept with her. It was taken ill on Tuesday last with a slight diarrhoea, but it passed off again. On Wednesday the nurse sent for her where she was at work, and told her her child was worse. She went for a doctor, and Dr McKeith arrived just after the child died. She had not given the child any medicine lately, and it had been fed on bread. The Coroner: Haven't you given it anything but bread? – Witness: Just a little milk from the breast. – The Coroner: Is the child insured? – Witness: Yes, in the Liverpool Legal Friendly Society. – The Coroner: In what sum? – Witness: A penny a week. – the Coroner: What sum would you get at death? - Witness: 30s. for three months. – The Coroner: How much shall you get now? - Witness: I don't know, sir. - Mrs Miller, nurse, said she always looked after the child. She generally fed it on bread and milk, boiling the bread and applying the milk afterwards. Some time ago the child had a convulsive fit, and was attended by Dr McKeith. Dr Alexander McKeith, a surgeon practising in the city, said that yesterday afternoon he was asked to see the child. He got at the house at a quarter past five, and the child was then in charge of Mrs Miller. It was not dead when he arrived at the house, but died shortly after. He had examined the child, and the extremities were livid and blue. The pupils were dilated, but otherwise there were no symptoms of the child having had a convulsive fit. He considered the cause of death collapse following diarrhoea. The Jury returned a verdict that the child died from Natural Causes.

Friday 16 August 1889, Issue 6936 – Gale Document No. Y3200745478
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A YOUNG MAN - Fighting on the Newton Abbot Race Course. Inquest This Day. - Mr H. W. Hooper, (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning touching the death of CHARLES POWELL, hawker, who met his death from injuries received whilst fighting on the Newton Abbot racecourse on Bank Holiday. Mr Trapnell was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
ELIZA POWELL, wife of WILLIAM POWELL, hawker, living in Coombe-street, said the body which the Jury had just viewed was that of her son CHARLES, aged 18. He was a single man, and was a hawker. The deceased used to live with her until about a month ago. She saw her son on Bank Holiday, in the morning, between ten and eleven o'clock. Deceased came into her house, and seemed in his usual health. he told her he was going to Newton Abbot races. On Tuesday morning she saw him in Coombe-street. She spoke to him, and told her he had received a blow in the face and enquired how he came by it. Deceased replied, "Oh, mother, that is nothing." Last Wednesday week she saw him in her yard, and he then had his face done up with a handkerchief. She then asked him to let her look into it, when he replied, "Oh, that's all right; it will pass off again." On Thursday he took to his bed, and appeared to be in a very great pain, his face being considerably swollen. He did not improve, and on Friday she sent for Dr Clapp, who advised his removal to the Hospital. She pressed him very much on the Thursday night to tell her how he received the blow, and he told her he had received it accidentally. Deceased said that it was "Badger" that gave him the blow, "Bader" being the name of a young man named Tootell. Deceased also said that it was an accident, and that Tootell did not mean to give him the blow. On Saturday they detained him at the Hospital. The deceased had told her that there had been some bother with some strangers on the Newton Abbot Race Course, but did not say who they were. By the Foreman: Deceased did not say that Tootell acted as a second for him. The blow was received by a kick from Tootell. Samuel Marshall, labourer, 20, living in Rack-street, said POWELL was a companion of his. On Bank Holiday he went to Newton Abbot Races, and on the race course he met the deceased in company with two or three other young men, including Tootell and Trump. They were all sitting down in a drinking booth, and POWELL was having some angry words with a big stout man. Another stranger came over and said to POWELL, "Have a go at me, I am only seventeen,." with the same striking POWELL in the side. POWELL said, "Half a minute, let me pull of my coat." Both the deceased and the other young man then commenced fighting, four or five rounds being fought. They both fell to the ground, and Tootell ran forward to pick POWELL up. After this POWELL fought another round, and then said, "I have finished." They removed the deceased to a caravan to wash to blood off his face, when he said, "Badger, you have finished me; I shouldn't have given out if it were not for you. I know you did not try to do it, but you ought to have seen where you were coming." He believed that the deceased was accidentally kicked by Tootell, and on Sunday, in the Hospital, deceased told him that Tootell was not to blame. Deceased was not drunk; they had only had a few pints of beer between them. Tootell, POWELL, and witness went over to see a race after the fight, and after that to a refreshment stall and had some tea. They all made their way into Newton, and went into the Ship Inn. They reached St. Thomas in the evening at eleven o'clock. – By the Jury: Deceased did not say he was kicked more than once. There was no proper "ring" formed; it was a rough-and-tumble fight. Thomas Tootell, alias "Badger," a labourer, of Coombe-street, said he was at Newton Races on the 5th of August. The whole of the last witness's evidence was true. He did not know who the man was with whom POWELL was fighting. When the men were fighting he went to POWELL'S assistance. He was standing up, and there was a great scuffle going on. He could not say that he did not kick POWELL; he might have done so. He was perfectly sober at the time. He did not hear deceased say that he (witness) had finished him, but he hard POWELL make the remark that it was an accident. He should not be able to recognise the person with whom POWELL was fighting; but he was wearing a light suit of clothes. The fight took place in the afternoon:- By the Jury: The man the deceased fought with said he was a fighting man and came from Plymouth. It was not often that POWELL indulged in fighting. He was not fond of fighting. the man from Plymouth commenced the fighting. He could not see who was on the ground at the time; he rushed in to save POWELL. – The Coroner: It is very clear how POWELL got the kick. From the evidence, it was accidental. – Witness: POWELL and myself were on very friendly terms. – Mr Russel Coombes, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he saw the deceased on the 10th August. Deceased had the right side of his face immensely swollen and also an attack of erysipelas, apparently proceeding from a graze over the edge of the lower jaw. Deceased was treated, but became delirious and eventually died on the morning of the 13th. He had made a post mortem examination and found the brain and the lungs were much congested but no other injuries besides those he had mentioned. He considered his death was due to chromatic erysipelas. There was no suppuration, deceased died before matter formed. – By the Jury: He should think the blow on the face was a very severe one. The deceased never told him how he met with the accident. This was all the evidence, and the Coroner, in summing up, said it was quite clear that POWELL met his death through a kick he received in a fight on August Bank Holiday, and that the person who gave him that blow was Tootell. The doctor had told them that death did not result from any other injuries than that received on the side of the face, and, therefore, no good could be got from finding out who the young man was with whom he was fighting. If the deceased had died from a deliberate blow which was given him in a fight, then it would amount to manslaughter, but they had the evidence of several witnesses who had heard the deceased say that the injury he received was from Tootell kicking him, and that it was quite an accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Coroner said he quite concurred in the view they had taken.

Monday 19 August 1889, Issue 6937 – Gale Document No. Y3200745538
DROWNING FATALITY AT TORQUAY, THIS DAY - Early this morning, at seven o'clock, a sad drowning fatality occurred in Torbay. The deceased is a young gentleman, named REGINALD KEY, aged twenty-five, residing at Ellerton House, Cleveland-road, Torre. About seven o'clock, whilst a visitor, named Cox, was promenading on the Corbyn Head Recreation Ground, he saw a dead body floating in the water close to the shore, and raised an alarm. His cry was heard by a boatman named William Hatton, who attends to the ladies' bathing machines at Corbyn Cove. Hatton at once got his punt into the water, for it was low tide, and pulled out to about fifty feet beyond Corbyn Head, where he found the deceased lying in the water, face downwards. He dragged the body ashore, and while Mr Westcott, builder, who was passing in his trap at the time, went for Dr Richardson, in Belgrave-road. Mr J. Shears, the proprietor of the boats and bathing machines, ran to Chelston, where he called for Dr Smith and P.C. Goodman. In the meantime Hatton and the visitor Cox, did all they could to restore respiration by artificial means, and when the doctors arrived – Dr Smith being first, some twenty minutes later – they continued to do the same for another half-hour. But it was all in vain, for no signs of life were apparent from the first. The deceased was naked, and his clothes were found on the rocks close by, where his dog, which invariably accompanied him, was running madly up and down, much excited. MR KEY was therefore bathing by himself, and as he was subject to fits, apparently came to his end through a sudden epileptic attack whilst in the water. The deceased's body was removed to his home, and the Coroner (Mr Sidney Hacker) communicated with. The sad affair has created quite a gloom over the locality.

Monday 19 August 1889, Issue 6937 – Gale Document No. Y3200745541
SCENE AT AN INQUEST THIS AFTERNOON – The Coroner and the Exeter Doctors. - Was It an Unnecessary Waste of Time and Money?
An Inquest was held this afternoon, at 27, Longbrook-street, by Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner), on the body of MR GEORGE VALLANCE, who died suddenly at his son's residence, on Saturday afternoon. The Enquiry was held in a room upstairs, Mr F. Edwards being chosen foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was MARY ANN VALLANCE, who said the body which the Jury had just viewed was that of her husband. She resided in the Scilly Islands with her husband, who was superintendent gardener at the Scilly Islands, aged 66. Her husband had been under medical treatment, and suffering from heart disease and dropsy. He came across from Tresco in a steamer on Friday, leaving there at ten o'clock for Penzance. She accompanied her husband and they had a very good passage. They landed at Penzance at about one o'clock and the deceased seemed very comfortable during the voyage. They came straight on to Exeter from Penzance by the mail train, staying at deceased son's in Longbrooke-street. When deceased arrived at the house he was quite comfortable. On the following day he was quite bright and cheerful, after dinner he slept for a little while. When he awoke he felt a little faint, had some shrub, and walked around the garden at the rear of the house. They came into the house and deceased sat on a chair. Almost immediately deceased put up his hand, exclaimed "Oh," and expired. Deceased had taken a dose of "Turkey rhubarb" on Saturday morning, as he occasionally did when he felt ill. Dr Budd said he was called to see the deceased on Saturday afternoon. He found the deceased in the sitting room in an arm-chair quite dead. The body was warm, and deceased had been dead, he should think, about half an hour. There were no marks of violence, and he considered that deceased died from heart disease. The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that Deceased died from Natural Causes.
No sooner had the Jury pronounced their verdict than MR VALLANCE, son of the deceased, rose from a chair, and speaking with great warmth said he strongly protested against the Coroner holding an Inquest. It was most unnecessary. – The Coroner: That is a matter entirely for me. – Mr Vallance: I told you this morning that Dr Budd was willing to give a certificate of death if it was desired. The Coroner: I cannot allow this. - Mr Vallance: As strongly as possible I protest against this Inquest. – The Coroner: Again I saw I will not allow you to make such statements. – Mr Vallance: The Court is now over. – The Coroner: It is my business to know when to hold an Inquest upon a person who has suddenly died. – Mr Vallance (addressing the reporters present): I say I protest, and I hope you will make a note of it. – The Coroner: I must ask you to desist. I will not allow you to go on. – Mr Vallance: If I cannot speak here I shall express my opinions somewhere else. – The Coroner: You cannot. I have a duty to perform to the public. – Mr Vallance: It is a perfect waste of time and money holding this Inquiry. My father died a perfectly natural death. – The Coroner: You must be quiet. – Mr Vallance: He has been -----. The Coroner: The Jury do not think so for a moment that an Enquiry must be held where a man suddenly expires after coming a long journey. – Mr Vallance: He has been suffering for the past twelve months, and it is wrong to have held this Inquest and made all this fuss. – The Foreman of the Jury (Mr F. Edwards): I think it is quite necessary that this Inquest should have been held. At one time I used to think that some Inquests were unnecessary. Mr Vallance (warmly): You don't know the facts of the case. The Coroner won't allow you to know them, and he won't let me state them. – The Coroner: (sternly): I will not allow this wrangling with you to go on. You must desist, sir. – Mr Vallance: I am not wrangling. The Coroner: Wherever shall we draw the line if we do not have Inquests upon persons that die so suddenly. – Mr Vallance: What did you tell me this morning when I told you that Dr Budd was willing to give a certificate of death? - The Coroner: I told you nothing. – Mr Vallance: Didn't you say you would override the opinion of all the doctors in Exeter? - The Coroner: I did not say so, sir. – Mr Vallance: You did; you know very well you said so. – The Coroner: I cannot allow this; I am presiding over this Enquiry, and will not allow you to go on wrangling. – Mr Vallance left the room, still protesting, and saying he trusted the Press would take notice of the matter, as the Inquest was uncalled for and unnecessary.

Tuesday 20 August 1889, Issue 6938 – Gale Document No. Y3200745556
THE DROWNING FATALITY IN TORBAY – Inquest this Day. - Dr Fraser, of Totnes, Deputy Coroner, held an Enquiry at the Clarence Hotel, Torre, this morning, into the facts attending the death of REGINALD KEY, 26, who was found drowned in Torbay early yesterday, under circumstances described in last night's "Evening Post." Mr C. Bentley was chosen Foreman, and the Jury having viewed the body where it lay at Ellerton-house, Cleveland-road, deceased's father, HENRY KEY, clay merchant, of Newton Abbot, identified the body as that of his son, who was subject to fits since he was eleven years of age. He forbade deceased to bathe alone, and he had only bathed four times this summer in company with friends. He left the house yesterday morning unknown, taking a towel with him. Charles William Cox, retired General from the Madras Army, was the first to see deceased. He was out walking, and on reaching the end of Corbyn Head he saw something floating in the water, and on finding it was a body he hurried to the boats at the bathing cove close by, and gave an alarm. This was at a quarter past seven, and on the rocks under the cliff he found the deceased's clothes, which he brought back to the cove, followed by the deceased's dog. A boatman had by this time brought the body, which was thirty yards from the shore, under water, and head and arms and legs immersed, ashore. They tried artificial means of respiration, and sent for medical attendance. William Hatton, master mariner, living at Ellacombe, said the last witness told him there was a body in the water. He was cleaning his boats at the time, and launched one, and pulled to about thirty yards beyond the Corbyn Head, where he found deceased's body. He towed it ashore, and tried to restore animation. William Arthur Winwood Smith, surgeon, of Chelston, was the first medical man to arrive on the spot, and he said the body showed no signs of vitality. With Dr Richardson's assistance, he tried to restore life, but could not. The man was dead, and had been drowned. A verdict to this effect was returned after the Coroner had summed up, the usual term being "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 20 August 1889, Issue 6938 – Gale Document No. Y3200745569
THE FATAL FIRE AT EXMOUTH – Death of MR GIDLEY. - Scarcely had the inhabitants of Exmouth recovered from the shock of the fire calamity with which their town was visited early yesterday morning, and the sacrifice of a mother and her three children to the flames, before the announcement was made that the father has succumbed to the dreadful injuries that he received. As we mentioned in our last evening's report he was conveyed to the Maud Hospital in a very precarious condition, and from the first his life was despaired of. He recovered consciousness at times after his admission, and was attended to by Mr Cox in the absence of Mr Hodgson, the house surgeon. We learn that he had a fearful night, but appeared quite unaware of the dreadful fate of his wife and children. He mentioned her name once and also said the fire came from downstairs, but as he had to be kept as quiet as possible no conversation was entered into. He suffered great pain in consequence of which he threw his arms about wildly at times. He remained conscious until a few hours before his death, when he was seen by his father-in-law. He expired about seven o'clock partly from the injuries and partly from the shock. The baby is still under the care of Mrs Adams, Chapel-street, and lies in a precarious condition, and is being attended to by Mr Commin, of Exmouth.
THE INQUEST.
Mr Cox (Deputy Coroner) attended at the Dolphin Hotel, where the bodies were deposited, at 1.45 for the purpose of holding the Enquiry. In addition to the Jurymen there was a large number of the inhabitants of Exmouth present, and several members of the Local Board, including Mr Benmore, Mr Grenfell, Mr Ellett, Mr Perry, Mr Vine, and Mr Haymes. Among those also in attendance were the Deputy Chief Constable (Superintendent Jesse), W. H. Hooper (Coroner of Exeter), and the Rev. – Parcell (Vicar of Exmouth.)
The Coroner, in opening the Enquiry, said he was sure they would all agree with him that they were met together under peculiarly distressing circumstances. A great number of the members of one family, under one roof, and including the father and mother, and most of their children had lost their lives in a most terrible and shocking manner, and he would be right in expressing their deep commiseration for the survivors and the relatives. It was no use dwelling on this painful matter, and it only remained for him to inform them that it was their duty to enquire into the cause of the death. They had no doubt that the fire was the cause of the death of those persons whose bodies they would have to view, but he thought they would all agree that it would be necessary if possible to ascertain how the fire originated, and also it would be proper to enquire into the means that were available for the suppression of the fire and the rescue of the inmates of the house in order that such terrible accidents, if possible, might be guarded against in the future. He understood that unfortunately the father had died that morning, so it would be necessary to enquire into the death of five instead of four. He presumed that as a result of one fire, they would consider the Foreman they elected as Foreman to Enquire into the deaths of all. He then asked them to choose a Foreman.
Mr Proctor Sherwin was selected. The other Jurymen sworn were Messrs. J. E. Poole, W. Perry, E. Harris, S. Tapman, C. Winter, J. Tozer, A. A. Carter, A. Hayman, G. F. Perriam, W.L. Skeiff, W. Walker, James Churchill, T. Shapter, W. Stevens, H. W. Cooper, and H. Hawkins.
The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner said he did not know whether it was the opinion of the Jury, but if there was another room available anywhere near of greater accommodation he thought it would be for the benefit of all concerned that they should adjourn there. He did not know what their views were.
A Juror remarked that he thought they should adjourn, as it would give the public every means possible of hearing the Inquiry.
Mr Perry (proprietor of the Coffee Palace) said he should be pleased to put his hall at their disposal, as it was disengaged. Mr Perry's offer was accepted, and the bodies having been viewed the Jury adjourned to the Temperance Hall.
The first witness called was John Adams, who said: I am a poulterer, and live in Chapple-street, in the parish of Littleham, Exmouth. I was acquainted with all the deceased persons. I have viewed the bodies, and I identify them. I cannot give any evidence with regard to their ages, but I think the eldest was about ten years. I reside nearly opposite the house in which the deceased, WILLIAM THOMAS GIDLEY lived. About 2 a.m. yesterday morning I heard cries of "~Fire" and "Help". I was then in my bedroom in bed on the first floor of my house, at the back. The window of the front room was a little open and both doors, and that accounts, I think, for my hearing the sounds so clearly. On hearing those cries I jumped out of bed and ran downstairs as fast as I possibly could, without stopping to dress. My wife said it was in the same room, and she jumped out of bed about the same time. We ran into the street, I then saw WM. THOMAS GIDLEY with his head out of the window calling for help at the arch window on the second floor looking into the street. He said, "Oh! Adams, do run and try to get a ladder, we shall all be burnt, or words to that effect." I said "Go back and try to go down over the stairs." He was bending out of the window as far as he could. GIDLEY said "I cannot get back." I then called Mr Soper, one of the fireman of the West of England Office, just around the corner of Fore-street. I shouted "Fire." I did not stop to hear them move, but ran back to the corner of Fore-street. It then came to my mind that Mr West, a mason, who resides in that street, had a ladder. I ran to his house and called, but I was unable to make anyone hear. I then ran back to the deceased's house, and found that someone had brought a ladder. Five or six people were there, and I saw my wife pick up a baby and carry into our house. There were two or three different ladders, but some were too long, and one was too short. MR GIDLEY was then in the same position as he was when I went away first. Before I arrived back two of his children had been rescued, namely, BESSIE and EDITH GIDLEY. The people present were endeavouring to get MR GIDLEY down by means of a ladder, sir. – Q: Didn't it occur to you to send for a ladder, especially kept in the town? – A: No, I did not know that there was any fire escape or ladder for the purpose, except the one that belongs to the Local Board brigade and kept in the yard. The Local Board yard is situated in Shepherd's-row, about five or six hundred yards from the scene of the fire. The escape did arrive eventually. I saw MR GIDLEY taken from the window. I was about five minutes calling the firemen and police, and a few minutes going for the ladder, but it was several minutes after I got back that he was rescued. It was done by three men. Mr Ferris and Mr Picketts were among them, and the latter did a great deal towards saving his life. Three ladders were placed against the window where MR GIDLEY was coming out, a man being on each ladder. After they got him down they carried him away to the Maud Hospital, and I went and helped my wife in attending to the rescued children.
By Mr Sherwin: After I had been all round calling and immediately I had returned from West's, I went in and put on my trousers. On looking at the clock then I saw it was about twenty-five minutes to three. Whether it was fast or slow I cannot say.
Mr Sherwin: The reason I ask is because he took the time when he started, and it was just about two o'clock.
Witness: Sometimes my clock is fast, it might have been ten minutes then. I did not see MRS GIDLEY at all.
Q: Were any of the fire brigade or town brigade on the spot? - A: There was one at the corner: I did not speak to him. It was, I think, Mr Soper whom I called.
Mr Perry: Do you really consider he was at the window-sill 35 minutes? – A: No.
Q: But you say you heard him cry at two o'clock? - A: No, a little after. He may have been there fourteen or fifteen minutes.
By the Coroner: From the first time I called the alarm until I went to the police station as about three minutes.
Mr Adams, junr. (representing the Local Board): Was anyone present when you first gave the alarm? - A: I did not see anyone at all; only MR GIDLEY at the window.
Q: Have you ever been present to see the fire escape put together? - A: Only just at a fire. I have never seen them practice on it.
Kate Adams said: - I am the wife of the last witness. About 2.30, or quarter-past two, I heard a window pushed and cries of "Fire." I could hear that it was at MR GIDLEY'S house. I told my husband that it was MRS GIDLEY crying "Fire," and I ran to my front window. Smoke was then coming from the arched window on the second floor of the deceased's house. I ran straight to MR GIDLEY'S in my nightdress, shouting "Fire" as loud as I possibly could as I went. I found the front door of the house was locked, and I heard a great fire roaring inside. There was no one there but me then. My husband was gone MR GIDLEY was shouting, "Bring a ladder." I then ran so far as Fore-street corner, shouting "Fire." Mr Seager, of the corner, was the first comer. I said, "Do get a ladder," and he went to Mr Perriam's, the painter, for one, and then went back to MR GIDLEY'S alone. He was then holding one of his children, BESSIE, out of the same window where I first saw him. MRS GIDLEY was also there holding her baby out of the window. I said to MR GIDLEY "Drop the child," and he replied, "I cannot." He then dropped the child BESSIE, and she caught hold of a rope that was hanging down. I thought she was caught in a crook upon which they hanged poultry. I told her to leave go, and she did so, and I caught her, pushing her against the front door as she was falling in order to break her fall. She did not appear to be hurt. At the same time MRS GIDLEY was shouting down to me. I heard her say "Oh! Mrs Adams" twice. She appeared to be stifled. MR and MRS GIDLEY were then at the window, and I heard MR GIDLEY say "Keep your head out ANNIE." A shoemaker named Gray then came up. It was no longer than five minutes since I arrived there.
Q: Do yo0u mean to say you were there five minutes before anyone was there? A: I might have been three. Directly I caught BESSIE I ran across the street, and put her in my shop, returning to the scene of the fire immediately. Tom Gray arrived just as I returned. MRS GIDLEY then threw the baby out of the window, and Gray caught it. Having done that she fell back suffocated. I carried the baby into my house, and I then saw Mr G. Ferris, landlord of the Forester's Arms, who ran around the corner for help. MR GIDLEY was still leaning out of the window. I then went in and remained with the two children for a few minutes. A neighbour, named Mrs Edwards, then came into my shop, and I gave her the baby, who I thought was dead. Having done that I returned to the street to see what I could do, still in my nightdress. Several people were then there with ladders, and I went home again. I cannot say whether any fire brigade men were there. MR GIDLEY fetched his two children from the storey above. The girl BESSIE told her, her father fetched her from the garret.
By the Coroner: My daughter told me that it was half-past two by our clock when I went first to the fire, and that was, I believe, about a quarter of an hour fast. That would make the right time about fifteen minutes past two.
[By Telegraph]
Mrs Adams continued her evidence, describing the various rooms in the house. BESSIE ELIZABETH GIDLEY, daughter of the deceased, appeared to be hazy with regard to recollecting anything that occurred. She was sleeping in the garret with her elder sister, and was fetched by her father on the night of the fire. A lamp was always kept burning in her mother's room. Paraffin was used, it being kept in a cupboard near the stove in the kitchen. The lamp was burning in her mother's room when she came down on the morning of the fire. Her father put her out the window and she slipped down a rope. She saw smoke coming up the stairs but no flames.
Some discussion took place with regard to the plans of the premises, and eventually Mr Warren said he would produce those he had, and Mr Adams, on behalf of the Board, said they would do the same.
Mr Charles Ashford, of Exeter, interposed from the body of the hall during the discussion and said: May I ask if this is a public Inquiry into the loss of the lives of those individuals yesterday morning, or is it an Inquiry into the construction of Mr Warren's premises?
The Coroner: Are you one of the Jurymen, sir? - A: No, I am one of the public.
The Coroner: Then you have no right to interfere in the conduct of this Enquiry, and I must request you not to do so.
Mr Ashford: I rather think -----
The Coroner: I shall have to order you to leave the room if you interrupt the proceedings again. You must understand nobody is allowed to interfere beyond the gentlemen of the Jury.
Mr Ashford: I perfectly understand.
At the conclusion of the little girl's evidence, it was decided to adjourn the Enquiry until Tuesday at eleven o'clock.

Wednesday 21 August 1889, Issue 6939 – Gale Document No. Y3200745584
A DANGEROUS PRACTICE: - Fatal Results. - Mr J. F. Bromham on Monday, at Hartland, near Bideford, held an Inquest on the body of EHTEL MARY BAKER, 11 years of age. It appears the child on Friday took a can of petroleum from a cupboard and began to pour it in the grate, thinking the fire would burn brighter. Of course, no sooner had she begun to do this than the can containing the oil became ignited and exploded. The child speedily became enveloped in flames and her mother, in trying to rescue her, also caught fire. With great presence of mind the mother went out to a pump and began to pour water over the child and herself with great effect. The burns which the child received, however, were so severe that she died in a few hours. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 26 August 1889, Issue 6942 – Gale Document No. Y3200745695
INQUEST AT TORQUAY – Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest this morning at the Half Moon Hotel, on the body of GEORGE BEST, blacksmith, who died suddenly on Saturday, under circumstances already reported. Dr Cave said he had made a post mortem examination on deceased's body, and found that dead had resulted from fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury found a verdict to this effect, and gave their fees for the benefit of the five children of deceased, who are now left orphans. The Coroner remarked on the unsanitary condition of the court in which the deceased lived.

Tuesday 27 August 1889, Issue 6944 – Gale Document No. Y3200745714
FATAL ACCIDENT AT PAIGNTON - Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Gerston Hotel, Paignton, this morning, touching the death of AMOS MAUNDER, a child five years of age, whose death was caused by falling from the passenger bridge at the crossing near the railway station, at Paignton, on Saturday last. Mr John Parnell was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The Jurymen, being sworn, at once proceeded to view the body and also the bridge from which the boy fell. The first witness called was JOHN MAUNDER, father of the deceased, who stated that t two o'clock last Saturday afternoon his son was quite well when he went away with other children to go to the beach. In the evening he was informed that his boy had fallen off the station bridge and was taken to Dr Alexander's surgery. Witness went to Dr Alexander's, where he saw his child who was quite unconscious. Later in the evening the child was taken home, but never recovered consciousness and died on Monday evening. Dr Alexander stated that he arrived home about seven o'clock on Monday evening, when the deceased was in his surgery. He was quite unconscious and in a most critical condition. Had seen the deceased just previous to his death, which was due to an effusion of blood and depression of the brain. Charles Pearse, labourer, proved seeing the boy fall off the bridge and being taken to Dr Alexander's surgery. After the summing up of the Coroner, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased met his death by accidentally falling from the railway bridge at Paignton on Saturday last, with a rider to the following effect: - That the Jury desire to draw the attention of the Railway Company to the unsafe state of the bridge, and suggest that something be done to prevent children from sliding down the banisters thereof, a most dangerous practice frequently indulged in by the young ones of the town.

Thursday 29 August 1889, Issue 6946 – Gale Document No. Y3200745757
THE DROWNING CASE AT TIVERTON - Last night an Inquest was held at the Elmore schoolroom, before Mr L. Mackenzie, touching the death of JOHN BAKER, aged four years, son of a smith, working in the factory. The circumstances under which the child was drowned have already been published in the "Post." Deceased was sent to school on Tuesday afternoon, but with a companion named Boobier, he wandered to the banks of the Lowman, and crossed the river by the fender. Afterwards he was passing over a plank when he slipped and fell and was drowned. Boobier ran home and raised an alarm, and twenty minutes later P.S. Perry recovered the body. The Jury returned an Open Verdict.

Friday 30 August 1889, Issue 6947 – Gale Document No. Y3200745777
SAD FATALITY AT KENTON - Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Devon Arms, Kenton, yesterday, on the body of THOMAS BIDGOOD, labourer, who was run over by a waggon at Southtown, Kenton, on Tuesday night. The body was identified by Mary Jane Slocombe. Henry Hoare, of 16, Parr-street, Teignmouth, who was the driver of another waggon, said on Tuesday he and deceased were proceeding from Kenton to Teignmouth. After they changed horses, at four o'clock, he drove after BIDGOOD, who was a little ahead, and on the top of the hill outside Kenton witness's horse shied at something on the side of the road, and when he tried to stop the animal it pulled him off his legs, but he got up and ran after it as fast as he could. On coming up to his waggon he found it pulled up on the top of the hill, with the deceased's waggon still in front. George Hellier, of Kenton, said he saw the last witness trying to check the runaway horse. The horse pulled Hoare, who had the reins in his hand, along the ground. On letting go his hold upon the reins the horse galloped off at full speed. The deceased jumped off his waggon, and attempted to catch the runaway horse with his left hand, but the animal knocked him down, and both wheels of the waggon appeared to pass over him. Witness immediately went with another man and picked up the deceased, who was unconscious, and placed him in Taylor's gardens, but he died almost immediately. The man did not appear to be the worse for liquor. Mr Edgar Richard Lipscombe, surgeon, said that he examined the body on Wednesday afternoon, and found the right leg badly smashed both above and at the knee. The injuries were quite sufficient to account for death, and they were undoubtedly caused by the wheels of a waggon passing over the limb. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 3 September 1889, Issue 6950 – Gale Document No. Y3200745874
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper), held an Inquest t the Police Court this afternoon touching the sudden death of JANE MCDONALD who resided in Preston Street. THOMAS MCDONALD, a seaman, residing at 49, Preston Street, identified the body as that of his late grandmother, who he said was a widow and 75 years of age at the time of her decease. He was in her company on Sunday last when she appeared to be in a very good state of health. About ten o'clock the same night she came down, unlocked the door, and let him in. She was afte3rwards taken ill in the stairs, and he went to her assistance and carried her to her bedroom. She said nothing, and died within a few minutes. She went to St Mary Magdalene's Church in the evening. Betsy Glanfield, wife of Nicholas Glanfield, living in George's-square, said she had known the deceased for ten years. She had suffered from heart complaint, having several times dropped down. She accompanied deceased to church when she appeared as usual, and did not complain of being unwell. Mr Brash, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Sunday night shortly after eleven o'clock. He found her lying on the bed dead. He examined the body, but discovered no marks of violence, and death in his opinion resulted from "Syncope", or failure of the heart's action. He had previously attended her for cough and weakness. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 4 September 1889, Issue 6951 – Gale Document No. Y3200745892
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A TORQUAY MAN – Killed in the Docks. - Last evening Mr Wyne Baxter held an Inquest at the Poplar Townhall, London, on the body of JOHN CLARE, aged 29, gentleman's servant and butler, of Lota, Torquay, who met with a fatal accident while on board the Donald Currie's steamship Dunrobin Castle, lying in the East India Dock. MR J. CLARE, of Lota, Torquay, identified the deceased as his son. Witness was told that he had accepted a berth as steward on the Dunrobin Castle. Wm. Lowers, fireman on board the ship, said that on Friday last, at midnight, he saw deceased on deck. He warned him that the hatches were off, but deceased stumbled and fell down the main-hold. He was helping to load the vessel; in fact, all were helping, because no labourers would. The father, recalled, said that the deceased had never been to sea in his life. John Nicol, mate, said deceased was only engaged the day before, and his sleeping quarters had not been shewn him. The Jury expressed their strong disapproval of the captain employing a man to load a ship which he knew nothing about. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

FATAL KICK FROM A HORSE AT CREDITON – Inquest This Day. - Mr H. W. Hooper, held an inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning, on the body of a boy named FRANK EDWARDS, aged five, who died yesterday by a kick from a horse. The body having been viewed, ELIZABETH EDWARDS, of Langdon-place, Crediton, identified it as that of her son. On the 4th July, about 5 p.m., she sent him on an errand by himself. About ten minutes after, a little boy, named HARRY CHAMBERLAIN, came to her and said he was kicked by a pony, in a field by the Crediton Inn. She went out and saw him walking towards his home. He said the pony had knocked him down. The animal belonged to Mr Bullen. Deceased crept under the gate, and she took him up and carried him home. Dr Body was then sent for, and he soon arrived with his assistant. There was a wound on the forehead, and the Dr. sewed it up. About five weeks after witness brought the deceased to the Hospital for advice, and they kept him in. He died yesterday morning. Harry Chamberlain, a boy aged 8, of Crediton, said on the 4th of July, he saw the deceased running after a pony in the middle of the field. Soon after he saw the animal kick deceased in the forehead and knock him down. Witness went to tell his mother.
By the Juror: Witness was not in the field at the time. Mr Martyn, assistant house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said on August 8th he received deceased into the Institution suffering from a discharging wound in the inner side of his upper eyelid. He progressed on the treatment that was given him until ten days after, when he was taken with convulsions. An operation was then performed on him, and he went on favourably until the 2nd inst., when he again had convulsions. It was thought proper to have another operation performed, which was done at nine o'clock, but the lad died the next morning. Death resulted from an abscess on the brain, caused by the accident. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 5 September 1889, Issue 6952 – Gale Document No. Y3200745919
DEATH OF THE REV. W. K. MOTT, late of Heavitree. - Whilst taking luncheon at the refreshment buffet at the grand stand on the Derby Racecourse yesterday afternoon, the REV. W. K. MOTT was seized with illness Medical aid was promptly rendered, but the rev. gentleman died in a few minutes. The body was afterwards removed to the Derby Infirmary. At the Inquest held last evening, the Jury, in accordance with the medical testimony, returned a verdict of death from apoplexy. The deceased gentleman was formerly a beneficed clergyman, and was curate of Heavitree Parish church from 1866 to 1868.

Monday 9 September 1889, Issue 6955 – Gale Document No. Y3200746003
THE DROWNING CASE AT DAWLISH – The Inquest. - At the Cemetery Chapel today, before Mr Watts, an Inquiry was held touching the death of GEORGE COMBSTOCK, who, it may be remembered, was drowned at the Dawlish Regatta on Friday, the 23rd August. The Jury (Mr G. B Avant Foreman), after hearing the evidence of JOHN COMBSTOCK, the father of the unfortunate man, as to identification; and that of William Casely, who was in the Wave when she went down, brought in a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning." According to Casely's evidence, the main sheet was made fast at the time of the boat going down. This, the Jury strongly remarked, might have been also accidental.

Tuesday 10 September 1889 Issue 6956 – Gale Document No. Y3200746022
DEATH THROUGH SWALLOWING A NEEDLE - An Inquest was held yesterday at the Dock Inn, Appledore, on the body of GEORGE EDWARDS, aged 51. It transpired that on Sundays, the 18th of August, deceased was taking supper with his wife. While eating a potato he drank some beer which he had poured into a small glass. He drank the beer right off, and immediately afterwards felt a needle in his mouth, and discovered that he had also swallowed one. The glass was one which was not often used, and two needles had been kept in it. He spat out the needle which was in his mouth with the potato, and he tried to clear the other one by vomiting. He did not succeed, and Dr Pratt was sent for. Dr Pratt soon arrived, but could find no trace of the needle. He recommended the deceased to drink cooling drinks, such as barley-water, and he saw him daily for three or four days. After that the deceased went to work, the only inconvenience he felt being a slight difficulty in swallowing. On Wednesday last he got worse and he went home and went to bed. Dr Pratt again attended him and used an instrument to try and find the needle, but could not. On Friday night deceased spat up some blood, and on Saturday his wife was frightened on finding him on the floor in great pain, with blood about the floor. Deceased shortly after died. Dr Pratt deposed that no operation could possibly have got at the needle. Death was due to the rupture of a blood vessel through swallowing a needle. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 11 September 1889, Issue 6957 – Gale Document No. Y3200746047
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A FIREMAN AT ILFRACOMBE - A sad accident, which terminated fatally, occurred on Monday evening to a young man named ALBERT DENDLE, who is employed as messenger to the Ilfracombe Fire Brigade. The men, under the command of Captain Jewell, were out for their weekly drill, and were engaged in practising with the escape outside the Town Hall. Several men were on the roof of the building, and a man was successfully lowered in what is termed a "chair knot", which is used when the escape does not reach the top of a building. A second trial was made with the same rope, and this time DENDLE was attached, but when the descent was about half accomplished the rope snapped, and he fell heavily to the pavement, a distance of about twenty feet, on his left side, his left temple striking the ground with a heavy thud. The unfortunate youth's father, who is also a member of the brigade, was stationed at the bottom, and was the first to pick up his son. The left side of the skull was completely smashed in. He was immediately taken to Dr Foquett's house, and from thence to the Hospital, where Dr Gardner was also in attendance, but it was soon seen that the case was hopeless. DENDLE lingered on in an unconscious state until just before twelve o'clock, when he expired. The young man was about 19 years of age, and was very popular in the brigade, he having been a member for about five years. An Inquest was held on the body last night.

Monday 16 September 1889, Issue 6961 – Gale Document No. Y3200746140
FATAL FALL FROM A RICK AT HEAVITREE - This morning Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy District Coroner) held an Inquest at the Blue Ball Inn, Heavitree, on the body of JOHN MILSOM, aged 61, of Heavitree. GEORGE MILSOM, of Sandygate, Heavitree, labourer, identified the body of the deceased as that of his father, a labourer, late of Sowton. He had known him feel giddy at times. Elias Nethercott, of St. Mary's Clyst, labourer, said on Friday last he was at work with the deceased at Mr Burgoyne's, Heavitree, engaged in making a straw rick. Witness and the deceased were on the rick together about five o'clock. He pitched up a bundle of straw, and witness took it from him, but on looking round again he missed him. He shouted out, "I have missed MILSOM." A man named Strong, who was pitching straw to the rick, replied, "Here he is, and I think he is a dead man." Witness went to him immediately, but beyond opening his mouth once, deceased showed no signs of life. There was no one else on the rick besides witness and the deceased. MILSOM had been at work all day, but did not make any complaint of illness. Christopher Strong, labourer, of St Mary's Clyst, said on the day in question he was engaged in pitching straw to a rick in a field belonging to Mr Burgoyne. He saw the deceased curled up on the ground as he was pitching the straw, and immediately went to him. Deceased had previously been taking straw from witness, but he did not see him fall. The deceased was perfectly sober. Robert Leonard Rutherford, physician at Digby's Asylum, said on Friday last, a few minutes to five, he was called to see the deceased, who he found lying by the side of a rick. On examination he found that he was dead, and that he had broken his neck. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 19 September 1889, Issue 6964 – Gale Document No. Y3200746216
SAD DEATH AT COMBMARTIN - Mr J. F. Bromham (District Coroner), held an Inquest at the king's Arms, Combmartin, on the body of a child named ALFRED GUBB, six months of age, who died on Monday under rather strange circumstances. MRS GUBB, grandmother of the deceased, said the child was put to bed as usual on Saturday evening, but awoke about 11.20 vomiting. The next day she sent for Mr G. E. Manning, surgeon, who prescribed for the child, but it died the following morning. Mr Manning said the result of a post mortem showed that death was caused by strangulation of the bowels, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Friday 20 September 1889, Issue 6965 – Gale Document No. Y3200746249
SAD SUICIDE AT CREDITON – Inquest
An inquest was held today, at Bedford's King's Arms, Crediton, by Mr H. Gould (deputy Coroner), to enquire into the death of CHRISTIANA GILLARD, of Port-street, Crediton, widow of JAMES GILLARD, mason, of Crediton, aged 72, she having died on the 17th instant, of arsenical poisoning.
EMMA GILLARD, daughter of the deceased, who seemed to be much affected, stated that on the afternoon of the 17th she noticed that her mother was rather strange in her manner as she had been for some time past. She objected to company as she thought everyone was watching her, and on that afternoon she left the front room in which she had been sitting and went into the kitchen, returning in three minutes time sucking a sweet. Shortly afterwards the mother and daughter and a Mrs Belford, who was staying in the house, sat down to tea, when MRS GILLARD was very much flushed, and soon after began to vomit. Her daughter asked her if she had drunk anything, and she replied, "Yes, my tea." Then, thinking she had evaded the question, she pressed her more closely, when her mother said, "Shall I tell you the truth?" "Yes, do mother," was the reply She then said she had taken some of the stuff which was used for the rats. The cupboard in which it was kept was generally locked, but it was now found to be open, and MRS GILLARD said she had taken it out at dinner time while her daughter was in the garden. The arsenic which had been taken had been given to MRS GILLARD'S husband some thirty years before for the purpose of killing rats. Dr Campbell was called, and he saw the deceased alive. She lived until eleven o'clock that evening. MRS EMMA BELFORD, widow, was then sworn. She said deceased had a delusion. She frequently complained of having something on her back pulling her about. She suffered from a spinal complaint, and was at times rather strange in her manner. Mrs Belford was present during the time all the previous witness had stated was taking place, and she fully corroborated her evidence. Dr Campbell stated that he was called in to see the deceased on the Tuesday afternoon in question, and found her sitting in the kitchen with her daughter; she was agitated, and very pale. Deceased told him she had taken arsenic, because she could not help it, the pain in her back made her so very miserable. She suffered from degeneration of the brain. The vomiting which had taken place was a symptom of arsenical poisoning. He did what he could to relieve the burning in the throat and chest which the arsenic had occasioned, but little could be done in such cases. Two grains of arsenic were enough to cause death, and deceased must have taken as much as twenty. The arsenic was undoubtedly the cause of death, but he did not consider deceased was responsible for her actions. Mr Gould said the jury had heard the statements of the witnesses and could clearly see that they agreed. The only thing left for them to consider was the mental condition of the deceased. The jury readily returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of unsound mind."

Tuesday 24 September 1889, Issue 6968 – Gale Document No. Y3200746329
DROWNED IN THE MILL LEAT – Inquest This Afternoon. - This afternoon Mr W. H. Hooper (Coroner) held an Inquiry into the death of WILLIAM GEORGE SERGEANT, the boy who was drowned in the Exe on Sunday. ELLEN SERGEANT, 5, Cricklepit-lane, mother of the deceased, said that the boy went to Sunday School at 3.20 on the day in question, returning at about 4.20. He left a book on a chair, and then went out to play. She never saw him again alive, and the first intimation of what had happened to him was brought to her by a little boy, who said he was in the water. Mary Anne Vosper, of Cricklepit-street, stated that she was at her window, overlooking the water, when she saw the deceased and his little brother playing with an apple. The apple fell into the water, and the deceased climbed over the wall and fell into the lake. She saw nothing more of him. Samuel Sharland, of Exminster, a labouring foreman, said he was ordered by the Council to search for the body, and he found it on Monday at five o'clock just below Quay Bridge. It was given into the charge of the parents. Dr Bell said he was called yesterday evening to examine the body, and found that it had been in the water about twenty-four hours. There were no marks of violence, and death was due to drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 28 September 1889, Issue 6972 – Gale Document No. Y3200746411
THE LATE DROWNING FATALITY AT ILFRACOMBE REGATTA - An Inquest on the body of JOHN TUCKER, boatman, who was drowning by the running down of a mark boat during the Ilfracombe Regatta on August 21st, was held at the Pier Hotel, Ilfracombe, on Thursday evening by Dr Slade-King, deputy Coroner. The body was found floating off the Tors in the afternoon by the crew of the smack Favourite. After hearing the evidence of identification the Inquiry was adjourned to Monday, October 7th, at 5 p.m., in order to obtain the master of the pilot boat as a witness.

Monday 30 September 1889, Issue 6973 – Gale Document No. Y3200746456
SAD DEATH OF A LAD AT WHIPTON – A Fatal Kick From a Horse. - An Inquest was held this afternoon before H. W. Gould, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the Half Moon Inn, Whipton, touching the death of WILLIAM GEORGE CHIPLING, five years of age. Mr R. Snow was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The first witness was William Jefford, of Whipton, a labourer, who identified the body of the deceased. He had taken care of the boy for some time past his mother being unmarried. On Saturday last, just before two o'clock, he was in a field, in the parish of Heavitree, belonging to Mr Snow. There were two horses in the field, and witness caught one. The other horse was following, and behind it were the deceased and another little boy. Presently the little boy that was in company with deceased came up to him and said, "Oh, little WILLIE'S dead." He did not know the name of the other little lad, but believed he was called Perkins He went back to where the deceased was lying, and took him up in his arms. The deceased was lying on the ground about a yard behind the last horse. The little lad was lying on his side, and blood was oozing from his ears and he appeared quite dead. He was accustomed to the horses and they were very quiet. Deceased must have struck the horse, he should think, with a stick. John Bickley, of Whipton, a labourer, said on Saturday last he was at work with the last witness. When he was going into the field he saw Jefford with one horse and the boys driving along the other. The deceased had a stick in his hand, and he (the witness) saw the horse kick him. He ran to where the deceased was lying, but by the time he got to the lad he was dead. He was in charge of the horse, and it was a very quiet animal. Dr R. J. Andrews, living at Heavitree, deposed to seeing the deceased on Saturday about two o'clock. He found he was quite dead when he arrived. There was a wound near the left temple, at the back of the ear. The wound was such as might have been occasioned by the kick of a horse. The skull was not fractured, and he believed that the deceased died from concussion of the brain, the result of the blow. The Coroner then summed up. He said it appeared to him to be a very regrettable accident, but at the same time he could not see that there was anyone to blame. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 1 October 1889, Issue 6974 – Gale Document No. Y3200746474
SAD DEATH OF A CHILD AT ST. MARY'S CLYST - Mr C. Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Malster's Arms, Clyst St. Mary, this morning, on the body of ALICE STAMP, aged 6 years, of Clyst St. Mary, in the parish of Sowton, who died rather suddenly on Monday morning. GEORGE STAMP, cordwainer, identified the body as that of his daughter. CAROLINE STAMP, wife of the last witness, was called and gave evidence to the effect that the child was taken ill about ten o'clock on Sunday night, and died on Monday morning about half-past twelve. Witness tried to get a person to go for a doctor, but could not wake one up. CHARLOTTE HEARFORD, grandmother of the deceased, said she was getting ready just after twelve early on Monday morning, but the child died before she left the house. Emma Eveleigh said she saw the deceased about nine o'clock on Sunday night when she seemed poorly, but there did not appear to be much the matter with her. The mother and father of the child were very kind to her. Dr Andrews, of Heavitree, said he had made a post mortem examination on the body, and found that the child died of inflammation on the lungs. She must have been suffering from it for some time. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 2 October 1889, Issue 6975 – Gale Document No. Y3200746490
SUICIDE OF A NAVAL LIEUTENANT THROUGH DRINK - Inquest. - Last evening Mr J. Vaughan (Borough Coroner for Devonport), held an Inquest at the Royal Albert Hospital to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a Naval Lieutenant, named FRANCIS E. J. TOTTENHAM (late navigating officer of H.M.S. Curlew), who committed suicide on Monday by jumping through one of the hospital windows and falling about a distance of sixty feet to the ground. George Neck, boots at Thomas's Hotel, Fore-street, Devonport, gave evidence to the effect that on Friday night, about 11 p.m., deceased rang his bell which he answered. Deceased, requested to speak to Mrs Parker, the proprietress, who was dressed, and he told Mrs Parker that someone had been looking into his window and he had two loaded revolvers ready to protect himself. He, however, shortly afterwards returned to his room. The Coroner questioned witness as to the state of the deceased at that time, and aft some hesitation, he replied that he had no doubt that the man was suffering from delirium tremens. Deceased was afterwards taken to the Royal Albert Hospital. The Coroner then stated that a brother officer of the deceased called upon him on the previous evening, and said that deceased had been tried by court-martial about twelve months ago, and was then dismissed his ship. Since that time he had been a teetotaller. James Carter Smith, the house surgeon, deposed that the deceased was admitted to the hospital on Saturday afternoon suffering from delirium tremens. On Sunday morning deceased told him that previous to Thursday last he had been drinking very heavily. He had not a particularly bad attack, but on Sunday night he commenced to get troublesome, and at times was very excitable. About seven o'clock on Monday morning he walked part way downstairs in his night-shirt. About eleven o'clock he was called to see deceased, whom he found lying in the operating theatre suffering from a compound fracture of both thighs and also to the skull. Deceased expired about three quarters of an hour afterwards. He had no doubt that it was through delirium tremens that he was led to jump out of the window. Esther Maddigan, nurse at the Hospital, said when the deceased got out of bed about eleven o'clock she spoke to him, but saw by his determined look that he meant mischief. She rang the bell, opened the door, and called for help, and whilst she was doing this she heard the glass smash. On turning round she saw that he had disappeared. Mr Green, assistant surgeon, came to her assistance, and she told him that deceased had gone through the window, but she could hardly realise that such a big man could do such a thing in so short a time. The windows had been screwed down on Saturday, but he broke one with his fist on that day.
The Coroner, in summing up, said it was clear that the deceased had been suffering from delirium tremens which caused him to go through the window. It was terrible to see so much injury and crime occasioned through drink. It was a curse to the English nation to see spent on this evil money which really should e devoted to making the home bright and happy, instead of which there was nothing but misery. He wished that such misery could be avoided. The Jury returned a verdict that death was caused by throwing himself out of window whilst in a state of unsound mind and suffering from delirium tremens.

Friday 4 October 1889, Issue 6977 – Gale Document No. Y3200746540
INQUEST AT ILFRACOMBE - At the Railway Hotel, Ilfracombe, yesterday, Dr Slade King held an Inquest relative to the death of RICHARD KIFT. Evidence was given by the deceased's son, GEORGE RICHARD KIFT, and a carrier, named Creek, that the deceased was quarrying stones in Francis Quarry, Ilfracombe, on Wednesday, when a large stone fell on him and knocked him from where he was standing to a distance of ten feet. Dr J. T. Gardner described the injuries to the man's right leg, which necessitated the amputation of the limb. KIFT died about an hour after the operation from shock. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the fees of the Jury were given to the widow. An absent Juryman named Palmer was fined five shillings.

Tuesday 8 October 1889, Issue 6980 – Gale Document No. Y3200746623
SAD DEATH FROM BURNS IN EXETER - This afternoon Mr W. Hooper held an Inquest at 22, St. David's-hill, on the body of MRS ANNE DACIE, aged 55, who died yesterday morning from burns. CAPTAIN DACIE, husband of the deceased, said his wife went to bed as usual on Sunday night about eleven o'clock taking a lamp, when some time afterwards he heard a scream, and on going up with his son they found the door locked. His sons burst it open and they found deceased in flames. She was burnt seriously, and Dr Moon was sent for, and the family doctor (Mr Hawkins), who dressed the wounds. Deceased was in the habit of reading in the room night and morning. CHARLES DACIE, son of the last witness, said after his mother had gone to bed on Sunday he heard a shout, and on going to her room found her in flames. He then threw his coat on her and put out the flames. Dr Moon said he was called to MR DACIE'S house about twenty minutes to one yesterday morning to see the deceased. He found she was burnt from the knees to the head. With the assistance of Dr Hawkins they dressed the wounds. He then left her in charge of Dr Hawkins, but he was called again about 8.30 last evening. MRS DACIE died before he arrived. Death was caused by shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 14 October 1889, Issue 6984 – Gale Document No. Y3200746735
SUDDEN DEATH OF AN INFANT - On the body of the infant daughter of WILLIAM and ELIZABETH EVANS, of Bishop's Building, Exeter, five weeks of age, an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper this afternoon. The evidence of the mother was to the effect that on Sunday morning the child, when she woke at 6.30 a.m. was suffering from convulsions, and died before a medical gentleman arrived. The Coroner elicited the fact that the mother fed the child on bread food, and he commented on this, at the same time pointing out that milk could be obtained at a small cost under the new regulation. Dr Perkins said death was due to Natural Causes, accelerated by convulsions, and a verdict to this effect was returned.

Wednesday 16 October 1889, Issue 6987 – Gale Document No. Y3200746770
SAD DEATH AT MORETON – Allegations Against the West of England Eye Infirmary. - An Inquest was held at the White Hart Hotel, Moretonhampstead, on Monday, by Mr Hacker, Coroner for the Totnes District, to enquire into the death of HARRIET WOTTON, aged 61, who died at Moretonhampstead, on Saturday morning, after being brought from the West of England Eye Infirmary, Exeter, on the previous evening in a carrier's van. ELIZA FORD, widow, of Court-street, Moretonhampstead, sister of deceased, said that for the last three years deceased had been living with her. About two months ago she went to the Eye Infirmary at Exeter on account of bad sight. She was ill when she left Moreton, but had not been confined to bed. On Friday night witness found her in the van, and she was taken out and carried to her house. She was unconscious, and groaned several times. Dr Collyns was called at once, but she died at eight o'clock in the morning. JANE WOTTON, of James-street, Exeter, said deceased was her husband's aunt. She did not think at the time that deceased was unfit to take the journey. The van had been packed by Mr Parker, the carrier, so as to make her as comfortable as possible, and she had given her some brandy to take with her as she could not eat anything. Selina Parker, sister of Parker, the carrier, said deceased came home in the van with her. She was sensible, but only spoke when witness spoke to her. She drank brandy four or five times on the journey. It was a covered van, the front being open, but it was not cold. They arrived home about eleven. Mr Down carried her home. She spoke to witness before Mrs Ford came. Witness went home with her, and afterwards fetched the doctor. George Nelson Collyns, surgeon, residing at Moretonhampstead, stated:- I knew deceased, having attended her in sickness. For a long time she has done no work on account of bad eyesight, having cataracts on both eyes. By my recommendation she was made an inmate of the Eye Infirmary in Exeter. On Friday evening, a few minutes before twelve, I was called to see her, and was told she was dying, and had just been brought from Exeter. I found her before a fire which had just been lighted with a few sticks. She was in a state of collapse, from which she never recovered. I have made a post mortem examination, and find the cause of death to have been congestion of the lungs. Both were highly congested, but the heart and kidneys were healthy. I could not say how long they had been congested, but it had reached the first stage of inflammation. The body was highly emaciated, there not being a scrap of fat about it. An operation had been unsuccessfully performed upon one eye, the other had not been operated upon. Deceased had been in bed up to four or five days before being sent home, and I consider she was not in a fit state of leave the Infirmary, and I think a great want of judgment has been shewn in discharging her in such a condition. The Coroner reminded the Jury that they could either return a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" or adjourn the Inquest till further evidence could be obtained. At present he did not see they could rightly attach blame to anyone. The Foreman of the Jury announced that with the evidence before them they could not arrive at a verdict that evening, but must adjourn the Inquest until such time as the evidence of those responsible for her discharge from the Infirmary could be had. The Coroner thoroughly concurred with the Jury in their decision, and the Inquest was adjourned till one o'clock on Friday next.

Friday 18 October 1889, Issue 6989 – Gale Document No. Y3200746829
SUDDEN DEATH OF A PATIENT FROM THE EYE INFIRMARY – Complete Exoneration of the Hospital Officials.
Important Evidence. - The resumed Inquest on the body of HARRIETT WOTTON, an old lady belonging to Moretonhampstead, who was for some time an inmate of the Ophthalmic Hospital at Exeter, took place today at Moretonhampstead, before Mr Coroner Hacker. The deceased was suffering from cataract in both eyes when she entered the hospital, and she was operated upon for one eye. She was subsequently sent home in a carrier's van, and on arriving at Moreton late at night she appeared to be dangerously ill, and shortly afterwards died. Dr Collyns was called in, and he subsequently expressed the opinion that from the post mortem the deceased ought not to have been sent out of the hospital, and on such a journey. Alice Haines, the nurse at the Ophthalmic Hospital at Exeter, who gave her evidence with much clearness, was the first witness today. She said she was nurse at the Institution. The deceased was admitted on the 16th August. The deceased was under Mr Toswill, and witness had charge of her as regards the nursing. When she came in she was in a very weak state of health. Mr Toswill said it was not a favourable case, and ordered that she should remain some time before she was operated on. She did not appear to get much better. Witness was present when the operation was performed, and Mr Roper was also there. After the operation she could see, and she was taken back to bed, where she remained the usual time in similar cases. The operation was performed on the 27th of September. After eight days she sat up in the ward, and the next day, Sunday, came down into the day ward. When she was in the day ward witness still attended her. She seemed about the same in health in the day ward, and had a good appetite. She had stout up to the time of the operation, and after that some brandy daily. She was discharged on Mr Toswill's order. She seemed all right up to the Thursday, before she left, when she was sick. Witness gave her some brandy immediately, and left her some brandy and milk the last thing at night. She slept soundly, and in the morning went down into the day ward after eating a good breakfast. After the operation she had a gathering on her finger, but witness poultice it, and it got better. She took her to Mr Toswill, who said jocularly he couldn't find much the matter. She had probably been eating something wrong – perhaps apple dumplings. He said he thought she would get on much better in her own country air than staying in the Infirmary, and she said she thought she should. He told her that he would give her medicine for a month, and when she came again she could bring another recommend. She was to go out and come again in a month. He said "How do you think about going home?" Deceased said she could go with the carrier as she knew him very well, and he passed close to her door. She said the carrier started from the Oat Sheaf, in Fore-street. Mr Toswill said, "You had better go home by train." She said she wanted to get home, that she had friends in Exeter, and they were coming in to see her that afternoon; her niece would certainly come, and they would put her into the carrier's van. Mr Toswill then asked the deceased whether she couldn't go and stay for a change with her friends before going home, and she said she would rather get away at once. Witness was in the room all the time the conversation went on. Mr Toswill said "Very well, come and see me again at the end of a month." Deceased said she would, and then turned and thanked witness for all she had done for her. Deceased was always a most grateful patient. Deceased had never shown any signs of failing appetite, and when Mr Toswill said she had probably eaten something to disagree with her, she said she had had no apple dumplings, and she should rather like to have one. When witness took her back she determined the old lady should have one, and she took her up one. On the day she left she asked witness to see to her things, and witness packed them up for her. She said she was surprised that her niece, who had promised to come, had not arrived to see her off, and witness said she would get somebody to find out her niece's address. Before the deceased went witness offered to lend her some wraps, but deceased said she would get some from her niece. MRS WOTTON, when she came, readily offered to lend her aunt something to cover her with, and the old lady walked downstairs and left in a cab. She was in her usual health when she went away and offered not the slightest complaint, in fact, seemed very grateful for all that had been done for her. She said she was quite warm enough with what she had on.
By the Coroner: I knew where she was going, and I thought she was able to take the journey. – Q: Did you think she was strong enough to walk to the Oat Sheaf? - A: I did. – Q: Why did you suggest a cab? - A: Because it was so damp. – Q: And you say that when she left the Institution she was in her usual health? - A: Yes. – Q: And you knew that she was going to Moreton, and the way she was going? -A: Yes, - Mr Tosswill asked her before she left whether she felt well enough to go the journey and she said she did. Witness considered her quite as well in the afternoon as she was in the morning. Mr Toswill: Would you mind asking the witness, Mr Coroner, if the deceased made any complaints as to feeling unwell when she left? - The witness (in answer to the Coroner): No; she said she was much better, and had slept soundly the night previous.
Mr Louis Henry Toswill (Who made an affirmation) was the next witness. He said he was a surgeon practising in Exeter, and was surgeon to the Exeter Eye Infirmary. To a very great extent, the evidence given by Nurse Haines described the circumstances of the case. In answer to the Coroner as to why the deceased was so suddenly sent away from the hospital, witness said he wished to state at once that it was in no way due to the fact that her recommend had expired. In this case it was true the recommend had expired, but he was not aware of the fact, except from what he had heard. He had nothing whatever to do with the recommends at the hospital(that was the secretary's work), and he never sent away a patient simply because the recommend had expired. Indeed, he had kept patients for three weeks or even longer after the recommend had expired. He attended deceased whilst she was in the infirmary. She was suffering from double cataract, and was by no means a good case. It was not a good one for an operation. There was no certainty about it. There were peculiar circumstances which made it unfavourable. Witness wished here to explain that he was informed by the deceased as to her anxiety to have the operation performed that if it was unsuccessful she might get a pension, and if no operation was performed the friends who were exerting themselves on her behalf would be unable to give assurance that she might not be cured. In answer to the Coroner the witness said unless a patient was in such a state of health as to preclude the possibility of a successful operation he or she was operated on. If there was a reasonable prospect of relief there was an operation. The deceased was not an average case, and it was for this reason that she was kept so long without being operated upon. Witness joked with her and told her he wanted to fatten her up. Usually a patient was operated upon in a week or fortnight after admission, but the deceased was kept for six weeks without being operated upon. The operation was perfectly successful – that is to say, whereas the woman lay on the operating table blind, she arose with the cataract removed, and could count his fingers. The operation failed ultimately, but that was on account of the deceased's feeble condition. When witness found she had a gathering on her finger he looked upon that as indicating the state of the system very unfavourable to the ultimate recovery of her eye-sight. After that he found her eyes got worse day by day and when he removed the bandage at last, he was convinced that it would be best for her to be out of the hospital, and if possible in the country. When he heard she was sick on the Thursday, that rather went to confirm the opinion he had formed that she would get no better while in the hospital.
The Coroner: How was it you discharged her without notice? A: Well, sir, I have had seventeen years' experience, and I find that when a patient has been in the hospital a couple of months and does not make substantial progress in health, she is much better in a pure country air. In such cases it becomes apparent that the hospital air does not agree with them, and they are likely to be better out than in the Institution. When he heard that the deceased had been sick it struck him that she would be saved from a further attack if sent to her home in the country, and that the sooner she went out the better. When he saw her on the morning of leaving he could possibly assert that she was in her usual health – her pulse was satisfactory, and her tongue clean. He came to the conclusion that as her eye had failed she must wait for a time before attempting an operation on the other one, and he told her so. She was an old and feeble woman, and he thought the two months in hospital had told upon her. The reason he advised her to go to friends in Exeter was because it was found that that practice tended to the patient's advantage rather than otherwise. It often proved an acceptable change, and enabled the patients to be close to the hospital in case they should find themselves suddenly worse. With regard to the woman's condition, he had not the slightest hesitation in saying that he considered her perfectly well able to bear the journey to Moreton on the day he discharged her. If he had thought otherwise he should not have allowed her to go. He suggested that she should go by train, as he thought that a more comfortable mode of travelling for her, but she persistently declined, and expressed her intention of going by carrier. There was not the slightest reason why she should not go home. The witness here expressed the desire to make some remarks as to a report which had appeared in the "Western Times," giving what purported to be the evidence of Dr Collyns. If that was true, Dr Collyns had not only given facts which were altogether unjustifiable, and as his statements, if uncontradicted, might do a great deal of harm to the institution which he (witness) represented he had attended that day to give evidence in contradiction of Dr Collyn's assumption. He would go so far as to say that the results of the post mortem examination were, if they were correctly reported in the newspaper, named, in some respects unreliable. Dr Collyns had said – according to that report – that inflammation of the lungs in its first stage was apparent.
The Coroner: Then that is not correct. What he did say was that inflammation was imminent. But I don't think we can have newspaper reports brought into the matter. Dr Collyns has a perfect right to express an opinion. – Mr Tosswill: But what I say he has no right to do is to say that the woman was in such a condition when she left the hospital that she ought to have been sent home. Now, sir, I have had a severe attack of congestion of the lungs, and up to three o'clock on the day on which I was attacked, I was hard at work seeing patients. A gentleman, who was formerly a Mayor of Exeter, told me only yesterday that on the morning of that day last year when he was attacked with a similar disease he had remarked to his wife how well he was. The deceased old lady had no doubt been suddenly stricken down with congestion of the lungs, probably due to exposure on the long journey, but he gave the most emphatic denial to the assertion that she was in other than her usual health when she left the hospital. He (witness) thanked the Coroner for allowing him to make this explanation, as it was possible that unless the reporters gave the denial publicity, the accusation might do harm to an institution which was considered in Devon to be worthy of the heartiest support. The Coroner briefly summed up, and suggested that after the lucid explanation of the doctor and the nurse they would probably come to the conclusion that the deceased died from natural causes. The Jury retired, and after a few minutes deliberation returned with a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," adding that no blame whatever was to be attached to the medical officer or the nurse.

Monday 21 October 1889, Issue 6991 – Gale Document No. Y3200746884
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER - Before Mr Hooper (Coroner), at the Police Court this afternoon, an Inquest was held on the body of MRS RHODA WAY WILLIAMS, aged 62, of 47, Magdalen-street. SAMUEL WILLIAMS, gardener, husband of deceased, stated that she appeared in her usual health on the day of her death except for slight inflammation in her legs. She had gone to St George's Clyst in a cab with her daughters, starting at 3.30 and returning about 6.30. She then seemed quite well and rather lively. She had a light supper, with which she took a little brandy and went to bed at about nine o'clock. She woke up early in the night and complained of great pain. Witness brought some brandy, but she died in about ten minutes. Mr Harrison (surgeon), said he was called at about 12.30 and found MRS WILLIAMS dead. She was short necked and high shouldered and he considered death was due to apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

Tuesday 22 October 1889, Issue 6992 – Gale Document No. Y3200746902
INQUEST AT DARTMOUTH - The Inquest on the body of the illegitimate child, ELLEN LOUISA TUCKER, aged thirteen months, whose death was announced in the "Post" yesterday, took place last evening, before Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner. Mr W. Parr was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and after hearing the medical evidence of Dr Harris, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Monday 28 October 1889, Issue 6997 – Gale Document No. Y3200747024
FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE RAILWAY – Inquest this Morning. - Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest this morning at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the body of WILLIAM GIGG, who met his death through injuries received on the railway at Sidmouth, on Friday last. Mr Foster was present and watched the proceedings on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company. Mr Diggins was chosen Foreman of the Jury. MARY JANE GIGG, the widow, said she lived at Tipton St. John, I the parish of Ottery St. Mary. The body just viewed was that of her husband, aged fifty-two, a platelayer on the London and South Western Railway. Deceased left home at ten minutes to seven on Friday morning last to go to work at Sidmouth Junction. He was then in perfect health. About ten o'clock on Friday morning she received a message saying that she was to go to Exeter by the next train, as her husband had met with a slight accident. She came to Exeter by the next train, and found her husband in the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Deceased was in bed and quite conscious, and said to her that it was a bad job. He said he could not move hand or foot. Deceased said that a pickaxe that he was using slipped from his hand, and he (deceased) also fell off the truck and there was no blame attached to anyone.
Harry Mortimore, a ganger in the employ of the London and South western Railway Company, said on Friday last he was at Sidmouth Junction at work with the deceased. About 9.30 a.m. they were engaged in putting some sleepers in a truck. Deceased was in the truck on the sleepers arranging them in position as they had to be conveyed to Wimbledon. Three other men were also with witness and the deceased, and the deceased was using a pickaxe to pull the sleepers together. The pickaxe slipped, and deceased fell backwards over the truck on to the ground, a distance of eight feet. When witness ran to the assistance of the deceased he found him on his back and seemingly unconscious. Some time afterwards deceased said "Oh, my head." A medical man was telegraphed for, but before the doctor arrived deceased was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Mr E. Russell Coombe, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital ,said he received the deceased into the hospital on Friday morning a few minutes before eleven. At that time deceased was conscious but suffering from a severe scalp wound on the left side of the head, and evidently in much pain about the shoulders. Soon after being put to bed, deceased's limbs became paralysed, and he from that time became weaker and weaker and died on Saturday morning. The injury was sufficient to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 28 October 1889, Issue 6997 – Gale Document No. Y3200747030
SUDDEN DEATH AT OTTERY - An Inquest was held at the King's Arms Hotel, Ottery St. Mary, on Saturday by Mr C. Cox (Deputy-Coroner) on the body of PAMELA SQUIRES, wife of MR C. SQUIRES. From the evidence it appeared that on Friday morning MRS SQUAIRES seemed in good health and ate a hearty dinner, after which she complained of feeling unwell and retired to bed, and expired before medical aid could be obtained. Drs. Gray and Reynolds made a post mortem examination, and certified that death arose from syncope. the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with this testimony.

SHOCKING DEATH AT TAVISTOCK - A fireman named WILLIAM SPRING, aged 40, met with a shocking death on Saturday morning about half-past nine, being blown to pieces by an explosion of dynamite at Hocklake, near Tavistock. The duty of the deceased was to charge holes with dynamite in connection with the construction of the new railway. About 9.20 he charged a hole for a tunnel miner named Samuel Endicott. It exploded all right and the deceased went in the direction of a tool-box in which the dynamite charges were kept. Shortly after he had left a terrific explosion occurred about fifty yards from where Endicott was working, and he at once hastened to the spot, and, after the smoke had cleared away, saw deceased lying on his back, and literally blown in pieces. The deceased was known as a steady man, but a smoker. The remains were conveyed to the mortuary of the new cemetery. In the evening Mr R. R. Dodd, District Coroner, held the Inquest at the Duke of York Inn, Tavistock. Dr Bradnick stated that the body was in too terrible a condition to be kept. The man Endicott gave evidence of identity, and said the explosion might have been caused by the dynamite being overheated. The Coroner adjourned the Inquiry for a week in order that the Government Inspector might have an opportunity of attending, and the Foreman of the Jury intimated that he had several questions which he wished to put to Endicott in the presence of the Inspector.

Monday 28 October 1889, Issue 6997 – Gale Document No. Y3200747023
INQUEST AT EXETER – At the Devon and Exeter Hospital, this morning, the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest touching the death of a child named ELLEN JANE OSBORNE. Mr Diggins was chosen Foreman of the Jury. LUCY OSBORNE, wife of RICHARD CHARLES OSBORNE, ironmonger, of 21, Friar's Walk, said the body which the Jury had viewed was that of her daughter, ELLEN JANE OSBORNE, aged 14 months. The child had a slight cold during the week, but had not been under medical treatment. On Saturday afternoon witness took the child from the cradle about ten minutes past four, when it was taken with a kind of convulsive fit. She sent for Mr Harrison, who soon arrived. She had been giving the child a little ipecacuanha wine during the week. She gave the child about half a teaspoonful at a time. She did not mix anything with the wine, but gave it to the child pure. The child's life was not insured. Mr Harrison, a surgeon, practising in Exeter, said on Saturday afternoon he went to the house of the last witness and saw the child on its mother's lap, dead. He should say the child had died about ten minutes before he arrived. He examined the child, and was of opinion that it died from convulsions, following teething and bronchitis. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 2 November 1889, Issue 7002 – Gale Document No. Y3200747145
TERRIBLE FATAL ACCIDENT AT BARNSTAPLE - On Monday morning about half-past nine a lad named HAYWARD met with a shocking death at Messrs. Shapland and Petters, cabinet works, Barnstaple. He had only been in employment there about a week, and was not, of course, experienced. This morning he was ascending in the lift which takes and lowers men and furniture from one story to another. He was alone, and was last seen in it looking a little out over. The result was that as the lift was going up the lad's head came in contact with a beam above, and he was almost instantaneously killed, his head being smashed to pieces. His body was conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary.
THE INQUEST - An adjourned Inquest was held on Thursday morning at Barnstaple, on the body of a boy named ARTHUR HAYWARD, aged 14, who lost his life in a shocking manner on Monday last, by having his head crushed between the bottom of a hoist and the flooring of a landing room at Messrs. Shapland and Petter's cabinet factory in that town, Mr Incledon Bencraft was the Coroner, and he was assisted by a Jury of 15. Mr Bignell, one of the Inspectors of Factories was present, he having been communicated with by the Coroner. The additional evidence taken was to the effect that the deceased was engaged in working a hoist at the factory, which went up and down from one floor to another with material. On the morning in question, as a lad named Sawday and a man named Massey were at their work, they saw the hoist passing their room, and the lad was lying down on it with his head and arms hanging out over. Massey called loudly to the boy to pull in his head, being afraid he would be crushed against the upper floor. The lad did not move, and Sawdye ran over and stopped the lift, and then lowered it when it was found that the boy was already killed, his head having been greatly mutilated by being caught between the floor below and the floor of the lift, while probably he was looking out over. From questions put by the Inspector to witnesses, it transpired that the hoist is very easily put in motion, which the Inspector thought increased the danger when used by a boy. The boy had been employed at the work a week, and had had full instructions as to how to work the lift. The Inspector said he had never before seen a boy working a lift. It was undoubtedly the work of a man. Messrs. Shapland and Petter, however, had months ago expressed their intention of doing all that was recommended to protect life, and had adopted certain suggestions with regard to belts and shafts, and if he (the Inspector) had seen a boy working the hoist he should have said it was dangerous. Mr W. B. Shapland, who was present, stated his intention, on the advice of the Inspector, to put a man on the work in future instead of a boy. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended in addition to the man that the hoist itself should be protected with opening gate's which should open outwards every time the hoist stopped at a landing.

Monday 4 November 1889, Issue 7003 – Gale Document No. Y3200747180
THE FATAL DYNAMITE EXPLOSION AT TAVISTOCK - On Saturday afternoon Mr R. R. Rodd (Deputy Coroner) resumed the Inquiry on the body of WILLIAM SPRING, aged 40, a fireman, employed on the new railway at Hocklake cutting, who was blown to pieces by an explosion of dynamite on the 26th of last month. Mr J. Davey was Foreman of the Jury. Mr J. Pethick (Relf and Pethick), one of the contractors; Mr H. Marten, one of the engineers; and Mr Superintendent Mitchell, inspector of explosives for the district, were present. The Coroner stated that, having reported the occurrence to the Secretary of State he had been told that it was not thought necessary to send down an inspector of explosives. Dr C. C. Brodrick said deceased's body was disembowelled, and the head and both legs and arms were blown off. The greatest amount of injury was received to the head, very little of which was left. Moses Frost, ganger in charge of the Hocklake cutting, said deceased was fireman at Broadwell cutting for about three months, and for two or three months had acted in that capacity at Hocklake cutting. He was a competent fireman, and witness never had a better. At the time of the explosion witness was about 600 yards away. On reaching the spot he could see nothing to account for the accident. Hot ashes were never used for drying the dynamite. Deceased put his own caps on the fuse, and the fuse is the dynamite, and he might have had a mishap in doing so. Superintendent Mitchell was of opinion that deceased removed dynamite from the thawing apparatus, and took it away some distance from the barrel, and that it was through the manipulation of the dynamite which the deceased took away that the explosion occurred. It might have been caused through the explosion of a detonator by striking it, stepping upon it, or improperly picking it, or a stone might have fallen on it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that there was no evidence to shew how the explosion occurred.

Wednesday 13 November 1889, Issue 7010 – Gale Document No. Y3200747375
STRANGE SUICIDE AT TORQUAY - An Inquest on the body of ANNA MARIA BLEUK HALL, 19, a laundress, whose parents reside at Stentiford's-hill, Pimlico, was held before Mr Sydney Hacker, County Coroner, at Torquay, last evening. ELIZABETH BLEUK HALL said the deceased, who was her daughter, died at a quarter-past six on Monday morning. On Wednesday last the deceased was ill, and witness advised her to get something. Deceased had suffered from bilious attacks and giddiness previously, but beyond this her health had been good. On Wednesday night deceased said she would soon be better and went upstairs. Shortly afterwards, witness heard a fall and found deceased at the bottom of the stairs. With the assistance of a Mrs Pym, who lived with witness, she got deceased upstairs. A young man, named Harry Pym, who kept company with deceased, also lived in the house, and witness asked him if he had said anything to deceased, and he replied that he had not. After being carried upstairs deceased was very ill. On the following morning witness called deceased to go to her work, but she said she could not go. Deceased got out of bed, however, but fell down, and shouted "Oh." Witness lifted her into bed, and gave her some senna and tea. Deceased remained in bed all day, but would have nothing to eat, as she said she felt sick and giddy. On Friday witness sent for Dr Cook, but as he did not arrive witness went to Mr Davey's, a chemist, and obtained two pills, which deceased took. Deceased was better on Saturday, and ate fairly well. On Sunday, however, she was again ill, and witness sent again for Dr Cook, but he did not come. Later in the day Dr Gardiner came and gave her some medicine, but she died on the following morning. In answer to questions put by the Jury, witness said a neighbour had told her that her daughter had taken some rat poison, but deceased replied that she had not. By a Juryman: Deceased and Pym did not quarrel on the night of the 5th of November. When deceased fell down stairs Pym was in his room upstairs. She had not given deceased notice to leave the house.
Mr Ph. H. Gardiner, surgeon, deposed to being fetched to deceased. There were no symptoms of any acute disease except weak and rapid action of the heart. In reply to witness, deceased, who seemed hysterical, denied that she had taken anything she ought not to have taken, but said her young man had threatened "to do a 'Jack the Ripper' on her." On Monday morning witness was told that she was dead, and this surprised him somewhat. The mother told witness on Monday morning that there were no suspicions of deceased having taken poison. Witness had made a post mortem examination, and in his opinion the cause of death was acute fatty degeneration of the heart, liver and kidneys. In the stomach there were signs of irritant poison, which the state of the heart would show to be phosphorus. The fatty degeneration of the heart was undoubtedly the result of phosphorous poison, which might have been taken from three to seven days previously. He believed phosphorous was used in rat poison. Witness also saw abrasions on the face of deceased which might have been caused by a fall. By the Jury: If a doctor had been called in an hour or two after the poison was taken death might have been prevented. Dr Cook had told witness that the wrong address had been given to him, and he could not find the house. A witness named Elizabeth Heath, deposed to seeing the deceased on Monday night, when she noticed something like brimstone round deceased's mouth, and thinking she had taken poison called her father's attention to it. The father of deceased deposed to being called from bed and seeing his daughter fainting. There was something said about her having taken poison, but deceased denied this. He did not see poison on her mouth. Young Pym handed witness a jar, which he gave to his wife. He did not know what was in the jar, or whether there was a label on it. Dr Gardener said there was no sign of pregnancy. Mrs Hall (recalled) said she had paid 1d. a week for an insurance policy on her daughter's life. Witness did not know that there was any rat poison in the house. Henry Pym, fisherman, living at Pimlico, said he had lived in the house occupied by the deceased's family and kept company with the girl for the past twelve months or longer. He had been on good terms with her during the past week. Witness proceeded to describe how he found the girl at the bottom of the stairs, and said he took a jar out of her pocket. He asked her what she had taken, as there was something fiery over her face, but she did not answer. Witness subsequently stated that the girl gave him the jar, which contained something "like greenstuff." He gave it to the father, but could not learn if the girl had taken any of its contents. He saw her on the following morning and asked her what she thought of herself, and told her not to do it again. He could not account for her taking the stuff beyond the fact that she might have been jealous of his having kept company with another girl. she had threatened to kill herself. In reply to a Juror, witness denied that he had ever threatened to give her "Jack the Ripper." He also said he did not strike her. P.C. Bond said he went to the house occupied by deceased's parents and was told by MRS HALL that her daughter had not taken poison, but afterwards admitted she had thrown a jar of rat poison into the ash-pail. He made a search, but could find nothing. This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner thought it was sufficient for the Jury to come to a verdict. Having reviewed the facts, he called attention to the absence of medical assistance until the Sunday, when Dr Gardiner was called in, but was not informed of what the girl had taken. He thought this was most extraordinary conduct on the part of the parents and Pym, and it was for the Jury to say if notice should be taken of it. The Jury, after a short absence, returned a verdict that death was due to poison, self-administered, while the girl was in a state of Temporary Insanity, and added as a rider that the girl's mother, father, and Pym should be severely censured for not sending for a medical man earlier. The Coroner said he quite concurred in the censure which was thoroughly deserved, and they were only prevented from taking a more serious view on the matter owing to the gross ignorance of the parties.

Tuesday 26 November 1889, Issue 7021 – Gale Document No. Y3200747648
THE SAD DROWNING FATALITY AT EXMOUTH – Inquest This Day. - An Inquest was held at the Clarence Inn, Exmouth, this afternoon, on the body of HARRY STONE, fisherman, of Charles-street, Exmouth, aged 24 years, who was drowned yesterday afternoon while fishing. The body having been viewed, Thomas Davey, fisherman, of Exmouth, said he was engaged in "seining" about half-past one yesterday. There were three men in the boat, which was some way off, whilst the deceased and another man were on the beach. Those ashore had to work the "shore arm". The boat the other men were in was about 18ft 6in. long. The two men on the beach were at a place named "Bull hill" in the river Exe. Those in the boat who were about 70 or 80 fathoms from the others, saw the deceased in the water, and went to his assistance, but he sank before they arrived. The other man with deceased was also drawn into the water. On the body being taken out of the water, which was about two minutes and a half, a rope was found twisted around his legs. Every means of restoring animation was used, but there were no signs of life within. The water the deceased was pulled into was deep. It was not customary to have the rope around the leg, the proper place being around the waist. William Davey, fisherman, brother of the last witness, said he was engaged with the deceased herring fishing yesterday about half-past one. Witness and the deceased worked the "shore arm" together, both taking hold of one rope. The deceased put the rope around his body. Witness told him to clear himself, but in endeavouring to do so he got caught in the "bight." He then attempted to free himself by slipping the rope down over his legs, but it was drawn tight by the strong tide and he and witness were then dragged into the water. Davey got clear, but STONE was not able to, and soon sank. There was great danger in stepping over the rope and very great care had to be exercised. It was very rarely that the deceased came to work the "Shore Arm." By a Juror: There was not extra strain on the net, neither was it hitched anywhere. Witness, continuing, said the net was about 24 feet deep, and about 55 fathoms in breadth. R. Rousell, another fisherman, who was in charge of the net, corroborated. The Coroner told witness that whenever he was in charge he should caution young hands, as there was great danger in stepping over the line. A man named Long, fisherman, also gave evidence. Dr Cock, of Exmouth, said he was called to see the deceased about two o'clock yesterday. On arriving at the scene of the disaster, he found that every means of artificial respiration was being used, and was continued, but it was of no avail, as there was no sign of life in the deceased. The Coroner said that a great deal of care was required to prevent the rope from twisting around the body. People who were not accustomed to it should be cautioned as to the great danger of stepping over the line. It was a very sad case, as the deceased left a wife and child. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning." By the wish of the Jury their fees were given to the widow.

Wednesday 27 November 1889, Issue 7022 – Gale Document No. Y3200747668
SAD DEATH IN EXETER - This morning the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Guildhall for the purpose of inquiring into the circumstances attending the death of CLEMENT GORTLEY, of 6, Longbrook-terrace, employed at Mr Newcombe's, High-street, who died on Monday evening after a few hours' illness. WILLIAM CLEMENT GORTLEY, traveller, residing at 41, St Paul's Ward, Newton Abbot, identified the body as that of his late son. Deceased he said was married, and was 34 years of age. For some time he had been manager in Mr Newcombe's jewellery business, in High Street. The last time he saw him alive was about six weeks ago at Newton Abbot, when he appeared in his usual health, which was good; in fact he had never heard him complain of being ill. Henry Newcombe, draper and wholesale jeweller, of High-street, said the deceased had been with him for over five years, during which time his health had always been good. On Monday evening last, about five minutes to five, deceased was in the shop apparently in good health. During the afternoon he went with his wife, and had his photograph taken, and came back about half-past four. About ten minutes to five he began to write a post-card, and while he was so engaged sat on the chair, and complained of a great pain in the back of his neck. Dr Mortimer happened to be on the premises, and he attended to him immediately. He also sent for Mr Steele Perkins, who arrived within a quarter of an hour. Their efforts, however, were of no avail, and he died at quarter to eight. He was a temperate man.
Mr Mortimer, surgeon ,said he spoke to the deceased in Mr Newcombe's shop on Monday evening about five o'clock, when he seemed in perfect health. He afterwards went into another department of the shop, and while there the last witness came and asked him to go to see deceased. He found him sitting at the counter holding the side of his neck, complaining of severe pain. It gradually increased, and about ten minutes afterwards he had a severe fit and became unconscious. He died about four hours afterwards. The opinion of witness was that he died from haemorrhage in the brain, or apoplexy.
The Coroner remarked that it was a sad case, but Mr Newcombe appeared to have done everything he possibly could for him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Friday 29 November 1889, Issue 7024 – Gale Document No. Y32007477713
THE FATAL MINE ACCIDENT AT TAVISTOCK - Mr Rodd held an adjourned Inquest yesterday at the Whitchurch Inn, near Tavistock, on the body of JOHN TAYE, miner, who was killed on the 25th November, while working in Trebor Mine. the Inquest was attended by Mr Punching, her Majesty's Inspector of Mines. WILLIAM TAYE, brother of the deceased, deposed that as they were removing planks a large piece of rock struck his brother and crushed his head badly, causing instantaneous death. Dr Northey stated that the deceased's skull was severely crushed, and a portion of the brain protruded. The Inspector, who had examined the mine, expressed his opinion that no one was to blame, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 30 November 1889, Issue 7025 – Gale Document No. Y3200747730
SUDDEN DEATH AT ST. THOMAS - How The Poor Live. Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday by the Deputy-Coroner, Mr H. W. Gould, at the Falmouth Inn, St. Thomas, touching the circumstances attending the death of JNO. GAHN, groom, aged 46, residing at Casely's-court, St. Thomas. Mr Philip Rousham was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was ANN GAHN, widow, who stated her husband was a groom, aged 46. Deceased appeared in his usual health on Sunday night. On Monday morning he was breathing strangely and witness called in a neighbour. Deceased died at 11.45 a.m. on that morning. In answer to the Foreman witness said her husband had been out of employment for the past two years. She did not think he had sufficient food. Witness went out working. Her family consisted of two children. Deceased had nothing to eat since the Sunday teatime till his death. She had not been in receipt of parish relief. Mary Hoare, widow, residing in the same house as the last witness, deposed to seeing deceased shortly before 9 a.m. on Monday morning. He seemed to be seething from the mouth and unconscious. In reply to the Foreman, witness stated she never saw deceased the worse for liquor. Deceased and his wife never to her knowledge quarrelled. Dr Vlieland, of St. Thomas was next called. He saw deceased about 11.45. He was lying on a couch, undressed, and dead. Witness was told he had been vomiting, and saw evidence of it on the clothes which covered him. From the appearance of the body witness was unable to form an opinion as to the cause of death. There were no marks of violence on the body. It was a most unusual thing for a man to die at twelve o'clock in the morning after vomiting at nine o'clock. The appearances were so indefining that it was absolutely impossible to form an opinion. He could tell if a post mortem examination was held. He had no reason to doubt that death was not caused by natural causes. The widow was here recalled, and stated that deceased eat two pieces of bread and jam at half-past four on Sunday. He was in no club, and was not insured. The Coroner briefly summed up. P.S. Egan stated he carefully searched the room, but found nothing to excite suspicion. Deceased was a man addicted to drinking. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and gave their fees, together, with additions by the Coroner and Doctor, to the widow.

Saturday 30 November 1889, Issue 7025 – Gale Document No. Y3200747745
THE FATAL RAILWAY ACCICENT AT CREDITON – Inquest This Day. - Mr H. W. Gould, District Coroner, this afternoon held an Inquest on the body of EDWARD ALFRED TOWNING, engine driver, who met with his death at Crediton Railway Station yesterday. Mr Elias Browning was chosen Foreman of the jury. Mr H. John Foster, Inspector of police, on the London and South Western Railway, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Company. John Henry Higgs, living at 99, Portland-street, Exeter, locomotive inspector, in the employ of the London and South Western Railway, was the first witness called. He identified the body of deceased as that of EDWARD ALFRED TOWNING, engine driver on the London and South Western Railway. Deceased was 35 years of age, and had been an engine driver about three or four years. He was on duty yesterday morning at 3 a.m. John Percy, fireman, of 7, Roseland-terrace, Heavitree, deposed that he was on duty at 3 a.m. yesterday with deceased. Witness and deceased were in charge of a train which ran to Yeoford, near Crediton Station, and on the return from Yeoford, about 8.30, the distant signal was against them, and witness blew the whistle to get the next signal "off." The signal was put "off," and deceased said, "Right away," and taking up the oil can in his hand said "I'll put a little drop of oil on." He went out on the foot railing of the engine. Witness, in the meantime, went on attending to his own duties, and after shutting off the water from the boiler, he looked out on both sides for the deceased, but could not see him. He perceived the guard, who was in the end van, putting out his hand, and he (Higgs) stopped the engine as quickly as possible. He got off the engine, and then saw deceased on the line. The train had passed clean over him. Deceased was lying on his face, with his head between the rails and his feet and legs close to the platform. He was dead when picked up. Witness had never known him to suffer from attacks of giddiness. He could not account for deceased falling off, except it was that he slipped. There was a rail which deceased could catch hold of. He was a very steady man. The engine was going at the rate of about fourteen or fifteen miles an hour at the time. In reply to Mr Foster, witness stated deceased wore nailed boots. That might account for his slipping off. Wm. Pengelley, signalman at Crediton Station, stated that he was on duty yesterday morning when the luggage train, of which deceased was in charge, passed his signal-box. Just after passing the box witness saw the driver take the oil-can to go out on the foot-plate, having the can in his right hand, and grasping the hand-rail of the weather board by his left. Deceased put his left foot round the weather-board to get on the front part of the engine, and let go his hold of the weather-board, thinking to catch hold of the rail on the boiler. Failing to grasp the rail, deceased missed his footing and fell off the engine, rolling between the platform and the train. Witness signalled to the train to stop, and at once proceeded to the body. Life had expired when he reached deceased, who was lying in the position described by the last witness. John Pook, guard, residing at 12, Union-terrace, Exeter, said he was the acting guard of the luggage train in question. His evidence was corroborative of that given by the first two witnesses. Dr W. G. S. Campbell gave evidence as to the state of the body. He found the upper right and lower left thighs broken, the former being the worst fracture. There was a superficial scalp wound on the back of the head. The Injury to the right thigh was quite enough to cause immediate death. The Coroner briefly commented on the evidence, and remarked on the sad nature of the accident, by which a young man had lost his life in a very sudden manner. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased leaves a widow and five children.

Monday 2 December 1889, Issue 7026 – Gale Document No. Y3200747780
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A CARTER AT TEIGNMOUTH – About four o'clock on Saturday afternoon a serious accident, which yesterday terminated fatally, happened to GEORGE UNDERHAY, a labourer, residing in Bickford-lane, West Teignmouth It appears that the unfortunate man, who was in the employ of Mr Elms, of Brimley Farm, was engaged in drawing mangel wortzels from a field in the Brimley-road to the farm, and whilst going to fetch a load from the field about four o'clock met the milk dray – also from Mr Elms' – in the Brimley-road, and pulled on one side to let it pass. Just as the milk dray was passing, UNDERHILL, it is stated, fell off the cart, into the road, falling on his head, where he was picked up insensible and conveyed to the Teignmouth Infirmary and Convalescent Home in the Dawlish-road. He was at once attended by Dr Austin, the house surgeon, who found that he had received a severe fracture of the skull, causing concussion of the brain. The poor fellow lingered on until yesterday afternoon, when he expired at half-past four, never having regained consciousness. Besides the house surgeon, several others of the medical men who attended the institution did everything to alleviate the sufferings of the deceased. It is surmised that the deceased was seized with a fit, as the horse never moved whilst the other cart was passing. UNDERHILL some time since was invalided out of the H.M. Navy, and leaves a wife and four children to be provided for. An Inquest will be held at the Infirmary this evening at six o'clock. The deceased, previous to being employed at Mr Elm's, was in the service of Mr F. Banbury, fish merchant, and Mr George Temple, coal merchant, both of Teignmouth, and was known to be a steady and trustworthy man.

Tuesday 3 December 1889, Issue 7027 – Gale Document No. Y3200747801
FATAL FALL FROM A CART - Last evening at the Teignmouth Infirmary Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of GEORGE UNDERHILL, who met with his death while in employ of Robert Elms, dairyman, of Lower Brimley, by falling from a cart in the Brimley Road, on Saturday evening as reported in our last night's issue. After hearing the evidence of Walter G. Passmore, who witnessed the accident, and Dr Austin, House-surgeon at the Infirmary, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

Friday 6 December 1889, Issue 7030 – Gale Document No. Y3200747875
INQUEST ON A CHILD IN EXETER – Scenes Between the Coroner and the Jury. - On Thursday, at the Exeter Police Court, Mr Coroner Hooper, held an Inquest on the body of a child named WALTER CHARLES FORD, aged two years, of Strong's Cottages, Bartholomew-street. ELIZABETH FORD, mother of the deceased, said on the 22nd of October, about 10.30 a.m., the child was at play in the kitchen. Previous to that witness had poured out a cup of hot tea, and while she was looking into the oven to her dinner, the child upset the cup of tea over her, severely scalding the chest. Witness then dressed it with linseed oil and scald ointment, but seeing that the child was no better she took it to the Hospital, where it was made an out-patient. On Wednesday evening the child got worse, and she sent for Dr Bell, but it died the same evening. Mr Bell, surgeon, of Exeter, said he went to see the deceased on Wednesday. He examined the baby and found it was convulsed, evidently dying. There was a healing burn on its neck and chest. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner remarked that there was no blame attached to the mother but it was rather unfortunate that the child was not kept in the hospital. A scene then took place between the Coroner and the Jury.

Saturday 7 December 1889, Issue 7031 – Gale Document No. Y3200747890
NEGLECT OF A CHILD IN EXETER - The Mother Severely Censured. - An Inquest was held by Mr Hooper at the Exeter Police Court on Tuesday on the body of a child named EMMA WORTH, of Ewings-square. MARY WORTH, mother of the child, said the baby was two months old, and she fed her with a little biscuit food. On Saturday evening she put the child to bed about 8.30, and it was then in a healthy state. When witness went to bed, about 11.30, she found that there was something the matter with the little one. A doctor was sent for, and he came immediately, but the child was dead. The child was insured in the Prudential office about two or three weeks ago, but she had not yet paid any money. She would not receive anything for the death of the child for the first three months, but after that 30s. Another child was also insured in a penny per week. Witness had not been giving the child any medicines. In reply to Mr Trapnell, witness said she was in a public-house for a little while, and there was no one in charge of the child. The Coroner remarked that it was a very improper thing to do to leave a child like this alone, for the sake of going to a public-house. By a Juror: Witness was sober at the time. In reply to the Coroner, witness said she had a pint and a glass of ale. Mr Brash, surgeon, of Exeter, said he was called to see the deceased just before one o'clock on Sunday morning, and on his arrival he found the child on a chair before the fire, dead. He examined the body and found it was well nourished, the pupils were dilated, and the hands clenched. In his opinion the cause of death was convulsions. In reply to the Coroner, witness said that the food given the deceased was very improper indeed. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a very bad case from beginning to end. the feeding was most improper, and he thought the Jury ought to take some notice of the matter. The mother went to a public-house, and left nobody to take charge of the baby, who died whilst she was drinking. The death was a natural one, but the feeding was most improper. Children under five months ought not to be fed with biscuit food. He thought the mother was seriously to blame; first for the way in which she fed the child, and then for going to a public-house and leaving it. In reply to a Juror, the doctor said that when he arrived at the house of the mother she was not drunk, nor did she appear to be under the influence of drink. A Voice: Hear, hear. – The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and said "the mother was in great blame for feeding the child with biscuits." The Coroner again remarked that it was a very bad case, and not a worse one had appeared before him for many years. He quite agreed with the verdict f the Jury. The mother might think herself very lucky. If he had a case of this kind again he should not hesitate to put the person implicated on a charge of manslaughter.

Tuesday 10 December 1889, Issue 7033 – Gale Document No. Y3200747961
SAD DEATH IN EXETER - This afternoon, at the Exeter Police Court, Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of JOHN TEED, of 2, Lower North-street, aged 76 years. JOHN TEED, brushmaker, of 28, Oxford-place, Plymouth, identified the body of the deceased as that of his father, whom he had not seen for nearly fourteen years. Elizabeth Gutheridge, a married woman, of 2, Lower North-street, said she had known the deceased, a widower, who lived alone, about a year and nine months. Deceased had been very delicate lately, having a bad cough at night. He had been treated at the Dispensary during the summer for skin disease. Yesterday about four a.m., the deceased was groaning and witness knocked at his door and carried him a cup of tea. The deceased fell three times before he reached the door to open it. He was exhausted for a minute, and after sitting on a chair close by, was put in bed. When he drank his tea, he said "The Lord had called him, and he was going home." Witness sat with him for some time, and then he said he felt warm, and thought he should sleep. She did not see him again until five minutes after nine, and then she took him another cup of tea. As he took the cup of tea he had a fit and fell back on the pillow, but he soon recovered and he was then washed, clean clothes put on, and fresh bedding put on. Witness and another person were with the deceased when he died just after twelve the same day. Mr Moon was then sent for. In reply to a Juror, witness said deceased was under Dr Perkins at the Dispensary. Mr Moon, surgeon, of Queen-street, said he was called to see the deceased, who he was informed was dying, just after ten yesterday morning, and on arriving found him lying in bed. Witness could not feel any pulse whatever, and he ordered him to receive stimulants frequently. About an hour and a half afterwards witness was again sent for, but the deceased died before he arrived. In witness's opinion death was due to heart disease. In reply to the Coroner, the doctor said a death like this could not have resulted from skin disease. Mr Welsman, deceased's employer, said he was at work on Saturday, and he showed no signs of illness. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 21 December 1889, Issue 7043 – Gale Document No. Y3200748197
FATAL TOSS BY A BULL NEAR EXETER - The Inquest. - On Wednesday, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM HENRY CHERITON, a boy, aged 13 years, of St. Thomas, who died at the above Institution. ELIZABETH CRUMP, of 34, Prospect-place, St. Thomas, identified the body of the deceased as that of her son, who had been a servant to Mr Charles White, of Whitstone, for about fifteen weeks. Last Saturday week witness heard that he had met with an accident. - By a Juror: the deceased had never worked at a farm-house before. John Arnold, labourer to Mr White, of Whitstone, deposed that on the 7th December a bull, belonging to Mr White was placed in a shed, while his own house was being cleared. The animal, however, got loose, and witness and the deceased ran after him. Seeing they could not catch him witness said, "BILL we had better give it up as the animal is getting angry." The deceased would not, and seeing the bull was running after him he threw down a hay fork he had in his hand, and ran towards a gate, the animal ran after him, and the deceased, seeing the bull close up to him, fell on the ground, but the anima. caught him up between his horns, carrying him several yards. As witness went over to the boy, the animal turned around upon him, and threw him down with his horns. The anima again turned on the boy, when witness went in and fetched his master, who came out and drove the bull away. The deceased was then taken to the hospital. In reply to Jurors, witness said the boy had teased the animal several times. – Mr Trapnell (a Juror): That accounts for it. – Mr White, the master, said he was sorry the accident had occurred, but Arnold and the deceased had no right to do anything with the bull. The animal which was a very quiet one, was over two years old. Mr Russell Coombe, house surgeon at the Hospital, said he received the boy into the institution on the 7th inst. He went on favourably until the 14th. After that the deceased grew worse, and died from the injuries received on the 17th. The Coroner said there seemed to be no blame attached to Mr White, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 28 December 1889, Issue 7047 – Gale Document No. Y3200748300
SAD FATALITY AT TAVISTOCK - At the Tavistock Cottage Hospital, yesterday, Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest respecting the death of TAMSON CROSSMAN, a widow, aged 84, and a resident in one of the Ford-street almshouses. From the evidence given it appears that on Christmas Eve, at half-past seven o'clock, Mrs Jackman, a niece of the deceased, on paying her a visit found the room full of smoke, and MRS CROSSMAN lying on the floor insensible with a portion of her clothes burnt. A candle appeared to have been knocked on to the floor, and caused the fire, which was soon suppressed. Deceased was taken to the Cottage Hospital, where she died on Thursday morning. Dr Brodrick gave as his opinion that the deceased died from the effects of a seizure, accelerated by a shock to the system, caused by her being burnt about the legs and the lower part of the body. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Monday 30 December 1889, Issue 7048 – Gale Document No. Y3200748321
SUDDEN DEATH IN ST. SIDWELL - An Inquest was held by the City Coroner, Mr H. W. Hooper, at Hampton Buildings, Blackboy-road, Exeter, this afternoon, on the body of JOHN HEXTER, aged 82, a retired coach-builder, who died the previous morning. Mr Francis John Horwill, of 74, St. Sidwell-street, identified the body as that of JOHN HEXTER, aged 82, who had been a coachbuilder, and had retired for some time. Deceased was a widower, residing at 3, Hampton-buildings. Witness was a cousin of his. On Christmas Eve he saw deceased last. Deceased was, he believed, the oldest living freeman of Exeter.
William Thomas, builder, residing at 4, Hampton-buildings, stated the deceased lodged with him for several years. Deceased had been troubled with the asthma, and at times could scarcely breathe. On the night of the 28th witness saw him several times. He did not then seem unusually worse. The following morning his wife took deceased up a cup of tea, but not getting any answer she went for witness, who found deceased dead. In reply to a Juror, witness said deceased had drank a little extra for Christmas. Mr Brown, surgeon, of Exeter, knew HEXTER professionally for the past two or three years, having attended him for chronic bronchitis. Yesterday morning he was informed deceased was dead. He apparently died from syncope and failure of the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Tuesday 31 December 1889, Issue 7049 – Gale Document No. Y3200748347
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest this afternoon at the Police Court, touching the death of SAMUEL WILLIAM WARD, a child fur months old, who was found dead by his mother's side this morning. There were no marks of violence on the body, and the medical evidence showed that death was due to natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

SUDDEN DEATH - Mr Burd, County Coroner, yesterday held an Inquest at the Globe Hotel, Northtawton, on the body of ANN ASH, aged 18 months, daughter of WILLIAM GEORGE ASH, a labourer, and who died suddenly on Friday. After hearing the evidence of LYDIA ASH, the mother, and that of Mr S. F. Hawkins, surgeon, who was of opinion that death was caused by internal convulsions, the Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 4 January 1890, Issue 7053 – Gale Document No. Y3200748369
THE SHOCKING RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT MUTLEY - Inquest. - The Plymouth Borough Coroner (Mr A. S. Clark), held an Inquest at the Western Law Court last night, on the body of ERNEST BULOW, the circumstances of whose death near the Mutley tunnel, we reported in our issue of last evening. The Jury viewed the body, which presented a horrible spectacle, being a perfect "mash" of clothing and human remains. Detective-Inspector J. Hill watched the case on behalf of the police, and Mr T. Wolferstan appeared to represent MRS BULOW. AMY BULOW, widow of the deceased, residing at 7, West Hill-terrace, stated that he was a cutter, by trade, but had not been in employment for more than a fortnight. He left home on New Year's Eve shortly after supper, and then appeared to be in his usual good spirits. Walter Bennett, engine-driver on the London and South Western Railway, said that on Tuesday evening he let the Stoke Station at 9.45 with a light engine for Friary, and returned to Devonport. He noticed nothing unusual on making an inspection of the engine. He was called, however, by his "cleaner" who said he had found traces of blood on the "motion," and this witness found to be correct. William Smith, another driver, deposed to examining the engine before the arrival of the last witness, and, believing the blood to be human he subsequently returned up the line to search. About two hundred yards east of Mutley tunnel he found the remains of the deceased. A porter at Mutley Station named William Henry Hole, stated that on Thursday morning about three o'clock he was informed that a body was lying on the line, and on proceeding to the spot with P.C. Ham he found a boot and stocking. For about a distance of thirty feet the line was strewn with fragments of bone and flesh. Witness returned to the station for a hamper, into which he placed the pieces he could collect and conveyed them in a wheelbarrow to the mortuary. In answer to the Foreman, witness said it was a common practice for people to cross the line at that point. P.C. Ham corroborated. The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that he considered the evidence showed that the deceased was making a "short cut" across the line when the met his death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 4 January 1890, Issue 7053 – Gale Document No. Y3200748368
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A FARMER NEAR HOLSWORTHY – An Inquest was held at Dux Farm by the Coroner (Mr W. Bird) touching the death of MR HENRY MARSHALL, aged 45, who met his death by falling out of his trap on Wednesday, on his way home from Holsworthy Market. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 11 January 1890, Issue 7059 – Gale Document No. Y3200748402
PAINFULLY SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER - A painfully sudden death occurred at Miss Goldsworthy's, fancy wool dealer, St. Sidwell's, last night or early this morning, the deceased being RHODA ANNIE EDDLES, aged 17, an assistant, and a native of Torquay. The poor girl had been home spending her Christmas holidays with her parents, and last evening seemed in her usual health and quite lively. This morning as the deceased did not show downstairs at the usual time her mistress went up to the bedroom and knocked three or four times and got no answer. Thinking that something unusual had occurred Miss Goldsworthy at once proceeded into the room, and drawing up the blind saw that the deceased was dead. Deceased's friends and Dr Steele Perkins were at once communicated with, and an Inquest was held this afternoon at the City Police Court before Mr Coroner Hooper.

Saturday 11 January 1890, Issue 7059 – Gale Document No. Y3200748412
THE SUICIDE OF A CLERGYMAN AT TORQUAY - On Friday we reported the supposed suicide of the REV. FRANCIS ADDAMS, aged 64, a clerk in Holy orders, of Torghatton, Babbacombe, he having been found with his skull shattered in the conservatory adjoining his house on Friday. Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body at the Royal Hotel, Babbacombe. Mr John Gilbert was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The Coroner said this was a case in which death had apparently occurred under circumstances of violence, and it would be for the Jury to have the matter cleared up and to ascertain in what manner the deceased came by his death. From what he had heard of the case it would probably resolve itself into a question of either accidental death or suicide, and the Jury would keep that in view in considering the evidence. He mentioned that as the body was in the same position as when found it would, perhaps, be of some importance. Evidence was given to the effect that deceased came from Salisbury to Babbacombe in March last, and in June he saw Dr Finch, who ascertained that he had been drinking heavily and was on the verge of delirium tremens. The doctor advised him to give up drinking, but later on ascertained that in consequence of the rev. gentleman's habits he had to take sleeping draughts in order to secure rest. At the end of the summer deceased's wife was taken to Exminster Asylum, where she remained for two months. While she was away her husband became very strange in his manner and depressed, and as it was found that he was not responsible for his actions he was also sent to an asylum, where he was an inmate for a week. On returning home his health was better than it had been for a long time, but his wife, who also came back in November, was restless. On Wednesday evening last deceased met P.S. Osborne and told him that his wife was very violent, and asked him to go in and threaten to lock her up. The sergeant replied that it would be exceeding his duty to make such a threat, but if MR ADDAMS liked he would call in and see if he could do any good by advising MRS ADDAMS to be less violent. MR ADDAMS was at that time under the influence of liquor, but not drunk, and he told the officer that he had been driven to drink by his wife's conduct. On the following evening the sergeant called at Torghatton, and MR ADDAMS, who answered his knock, said, "Oh, you have just come in time." The officer entered the house and found MRS ADDAMS very much excited. She used very violent language both to her husband and to a nurse named Stone, and MR ADDAMS occasionally laughed loudly at her remarks. Sergeant Osborne advised MRS ADDAMS to be less violent, and told her husband that it was very improper for him to laugh at his wife when he knew her state. MRS ADDAMS replied that she had not been violent to her husband, except with her tongue. In giving evidence, MRS ADDAMS said the quarrel on Thursday night was the result of something he said about her having been sent to the asylum. Her husband went to bed about ten o'clock, and about five the next morning she went to his room and lighted a candle, as it was his custom to read in bed. About eight o'clock deceased was seen in the sitting-room by the servant, and shortly afterwards the report of a gun was heard, and the deceased was found in the conservatory lying on his back dead with a double-barrelled gun at his feet and a walking-stick by his side. Dr Finch was called, and he stated that his investigation had led him to believe that the muzzle of the gun must have been placed in the mouth, as the shot came out at the right side of the top of the head, and one of the battered missiles was found in the deceased's hat. The gun and walking-stick were examined, and the conclusion arrived at was that the trigger had been drawn by the crook of the stick. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while labouring under Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 18 January 1890, Issue 7065 – Gale Document No. Y3200748433
THE MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE FROM ST. THOMAS - An Inquest was held, before Mr Deputy Coroner Gould, at the Plymouth Inn, Alphington-street, St. Thomas, on Tuesday on the body of SUSANNAH SETTER, the wife of ELI SETTER, of St. Thomas, builder, who had been missing since Wednesday, and who was found drowned in the river Exe on Monday afternoon. Mr Henry Clogg was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
ELI SAMUEL SETTER, of 7, Fortescue-road, builder, identified the body of the deceased as that of his wife, SUSANNAH SETTER, aged 27. He last saw her alive on Tuesday night last. She was then in bed. He retired to rest shortly after eleven o'clock, and his wife was then all right, but on waking up the next morning, between five and half-past, he found her missing. Before he dressed he came downstairs and searched for his wife about the house, but could not find her, and on going to the front door he found it open. His mother was sleeping in the house, and she did not hear the deceased leave the premises. He could not account for his wife's disappearance. She was very ill about four months ago, and since that time her mind had been a little deranged. He had never heard her say anything about committing suicide. By a Juryman: She was not violent, and did not want looking after. Charles Tregale, of 30, Beaufort-road, a labourer, said that on Sunday afternoon he was strolling down Haven Banks, between three and four in the afternoon, and when opposite the Welcome Inn he began to look into the Weir, when he caught sight of a hat and a boa in a bush. He got down to the bush, which was under the bank, and pulled out a boa, umbrella, jacket, letter, purse, veil, handkerchief, thimble, pin case and a hat. The purse contained two gold rings, 5s. 9d. in silver, and a bill. [The letter was one from deceased's sister, and had no bearing on the death of the deceased.] Witness did not see anything of the body. The goods appeared to have been stowed away in the bush. He gave the articles to an ex-policeman. John Howard, of Porch-place, St. Sidwell's superannuated from the Devon Constabulary, said on Sunday afternoon about 3.30 he saw the last witness with the articles named. Tregale told witness he had found them in a bush near the weir. He took the goods to Sergt. Egan. MR SETTER identified the articles (produced) as being the property of his deceased wife. Robert Henley, West-street, Exeter, labourer, said he commenced searching for the body on Sunday, and continued yesterday. He was accompanied by two other men, and at the bushes between the two weirs he saw the body caught in a bush. The body was under the water at the Salmon Pool side. The deceased was caught in the bush by her hair, the face being turned upwards. Mr Vlieland, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said he had examined the body of the deceased, and there were no marks of violence. The body presented the appearance of having been in the water some time, and the symptoms of death were those of drowning. He had medically attended the deceased, and about three months ago she was suffering from melancholia. People affected with melancholia might develop suicidal tendencies. The Deputy Coroner, in summing up, said it was a very unfortunate case, and he was sure their sympathies were extended towards the husband and family. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane," and the Foreman stated that the Jury desired also to express their sympathy with MR SETTER in his sad bereavement.

Saturday 25 January 1890, Issue 7071 – Gale Document No. Y3200748468
A BODY FOUND IN THE EXE - The Inquest. - Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner, held an Inquest at the new Police Court, on Tuesday, on the body of JAMES WAKEFIELD, of 12, Summerland-street, an insurance collector, whose body was found in the river Exe that morning. Mr Sampson was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Elizabeth Thompson, a widow living at 10, Iron Bridge, said she had known the deceased, JAMES WAKEFIELD, for several years, and the body which the Jury had just viewed was his body. Deceased was a widower, and an insurance agent, and was aged fifty-seven. Deceased up to within the past month or so had lodged with witness for seven years. Last Sunday deceased came to her house and had dinner, and promised to return on Monday morning, but he did not do so. WAKEFIELD seemed in his usual spirits on Sunday. Deceased was an agent for the London, Edinburgh and Glasgow, and had given way to drink a little lately. Sarah Ann Tucker, of 12, Summerland-land-street, said the deceased lodged in her house, occupying one room. She saw him daily, and recently the deceased had given way to drinking habits. Monday morning was the last time she saw WAKEFIELD alive, and asked him if he would like a little breakfast, and he replied "No." Deceased had a cup of tea in bed early in the morning. She saw nothing unusual in his manner. John Berry, labourer, of Mary Arches-street, said about 8.30 on Monday evening he was leaving Colleton-hill to go towards the Port Royal, when he saw a young woman by the steps, and about twenty yards from where she was standing he noticed a hat and umbrella (produced) on the wall by the river. The young woman said, "I heard someone scream, and I was afraid to pass by." Witness asked the girl why she had not mentioned to him before that she heard someone scream, and she said it occurred more than five minutes ago. He took the hat and umbrella to Mr Edwards, at the Port Royal in the first place, and he told him to take it to the Police-station, which he did. Bessie Radford, aged 16, of 7, Weirfield-road, said she was returning home by the Quay on Monday about 8.30, and when near the ballast heap she heard someone screaming and groaning. She could see no one, but thought the noise came from the water. She was afraid to go along, and waited until the witness Berry came up. John Westcott, labourer, residing at the West Quarter, deposed to picking up the body of the deceased that morning in the presence of P.C. Bubear and a man named Cooke. Charles Cooke corroborated. P.C. John Bubear proved searching the clothes worn by deceased and finding a collecting book and papers relating to insurance in them, also a pawn ticket. There was also a letter from the head office asking the deceased for his accounts, and a purse containing 3d. in bronze. Deceased was a native of Swindon. Mr Bell, surgeon, deposed that about half past nine that morning he examined the body of the deceased at the Mortuary. There were no marks of violence, no fracture, and the body presented all the appearances of death from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 1 February 1890, Issue 7077 – Gale Document No. Y3200748530
THE IMPROPER FEEDING OF INFANTS - Mr Deputy Coroner Cox on Wednesday held an Inquest at Cuckoodown, West Hill, near Ottery St. Mary, touching the death of HANNAH PRISCILLA BASTEN, daughter of HENRY BASTEN, farm labourer, who was found dead in bed on Monday morning. By the evidence it transpired that the child was weakly. It was only three months old, and on the night before its death MRS BASTEN gave the deceased a sop, consisting of bread and sugar, mixed with water. She was obliged to feed the child, as she had not sufficient milk for her. The Deputy Coroner said he did not think the food given the child was good for her. Witness replied that she had similarly fed her other children, who were very healthy. Dr Reynolds deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body that morning, and found that death was due to suffocation, from the child having drawn food into its windpipe and lungs. The Deputy Coroner asked whether the food given the deceased was proper food to give an infant. Witness. I do not consider it proper food for any child, especially for a very weak one. I am very strongly against giving children food of any sort until they are ten or twelve months old. Milk is the proper and natural food, and if a child cannot have mother's milk, cow's milk should be procured and be diluted with water. The Deputy Coroner said that people should bear in mind that the natural food for children was milk. Witness stated that the food was carefully mixed, and there were no lumps. The Deputy Coroner advised MRS BASTEN to endeavour to bear in mind that children should not be fed, as it looked as though the food given the child had something to do with her choking. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally suffocated, owing to a sop, composed of a quantity of bread and sugar and water, choking her. The Deputy Coroner remarked that not long ago a child died under similar circumstances in the neighbourhood.

Saturday 1 February 1890, Issue 7077 – Gale Document No. Y3200748519
INQUEST IN EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest yesterday at 7, Poltimore-square, Longbrook-street, on the body of a child named RICHARD CARMAGH, six months old. SARAH CARMAGH, wife of RICHARD CARMAGH, cab-driver, deposed that the body just viewed by the Jury was that of her son RICHARD, aged six months. The child had been weakly ever since its birth, and Dr Perkins attended it just before Christmas. She had six other children. She could not suckle the child, but had purchased condensed and dairy milk for the deceased. The child took no other food but the milk from the bottle. The baby slept with her, and on Thursday morning at 11.30 she washed and dressed the deceased who seemed all right. Soon after the child seemed as if it was suffocating, and began to get black in the face. She did what she could for the child, but it died in her arms. She sent for Dr Perkins, and he at once came, but the child had then been dead about ten minutes. The child's life was not insured. Dr Perkins said he was called in the morning about a quarter to twelve to see the deceased. He went to 7, Poltimore-square, as soon as possible, and saw the child on the sofa in its night clothes. The body was quite warm, but life was extinct. There was nothing particular about the body, except that the thumbs were a little turned into his hands. There were no marks of violence. He had attended the child off and on since its birth, and before Christmas it had a severe attack of bronchitis. He had no doubt the child died from natural causes, and would suggest spasm of the glottis by cough. The Jury returned a verdict of "~Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 1 February 1890, Issue 7077 – Gale Document No. Y3200748509
SUICIDE AT NEWTON ABBOT - A respectable woman from Plymouth, named ELIZABETH PRATT, committed suicide t Churchill's Refreshment Rooms, Queen-street, Newton Abbot, on Saturday night. She slept at Churchill's on the night of Friday, and kept to her bed throughout the following day. On Saturday night, before retiring to bed, Mrs Churchill, on going into the bedroom occupied by deceased with a dish of warm milk, was startled to find her quite dead, having wound a large tie three times round her neck and thus strangled herself. Dr Davies was immediately called in, but of course his services were of no avail. Deceased is a single woman, and her sister from Plymouth arrived at Newton yesterday, and identified the body. Sergeant Tucker has made enquiries in the case, and reported the occurrence to the Coroner.
THE INQUEST - Mr Sidney S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Queen's Hotel, Newton, on Tuesday, relative to the death of ELIZABETH MILICENT PRATT, 50, single, daughter of MR JOHN PRATT, of 33, Brunswick-road, Plymouth, who was found dead in bed at Churchill's Temperance Hotel on the night of Saturday last. Mr W. Dunn was chosen Foreman of the Jury, which was composed of the following:- Messrs. John Brown, William Eiff, John Perrott, John E. Endacott, Edwin Mudford, Thomas H. Gauge, William H. Ashby, George Hellins, Henry Dodge, Francis E. Fuller, William Always, and Thomas Cawse.
ANNIE JERMAN, who was much affected whilst giving her evidence, stated she was sister to deceased, and daughter of JOHN PRATT, for many years a commercial traveller of Plymouth. She lived at 33, Brunswick-road, Plymouth, and for the past six months deceased had been living with her. She saw her sister off by train at Plymouth station on Friday afternoon last. Deceased told her she was going to Torquay, and witness understood it was for a change. She carried nothing but a little basket. On the following morning (Saturday) witness received a letter from deceased. It bore no address, but the postmark on the envelope was Newton Abbot. It stated "I have arrived so far, so don't trouble about me. Hope you got home safe, and dear Alice and pa. Love to you all, from BESSIE." Their father was suffering from softening of the brain, which was a hereditary complaint in the family, and one sister had been in a lunatic asylum. Deceased had been very much depressed at times during the six months she had been with witness. Previous to that time she had been in a situation as mother's help to a Mrs Glyne at Torquay. On Sunday morning witness received a telegram from Churchill's Hotel, and immediately went to Newton, where she found her sister dead. She identified the tie with which she had strangled herself, as belonging to one of her boys, and also recognised several articles found in the bag as belonging to deceased. The bottle labelled "Chlorodyne" she had never seen before, nor, to her knowledge, was deceased in the habit of taking sleeping draughts. Deceased had never, in her hearing, made any threat that she would take her life, and she knew of no reason why she should. Dr Davies, practising at Newton, stated he was called into Churchill's Temperance Hotel at 11 on Sunday morning where he found deceased quite dead in bed. The tie produced was wound tightly round her neck and tied in one knot. The bottle produced, marked "Chlorodyne," was near the bed, quite empty. It had evidently contained laudanum. He should think that the deceased must have taken a dose of laudanum, and afterwards tied the scarf around her neck. Being under the influence that narcotic would facilitate death from strangulation. It was a very unusual thing for strangulation to result from a person tying anything round the neck himself, and that was the reason which led him to think deceased had taken laudanum. Mrs Churchill stated deceased came into their temperance hotel on Friday evening and asked for a cup of tea. She was asked into an inner room, where she remained some time. She then said it was too late for her to proceed to Exeter that night and asked if she might have a bed. She was an exceedingly ladylike person, and very quiet in manner. She stayed the night, and the next morning, at half-past eleven, they asked her if she was going to dress. She said yes, but did not do so. Witness went to her bedroom at four o'clock, when she was apparently sleeping very heavily. Witness roused her and asked her if she had been taking drugs, and she replied "Yes, chlorodyne." Witness then questioned her as to where she was going at Exeter, and she told her to a Miss Perry, 105, West-street, Exeter. Witness wrote a post card to that address stating deceased was at the hotel and would be at Exeter on the afternoon of Sunday. She read the postcard to deceased before dispatching it. The postcard was returned as there was no such name and address. Witness then made enquiries of deceased as to her relatives at Plymouth, and after giving several false addresses she gave the right one, Brunswick-road, the residence of her sister. Witness found deceased dead at half-past twelve on Saturday night. Eliza Leaman corroborated, and P.C. Magor stated he was called into the hotel on Saturday night, where he found deceased dead as described. He searched her belongings, and found money in her purse amounting to £1 2s. 3 ½d. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 8 February 1890, Issue 7083 – Gale Document No. Y3200748550
"DEATH FROM NATURAL CAUSES" was the verdict of a Coroner's Jury at an Inquest held this morning at No. 8, York Buildings, on the body of a lady named ANN METHERELL, aged seventy-five years. Elizabeth Rose gave evidence to the effect that on Thursday the deceased retired to rest, apparently in her usual state of health. The next morning, on taking up her breakfast, she appeared very strange, whereupon witness immediately went and called a Mr Fryer, who afterwards fetched a surgeon. Mr Hawkins said he was called to see the deceased yesterday ,and found her dead in bed. He examined the body, but found no marks of violence. In his opinion death was due to disease of the heart.

Saturday 8 February 1890, Issue 7083 – Gale Document No. Y3200748541
SHOCKING TRAGEDY NEAR EXETER – Murder and Suicide. A Horrible Spectacle. - Information reached Exeter on Wednesday morning that a shocking tragedy had occurred at Huxham, a village about five miles from the city.
It appears that a man named JAMES GOSLING, with his wife and family, have been living at Rose Cottages, Rose-lane, Higher Huxham, near Stoke Canon, for some time, and have frequently been heard to quarrel. Last June GOSLING was arrested for brutally ill-treating his wife, and was sentenced to six weeks' imprisonment with hard labour. This, it would seem, he has never forgotten, and has repeatedly, when quarrelling with his wife, said he would never overlook it. He went to work as usual at Mr F. Tremlett's paper mills on Tuesday, and spent the evening at the Stoke Canon Inn drinking. He left there about ten o'clock, and shook hands with everyone in the house before departing, arriving home at Rose Cottage, a distance of two miles from Stoke Canon, at half-past ten. The family altogether consists of eight children, but only four live home, and all had retired to rest except JOHN, aged 15, who is in the employ of Lord Poltimore, and his mother. A quarrel arose between the two, and GOSLING, threatening to strike his wife, she rushed out of doors. The man came to the door and asked her to return into the house, but she refused, and he locked the door. About a quarter of an hour afterwards GOSLING again went to the door and repeated his former request for his wife to enter the house, which she declined to do. He then rushed out of the house after her, through the garden in front, and out into the road towards Stoke Canon. When about thirty yards from the cottage he overtook her, and with his pocket-knife cut her throat in a frightful manner. GOSLING then went back into the house and put his hand into his pocket and pulled out some coppers, which he offered to his son. The boy accepted the money, and then the father took from the mantelpiece a razor which he had been in the habit of shaving with, and cut his own throat, severing the head nearly from the body. The poor boy was horrified, and without disturbing his three little brothers, who were peacefully sleeping upstairs, ran off to fetch P.C. Goddard, of Stoke Canon, and call assistance. An old man named Cross lives with his daughter very near the GOSLINGS, and they dressed and went into the house, but GOSLING was then lying on the floor dead. A Mrs Mellish soon arrived on the scene of the murder, and went in search of the murdered woman, whom she found against a hedge with her throat cut nearly from ear to ear. She was quite dead, and there was a pool of blood on the ground beneath. The poor woman's body was carried into the house and placed beside that of her dead husband. On visiting the scene of the terrible tragedy in the afternoon three little boys, aged about ten, seven, and five, were walking about the garden bareheaded, and evidently suffering from the coldness of the air. No policeman was near at hand, and the door of the cottage was locked. On making enquiries as to where the dead bodies of the man and woman were lying, one of the lads pointing to the window said, "They are in there," meaning the kitchen. No blinds had been drawn by the police, and in the kitchen laid out on four chairs, covered with a sheet, were the corpses to be seen by all who cared to peer through the window. On putting a question to the eldest boy he at once directed our representative to the back yard, and picking up a small pair of trousers said, "This is BERTIE'S trousers, and this is what they wiped up the blood with," and BERTIE, recognising the trousers as belonging to him, at once began to handle them. Near by, also in the back-yard, was a large quantity of blood, which had been washed up from the kitchen and deposited there. The police surely ought not to have allowed the children to remain near the scene of such a shocking crime, and should certainly have taken the trouble to draw the blinds and wash up the stains of blood, and have prevented the unfortunate children from peering in through the window and keyhole to view the bodies of their dead parents. Following is the account of the murder as given by FRANK GOSLING, son of the deceased, and a man named Cross, living in the next cottage to that occupied by GOSLING.
FRANK GOSLING said:- I am the eldest of the four children who lived home with my father. I am a labourer, in the employ of Lord Poltimore, and my father used to do odd jobs for Mr Tremlett. My father was called JAMES GOSLING and was 47 years of age: my mother was named EMMA, and was 47 this month. Last June my father was summoned for ill-treating my mother, and had to go to prison for six weeks. After coming out of prison he came to reside at Rose Cottage with my mother. There are eight of us to the family, but only four live home; there being three younger than myself. My father and mother very often used to quarrel, and on Tuesday night I was with my mother in the kitchen between ten and eleven when my father came home. He had been out drinking all the evening, and it was rather late before he arrived home. I went upstairs to go to bed, when I heard my mother begin to call out "Murder." She ran out of the house into the garden, and then into the road. I came down, and saw my father running into the road after my mother towards Stoke Canon. She had only proceeded about thirty yards when he caught her, threw her in the hedge, and, taking out his pocket-knife, cut her throat. I ran back to knock up Mr Cross, and soon afterwards my father came back also, and entered the kitchen. He put his hand into his pocket, took out some coppers, and asked me to accept them, and then taking his razor off the mantelpiece he opened it and cut his throat. My three other little brothers were upstairs asleep, and did not hear anything of it. I ran into Stoke Canon for P.C. Goddard, but before he arrived my father and mother were dead. Dr Somer, of Broadclyst, and Sergeant Dymond also arrived. My father and mother struggled very much in the road.
The man Cross, the next door neighbour, who is well up in years and nearly blind, said: On Tuesday night, about 11 o'clock, I heard the big boy FRANK calling out very loudly, and wondered what it was all about. I went to the window and listened, and presently I heard GOSLING say to his wife, who was in the road, "Come into the house," and she replied, "I shall not." GOSLING then went in and shut the door and soon afterwards appeared again at the door, and said, "Will you come into the house?" The wife again said she would not come into the house. I then heard GOSLIGN running along the roadway, and heard his wife screaming. Within a minute or so of hearing the screams GOSLIGN came back, and I awoke my daughter, who was sleeping in the house, telling her there was something up with GOSLING and his wife again. My daughter looked out of the bedroom window and said to GOSLING "What is up now?" when he replied "Oh! I have done it now; I have cut her throat." The man then walked into his house, and before me or my daughter had time to go into GOSLING'S house he had cut his own throat and was dying. I have heard that a severe struggle took place, and that the poor woman had cuts on her hands and face.
THE INQUEST -
On Wednesday Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the bodies of JAMES and EMMA GOSLING at Barnhayes Farm, the residence of Mr Stiles. The tragedy has created the greatest horror throughout the district, and sympathy on all hands is expressed for the eight children. Mr J. N. Franklin was chosen the Foreman of the Jury. The Jury having viewed the bodies, which were resting on four chairs in the kitchen, the first witness called was
HENRY GOSLING, who said: I live at 20, Clifton-road, Exeter. I am a journeyman baker. I have seen the bodies which the Jurymen have viewed, and identify them as those of my father and mother. My father's name was JAMES GOSLING, and my mother's EMMA GOSLING. My father's occupation was that of a labourer. He was 47 years of age, and my mother 46 years. I last saw them alive on Christmas Day. They did not live happily together.
FRANK GOSLING, another son of the deceased, said: I live at Huxham, and am 13 years of age.
The Coroner: What time did you last see your father and mother? - I last saw father on Tuesday morning at half-past six, when he went to work.
What time did he return? - I cannot tell. I was in bed.
Had you gone to sleep? – Yes , sir.
Did anything awake you? - Yes, I heard father and mother kicking up a row.
Were your father and mother downstairs at the time? – Yes, sir.
Did you hear any words pass? - Not very many.
Just tell us what you heard? - IO heard father call mother three bad names.
What did you first hear? - I heard mother holloaing "Murder" when I first woke up.
Did you hear any noise as if your father was knocking your mother about? - No,sir.
Mr Franklin: Was your mother in the road or in the house at the time? - In the road.
The Coroner: Where was your father? - In the road.
Did you see your father after that? - Yes, sir.
Where? - He came back and went into the house.
Howe long did they remain outside? - About five or ten minutes.
Where did your father go? - He took the razor down from the mantelpiece and sat in the chair and cut his own throat.
When you heard of the murder of your mother what did you do? - I went down the road and saw that he had killed mother.
Was that before he came into the cottage? - Yes, sir.
What did you see down the road? - I saw mother down in the road and father cutting her throat.
What distance was that from the cottage? - Not very far, sir. Father had got mother in the hedge.
Did your father see you? – Yes, sir. He said, "FRANK, you have come too late; her's dead."
What did he do then? - Then he came home and cut his own throat.
He left your mother and went indoors? - Yes, sir.
Mr Franklin: You followed him into the house? - As soon as I saw he had cut mother's throat I went back and called up MARY ANN.
The Coroner: Did you follow him into the house? - Yes, sir.
What did he do directly he came in? - Directly he came into the house he took the razor and sat in the chair and cut his own throat. He stood up and then fell right down on the floor.
You say you saw him cut your mother's throat; what did he do it with? - His pocket-knife (produced).
Have you known your father and mother have quarrels? - Yes, sir
Often? - Not very often lately.
Have you heard him threaten to murder your mother? - Yes, sometimes.
How long ago was the last occasion? - I cannot tell for certain, but more than a month ago, I should think.
Had they any quarrels before he went to work in the morning? - No, sir.
Can you tell if your father had been drinking? - I think he had been drinking a little, not very much.
What makes you think that? - He would not kick up a row if he had not been drinking.
Then he usually had a row when he had been drinking? - Yes, sir.
Did you notice any signs of drinking that night? - No, sir; he walked steadily.
What did you do afterwards? - I called up Mary Ann – Miss Cross – a neighbour.
Did you notice anything different in your father's appearance when you last saw him? - No, sir.
As far as you can say he had not been drinking? - I could not notice that he had.
Who was in the house besides you? - No one besides my three little brothers, who were upstairs.
The Foreman of the Jury complimented the boy on the straightforward manner in which he had given his evidence.
Henry Radford was then sworn. He said: I live at Huxham, and am a farm labourer. I was called by Miss Cross at twenty minutes after eleven o'clock on Tuesday night. She said that GOSLING had cut his wife's throat, and was going to cut his own. Miss Cross lived next door to the deceased. I dressed and went to the cottage and saw GOSING lying on the floor of the kitchen with his throat cut and a little boy looking over the stairs. He was not dead, but moaning and unconscious. I spoke to him and called him by his name, but got no answer. I went out to call the neighbours. I came back with Edwards about three or four minutes after, and deceased drew one deep breath and expired. There was not much blood on the floor when I came first, but there was a lot afterwards. When I came into the road to call some more neighbours I saw the woman lying in the road about two gunshots down on the left-hand side. She was quite dead. I came on past and met Miss Cross. I did not hear any disturbance during the evening.
By the Foreman: I have not heard any rows between them.
John Goddard, police constable, stationed at Stoke Canon, said: On Tuesday night, at 12 o'clock, between Stoke Canon and Rew, I met Thomas Melhuish, and from what he said to me I went to Huxham. About seventy yards from the deceased's house I saw the woman, EMMA GOSLING, lying on her back dead, with her throat cut. There was not much sign of a struggle. I went from there to the house, where I saw JAMES GOSLING lying on his face and hands in a pool of blood on the kitchen floor, with his throat cut, dead. A razor (produced) was lying open close by his head. On the table I saw the knife (produced) open and with blood about it. It appeared to have been wiped. I searched the body and found nothing on it. The doctor came at half-past one. I obtained assistance and took EMMA GOSLING indoors. I have known the deceased for five years. They frequently had rows, the man often beating his wife. I was called in on one occasion when he took down a "gamble" (an iron hook) and struck her across the head. Since then he had been charged on two occasions with wife beating. The last time was in June, when he was apprehended on a warrant for an aggravated assault, and sentenced to six weeks' hard labour. I have not heard much since. The last time I saw MRS GOSLING was on Monday, when I asked her how it was going on at home, and she said "Better." I have ascertained that GOSLING was not drunk that night, but there is no doubt that the man had been drinking.
James Somer, surgeon, residing at Broadclyst, said: Half-past twelve on Tuesday night I was called to see JAMES and EMMA GOSLING. I arrived at the house about 1.30 and saw the body of JAMES GOSLING on his face and hands on the kitchen floor in a pool of blood. On turning over the body I found his throat cut, all the principal blood vessels on the left side being severed; the windpipe was slightly injured, and some of the blood vessels on the right side were also severed. The wound had evidently been made by a sharp instrument, such as a razor, as it was a clear-cut wound. I should think it was self-inflicted. There were no further marks of violence. Death resulted from loss of blood. I then examined the body of the woman EMMA GOSLING, and found the throat cut with a wound of a jagged character. The blood vessels on both sides were severed, and the windpipe partly severed, the injuries being such as to cause death. There was some mud on the clothing, but no further marks of violence on the body. In my opinion death in either case had not taken place long.
Mary Ann Cross, unmarried, living at Huxham, said: - I live next door to the deceased. I heard nothing of them until I heard the boy FRANK screaming. He was screaming "Father, father," "Mary Ann" (meaning witness). I opened the window and asked what was the matter, and he said, "Father is killing mother down the road." I said, "It is nonsense, FRANK." He said, "He is, I saw him down the road." The boy went in, and the father came in just after. I said, "GOSLING, what have you been doing?" and he replied, "I have done it; I have finished her." I have heard them quarrel many times, but I did not hear them on Tuesday. EMMA GOSLING often told me that her husband had kicked her and beaten her. I think I have heard her say many times that he threatened to murder her, but she had not made any complaints recently.
The Coroner: How long since did you see a quarrel between them? - Last Saturday I heard him having some words with her, but he was not using violence.
In summing up, the Coroner said: Gentlemen of the Jury, that is all the evidence I have to place before you. I think it is so clear that you will have little trouble in arriving at a verdict. You have heard the evidence of FRANK GOSLING and the evidence of the last witness, which goes to show that the deceased EMMA GOSLING was murdered in a most deliberate way by her husband, JAMES GOSLING. If you are satisfied as to that you will return a verdict of wilful murder against JAMES GOSLING. In considering that verdict it will not be your duty to enter into a discussion as to the state of mind of JAMES GOSLING, the murderer. If you are satisfied that he murdered his wife you must return a verdict to that effect. Having dealt with the deceased EMMA GOSLING, you will then consider the evidence as to the death of JAMES GOSLING. From the evidence of FRANK GOSLING, who was an unfortunate witness of the death of both his parents, you will see that he states he saw his father, after having murdered his mother, go into the kitchen and cut his throat. With regard to his death, you will no doubt bring in a verdict of suicide, and in doing so you will have to consider the state of mind in which the deceased was. You will not, of course, lose sight of the fact that he had murdered his wife, and that no doubt he was in a state of great excitement, and you must consider whether that was due to either temporary or permanent insanity. I don't think I need add any further remarks, the evidence being so clear that you will have no difficulty in dealing with it.
The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against JAMES GOSLING in the case of the death of EMMA GOSLING, and in the second case a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."
The Jury handed over their fees to the eldest son for the benefit of the young children.

Saturday 8 February 1890, Issue 7083 – Gale Document No. Y3200748552
SUICIDE AT POLTIMORE – Inquest, This Day. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning on the body of JOHN FORD, who was discovered with his throat cut on Friday week last, as already reported. JANE FORD, of Poltimore, wife of the deceased, indentified the body. She said her husband was 64 years of age, and previous to his death was in the employ of Mr Gould as a farm labourer. Deceased appeared all right on going to bed the night before the occurrence, and she was unaware of anything being wrong until she was disturbed about 2.13 the next morning by a noise, and on calling her husband she found he had disappeared. She repeatedly called him and failing to get any reply she procured a light and went in search of him. She discovered him at the bottom of the stairs on the floor. There was a lot of blood about him, and he was unconscious. Between his legs was a razor. Latterly he had appeared very low-spirited and depressed, but he had never shown a tendency to commit suicide. He had been medically attended by Mr Somer, surgeon, of Broadclyst, but not of late. Deceased had a sister in the Exminster Asylum. Witness was not aware of the cause of his depression. The Coroner here read a letter which he had received from the deceased's employer, in which he said he thought it right to say that the deceased had lived nearly all his life in Poltimore parish and had worked for him quite satisfactorily. He had no idea that he would have committed such a rash act. Thomas Bissett, a labourer of Poltimore, said he had known the deceased for twenty years. He resided in an adjourning cottage, and the evening before the occurrence he was with him for about two hours. During the conversation, he referred to some cider, and said if it did not "work" it would drive him "mazed," and he should be down in the asylum with his sister. He was called on Friday morning and two other neighbours named Pugsley and Stark came to his assistance. The former fetched Dr Somers, of Broadclyst. Mr Russell Coombe, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased into the institution on the 4th inst. He had an unhealed wound in the throat leading into the windpipe, and he was suffering from bronchitis. The wound was of considerable size, very irregular, and jagged. The deceased expired yesterday morning, the cause of death being bronchitis, which might have arisen from the injury to the throat. Deceased was unable to talk. The Coroner, in summing up, referred to the insanity in the family, which he said appeared to be hereditary, and he considered it a very strong fact. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 8 February 1890, Issue 7083 – Gale Document No. Y3200748564
SUICIDE OF A PAIGNTON GARDENER - WILLIAM HODGE, 50 years of age, gardener, residing at Cross, Paignton, committed suicide by hanging himself to a tree on Wednesday. The body was found by a lad named Shute, about 10.30, hanging to an apple tree in an orchard near the Devonport Arms. A man named Robert Andrews, labourer, cut the body down, but life was found to be quite extinct. P.S. Pope was instantly communicated with, and an Inquest will be held.

Saturday 15 February 1890, Issue 7087 – Gale Document No. Y3200748579
DEATH UNDER CHLOROFORM AT EXMOUTH - The Inquest. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Cox) held an Inquiry on Thursday at the Dolphin Inn, Exmouth, into the circumstances attending the death of EMILY VEALS, who died in the Maud Hospital on Tuesday. Mr Carter was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The body having been viewed by the Jury at the Maud Hospital.
JAMES VEALS, grandfather of the deceased, said she lived in the same house with him, being a single woman, aged twenty-four. She had been suffering for years from a skin disease, and had undergone six operations in connection with it. Whenever deceased went under an operation chloroform was administered. All previous operations had been successful. Deceased expressed a wish to undergo an operation for the purpose of removing the remaining spots on her face, which had been affected by lupus, and it was decided that the operation should take place on Tuesday between three and four o'clock at the Maud Hospital. Deceased was staying in the Hospital, having been there for more than a month.
Arthur Curtis, a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, practising at Exmouth, said that morning he made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased with his partner, Dr Kans. There was nothing at all the matter with the heart, which appeared to have acted after breathing had stopped. Deceased had never suffered from heart disease; neither was there any disease of the important organs. The cause of death was stoppage of breathing through paralysis of the muscles of respiration. This was due to the administration of chloroform.
A Juryman: Was there anything that would cause a difference in the operation being unsuccessful this time and successful on another occasion.
Dr Curtis: You cannot account for that.
Mrs Charlotte Anna Long (nee Hume), a widow, lady superintendent and head nurse of the Maud Hospital, said deceased was admitted to the Hospital about a month ago to undergo further treatment for her face, as she was suffering from lupus. An operation was carried out on the deceased about three weeks ago, when there were present Dr Cock (who administered the chloroform), Dr Hodgson (who conducted the operation), and a nurse and herself. Deceased did not then show any alarming symptoms. On Tuesday deceased was to undergo another operation, when the same persons as mentioned above were present, also an under-nurse, but she was not taking part in the operation. Deceased then appeared to be in her usual condition, and as far as witness could judge, fit to undergo the operation. Witness was chiefly occupied in holding a basin of hot water and soaking sponges in the hot water whilst the operation as being carried out by the operator, Dr Hodgson. Chloroform was administered by Dr Cock before the operation commenced. The chloroform was administered by Skinner's inhaler. Early in the operation she noticed stertorous breathing, and measures were at once taken to restore regular breathing, and the galvanic battery was applied by Dr Hodgson. Remedial measures were continued for about half-an-hour, but without effect. Chloroform had been administered some 260 times since the Hospital was first established in Exmouth, which would be three or four years ago. It had been administered by Drs. Cock and Hodgson, and no accident had never occurred before. Nitrate of amyl had been supplied to the nostrils, which was supposed to be a good remedy in such cases.
John Cock, L.R.C.P. (London), M.R.C.S. (England), practising at Exmouth, and joint surgeon with Dr Hodgson to the Maud Hospital, said the deceased was known to him as a sufferer from lupus. Deceased did not suffer from any complaint of the heart as far as he knew, and quite a healthy person apart from lupus.
He had administered chloroform to the deceased on previous occasions, when an operation was being conducted by Dr Hodgson. The disease was of a serious character, but not immediately dangerous to life. Deceased had never shown any ill effects from previous operations, and the same method was adopted of administering chloroform as took place on Tuesday last. Chloroform was never measured out, because it was not known how much the patient would require. Some patients took a great deal, and others very little. It also depended on the temperature, because when the weather was cold the chloroform would not evaporate so quickly as it would when the climate was warmer. He was seven or eight minutes administering the chloroform before the deceased was in a fit state to undergo the operation. He noticed nothing alarming, the deceased going along very well. The chest of the deceased was watched whilst the operation was being carried on, to see if the breathing was correct. Dr Hodgson had only been carrying on his operation about three minutes when the patient shewed signs of recovering consciousness, and more chloroform was applied. The deceased then suddenly stopped breathing whilst the chloroform was being administered, and witness immediately got out her tongue with a pair of forceps, which were kept close by for the purpose. Artificial respiration was immediately attempted by means of Dr Sylvester's method, by which air was drawn into the chest and forced out again. This was continued for more than half-an-hour. Whilst artificial respiration was being carried out deceased did not show signs of recovery. Deceased had previously inhaled a larger quantity of chloroform than was applied on Tuesday without any ill effects. He did not place more than the usual quantity on the flannel. It was absolutely impossible to predict how a patient would behave under chloroform. He had given chloroform to patients who suffered from heart disease, and they had taken it remarkably well.
In answer to a Juryman, Dr Cock said it was usual for two medical men to carry out an operation like the one performed on deceased. It was not customary for three medial gentlemen to be present.
Dr Curtis said he was perfectly satisfied with the evidence of Dr Cock.
Dr Cock said that as he was responsible for giving the deceased the chloroform he desired to give the Jury every information. He had administered chloroform to 500 persons, and had kept a record of the names of 200 of the patients. When he was house surgeon at Guy's Hospital, London, it was his duty to see chloroform given to patients. He had never lost a patient before, and he had known cases in which breathing had stopped and afterwards restored. All anaesthetics were dangerous, and a person under chloroform was half poisoned, and all one's skill had to be employed to keep the patient from being wholly poisoned. In some cases it was almost impossible to avoid accident. The per-centage of deaths arising from persons under chloroform was one in a thousand. Dr Hodgson had great hopes of curing the disease the girl was suffering from, and there was a great improvement in her condition lately. The complaint was one that was progressive, and destroyed the skin of the face. The pain of scraping off the lupus tissue from the face with a steel instrument could not be endured by the patient except under chloroform.
Dr Curtis said he was at one time a physician in one of the great London Hospitals, and had administered a great deal of chloroform. Deaths unfortunately did occur through its use, and could not be avoided.
The Coroner said that there could be no doubt from the evidence given that death resulted from the use of chloroform. It therefore became their duty to enquire in what manner the chloroform was administered, and they had had plenty of information given in evidence on that point. There were cases in which it was impossible to predict whether the administration of chloroform would result fatally. He had thought it advisable that Dr Curtis should give evidence on public grounds, and also as regarded Dr Cock. If they were satisfied with the evidence as given they would return a verdict of "Accidental Death."
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider to the effect that they were convinced that the utmost possible care was taken in the administration of the chloroform.
The Coroner said he entirely agreed with the verdict of the Jury, which exonerated Dr Cock from any blame.

Saturday 15 February 1890, Issue 7087 – Gale Document No. Y3200748604
DEATH ON THE HIGHWAY NEAR BUDLEIGH SALTERTON - At the King's Arms Inn, Otterton, yesterday an Inquest was held on the body of JOHN CARTER, aged seventy-eight, who was found dead on Wednesday on Peak Hill. The widow identified the body, and stated that deceased left home in his usual health on Wednesday morning to cut furze on Peak hill. James Skinner, of the Anchor Inn, Sidmouth, stated that he knew deceased, who called at his house at one o'clock on Wednesday. He appeared in his usual health, but took two pints of beer, his custom being to take one. Deceased was sober. Mary Pyle, residing on Peak Hill, said she saw the deceased pass her house about 23.45 on Wednesday. He was ascending the hill leaving Sidmouth, and was staggering. Abel Curwood said he was driving down Peak-hill at 3.30 on Wednesday and saw the deceased in the watercourse by the side of the road, about 200 yards from the house of the last witness. Deceased appeared to have been resting and had fallen back. His legs were sticking up. Witness thought he breathed once. Mr T. Evans, surgeon, Budleigh Salterton, said he believed death was due to syncope, and a verdict was given in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 15 February 1890, Issue 7087 – Gale Document No. Y3200748588
MYSTERIOUS CASE OF POISONING AT EXWICK – Inquest – This Morning. - An Inquest was held at the Lamb Inn, Exwick, this morning, at nine o'clock, before the Deputy Coroner (Mr Gould), touching the death of ANN DEW, who was found dead in bed yesterday morning. Mr Challice, was chosen Foreman of the Jury. JOHN DEW, living at Exwick, labourer, said his wife was aged 51, and he last saw her on Thursday night about ten o'clock, when she was laying on the bed, undressed. Deceased was also lying on the bed at six o'clock, when he came home from work, and he said to her, "Why don't you get up and do some mangling?" and the only answer she made was that she would get up soon. His wife did not complain to him that there was anything the matter with her. About ten o'clock on Thursday night deceased asked for a cup of tea, which he carried up to her, but she only drank half of it. The deceased then said she wanted to go to sleep, and witness left her and went downstairs. At quarter to six on Friday morning witness went to where the deceased was lying on the bed, and found that she was quite dead. Witness slept downstairs on the sofa all night. He could not say whether his wife was under the influence of liquor on Thursday night, but she was in the habit of drinking alcoholic liquors. There were two bottles (produced) and a glass in the room on Thursday night, the bottles being labelled "Liniment, for outward application only." The bottles were placed on a table beside the bed in which deceased was sleeping, and witness took them both downstairs the same evening. The bottles were empty when he removed them. The deceased was not in the habit of using the liniment, but his daughter used to apply it to her legs. He had no particular reason for removing the bottles. Witness had never known his wife attempt to commit suicide. In answer to the Coroner, however, the witness said he remembered Dr Vlieland some time ago attend his wife, when she had to be removed to Hospital, because she had taken some "stuff," which rendered her unconscious. Witness and his wife lived happily together. Two of witness's sons, aged 28 and 12 respectively, slept in the house the same night. One of the glasses had contained whiskey or sherry, but witness said he did not see deceased drink any that day. GEORGE DEW, labourer, son of the deceased, deposed to seeing his mother in bed at 7.15 on Thursday evening. Although the deceased was in bed she had all her clothes on. He could not say whether his mother was in liquor at the time. Witness put several questions to the deceased, but she made no reply. He was not alarmed because deceased did not reply to him, as he had seen her in the same state many times before, and especially when she had taken liquor. Witness had never heard his mother say she would commit suicide.
Louisa Bond, wife of William Bond, packer, of Exwick, said she lived near the deceased, and last saw her alive on Thursday afternoon at four o'clock. She went up to the house of the deceased with some mangling; she was then sitting by the fire. Deceased complained of being very cold, and said she could not get any heat into her body. Witness remained there about five minutes, and did not think that deceased was the worst for liquor. Sergt. Egan, of the Devon County Constabulary, said on Friday morning, about 7 a.m., the husband of the deceased called on him, and said he had found his wife dead in bed. He accompanied DEW to his house, and on entering the bedroom he found the deceased stretched across the bed with her face towards the window. On examining the body he saw the face was livid and the lips black, and the tongue firmly clenched between the teeth, and the lips contracted. Deceased was dressed, and lying on her right side. Witness noticed a glass on a table at the foot of the bed, and asked the husband if he had taken any bottles from the room. He replied "Yes," and witness then told him he must let him have them. DEW then handed him the two bottles produced marked "Liniment." Witness had taken the bottles and glass to Mr Harris, chemist, and found that one of them and a glass had contained ammonia and belladonna. Dr Vlieland deposed to seeing the body of the deceased about eleven o'clock on Friday morning. She was lying as described by the last witness, and her face was more or less buried in the pillow. There were no marks of violence about the body. The lips and tongue of the deceased were congested, the tongue pressed forward between the teeth, but not wounded, and the pupils of the eyes were widely dilated. Deceased was black about the nose and mouth. Death might have been caused by poisoning, and such a poison as belladonna. His opinion was that the glass had contained belladonna, and in the small bottle there was a strong smell of ammonia. Witness had attended the deceased on several occasions, and about six months ago he was called about eight o'clock in the evening to attend the deceased. He went to the house and found the woman was suffering from the effects of liquor, but he saw no definite signs of poison having been taken. There was then a cup and two tins of Keating's insect powder in the kitchen, and the powder appeared to have been mixed in the cup. The son GEORGE then said, "Oh, yes, I know, that is what she has taken." There was a considerable quantity of the powder sticking to the cup. Thinking it was a case that should be watched, he ordered the woman to be taken to the Hospital. He had a suspicion that the woman had taken ,poison. There was nothing amiss with deceased's mental condition. The son produced the tins of insect powder for witness to look at. The Coroner, in summing up, said if it was the wish of the Jury that Dr Vlieland should make a post-mortem examination he would adjourn the Inquest. Belladonna had been taken, it appeared, by the deceased, but whether it was taken intentionally or accidentally there was no evidence to show. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased met her death by taking belladonna.

SUICIDE AT EXMINSTER ASYLUM - Mr W. H. Gould (the Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Exminster Asylum last evening on the body of OLIVE HILL, married, aged 27, of Brixham, an inmate of the Institution, who committed suicide by hanging herself. JAMES GEORGE HILL, fisherman, husband of the deceased, identified the body. She had, he said, threatened to commit suicide previous to her admission to the Exminster Asylum, which took place eight weeks ago. Dr. G. Saunders, medical superintendent of the Asylum, said the deceased was admitted to the Institution on the 18th December last. She was acutely melancholy, and special instructions were given for the guidance of the attendant in dealing with her. In No. 2 ward, in which she was placed, there were 57 patients, of whom 13 were actively suicidal. Generally there were five attendants, but on this occasion of the suicide there were only three attendants present. On Monday last witness went through the ward when a patient named Fry drew his attention to something in the room, and witness immediately found the deceased suspended by a piece of tape to a gas pipe. Witness believed that the tape was used in the Christmas decorations, which the deceased had assisted to take down. When the tape was cut deceased was found to be pulseless and livid. Artificial respiration was adopted, and after threequarters-of-an-hour breathing re-commenced. She was placed in bed, but she never recovered consciousness, and died on Wednesday morning. The decorations were removed about a fortnight ago, but as the attendants had instructions to carefully search all suicidal patients, he could not tell how she secreted the tape. A large number of the staff had been on the sick list, chiefly suffering from influenza, and consequently the nursing power had been much weakened in every department. When the deceased was found there were only three attendants instead of five, one being absent through illness and the other being on leave for the afternoon. He had no supernumeraries to take their places. Death was caused by congestion of the brain and lungs, the result of the hanging. Elizabeth Ham, attendant of the ward, said she received instructions to keep careful watch on the deceased, inconsequence of her suicidal tendencies. It was the duty of one of the attendants to accompany the deceased whenever she left the ward. Witness supposed that the deceased, when assisting in taking down the decorations, must have secreted the tape in her pocket. Nurses Musgrove and Rumbelow put the suicidal patients to bed, and it was their duty to search them. Eliza Grace Musgrove, nurse in the ward, said on Monday afternoon the deceased was in her charge. On the previous night on going to bed witness searched her, "but not her clothes." She had not been in the habit of searching the pockets of patients. - Q: You say you have never searched their pockets? - Yes; but whenever I think they have placed anything in their pockets I search them. - Q: Did you not know that the deceased was suicidal? - Yes. - Have you searched the deceased's pockets within the past fortnight? - No; I have not. - In answer to the Jury, witness said she had never heard the deceased threaten to commit suicide. In answer to the Coroner, she said she had instructions to give the deceased continuous supervision, and had been told that she had made several attempts to hang herself. Elizabeth Rumbelow, nurse, said it was her duty to search suicidal patients. On Sunday night the deceased was searched by the last witness. On Thursday night witness searched the deceased, but did not examine her pockets. Although it was a part of the nurses' duty to watch patients leaving the ward, witness did not notice the deceased leave. Subsequently Nurse Musgrove explained that the clothes of patients were kept outside the bedroom, and that was the reason why they were not searched. The Coroner said the Superintendent (Dr Saunders) seemed to have taken every precaution in giving the necessary instructions. One part f the nurses' duty was to search the patients, but they never searched their pockets. It seemed extraordinary that the patients should have been allowed to wear clothes day after day which had not been searched. It was quite possible that the deceased might have had this tape in her clothes for a considerable time. He had expressed an opinion before that the staff of the Asylum was not strong enough to look after the number of patients. Here there were 57 patients in the ward, and only three nurses in attendance. However remiss the nurses might have been in their search, he thought every allowance should e made for them on this particular afternoon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind," and added a rider to the effect that instructions should be given to the nurses to search all clothes of patients, and expressing an opinion that the staff in No. 2 Ward was not sufficiently strong.

Saturday 22 February 1890, Issue 7093 – Gale Document No. Y3200748638
ACCIDENTS AT HONITON - A boy named FRANK BRADBEER, aged one year and nine months, residing at Silver-street, Honiton, was on Tuesday playing in the yard when he fell in a tub containing three inches of water and was drowned. An Inquest will be held.

THE DROWNING OF A BARGE MAN AT NEWTON - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday at the Vicarage, Kingsteignton, touching the death of JOHN SCOTT, a bargeman, in the employ of the Devon and Courtenay Clay Company, who was drowned in the river Teign on Tuesday evening. LOUISA SCOTT, daughter of deceased, identified the body as that of her father, and stated he was 54 years of age. Joseph Whitear deposed that at about seven o'clock on the evening of Tuesday he and the deceased started to take a loaded barge from Little Cellar Bridge to Buckland Point. Deceased's pole stuck in the mud when between the Gas house and Newton Marsh, and witness rowed back after it in a small boat. Whilst gone, deceased used witness's pole, which also stuck in the mud, and deceased must have been pulled overboard. Witness heard a splash, and immediately rowed to the spot. There was a strong wind blowing, and he had some difficulty in getting the boat back to the barge. When he arrived at the spot where deceased fell in he had disappeared, and the body was not recovered until about nine o'clock. Their poles often stuck in the mud at this part, and witness had been pulled overboard in the same way. Wm. Gelding, who was poling a barge immediately in advance of the deceased's barge, and George Watts, a labourer of Newton, gave evidence as to the recovering of the body. The Coroner then summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a recommendation to the Teign River Commissioners to remove the mud accumulated at the part of the river at which the fatality occurred.

Saturday 1 March 1890, Issue 7099 – Gale Document No. Y3200748539
INQUEST AT TAVISTOCK - At the Tavistock Cottage Hospital on Tuesday Mr R. R. Dodd, District Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM HOOKWAY, a fireman, aged 36 years, formerly of Tiverton. Charles Richard Philp, a navvy, deposed that on the 13th of February he was at work with the deceased in the Launceston-road cutting, Tavistock. They had blasted three holes with gunpowder, and were removing pieces of stone from the rails when a large rock, weighing about 8cwt., suddenly fell and caught the deceased's leg, severely crushing it. Mr Allen Phillips, of Tavistock, said he was on a bridge and watched several men at work. He thought the rocks above them looked loose, and he saw a big one fall. Three or four men ran away, but the deceased was injured. Dr Hislop deposed to attending the deceased at the Hospital, and amputating the leg, with the assistance of Dr Smale, on the day of the accident. Gangrene set in, and the limb was again amputated, above the knee. Death resulted from exhaustion. The Foreman said it was a question with him and some of his fellow Jurors whether the ganger ought not to have seen that the dangerous overhanging rocks were properly removed. The witness Philp stated that the ganger was a very careful man, and would not knowingly allow the men to work where there was danger. He had two sets of men to look after, and was not present when the accident occurred. After some deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 8 March 1890, Issue 7105 – Gale Document No. Y3200748688
SUDDEN DEATH OF A CHILD IN EXETER – On Monday Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a child named JOEL SAUNDERS MUDGE. The evidence of the mother, who resides in Cottage Court, Coombe-street, shewed that the deceased since its birth, six months ago, had been delicate, and died on Saturday whilst in charge of a neighbour named Shipcott. The latter gave evidence, and said she had been accustomed to feed the child with a little biscuit, but latterly with bread and milk. Mr McKeith, surgeon, said he had attended the child previous to its death for bronchitis, and was called on Saturday after its decease. There were no marks of violence on the body. He could not exactly say what was the cause of death, but it was consistent with natural causes. He rather thought it was produced by suffocation. The mother was questioned as to whether the child was insured. She said it was in the Medical Aid, and she paid 2d. weekly. In summing up, the Coroner said it was one of those cases which they had had frequently before them; it was improper feeding again. It was a great pity that children should be fed on bread stuff before they were five months old. He also again referred to the question of insurance, and said he was very glad to be able to tell them that he thought some step would be taken before very long in cases where children were insured in this way, and often where more money was paid to the parties than was expended on the actual burial of the child. It was so in many cases – he did not mean to say it was in this. There did not seem to have been any illtreatment of the child. The Jury found a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 8 March 1890, Issue 7105 – Gale Document No. Y3200748713
SHOCKING DEATH AT BRAMPFORD SPEKE - The Inquest. - Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest at Brampford Speke on Wednesday on the body of ERNEST TURNER, aged 15. WILLIAM HENRY TURNER, of Exeter, fly proprietor, identified the deceased as his son. William Harris, schoolmaster of the Boys' Reformatory School, Brampford Speke, said the deceased was admitted to the school, about twelve months ago. A little after 11 a.m. on Monday last he was engaged with a horse and cart in taking a load of mangold to the Vicarage. The horse was very quiet and the deceased had been accustomed to such duties. No person went with him to the Vicarage. The deceased was very steady and not given to larking. About 12.30 a man named Leach informed witness that TURNER had been knocked down. Basil Vyvian Blundam, of Brampford Speke Vicarage, said he saw the deceased unloading mangold at the Vicarage on Monday last, but left before he had finished. The lad appeared to be in a good state of health. Bernard Blundun deposed that on the day in question, about twelve o'clock, he saw the deceased on the ground by the yard gates lying on his side. He was groaning, and his head was bleeding. Witness went in the house and informed his sisters of the occurrence. P.C. Thomas |Parsons, of Upton Pyne, stated that on Monday, at 12.10, on receiving information that one of the Reformatory boys had met with an accident at the Vicarage, he went there and saw the deceased lying on the ground on his back in a pool of blood. A splinter from the yard gate was under his shoulder. The deceased was then conveyed to the Agricultural Inn, and a doctor sent for. The horse and cart witness saw at the Vicarage gates was about 200 yards from where the deceased was, but out of sight. The animal was in charge of a man named Rice, who stated that the horse had run away and broken the harness to pieces. A piece of the yard gate was broken and witness saw some hair on the gate post. William Rice, a blacksmith, of Brampford Speke, said on Monday last a little girl came and asked him to go to the Vicarage to see the deceased. He went and saw the horse and cart at the Rectory gates. The harness was broken in pieces. Mr James King Lewis, of Thorverton, surgeon, said he saw the deceased on Monday last between half-past one and two o'clock at the Agricultural Inn. He found him unconscious, and in a state of complete collapse. There were four superficial wounds, two on the right cheek and two on the scalp on the left side. The left ear was lacerated, and blood was issuing from both ears and the nose. The lower jaw was broken, and there was paralysis on the right side of the body. It was a very serious and hopeless case from the first. The deceased died on the following day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 22 March 1890, Issue 7116 – Gale Document No. Y3200748757
DEATH OF AN OLD LADY AT ST. THOMAS – Sinister Rumours.
A Son Censured for Gross Neglect - The Inquest. - On Tuesday at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, Mr Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquiry into the death of ANN CHANNON, of Alphington Cross, aged 84. Deputy Chief Constable Jesse watched the proceedings on behalf of the police. The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said from what was reported to him he desired to have an Enquiry made. He had order Dr Vlieland to make a post Mortem examination to assist them in their investigation. Mr Bradley having been chosen Foreman, the Jury proceeded to Alphington Cross to view the body. On their return, JOHN CHANNON, a retired litho writer, was called and identified the body of the deceased as that of his mother, a widow, who resided with him. A housekeeper also lived with them. The deceased was very feeble and of weak intellect, but did not suffer from sickness. At their previous residence in Fortescue-road the deceased was able to walk about, but since living at Alphington Cross she had had to keep to her bed very much. Dr Vlieland attended her in February, and he ordered her to be out of bed every day, which was done until two days before her death. Prior to nine months ago the deceased was in receipt of money, but after some dispute about her property she became a woman of independent means. She possessed sufficient to maintain her. the deceased's income passed through witness's hands, and after paying for everything the surplus was placed in the bank in his name. The housekeeper receives £1 a month, but during the last three weeks had received £1. Witness only remained out a little while during the day, and it was very rarely that the housekeeper went out with him. He did not stay very long, when he suspected "Treachery" by the opposite party to the property dispute watching him wherever he went. A book containing things done in connection with the house was then handed to the Coroner, and in reply to him, witness said that he went to the Union with his housekeeper to find a woman to stay with the deceased while they were out. After several questions had been asked witness, the Coroner said the book bore the appearance of having been all written at the same time. Witness stated that he had made out the diary every night. In reply to a Juror, witness said his mother did not ever complain of insufficient food or insufficient attendance.
In answer to Mr Bradley witness stated he had never left his house for several hours, nor did he know that the neighbours complained of it. He had not left his house day after day with his housekeeper. The decreased had been well provided for.
In reply to the Coroner he stated that when his mother died he and his housekeeper were in the house all day, with another person, but on a diary of the day of deceased's death being handed to the Coroner, it showed that the housekeeper and the other person went out about 5.30 and were soon followed by witness, who said he went for the doctor. He could not find him, and walked back quickly to the house. On going home witness asked his mother if she was in pain and she replied "No." The Coroner read the diary, in which the witness stated that after taking her some tea she seemed to pass away like a snap of a candle. Witness ran down about twelve times to see the doctor on his way home from Exminster, but he passed by, and he could not make him hear. The diary contained several entries respecting what the deceased had to eat during the day. In reply to the Coroner as to the object of the diary, witness said he thought there was a lot of treachery about, and on the Coroner asking him to explain, he said he was afraid of persons accusing him of starving his mother, or something like that. In answer to a Juror witness said his mother's income was about £23 10s. Several questions were then put to MR CHANNON about going out during the day, and in answering them he became confused, contradicting himself two or three times. In reply to the Deputy Chief Constable, witness stated that he was aware that certain remarks were being made against him of neglecting his mother.
Mr Jesse, to witness: You said to the Foreman that you did not hear any remarks were being made against you, and you know that someone has cautioned you against your conduct to your mother.
Witness said that there was no foundation for the accusations. He had not done anything wrong to the deceased. Witness being asked what was his personal income, declined at first to say, but after some time stated about £30 a year. In reply to Mr Jesse, he said he left Fortescue-road in consequence of the people timing him when he went out. It had nothing to do with the treatment of his mother. He did not know whether the landlord gave him notice to leave in consequence of the way in which he conducted himself and the things in the house, nor did he tell him that such a noise was made that no one could go in the house.
Mr Jesse stated that the diary did not go back as far as February 13th, and asked witness where he was on that day, and he replied "At home," but in again answering Mr Jesse, he said, could not say whether he came home drunk. He might have been a little "screwed." In answer to a question as to why he did not get someone to nurse the deceased, witness said he tried to obtain one at the Union, but then gave it up, as he would not have them in the house, they "nicked" the tea, &c. On the day of deceased's death, witness went out twice to get some port wine, and in the evening seeing his mother was worse went out again to get Dr Vlieland. Witness here got greatly confused in his statements respecting his movements on this evening. First stating that he went for Dr Vlieland, and then he passed his house and went in the Buller's Arms, where the housekeeper was.
Mr Jesse: You passed the house of the doctor you went in search of, and went direct and looked in at the Buller's Arms.
Witness said he went to the doctor, but he was not at home.
Dr Vlieland, of Cowick-street said he was called to see the deceased on Friday last. He had attended her before, when she said she could get out of bed, but it was not right to let her stay up until ten o'clock at night. He saw her on Friday night last in bed dead. Witness had since made a post mortem examination of the body, and found from the external appearance that it was fairly nourished. There were no marks of violence. In the ordinary hollows of the body there was an accumulation of dirt, and deceased only seemed to have been recently washed. The hair was matted, and the skin of the skull was very dirty. At the lower part of the back were extensive bed sores, which could only be formed by lying, and that constantly, and with proper care, he should say, they ought not to have existed to such an extent. Witness then proceeded to an internal examination with the result that he found the natural organs of the body were normal. The stomach was inflated with gas, and contained some undigested food. In witness's opinion, the inflation of the stomach pressing on the heart brought about the failure of its action, death resulting from syncope. In reply to the Coroner, Dr Vlieland stated that the stomach had not been used to take in such food as that found in it, and on that day there was an injudicious loading of the stomach. In answer to Mr Jesse, Dr Vlieland said he did not think the deceased had received the attention she should have had.
Emma Merrifield, a married woman, housekeeper to MR CHANNON, said she attended the deceased up to her death. She received sufficient funds from MR CHANNON to maintain the deceased. In answer to the Coroner, witness said she used to go out with MR CHANNON before the deceased was taken worse. Witness mentioned Dr Vlieland's previous visit, and in an excited state said to him, "I asked you to take a glass of wine, and you said you had just had a pint of beer." (Laughter.)
The Coroner: You must be quiet.
The witness was then quiet for a while on her learning that no charge was being brought against her, and stated that deceased did not remain out until ten o'clock in the night. When she left her someone else was placed in charge. Witness soon got excited again, and said "If the old lady could come up from her grave now she would tear some of them to pieces after this carrying on."
The Coroner: I must ask you to be quiet.
Witness: Ask them (the Jury) if they would like a drop of gin before going to attend an old lady (Laughter). Witness was asked if she came home late on the 14th and 15th of January very drunk. She stated that it was false. - MR CHANNON: I gave the old lady a drop of wine, but she did not care for wine. She liked a drop of beer or gin. (Laughter.)
The Coroner: You must not talk like that.
The witness till continued in this vein, and said she went to Dr Vlieland's for some medicine, and after a conversation he told her not to drink so much gin, but she could not go to the old woman without an extra drop. She was there to tell the truth and not lies, and there before the judge and jury." (Laughter). "They that say I was drink," she continued, "ought to be hung, and I will pull their legs."(Laughter.) "MR CHANNON is a funny man; I can't make him out. He has a peculiar fashion, and I never lived with a funnier man".
Witness then said the deceased had not been deprived of food. Cross-examined: She did not say to JOHN CHANNON last night, "You starved your mother to death; you killed your mother by leaving her so many hours." - Witness: I got a broad back, I can bear it all. The doctor ought to know whether he starved her when he opened her. (Sensation.) I am not coming here to be hanged innocent. I know I am innocent.
Jane Horrell, wife of Samuel Horrell, living at 24, Church-road, St. Thomas, said she was on friendly terms with the deceased, and was in the habit of seeing her when she resided at Fortescue-road. Since she had been at Alphington she had only seen her once, and she was then in bed. She made no complaint to her. – Q: Did she bear traces of neglect? - A: When her sister was living she appeared better. – Q: Did she appear dirty? - A: Not as clean as I should like to see anyone. She cried, and asked witness to come again, but she did not go, being unaware that she was taken worse.
P.C. Johns said at four o'clock in the afternoon of the 13th February he saw CHANNON and Emma Merrifield go towards Exeter. He also saw them return again about 11 p.m., both being drunk. On the following day he went to CHANNON'S house about three o'clock, but could gain no admittance, the door being locked. He was informed that CHANNON and Merrifield had then gone towards Exeter, and P.C. Newberry had since told them that they returned about the same time on the night previous. He had seen them return from Exeter several times, being on nearly all occasions drunk. Last Friday he was on duty near Exe Bridge, when CHANNON came up to him and said his housekeeper had left him at a critical time as his mother was lying dangerously ill, and he did not think she would live until the morning. Merrifield, who was in the Buller's Arms then came out, and in answer to him said, "She might die before the morning or she might live for a long time." Merrifield was in drink at the time. At his suggestion CHANNON left to go for a medical man.
P.C. Gerry said on the 15th February last he was on duty near Fortescue-road, when he saw Merrifield and CHANNON return home drunk. Merrifield shouted, "You are not JOHN CHANNON, you are Jack the Ripper."
On Monday night about 10.45, when standing near the railway arch in Alphington-street, he saw them going towards Alphington. Both were under the influence of drink and quarrelling. He heard Merrifield say to CHANNON, "You starved your mother to death; you killed her by leaving her so many hours by herself." She then commenced making use of most disgusting language. CHANNON said "If you say another word I'll have you taken up for manslaughter." Merrifield continued using bad language, and said she would go in to Dr Vlieland, and he would show him up a bit.
This was the last witness, and the Coroner, in summing up, said he thought they would say that the matter had been thoroughly ventilated, and also that it was a case for Enquiry and the attention which they had given it. They had the evidence of Dr Vlieland as to the cause of death, which was syncope. There was a strong suspicion in the case that the deceased did not have proper care from those who had charge of her, and which she, as a woman of means, had a right to expect. There was, however, (and he would advise them so), not sufficient evidence to make a criminal charge against those who had the care of the deceased. There was certainly a very strong suspicion, but he felt that it was impossible to carry the case any further. He should advise them to return a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony; that the deceased died from syncope. Whether they would take it upon themselves to express any opinion as to the treatment the deceased received, he would leave it for them to consider.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Coroner then asked CHANNON to stand forward, and addressing him he said the Jury had gone into the Enquiry, and had come to the conclusion that his mother had died in a natural way, not by any violent means, but of syncope. They were, however, of opinion that there was very strong evidence of neglect on his part, and those who had the care of her, but they were advised by him that there was not sufficient evidence to bring him within the pale of the law. the Jury were of opinion that he, who had ample means to provide the deceased with all necessaries, should have supplied her with them, and given her proper care and attention. This he had not done, and they desired through him to express their indignation and abhorrence of the treatment he had paid her. (Applause.)
CHANNON: I should like to know who is at the bottom of this intrigue to make this post mortem examination.
The Coroner: We don't want any further remarks. The Enquiry then closed, having lasted five and a half hours.

Saturday 22 March 1890, Issue 7116 – Gale Document No. Y3200748759
SHOCKING FATALITY AT EXMOUTH JUNCTION – A Romantic Theory. - On Sunday morning, soon after seven o'clock, a signalman named Raymont found the body of a lad named CHARLES HENDY on the railway line near the Exmouth Junction. The body was dreadfully mutilated, there being a deep wound on the back of the head, one of his legs was completely severed from the trunk, and the other leg partially so. Both boots were off, and they were lying one on each side of the line, while his hat and stick were picked up near the spot.
An Inquest was held by Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) at Hellier's Cottage, Pinhoe-road, on Monday afternoon on the body of the deceased, of which Captain Bennett was chosen the Foreman.
HENRY HENDY, Hellier's Cottage, 14, Pinhoe-road, clerk at the Exeter Post Office, identified the body of the deceased as that of his brother, CHARLES HENDY, who lived at home with the family. Deceased was a clerk, aged 15 last birthday. Witness did not see deceased after Friday. He could not account in any way for his brother being found on the railway. Deceased's health had been very good, and witness did not know that he had any trouble. Deceased came home to supper on Saturday evening, and left again at seven o'clock. There had not been any quarrel or disagreement with the family. – The Coroner: I hold in my hand letters from a girl named Blanche Smith. Had deceased kept company with the girl? - Witness: I know her by sight, but my brother had not kept company with her. Deceased had frequently heard from Miss Smith. The Coroner: From what I gather from these letters I think there must have been a disagreement in the family. – Witness: There was no disagreement to my knowledge. – The Coroner: Had you or any member of the family resented his corresponding with the girl? - Witness: I never said a word to him. - The Coroner: As far as you know there was nothing whatever. Had he ever said that he would commit suicide? - Witness: I never had the slightest reasons to suspect that he would commit suicide. - The Coroner: You had never heard him threaten to commit suicide? - Witness: No, never. - The Coroner: Was he a young man of good intellect? - Witness: Yes, very. He was very steady and a teetotaller. - The Coroner: When did you first hear of your brother's death? - Witness: On Sunday morning. A man named Jones told me. – The Coroner: Can you account for your brother's death? - Witness: I cannot. All I can state is that my brother knew two or three young men at the railway shed, and I have known him to go over there. - The Foreman: Do you know that he had been for some time threatening to enlist? - Witness: Yes, he had been threatening to enlist. – The Foreman: Was it not because there was some unpleasantness in the family? - Witness: No. – The Foreman: Has not CHARLEY (meaning deceased) complained of unpleasantness? - Witness: No; he has lived happily at home. – The Coroner: If it is stated in the letters that he was unhappy, it is not true so far as you know? - Witness: That is untrue so far as I know. Deceased often said he would enlist as a soldier or else he would be a sailor. When I found he was not home on Sunday morning I concluded that he had gone to Plymouth and enlisted. I should have gone to Plymouth in half an hour to see whether he had enlisted. Deceased was of a roving disposition.
LOUISA HENDY, sister to deceased, said she was home on Saturday evening when her brother came to supper. He left home just before seven, and did not say where he was going. She had not noticed anything amiss with the deceased. – The Coroner: Had there been any quarrel with deceased and any member of your family? - Witness: No. – The Coroner: Will you swear that? - Witness: I am positively sure. – The Coroner: Not at any time? - Witness: None whatever. The Coroner: Now, do you positively swear that? - Witness: I do, sir. – The Coroner: Do you know a girl called Blanche Smith? - Witness: Yes, sir. – The Coroner: Had there been any objection on your mother's part. – Witness: No. – The Coroner: Had there been any unpleasantness in your family whatever? - Witness: No, sir. I had never heard the deceased speak of suicide.
John Raymont, signalman, residing at Lion's Holt, said he was employed by the London and South Western Railway Company. About ten minutes past seven on Sunday morning he left the Exmouth Junction signal box to put out one of the signal lights. As he was ascending the ladder he noticed something below the signal lying on the rails. On going further up the line he found it was the body of the deceased lying between the rails on his face, about 150 yards from the signal. Deceased was quite dead. One of the legs of deceased was almost severed from the body, and the head was also cut. No train had passed over the line on Sunday morning. The last train was the 10.30 to Exmouth on Saturday night. There were path fields on one side of the line, but not adjoining the line. The path on the railway line leading to the junction or to the station was only used by workmen going to and from the sheds. Inspector Foster (who represented the London and South Western Railway) said there was n right of way on the line at all. The deceased's hat was about twenty yards from the body. In answer to MR G. R. HENDY (deceased's eldest brother) witness said the path on the line was not used by the public, but only by workmen. – MR HENDY: I have often gone that way myself, and unfortunately taken my brother with me. MR HENDY asked if he might put a question to Captain Bennett, but the coroner said he did not think it advisable. Raymont said he could not tell how it was that the hat of the deceased was found twenty yards from the body. He did not think it was a suspicious circumstance that the hat should have been found so far away. He thought the wind carried the hat some distance, and if struck by an engine a person would be knocked forward some distance. – A Juryman: Was there any notice board put up near the place for passers-by? - Raymont: I don't think so. – A Juryman: There should be then. – Raymont said the body was found about 150 yards from Polsloe Bridge. Inspector Foster mentioned that the engine of the Exmouth train had been thorough examined, and there were no signs of blood on it whatever. Jane Harding, of No 6, South Law Terrace, Heavitree, pupil teacher, deposed to seeing the deceased in High-street, Exeter, about eight o'clock on Saturday evening, when she did not notice anything unusual in his manner. P.C. Gammon proved searching the body and finding on it a watch, a pocket-knife, and some other small articles. s There was very little blood on the rails. P.C. Bond stated that he found deceased's boots. The right foot boot was half-way down over the bank and about ten yards from the body, and the left boot twelve yards from the deceased in an opposite direction. Witness also found a pipe and some tobacco in the coat that the deceased was wearing at the time. Dr John McKeith, of Exeter, said he had examined the body, and found the left leg almost severed from the body just below the knee. There was also a large scalp wound on the top of the head exposing the skull, and several contusions on the face. Blood was also issuing from the nose. The injuries were sufficient to cause death, and such as to occur by a train passing over the body. The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought the Jury would have little doubt that the deceased met with his death by injuries received on the railway line. They would have to consider what led the deceased to get on the line. What was his motive? It had been suggested that he might have been going up the road and on to the path leading to the railway sheds. Assuming that he had been going to the sheds it was singular that he should have been found without his boots. That was an extraordinary occurrence. Whether he intended to walk to the shed or whether he wished to commit suicide why should the deceased have taken off his boots. They would have to consider whether deceased met his death accidentally, or committed suicide. The member of deceased's family had stated that he was perfectly happy and there was nothing in his manner which led them to suspect that he intended to commit suicide. In the event of the Jury being of opinion that deceased committed suicide, they would, of course, take into consideration the state of his mind at the time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead," and expressed a wish that a notice board should be put near the path. Inspector Foster: If there is not a notice board there, which I think there is, there shall be one erected.

Saturday 29 March 1890, Issue 7121 – Gale Document No. Y3200748790
SAD DEATH OF A PENSIONER AT HEAVITREE - At the Windsor Inn, Heavitree, on Wednesday Mr Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of JOHN COUSINS, aged 40, a pensioner from the Coast Guards, whose death we reported in >Tuesday night's issue. ELLEN COUSINS, of 98, Sandford-street identified the body as that of her late husband. On Sunday last they were at supper at a friend's house at Heavitree, when the deceased was seized with a fit. He became unconscious, and struggled much. He had not been subject to fits before, but he was of a rather nervous disposition. His health was fairly good, but about twelve months ago he was treated by a medical man for lowness of the system. Deceased had lately complained of indigestion. As soon as he became unconscious, Dr Andrews was sent for, and he remained with him until his death at 11.30 on Sunday night. Mary Lewis, wife of James Lewis, labourer, of 23, Roseland-terrace, Heavitree, said she was called by her sister to go and see the deceased at No. 19, Roseland-terrace, on Sunday night, about 9.30, and on arriving at the house found the deceased in the front room in a fit. Supper was laid in the same room. Witness remained with him until he died. Richard James Andrews, surgeon, of Heavitree, said about 9.30 on Sunday night he was called to see the deceased. He found him in a convulsive fit unconscious. Witness administered an emetic, but it had no effect, and the man died about an hour and a half after. In witness's opinion deceased died from heart disease, accelerated by indigestion. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 29 March 1890, Issue 7121 – Gale Document No. Y3200748810
INQUEST IN EXETER – A Witness Cautioned. - This morning at the Exeter Police Court, an Inquest was held by Mr W. H. Hooper, City Coroner attending the death of EVA GREENGRASS. HENRY GREENGRASS, a sergeant in the R.A., stationed at Topsham Barracks, identified the body of the deceased as that of his daughter, who was born on Monday night at Park Well Cottage, Topsham-road. On Tuesday evening the child died. Witness had had four children, but three were born dead, and the other soon died with convulsions. A Mrs Coles, attended at the birth, and gave a certificate as follows:- "This is to certify that I, Louisa Cole, witness the birth and death of the female child of HENRY GREENGRASS, of the R.A., at Topsham Barracks. Child's life, 24 hours. – Yours truly, Louisa Cole." Witness aid the certificate was taken to the Registry Office, but they declined to register the birth. Mr Bell, surgeon, of St. Sidwell's said he saw the child by the request of the Coroner, and on examining it found it to be a child of about 7 ½ months. The deceased had been properly attended to at the birth, and it died from inanition.
Louisa Cole, a widow, of Wonford, who appeared late in Court, was then brought before the Coroner, who said it was a very improper thing to do, and an illegal act to give the above certificate. What she had done was probably in ignorance. The Coroner told her never to do it again. Mrs Cole was then sworn, and said she attended MRS GREENGRASS at the birth of the child, and remained with her for some time. A young woman was then left in charge. In reply to the Coroner, witness said she was not a certificated mid-wife. The Coroner said that was another reason why she should not give the certificate. In summing up, Mr Hooper said he thought it right to have the woman before them so as to prevent such proceedings again. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 29 March 1890, Issue 7121 – Gale Document No. Y3200748828
SAD DEATH IN EXETER - The Inquest. - Yesterday, at the Exeter Police Court, Mr Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of HARRIETT HAWKINS, of No. 18, James-street, aged 60 years. GEORGE HAWKINS, bill poster, of No. 9, James-street, said the deceased was his sister, and she lived alone in apartments. On Wednesday evening, about half-past ten, he was called to go and see her, and on arriving at the house he found her apparently dying, being unconscious. The deceased died just after eleven the same evening. Dr Perkins had attended her just before witness saw her. In reply to the Coroner witness said he noticed a blow on the deceased's left forehead. Jane Wotton, a married woman, of No. 18, James-street, said on Wednesday evening, about 11.30, the deceased appeared in her usual health, just before going to bed, but had complained of a pain in her chest. Later in the evening witness heard her groaning, and then went to her room, where she remained until her death. Sarah Jane Wreford, a married woman, also of No. 18, James-street, said on Wednesday night after going to bed between nine and ten she heard someone stumble and then fall heavily in the room above, where the deceased lived. They then heard groans, and on witness and her husband going to see what was the matter, they found the deceased's door locked. The door was then opened, and the deceased was found lying on the floor, unconscious in her nightdress. Witness noticed a bruise on the left side of the temple, and a cut on the lip. The deceased held two keys in her hand, one of the bedroom and another of another room. A medical man and deceased's brother were sent for. Dr Perkins, of South-street, said he was called about ten o'clock on Wednesday evening, and on arriving there found the deceased quite insensible. On examining her he found a blow a little above the left temple, and a cut on the upper lip. Witness then dressed the wounds and went home, but he was called again about eleven. The person who came said the woman was dying, but he informed them that he could do no more. Dr Harrison, of Lower Southernhay, said he was also called to see the deceased on Wednesday evening. He went immediately, but the woman had died before he arrived at the house. In witness's opinion deceased died from failure of the heart's action, accelerated by a shock to the system. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 5 April 1890, Issue 7126 – Gale Document No. Y3200748847
INQUEST IN EXETER - This afternoon Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of RICHARD PASSMORE, a single man, aged 75 years, of No. 7, Brunswick-place, gardener. ANN MOORE, a widow, said the deceased was her brother, and she saw him last in October, when his health was fairly good. Elizabeth Callow, of No. 7, Brunswick-place, said the deceased occupied one room in the house, which was his own. Witness attended him, and was with him all night and until Friday morning when he died. On Thursday evening before deceased went to sleep he was livelier than usual. About 5.30 yesterday morning he was taken rather ill with what appeared to be a seizure, but he would not let her fetch a doctor. At six o'clock, seeing the deceased was dying, witness sent for a neighbour, but the man breathed his last before anyone came. The deceased had had medicine from a doctor about five weeks ago. Dr Perkins, of St. Sidwell's, said he had known the deceased for some years, but had not attended him until twelve months ago. Dr Mortimore attended him six weeks ago. Witness had seen him for heart disease. On Thursday evening he was called to go to see the deceased by a neighbour, as they thought he was worse, but PASSMORE would not see anyone. Witness then said he would look in the next morning. In witness's opinion the cause of death was paralysis of the head and apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 5 April 1890, Issue 7126 – Gale Document No. Y3200748855
INQUEST IN EXETER - On Wednesday at 2, Belmont Villas, Belmont-road, Mr Coroner Hooper, held an Inquest on the body of REGINALD SIDNEY EGBERT HOWELLS, aged one year and ten months. JOSEPH CHARLS HOWELLS, Baptist minister, identified the body of the deceased as that of his son, who had lately been troubled with the whooping cough, but not attended by a medical man. On Tuesday morning the child was in the kitchen, and about five minutes after speaking to witness he was suddenly taken ill with what appeared to be a fit. Everything was done for the child while the doctor was being fetched, but he died before the arrival of the medical man. – A Juror: Is the child insured? - Witness: Oh, no; I am too much opposed to the insurance of children. Mr Mortimore, surgeon, of St. Sidwell's, said he was called to see the deceased in the morning by the last witness, and on arriving at the house found the child in a bath of water dead. Witness examined the child, and in his opinion he died of convulsions, brought on by whooping cough. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

THE SHOCKING SUICIDE NEAR EXMOUTH – The Inquest. - On Thursday, at West Down Farm, Littleham, near Exmouth, Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM MAUNDER, a farmer, aged 62 years, whose shocking death was reported in our Wednesday's edition. HENRY FREDERICK MAUNDER identified the body as that of his father, who had been in his usual health, and not depressed. Wednesday they were both in the stables, and while witness was taking the horse to the pond to drink there was a report of a gun. On hearing this he took the animal to the stable, where he saw his father on his hands and knees groaning. Witness endeavoured to lift him up, but as he could not, he went for the men on the farm. Witness did not see his father after. Just before taking the horse to drink, witness had been talking to his father about some future work; sowing a field with corn, &c. In reply to several Jurors, witness said his father had given notice to leave the farm, and intended to take another. The gun was kept in the lower part of the harness-room. His father had not lost many cattle lately, but did a year or two ago. He did not know if anything pressed on the deceased's mind, nor had he heard him say that he would commit suicide. The gun was not kept loaded, and the cartridges were stored in the house, but the deceased might have had one in pocket. John Dommett, a farm labourer, employed on the place, said he was called by the last witness to go to the stable, as the deceased had shot himself. On going there he (witness) saw his master in a stooping position on his knees, and his head was bleeding very much. The only thing witness heard him say was "house." The deceased died about five minutes to eleven. George Rendall, a farm labourer, also employed at the farm, corroborated, and proved picking up the gun, which lay near the deceased, and placing it against the wall. Dr Hodgson said he saw deceased in the stable after the occurrence, just after eight o'clock on Wednesday morning. He was conscious, and said, "Is that you, doctor?" On examination, witness found he had blown away his lower jaw, mouth and the left eye. He was bleeding very much, and his face was terribly mutilated. The nose was only hanging by the skin, and his tongue was partly shot away. The cause of death was shock and loss of blood, brought on by injuries received from the shot f a gun. A piece of string (produced) was found by the side of the deceased. Witness supposed he placed one end under his foot and the other end on the trigger. Witness remained with the deceased for about an hour. The poor fellow did not speak much, once saying, "Am I very bad?" - Dr Cock, also of Exmouth, attended with witness, and he took charge of the gun, one of the barrel s of which was still loaded. Some of the flesh and some of the shot lodge don the shed. The deceased was always a man that was depressed about things. Mrs Long (nee Hume), leading superintendent of the Maud Hospital, proved witnessing the death of the deceased. The Coroner, in summing up, said that under the circumstances in which the deceased was found there was no doubt that he committed the act by which he met his death. That was the discharge of one of the barrels of a double-barrelled gun. Dr Hodgson had said that the deceased was a man whose spirit was not good, and who was often depressed. It as well known to the Jury that the man had suffered severe losses, as a great many farmers did. Several Jurymen stated that the deceased always appeared to be greatly distressed, but he did not complain to his family or to those employed on the farm. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Saturday 19 April 1890, Issue 7137 – Gale Document No. Y3200748910
SUDDEN DEATH IN ST. THOMAS - About ten o'clock on Wednesday morning MR WM. SERCOMBE, who has for many years carried on the business of a basket maker in Cowick-street, dropped down dead whilst in the shop of Mr Stevens, builder, St. Thomas. About a minute prior to his sudden demise he expressed how well he was in health, and said he had never felt better in his life. Deceased was about 79 years of age. An Inquest will be held on the body on Friday morning at the Plymouth Inn.

Saturday 19 April 1890, Issue 7137 – Gale Document No. Y3200748915
THE SHOCKING DEATH OF A DARTMOUTH SEAMAN - The Inquiry into the death of CHARLES BALKHAM, who was burnt to death on board the hulk Jane while being towed from Portsmouth to Dartmouth, as reported in the "Post" of Monday, was held before Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, on Tuesday at Dartmouth Guildhall. Mr T. Veale was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and after the usual preliminaries the body w2as identified by the brother, WM. BALKHAM, who said deceased was a sailor, and 38 years of age. John Trevassa, a lumper, deposed to being one of the hands on board the hulk. He saw deceased go below to sleep. He had with him a lantern, and went into the forecastle of the vessel. He was steering at the time, and the other two men were asleep. George Adams said he woke up suddenly about eleven o'clock and went to call deceased. He found him in the forecastle "all in a glow of fire." He was lying on his right side, and all the clothes from his right trousers pocket to the face, with the body itself, was burnt. He was very much frightened, and the smell being horrible he rushed on deck and called to the tug, but they could not render assistance as the sea was high. They arrived at Dartmouth on Sunday morning and gave the body in charge of the police. Dr Soper gave evidence as to the state the body was in. His opinion was that the man, not having had his proper rest the previous night, slept heavily, and that the pipe found in the trousers set fire to the clothes and he was suffocated with the fumes previously to being burnt. P.S. Stentiford having given evidence as to seeing the body, produced the pipe, pouch and box of matches with the clothes. The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a very melancholy one, and from the evidence it would appear that the deceased had no rest the night previous, and must have slept heavily and been suffocated. The Jury had heard from Captain Perring, master of the tug, that deceased was perfectly sober when he went on board the hulk. The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 19 April 1890, Issue 7137 – Gale Document No. Y3200748919
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held last evening by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper), at 20, Raleigh-road, Exeter, on the body of MR ROBERT PEARCE, accountant, who died on Thursday evening, aged about 60 years. Mr Charles Ashford, of Beaconsfield, 3, Raleigh-road, said he was called by the deceased's wife on the previous evening, who stated that she believed her husband was dying. He went immediately, and found deceased on the floor of the front room. He shortly after breathed his last. The deceased was in conversation with his wife, arranging a visit to Hastings, when he was taken suddenly ill. Dr Henderson stated that he had attended deceased in the months of January and February, he being a sufferer mainly from an affection of the heart of long standing. He last saw him on the 17th February, when he was in his usual condition. He was called on the previous evening, and on arriving at the house found deceased lying on the carpet of the dining-room quite dead. He attributed death to syncope. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 19 April 1890, Issue 7137 – Gale Document No. Y3200748907
SAD DEATH OF A SOLDIER IN EXETER – The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Higher Barracks on Monday, before Mr Coroner Hooper (City Coroner), touching the death of ALFRED TOLLEY, a private of the 1st Devon Regiment, station at the Higher Barracks, Exeter, who died suddenly outside the Barracks on Friday evening. The first witness called was William Fait Kenyon, Sergeant-Major of the Devonshire Regiment, stationed at the Higher Barracks, who said the body the Jury had just viewed was that of ALFRED TOLLEY single man, a private of the regiment. Deceased was twenty-five years of age, and enlisted at Tenbury, Worcester, on the 29th June, 1883. Deceased was a native of Worcester. James Gliddon, a private in the Devonshire Regiment, said he knew TOLLEY quite well. On Friday evening witness was with deceased outside the Barracks, about 6.30, when deceased said he felt a pain in his left side. He remarked that he could not walk very fast, and they both then walked along slowly. the pain, however, increased and deceased fainted away, witness keeping him from falling by catching him in his arms. A female was passing at the time, and witness sent her to the barracks for assistance. Deceased expired shortly afterwards. TOLLEY was perfectly sober when he left the barracks. Thomas Michael O'Brien, surgeon-major of the Army and Medical Staff, in charge of the troops stationed at Exeter, said deceased had never been admitted to the hospital at Exeter. On Friday evening last, the 11th instant, the witness asked him to come and see the deceased. He did so within five minutes, and found him lying on a stretcher in the hospital, life being extinct. There were no marks of violence. Witness had made a post mortem examination, and found the deceased had been suffering from heart disease of long standing, the valves of the heart were thickened and adherent, and the pericardium showed traces of inflammation, the left lung was adhering to the left side of the ribs, and there were evidences of pleurisy also in the left lung. Deceased had a severe attack of acute rheumatism in June, 1884, when stationed at Dublin. TOLLEY was then seventy-four days in the Hospital. Heart disease was a common sequence of acute rheumatism. He was of opinion that deceased died of heart disease and congestion of the lungs. The Coroner thanked the last witness for the very careful way in which he had made the post mortem examination. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from Natural Causes.

Saturday 19 April 1890, Issue 7137 – Gale Document No. Y3200748906
SAD DEATH OF AN OLD MAN IN EXETER - On Tuesday, at the Exeter Police Court, Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest concerning the death of AARON ELSTON, aged 90 years. ELIZABETH TAYLOR, wife of J. TAYLOR, of Passmore's-court, St. Sidwell's, identified the body of the deceased as that of her late father, a weaver, who resided in the same house. There had been no difference in his health lately. He had been failing through his age. The deceased went to bed at seven o'clock on Saturday night, and just before six the next morning witness heard him breathing very heavily and moaning. Witness went in and spoke to him, but received no answer. She then found he was dead, and a medical man was sent for. Mr Brown, surgeon, of St. Sidwell-street, said he was called on Sunday morning between six and seven o'clock, and on arriving at the house he found deceased dead. Witness examined the body, and in his opinion deceased died of senile decay. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 19 April 1890, Issue 7137 – Gale Document No. Y3200748927
THE DROWNING OF A SAILOR AT TEIGNMOUTH - The Inquest. - Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, sat at the Queen's Hotel, Teignmouth, on Monday to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a sailor who was found dead on the shore of the Teign, as reported in Monday night's issue of the "Post." Mr George May was selected Foreman of the Jury.
ANNIE ELLIOTT, residing in French-street, stated that she had been engaged to the deceased about fifteen months, and his name was MICHAEL CAINES. The last time she saw him alive was on Saturday evening about five o'clock, when he left her house saying he was going to take his pay for his services as able seaman on board the brigantine Vivid. The deceased cam home about 6.30 p.m., and gave her £3 out of the money he had received, keeping 10s. for his own use. He did not stay but went out again saying as he went he was going to see some shipmates off by train for Lowestoft. She heard nothing more about him until just before 11 p.m., when a young woman told her that the deceased had been put on board his ship intoxicated. The next morning (Sunday) from what she heard she went to the Mortuary and identified the body. She (witness) was to have been married to him the same morning.
John Northcott and Edward Wheeler, sailors, deposed to putting the deceased on board his vessel about 10 p.m. on Saturday night, after he had been cautioned by the police. The deceased was the worse for liquor and after they got him on board they put him into the forecastle and lashed it down as they thought secure. All was quiet when they left the vessel.
Frederick Medland, a lumper, residing in Mulberry-street, Teignmouth, said on Sunday morning he went for a walk around the "Old Quay," as was his custom, and about 7.30 a.m. his attention was called to the large number of boats that were moored alongside the Quay, it being rather an unusual occurrence for a Sunday morning. Whilst gazing over the side he saw the body of the deceased lying on the mud in about six inches of water, where it had been apparently let by the receding tide. He called assistance from one of the ships close by, and got the body out of the water. It was lying with the face downwards, and was quite stiff and cold. He then sent for a police constable. In his opinion, the deceased jumped overboard for the purpose of swimming ashore, but taking a wrong direction got under a perpendicular wall, and being unable to find a landing-place, got fatigued and was drowned. The vessel was lying about 150 yards from the spot where the body was found. But at low water the deceased could have walked on shore.
P.C. Bloomfield proved to finding the body at the place indicated by the last witness. With assistance he conveyed it to the mortuary. Upon searching the clothes he found 5s. an some tobacco.
The Captain of the vessel stated that he went on board shortly after the deceased was found, and examined the forecastle. Although the "scuttle" was lashed down with a chain and rope, the deceased could easily gain an exit on to the deck as the scuttle was only fastened to a sliding board, so that anyone coming up from the forecastle could lift the whole affair up with their head, which he found had been done.
George Herbert Johnson, a surgeon, practising at Teignmouth, deposed that he went to the mortuary on Saturday morning and examined the body, which had all the appearances of drowning.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 26 April 1890, Issue 7143 – Gale Document No. Y3200748956
FATAL ACCIDENT AT TORQUAY - A sad fatality happened whilst playing on the Strand yesterday, to a lad named JOHN HURND, aged nine years, son of J. HURND, labourer, of Sandhill, Torquay. At the time of the occurrence the Queen's Hotel omnibus was proceeding along the Strand after meeting the 5.9 p.m. express down train. Near the hotel the lad was playing with a dog, and not noticing the vehicle behind him, he ran under the front wheels. The driver not being able to pull up, the hind wheel passed over his back. Taking no notice of his injury the little fellow got up and was walking away, when he dropped to the ground, and a man named S. Melluish, a fish hawker, of Torquay, who was close at hand, went to his assistance and conveyed the little sufferer to the Infirmary. Here his injuries were found to be of a very serious nature, and the house surgeon gave it as his opinion that the lad will not recover. No fault however attaches to the driver, as he did his best to pull up. The poor little fellow passed away at half-past seven. The Coroner has been communicated with, and an Inquest will be held on Monday evening.

Saturday 26 April 1890, Issue 7143 – Gale Document No. Y3200748948
THE SUICIDE AT BUDLEIGH SALTERTON - On Tuesday at the Rolle Arms Hotel, Budleigh Salterton, Mr Cox, of Honiton (Deputy Coroner), held an Inquest on the body of MR WM. WILLIAMS, for some time a prominent member of the Local Board, who was found dead on Sunday morning last at 33, West-road. Deputy Chief Constable Jesse watched the case on behalf of the police, and Mr C. T. K. Roberts (Exeter) appeared for the deceased's relatives. John Trump, boot and shoe maker and postman of Budleigh Salterton, said the deceased had been troubling about his two sons, and had told him that he would commit suicide some time since. Witness told Mr Strickland of the expression. On Sunday morning, about nine minutes to twelve, ARTHUR WILLIAMS (the deceased's son) came and said, "Good morning John. Have you seen father?" and witness replied, "No, I have not, not since Wednesday." ARTHUR then said, "Father has been gone an hour and a half." As ARTHUR was leaving, witness said, "For heaven's sake, ARTHUR, go and search everywhere; there is something wrong." About three minutes afterwards witness heard sharp cries of grief. At the same moment ARTHUR got on the party wall, and said his father was dead, pointing to the door of the shed on the west side of No. 33 West-road. When he arrived at the shed the door was closed, and the deceased's sons were standing outside. John Rogers, a groom, said he assisted in taking down the body. When witness first saw the body ARTHUR told him to let the body remain until the arrival of the police and doctor. By the Deputy Chief Constable: He noticed that the deceased had a cap on his head. The cap fell off while the body was being taken down. After the body was placed on the ground witness noticed bruises on the head. By the Deputy Coroner: The bruises could not have possibly been caused while the body was being laid on the floor, as it was taken down as carefully as if it had been a baby. He saw a slipper lying on the floor some distance from the body. P.C. Pike, stationed at Budleigh Salterton, proved being called by HENRY WILLIAMS, who said that his father had hung himself. With the assistance of Rogers witness cut down the body. Mr G. Bennett, a member of the Jury, said that he saw the deceased on Saturday evening, but did not notice anything particular in his demeanour. Dr Evans, of Budleigh Salterton, said he had made a post mortem examination on the body, in company with two other medical men. The body externally presented the appearance of death from hanging, but deceased also had some marks on the head. On the right side of the top of the head there were eight or nine marks, which appeared to be "scrapes." They were not very recent marks, and must have been there several hours, probably twenty four hours. In witness's opinion the marks had been caused at least six hours. There was a bruise on the upper part of the forehead, which, possibly, was caused at the time of death. It might possibly have been of as much as two or three days' standing. On the left side of the head, above and behind the left ear, there was a lacerated wound an inch long, which must have been caused shortly before or at the time of death. The bruise on the forehead would have been more likely to have done so than any of the other wounds. Death was caused by strangulation. Several witnesses were called, including the two sons, who proved finding the body of their father. They had not had an angry word with deceased. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of suicide whilst Temporarily Insane, which was greeted by slight applause. The Inquest lasted several hours.

Saturday 3 May 1890, Issue 7149 – Gale Document No. Y3200748998
DEATH FROM LOCK-JAW AT BRAUNTON - Last evening an Inquest was held by Mr G. F. Bromham, County Coroner for the Barnstaple Division, on the body of CHARLES HARTNOLL HOW, a farmer, aged sixty-two, who sustained a fall on the 17th of last month and cut the back of his head. The deceased had been working on his land until Monday last, when he complained of feeling ill, and on Tuesday Dr Lane was called in and found that lock-jaw had set in. The deceased afterwards had convulsions, and died on Wednesday evening. MRS JANE PYKE, sister of the deceased, identified the body, and said her brother lived in South-street. Witness knew the deceased had sustained a fall, but he had been to work since. On Monday she was sent for, and upon going to his house she found him ill. She recommended that Dr Lane should be sent for, but the deceased objected. During the night he had convulsions, and witness on Tuesday sent for Dr Lane, who on his arrival pronounced recovery hopeless, as lock-jaw had set in. John Murch, a lad, working for the deceased as farm servant, deposed that he and his master lived in the house by themselves. On Thursday fortnight the deceased came home about ten o'clock. He sat on a chair by the fire, and almost immediately fell off it, and knocked his head against the "hob." Witness helped him up, and afterwards assisted him upstairs. The deceased did not complain of suffering. He stayed at home all the next day, but the following day he went about his farm work as usual. Last Sunday night he complained of a stiffness in his neck. Dr S. O. Lane stated that he was called in on Tuesday morning to see HOW, whom he found downstairs. Witness examined the cut on the head, and the wound in itself, as far as appearance went, was trifling Deceased could not open his teeth, and he was suffering from lock-jaw. Witness did not think that if he had been called in immediately after the accident that lock-jaw would have been prevented. The actual cause of death was tetanus setting in on the wound, the result of the accident. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 3 May 1890, Issue 7149 – Gale Document No. Y3200748993
SUDDEN DEATH AT EXMOUTH - Mr Cox, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on the body of SUSAN BIRKMYER, aged 53, wife of MR J. B. BIRKMYER, artist, of Exeter, who died on Friday last, and whose death was reported in Monday night's issue. Samuel Perriam, painter, Exmouth, deposed that on Friday afternoon he was painting the exterior of Mr Smith's house, in Ferry-road. He went to the bay window of an upstair sitting-room, and there saw deceased in a chair in that apartment as if asleep. He rattled the window, and she opened her eyes, but closed them again. At 3.30 he saw the deceased in the same position, and afterwards left the window. Frank Casley, a painter, said about 6.30 he saw the deceased in a sitting posture on the floor, between two chairs, just inside the window. After knocking at the window and receiving no answer he communicated with Mr Smith. The latter, a coal merchant, of Ferry-road, Exmouth, stated that the deceased had been lodging in his house for three months, and so far as he knew had not been ill. He last saw her alive about 6.30 a.m. on Friday, she being n the habit of rising early, when she appeared to be in her usual health. At 6.30 p.m., on being called by the witness Casley, he went to the deceased's apartment with his mother and found her dead. Dr Kane, who was passing, was called in. Edith Smith, niece of the last witness, said MRS BIRKMYER seemed to be in her usual state of health from two o'clock to a quarter-past on the date mentioned. Dr Kane said he had not attended the deceased, and was therefore unable to give a certificate of the cause of death. Having made a post mortem examination of the body, he was of opinion that death was due to syncope, arising from fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 10 May 1890, Issue 7155 – Gale Document No. Y3200749033
SAD DEATH AT EXMOUTH - The Inquest. - An Inquest was held by Mr C. Cox, Deputy District Coroner, at Winter's Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Thursday on the body of ANNA MARIA FRANCIS, aged 36 years, of Pound-street. The Jury, of which Mr Henry Woodward was chosen Foreman, having viewed the body, James Wood, a Naval Reserve man, of Bridgwater, said he saw the deceased at her door on Monday night, having come out to see if it was her child that had fallen down. On discovering that it was not she went in the house. Shortly after witness heard that she was dead. The deceased appeared in her usual health. EDWARD JOHN FRANCIS, mason, identified the body of the deceased as that of his wife, who was subject to fits, and who had been attended by a medical man at the Dispensary up to last Monday week. Witness last saw her alive on Monday morning, just before going to work at six o'clock, when she appeared in her usual health. About a week ago deceased complained of being ill, but she had not had any fits lately. she had had about four fits to witness's knowledge, but she would not tell him if she had any whilst he was away. She was unconscious during the fits. On coming home from work on Monday evening he found his wife kneeling on the floor in the kitchen with her arms and face lying on the bedclothes of the cradle. He could not say if his wife was dead or not at the time. Witness sent for his sister-in-law, and a short time afterwards went for a doctor, who arrived within a quarter of an hour. After the doctor had seen the body, witness asked his opinion of the matter. He replied "it is a bad job, or words to that effect." In reply to Jurors, witness said he did not fetch the doctor at once as he thought the deceased was in a fit as usual. She did not seem to have had any struggle. SARAH ANN ANDERSON, a widow, of Pound-street, and sister to the deceased, said she was in the house about six o'clock on Monday evening, when deceased appeared to be livelier than witness had seen her for some time. This was the last time witness saw her alive. Later in the evening she was called to go and see the deceased, as she was bad. She went immediately, and there saw her sister in the position described by the last witness. She helped to lift her on the chair, and tried to revive her. Dr Hudson, of Exmouth, said he had attended the deceased previously at the Dispensary and she was subject to epileptic fits. They were of frequent occurrence when the deceased was not medically treated. He was called in to see her on Monday evening between eight and half-past, and on arriving at the house found her in a chair, supported by her husband and MRS ANDERSON. The woman was dead, but did not appear to have been dead long, as the body was warm. Witness had since made a post mortem examination of the body and in his opinion death was caused by suffocation by her face falling upon the bedclothes whilst in a fit. Little sign of suffocation could be seen after death, as people could be suffocated without leaving any sign. He found on examination congestion of the lungs. The right side of the heart was full of black blood, which showed that the breathing stopped before the heart did. Witness could find nothing in the windpipe to show the deceased had been choked, as it sometimes occurred in a fit. In reply to the Coroner, witness said it was important to fetch the doctor immediately in the case of suffocation, but not as regard epileptic fits, as friends cold do as much as a medical man. In reply to a Juror, witness said there was cake in the stomach, but it did not need analysing as he had found sufficient to know the cause of death. The Coroner thought it would have been wise if the husband had gone for a doctor sooner. The Jury thought no blame could be attached to the husband. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, that deceased was accidentally suffocated. The Coroner was asked by the Jury if he would communicate with the Registrar-General respecting the registration of deaths. The Coroner said he would see into the matter.

Saturday 10 May 1890, Issue 7155 – Gale Document No. Y3200749050
ANINFURIATED BULLOCK IN NEWTOWN – A Plucky Act. - The dangerous practice of driving horned cattle through the streets in the day-time has been frequently commented upon in these columns. On Wednesday afternoon a very serious accident happened which should go far to induce an alteration in the regulations in the above respect. It seems a couple of bullocks were being driven through the Barnfield, having come from Newport Farm, Topsham, where they were on Wednesday purchased by Mr Conibear, butcher, of Summerland-street, when one of them became infuriated, and got beyond the drovers' control. Near the residence of Mr Wood, the Cathedral organist, the beast went for a horse, and lacerated its side so severely that there is little prospect of saving its life. From the Barnfield it pro9ceeded on its mad career to Newtown. It rushed through Clifton-street, and the butchers in charge of it did their best to quiet it. One of them, known by the name of "Sam," was tossed twice, but his injuries were not serious. At the corner of Albert-street stood a baker's cart belonging to Mr Satterley. This was capsized. Going on towards Belmont the animal, at the bottom of Portland-street, knocked down MR J. GOULDING, an elderly man, dairyman, of St. James. MR GOULDING was picked up in an insensible condition, and taken to the Hospital, where he died yesterday morning. Eventually P.C. Veysey and a man named Rowlands succeeded in securing the bullock by putting a rope round its head and tying it to a post. The other bullock was driven to Mr Conibear's. Among those who deserve praise for their plucky action when the bullock made his charge is William Wood of Adelaide-Court, St. Sidwell's, who actually stood over the prostrate body of MR GOULDING and beat back the infuriated beast.
THE INQUEST - The Inquest was held at the Hospital yesterday afternoon, before Mr Coroner Hooper. Mr Le Mesurier (chief constable) attended, and Mr Lee was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
The first witness called was EDWARD JOHN FYSON GOULDING, who deposed:- I am a clerk on the Great Western Railway, and am employed at St. David's Station. The body the Jury have just viewed is that of my late father, who was called JOHN GOULDING, a dairyman by trade. My father resided at 1, Culverland-road, and he would have been sixty-three on the 1st of June. He was a widower. The last time I saw my father alive was on Saturday last, when he was in his usual state of health. My father lived alone, but my sister used to visit him daily. I live in St. Thomas, and used to visit my father two or three times a week. My father was very temperate, and did not have fits; in fact I don't think he ever had a doctor in his life. I was fetched on Wednesday evening to come to the Hospital, and I immediately came. The next morning I saw my father, who was unconscious. I was with my father up to the time of his death, this morning. My father never recovered consciousness from the time he was knocked down by the bullock.
George Brannam, after being cautioned by the Coroner that the evidence he gave mi8ght be used against him, said: I am a cattle drover in the employ of Mr Frederick William Conibear, butcher, Summerland-street. On Wednesday last I was sent to Whimple after two bullocks by Mr Conibear. I was going to Mr Sanders, Gateshayes Farm, after the bullocks, and was to take them to a slaughter-house in Smythen-street. I brought them along quietly until they came to the Barnfield.
The Coroner: What made you bring them along the Barnfield?
Witness: Because it is the quietest way, and I wanted to avoid meeting the public. I did not want to get into any trouble, and that's the reason I came the Barnfield way. I have got into trouble with bullocks before. In the Barnfield one of the heifers became frightened on account of a coal van, drawn by one horse, passing by. The animal charged the horse and the van, and I then got the bullock back to the crossing and kept it there until I could get further assistance. With assistance I endeavoured to drive the animals back to Cosway's slaughter-house in Polsloe-road instead of going on to Smythen-street. I was rather afraid that going through Magdalen-street the animals would do some damage.
The Coroner: What right had you got to take it to Polsloe-road?
Witness: I have permission to take bullocks there when they are restive. – Witness: continuing, said: Seven or eight persons with myself drove the bullocks across Newtown, and the one that charged the horse became worse than before. The animal was between two and three years old. When we got to Mr Lamacraft's, at the Globe Inn, MR GOULDING came by and said, "George, hit them across the fore legs." I could not get near the bullock to strike it, and then MR GOULDING tried to hit the animal across the fore legs with a stick he was carrying in his hand. The bullock at once rushed at MR GOULDING, knocked him over, and butted him. Mr Beavis came up and caught the bullock by the tail and head-roped it, and I ran after the other. I was away looking after the second beast for about a quarter of an hour. I was perfectly sober at the time, having drank only one half-pint of cider. I took the bullock I ran after to the Smythen-street slaughter-house, and then went back to Newtown and found the other bullock tied to a post, it being afterwards removed in a bullock-cart and taken to Smythen-street slaughter-house. I did not know anything about the bullocks until I fetched them. Mr Sanders came half the way to Exeter with me.
The Coroner: Why did he come with you?
Witness: On account of the cross roads. Before leaving me Mr Sanders said the bullocks were quiet.
Mr Facey (to witness): You ought to know the regulations regarding the driving of cattle through the street. Was there anyone with you when you passed Livery Dole?
Witness: No one was with me. I won't answer your questions.
Mr Facey: You say the bullocks were quiet until you came to the Barnfield. Had you anyone with you then? - Yes, a man named Dymond.
Mr Facey: Do you consider it proper to turn bullocks through Newtown when you know there are schools there?
The Coroner: I cannot allow you to make these observations; nor can I allow you to make a speech.
A Juror: The witness has answered quite enough. Mr Coroner?
The Coroner: I think I have all the questions and answers.
The Foreman: Don't you think for the safety of the public these bullocks should have been head-roped?
Witness: If I had had the two bullocks head-roped what should I have done with them. What if I had three or four bullocks head-roped, where should I have been? Will you explain it to me?
The Coroner: I must have this Enquiry conducted properly, and cannot allow such questions.
Mr Facey: Will you look at your depositions?
The Coroner: I know what I have on my depositions. (*Addressing witness): Why were the bullocks not head-roped? Is it required that they should be?
The Coroner: Yes, it is.
Witness: I should like to see the law for that.
The Coroner: The question about whether the bullocks should be head-roped is not for us to decide.
Mr Facey began to make some remarks as to whether two, three, or four animals constituted a "drove," when the Coroner told him he must be quiet whilst he was explaining to the witness.
The Coroner: There is a penalty not exceeding £5 for not head-roping cattle when driven through the city.
The Chief Constable: That is so.
Mr Facey: A drove is three.
The Coroner: Will you be quiet? - Mr Hooper, addressing the witness, said he was asking him questions which, in the interests of justice, he was bound to put.
Witness: And I have answered.
Mr Trapnell: The man has given his evidence very straightforwardly and satisfactorily.
Witness was then asked how it was he asked Mr Sanders if the bullocks were quiet, when he replied that once before he had driven a bullock from Gateshayes and it had turned "rusty" on the way in to Exeter.
The Coroner then called for the next witness, and wanted to know why Mr Conibear was not in attendance.
Mr Beavis said Mr Bonibear was too ill to attend the Inquest.
William Babbage, brewer, Bath-road, said: I work for Mr Lamacraft, of the Globe Hotel, Newtown. MR GOULDING had been there for grains on Wednesday and a man was with him. When the grains had been loaded, MR GOULDING lead the horse and cart out into the roadway so that it might proceed up Belmont. The bullock was then coming up Newtown, and MR GOULDING ordered the man with the horse and cart to go along. MR GOULDING remained by my side. The bullock charged a phaeton standing outside the hotel, and I turned it away from the phaeton by means of a stable pick. I had in my hand. The animal then rushed at MR GOULDING and knocked him down. I do not think the bullock touched MR GOULDING'S body with its horns, but butted him with its head. MR GOULDING fell over on his back, and I rushed at the bullock with my stable pick, and succeeded in keeping it away from him. The animal then rushed at me, but I kept it off by means of the pick I had. Mr Beavis then came up and head-roped the bullock. MR GOULDING was taken to the Hospital
By the Jury: MR GOULDING had a ground-ash stick in his hand, and tried to beat the bullock off.
P.C. Frank Lewis, of the Exeter Police Force, said: On Wednesday afternoon, soon after four, I was on duty in Paris-street. On seeing a great number of people running across the playground at the bottom of Paris-street, I proceeded into Clifton-road, and when near the Globe Inn I saw MR GOULDING standing in the road just above the double doors of the back entrance. There was a bullock facing MR GOULDING and at the same moment the beast rushed at him and knocked him over on his back. MR GOULDING'S head coming in contact with the stones. I hurried up, and the bullock attempted to go for MR GOULDING again, when it was knocked off by the last witness. I assisted with the other men to pick MR GOULDING up, and I noticed that there was a large wound at the back of his head, and a pool of blood on the ground. I carried him into a passage out of the way of the bullock, and immediately sent for a cab. Before the cab arrived I bathed MR GOULDING'S head with some water. He was then insensible, and I conveyed him at once to the Hospital.
Mr Facey: Can you tell the Jury as a member of the police force whether there are regulations or bye-laws as regards the driving of cattle through the streets?
P.C. Lewis: Perhaps the Chief Constable will answer that question.
The Coroner: I have said before that the question does not affect the present Enquiry at all. It is a subject for another court to enquire into and determine upon.
Mr Russell Coombe, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said: I received JOHN GOULDING into the Hospital on Wednesday last, in the afternoon, when I found he had a wound at the back of his head, but was otherwise uninjured externally. He was very violent, and vomited several times. He was put to bed and attended to, but gradually became comatose, and died in the Hospital yesterday morning early. I have made a post mortem examination, and I find he had haemorrhage into the substance of the brain, and that, I believe, was the cause of death.
By the Jury: The immediate cause of death was bleeding into the brain.
The Coroner, in summing up, aid the question for the Jury to consider was whether the deceased met his death through culpable negligence on the part of the drover, or in a manner that did not reflect any want of care by Brannam. If they found that the deceased met his death by culpable negligence, then it would be a verdict of manslaughter but if they found there was no culpable negligence, then it would be a verdict of accidental death. They had heard the facts from the man Brannam, and he (the Coroner) thought the drover had given his evidence in a very straightforward manner, and he did not approve of the way in which he had been attacked by one of the Jurymen. He put questions to Brannam, and he had answered very fairly.
A Juror: Yes, he did.
Mr Facey: I did not attack him. I -----
The Coroner: I beg you pardon. I have all the facts before me, and you must not interrupt. Proceeding, Mr Hooper said the death of MR GOULDING was very unfortunate. He sympathised with the family, very much. He did not know but he should think MR GOULDING was in the Globe Hotel on the afternoon of Wednesday, and went out and did his utmost to stop the bullock in its career. They had heard described how the animal butted the deceased, and he thought it was necessary that a post mortem examination should be held. It did not appear to him that there was any negligence in the case that amounted to criminal negligence. The head-roping of the bullocks was a question for a court of magistrates to decide. The bye-law stated that no bullocks should be driven through the city between the hours of 8 a.m. and 7 p.m., unless they were head-roped, "or under proper control." He would ask the Jury to consider their verdict.
The Juryman: Is there no rule laid down whether there shall be more than one man?
The Coroner: That is entirely a matter for another court.
Mr Facey wanted to ask a question, but the Coroner said he would not hear any more remarks.
Mr Facey: Will you allow me to address the Jury?
The Coroner: Certainly not; it is a great waste of time.
Mr Facey: I want to simply ask a question?
The Coroner: You have asked questions enough.
A Juryman: This is a waste of time, Mr Coroner.
Mr Facey: I should like the Jury to make a suggestion to the Coroner.
The Coroner: You must consider your verdict.
The Jury then returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and said they wished to commend Brannam for the trouble he had taken.
Brannam: I thank you, gentlemen.
Mr Facey, again addressing the Coroner, said: I want to ask a question.
The Coroner: I cannot allow you.
Mr Facey: I want you to make a presentment to the Town Council.
A Juryman: I should think the Foreman of the Jury is the person to make a presentment and no one else.
Another Juryman: What is he (meaning Facey) making such a "spuddle" for?
The Coroner: I don't know.
Mr Bevis: A man in the trade ought to know better.
A Juryman: And getting his living from the butchering. He ought to know better.
Another Juryman: It won't do him any good as he grows older.
Mr Facey: If the Jury cannot make ------
The Coroner: I won't allow you to go on speaking, sir. I am presiding over this Enquiry.
Mr Facey: But you are allowing the Jury to attack me.
The scene then closed, and the Jury dispersed.

Saturday 10 May 1890, Issue 7155 – Gale Document No. Y3200749032
SUPPOSED INFANTICIDE NEAR OTTERY – A Verdict of "Wilful Murder." - We briefly reported in our Wednesday evening's issue that the infant daughter of MR and MRS MITCHELL had been found drowned in a pan of water in a cottage at Lancercombe, Ottery St. Mary, and that suspicion rested upon the mother, ELIZABETH MITCHELL, who is the daughter of respectable parents living at Colyton. On Wednesday afternoon an Inquest was held on the body at Mr Samuel Retter's house, at Lancercombe, before Mr C. E. Cox, (Deputy Coroner). – P.S. Pope, of Ottery St. Mary, watched the case on behalf of the police. Before proceeding to take the evidence, the Coroner said the case was a very painful and serious one, and he thought the mother should be afforded an opportunity of hearing the statements of the witnesses if Dr Reynolds considered her to be in a fit state to undergo the excitement.
Dr Reynolds saw the unfortunate woman, and said he found no objection to her being present. MRS MITCHELL was thereupon accommodated with a chair in the room. She appeared to be very considerably depressed, and at times viewed the Coroner and Jury vacantly. During the course of the Inquiry three or four incoherent remarks fell from her lips, but the remainder of her observations were more or less intelligible. Mr Samuel Retter, of Lancercombe Villa, Tipton St. John, said on Monday last about 5 p.m., witness's son, CHARLES, on coming home from Tipton, said his sister had told him that MRS MITCHELL had gone towards Sidmouth without her child. Witness went to the cottage, the front door of which was partially open, and finding the cradle empty he proceeded to the back kitchen, and there saw the deceased with her clothes on in a zinc pan. The vessel was nine or ten inches in depth, and the face of the child, who was lying on her left side, was completely covered by water. Witness at once took the deceased from the pan and laid her upon the floor. The child appeared to have been dead for some hours. John Ebdon, road contractor, of Harford, gave evidence to the effect that about a quarter to twelve on Monday he saw MRS MSITCHELL at Crosshill. She was carrying what appeared to be an infant in a shawl. She approached witness and inquired, "Have you seen a policeman here?" He told her that Sergeant Pope had just turned the corner in the direction of Sidmouth, and she said she did not want him particularly. MRS MITCHELL murmured other words which witness took to imply that she required the police, and added, "I must go on; my dear baby is cold." Witness asked, "What's up over to Lancercombe?" and MRS MITCHELL replied, "Not much." Witness observed to Thomas Palfrey, who was present at the above conversation, "I don't consider that woman is exactly right; she seems in great trouble." - Dr F. M. Remnals, of Ottery St. Mary, ,proved being called into the MITCHELLS' cottage about 5.35 on Monday. The deceased was quite dead, and her clothes saturated with water. The body bore no external marks of violence. Having made a post mortem examination, he had not the slightest doubt that death was caused by drowning. He had that day seen MRS MITCHELL, who, in the presence of P.S. Pope, and in reply to a question, stated: "I first took it down to the river and when it cried I put my finger on its mouth. I took it out, and then I put it in the pan." Asked if she placed the child in the river, she said "Yes." Witness saw MRS MITCHELL two months ago, and she then appeared to him to be wanting in intelligence to some extent. The Coroner summed up, and after a short consultation twelve Jurors expressed themselves in favour of a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against ELIZABETH MITCHELL. Mr O. Perry, however, disapproved of the decision, urging that she was not in a sound state of mind. The Coroner told Mr Perry that the question of sanity did not affect that Jury, and said he should accept a verdict of "Wilful Murder" from the twelve Jurymen.
The unfortunate woman was arrested after the Inquest by P.S. Pope, and taken to the Ottery Police Station.

Saturday 17 May 1890, Issue 7161 – Gale Document No. Y3200749062
DEATH OF THE REV. J. W. HEDGELAND - The announcement of the sudden death of the REV. J. W. HEDGELAND on Sunday afternoon created a painful sensation throughout the city that day and especially in the united parishes of St. Stephen and St Martin, of which he was the rector. At first the report was not accepted by many, as the rev. gentleman preached at St. Stephen's in the morning, and then appeared in his usual health, but on enquiry they found that the rumour was unhappily only too well founded. After the morning service the rev. gentleman returned to his residence, the Highlands, in the Barnfield. Whilst at luncheon with MRS HEDGELAND he complained of feeling unwell. He retired to his room, and shortly afterwards expired. The deceased gentleman was the son of an Exeter architect, who resided at Mount Radford. He was educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he took his B.A. in 1852, and his M.A. in 1855. In the first named year he was ordained deacon by the then Bishop of Exeter, and in 1853 took priest's orders. The rev. gentleman's first, indeed his only, curacy was that of Kenwyn, in Cornwall, which he held from 1852 until 1865, when he was appointed Rector of St. Martin's by the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. The following year he was given the Rectory of St. Stephen's, and was allowed to hold both livings, the gross value of the two at the time of his appointment being but £100 a year, and the population of both parishes only 540. From 1866 to 1877 MR HEDGLAND was Rural Dean of Christianity. Some time after MR HEDGELAND'S appointment the value of the two livings was augmented, and the gross value is now put down in the Diocesan Calendar at £277 per annum. For some years the deceased gentleman endeavoured to obtain the requisite authority for the amalgamation of the two parishes, and about twelve months since the legal formalities to this end were completed. The presentation of the living rests alternately with the Bishop and the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. MR HEDGELAND was a Churchman of broad views, and took an interest in the work of most of the religious societies in Exeter. Personally he was a man of gentle and most courteous demeanour. He was a firm adherent to the Church views of the old school, but was always anxious to live on pleasant terms with those with whom he associated. By his parishioners and by others who formed the congregation worshipping at St. Stephen's MR HEDGELAND was greatly beloved, and all who had the privilege of his acquaintance will join in our regret that death has so suddenly removed him from our midst. The deceased gentleman was 65 years of age, and MR HEDGELAND and the late Prebendary Reginald Barnes married two sisters – the daughters of MRS NATION. Much sympathy will be felt for the members of the family. MR HEDGELAND leaves a widow and three sons. At St. Stephen's Church in the evening the Rev. P. J. Mitchell (curate of St. Matthew's, Exeter) was the preacher. The lessons were read by Mr W. W. Tremlett, and hymn 360 "Who are these like stars appearing," and 286, "Jesus, the very thought is sweet," were sung during the service, the latter before the sermon. The preacher, on entering the pulpit, said: Before I read my text I believe some words are necessary as to the occasion of my appearance here. That afternoon, as many of you no doubt know already, the rector of this parish passed suddenly away to his rest. I think that it is the duty of everyone who has been connected with this parish to remember those who are left behind in their prayers, and to give them all the sympathy that is due on such an occasion. At the conclusion of the service hymn 28, "Lord, in the day Thou art about," w3as sung, and before the congregation dispersed, the organist (Miss Norton) played the "Dead March" in Saul.
THE INQUEST - On Monday afternoon the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquiry into the cause of death at the deceased's residence, Highlands, the Barnfield. Mr G. Wippell was chosen Foreman of the Jury HAROLD CHARLES HEDGELAND, son of the deceased, identified the body, and said his father was about 65 years of age. On Sunday he attended service at St. Stephen's Church, being accompanied by him. He appeared then in his usual state of health, although recently he had often complained while walking of having pains in the region of the heart, and had been compelled to stop. They returned from church about twenty minutes to one The deceased partook of lunch with the family, and shortly before three left alone to attend a mission service at the Exe Island. He had not been gone long before witness went to the door, and then saw him brought back to the house in a cab. He asked him why he had returned, and he replied he was very weak and unable to walk. With the assistance of his brother he was taken into the house and placed in a chair. He then became very ill indeed, and continually gasped for breath. A doctor named Baron Langsdorff was staying with them, but his attendance proved of no avail. Within about seven minutes after his return he expired. Dr Blomfield was afterwards sent for. Baron Langsdorff, by profession a magnetiser, said he had been staying with the deceased. Of late he had complained of having pains in the chest, but at dinner on Sunday he was very cheerful, and did not complain of being unwell. When he was called on deceased's return that day he found him in a semi-conscious state. He exclaimed "I am gone," and a few minutes after died. Dr Blomfield said he was sent for on Sunday afternoon about quarter past four to see deceased. He went at once, and on his arrival found MR HEDGELAND seated in a chair in the hall quite dead. On Monday he made a post mortem examination, by order of the Coroner. There were no marks of violence about the body. There was, however, fatty degeneration of the heart, and the latter was also diseased. The other organs were quite healthy. In his opinion the cause of death was angina pectoris, which frequently produced sudden death. The Coroner said he thought it desirable to order a post mortem examination as the death was sudden, and it was more satisfactory to all concerned that they should have the fullest evidence of the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

THE SAD FATALITY TO A CHILD AT TORQUAY - The Inquest. - On Monday at the Torbay Hospital the County Coroner (Mr Sidney Hacker) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of EDMUND THOMAS BAKER, aged nine years, son of EDMUND BAKER, of 12, Vale-cottages, Upton, Torquay, who while playing with some other children near some unfinished buildings on Saturday last, was struck by a falling tressle, and sustained such fearful injuries that he died within six hours. EDMUND BAKER, father of the deceased, gave evidence of identification, and said he thought it was very careless on the part of builders to leave their tressles about in the position that this one was, as children would climb about and accidents were bound to occur. George Bond, labourer, stated that on Saturday last he was passing the unfinished buildings at Upton when he saw the deceased climbing on to the cross-piece of a tressle which was standing on a piece of sloping ground. The child's weight caused the tressle to overbalance, and the top struck him on the forehead as he fell. Witness went to the lad and lifted the tressle away. The lad was bleeding from the mouth and nose, and appeared to be insensible. Thinking the case a serious one, he called for assistance, and the boy was conveyed to the Hospital. Mr Frank Evans Cave, House Surgeon at the Hospital, said the boy was brought to the institution at 4.30. His condition was most serious, the base of the skull being fractured. The boy never recovered, expiring at ten o'clock the same evening. A subsequent examination showed that the skull was almost divided, and the injury must have been inflicted by a very heavy body. The Coroner, in summing up, said there was no law to compel a builder to fence in the land on which he was erecting houses, but it was the duty of parents to keep their children from places where they would meet with danger. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 17 May 1890, Issue 7161 – Gale Document No. Y3200749060
FATAL ACCIDENT TO AN EXETER WOMAN - The Inquest. - Mr Hooper (City Coroner), held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday on the body of ELIZABETH WOODWARD, aged about 76 years of Exe-lane, Exeter, who died in the institution on Sunday last. The Jury, of which Mr Frank Cox was Foreman, having viewed the body, MARY HUGO, wife of James Hugo, labourer, of Waterbeer-street, identified the deceased, who was her father's aunt. She was a single woman, and used to earn a little by the needle, but had lately been receiving pay from the parish. The deceased lived in a single room, and on the 14th April, between five and six o'clock, she sent for witness to come and see her, as she had fallen down. Witness went and found the deceased in her room with Mrs Reed, who lived in the same house. Deceased said she had tripped her foot in the stones at the bottom of the stairs, and fell. She complained of injury to her hip. Witness went for Mr Harris, surgeon, but he said he could not come immediately, and ordered the woman's removal to the Hospital. The deceased was then taken to the institution in a cab, where Mr Harris soon arrived, and attended to her injuries. No person saw the deceased fall. The stones where she tripped were placed in an awkward way. Mr Reginald Martin, assistant house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased in the institution on the 14th April, in the afternoon, suffering from a fracture of the right thigh. She was put to bed and attended to, but she did not get on very well. The woman had bed sores, and gradually sank from exhaustion, dying on May 11th from the fracture. The Coroner, in summing up, said the officials at the Hospital seemed to have done all they could for the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

Saturday 17 May 1890, Issue 7161 – Gale Document No. Y3200749071
SHOCKING DEATH OF THE MAYOR OF BARNSTAPLE'S DAUGHTER - An Inquest was held last evening at the residence of the Mayor of Barnstaple touching the death of his Worship's daughter, ALICE LOUISE LAKE, aged three years, who died from the effects of scalds received on Wednesday. It appeared that the child was about to have a bath, and the nurse girl having partly filled he tub with water nearly boiling left the room to get cold water, leaving the child in the room. During the absence of the nurse the child either got or fell into the bath, and received such injuries that, although attended to at once, she died the following morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and censured the nurse girl for her thoughtlessness in leaving the child as she did.

Saturday 17 May 1890, Issue 7161 – Gale Document No. Y3200749067
SUICIDE AT WITHYCOMBE - The Inquest. - Extraordinary State of Affairs. A Juror Cautioned. - On Wednesday, at Holley Tree Inn, Withycombe, Mr Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of JAMES LUFF, a kiln-burner, aged 46 years. At the time appointed for the Inquest all the Jury were present, except one named Wilmott. In reply to the Coroner as to why he was not present, P.C. Vanstone said he had told him to be at the Inquest. A Juror: He told me that he was not coming because someone would be there from Exmouth. The Coroner: I shall fine him 40s. if he does not come, but I should not like to do so if it is a misunderstanding. The constable then went and fetched Wilmot, who, on appearing at the Inquest, said it was a misunderstanding. The constable said he had enough men, and he took it more as a joke than anything else. The Coroner: It is an extraordinary reason to give, but if you tell me it is a fact I will not fine you this time. Don't you do it again, or else you will be fined 40s. I shall not allow you the fee, and you must stay at the Inquest. Mr Dunn was chosen foreman of the Jury. The body having been viewed, MRS LUFF identified it as that of her husband, who had previously been living at 14, Victory-road, Horsham, Sussex. He had been out of work since March 3rd, and on the second of May the doctor said he was fit for work. The next day he went to Exmouth to work for Mr H. H. Hooper, builder. Witness last saw her husband alive on the 3rd of May, at half-past seven in the morning. In reply to the Coroner, witness said her husband was not in the habit of taking opium. His brother committed suicide by drowning twelve months ago. Edward Henry Pike, of Withycombe, engaged in the brickyard of Mr H. H. Hooper, said the deceased worked in the same yard. He first came last Saturday week, and lodged with witness. The first night he appeared alright, but the next day he was sweating all over. The third day he was very weak, and said it was owing to his ill-health before he came to Exmouth. The deceased seemed to do his work efficiently. In reply to the Coroner witness said he had seen LUFF the worst for liquor, and he was drunk the first night he came there. Often times since witness had seen him the worse for liquor, and he had been dismissed from his work by Mr Hooper. Witness, continuing, said he last saw deceased on Saturday night, about ten minutes to ten, when he appeared in his usual health, and did not seem in depressed spirits. The deceased at times would not say a word to anyone when asked a question. He did not say anything to witness to led him to suppose that he would put an end to his life. A bottle (produced) was similar to one witness had seen in the garden on Sunday morning before he knew of the deceased's death. LUFF'S window faced the garden where the bottle was picked up. Witness had not see a poison label about. When witness saw the deceased on Saturday night he said, "Has Mr Hooper paid you your lodge?" Witness replied that he had not, and that Mr Hooper had not agreed to pay LUFF'S lodge, but that he was to pay it himself. The deceased spoke of the discharge by Mr Hooper, and said he would take a rest, and the go to the brick works at Heathfield on the Monday morning. In answer to the Coroner, witness said he did not hear the window open or shut. On Sunday, about dinner time, he went up to the deceased for the purpose of speaking him about his dinner. Witness's wife advised him not to, as deceased would go out and get drinking. Pike, however, went up and shouted "LUFF, LUFF," but received no answer. He went to eh deceased and shook him. Again receiving no answer witness went to the police. A Juror said that he met Pike before going to the police, and advised him to go for a doctor first. In reply to the Coroner Pike said he went for the police first, but the doctor arrived within a quarter of an hour. When Pike shook the deceased he was still alive. Henry Bowerman was called, but did not answer to his name. P.C. Vanstone said he had summoned him as a witness. The Coroner: It is a very extraordinary affair. The constable said he had warned him in the usual way, but had not seen him that day. He said all right when he told him. The Coroner: First there is a Juror not present, and now there is a witness. I shall not pass the witness unless he has some very substantial excuse. The witness does not seem very material. Henry Horn Hooper, builder, of Exmouth, said the deceased came into his employ on Saturday week, when he appeared in good health. On Monday he became very peculiar about his work, and witness did not think he was sober from Monday to Friday, when he was discharged, in consequence of his being found in the kiln dead drunk. The man refused his money when it was offered on Friday about six o'clock, and witness saw him go into Beavis's public house. On Thursday witness found Pike and his Foreman drunk, and on the 2nd May he had his ribs broken. Beavis's public house was a curse to the village. The Coroner: I have no doubt it is a very great curse. Mr Hooper said he had nearly lost £100 through it, and he did not think deceased had been in his right senses ever since he had been in his employ. Arthur Toole, chemist of Exmouth, said the deceased came to him on Saturday last just before noon and asked for two ounces of laudanum. Witness only let him have 1 ½ ounces, as he thought it was sufficient. He said he was going to give it to a horse in a "mash." Witness labelled the bottle "Poison." The one produced was similar to the one he let the deceased have. In reply to a Juror witness said he could not see anything peculiar in deceased's manner, and he did not appear to have been drinking. Mr Beavis, of the Country House, was called, and said he could not recollect the deceased coming into his house on Friday last. The Coroner said he should like to find out whether the man was supplied with drink on Friday last. Witness, continuing, said the deceased was at the Inn on Saturday night, and he was then sober. The men came to his house on Thursday last after liquor, and said Mr Hooper had sent them. Mr Hooper said that what Beavis had stated was a falsehood. He was away at Starcross on Thursday. The Coroner thought that it might possibly be a mistake. P.C. Vanstone said he went to the place where deceased lodged on Sunday last. The bottle produced was given to him. He searched for a label, but could not find one. Francis Beavis, of the Country House Inn, aid the deceased came to his house between five and six o'clock on Friday last, and asked for a penny-wroth of beer. Witness served deceased, who said he was very tired, and had been laying down. The man was not drunk at the time. He owed four shillings for drink. P.C. Clements also proved that the man was not drunk on Friday evening. Dr Shapland said he had made a post mortem examination of the body and found that death was due to opium poisoning. The Coroner thought no blame was attached to Mrs Beavis in supplying the man with beer. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 24 May 1890, Issue 7167 – Gale Document No. Y3200749094
INQUESTS IN EXETER - An Overcrowded House. - An Inquest was held at the new Police Court, Exeter, on Tuesday, by Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, on the body of the illegitimate child of ELIZABETH NEAL, of Hexter's Court, St. Sidwell's. ELLEN BELLAMY, a tailoress and sister of MISS NEAL, said the child was born on Sunday night about half-past six, and died on Monday at half-past four. In reply to a Juror, witness said she was not married and had four children, the eldest of whom was thirteen years of age. There were three rooms in the house, and her sister, father and mother, the four children, and witness lived in it. She had lived there many years. The Coroner thought that it was very insufficient accommodation.
A Juror: It is too many persons, no doubt, for one house like that. Dr Mortimer aid he was called to see the child on Monday afternoon, and on arriving at the house found it dead. He examined it, and in his opinion death was due to debility. A Juror said he had never heard of any sickness in the house, and that the children must have some place to go. Eliza Mary Hatchet, a certificated midwife, of Albert-street, Newton, said she attended to MISS NEAL at the birth of the child, on Sunday. the Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

Mr H. Wilcocks Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court on Thursday, on the body of SARAH MAERS, an infant. ELIZA ROACH, wife of Walter Roach, a labourer, of No. 11, Preston-street, identified the body, and said it was the child of her sister-in-law, who resided near the Mission Room in the Exe Island. The child was born on Wednesday afternoon about quarter after one, a nurse attending at the birth. About eight o'clock witness went for Dr Brash as the baby was ill, but he was unable to attend. He sent her to Dr Roper, but the latter was away at the Theatre. Witness then went for another doctor, but he was out of town, and eventually Dr Roper attended. The child, however, died. Annie Hepworth, a certificated midwife of the lying-in Charity, said she attended EMMA MAERS at the birth of her child. The baby did not seem well at the first. Dr A. C. Roper, of Southernhay, one of the surgeons of the Lying-in Charity, said he was called on Wednesday about 9.10 at the Theatre to go and see the deceased. On arriving at the house he found the child in bed dead. Witness examined the body, and found that the lungs had not perfectly expanded, from which cause the child died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 24 May 1890, Issue 7167 – Gale Document No. Y3200749095
SAD CASE OF SUICIDE AT SILVERTON - Sensation was caused at Silverton on Tuesday on the news becoming known that JAMES MILLER, aged 33, son of MR MILLER, of Ruffwell Farm, had committed suicide during the morning by cutting his throat. The man, it appears, lived at home with his father and stepmother and was unmarried. No cause can be assigned for the rash act, but recently he had been strange in his manner, and the night previous was singularly absent-minded. He called at the Ruffwell Inn and the strangeness in his manner was noticed by the daughters of the innkeeper, but he said nothing which would lead them to infer that he premeditated the terrible deed. He went to bed at nine o'clock, wishing his father good night in his usual manner. On calling him in the morning the father could get no response, and on entering a ghastly spectacle presented itself. The walls of the room were smeared with blood, and the unfortunate man was lying on his right side on the bed with his drawers, socks, and shirt on, and his throat cut from ear to ear. A looking-glass also lay on the bed. On examination it seemed as if MILLER had made an unsuccessful attempt, for there was blood on the walls and down the stairs and on a glass downstairs, so that it would appear that after failing to kill himself he went down and drank a glass of water. On the wall of the bedroom was written in pencil, "I am no murderer." The second attempt was only too fatal, the windpipe and main arteries being severed. P.C. Whitnow, of Silverton, with great promptitude communicated with the Coroner (Mr Burrows, of Cullompton), and at half-past four an Inquest was held at the Ruffwell Inn. MR MILLER first identified the body as that of his son, and narrated the details related above. Mr G. Tapscott, artist, of London, staying at the Ruffwell Inn, deposed to speaking to the deceased on the previous evening and noticed that he was very singular in his manner. He spoke to him, but MILLER hardly seemed to comprehend what was said to him. Dr E. L. Puddicombe having deposed to the nature of the wounds which caused death, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

Saturday 31 May 1890, Issue 7173 – Gale Document No. Y3200749136
SAD CASE OF DROWNING AT BARNSTAPLE - The Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday by the Borough Coroner (Mr R. I. Bencraft) at the New Inn, Pilton, on the body of the boy RALPH TROTTMAN, aged 13 years, who was drowned in the River Taw on Sunday morning last. The evidence of a boy called George Henry Knill, aged 14 years, was to the effect that he, with the deceased, left their homes at Pilton on Sunday morning about seven o'clock, and went out to bathe at Pottington Point, by the side of the Ilfracombe Railway. Deceased could swim a little, but witness noticed deceased had got out too far and beyond his depth. He spoke to deceased, and asked him if he could swim, and he replied "No." Witness tried to get to him, but was afraid deceased would catch hold of him. He then went for assistance. A man was standing on the railroad watching them, and he refused to go to the deceased's assistance, and walked away without seeing if anything could be done to rescue him. Witness did not know the man by name, but could identify him again. Frederick Mogridge deposed that he, with the assistance of other fishermen, succeeded in recovering the body of the deceased about three o'clock in the afternoon of the same day by means of a net. The Coroner remarked that the spot where the boys had bathed was a very dangerous spot to inexperience swimmers, and he also severely condemned he inhuman conduct of the unknown individual, who coolly walked away without rendering any assistance to the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning."

Saturday 31 May 1890, Issue 7173 – Gale Document No. Y3200749150
KILLED BY LIGHTNING AT MORETON - An Inquiry has been held into the circumstances attending the death of ALBERT MARTIN, who was found dead, as we reported in our Tuesday's issue, near a furze rick on Monday morning, supposed to have been struck by lightning. Mr Sidney Hacker was the Coroner: Evidence was given by Robert Cleeve, son of the occupier of the farm, who said he went out to see the cattle on Monday morning about a quarter to seven when he saw deceased under a furze rick apparently asleep. He took him by the hand, and found him perfectly stiff and cold. He was in a half sitting posture with his back against the rick, his hat being four or five feet away. He returned to the house and told his father, and then went and fetched the sergeant and afterwards assisted in bringing the body to the house. The rick was about a gun-shot from the road. MARK MARTIN, labourer, of Bridford, identified the body as that of his brother. He was a farm labourer, and native of Tedburn St. Mary. He was 19 years of age. Mr Geo. Nelson Collyns, surgeon, of Moretonhampstead, proved examining the body of deceased. He found the face much discoloured, particularly on the right side. On removing the clothes he found a large reddened patch on the right groin, and on the front of the ankle on the same side there was another patch with a slight wound, from which a small quantity of blood had escaped. There was also a mark in the cheek, just under the eye, where struck. From these appearances he concluded that death resulted from shock, caused by a stroke of lightning. The clothes were not burnt or singed at all. The Coroner in summing up, commented on the danger of taking shelter during a thunderstorm under trees, or any object higher than general surroundings. A verdict was returned that deceased came by his death on Sunday from the effects of a stroke of lightning whilst taking shelter under a rick of furze.

Saturday 31 May 1890, Issue 7173 – Gale Document No. Y3200749137
INQUEST AT TIVERTON - On Tuesday an Inquest was held before Mr Lewis Mackenzie, Borough Coroner, at the Tiverton Infirmary, into the death of WILLIAM BOWDEN, aged 73, who died last Saturday from injuries received by a tree falling on him at Culmstock on May 10th. ELIZABETH ANN BOWDEN, daughter of the deceased, identified the body as that of her father, who was a widower. William Anstey, farmer, of Juryhayes, said deceased had worked for his family sixty years. Witness was having trees felled at his farm at Henegar, Culmstock, on May 10th, and deceased was assisting. Witness was called out of the house, and found deceased lying on the ground on his back, having been struck down by an oak sapling which fell on him. BOWDEN was carried into the house and Dr Prideaux, of Wellington, sent for. The doctor found that BOWDEN'S back was broken, and suggested his removal to Tiverton Infirmary. This was carried out. Henry Chave and John Gibbings, labourers, of Witherleigh, said they were working with the deceased when the accident happened. they were sawing the tree, and when it began to fall they shouted to deceased. He immediately began to run, but instead of running away ran in the direction the tree was falling, and one of the branches struck him across the back. They assisted in conveying him to the Infirmary. Mr Michelmore, House Surgeon at the Infirmary, said deceased died from exhaustion, consequent on the injury to the spine. Three of the vertebrae were broken, and the spinal cord completely smashed. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 14 June 1890, Issue 7185 – Gale Document No. Y3200749208
THE SHOCKING FATALITY TO A LADY IN EXETER - The Inquest. - Mr Henry Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquiry at Osborne House, Queen's-terrace, St. David's, on Wednesday, touch the death of ELIZA CHARLOTTE LUNN, a single lady, aged 59 years, living in the same house. Mr Scammell was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Miss Evelyn Edwards, of Crediton, identified the body and said deceased was the daughter of a doctor. Witness had been living a considerable time with her, who had been delicate for about a year. She did not know whether the deceased suffered from a complaint in the throat. On Monday last about half-past seven she sat down to dinner with the deceased and her sister. The dinner consisted of veal, and just after beginning to eat the deceased was choked by a piece of meat lodging in her throat. She was taken ill, and witness went for medical man, who arrived within two or three minutes. The deceased ate heartily. Baron Langsdorff, magnetiser, of the Highlands, Barnsfield, said he had attended the deceased for about three months for weakness of the nerves. He did not administer any drugs, nor prescribe any, but simply magnetised her. She had never complained to witness of weakness of the throat. Anna H. Croucher, of Osborne House, said she had been nurse to the deceased, and on Monday evening about twenty minutes to eight she went into the room where the deceased was at dinner. She observed the latter put a piece of veal of unusual size in her mouth. She immediately began to choke. Witness went to her assistance, and put her fingers in the lady's throat, but she found she had swallowed the meat. Medical men were sent for, but the deceased soon died, in the presence of witness. George Abbott, of 47, Queen-street, physician and surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Monday evening, about half-past seven. On arrival at the house he found MISS LUNN sitting on a chair in the dining-room, in an unconscious state. He was informed that she had swallowed a large piece of meat. Witness endeavoured to extract it, but it was too far down, and he then pushed it into the stomach. The deceased had ceased breathing, and died about a minute after from asphyxia or apnoea, caused by the impaction of food in the gullet preventing air getting into the lungs. Witness said he wished to acknowledge the assistance given by Dr Moon, who was also called in. The Coroner, in summing up, said death seemed to be the result of a most dreadful accident. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased met her death by choking, whilst at dinner.

Saturday 14 June 1890, Issue 7185 – Gale Document No. Y3200749217
SHOCKING CARRIAGE ACCIDENT AT TEIGNMOUTH – A Lady Killed. - A terrible carriage accident happened at Teignmouth this morning, which in the end proved fatal to a lady visitor, and resulted in severe injuries to a lad who was in charge of a donkey carriage. It appears that Dr Piggott, of Orchard's Gardens, was on his usual round, and when in Brunswick-street, the horse of his carriage by some means took fright, starting off at a tremendous pace towards the Den, where the carriage parted. The coachman still stuck to the reins, but on getting near the Club was severely thrown off by the horse, which here made a turn and plunged into a donkey carriage belonging to Mr James Helier, of Parson-street. The lad in charge was named William Tapp, residing with his parents in Mulberry-street, and the chair was occupied by a lady visitor, MRS LEWARNE, of Plymouth, who was staying at No. 6, Courtenay-place. The lady was thrown out and terribly cut, and the boy Tapp was also seriously injured about the head. The lady was conveyed to her lodgings, and the boy to the Teignmouth Infirmary. About 12.30 MRS LEWARNE passed away, although everything that could be done was done by the medical men present. At the Infirmary it was found on examination that the boy's collar-bone was broken and his head terribly injured, the brain protruding. At one o'clock the lad remained unconscious, and it is not expected that he will live out the afternoon. The donkey carriage was completely smashed, as well as Dr Piggott's carriage, and the horse was much cut, but no injury was sustained by the donkey.
A later message says the lady who was killed is MRS ELIZABETH LEWARN, of Trafalgar House, Plymouth, and is about sixty-three years of age. The Coroner for the district (Mr Sidney Hacker) has been made acquainted with the death, and an Inquest will be held on Monday. At two o'clock the boy Tapp still remained unconscious. The lady killed, it is understood, was to have returned to her home at Plymouth this afternoon. The affair has cast quite a gloom over the town.

Saturday 21 June 1890, Issue 7191 – Gale Document No. Y3200729252
SUPPOSED SUICIDE OF A GIRL IN NORTH DEVON - Much consternation was caused at Tawstock on Monday, when it was stated that a girl named ALICE MAUD WILLIAMS, aged sixteen years, daughter of a tailor in the employ of Mr J. N. Brewer, of Cross-street, Barnstaple, had committed suicide by drowning herself in a quarry pit. The deceased had been in the employ of Mrs Hertop, dressmaker, of High-street, Barnstaple, and had to do the work of the house. It is stated that on Sunday morning her mother found fault with her for not getting the breakfast in time. In the evening about nine o'clock the parents went to bed, leaving the girl up preparing the fire for the morning. Soon afterwards she was heard to leave the house. As soon as possible her father and brother left the house to look for her. Search was made in the evening and early next morning, and eventually he body of the deceased was found in the quarry pit. It was at once conveyed to the house of the parents, where it awaits an Inquest.. The parents are able to assign no cause for the rash act other than the few words which passed in the morning. The girl, however, during the day is said to have visited a relative and to have cried.
An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at Lake, near Barnstaple, by Mr Coroner Bromham, upon the body of the girl ALICE MAUD WILLIAMS, aged about sixteen, who was found drowned in a quarry pond at the back of the village. Evidence was given by the parents and Mr W. Jones to the effect that the girl, who was an apprentice to the dressmaking at Mrs Hortrops, Barnstaple, was home on Sunday last. She overslept herself in the morning, and was scolded by her mother. The girl was found crying afterwards by her father, and also in the evening. The family went to bed, and left the girl downstairs laying in the fire for the morning. The parents noticed she did not go to bed, and found that she had left the house. A search was made then, and also early the next morning when footprints were discovered by the edge of one of the ponds. A boat was procured from Barnstaple, and the body was recovered about half-past ten in the morning. The Jury were not satisfied with the evidence brought forward, as they thought there was not sufficient motive shown for the girl to destroy herself. They, however, after consultation, returned a verdict of "Suicide, whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 21 June 1890, Issue 7191 – Gale Document No. Y3200729253
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT TEIGNMOUTH - Inquest. - The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of a lady named MRS ELIZABETH LEWARN, of Trafalgar-house, Plymouth, who at the time of her death was staying at Mr Radbourne's, 6, Courtenay-place, Teignmouth, for the benefit of her health, was held on Monday morning by Dr Fraser, Coroner for the district of Totnes, in the absence of Mr Sidney Hacker and his deputy, both of whom are away. Mr John Rees Williams, of Gloucester-terrace, was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
MR WILLIAM LEWARN deposed that the deceased was his wife, and they had been staying at 6, Courtenay-place. His wife's age was 64. She had been at Teignmouth nearly a month for the benefit of her health. He saw her on Saturday last about 11 a.m., when he walked to Mr Mann's butcher's shop in Northumberland-place with her. Here they parted and deceased went into a donkey-chair. He did not see her again for nearly an hour, when she was in bed under the care of the doctor. She was alive then, but a few minutes afterwards expired.
Frederick C. H. Piggott, a surgeon, residing at 28, Orchard Gardens, Teignmouth, stated that on Saturday morning he was out on his round about 11 a.m., and was leaving a house in Brunswick-street. He was driving a Victoria carriage and the horse was facing the Den. Directly he entered the carriage the horse started quietly, but after it had gone about twenty yards he saw his man making an attempt to pull up the animal. The fore part of the carriage parted on the right side. His man still attempted to pull up the horse when the carriage parted on the left side, and the animal then bolted. The portion of the carriage witness was in was left behind, and he was shot out. The last thing he saw was the horse going at full gallop dragging the coachman, who still held on to the reins, along the ground. As soon as he was helped up he ran on to the Den, and there saw a crowd outside Den Crescent. He hastened in the direction, and when he got on the outside of the crowd he saw a poor boy being carried across and laid on the grass, and within a minute or two MRS LEWARN was also assisted across. The horse had never run away before.
A part of the near side of Dr Piggott's carriage was produced, which showed that the bolt had broken.
The Coroner remarked that the bolt on the other side was almost bound to go after the first had broken, and in this the Jury concurred.
Witness, in answer to the Coroner, said the carriage was thoroughly done up last summer.
By the Foreman: It is a rule to examine the carriage now and again. His carriage was examined about last March or April, and when he started on Saturday morning he quite thought that it was safe. His coachman always pointed out to him any defect if he knew of it. The coachman was a very trustworthy man. In answer to a Juryman, the doctor said the horse was not the same that ran away a short time since, and was free from vice.
Philip Matthews, a coachman, in the employ of Dr Piggott, stated that on Saturday last he was ordered at the Infirmary with the carriage at 10.20 a.m. The doctor then went on his rounds, and was at 9, Brunswick-street, a little after 11 a.m. After they left Brunswick-street, and when he had gone about a dozen yards he felt a jerk, and he pulled on the reins and cried "Whoa." The horse gave a spring and pulled him off the box. He held on to the reins, and the horse dragged him for about twenty yards, when he was compelled to let go. When he got up he ran as fast as he could, and caught sight of the horse and part of the carriage passing the shrubberies near the club. A moment later he heard a collision. When he got up to the horse it was kicking, and he caught it by the nose, and said, "Whoa, old girl," and it stopped kicking directly. He saw the lady lying on the grass, and the boy was put into the carriage, after which he took the mare to the stable and washed out her wounds.
In answer to the Coroner, witness said that he had no idea but what the carriage was all right. The break was not on when the carriage parted, and he could not in any way account for the carriage parting. In answer to a Juryman, witness said he examined the carriage about five weeks ago. He found a defect, with which he made his master acquainted, and it was repaired the next morning.
Mr George Herbert Johnson, a surgeon, residing at 6, Den-crescent, and practising at Teignmouth, deposed that on Saturday morning last he witnessed the accident, which occurred about 11.5. He was about to start on his round from his house, when he saw a horse at full gallop going across the Den, dragging the fore part of the carriage after it. He ran out, and saw one of the wheels of the carriage graze a rockery. The horse then made a dash across the road and came a crash against some railings opposite No. 4, Den-crescent. the fore wheels swung round. On coming closer to the scene he saw a donkey carriage considerably damaged lying low on its left side against the wall. Inside the donkey carriage was a lady lyi8ng on her left side, whilst the boy was lying on his back. Both were unconscious. the lady was conveyed in a carriage to 6, Courtenay-place, and the boy to the Infirmary. He examined the head of the lady, and found a large scalp wound on the left side of the forehead, which was feely exposed, and a fracture extending half way from the side of the head forward and backward down to the orbit. The left eye was also badly injured. He returned in about 20 minutes after seeing the boy, and found her sinking, and the deceased passed away about twelve o'clock. He considered death due to injury to the brain and shock to the system.
In answer to a Juryman, the doctor replied that the boy was still lying in a very precarious state, not having yet regained consciousness.
The Jury, through the Foreman, tendered their sympathy to MR LEWARN, in his sad bereavement. MR LEWARN thanked them, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury added a rider exonerating Dr Piggott and his coachman from all blame, and gave their fees to the Teignmouth Infirmary, expressing sympathy with the boy.

ALLEGED CONCEALMENT OF BIRTH AT CHULMLEIGH - Before the Rev. J. Vowler-Tanner and Messrs. G. Cutcliffe and R. J. Preston White (County Magistrates), on Monday, ALICE CHANTER, a domestic servant, in the employ of Thomas Fewings, of East Week Farm, Chulmleigh, was charged with having concealed the birth of an infant at East Week Farm on the 1st June. It appears that the body of the child a day after birth was found in the mother's clothes box. At the Inquest Jane Sowden, who attended the prisoner at Mr Fewings' request, stated that ALICE CHANTER told her where the child was on the Monday, the day after the birth. She yesterday informed the Bench that she was told by the mother the same day where the child was, but did not look at it because the mother told her it was born dead. Dr Tucker had held a post mortem examination, but he could not say whether the child was born dead or alive. It had breathed. The Bench dismissed the case, and said they had seriously thought of committing prisoner on the charge of causing the child's death, but from the medical evidence they thought it might have been otherwise. Fewings was censured by the Bench for the manner in which he gave his evidence, and they considered the manner in which his house was managed was a disgrace to the neighbourhood.

Saturday 28 June 1890, Issue 7197 – Gale Document No. Y3200749312
SAD DROWNING FATALITY AT CULLOMPTON - On Thursday a sensation was caused in Cullompton when it became known that a pensioner, named ROBERT FRY, had been drowned in the mill leat, near the iron bridge. It appears that deceased, who was in the employ of Messrs. G. Luxton and Co., was on his way to the cricket field with some goods for the club, and on his way threw a stump in the water that the dog he had with him might retrieve it. the stump, however, stuck in the bottom of the leat, and deceased entering the water to recover it got out of his depth. An alarm was at once given, and Mr P. Luxton, son of deceased's employer, dived for the body. When recovered, however, life was found to be extinct. An Inquest will be held.

Saturday 28 June 1890, Issue 7197 – Gale Document No. Y3200749296
THE SAD DROWNING FATALITY AT CULLOMPTON - Mr F. Burrow, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ROBERT FRY, who, as was announced in yesterday's "Evening Post," was drowning in the mill leat at Cullompton the previous night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 28 June 1890, Issue 7197 – Gale Document No. Y3200749304
THE SAD ACCIDENT AT UFFCULME - Inquest on the boy PEARCE. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at the Hospital, before the City Coroner (Mr W. H. Hooper), touching the death of a little boy named WALTER PEARCE, residing at Bradfield, Uffculme. The father of the deceased, a labourer, deposed that the boy lived with his grandmother, and on the afternoon of the 31st May he was called to see his son who had met with an accident. William Jeffery, a lad, nine years of age, said that on the 31st May he was with WALTER PEARCE watching a waggon pass when the deceased ran across the road and was knocked down by the vehicle, the wheels passing over his body. He at once told his grandmother of the occurrence and she came to his assistance. P.C. William Jeffery said he was called by the last witness to the scene of the accident, and found that the deceased had met with serious injury. After having his wounds dressed he was conveyed to the Exeter Hospital. He questioned the waggoners upon the matter, and found no blame attached to them. Mr Reginald Martin, assistance house surgeon at the Hospital, said on May 31st, he received the deceased as an inmate, and found he was suffering from bruises in the head from which he died on June 21st. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 28 June 1890, Issue 7197 – Gale Document No. Y3200749309
SAD DROWNING FATALITY AT LITTLEHAM - The Inquest. - At the Rolle Hotel, Budleigh Salterton, on Monday morning, an Inquest was held by Mr Cox (Deputy District Coroner) on the body of ELLEN BAMSEY, a girl six years, of Knowle Hill, near Budleigh Salterton, who was found drowned in the water at Littleham Cove on Saturday. Mr Christian was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The body having been viewed, ALFRED BAMSEY, gamekeeper, identified it as that of his daughter, who he last saw alive at a quarter past nine on Friday morning. At that time the girl went away with some other children, named John Pratt, Frank Pratt, and Bessie Pratt, to go to Littleham School, which was about a mile away. The children generally were home again at 5.30 in the evening, but his daughter did not return on Friday. About ten o'clock search was made for her but without success. One day last week witness received complaints of his child not attending school. Witness cautioned his daughter, who said she would not do it again. About a quarter past three on Saturday morning the three Pratts arrived home, and said that the deceased was drowned. The girl, Bessie Pratt, accompanied witness to a certain spot the same morning, where the child was found drowned.
Witness found the body in the water close to the cliff. The three other girls were further on than the deceased, who, on endeavouring to cross to another cliff, fell down into the water. The rocks were very irregular near the place where the body was found. The other three children slept on a piece of rock near where BAMSEY was drowned. Last Saturday week the Pratts remained away all night. In reply to the Coroner, P.C. Pike said the children slept on a rock about three feet wide and fifteen feet in length, and the children could not get away from it at high tide. The Coroner thought it was a terrible place for three children to sleep. John Pratt, a boy, said on Friday he was with Bessie and Frank Pratt, and ELLEN BAMSEY and he proposed that none of them should go to school. The other three agreed that they should go "mitching." They then went towards the cove in search of shell fish. About four o'clock the deceased was on a different rock from the rest, when a wave knocked her over, and she fell into the water. Witness shouted, but could not get away from where he was to help the deceased. She did not speak while in the water, and soon sunk. Before BAMSEY fell into the water she kept calling for her father, and appeared to be afraid of her perilous position. A Juror said the tide ran very fast at the spot where the deceased was drowned. Bessie Pratt said she went with the deceased's father on Saturday to show him the spot where the deceased was washed off. ELLEN BAMSEY got drowned in endeavouring to get from one rock to another. William Terril Squires, a visitor to Budleigh Salterton, said he met the four children about half-past one on Friday about half a mile from Littleham Cove. P.C. Pike said on Friday evening he made inquiries about the children, but he was not successful in finding them. The next morning he heard that the Pratts had returned home, and that BAMSEY was drowned He then went to a spot between Straight Point and Water Shute with other persons and found the body in about fifteen feet of water. The children were getting about from rock to rock, and it would appear from what he had heard, and as deceased was endeavouring to do so a wave washed her off. The Coroner, in summing up, suggested that the parents, or some responsible person, should accompany the children to school, because young children were very likely to get into danger unless there was some elderly person with them. He did not mean to cast the slightest blame on anyone. The parents must have relied upon their children going to school. He hoped it would be a warning to the children as well as to others not to play truant any more. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and expressed sympathy with the family in their bereavement. The Foreman said it was the opinion of the Jury that there should be a public mortuary for Budleigh Salterton, as there was no place to convey the bodies to when found. The Coroner concurred, and thought that the Jury should convey their expression to the local authority. A Juror asked if it was compulsory to put a body in a public-house. The Coroner replied that it was customary.

Saturday 28 June 1890, Issue 7197 – Gale Document No. Y3200749308
THE CARRIAGE ACCIDENT AT TEIGNMOUTH. Inquest on the Second Victim. – As we reported in our Monday's issue, the lad WILLIAM TAPP, who met with such serious injuries in the shocking carriage accident which occurred on Saturday week last at Teignmouth, died in the Infirmary on Sunday evening. On Monday night Mr Sidney Hacker, the Coroner for the district, held an Inquest on the body at the Infirmary. The Jury was composed of the same gentlemen who enquired into the death of Mrs Lewarn, who also met her death from injuries received in connection with the same accident. WILLIAM SMART TAPP, a yachtsman, of Mulberry-street, identified the body as that of his late son, who, he said, was 14 years of age. He had been employed for eighteen months by Mr Hellier, of Teignmouth, as a "donkey boy." He visited the deceased on several occasions during the time he was in the Infirmary, and on Tuesday last he was conscious, and recognised him. After that he was unconscious, and remained so until the time of his death. TAPP then produced a bolt which had been found, saying it was a portion of the carriage, and which he contended showed the weakness of the vehicle, and helped to bring about the accident. The father exhibited some warmth during the proceedings, but the Coroner remarked that they were there to inquire into the cause of death. Mr Hacker then proceeded to read over the evidence given at the last Enquiry into the death of Mrs Lewarn, after which Mr James Young, house surgeon at the Teignmouth Infirmary, was called. He deposed that the boy was brought into the institution on Saturday week last, suffering from severe injuries to the base of the skull. He was unconscious, and owing to his condition they were unable to make anything like an examination until two or three days after his admission. He was fed by artificial means until Tuesday last, when he drank a little milk. They continued to give him nourishment until Saturday. On Tuesday he regained consciousness, and was able to spell his name, in fact he gave fair hopes of recovery. But afterwards he again lost consciousness and behaved in such a manner, as to require the assistance of two persons to keep him under restraint. On Saturday night his pulse became weaker, and on Sunday morning he exhibited signs of sinking rapidly, and he same night at ten o'clock he died. Death was due to concussion of the brain and collapse. The Jury having returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" in the case of Mrs Lewarn, felt that there was nothing to lead them to form a different opinion of the cause of death in the present instance; that the boy met his death from injuries received from the carriage accident on Saturday week last. They expressed deep sympathy with the parents of the boy in their sad bereavement, and they gave their fees to the Infirmary.

Saturday 28 June 1890, Issue 7197 – Gale Document No. Y3200749288
BABY FARMING AT PLYMOUTH - The death of ALEXANDER FACEY, a baby of four months, was the subject of an Inquiry held by the Plymouth Coroner on Wednesday at the Coburg Inn, Coburg-street. It was stated by Elizabeth Littreby, an old woman, living at 13, John's-lane, where the child died, that she had taken charge of him when he was six week sold, and had been paid 4s. weekly by the mother, MRS ALEXANDRA FACEY, a domestic servant, who had been separated from her husband for more than a year, and who did not pretend that the child was legitimate. Deceased was delicate, and witness had called in a doctor three times, for whose attendance the mother's grandmother had paid. It was last taken ill on Sunday night with a fit of screaming, and it died at midnight. Witness also had charge of a child eight months old, but her house was not registered. She thought that was not necessary till she kept three babies. Mr Elliot Square, surgeon, saw the child die, and made a post mortem examination. He found the body well nourished, and without any trace of injury. Deceased died from a convulsion due to inflammation of the ear, and in no way to injury A verdict was returned accordingly, the Coroner expressing pleasure that while baby farming was apt to induce suspicions, this case seemed entirely innocent.

SUDDEN DEATH AT NEWTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held on Monday morning at the Ship Inn, Newton Abbot, by Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, on the body of JOHN WEATHERDON, shoemaker, who was found dead in his house, 30, Wolborough-street, on Sunday morning. The deceased, who was 81 years of age and a bachelor, for the last thirty years had carried on business at 30, Wolborough-street, as a cobbler. Of late years, through infirmities and old age he had been unable to earn much, and recently nothing whatever, being dependent entirely for a subsistence on payment of out-standing accounts. On Saturday last he was more depressed than usual, and on an illegitimate son of his visiting him, he gave him some accounts to collect and two sovereigns, with instructions that he was to keep the latter to pay his funeral expenses, as he did not wish to be "buried by the parish", but that in the event of his being unable to collect in any of the bills he was to return him 10s. On Sunday morning the deceased was found in the kitchen lying on his back and quite dead. One of his boots had been taken off, and the other partly so Dr Ley, who saw the body shortly after it was discovered, attributed death to apoplexy. The Jury (of whom Mr J. Pascoe was Foreman) returned a verdict of death from Natural Causes. They also added a rider requesting the Coroner to call the attention of the Sanitary Inspector, not only to the wretched state, utterly unfit for habitation, of the premises in which the deceased was found, but also to similar houses equally uninhabitable in the immediate vicinity. The Coroner consented to forward the rider to the proper quarter.

Saturday 12 July 1890, Issue 7209 – Gale Document No. Y3200749351
DEATH FROM EXCESSIVE DRINKING - Inquest in Exeter. - At the Exeter Police Court on Monday, Mr H. W. Hooper, (City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of JOHN COTTERELL, of Ewing's-lane, a pensioner from the 77th Regiment. Mary Ann Endicott, wife of a labourer, of Ewing's-lane, identified the deceased, and said he had lately rented a room of her He went out on Friday morning, and returned about ten o'clock, going to his own room. A fellow workman visited him during the day, and at three o'clock deceased came downstairs for something to eat. He again went to his room, and at six o'clock he called to witness. On going up she found the deceased lying on his bed, and he appeared to be dying. A neighbour went to several doctors, but they were not home. Eventually Mr Bell attended, but deceased had died before his arrival. In reply to the Coroner, witness said she thought deceased had been drinking on that day. He was addicted to drink after he had received his pension. George Dew, a labourer, of Exwick, deposed the deceased was with him at the Buller's Arms, Exwick, one or two days last week. On Wednesday and Thursday deceased drank very heavily. On the Tuesday witness and COTTERELL received their pensions, and after paying certain sums of money they owed, they spent the rest in drink. Witness visited the deceased on Friday, and about six o'clock he called the last witness, as deceased was ill. COTTERELL died soon afterwards. Mr Bell, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Friday last about 7.30. On arriving at the house he found COTTERELL in bed, dead. Witness examined the body, and questioned the last witness as to whether the deceased had been drinking. He replied that he had been drinking very heavily since Monday. Dew also said deceased was lying on the bed, but sat up, and again fell backwards. Dew then cut away a scarf that deceased had around his neck. There was a jug containing vinegar and water on the table with Mrs Endicott said the deceased had been drinking. In witness's opinion deceased died from apoplexy, brought on by excessive drinking. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 12 July 1890, Issue 7209 – Gale Document No. Y3200749360
SUICIDE NEAR ILFRACOMBE - On Thursday evening WILLIAM LEY, aged about forty years, a farmer, of Shaftesborough Farm, committed suicide by hanging himself in the farm. The deceased had been complaining of his health for some time and the amount of work he had to do. During the morning he remarked that he dreaded the work he had to do for the day. He, however, worked all day, and on his return said to his wife that rather than go through it again he would take a rope and hang himself. He then went and milked the cows, and sent the boy off with the milk. Some time afterwards his wife had occasion to go to the barn, when she was horrified to see her husband hanging to a beam. Her screams attracted the attention of a neighbour named Watts, who at once got deceased down and sent for a doctor, but life was extinct. It seems the deceased placed the plough guide across the beams, to which he tied a rope and fastened it round his neck, and then swung himself from the chaff-cutting machine. Deceased leaves five children. An Inquest was held by Dr Slade-King at the farm yesterday afternoon.

Saturday 12 July 1890, Issue 7209 – Gale Document No. Y3200749362
THE FATAL FALL AT TEIGNMOUTH - Inquest This Morning. - An Inquest was held at the London Hotel this morning by the Deputy Coroner (Dr Fraser, of Totnes) in the absence of Mr S. Hacker, (Coroner for the district) to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of a lad named SIDNEY ROGERS, residing with his parents in Chapel-street, West Teignmouth, who met with his death by falling from a railway bridge in Chapel-street. After the Jury had viewed the body lying in the father's house at Chapel-street, the Coroner called upon MRS ELIZABETH ROGERS, the mother of the deceased lad, who stated that she resided at 17, Chapel-street, and the boy was eight years of age last Tuesday. She last saw him alive yesterday morning at 9 a.m. when she went to work. She saw him again at one o'clock, when he was dead.
A lad named James Henry Smith, residing with his friends in Chapel-street, deposed that yesterday morning he went to play with a boy called Albert Nason, on the New Quay, and after playing for some time he went home to get his dinner, and when in Chapel-street he saw SIDNEY ROGERS on the bridge which crosses the railway. He went up and saw him get over a wall, and then on to the bridge, and then walked along on a ledge on the inside of the bridge. The bridge was about five feet in height from the road. The boy walked along the ledge several times, and in turning again to go back lost his hold and fell on to the railway, about forty feet below. He raised an alarm, and a man named Woodgate, and a boy called Dingle went and picked him up. He could not say whether the boy was dead when he was being carried home.
By a Juryman: He was lying across the top of the bridge when ROGERS fell off.
Frederick Robert Dingle, a youth, residing in Chapel-street, stated that yesterday, about a quarter to one, while at home, he heard a boy call out that a lad had fallen off the bridge. Witness and his uncle went over a wall and picked the deceased up. He appeared to be quite dead, and they took the body home to his father's house.
William Henry Woodgate, a sailor, residing in Chapel-street, who helped to carry the lad home, gave similar evidence.
George Henry Warren Thomas, a physician and surgeon, Orchard House, Teignmouth, said he was called to Chapel-street, about one o'clock, where he found the boy SIDNEY ROGERS lying on a sofa on his back dead. He had swellings on the right side of the head, and the bone beneath was fractured. He also had a bruise on the left thigh and on the left foot. He came to the conclusion from what he heard and saw that the lad had died from fracture of the skull and concussion of the brain.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," in accordance with the medical testimony, and added a rider "That the Great Western Railway Company be communicated with, with a view to having more protection made on these bridges in the shape of spikes or in other ways." The Jury handed their fees over to the mother of the unfortunate lad, who is in poor circumstances. It is strange that the lad's father is a steward on board the same yacht as Mr Tapp, the father of the lad who was killed in the recent carriage accident.

Saturday 19 July 1890, Issue 7215 – Gale Document No. Y3200749387
THE FEEDING OF CHILDREN - An Inquest was held at the Police Court on Wednesday on the body of a child aged about two months and a fortnight. The mother, a single woman, named KATE WHITE, said the child since its birth had been in the charge of Mrs Williams, a nurse. She had been in the habit of visiting it once a week, and sometimes twice. Mrs Annie Williams, living at 73, Summerland-street, said since the first six weeks after the deceased's birth it had been in good health. That morning about eight o'clock she saw it was unwell, and immediately fetched Mr McKeith. She had been accustomed to give it a "sugar teat," but fed it only on milk and water. Mr McKeith said the death was a natural one, and arose, in his opinion from the child having a convulsion and being suffocated by turning its face. Mr McKeith deprecated the practice among mothers giving their children what was commonly known as "sugar teat." It was very improper, and a habit often fraught with danger to the child, and especially if taken in large quantities. He did not say such was the case in the present instance. The Coroner quite concurred with Mr McKeith's observation. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 16 August 1890, Issue 7238 – Gale Document No. Y3200749554
INQUEST IN EXETER - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper held an Inquest last evening at the Exeter Police Court touching the death of CHARLES REED, aged ten months, son of MR CHARLES REED, of the Three Tuns Inn, High-street. The deceased suffered from dropsy of the brain, and, at the suggestion of Mr Roper, he was removed to London for the opinion of Dr S. Gee. During the return journey on Wednesday the child died shortly after the train left Bristol. Mr Roper attributed death to convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. MR REED questioned the necessity for an Inquest, Mr Roper having certified the cause of death. The Coroner stated that the registration could not be made upon that certificate in Exeter; the death must be registered at Bristol. The holding of the Inquest was a duty which he could not avoid. Some of the Jurors interrogated the Coroner upon the same matter, pointing out that the deceased had been under medical treatment since birth. Mr Hooper replied that Mr Roper had not seen the child for a fortnight, and that the point was the suddenness of the death.

Saturday 23 August 1890, Issue 7244 – Gale Document No. Y3200749579
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT TORQUAY - Tuesday, at the Torquay Police Court, an Inquest was held by Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, on the body of FLORENCE ANNIE GILLORD, aged 4 ½ years, the illegitimate child of a domestic servant employed at Launceston, who fell from the balcony at the back of the Local Board buildings in Market-street on the previous evening, and died an hour afterwards from her injuries. The deceased was on the balcony looking at some children playing below, and in order to get a better view she stood on a box. It is presumed that she overbalanced herself, and fell a distance of 35 ft., sustaining injuries of a frightful character. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and a rider asked the local authority to prevent tenants leaving boxes or other articles on the balcony.

Saturday 30 August 1890, Issue 7250 – Gale Document No. Y3200749634
THE MISSING SIDMOUTH GIRL - The Inquest. - The Inquest on the body of BESSIE HARRIS, which was found in the river Sid yesterday, was held at the Commercial Hotel at noon today. The Foreman of the Jury was Mr W. F. H. Majendie, Hill's-cottages. The evidence showed that the deceased had been despondent of late, and only the night before was found crying because she thought she had not sent up the dinner properly, when in reality it was all that could be required. Dr Pullen conducted the post mortem, and in evidence said he could find no sign of injury before death. All the organs were healthy. The brain and heart showed congestion. The cause of death was drowning. After due deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 6 September 1890, Issue 7256 – Gale Document No. Y3200749664
DROWNING FATALITY AT BUCKFASTLEIGH - Yesterday morning the youngest daughter of MR RICHARD HAMLIN, of Laurel House, Buckfastleigh, aged about 3 years, was missed. Search was made, and she was found drowned in a water-pit at the back of the house. An Inquest will be held.

Saturday 6 September 1890, Issue 7256 – Gale Document No. Y3200749656
THE ILFRACOMBE BOATING ACCIDENT - On Saturday, the body of MISS LOUISA DAY, aged 15 years, who was drowned in the recent boat accident at Ilfracombe, was found embedded between some rocks under Hillsborough Hill. All the bodies have now been recovered. the Inquest was re-opened later in the day, and formal evidence of identification having been given, the Inquiry was again adjourned until Tuesday evening at six o'clock.

Saturday 6 September 1890, Issue 7256 – Gale Document No. Y3200749660
THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF A WOODBURY BAKER - The Inquest. - At the White Hart Inn, Woodbury, on Monday, Mr Cox (Deputy District Coroner, of Honiton) held an Inquiry into the mysterious death of EDWIN PERRY, a baker, of Woodbury, aged 54 years, who was found drowned in a water cask at his house on Friday morning last.
EVA PERRY identified the body as that of her husband, and said he suffered from rheumatism occasionally, and had it lately more than usual. She last saw him alive about half-past ten on Friday, when she was assisting him about some work in the bakehouse. Their apprentice was present at the time. After he had finished he shut up the oven and went out in the yard as was his custom. Witness left him when deceased had done his work in the bakehouse. About five minutes afterwards she went out to speak to him about something. She did not see him at first, but after searching she found him in the water butt with his legs upwards. He appeared to have gone there about the shuting, and to have fallen in off the ladder. About three or four months previous deceased nearly fell in the cask, and she cautioned him, saying some of the boys would attend to it. Deceased was got out, and witness did not see him again.
In reply to the Coroner witness said they had had losses in the business during the last few years and sometimes PERRY was rather depressed about it. He had said nothing to her which would lead her to suppose that he would put an end to his life.
In answer to a Juror witness said her husband suffered in his right hip.
Answering Sergeant Ellicott, witness said a covering was usually kept over the cask, but the day before the occurrence it slipped off when her daughter went to get some water with the can. The can sunk to the bottom and she called her father thee. She took the water from the ask as she could not find the key of the tap.
In reply to a Juror, witness said there was nothing to worry deceased that morning.
KATE PERRY, daughter of the deceased, said she last saw her father alive about half past nine on Friday morning, when he was in his usual health. Soon afterwards, she heard her mother scream "Kate, Kate, Kate," and she immediately went to her, when she was informed that her father was in the tub. She got a Mr Browning, a neighbour, and with his assistance she got the deceased out of the tub. He was dead when taken out. In reply to the Coroner, witness said she could not say if the deceased put the cover of the butt on when he came to take out the cask.
Harry Buttle, apprentice to the deceased, deposed that he was with his master on the morning in question in the bakehouse, when he was in his usual spirits. He did not say anything which would lead him to believe that he would commit suicide.
Luke Browning, a shoemaker, of Woodbury, who raised an objection to take an oath, and was not sworn, said he was w3ell acquainted with the deceased, and about ten o'clock on Friday morning he was in his shop, when he heard cries of distress coming from MR PERRY'S house. On hearing it he left his shop and proceeded to the house. On his way he met the daughter, who said, "Come, father has fallen into the water cask." On going to the butt witness saw deceased with his head, body, and hands, submerged in the cask of water. Witness at once succeeded in pulling him out, and sent his brother-in-law after a medical man. He undid the shirt collar of the deceased, when a gush of wind came out of his mouth. He endeavoured to restore life, but was unsuccessful.
Dr Furnival said he had attended the deceased for about six years for a rheumatic affection. He was a man who was always cheerful and pleasant. Deceased had had great losses lately, but in witness's opinion it had not affect him. Shortly after ten on Friday morning witness was called to see deceased. On arriving at the house, and having examined the body, he found that life was extinct. From all appearances deceased had been dead about twenty minutes or half an hour. It was quite possible if the deceased had fallen in the cask that he could not have released himself. He would be asphyxiated after his head had been under twenty seconds, so that he could not have helped himself. No part of the body was injured.
In reply to a Juror, witness said there were no appearances as if deceased had had a fit.
The Coroner, in summing up, said he did not see any evidence that would lead anyone to suppose that deceased would put an end to his life. The position deceased was found in was very peculiar, and at the first blush it would make one think that he might have recovered himself and saved his life. Looking at the evidence he should certainly say that death was the result of an accident.
The Jury having consulted in private for about ten minutes, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 13 September 1890, Issue 7262 – Gale Document No. Y3200749711
DEATH FROM LOCK-JAW AT TORQUAY - The Inquest. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Torbay Hospital on Wednesday, into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES TUCKER, 39, stonemason, whose decease was reported in Tuesday's issue of the "Evening Post." The first witness called was
WILLIAM TUCKER, of the Model Lodging House, Queen-street, and plasterer, who identified the body as that of his brother. He knew nothing of the accident, but on visiting deceased at the Hospital his brother muttered, "Bless y, oh! Bicycle Bill, this is what ye hath done."
Henry Belworthy, of 1, Ellacombe-terrace, stated that he saw deceased last Thursday week in reference to taking a headstone to Kingskerswell churchyard. This was accomplished safely, the deceased riding a tricycle. Soon after leaving the Half Way Inn, deceased turned round to look after witness and the others, who were riding behind. Whilst he was in the act of turning to look behind the machine capsized, and TUCKER was thrown into the hedge. He got up again, and said he had had a severe shaking, and holding up his hand showed his thumb, which was bleeding from two cuts on the surface in front. He did not know how the accident occurred, but understood the steering gear was out of order. TUCKER rode home to Torquay, and though advised to call at the Infirmary and have the wound dressed, declined to do so. He saw deceased frequently till his death. In answer to one of the Jury, witness stated that he did not know of deceased hurting his hand a second time.
P.C. Thomas Pratt stated that he had made enquiries, and found that whilst repairing a lock last Friday, deceased called out, "Oh! my hand."
Dr Gardner deposed that deceased first saw him on Friday week. His thumb on the left hand was swollen, and he told him to bathe and poultice it. He did not see TUCKER for a week, when he came to him again. The hand was in much the same condition, and he directed the deceased to continue the poulticing, which he had left off. Next morning he noticed symptoms of lock-jaw, and told him to go to the Hospital at once, offering him a cab. He did not go then, and he called at his house in the afternoon, and in the evening deceased entered the hospital. There was no accounting for lock-jaw, which might or might not proceed from a wound.
Dr Cave, house surgeon at the Hospital, said he received a note from Dr Gardner, who called in the afternoon on Saturday respecting TUCKER'S admission. Deceased came in in the evening, and could then only speak through his teeth. He received food through his teeth, and died in a spasm from suffocation on Tuesday morning. He corroborated Dr Gardner's testimony as to lock-jaw.
The Coroner remarked that it was a sad case, and the Jury, of whom Mr Bentley was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". The case was watched by Mr Archibald Rock, district agent of the Northern Accident Insurance Company, on behalf of that company, in which the deceased was insured for £200.

Saturday 13 September 1890, Issue 7262 – Gale Document No. Y3200749712
TWO MEN KILLED AT PAIGNTON - In our Tuesday evening's issue we reported that two scavengers in the employ of the Paignton Local Board, named RICHARD EMMETT, aged 62, and WILLIAM PURNELL, 46, had been killed on Tuesday morning. They had just left the Local Board yard in charge of a scavenging cart, and when passing along Mill-lane their horse bolted. Both men were seated on the shafts at the time, and before they could jump off their cart collided with another vehicle drawing stones which was proceeding along the lane. Assistance was quickly at hand, and Drs. Mudge and Alexander at once examined the men, but only to find that EMMETT had been killed instantly, and PARNELL expired within an hour. EMMETT'S injuries were confined to the head, which was apparently crushed between the two carts, and PARNELL had a large hole in the side of his neck, caused by the fore-part of the stone cart. EMMETT'S body was removed to his lodgings in the Local Board buildings, and that of PARNELL to the rooms of a man named Hocking in the same block . Both men leave families, that of EMMETT being grown up. The affair has cast quite a gloom over the town, which is crowded with visitors, and great sympathy exists for the bereaved friends. The deceased were known as steady men.
THE INQUEST - At the Town Hall in the evening Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the deaths of the unfortunate men.
SUSAN EMMETT of No. 3, Mill-cottages, identified the body of RICHARD EMMETT as that of her father. He was 62 years of age, and was a labourer in the employ of the Local Board. She last saw him alive early in the morning, and about eight o'clock she heard that there had been an accident, and ran to the door just in time to see a horse and cart pass the house at a rapid pace. There was no one in the cart, and she subsequently heard that the horse was killed and her father injured.
Mudge Austin, ostler, of Paignton, stated that about eight o'clock that morning he was proceeding down Mill-lane, leading a horse with a load of stone. He saw EMMETT and PARNELL come in from the other end of the lane in charge of a dust cart. PARNELL was driving, and EMMETT was sitting on the other side of the cart. Some distance down they stopped to take up some dust. Both men were in the act of dismounting when the animal attached to their cart bolted without any apparent cause and came against the shafts of his (witness's) cart. Both men were thrown from the shafts with great violence, PARNELL striking against the rail of witness's cart and EMMETT against the wheel. The horse and cart went on at a terrific pace, and he did not see anything more of it. Witness immediately went to the men, and found that EMMETT was dead and PARNELL seriously injured.
ROBERT PARNELL, labourer, of Goodrington, identified the body lying at No. 2, Mill-cottages, as that of his brother WILLIAM PARNELL. He was 45 years of age, and was employed by the Local Board.
John Densham, carpenter, of Polsham-road, stated that he saw the cart proceeding down the lane at a walk. It stopped some little distance down, and both men were in the act of getting off when the horse suddenly bolted. One of EMMETT'S legs got inside the shaft and the other was out, and as he could not clear himself he hung on to the breeching, whilst PARNELL was thrown along the rail. The horse went away at a rate of ten or twelve miles an hour, and when it came into collision with the stone cart PARNELL was struck by the rail across the throat and knocked off, and EMMETT came into contact with the wheel. EMMETT was dead when picked up, and PARNELL, who was still alive, was taken to the Local Board buildings and medical assistance sent for.
Richard Free, labourer, and Thomas Mitchell gave similar evidence.
Dr Alexander stated that he was called to Mill-cottages, about 8.15 a.m. On reaching there he found that EMMETT was dead. On examining PARNELL he found that his case was hopeless. He appeared to have received a tremendous blow on the upper part of the chest; the lungs were bruised and the upper ribs fractured, and there was a frightful wound on the neck. He died in about an hour. EMMETT bore no external mark of injury, but he thought death was due to shock.
Mr W. J. Wyatt, surveyor to the Local Board, stated that the horse was purchased in February last, and was worked regularly. He had never heard any complaint about the animal.
The Coroner said whilst the case was an extremely sad one, there were no circumstances in connection with it which attached blame to anyone.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and gave their fees to the fund being raised for the widows and orphans of the deceased.

Saturday 27 September 1890, Issue 7274 – Gale Document No. Y3200749761
SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EXETER LABOURER - The Inquest. - At the Exeter Police Court on Monday the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) held an Inquiry touching the death of WALTER WHITFORD, of Mary Arches-street, formerly a soldier, who died on Saturday last. Emma Kerslake, a single woman, living at 49, Mary Arches-street, identified the body and said the deceased was 23 years of age. He had been employed as labourer at St. David's Station. He went to work last Wednesday at 9 a.m., but returned about two hours afterwards complaining of pains in his stomach. He went to bed, and remained there until Friday morning about nine o'clock, when he said he was much easier. On Saturday he went to the Hospital, where he was told to get a recommend, but although his mother got one he did not use it. When he died he had finished his tea, and was sitting in a rocking chair. She heard a noise, and on looking round she saw him falling off the chair. Witness laid him on the floor and bathed his head with some water, but he died within a few minutes. She immediately sent for Mr Perkins. Witness had been living with deceased for about three weeks and they were about to be married. During that time he complained of his heart beating loudly and feeling pains. Mr John Steele Perkins said he was called to see the deceased a little before six o'clock. He found him lying on his back on the floor. He examined the body, but found no marks of violence. Witness had been informed that deceased had been in several hospitals in India suffering from rheumatic fever, and no doubt it left an effect upon him. Lifting heavy weights, such as he had been accustomed to, would have a prejudicial effect upon a weak heart. Death was due to syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

DROWING FATAILITY IN EXETER - A Dangerous Spot. The Inquest. - An Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of a little boy named JAMES FRENCH, aged three years, who was drowned in the mill-leat at Ewings-lane, was held by the Deputy Coroner, Mr W. H. Gould, on Wednesday. THIRZA FRENCH, wife of JOHN FRENCH, chimney sweep, of Ewing's-lane, identified the body as that of her son JAMES, who was aged 3 years in June. She last saw the deceased alive about ten minutes to two o'clock on Tuesday afternoon. He was playing with two little girls, younger than himself, named Ellen Worth and Polly Vosper. Witness went out to look for him for the purpose of washing his hands and sending him to school, and she saw one of the little girls named Worth alone. On asking where her son JIMMY was, she said he had gone down to the passage to go down the steps into the water. Witness noticed that the little girl's frock was wet, and she ran down to the water and made enquiries as to the whereabouts of her child. About five or ten minutes afterwards he was taken out of the water by a man named Richard Moore. Deceased was fairly strong on his legs. By the Foreman (Mr Honey): What are the steps used for? - Witness: I did not know there were any steps there until that day. Richard Moore, living at No. 2, West View-terrace, said he saw a young man searching for something, and asking him what it was he said he thought someone was in the water. Witness searched, and recovered the body from the mill leat about two o'clock. Deceased was quite dead when witness recovered his body from the water. Dr McKeith, practising in St. Thomas, said he was called about twenty-five to three o'clock in the afternoon to see the body. He saw the deceased about five minutes afterwards in the house at Ewing's-lane. When witness arrived he found the Bathing Superintendent, Mr Frank Shooter, trying to produce artificial respiration. There were no marks of violence on the body The Coroner remarked that where the deceased fell in was a very dangerous place, and some protection ought to be put around it. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned," and the Foreman added that the spot was a dangerous one, and something ought to be done to prevent a similar fatality.

Saturday 27 September 1890, Issue 7274 – Gale Document No. Y3200749758
DEATH FROM SUFFOCATION AT TORQUAY - Mr Coroner Hacker and a Jury, of whom Mr B. Tralease was Foreman, on Tuesday, at the Police Station, enquired into the circumstances attending the death of ERNEST WALTER, the nine-weeks' old child of ROBERT and EMMA PYM, of 3, Stentiford-hill, Ellacombe. The child, it seemed, slept with its parents on the inside position, being then between the mother and the wall. It was nourished at five o'clock on Sunday morning, MRS PYM falling to sleep with the infant still at the breast. Again waking at 7.20, the mother was startled to find her child was dead, though apparently it was in its usual position, and was not covered by the bed clothes Dr J. B. Richardson believed that the child, whilst being nourished, was accidentally over-lain, pointing out that after being freely fed very slight pressure would have occasioned suffocation. The Jury brought in a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

SUDDEN DEATH AT BIDEFORD - A verdict of "Death though failure of the heart's action" was returned by a Jury at an Inquest held on Tuesday evening in the Board School-room, East-the-Water, Bideford, by the Deputy Coroner (Mr C. Smale), on the body of an old man named JOSEPH AUSTIN. From the evidence given it appeared that the deceased was taken ill in the yard of his house in Torrington-street. He was assisted indoors by his daughter, and placed upon a chair. A doctor was sent for, but deceased expired in about two minutes.

Saturday 27 September 1890, Issue 7274 – Gale Document No. Y3200749782
THE FATAL FALL AT HEAVITREE - GEORGE TUCK, who it will be remembered, met with an accident through falling off the steps while cleaning glass at Heavitree, a few weeks ago, died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday between five and six o'clock.
THE INQUEST - Yesterday Mr W. H. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE TUCK, of Heavitree, who died on Thursday from injuries received on the 6th instant. ELIZABETH TUCK, of 3, Ellis' Buildings, Heavitree, identified the body as that of her late husband. She said he was 41 years of age, and by trade a mason having been in the employ of Mr Chamberlain, of the Ship Inn, Heavitree. Emma Vickary, of Heavitree, deposed to seeing the deceased cleaning windows at Mr Chamberlain's on the 6th inst. He was standing on a pair of steps, and while in the act of turning round he fell to the ground. On going to his assistance she found him unconscious. The deceased was afterwards taken to his home, and there attended. The steps appeared to slip, which caused him to fall off. They were not broken. Elizabeth Towell, living at the Ship Inn, said she saw the deceased engaged in cleaning the windows on the date in question. About five minutes before the accident she cautioned him as to how the steps were placed, and said if he was not careful he would fall. He replied, "They were all right." but got off, pulled them out a little, although the cords were not then straightened as they should be. He was a steady man and perfectly sober at the time.
Mr Russell Coombe, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was admitted into the Institution on the 6th inst. He was suffering from a scalp wound, and was restless and somewhat delirious. From the time of his admission to the date of his death on Thursday he never properly recovered consciousness. The cause of death in his opinion was laceration of the brain substance. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 27 September 1890, Issue 7274 – Gale Document No. Y3200749780
THE RECENT BURNING FATALITY AT DAWLISH - The Inquest. - On Monday, before Mr S. Hacker (County Coroner) at Dawlish, an Inquest was held on the body of ANN EDMONDS, who died at the Cottage Hospital on Sunday from burns received through the bursting of a lamp, while deceased was in the act of blowing it out after getting in bed. CHARLES EDMONDS, baker, of Old Town-street, husband of deceased, said his wife was 35 years of age. About five o'clock on Saturday morning witness took his wife a cup of tea in bed. About six o'clock witness heard screams and then a crash followed. Deceased was then coming downstairs in her nightdress in flames. After some little time, with assistance, the flames were put out. His child in the cradle was taken out of the room by an older brother. John Hoare, butcher, gave evidence as to the means taken to put out the flames by MR EDMONDS and himself. John Burrows, butcher, who assisted to take deceased to the Hospital, said the only remark she made was, "To think I should blow out the lamp and set myself on fire like this." ELIZABETH EDMONDS, sister-in-law, stated that in conversation deceased said she was blowing down the chimney to put the light out when the lamp suddenly exploded. Mr A. de W. Baker, surgeon, who attended deceased, said that death resulted from shock to the system occasioned by the burns. The Jury, in accordance with the medical evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 11 October 1890, Issue 7286 – Gale Document No. Y3200749829
FATAL ACCIDENT AT WOODBURY - Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday on the body of HARRY SALTER, of Exton, Woodbury, who died in the above institution on Wednesday morning. The Jury, of which Mr Trapnell was Foreman, having viewed the body, ROBERT SALTER, farm labourer, of Exton, Woodbury, identified it as that of his son, aged fourteen years. From the evidence given by Ernest Henson, John Godfrey, and George Cornish, boys, of Woodbury, it appears that they had been with the deceased, employed by Mr Hallett, of Gilliford Farm, Woodbury, on the 13th September. Just after dinner all four were at play in the stables, two being upstairs and two beneath. Cornish endeavoured to place a piece of wood over a hole to stop those beneath from throwing things up when the wood fell on deceased's head. Mr R. Martin, assistant house surgeon, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, proved receiving the deceased into the institution on the 13th September, suffering from a depressed fracture of the skull. Deceased died on Wednesday morning about three o'clock from an abscess on the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 11 October 1890, Issue 7286 – Gale Document No. Y3200749855
INQUEST IN EXETER - The City Coroner (Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Tuesday, upon the body of GEORGE KINGDOM RADMORE. Mr Geo. Diggines was elected Foreman of the Jury. MRS ELIZA RADMORE, wife of the deceased, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her husband. He had been a farmer, but latterly had followed no occupation. He was sixty-one years of age. Witness last saw him alive on Saturday, the 4th of October, about ten in the morning. He left home to go to Thorverton. He seemed in his usual health when he left. He returned home in a cab. He could not stand then, but spoke to witness. She saw blood and asked him why he did not go to the Hospital. He said he would be taken to the Hospital in preference to having a doctor. Deceased said his knee gave way. By a Juror: Deceased frequently suffered from weakness of the knees. Charles Lugg, the cabman who drove deceased home, said he was at St. David's Station with his cab on Saturday evening when the 9.30 train from Thorverton came in. A young boy came to witness and told him that a gentleman had fallen down. Witness drown down to the place indicated, and found the deceased in the arms of two young men. Witness asked what was the matter, and he said his legs had given way, and he had fallen against the kerbstone. Deceased was sober at the time. His forehead was bandaged with pockethandkerchiefs. Deceased asked witness to drive him to his home. By the Foreman of the Jury: Deceased was attempting to walk home. Mr Martin, assistant house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received deceased into the Hospital on Saturday night about ten o'clock. Deceased was perfectly sensible, and had a cut over his right eyebrow, and there was a loss of power in both legs. Deceased remained in the same state until the next day about twelve o'clock when he had a very severe fainting attack, from which he never recovered. He died about 3.30 the same day. Witness made a post mortem examination, and found that deceased had suffered from chronic inflammation of the brain, which fully accounted for the symptoms described in the evidence. Witness did not think the cut over his eye had anything to do with deceased's death. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 11 October 1890, Issue 7286 – Gale Document No. Y3200749836
FOUND DEAD IN A TRAIN AT NORTHTAWTON - The adjourned Inquest on the body of MRS MARY ANN ROBINS, who was found dead in a railway carriage on Wednesday, was resumed at the Railway Hotel, Northtawton, last evening before Mr W. Burd (County Coroner). WILLIAM ROBINS, of St. Sidwell's, son, identified the deceased as that of his mother. She was seventy-two years of age. He saw the deceased about a fortnight ago, when she was in robust health. Mr George Banbury, M.R.C.S., said he made a post mortem examination and found deceased died from syncope resulting from failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." MR ROBINS thanked all who had been connected with the matter, and said it was through the Press that he had been able to identify the remains.

Saturday 18 October 1890, Issue 7291 – Gale Document No. Y3200749875
SUDDEN DEATH AT WHIMPLE - A case of sudden death occurred at Whimple on Monday morning. About ten o'clock EMMA TURL, wife of WILLIAM TURL, of Lower Cobden Farm, went into the front garden for the purpose of shaking the cloth which had been used for breakfast and returned to the kitchen, where she was observed by a youth named George Salter, a farm servant, to reel and fall. The boy immediately called his master, who was at work in an adjoining field, and on MR TURL'S arrival he found his wife lying on the floor of the kitchen. She was not dead, but only breathed two or three times, and then expired. Dr Summers, of Broadclyst, was summoned, but his services were of no avail. It is stated that the deceased woman has enjoyed good health, and has never been attended by a medical man. She was 32 years of age. P.S. Pope, of Ottery St. Mary, who has charge of the case, has communicated with the Coroner, and an Inquest will be held. Heart disease is believed to be the cause of death.

Saturday 18 October 1890, Issue 7291 – Gale Document No. Y3200749897
THE FATAL FIRE AT EXMOUTH - The Inquest. - At Sage's Albion Inn, Exmouth, on Monday, an Inquest was held by Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy District Coroner, touching the death of RUETTA BASTIN, who was burned to death under terrible circumstances on Saturday morning last, at her residence in Albion-street. Superintendent Moore represented the Fire Brigade. The Jury, of which Mr A. Carter was Foreman, having been sworn, they went and viewed the body The first witness called was ELLEN AMELIA PORTBURY, widow, of No. 7, South Lawn-terrace, Heavitree, Exeter, who identified the deceased as that of her sister, who was 59 years of age, and was the widow of the late CAPTAIN ROBERT BASTIN, ship owner and master mariner, of Exmouth. Deceased had lived in the house where she was found dead ever since she was married. Witness had not seen her for three years, and deceased would not admit members of the family into her house. In reply to the Coroner, witness said she had no reason to suppose that deceased would put an end to her life. Deceased was very eccentric. Witness, continuing, said she thought the deceased must have let fall a lighted candle or lamp, which set something on fire. The Coroner began to put a question to the witness, but before Mr Cox could finish it she, in a very excited manner, said, "That is a question which I shall not answer; I know nothing of her (deceased). She is just like a stranger to me. I think it is not right for you (the Corone3r) to ask me such a question." Witness then left the room quickly. The Coroner said that witness must be re-called, but she did not come back. A Juror said there had been an estrangement between the family, and deceased seemed to have an idea that the family ere desirous of getting possession of her property, and getting her under their control. William Bibbings, a plumber, residing opposite the deceased's house, said the woman was of most peculiar habits. He did not think there was anything wrong with deceased's mind. Witness had never seen her the worse for liquor, and he had spoken to her every day. At 9.30 on Friday evening deceased spoke to witness by partly opening the front door. Witness sent over a meal to deceased about a quarter to elevens, but the woman did not come down to the door. At ten minutes to six the next morning he was in his workshop when his wife called him out and he noticed that there was smoke coming from the deceased's front window. Witness tried the door but it was locked, and he burst door open. He went upstairs but found that door locked also. He forced it open, and there saw the deceased, whom he dragged out on the landing. The deceased was dead, and her head was still burning. Witness saw something which appeared to be a lamp by the side of the body. George Perriam, of Albion-street, proved going into the house with the last witness to put out the fire. He had seen the deceased the worse for liquor lately. Mary Jane Bricknell, a widow, residing in the next house to where deceased had lived, said that on waking up on Saturday morning about half-past six, she found her bedroom full of smoke. She thought that something was wrong, and immediately aroused the other persons in the house. On going outside she saw smoke coming from deceased's window. It was not the first time she had discovered smoke coming from the house. Dr Hodgson, of Exmouth, said he was called to the house about six o'clock on Saturday morning, and on arriving there, he found the deceased dead. She was very much blackened by the fire, and her hands were burnt off. In his opinion the deceased was not dead until she was burned owing to the position of her arms. He considered she had been burning a long time before she was found. Witness, after examining the woman, ordered her removal to the mortuary. Thomas Rowsell, a painter, of Charles-street, Exmouth, proved being present at the time of the fire, and helping to put it out. The Coroner said it was satisfactory to know that the firemen were quickly at the house. Supt. Moore said in his opinion the fire originated through the lamp. P.S. Clements produced an ordinary room lamp and an oil can with the mouth-piece burnt off. He said he found it on the floor near the table when he went to the house about half-past six on Saturday morning. Witness found the lamp in three pieces. The floor was covered with rubbish. There were candles in the house, both upstairs and down. Superintendent Moore said he found three jars of brandy in a room downstairs, and one appeared to have been fresh opened. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was very unfortunate that the deceased had given way to drink, and the house appeared to have been in a most wretched state. It was difficult to say what was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," but could not say how the fire occurred.

Saturday 25 October 1890, Issue 7297 – Gale Document No. Y3200749908
SINGULAR DEATH AT BEER - JAMES HORNER, a mason's labourer, and son of SIDNEY HORNER, watchmaker, of Beer, near Seaton, has died under peculiar circumstances. It is alleged that the young man and his father quarrelled last February, and the father struck his son on the head with a stick. Since then the young man has been subject to fits, and has been under the treatment of Dr Evans, senr., of Seaton. Last week he took to his bed, and died on Sunday morning. A post mortem examination has been ordered, and an Inquest will be held.

Saturday 25 October 1890, Issue 7297 – Gale Document No. Y3200749919
SAD SUICIDE AT TORQUAY - The Inquest. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr Fraser) on Monday at the Torbay infirmary held an Enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE HENRY HEBBES, a visitor, who was on Sunday morning found dead in Upton Valley, with his head almost severed from his body there, but the gash across the throat stretched almost from ear to ear. Mr Bubb was chosen Foreman, and the only witnesses called were P.C. Hockeridge, who discovered the body, and Mr G. Hebbes, gentleman, of Oxford, uncle of deceased. The constable said he found the body at 6.50 a.m. on Sunday in Mr Phillips' nursery. Five feet away was a pool of blood and still nearer the body – it was quite still – was the razor which he produced. There were no signs of a struggle having taken place. MR HEBBES was not aware that his nephew had this razor in his possession. Deceased suffered from severe pains in the head, darting from temple to temple, and while anticipating a sudden death like his wife's he had never hinted at taking his life. Since the decease of his wife he had been very low spirited, and his medical attendant advised a change and lively company. The Jury at once returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 1 November 1890, Issue 7303 – Gale Document No. Y3200749944
FATAL LAMP ACCIDENT AT EXWICK - The Inquest. - At the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday the City Coroner (Mr H. Hooper) held an Inquest touching the death of ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE, who died in the Hospital that morning. HENRY PARTRIDGE, a porter, in the employ of the Great Western Railway, living at Exwick, said the body the Jury had viewed was that of his mother, aged 56, wife of JAMES PARTRIDGE, gardener. On Saturday evening, 18th October, he was informed that his mother had upset a lamp and got badly burned. He went home and his father told him that he had retired to rest when the accident occurred. The deceased was on the Saturday suffering from a bad cold, and witness's father said his mother was carrying a cup of elder tea in one hand and a paraffin lamp in the other when the accident happened. His father went o deceased's assistance, and she was taken to the Hospital in a trap. Rosa Richards, 12, daughter of Henry Richards, a packer on the Great Western Railway, living at Exwick, said on the night in question, between ten and eleven o'clock, she went into deceased's house. MRS PARTRIDGE who was then sitting on a chair near a table, soon proceeded to get a cup of elder tea. There was a lamp burning on the table, and shortly afterwards witness wished the deceased good-night, and proceeded home. Within five minutes witness was going down the hill, when she saw the deceased in the roadway, with her clothes all in flames. She called for assistance, and witness's mother came with a sack and extinguished the flames. Maria Richards, mother of the last witness, residing two doors from MR PARTRIDGE, deposed t seeing the deceased outside her house, leaning against the wall, in flames, and shouting out, "I am burning; I am burning." Witness ran back to her house and procured a sack and extinguished the flames. Shortly afterwards witness brought the deceased to the Hospital. Deceased said she had a cup of elder tea in one hand and was carrying a lamp in the other, when the lamp turned over, or fell over, and caught her dress on fire. Mr Russel Coombe, house surgeon, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said on Saturday evening he received the deceased at the institution. She was very seriously burnt about the face and arms. there were also burns on the legs. Deceased was put to bed, and the burns were carefully dressed. Deceased seemed to favourably progress, but the wounds were of a serious nature. During the past few days deceased had been gradually sinking, and she died that morning. The cause of death was the burns. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 1 November 1890, Issue 7303 – Gale Document No. Y3200749941
INQUEST AT CHUDLEIGH - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest at Chudleigh on Tuesday touching the death of a little girl named CAUSELEY, who died on Monday through the effects of poison, supposed to have been caused by eating a pilchard on Saturday. The case possessed some peculiar bearings, the cause of death seeming to puzzle the medical men, Dr Wade (Chudleigh) and Dr Harry (|Newton), the former maintaining that it was a case of fish poisoning. This failing, however, to satisfy the Jury, they ultimately returned a verdict "That the deceased died through Misadventure, owing to some poisonous irritant accidentally taken."

Saturday 8 November 1890, Issue 7309 – Gale Document No. Y3200749991
SHOCKING FATALITY AT DEVONPORT - Yesterday at Devonport a shocking fatality happened. It appears that a conductor named ROCKETT, a boy employed on a 'bus belonging to the company which is competing with the Three Towns tramway, descended from the front of the 'bus when in Fore-street, and slipping, fell under the wheels, which went over his neck. He was immediately removed to the Hospital, where he expired shortly afterwards. An Inquest will be held today by the Devonport Coroner (Mr Vaughan).

Saturday 15 November 1890, Issue 7315 – Gale Document No. Y3200750014
A WOMAN FOUND DEAD AT TOPSHAM - The Inquest. - At Duffett's Bridge Inn, Topsham, on Wednesday Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy District Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of JANE BUCKLAND, a married woman, of Ebford, in the parish of Woodbury. GEORGE BUCKLAND, labour, identified the body of the deceased as that of his wife, aged 44 years, who he last saw alive at half-0past six on Monday morning. Witness had not seen his wife the worst for liquor. Deceased was in the habit of going to Topsham with butter and poultry. Margaret Harris, a married woman of Ebford, stated that the deceased went to Exmouth with her on Monday morning, and returned to Topsham by the three train. Both went home about six o'clock, and witness last saw the deceased at eight o'clock at Ebford, when BUCKLAND expressed her intention of going to Topsham again. Deceased was not the worse for liquor, and she did not complain of feeling unwell. Answering a Juryman, witness said the deceased and her husband were on good terms. She had seen the deceased the worse for liquor. Mary Ann Kerridge, a single woman, of the Duke of Monmouth Inn, Monmouth-street, proved supplying the deceased with a drop of whiskey at quarter past ten on Monday night. Samuel Davey, a miller, of Monmouth-street, said that while proceeding to work on Tuesday morning at quarter to seven he found the deceased in the hedge in Riversmeet-road. Witness afterwards fetched a medical man, and gave information to the police. P.C. Phillips, stationed at Topsham, gave evidence as to receiving the body in his charge from the last witness, and removing it to the Bridge Inn. Witness had been informed that deceased went into the Globe Inn, Lighter Inn, and Duke of Monmouth Inn on Monday night. BUCKLAND was a woman of notorious intemperate habits, and Phillips had very often seen the deceased the worse for liquor. The weather on the night in question was very boisterous. Dr MacArthur, surgeon of 2, Riversmeet-terrace, said he was called to see the deceased in the morning in Riversmeet-road, and on arriving there he found the deceased dead. On examination witness found there were no marks of violence to account for death. Witness had since made a post mortem examination, and, in his opinion, death was caused by syncope, owing to failure of the heart's action, due partly to over-exertion during the day, and probably accelerated by her intemperance. The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 15 November 1890, Issue 7315 – Gale Document No. Y3200750030
INQUEST IN EXETER - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court on Thursday on the body of PHILIP THOMAS PILL, aged five weeks. BESSIE FANNY PILL, wife of THOMAS PILL, labourer, of Tuckwell's Buildings, Exe Island, the mother of the child, said the deceased was put to bed at 9.15 in the evening in his usual health. At five o'clock the next morning witness nursed the deceased. Witness awoke again about 6.15 that morning and found the child dead inside the bed nearest to the wall. His face was not covered up with the bedclothes. Deceased's life was not insured. The child had not been medically attended since his birth. By a Juror: Did the child have a fit during the night? - Witness: No. – By the Coroner: Was the child restless? - Witness: Not at all. Mr McKeith, of St. Thomas, said he was called that morning about 6.30 a.m. to go to attend the deceased. When he arrived at the house the deceased was dead. Witness had examined the body, but found no marks of violence. The child appeared well nourished. In his opinion death was due to convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 22 November 1890, Issue 7321 – Gale Document No. Y3200750045
DEATH OF MR J. B. LOUSADA, J.P. - Death has removed from our midst one of the oldest and most highly valued Justices of the Peace in Devonshire, MR JOHN BARUCH LOUSADA. The mournful event – which will be received in all circles of society where he was known, with great regret – occurred at an early hour on Monday morning at his residence, Redliffe, Denmark-road, Exeter. Although ripe in years, having only a short time since attained his 81st birthday, his decease under such sudden circumstances came as a shock to his relatives and friends. Up to the very last he has enjoyed good health, and so late as Sunday evening he appeared most cheerful, and in the morning attended Divine service at the Exeter Cathedral. He was made a County Magistrate in the year 1856 and for many years sat on the Bench at Sidmouth, when residing at Peak Hill. On removing to Exeter he took his seat at the Wonford Petty Sessions, held at the Castle of Exeter, where he has been a most regular attendant, and as an administrator of justice his presence was most valued. He was present on Tuesday week. On retiring to rest on Sunday he appeared in his usual health, but early on Monday morning he was seized with a fit of coughing, and before medical aid could be summoned he had passed away. He was at one time an officer in one of the Volunteer corps in Exeter. He was also connected with many institutions, but living a retired life many of his kindly and charitable acts were concealed. He leaves a widow and eleven children, - five daughters and six sons – to mourn their loss.
INQUEST - On Monday Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at Redcliffe to Enquire into the circumstances attending the death. The Rev. T. J. Ponting, son-in-law of the deceased, identified the body. He said he was called between 4 and 5 a.m. that morning, and on going to the deceased he found him in bed dead. He was informed that he had been restless before his death having been troubled with cough. He also breathed very heavily and afterwards died. He saw the deceased on Sunday evening about five o'clock, when he appeared in his usual health. Mr A. E. S. Perkins said the deceased had enjoyed very good health, and he had only attended him for colds for some years past, and an attack of angina pectoris. He saw him a fortnight since, when he returned from Plymouth, and he visited him professionally on Monday last That morning, about half-past four, on arriving at Redcliffe he found the deceased dead. Death was due to natural causes, probably from syncope owing to failure of the heart's action. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, and the Coroner and Jury expressed their sympathy with the family.

Saturday 29 November 1890, Issue 7327 – Gale Document No. Y3200750108
AN EXETER MAN DROWNED AT FALMOUTH - At Falmouth yesterday an Inquest was held on the body of HENRY HILL, of Exete3r, aged 43, and formerly mate of the schooner Florenco Vivian. It appeared from the evidence that deceased fell into the water from a boat off the Breakwater, and on being rescued and taken to the Royal Cornwall Sailors' Home was kept waiting a quarter of an hour while an admission note was obtained from the secretary. Deceased died about six hours afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and suggested that the purveyor at the Sailors' Home should be invested with powe3r to admit accident cases at once.

SAD DEATH OF A WOMAN IN EXETER - Inquest this Afternoon. - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an inquest at the Exeter police Court this afternoon on the body of ELIZABETH ATKINS, who died last evening at her residence, Gatty's-court, Exeter. The first witness called was GEORGINA BREALY, wife of a labourer, living at Polsloe-road, who identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her aunt. Deceased was the widow of WILLIAM ATKINS, and was 69 years of age on the 4th May last. Witness saw the deceased alive for the last time in the Exeter Market yesterday. Deceased was then in her usual state of health. Deceased was not a teetotaller. John Horrill, ostler, employed at the Coach and Horses, said he had known deceased for about twelve months. He saw her last evening about 9.30 at the Coach and Horses. Deceased went into the tap-room and drank a little brandy. Deceased was sober at the time, and after she had drank the brandy she left the house. Witness did not see the deceased again. Robert Tout, a labourer, living at No. 9, Gatty's-court, deposed that deceased lodged in his house, occupying one room. Deceased came in last evening about a quarter to ten o'clock. During the night witness's wife heard a noise downstairs, and went and found deceased was lying at the bottom of the stairs on her back. Witness spoke to her, but failed to get an answer. Dr Perkins was sent for. There was blood issuing from deceased's mouth. Dr Perkins was out of town, and Dr Mortimer, surgeon, said he had examined the body of the deceased. He found a large wound at the back of her head, and blood was flowing from her mouth. In witness's opinion death was due to haemorrhage of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 29 November 1890, Issue 7327 – Gale Document No. Y3200750081
SAD DEATH IN EXETER - The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at 58, Summerland-street, on Thursday, on the body of HARRIETT LOUISA PIPER. The old lady, it will be remembered, is one of the two sisters anent whose destitution numerous comments were made a short time since in a contemporary. The deceased and her sister had both applied for one of the almshouses bequeathed by a long since deceased citizen, Mr Wynard, for the benefit of destitute or infirm persons who had been employed in the tucking and weaving trade. The Inquest was held before Mr Henry Wilcock Hooper (Coroner), and the first witness called was LOUISA HARRIETT GILL, wife of a brewer living at Catherine-street, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her late mother, widow of the late SAMUEL PIPER, of this city. Deceased was residing, up to the time of her death,, at No. 58, Summerland-street. She was 81 years of age. She had previously resided at Catherine-street up to the time of a recent fire, and had suffered for some time from spasms of the heart, although she had not lately been under medical treatment. On Tuesday evening the deceased was at witness's house and complained of being cold, and witness gave her some tea. Deceased left witness's house alone about 6.30. She lived with her sister, who was 90 years of age. The deceased was latterly a straw bonnet maker by trade. Witness did not hear anything more of her until eleven o'clock the next morning, when she was sent for. Witness on her arrival found the deceased dead in bed. Mrs Sarah Ann Edgecumbe, wife of Charles Mason Edgecumbe, living at 58, Summerland-street, said that the deceased had been living with witness for six weeks, and also her sister, MISS HUTCHINGS. The latter came to witness's door, and said that her sister was dying. Witness went to deceased's assistance, immediately, and found her sitting up in bed with her hands across her chest. She said that she was in dreadful pain and thought she was dying. Witness called her husband and set him for some brandy. Witness could not get any brandy as the public-houses were closed, but as she had some port wine in the house she heated it with boiling water and put some ginger and sugar in it. Deceased drank it and was sick and said that she felt easier. Witness sat by her until three o'clock when deceased went off to sleep. Witness went to her again shortly after seven o'clock and found her lying just as she had been left. Witness thought she was living as she was warm. Witness went for a Mrs Shepherd, and when she arrived she pronounced life to be extinct. Mrs Shepherd went for Dr Mortimer. William Mortimer, surgeon, of Exeter, said that he was called on Wednesday morning about ten o'clock to go to No. 58, Summerland-street, to see the deceased. When witness arrived he found that the deceased was dead. Witness examined the body, which was lying in a sleeping attitude, and found no marks of violence, and the body was almost cold. In his opinion life had been extinct for two or three hours. Witness considered the cause of death was failure of the heart's action, accelerated by the coldness of the night. Mr Edgcumbe said that the deceased had not wanted for anything while she had been under his wife's care. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 6 December 1890, Issue 7333 – Gale Document No. Y3200750138
DEATH OF MR WILLIAM HUXTABLE - MR WILLIAM HUXTABLE, who has been a prominent and highly respected citizen for many years, expired on Saturday evening in a painfully sudden manner. the deceased gentleman was for some days last week "out of sorts," and felt acutely the severe weather which set in a few days ago. Nothing of a serious nature, however, was apprehended, and the venerable gentleman was "out and about" so late as Saturday evening last. During the evening he complained of being unwell, and on reaching his chamber he fell to the floor and expired before medical aid could be called in. MR HUXTABLE was a prominent citizen, not only as a commercial man, but as a member of the governing authority It is only justice to his memory to say that his public efforts were invariably in the direction of benefiting the city in which he for so many years successfully traded. In one or two instances his action was not, however, in accord with the views of some of his colleagues at the Council who were not of the same way of thinking politically, and not long since the Conservatives in the Council declined to invite the deceased to remain for a further term on the Aldermanic bench. Although at the time a considerable amount of feeling was expressed in this matter, and it was believed that his object was to serve his party rather than the citizens generally, we think it may be fairly assumed that in the extraordinary action in connection with the St. Mary Major's Ward election, whereby Mr A. E. Dunn was returned by the casting vote of MR HUXTABLE that gentleman might have erred by inadvertence rather than design. MR HUXTABLE'S death will be hard of throughout the city with deep regret, and even those who were his strongest opponents in a political sense will agree that in his demise the city has lost one of her worthiest sons.
THE INQUEST - At The Priory, the Mint, on Tuesday, Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MR WILLIAM HUXTABLE, a retired builder of the city, and an ex Alderman, who, as was reported in our issue of Monday evening died suddenly at his residence on Saturday evening. Miss Jessie Tucker, residing at The Priory, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of WILLIAM HUXTABLE, 83 years of age, and said that the deceased was out of doors on Saturday last. At 10.30 the same night the deceased retired to rest, and shortly afterwards she heard a fall, and on witness entering the deceased's room she found him lying on the floor. Dr Henderson was immediately sent for. He said he found the deceased in bed dead. In his opinion from the appearance of the body, death resulted from syncope. The Coroner said to him the case as a very painful one. He had known MR HUXTABLE for a great many years, and also his predecessor, Mr Goldsworthy, and it was a very painful thing to him to preside there that evening. He proceeded to refer in eulogistic terms to the deceased, and to the respect in which he was held by his fellow citizens. Mr Darke (Foreman of the Jury) said he would have much preferred that there had been no Inquest, but the Coroner had thought it was necessary. The Coroner: I have always laid down during the thirty-seven years I have held this office a particular rule upon which I have always acted, to make no difference between a rich man and a poor man, although it has been stated, I believe, in the papers that I give one law to the rich and another to the poor. But I don't think anyone can say that. The Foreman endorsed the remarks of the Coroner concerning the late MR HUXTABLE, and said an Inquest was always a very painful thing. The Coroner said he trusted the Jury would agree with him that the case was one into which an Inquiry should be held. The point for consideration was whether the death was a sudden one or not. Mr Tapscott said after hearing the concluding remarks of Dr Henderson he perfectly agreed with the remarks of the Coroner. Up to that time he did not think an Inquest was necessary. Dr Henderson pointed out that when a death occurred from an unexpected cause the case was under the Coroner's ruling.

Saturday 13 December 1890, Issue 7339 – Gale Document No. Y3200750148
THE SAD DROWNING FATALITY AT TOTNES - "Accidental Drowning" was the verdict of a Jury empanelled by Dr Fraser (Deputy Coroner), at the Bull Inn, Totnes, on Tuesday, to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES WOODLEY, aged sixteen years, who was found drowned on Monday morning last in the mill leat at Totnes, as reported in the "Evening Post" of Monday night. The Jury, of which Mr E. L. Middleton was Foreman, appended a rider to their verdict, urging the necessity of a wall being built to separate the leat from the footpath, in order to prevent further danger to the public Several witnesses gave evidence, including John Potter, who proved seeing the body of the deceased in the water on the morning in question.

Saturday 13 December 1890, Issue 7339 – Gale Document No. Y3200750150
SUICIDE OF A RETIRED EXETER TRADESMAN - The Inquest. - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Exeter Police Court on Monday into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN MERRY, a retired butcher, who attempted suicide by cutting his throat on Wednesday. ELIZABETH MERRY, widow of the deceased, said that the deceased was a butcher, living at No. 9, Brook Green-terrace, Well-lane. He was 71 years of age. The deceased took breakfast with her on Wednesday the 3rd of December. She saw nothing unusual in his manner. She missed the deceased during the morning, and went in search, and found him in the w.c. She saw blood coming from under the door, and ran to the front of her house and called a man named Milford, a neighbour. Deceased was taken into the house, and medical assistance was sent for. Mr Brown and Mr Mortimer speedily arriving. There had been no angry words at the breakfast table. By a Juror: The deceased had lost about £800 in the Wet of England Bank failure, and had also lost a little rent money, amounting to about £3. This seemed to have preyed upon his mind. Witness told him that that would not ruin him, and she tried to cheer him up. Deceased appeared to be all right and ate his breakfast as usual. Mr James Milford, a ex-policeman, said he was called by the last witness on the 3rd of December. MRS MERRY told him that her husband had cut his throat. Witness went to the deceased in the w.c., and with assistance, took the deceased who was unconscious into the kitchen and laid him on his back. By the time witness had got the deceased into the kitchen, Inspector Skinner was upon the scene and asked MRS MERRY what her husband had cut his throat with. She replied a razor, which the inspector took charge of. Inspector Skinner deposed that he was called on the morning that he was called on the morning of Dec. 3rd to go to MR MERRY'S. Witness saw deceased in the front kitchen unconscious with his throat cut. Witness produced the razor, and said he took it from a shelf in the back kitchen. It was stained with blood. MRS MERRY took the razor from the w.c. and put it on the shelf. Witness had known the deceased for a long time, and he always found him a very steady man. Dr Brown said he was fetched to go to Brook Green-terrace on Wednesday last, being told that MR MERRY had cut his throat. He found deceased was unconscious and nearly pulseless. Witness examined him and found a gash in the upper part of his throat, extending about four or five inches in length, and two inches deep. It had severed the wind pipe, and cut the base of the tongue. Witness wished for assistance, and sent for Dr Mortimer, who came shortly after. When Dr Mortimer came the deceased was removed upstairs. Witness, with the last-named's assistance, sewed up the gash. Witness did not expect the deceased would live, and he expired this morning at 5.30. Death was due first to the gash, and secondly to congestion of the lungs which set in on Friday last. By the Foreman: Deceased would not have died if congestion of the lungs had not set in. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporary Insane."

Saturday 3 January 1891, Issue 7355 – Gale Document No. Y3200750246
SUDDEN DEATH AT TORQUAY - At the Castle Inn, Torquay, on Monday, an Inquest was held before Mr Coroner Sidney Hacker, on the body of a woman named ELIZABETH WHARRAN, aged 65, of Fern Villa, St. Luke's-road, who was found dead at her house on Saturday last. It appeared from the evidence that for over twenty years deceased had lived alone and had never been seen outdoors. On Saturday a boy in the employ of Mrs Smale, baker, of Union-street, called to deliver the bread and found the door locked. He called the neighbours, and on forcing the door the woman was found lying on the bed quite dead. Dr Karkeck was called and made a post mortem examination, when he discovered traces of heart disease. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 10 January 1891, Issue 7361 – Gale Document No. Y3200750287
SHOCKING FATALITY AT ST. DAVID'S STATION - On Tuesday morning soon after 9 o'clock a shocking fatal accident occurred at the St. David's Railway Station, Exeter, to a man named JOHN WEBBER. It appears that the unfortunate man followed the occupation of a packer, and was employed by the Great Western Railway Company. He went to work about seven o'clock that morning, his duties being to repair the road between the metals used by the London and South Western Railway Company at St. David's Station. A fellow workman named William Franklin was also with him. All went well until nine o'clock, when deceased was removing some bricks from the road just opposite the bookstall. Franklin then remarked to the deceased, "Get out of the way JACK; A South Western is signalled." The former immediately got upon the platform, but WEBBER continued working. Soon after Franklin again warned the deceased of the danger, and asked him to get outside the rails. By this time the train was about 100 yards away and WEBBER appeared to have become bewildered and hardly knew which way to go. He, however, made for the platform and was about half-way up when the engine caught him by the side. The unfortunate fellow was taken carried along the edge of the platform, his legs being beneath. The driver of the engine immediately applied the break, but could not stop until the deceased had been taken on quite 30 yards. WEBBER having been got upon the platform, the guard of the train, assisted by Inspector Parkhouse, who was soon in attendance, bandaged up the poor fellow's wounds as best they could. The ambulance was brought into use, and Dr Moon, who was sent for, was met on the hill leading to the Station. He ordered WEBBER to be taken to his house at once, and there his wounds, which were of a very serious nature, were dressed. At Dr Moon's request he was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but before arriving at that institution WEBBER had expired. The body was then removed to the mortuary at the Police Court. The train was the 6.25 a.m. from Plymouth, and the number of the engine, 357, the driver being James Spearman. It is usual for men repairing the road to stand in the six-foot way when a train is signalled, and had the deceased done this instead of getting on to the platform, which is more difficult, there is no doubt that the accident would not have occurred. WEBBER, who is about 60 years of age, and a widower, residing at Exwick, had only recently been discharged from the Hospital from injuries received by being knocked down by an engine whilst repairing the metals.
THE INQUEST - Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday on the body of JOHN M. WEBBER, widower, aged 59, of Exwick, a packer on the Great Western Railway, who was killed under shocking circumstances at St. David's Railway Station on Tuesday morning. Mr H. J. Foster (police inspector on the London and South Western Railway) and Mr Green (police inspector on the Great Western Railway) watched the proceedings on behalf of the railway companies. The Jury, of which Mr G. Hawkins was Foreman, having viewed the body, MARY ELIZABETH WEBBER, a single woman, of Exwick, identified the deceased as that of her father, who was in good health when she last saw him on Tuesday morning on his going to work at seven o'clock. About half-past nine the same day witness heard that her father had been killed on the railway. In reply to Jurors, witness stated that her father met with an accident about five months ago, near the same spot, and since that he had been rather deaf in one ear. William Franklin, platelayer on the G.W.R., who was working with the deceased, between the rails used by the London and South Western Railway at the time of the accident, gave evidence as to his having asked WEBBBER to stand outside the lines, as a South Western train was signalled. Witness got upon the platform, but as deceased did not move he again warned him of the danger. WEBBER hesitated for a moment, but instead of going out in the six-foot way he began to get upon the platform. The train, however, was soon upon him, and before he could get out of its way the engine carried him along some distance. William Parkhouse, inspector on the Great Western Railway, stated that he sent for a medical man as soon as the accident happened and helped to bandage a large wound at the back of the head. The deceased was put on the ambulance and witness and other men took WEBBER to Dr Moon's house. The wounds were dressed and the unfortunate man taken to the hospital, but the deceased had expired before he reached that institution. James Spearman, driver of the 6.25 South Western train from Plymouth on Tuesday morning, deposed that he reached St. David's Station just after nine, and as soon as he saw the deceased on the edge of the platform he applied the continuous brake. Before the train, however, was brought to a standstill the engine had struck the deceased. Dr Moon said that when the deceased arrived at his house the wounds were bleeding profusely. After dressing the wound witness ordered WEBBER'S removal to the hospital. On arriving at that institution it was discovered that deceased was dead, and he was then taken to the mortuary. Dr Moon afterwards made a more careful examination and found WEBBER had a compound fracture of the left thigh, and also a fracture of the right leg below the knee. There was also a wound on the left hand and at the back of the head. The right leg appeared to have been completely smashed. The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a most sad and painful one. The deceased appeared to have had a good character during the many years he had been in the service of the Great Western Railway. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and exonerated the deceased's mate and the engine driver from blame.

Saturday 17 January 1891, Issue 7367 – Gale Document No. Y3200750349
INQUEST IN EXETER - This Afternoon. - At the Exeter Police Court this afternoon Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest touching the death of a child named WALTER GEORGE PRING SEWARD, aged five months. From the evidence of the mother (MARY SEWARD) widow, of 6, Easton Buildings, Castle-street, it appeared that the child was all right when she got up from bed this morning, but soon after deceased was taken ill as if in a fit, and died before medical assistance arrived. Answering the Coroner, witness said she had been a widow for eight years, and had three children living. Dr Brash, who was called to attend the deceased, stated that in his opinion the child died from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

An Inquest was also held this afternoon on the body of ALICE ETHEL HOLMAN, aged six weeks. CHARLOTTE M. HOLMAN, of East-court, Smythen-street, the mother, said that when the child was put to bed last night it was quite well, but on witness awaking this morning about half-past seven she found it dead. Answering the Coroner, witness said the child was well covered with clothes, but It did not prevent its breathing. Dr Brash said he examined the child and in his opinion death was due to convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 24 January 1891, Issue 7372 – Gale Document No. Y3200750366
THE LATE SERGEANT-MAJOR ELMSLIE - Inquest at Exminster. - An Inquest was held before Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, at the Stowey and Daniel Arms, Exminster, yesterday, on the body of ALEXANDER ELMSLIE, formerly a Quartermaster-Sergeant of one of the Batteries of Artillery stationed at Topsham Barracks, but lately Instructor of a Volunteer Battery at Dundee. It appeared from the evidence that for some time past the deceased had been very depressed, and had suffered from absence of memory. By medical advice he came to Exeter with his wife and family three months since, his doctor entertaining the opinion that a change of air and scene would led to a restoration of health. A month's stay in Exeter not having the desired result, the deceased's leave was prolonged, and towards the end of the year he was much brighter, and his wife anticipated that ere long he would be able to return to duty. Memory, however, did not permanently return to him, and on one occasion he was absent from home during the greater part of the day, being unable to recollect the road back to Heavitree, where he was living. On New Year's-day the deceased, who seemed much as usual, said he was going out for a walk; he was not quite clear where, but he should return for dinner. Nothing further was seen of him by his wife until Thursday, when she was called upon to view his body, which had been taken out of the Canal near the Exminster drawbridge. It transpired at the Inquest that on the day of his disappearance the deceased was met by someone, of whom he inquired the way to cross the river. No one saw him after this. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The deceased, who bore an excellent character, leaves a widow and five children, the oldest of whom is 10 years of age.

Saturday 24 January 1891, Issue 7372 – Gale Document No. Y3200750365
SAD CASE OF SUICIDE IN EXETER - At an early hour this morning MR S. T. GILBERT, boot and shoe maker, of 103, Fore-street, Exeter, shot himself while in his bedroom. As far as can be ascertained at present it would seem that MR GILBERT retired about one o'clock to his bedroom, leaving MRS GILBERT downstairs. Shortly after the servant, a girl named Moyle, appears to have heard a report of firearms, and on going to the room from whence the noise proceeded, and finding it full of smoke, she ran downstairs and told her mistress. An examination of the bedroom showed that MR GILBERT was dead, having shot himself through the head. MRS GILBERT and her servant ran for assistance, and in the street met Mr Edwards, the steward of the Liberal Club, who was on his way home. He at once proceeded to the bedroom, and was followed almost immediately by P.C. Davey, who was on his beat, and seeing a commotion in the street hastened up to ascertain what was amiss. s They found the deceased lying back on the bed with a bullet wound through his head, and quite dead, and the weapon with which the rash act was committed was lying on the floor at his feet. It was a small "Bulldog" revolver, apparently quite new, and on the table was a box containing forty-nine cartridges, the fiftieth having been inserted in one of the chambers of the revolver and discharged, and muzzle of the weapon having, apparently, been placed to the unfortunate man's mouth. Deceased was partly undressed. P.C. Davey at once took charge, and sent for medical assistance, and Mr C. E. Bell, the police-surgeon, was soon upon the spot, but his services were of no avail, and, indeed, death must have been instantaneous. MR GILBERT was a much-respected tradesman, and general sorrow was evinced as soon as the sad event became known. At present no reason can be assigned for the act. He leaves a widow and young family.
THE INQUEST - The Inquest on the body of the deceased was held this afternoon at three o'clock, before the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) at the new Police Station. The first witness called was MRS SARAH ANN GILBERT, who said she resided at 103, Fore-street, and was the widow of the deceased, SAMUEL THOMAS GILBERT. Her husband was s46 years of age and carried on business as a boot and shoe maker. On the previous evening her husband was intoxicated, and they were sitting together in the sitting-room until deceased left to go to bed. This was about quarter past one o'clock. She had had no angry words with her husband; in fact he appeared to be in good spirits. He took as a rule about a quart of brandy per day, which he usually drank himself. She did not drink any yesterday. She heard the noise upstairs about two minutes after her husband went to bed. It sounded as though something fell on the floor. She at once proceeded to the bedroom and found deceased lying on the bed on his back. He was dressed, save his coat. There was a quantity of blood about his face. Witness called "SAM" but receiving no answer she woke up the servant, who had gone to bed. She had five children also in the house, the eldest being sixteen years. Witness afterwards called up some neighbours. She was not aware at the time that deceased had any firearms in his possession. Deceased was not sober when he went to bed. By a Juror: Did he ever threaten his life before? Witness: Yes, on several occasions. He threatened to blow his brains out in the Jubilee year.
Alice Moyle, a domestic servant, in the employ of the last witness, said she last saw deceased alive at 11.30. He was then drinking brandy; she saw him dilute it with a little water. She heard deceased come upstairs, and was aroused by the report of a gun about two minutes afterwards. MRS GILBERT then rushed into her room and said, "Be quick; MR GILBERT has shot himself." She corroborated the last witness regarding the position of the deceased. A Mr Edwards was the first man to come upon the scene. She did not hear any disturbance between the deceased and his wife. In reply to a Juror, witness stated that she had not seen any firearms previous to this occasion.
Mr Frederick Edwards, a club manager, who was passing down Fore-street, about 1.30 a.m., proved rendering assistance, and bore out the previous evidence. Witness, on looking about the room, found the revolver produced.
Mr C. E. Bell, the police surgeon, corroborated the previous witnesses as to the position of the body. There were no signs of any struggle, and blood was flowing freely from deceased's mouth and nostrils. Deceased was quite dead when witness arrived. He turned the body over, and found blood issuing from a wound in the back of the head. He could find no point of entrance or exit of the bullet. Upon examination of the mouth he found a hole in the upper palate. The revolver produced would cause such a wound. The cause of death would be destruction of the brain, haemorrhage, and death would be instantaneous. In reply to a Juror witness said it was quite impossible for it to be an accident.
Dr Harris said he was the medical attendant of the deceased. He had attended him for several complaints during the past ten years. He had also attended deceased for illness from the effects of alcohol. He had frequently remonstrated with the deceased as to his intemperate habits but without avail, and there was no doubt that the drink affected his mind.
The Coroner remarked upon the distressing nature of the case, and wished to convey the deepest sympathy to the family of the deceased. He thought the evidence was quite clear as to suicide.
The Jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity, brought on by excessive drinking."
The Foreman, on behalf of the Jurymen, wished to express their sympathy with the widow and family.

Saturday 24 January 1891, Issue 7372 – Gale Document No. Y3200750368
SUDDEN DEATH AT HEAVITREE - Inquest This Morning. - At the Royal Oak Inn, Heavitree, this morning, Mr W. H. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of CATHERINE ALLEN, who died on Thursday morning last. FREDERICK ALLEN, residing at No. 6, White's Cottages, Heavitree, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of his wife. He was employed as ward porter at the Exeter Asylum. Deceased was thirty-two years of age. He last saw her alive on Wednesday morning about 6.30, when she appeared as usual. Her health was not generally good. Deceased was always complaining of weakness of the heart. Witness did not sleep at home as his duties did not permit of him doing so. He did not sleep home on Wednesday night. HENRY JOHN ALLEN, son of the last witness, said he last saw his mother alive on Wednesday night between half-past eight and nine o'clock at his home. Deceased went to bed about nine o'clock and witness did also. He slept in an adjoining room. The next morning he was informed by his sister, aged nine years, that his mother was dead. Witness informed a neighbour of the occurrence, and a medical man was immediately sent for. Dr Richard James Andrews said he was called to see the deceased on Thursday morning about nine o'clock. He found deceased dead in bed. He examined the body, and found no marks of violence. There was nothing in her appearance to denote the cause of death, and witness had made a post-mortem examination. In his opinion the cause of death was syncope and a diseased heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Coroner remarked that it was a very painful case of sudden death.

Saturday 24 January 1891, Issue 7372 – Gale Document No. Y3200750367
TORQUAY NEWS - Fatal Accident to a Cab-Driver. The Inquest. - Mr S. Hacker (Coroner for the district) held an Inquest at the Torbay Hospital last evening on the body of WILLIAM GILL, a cab-driver, who it will be remembered fell from his cab on the 26th December last. He was conveyed to the Torbay Hospital where he died on Thursday. MARY ANN GILL, residing at 4, Ellacombe-terrace, identified the body as that of her husband, who she said was 53 years of age last March. Up to the time of the accident he had been in good health. He had told her that he knew nothing whatever about the accident. She did not think he had gained consciousness sufficient to do so. Martin Medland, of 20, Lower Wellesley-road, said on Boxing-day he was on the cab stand with the deceased who was standing by the side of his cab. He saw him getting up on his carriage and shortly after he heard the horse move. He immediately looked around when he saw GILL lying in the road. He went and caught hold of the horse, and several other men took the deceased to the shelter. Witness thought he must have fallen from the step. The man was not intoxicated. He could not explain how the accident happened. John Hodges, a hackney carriage proprietor, of Wellswood-terrace, said the deceased was in his employ. At the time of the accident he was in the shelter. When he went to the deceased's assistance he found him lying on the ground. He heard him fall, and in an unconscious state he was conveyed to the Hospital. He could not say that he had not been drinking, but he was not the worse for liquor. Dr Chave, house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said the deceased was brought into the institution about 6.30 on the 26th December last. He was quite unconscious. There were no wounds on his head, but there was haemorrhage from the ears and nose, which were symptoms of a fractured skull. His hat might have prevented his scalp from being injured. He was unconscious for thirty-six hours, and partially unconscious for twenty-four. He never gave any account of the accident. Nothing could be done to save his life. The result of a post mortem examination was that witness discovered a small fracture at the base of the skull; but death resulted from extensive laceration in the front of the brain. The Coroner in summing up said from the evidence it did not appear that any blame was attached to anyone. The Jury concurred with this view, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 31 January 1891, Issue 7378 – Gale Document No. Y3200750400
SUPPOSED SUICIDE AT INSTOW - Information has just come to hand which tends to show that a young farming pupil, named HERBERT DELAY, has committed suicide by shooting himself with a revolver. He was a pupil in agriculture with Mr E. R. Berry Torr, of Westleigh House, near Instow, North Devon, and has been noticed of late to be much depressed. On Tuesday he rather abruptly left the house, and an hour or two afterwards his dead body was found in a lane close by with a revolver by his side. He is a son of MR DELAY, of Upper Tooting, Surrey, and had lately been home to visit his friends. An Inquest will be held this evening.
THE INQUEST - The Inquest was held on Wednesday evening at the Marine Hotel, Instow, before the County Coroner (Mr J. F. Bromham). Mr R. Balsdon was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr Edward Ralph Berry-Torr, living at Westleigh House, Westleigh, identified the body as that of HERBERT WILLIAM DELAY, son of WILLIAM DELAY, of Upper Tooting, Surrey. The deceased was his pupil in agriculture. Witness thought that his age was 23, and said he had been residing with him for two years. Deceased was originally intended for an engineer, but owing to loss of sight in one eye and deafness he was obliged to relinquish that profession. He appeared to be somewhat depressed because of this. At the end of last year the deceased consulted Dr Thompson of Bideford, with regard to his deafness, and upon one occasion he came home from Bideford and said, "It is all up with me," and bursted out crying. He also said that the doctor could do nothing for him. Witness on Monday last asked him to do some business on the farm, but he said he wished to go to Barnstaple, and would see the work carried out in the afternoon. In the evening witness received a telegram from him stating that he could not return that night. On Tuesday witness was away and upon returning was told that the deceased had not been home to tea after his return from Barnstaple, and soon after he received a message from P.C. Smith stating that the deceased had been found shot. The revolver produced belonged to the deceased, who purchased it two years since. Witness forbade his using it, and thought it had been sent home. Bessie Bowden, a domestic servant in the employ of Mr Berry-Torr, deposed to seeing the deceased in the breakfast-room on Tuesday about three o'clock. He was reading, and she heard him say "I am done for." He then whistled, upon seeing witness was present. He afterwards left the house. In reply to a Juryman, witness said before leaving deceased said that she would never see him again, and wished her good bye. Deceased had used that remark before, and she did not at the time take any notice of it. Richard Huxtable, labourer, deposed to finding the body, and P.C. Smith stated that he found in a pocket of the deceased's clothes an almanac with the words written on the back, "God have mercy on me." Dr C. S. Thompson, of Bideford, testified to having professionally attended the deceased, who was suffering from a disease of the internal ear, which might be accompanied by mental aberration. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 31 January 1891, Issue 7378 – Gale Document No. Y3200750422
TORQUAY NEWS - Fatal Accident to a Child. - On Tuesday a little girl named ETHEL LAVERS, the daughter of THOMAS LAVERS, carriage proprietor of Lime Tree-cottages, was sitting at a table on a high chair from which she fell off. Dr Thistle w3as called to attend her, but his efforts were of no avail, and she died in the evening.
THE INQUEST - On Thursday Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner for the District, held an Inquest on the body of ETHEL MAUD LAVERS, aged one year and ten months, the daughter of THOMAS and EMILY LAVERS, of the Lime Tree Cottages, Belgrave, who died from injuries received through falling from a chair. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The evidence of the mother and father was to the effect that the child was put on a small chair which was placed on a higher one. While the mother was attending to her cooking with her back towards the child the latter fell off on the stone floor. She was picked up, but nothing was noticed amiss with her until two o'clock, when Dr Thistle was sent for. He prescribed a hot bath and gave her some medicine, but she died at six p.m. The testimony of Mr Thistle shewed that the primary cause of death was injury to the brain. The child also had convulsions, and had been weak from its birth, not being able to walk.

Saturday 7 February 1891, Issue 7382 – Gale Document No. Y3200750444
DISTRESSING SUICIDE AT SEATON - At the Pole Arms Hotel, Seaton, yesterday, Mr Deputy Coroner Cox, of Honiton, held an Inquest on the body of JAMES HAWKER, aged 46, who hanged himself in a linhay on Wednesday last. Deceased's wife who said she had only been married five weeks sated that her husband had been depressed of late because of the want of employment. He complained that he was accused of being addicted to drink. Evidence was however given which showed deceased to be practically a teetotaller. A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 14 February 1891, Issue 7383 – Gale Document No. Y3200750480
INQUEST AT SIDMOUTH - Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest at the London Hotel, Sidmouth, yesterday, on the body of an infant aged twelve days, daughter of MR and MRS J. DEAN, of Upper High-street, Sidmouth. Dr L. Williams, who made a post-mortem examination of the body, said that deceased died from inflammation of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 14 February 1891, Issue 7383 – Gale Document No. Y3200750473
SAD DEATH OF AN EXETER GARDENER - The Inquest. - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday into the circumstances touching the death of WILLIAM BLIGHT, and the first witness called with MRS CAROLINE BLIGHT, living at Stepcote-hill, who identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her late husband, a gardener, about 50 years of age. He had not lived with witness since October last. She saw him on Friday night last about eight o'clock at her house. He was then perfectly sober, and apparently in good health. The deceased stayed at her house for about ten minutes, and no angry words passed. The parting was a friendly one. She did not her of her husband's death until last Sunday night at the Falmouth Inn. Richard Turner, a cab driver, living at Gatty's-court, St. Sidwell's, deposed that at about al quarter to eleven, on Friday night, he was going up St John's-hill, when he saw the deceased lying on the footpath on his back. There were several persons near. Witness passed on, but on returning from Longdown about a quarter to twelve he still saw the deceased lying on the footpath. A man called witness, saying that there was a man on his back, and asked witness if he saw a policeman at the bottom of the hill he was to acquaint him of it. They said the man was not drunk but that he was ill. The deceased was then put into the cab and witness drove him to Stepcote Hill, where there were two policemen and a sergeant. Witness was told to take him to the St. Thomas Police Station, as he was drunk, but deceased said he was ill. Witness was told by a policeman to drive BLIGHT to the Constabulary in New North-road and he did so. He did not hear anything further of the matter until he was informed on Sunday morning that deceased was dead. By P.S. Sullock: When you drove him to Stepcote-hill did not the police try and get out of him all they could, and did he not have the appearance of a drunken man? - Witness: Deceased answered all your questions all right. – P.S. Sullock: Did I not tell you that you could drive him to the Hospital or the constabulary if you liked? - Witness: You never said anything about the Hospital. – P.S. Egan: When deceased came to St. Thomas in the cab did I tell you that he was drunk? Did you say that the man had been drinking and he was not bad. – Witness: I did not say the man was drunk, but I said he was ill. – The Coroner: I think the cabdriver acted in a kind manner in taking the deceased home. – P.C. James Newberry, stationed at St. Thomas, said on Friday night last, about twelve o'clock, he was on duty in Cowick-street, St. Thomas, in company with P.S. Egan, when Cabman Turner came up to them saying he had a man in his carriage whom he had found near Little John's Cross. The lamp was taken from Turner's cab, and witness and the sergeant looked at the deceased, who had the appearance of being drunk. Deceased did not answer any questions put to him, and the cabman was given instructions to drive the man to headquarters in New North-road. Witness searched BLIGHT and found upon him some tobacco, two knives, 3s. 1 ½d. in money, and a bottle of rum (produced). Witness saw deceased was poorly, and asked if a medical man should be sent for. BLIGHT replied in the negative. Dr Brash was, however, sent for. Deceased told witness he had drunk two glasses of beer, a pint and a half of cider, and a drop of gin. BLIGHT also told the doctor the same. Enquiries had been made at a couple of public-houses in St. Thomas where deceased was refused drink because he was not sober. P.C. William Powe corroborated the last witness's evidence as to the condition of the deceased, and said BLIGHT as taken to the Hospital during Saturday morning. Mr Martyn, house surgeon, at the Hospital said the deceased was received into the Hospital on Saturday. He was quite conscious, but paralyzed in all four limbs as well as the chest. Deceased was put to bed but the paralysis gradually increased and the man died on Sunday morning. The Coroner having summed up the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed their appreciated of Turner's conduct in taking so much trouble with the deceased.

Saturday 21 February 1891, Issue 7394 – Gale Document No. Y3200750518
INQUEST IN EXETER - At the Exeter Police Court this afternoon Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of MARY ANN ARMSTRONG, a widow, aged 77 years, of 15, James-street. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 28 February 1891, Issue 7400 – Gale Document No Y3200750562
INQUEST AT PAIGNTON - On Wednesday the Deputy Coroner (Mr D. A. Fraser) held an Inquest at the Temperance Hotel, Paignton, touching the death of FREDERICK SANDERS, aged seventy-four, who committed suicide on Tuesday. The REV. F. G. SANDERS, Vicar of St. Saviour's, Brixton, identified the deceased as his uncle. The deceased had travelled a great deal, and had resided at various times in America, in London and at Dublin. Deceased came to reside at Paignton about two years ago for the benefit of his health, as of late years he had suffered greatly from an ailment. He saw him in September of last year, when he appeared depressed on account of ill-health. Witness had, however, received many letters of a cheerful nature from deceased, the last being about a month ago. Mrs Pope, landlady of the Temperance Hotel, stated that deceased was a most temperate man, and, she believed, suffered a great deal. On Tuesday morning, about quarter-past nine, her daughter took breakfast to deceased's bedroom as usual, but could not open the door. Witness then pushed open the door sufficiently to ascertain what had happened, and called a man from the yard adjoining to come to her assistance. Mr Thomas Searle said on being called by Mrs Pope he went to the bedroom and found deceased hanging by a silk handkerchief to a hat-peg behind the door. He immediately loosened the slip-knot and cut down the body, which was then slightly warm. Dr Henry Collins deposed to seeing the deceased on the 13th and 15th of October last, when he found him suffering from nervous depression on account of the pain from a severe ailment. He prescribed for deceased, and gave him directions for living, &c., which he believed he had carried out. From the state of his disease and consequent depression, he was not surprised to hear what had taken place. The Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity, brought on by excessive pain cause by a disease from which he was suffering.

INQUEST AT DAWLISH - An Inquest was held at the South Devon Inn, before Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, touching the death of an infant named CATHERINE FAITH GRAY, whose death took place on Saturday, 21st inst. Mr G. F. Webb stated that he had made a post mortem examination, and that he considered the cause of death to have been convulsions, but the child was thin and generally poorly nourished. The Jury found a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence of "Death from Natural Causes."

A FARMER COMMITS SUICIDE AT SOUTH TAWTON - A Sad Case. - Shortly to be Married. - On Saturday afternoon MR JOHN CROCKER, assistant-overseer and farmer in the parish of South Tawton, shot himself in his cottage at South Zeal. Deceased was a widower, and lived with his two children a boy and a girl whose ages were 12 and 14. The Inquest was held on Monday by Mr W. Burd, Coroner. JOANNA CROCKER, mother of the deceased, said she last saw her son alive on Friday last, when he was in his usual health. He had been much excited for some time past, probably owing to his falling from a horse and hurting his head. He did not appear to be so right in his mind as he used to be. She was not in the house when deceased died, but she heard his son, WILLIAM, who went up to see his father in bed, screech out "Father's dead." Witness went up and found deceased lying in bed with his head shattered. She did not notice the gun. Elizabeth Cooper, Mary Jane Counter, and Mrs White were then called in the room, and a policeman sent for. Witness did not hear any sound of a gun shot. WILLIAM KNAPMAN CROCKER, son of deceased, proved discovering his father as above described. He stated that he had seen his father threequarters of an hour before when he told him to get the horse ready for him (deceased) to go to Okehampton, and that he was not to be disturbed, as he wanted to go to sleep. The gun was in the kitchen when witness went out, and the cartridges were kept in a cupboard there. P.C. William Stapleton, stationed at South Tawton, said he was called to the house about four o'clock on Saturday afternoon, and on going there he found deceased dead, his head being nearly blown off. There was a gun lying on the bed with the muzzle about three foot off, and pointing to his head. He examined the gun, and found a empty, but recently discharged cartridge in the right barrel. Witness discovered the shots went into the wall behind the deceased. CROCKER had been drinking heavily lately. Witness saw him at the Sticklepath pigeon shooting matches, and he did not consider he was fit to carry a gun. The deceased had not been exactly right for a long time, and in his opinion it had been brought about by drink. The constable also saw the deceased at 10 p.m. on Thursday, and he was then in liquor. He wanted to fight, and had to be ordered out of the Devonshire Inn, Sticklepath. WM. KNAPMAN, brother-in-law, to the deceased, said that CROCKER in November last fell from his horse and lay for several minutes unconscious. His head was injured, and he had complained ever since. Witness also proved deceased's condition at the pigeon shooting matches on Thursday. He did not think CROCKER knew what he was about. Dr G. V. Burd, of Okehampton, deposed to attending deceased when he met with the accident. He was bruised about the upper part of his face, and it was quite possible that he might have shaken his brain,. Consequently liquor would have more effect upon him. CROCKER had lately been suffering from stomach derangement and congestion of the liver. His illness was almost entirely brought on through drink. A short time ago he was on the borders of delirium tremens. Death was due to a gunshot wound. The muzzle of the gun must have been put close to his mouth, but not inside. In witness's opinion the weapon was held by the left hand, and the trigger pulled with the right. CATHERINE CROCKER, deceased's daughter, said her father was to have been married very shortly. The Jury returned a verdict that "Deceased committed suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 28 February 1891, Issue 7400 – Gale Document No. Y3200750550
A WOMAN FOUND DROWNED NEAR NEWTON - In the Hackney Canal, near Newton, the body of ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE, a shell fish dealer, was found on Wednesday last. At the Inquest, held yesterday, it was shewn that the deceased was not sober, and she accidentally fell into the water, where she was afterwards found dead by a passer-by. Dr H. A. Davies attributed death to drowning, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

INQUEST AT AXMINSTER - Mr Cox (Deputy Coroner) of Honiton, held an Inquest yesterday afternoon at the George Hotel, Axminster, on the body of MR GEORGE HAYMAN, boot and shoemaker, of Trinity-square, Axminster. The evidence showed that the deceased, who was 54 years of age and had recently suffered from inflammation of the lungs, was seized with sudden illness while in his workshop on Thursday last, and died within a very short time afterwards. Dr Langran, Axminster, stated that a post mortem examination showed that deceased suffered from fatty degeneration of the heart, which produced syncope, which was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict according to the medical evidence.

Saturday 7 March 1891, Issue 7406 – Gale Document No. Y3200750574
A FATAL KICK - At the George Hotel, Uffculme on Tuesday, an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Cox on the body of WILLIAM JOHN REW, who died from the results of a kick by a cow at Mountstephen Farm on Saturday last. The evidence showed that while deceased was in the act of placing some hay in the crib the cow kicked him in the abdomen, and although he did not feel any pain at first he died in great agony on the following morning The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Internal Injuries, accidentally sustained through the kick of a cow at Mountstephen Farm."

Saturday 21 March 1891, Issue 7417 - Gale Document No. Y3200750662
INQUEST AT DAWLISH - A Miser's Death. - An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, Dawlish, at 11 o'clock on Tuesday, by Dr Fraser (Deputy Coroner) on the body of THOMAS CALLAWAY, labourer, aged 64. Evidence was given by Henry Westcott, landlord of the Carpenters' Arms, who identified the deceased. Witness was called about 8 a.m. on Monday morning by a man to see what was the matter with CALLAWAY. He went to Manor-place, the deceased's residence, and found him crouched behind the door dead. The last time he had seen CALLAWAY was on Saturday last, in Old Town-street about eight o'clock in the forenoon. Deceased never worked for him, but CALLAWAY was witness's mother's half-brother. Deceased had no other relatives except witness that he knew of. Elizabeth Moore said she lived with the deceased. She had known him for twenty years. CALLAWAY went to bed after having is dinner on Sunday, and complained of being ill. She took him up a cup of tea, and about 9 p.m. she also took him a cup of coffee. She didn't see him again until 7.30 next morning, when she found him dead behind the door. P.C. Edwards proved being called to the deceased's residence. He found CALLAWAY quite dead, crouching behind the door, and naked. The room was in a very filthy state; and in deceased's trousers' pocket witness found the sum of £7 11s. 2d. in gold, silver and bronze. Dr Baker proved examining the body, and found no marks of violence upon him, and was of opinion that deceased had died from syncope, brought about by self-neglect during the severity of the late snowstorm. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The old man for years past has been known as a miser; and was said to have saved £360.

FATAL ACCIDENT AT TEIGNMOUTH - A fatal accident occurred at Teignmouth on Saturday night to a labouring man named JOHN BUTLER, residing at the Model Cottages, Diamond's-lane. It appears that BUTLER left the town about eleven o'clock on Saturday night for the purpose of going home, his house being entered by passing over a flight of stone steps to the number of about a dozen. It is surmised that, having got on to the top of the steps, he slipped and fell backwards, receiving a terrible blow in the head, together with other severe injuries. s The fall rendered him insensible, and the deceased was found in an unconscious condition where he fell the next morning (Sunday) by two men named Edwin Passmore and Thomas Chaff, who reside in the same row of buildings, and who were attracted by the poor fellow's groans under their bedroom windows about 7 a.m. The two men conveyed BUTLER to his residence, and sent for a medical man, who on arrival found several cuts about deceased's head, together with a fractured thigh. The unfortunate man was also suffering severely from the exposure, having been exposed to the cold weather for eight hours. A man named Bowerman, who resides in the Model Cottages, passed over the steps shortly before three o'clock on Sunday morning to carry the letter bags to meet the mail train, but he did not see BUTLER at that time.
It has since transpired that the first person who saw BUTLER was a man named William Webber, who was going to his work shortly before 7 a.m. on Sunday morning. He spoke to deceased, who put him off with an evasive answer, and Webber left him without giving any information to anyone as to the man's condition. BUTLER died on Monday morning from the terrible injuries he had received.
THE INQUEST - At the London Hotel, Teignmouth, on Tuesday, Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, of Totnes, sat to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of a labourer named JOHN BUTLER SMITH, residing in Model Cottages, Diamond's-lane, West Teignmouth, who died on Monday morning from injuries received on Saturday night. WILLIAM BUTLER SMITH, brother of the deceased, living at East-street, Newton Abbott, deposed that deceased was 50 years of age. The last time he saw him alive was on Sunday night last after the accident. Deceased said to him, "Oh, Bill, this is a bad job," it was then about 8.45 p.m., also remarking that he slipped down the steps. His brother complained of a pain in his side, and died at 9.5 a.m. on the 16th instant. He was not aware that the deceased drank heavily.
John Damerell, a labourer, residing at 17, Somerset-place, Teignmouth, said he saw the deceased on Saturday night last at 10 p.m. at the tap-room of the Teign Brewery. The deceased was then sober. He saw deceased again about 10.40, when he appeared to be sober. Shortly before eleven deceased and witness came out into the road when he noticed the deceased was not sober. He offered SMITH assistance, and took him home to his door. He (witness) left deceased at his door, as he would not allow him (witness) to unlock it. J. Bowerman, living at the Model Cottages, said Sunday morning, the 16th instant, about 1.30 a.m., he got up to carry the letters from the post-office to the station, and at this time he heard the deceased walking about the room over him. He returned about 5 a.m., when he heard a person again walking about the room, and someone went out at the door over the landing and down the stairs. Whilst he was in bed he heard groans overhead, but he (witness) was not aware of the accident until 10 a.m. on Sunday morning. William Robert Mills, residing at 9, Model-cottages, also gave evidence. William Webber, a labourer, residing in Chapel-street, West Teignmouth, stated that on Sunday morning last about 7 a.m. he was going to his work, when he saw JOHN BUTLER SMITH lying in the road in Diamond's-lane. Witness asked him why he was there, and deceased replied, "Leave me alone." Witness also asked him where his hat was, and he replied, "I have lost it." Witness offered to help deceased, but he would not accept the offer.
Several other witnesses were called, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 21 March 1891, Issue 7417 – Gale Document No. Y3200750635
DEATH FROM EXPOSURE - At Offwell on Monday, Mr Deputy Coroner, C. E. Cox, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of a labourer named CHARLES BIDGOOD, who had been missing since Tuesday last until a day or two ago, when his body was found in the snow in West Colwell Coppice under circumstances already reported in the "Evening Post." After hearing the evidence of several persons as to the movements of the deceased from the time of his going to work on Monday morning up to his leaving the house of Mr Joel Bromfield, during the height of the storm on Tuesday evening, from which time he was never again seen alive, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Exposure." The Coroner commented strongly on the action of a publican named Boyland in supplying deceased with liquor just before he was missing.

Saturday 21 March 1891, Issue 7417 – Gale Document No. Y3200750649
A FATAL KICK - On Thursday a farm labourer named CHARLES SCOTT, aged 27 years, while working at Rapstone Farm, Northmolton, was kicked by a horse in the abdomen, from the effects of which he died yesterday. An Inquest will be held.

INQUEST IN EXETER - Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at No. 13, Albert-street, Newtown, Exeter, touching the death of SUSAN HAWKINGS, aged 68, who resided at the same place. Miss Griffin, residing at No. 13, Albert-place, identified the body of the deceased, who was found dead in bed this morning about nine o'clock. Dr Henderson proved examining the body and finding a mass of cancers under the right arm pit. In his opinion death was due to the cancers. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 28 March 1891, Issue 7422 – Gale Document No. Y3200750677
SAD DEATH OF A YOUNG WOMAN IN EXETER - The Inquest. - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry at 101, Sandford-street, Exeter, on Monday, on the body of MINNIE GREENSLADE, who died suddenly on Saturday. Mr H. Hussey was chosen Foreman of the Jury. ANNIE GREENSLADE, daughter of W. GREENSLADE, goods guard on the London and South Western Railway, a single woman, living at 101, Sandford-street, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her sister aged 23. Deceased was an assistant school mistress by occupation at St. David's School, where she had been employed for twelve months. Her sister had been ill recently, and a medical gentleman was treating her for consumption On Saturday, about 12.30, after deceased had been out she came home, and was sitting on a footstool beside the fire, when she said, "I feel very funny," and fell on her right side. Witness caught hold of her, and a doctor was sent for. Dr McKeith, who came, pronounced life to be extinct. Mrs M. E. Blaney, living at 63, Clifton-street, said she had known the deceased for many years. She saw her on Saturday at her own house about 11.30, when she complained of being very tired. Deceased drank a cup of cocoa and ate a couple of biscuits. She returned home about half an hour afterwards. Dr McKeith deposed that he was called on Saturday about one o'clock to go to 101, Sandford-street, to see the deceased. On his arrival he found her lying on the floor in the kitchen dead. He examined the body and found no marks of violence, and death in his opinion was due to syncope caused by stress upon the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 28 March 1891, Issue 7422 – Gale Document No. Y3200750697
FATAL ACCIDENT IN EXETER - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday into the circumstances touching the death of ANNE POPE. JOHN POPE, a greengrocer, residing at 32, Paris-street, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of his mother, a widow, aged 78, residing in Paris-street. On Wednesday, March 11th, witness went into his shop to serve a customer, when he heard a noise in the passage. On going out he found the deceased lying on her left side. His mother was unconscious, and witness took her to the kitchen and placed her on a chair. A medical man was sent for, and Mr C. E. Bell was soon in attendance. The deceased expired about a quarter to four Wednesday morning. The deceased was subject to giddiness for the past three months, and had fallen down before, but it had not affected her. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he had attended the deceased, off and on, for some years past, on account of old age. He was called on the 11th March to go to Paris-street. On his arrival he found deceased in the kitchen on a chair. She was then conscious, and complained of a pain in the left leg. On examination, witness found the deceased had sustained a fracture of the left thigh in the joint. She was put to bed, but deceased gradually got worse, and died on Wednesday. In his opinion death was due to the accident, and exhaustion. Deceased had had every care and attention from her son and his wife. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

INQUEST IN EXETER - A Caution to Midwives. - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquiry at No. 42, Radford-road, Exeter, on Wednesday, on the body of ROSE MOORE, who died that morning HENRY WILLIAM MOORE, an engineer, residing at 42, Radford-road, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of his daughter, who was born on Tuesday at seven o'clock in the morning, and died next day at two o'clock in the afternoon. Witness saw the deceased on leaving for work in the morning about 5.40, and he then thought the child had a difficulty in breathing. Witness produced a certificate which he said the mid-wife (Mrs Hepworth) had given him. When he heard of the death he went to Mr Hawkings and asked him what he would do in the matter, and he told him to get a certificate. Mrs Hepworth, a certified mid-wife, said she attended MRS MOORE in her confinement. She did not think the child was strong, and when she left MRS MOORE in the morning, she told her if the child was not better in two hours, she was to send for a doctor. She gave a certificate of the cause of death. The Coroner told the witness that she was not competent to do such a thing and he hoped it would be a caution to her in future. Mr J. Perkins, of South-street, Exeter, said he examined the deceased, and in his opinion death was due to convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 4 April 1891, Issue 7428 – Gale Document No. Y3200750734
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER - Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Exeter Police Court on Tuesday into the circumstances touching the death of JANE WILLIAMS. Susan Rawling, living at 14, Codrington-street, identified the body as that of JANE WILLIAMS, a single woman, aged 65. She had rented a room of witness for the past seventeen months. She saw the deceased alive on Saturday evening, about eight o'clock, when she appeared to be in her usual health. Witness had never heard her complain about her health. About 10.30 mornings the deceased was in the habit of rising, and on her not doing so on Sunday witness went up to her bedroom and found she was dead in bed, the body being quite warm. No one else slept in the room with the deceased. By a Juror: Deceased seemed to enjoy good health, and had an excellent appetite. She did not know if the deceased took supper the night before. By another Juror: A doctor was sent for as soon as the deceased was found to be dead. By the Coroner: There was no poison at all in the room. Mr Bell, surgeon, said he was called about 12.30 p.m. on Sunday to go to 14, Codrington-street, where he saw the deceased in bed. There were no marks of violence, and in his opinion death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 4 April 1891, Issue 7428 – Gale Document No. Y3200750732
TERRIBLE RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT NEWTON - A Sailor and a Woman Killed. - Considerable consternation was caused amongst a numerous gathering of holiday-keepers at Newton Railway Station on Monday evening, when two of the number – evidently lovers – lost their lives. A large proportion of those present at the time of the sad occurrence were returning from Torquay Races, where they had evidently spent a most enjoyable day, but their pleasure was undoubtedly marred by the shocking fatality which took place in their midst. On the arrival of the Zulu from Exeter a large crowd had congregated on the platform, and when some coaches were being joined to a part of the train remaining to be sent to Torquay a sailor named A. BULLEN, belonging to H.M.S. Defiance, torpedo depot, stationed off Saltash, caught hold of the carriage door as the train was in motion, and was thrown on the rails. He was accompanied by a woman named MARGERY ASH, who was holding on to him, and she was also pulled down to the rails, the carriages passing over both. Mr Maggs had the bodies quickly removed, and it was found that the man was dead, while the woman shortly afterwards expired at the Newton Hospital. she received terrible injuries to her body. The man was taken to the mortuary, and an Inquest will be held.
INQUEST AND VERDICT - The Coroner's Inquiry into the circumstances attending the deaths of ALBERT BULLEN, an able seaman of H.M.S. Defiance, Plymouth, and MARGARET ASH, of 24, Randell-street, Plymouth, who were killed at the railway station at Newton Abbot on Monday evening, was held on Tuesday by Mr Sydney Hacker at the Town Hall, Newton Abbot. Mr C. E. Compton, divisional superintendent, was in attendance to watch the proceedings on behalf of the G.W.R. Company. Following the viewing of the bodies, evidence of identification was taken. ELIZABETH BULLEN, of 1, Crescent-terrace, Torquay, identified the body of BULLEN as that of her brother, who, she said, was 21 years of age, and the last she saw of him was at Torquay. at 6.30 the previous evening, when he left for Newton by train. During the afternoon he had been in company with MARGARET ASH. He was sober when he left Torquay, and was accompanied by one of his messmates – Frederick Drew, able seaman on board H.MS. Defiance, of 129, Union-street, Stonehouse, said he knew both the deceased persons. MARGARET ASH was 20 years of age, and did not live with her parents, who resided outside Plymouth. They came up from Torquay together by the 7.24 train the previous evening, and were standing on the Newton platform waiting for the Plymouth train to start, when he saw the female deceased fall off the platform, and he called the attention of the guard to the occurrence. The witness was questioned closely as to the exact circumstances of the occurrence, but could give no further information, and the Coroner remarked that he was afraid he remembered very little about the matter. John Murrin, platform inspector, stated that the three o'clock train from Paddington on arriving at Newton was divided, a portion going on to Plymouth and the remainder being back to make up the 7.53 train to Kingswear. He was informed that someone had fallen under the train, and on a search being made the bodies of the deceased persons were discovered beneath the last carriage but one. The bodies were placed upon the ambulance and taken to the porter's room. When the empty carriages were backed the passengers made a rush to get in, and although there were ten or a dozen station officials on duty they were unable to keep them back. Joseph Surridge, parcels porter, corroborated. Sergeant Tucker also gave evidence. He was of opinion that the deceased persons must have fallen between the moving and the stationary coaches, and that four wheels passed over them. The station officials, including Mr Maggs, the station-master, were doing their best to keep the people back. Witness assisted in getting the bodies out. BULLEN was quite dead, but the female was alive and conscious, and kept saying "Lord have mercy on my soul." Inspector Murrin, recalled, said the platform at the time contained the contents of several trains for Torquay. Dr Danvers said he was called to the station, and saw the bodies in the porters' room. The male body was perfectly dead, but the woman was living, and he ordered her removal to the Cottage Hospital, where Drs. Haydon and Nisbett also attended her, but she died half an hour after being admitted. He described the injuries, which were of a horrible nature, and said in his opinion the position of the waiting-room in the centre of the platform and just at the foot of the stairs was dangerous in view of a congestion of passenger traffic, as people coming over the footway had no space to spread out, the platform on either side of the waiting-room being no more than seven or nine feet in width. Attention was also called by Mr Parker, a Juryman, to the bad lighting of the station near the foot of the stairs, opposite where the accident occurred.
The Coroner briefly summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," expressing the opinion that no blame whatever attached to the station officials. They wished, however, to call the attention of the company to the remarks made by Dr Danvers. Mr Compton said he had been in charge of this section of the Great Western Railway for 25 years, and this was the first occurrence of the kind they had had. He promised to bring the representations of the Jury before the General Manager of the Company.

Saturday 11 April 1891, Issue 7434 – Gale Document No. Y3200750756
THE DEATH OF MR CHARLES LAMSLEY – Inquest and Verdict. This Afternoon. - The Coroner's Enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MR CHARLES LAMSLEY, musical director at the Exeter Theatre, which took place suddenly yesterday morning, was held this afternoon by Mr H. W. Hooper (the Coroner for the city) at the deceased's lodgings, 114 Bath-road. The Jury having been sworn, and the body viewed, evidence was taken. The first witness called was
MR JOSIAH LAMSLEY, a naval pensioner, residing at 6, Wilton-terrace, Marmion-road, Southsea, who identified the body as that of his son, who he said was 39 years of age last December. the deceased, whom witness had not seen for some time, always enjoyed good health.
Miss Scott, niece to Mrs Shapter, the landlady, said she had known the deceased for about three months. She saw him go out on Thursday evening about 6.40, after having dined. He bled frequently from the nose, and did this on Wednesday, but did not complain of illness when he went out on Thursday evening. She did not know what time he came home that night, as he had a latch key, and let himself in, but about two o'clock on Friday morning she heard him moving about in his own room. He was then breathing heavily, but did not call for assistance. She heard no more of him until 7.10 a.m., when he called her and asked her to bring him a newspaper. She took it to him, but he did not say anything further to her. At 8.15 she went to his room with a cup of tea to him, and getting no answer to her knocks at the door she entered, and found him partly dressed in a sitting posture on the bed. She spoke to him, but received no answer, and she then found he was dead. He had been taking medicine received from two chemists for the bleeding from the nose, but he had taken none for the past three or four days. He had not had any medical attendance while there. The Coroner: Was he usually a temperate man? - A: I can't say. I never saw him the worse for drink. - By the Jury: The deceased made no complaint to her. There was a lot of dry blood in his mouth. She did not hear him complaining of retching. He had a very bad cough on Wednesday night.
William Walter Pook, butcher, of 48, Sidwell-street, deposed that the deceased was a friend of his, and he was in his company on Thursday night. Witness met him at about 10.45 in the tradesmen's-room of the Acland Arms, where there were several people. They remained together at the inn until just after eleven o'clock, when they walked straight up the street towards the deceased's lodgings, outside the door of which he wished him good night. The deceased was then in a weak condition, but was perfectly sober. He only had two "drops" of whiskey in witnesses presence. By the Jury: Although the deceased did not complain to witness he knew he was weak, because he broke a blood vessel in his head some time since, and suffered from bleeding of the nose.
Mr Brown, surgeon, said he knew the deceased only by sight. He was called to go to him on the previous morning between eight and nine o'clock, and he went. He found him lying partly dressed on the bed, with his head resting on the rail at the head of the bed, dead. Death, he should say, took place half-an-hour previously. He examined the body, found the pupils of the eyes dilated, and blood and froth issuing from the mouth and nostrils, especially from the left nostril. The skin was blood red, but there was no smell of liquor from the mouth. There was rather a smell of acidity. He observed no medicines about the room, but in one of his pockets he found a bottle containing what he thought to be tincture of iron, which was the proper remedy for haemorrhage. From the appearance of the body he concluded that deceased had had some internal haemorrhage, and that he fainted right off. His opinion was that death was due to internal haemorrhage, and secondly to syncope. Mr Edward Perkins had attended the deceased for internal haemorrhage on two occasions.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."
Mr S. L. Gifford, business manager at the Theatre was present during the Enquiry. The Funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon, leaving deceased's lodgings at 2.15.

Saturday 11 April 1891, Issue 7434 – Gale Document No. Y3200750754
FATAL ACCIDENT AT ST. THOMAS - The man named JAMES SELDON, aged 64, of Exeter, who was seriously injured in Okehampton-street, St. Thomas, while removing furniture on the 26th March, died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was an in-patient, last evening The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) has been communicated with, and an Inquest will probably be held on Monday next.

Saturday 11 April 1891, Issue 7434 – Gale Document No. Y3200750755
SAD DEATH IN EXETER - The Inquest. - The City Coroner, Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper, held an Inquiry into the circumstances touching the death of SARAH NOAKES, who died on Thursday morning at Lethbridge's Cottages, Newtown. The first witness called was Mrs Ann Allen, wife of William Allen, who said she lived at No. 3, Lethbridge's Cottages, Newton. She knew the deceased, who was a widow, and she resided in the adjoining house. Deceased was in her 70th year, and witness on the morning of MRS NOAKES death saw her twice. She appeared to be in her usual state of health, but deceased said she did not feel exactly, and had pains in her head. On Thursday about 12.30 witness went to deceased's house with her weekly money, and on getting no answer to a knocking at the door walked in and found her lying on the sofa. Witness called deceased by name and pulled her up and found she was dead. Henry Fouracre, a gardener, living at No. 2, Lethbridges-cottages, Newton, said he saw the deceased on Thursday morning, when she appeared in her usual state of health. She had a large bundle of heavy carpets under her arm which she said she was going round the corner to beat. Witness did not see the deceased again alive. Mr George Tucker Clapp, a surgeon, practising in Exeter, said he had not attended deceased recently. On Thursday morning he was called to go to Lethbridge's Cottages to see her. On his arrival there he found deceased lying on the sofa dead. He examined the body, and found no marks of violence, and in his opinion death was due to apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 11 April 1891, Issue 7434 – Gale Document No. Y3200750768
ALLEGED MANSLAUGHTER AT TAVISTOCK - A verdict of "Manslaughter" was returned against a married woman named EVA HOLLAND at an Inquest held by Mr Coroner R. R. Rodd, on the body of her child, JOHN HOLLAND, aged seven months, at the Tavistock Workhouse on Wednesday. Mr William Reverton (master) deposed to admitting the deceased and his mother into the house on Friday evening in a dirty condition. The child was dying, and witness accused the woman of neglecting it. The child expired on Monday afternoon EVA HOLLAND, the mother, said she visited various workhouses lately. The child was delicate from its birth. Mr J. T. Hislop, surgeon, on being sworn, deposed that on making a post-mortem examination he found that the deceased was a male child of seven months of age, its weight being only seven pounds. There was scarcely a trace of fat all over the body; the muscles were exceedingly small, but the organs were healthy and free from disease. He found in the stomach a small quantity of partially digested food. The cause of death was exhaustion, due, in his opinion to prolonged neglect, but he would not say that death was due to actual starvation. Sergeant Cole, of the county police force watched the case on behalf of the police.
On Wednesday EVA HOLLAND was charged under the Coroner's warrant, at Tavistock Police Court, before Messrs. D. Radford, and W. S. Rosevere, with causing the death of her child by neglect The magistrates dismissed the case, but the prisoner was removed to Exeter gaol under the Coroner's warrant.

Saturday 18 April 1891, Issue 7440 – Gale Document No. Y3200750782
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT ST. THOMAS - The Inquest. - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an Enquiry at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Monday into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN SELDON, who met with an accident at St. Thomas, on Tuesday, March 26th. SARAH SELDON, residing in Albert-place, Rack-street, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her late husband, who was a labourer, aged 57. He w3as employed by Mr Ridge, a general carrier, of Exeter. On Thursday, the 26th March, he went to work about 7.30 in the morning, and was going to remove some furniture from Pinhoe to St. Thomas He did not come home to dinner, as he took it with him. About five o'clock the same evening a young man came and informed witness that the deceased had met with an accident, and had been taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. She went there and found the deceased in bed. He was a very temperate man, and was perfectly sober at the time of the accident. Witness had frequently visited the deceased during his stay in the Hospital, and was with him at the time of his death, which occurred on Saturday evening. John Caine, a labourer, living at 19, Odger's-row, Commercial-road, Exeter, said he knew the deceased. On the day of the accident he was engaged with the deceased in removing furniture from Pinhoe to Okehampton-street. On their arrival in the street named about 2.30 witness and the deceased were taking a chest of drawers up a narrow staircase, deceased being in front. All the drawers were taken out. When they arrived on the first landing witness lifted the case on the top of the banisters. He put his arm around the case to lift it up, and SELDON, who had no hold on the case fell down over the banister, striking the floor on his left side. Deceased was taken into the front room and shortly afterwards removed to the hospital in a cab. Henry Andrew, assistant house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said that on the day of the accident he received SELDON into the Hospital. He was in a collapsed condition and in great pain but was conscious. He was put to bed at once. On examination witness found the deceased had a ruptured kidney, which was the cause of death. He also had a bruise on the face, and another one over the kidney. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 2 May 1891, Issue 7450 – Gale Document No. Y3200750849
FOUND DEAD AT SAUNTON - MR THOMAS BROOKE, who left his house at Braunton on Wednesday, April 22nd, has been found dead on the sands at Saunton. It is supposed that he got on the rocks close by and the tide caught him and took him out to sea. Mr Brougham, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Wednesday afternoon and the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 2 May 1891, Issue 7450 – Gale Document No. Y3200750858
INQUEST - An Inquest was held by Mr H. W. Hooper, at No. 4, Atwill's-Almshouses, Exeter, this morning on the body of a widow named ANN PAYNE, who resided there. REBECCA ROWE, identified the body as that of her mother, who was 85 years of age. The deceased had resided at Awill's Almshouses for a considerable time, and died on Friday morning. Evidence having been given by Malanay Coad and Maud Rowe, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with Dr Henderson's testimony which was to the effect that deceased died from syncope.

Saturday 2 May 1891, Issue 7450 – Gale Document No. Y3200750862
THE TOPSHAM DROWNING CASE - Inquest, This Day. - Mr W. Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Vestry-room, Topsham, this morning, into circumstances attending the death of a young woman, named ELIZABETH SALTER, a domestic servant, aged 18 years, who was found drowned in the River Exe on Thursday afternoon last. The Jury, of which Mr G. Hopewell was Foreman, having viewed the body, LUCY DAVEY, a married woman, of Topsham, identified it as that of her sister, who she last saw alive about half-past two on the afternoon of Thursday last. Deceased lived with her father, and during the afternoon witness spoke to her about going with her to Woodbury Salterton for a character to enable her to get a situation. The unfortunate young woman replied, "Rather than go there I would drown myself." Deceased had tried several times to get a character, but did not succeed. One of the persons she went to said she would give her a character for honesty, but nothing else. The fact of her not getting a character must have troubled her, but she did not complain to witness about it, and they had never had any disagreement at home. She had often said in her younger days that she would drown herself, and witness last heard her use the expression about two years ago. It was a usual saying of deceased's. Answering the Foreman, witness said she knew of no reason why deceased threatened to drown herself, and she did not think she meant it.
Sarah Sergeant, a married woman, of Topsham, proved seeing the deceased at the door of her sister's residence on Thursday afternoon. She was crying, and after some conversation about getting a character from Woodbury Salterton, witness offered to write for her, and to this she agreed. Answering the Coroner, witness said the deceased always appeared to be in the bet of spirits JESSIE COLE, also a married woman, of Topsham, and sister to the deceased, said the latter came to her house on the afternoon in question. In reply to witness, she said she was going to Woodbury Salterton if it did not rain She did not complain of any trouble, but witness noticed she had been crying. She would not tell her what was the matter. By a Juror: Deceased did not appear to be excited, but was very quiet. Alfred Beavis, of Clyst St. George, wheelwright, gave evidence to the effect that on Thursday afternoon about three o'clock he saw the deceased going towards the river from New-lane. Alfred John Melhuish, groom to Captain Porters, of Mount Weir, deposed that on the afternoon in question he was proceeding through the path fields to The Retreat, when he heard cries from some person in the water. On going to the spot he saw the deceased drowning from fifteen to twenty feet from the bank. Witness being unable to swim ran for assistance. As soon as possible he returned with a man named Reed, but the deceased had sunk. Witness found a hat on the bank, with a brooch attached to the rim. Answering the Coroner, witness considered that she was struggling to get out when he saw her. In reply to the Foreman, Melhuish said the tide was low at the time, and the water was about ten to twelve feet deep. There were footprints on the sand leading to the water. Benjamin Bowden, of the Countess Weir Inn, proved recovering the body fourteen feet of water, and twenty-four feet from the shore. P.C. Brownson gave evidence as to seeing the footprints near a place called Jackson point, and searching the deceased, upon whom he found a list of addresses, a pocket-handkerchief, a pair of gloves, and a "Band of Hope Review." Dr Frood, of Topsham, deposed to examining the body of the deceased. Its appearance was consistent with death from drowning. Mrs Cole, recalled, said the deceased had not shown any symptoms of insanity, but a brother was in the asylum. The Coroner having briefly summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 9 May 1891, Issue 7456 – Gale Document No. Y3200750888
INQUESTS IN EXETER - At the Exeter Police Court on Monday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest touching the death of WILLIAM MILL, aged 67, a watchmaker, late of 23, Smythen-street. It appeared from the evidence that deceased, who had been lodging at the house in question for the past six weeks, came in shortly after nine o'clock on Saturday evening, and remarked to Mrs Stevens, his landlady, that he had been to Ide, and was so ill he could hardly got back again. Shortly afterwards he went to bed, giving orders, however, that his breakfast should be brought up to him next morning. This was done, but as the landlady received no reply to her knocks, she sent for P.C. Wheeler, who burst the door open, and deceased was found lying dead on the bed. Dr Bell, who was sent for and examined the deceased, said he should consider death to be due to heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

An Inquest was afterwards held on the body of a child about four days old, named MABEL JARVIS, whose parents reside at Water Lane. The evidence of Dr Brash went to shew that the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural causes."

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court on Thursday touching the death of FREDERICK THOMAS DART, aged 29, journeyman baker, of Holloway-street, late in the employ of Mr Pidsley. ELIZA DART, wife of the deceased, deposed that during the severe weather in December last, the deceased came home about seven o'clock in the evening. He said he was suffering great pain across the back, and could hardly walk upstairs. He also said he had slipped in coming down the area steps at a house in Southernhay. In January last the deceased was attended by Dr Kempe, but he got no better and died on Wednesday morning. Dr Kempe stated that he had attended the deceased since the beginning of January last. At that time the deceased complained of a pain between the shoulders, and said he had fallen down and struck himself there. Witness examined him, and found he had a large bruise on the right shoulder blade. In a day or two an abscess formed, which was lanced, but a short time afterwards another abscess formed. Since then several abscesses had formed, and the deceased also contracted inflammation of the left lung, and died Wednesday morning. Witness should say death was due to exhaustion consequent on the accident and the severe drain on the system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 16 May 1891, Issue 7462 – Gale Document No. Y3200750940
A CHILD BURNED TO DEATHY AT BARNSTAPLE - Mr Coroner Incledon Bencraft of Barnstaple, held an Inquest this morning at Victoria House, Joy-street, on the body of MARY ELIZABETH RICHARDS, a little girl, three and a-half years of age, daughter of MR RICHARDS, draper, and who met with her death by burning the previous day. The evidence was to the effect that on the morning of yesterday about half-past eleven the housemaid left her in the nursery fully dressed with the exception of her boots, which the child said she would do up herself. Soon afterwards smoke was seen issuing from the room, and screams were heard, and on the uncle of the child going into the nursery he found her in flames. He called for assistance, extinguished the flames, and applied oil and wadding to the burns, and sent for Dr Harper. The child stated that she did it with matches, and on the floor an empty box was found, with matches strewed about. Dr Harper dressed the wounds, but the deceased died from shock last evening while the doctor was in the house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sympathy with the parents.

Saturday 16 May 1891, Issue 7462 – Gale Document No. Y3200750918
THE DROWNING OF A CHILD AT TREW'S WEIR - The Inquest. - Mr H. W. Gould, County Coroner, held an Inquest at the Oddfellows' Inn, Countess Weir, on Monday afternoon, touching the death of WILLIAM STENTIFORD, a child four years of age, who was drowned at Trew's Weir on Sunday fortnight. CHARLES STENTIFORD, of 50, Alphington-street, St. Thomas, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of his son WILLIAM, who was four years of age. He last saw the deceased alive on Sunday, April 26th. On the morning of that day the deceased, his brother, and witness went to Trew's Weir Paper Mills, where witness worked. On his arrival at the mills witness went into the stables, leaving the deceased and his brother outside. Whilst witness was in the stables, he saw the deceased and his brother in the field beyond, picking flowers and playing about. When witness had finished his work in the stables, at about ten minutes to eleven o'clock he called to the children. His son (aged 6 years) came to him and said the deceased had gone home to have his breakfast, as he was hungry. Witness went home, but not finding deceased there came back. In the field where he saw the children playing witness observed some flowers on the banks, and a footmark about four to five inches long running parallel with the bank, which he believed to have been made by the deceased. He also saw the boy's hat floating on the river about four or five feet from the margin. Richard Haydon, caretaker, of Countess Weir, said on Saturday last, about eleven o'clock, he observed the body of the deceased in the water, and recovered it. Mr Charles James Vlieland, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said he examined the body of the deceased. There were no marks of violence, and the body was very much decomposed. In his opinion death was due to drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

THE RAILWAY FATALITY AT EXMINSTER - An Inquest was held at Exminster by Mr Gould, Deputy District Coroner, on Wednesday, on the body of JOHN PEPPERELL, aged 74 years, of Exminster, who was killed on the railway on Monday.
CHARLES PEPPERELL, lime burner, of Exminster, identified the deceased as that of his father, who was also a lime burner. Deceased was in the habit of crossing the railway line in going to and from Exminster to his home. He was rather deaf at times, and witness last saw him alive on Monday last, about ten minutes after one, when he said he was going to Mr Lee's. His father had no trouble, and was not likely to commit suicide. James Lee gave evidence to the effect that deceased came to his house soon after one, after which he went in the direction of the railway towards his house. He was sober, and there was nothing unusual in his appearance. Thomas Densham proved seeing the deceased near the Asylum going towards his home about 1.30 on the day in question. William Charles Holloway, upholsterer, of No. 77, Paris-street, said on Monday last he was travelling by the dawn train which left Exeter at 1.37. Before he came to Exminster he was looking out of the window when he saw the deceased knocked down by the train. Dr Frood, of Topsham, said he had examined the body, and found the skull completely smashed. There were compound fractures of all the limbs and the ribs were broken. The injuries were sufficient to cause instant death. James Frederick, station-master at Exminster, deposed to finding the deceased on the down line dead.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 23 May 1891, Issue 7468 – Gale Document No. Y3200750956
SUDDEN DEATH - As THOMAS ASHFORD, farmer, of Combeinteignhead, was in company with his son, returning from Newton Abbot on Thursday evening, he was seized with faintness and before he could reach home he died. An Inquest was held yesterday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 23 May 1891, Issue 7468 – Gale Document No. Y3200750947
INQUEST IN EXETER - On Thursday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, touching the death of DENIS O'LEARY, aged 43, a blind man, who it will be remembered, was run over by a train at Queen-street Station a short time since. The first witness called was Emily Palmer, the nurse who attended the deceased while in the hospital, who stated that O'Leary had told her he was married, and was a street musician. Deceased lodged at 2, Preston-street, previous to the accident and was blind. Ernest Bedford, newsboy at Queen-street Station bookstall, deposed that about 1.10 on the 19th March last he was at the stall at the station, when he saw the deceased, who was in the habit of visit the station, come in the big gate alone, and fall off the platform on to the line. An engine came along at the same time and went right over the deceased. Some men then pulled deceased off the line and laid him on the platform. Fred Meldon White, relieving parcel porter at the Queen-street Station, corroborated. Mr Reginald Martin, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, deposed that deceased was received into the Hospital on the 19th March. He was collapsed, and his right thigh was very much crushed. Deceased was taken to the operating room, where his thigh was amputated. He went on favourably up to a month ago, when a change took place and deceased died on Wednesday. Witness had made a post mortem and found that deceased had died of pleurisy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 23 May 1891, Issue 7468 – Gale Document No. Y3200750956
SUDDEN DEATH OF A SAILOR AT DARTMOUTH - On Wednesday at the Dartmouth Guildhall an Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner (Mr R. W. Prideaux) touching the death of an able seaman, named JAMES GARDINER who fell dead in Clarence-street on the evening of Whit-Monday. Dr South and Lieutenant Benson, H.M.S. Britannia, were present, the deceased belonging to that training ship. Dr Crossfield said he had made an examination, and found no marks of violence. He had formed the opinion the death was due to natural causes, probably heart disease. Dr South was of the same opinion. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 30 May 1891, Issue 7474 – Gale Document No. Y3200750984
SUDDEN DEATH AT WOODBURY - On Monday, at the White Hart Inn, Woodbury, Mr Charles E. Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of MR LAURENCE JOHN PARSONS, who died suddenly on Friday, the 22nd inst. Dr Barton, surgeon, of Lympstone, said he had made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found that there had been a rupture of the vessels of the heart, which had caused death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 6 June 1891, Issue 7478 – Gale Document No. Y3200751031
THE BOATING FATALITY AT STARCROSS – Inquest. - On Thursday Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquiry at the Courtenay Arms, Starcross, into the circumstances touching the death of GEORGE SEARLE, a boatman, who was recently drowned. GEORGE SEARLE, a waterman, of Starcross, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of his son, GEORGE HENRY SEARLE, who was a boatman and was 20 years of age Deceased was a very good waterman, but could not swim. Robert Woodgates, of Teignmouth, said on Tuesday last at about 6.30 p.m., he was fishing in the river, when he discovered the body of the deceased floating in the water. Mr Edgar Lipscombe, surgeon, of Starcross, gave evidence as to examining the body of the deceased. He found it very decomposed, and presented the usual appearance of death from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death from Drowning."

Saturday 13 June 1891, Issue 7484 – Gale Document No. Y3200751051
INQUEST IN EXETER - Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court this afternoon relative to the death of the infant child of BENJAMIN STEPHEN SEAGRAVE, a labourer, living at No. 1, Spicer's-court, in the parish of Allhallows-on-the-Wall. SEAGRAVE identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of his daughter, LOUISA SEAGRAVE, who died yesterday shortly after its birth. Mrs Clennick, certificated midwife, residing in Mary-Arches street, said she attended the wife of the last witness yesterday. Not long after the birth witness saw that the child looked very black about the head. Mr Harris said he was called about 11 p.m. last night to go to the house of the child's parents. He examined the body of the infant, and found no marks of violence. In his opinion death was due t want of vitality If medical aid had been summoned sooner the child might have lived. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 20 June 1891, Issue 7489 – Gale Document No. Y3200751083
INQUEST IN EXETER - Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Enquiry at the Exeter Police Court this morning relative to the death of MR THOMAS PIDSLEY KINGDON. The first witness called was Mr Mallett, miller, residing at Exwick, who identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of MR KINGDON, who was 64 years of age, and resided at Prospect House, Richmond-road. He last saw the deceased alive on Friday morning, about 8 o'clock at his own house. He as unconscious and was sinking fast. He had seen the deceased the day before, and he was evidently unwell then. Dr Moen was then in close attendance. Mr Richard Travett, foreman at Mr Stockham's, cork merchant, living at Prospect House, said the deceased had lived with him for about eight years. On Monday night he slept at witness's house, and on Tuesday morning went out very early, witness believed before 6 a.m. He saw the deceased before he went out. He was then sober. During the day witness heard he had had a fall, and was fetched to see the deceased at the South Western Hotel, where he saw him in the tradesmen's room. He was taken in a cab to his lodgings. The deceased had a mark over the forehead, but witness did not see any blood, neither did he hear anything about the fall from the deceased. By the Foreman: The deceased had been in failing health for a long time past. The Foreman: Did you see any change in him before the fall? - Witness: No. – A Juror: Did you ever hear the deceased express a wish that he was dead? - Witness: Many times.
Henry Badcock, a foreman porter on the London and South Western Railway, said on Tuesday last about 6.25 a.m. he was at the side door of the Railway Hotel. His attention was attracted to deceased by his walking just as if he had paralysis of the left side. When he came opposite Mr Lee's, the gilder, he tripped, but did not fall. When he came opposite the Museum Hotel the deceased turned his head towards the Museum to look in but the door was closed at the same time he fell off the pavement. Witness picked him up. He was perfectly sober at the time. He struck himself just across the brow, and blood was flowing rather freely. He merely said "Murder." Witness asked him where he wanted to go, and the deceased replied. Witness left him in charge of a Mr Phillpots. James Phillpotts, living at No. 2, Bartholomew-street, said he was in Queen-street on Tuesday morning last about 6.30. He had known the deceased for years and saw him on the pavement in Queen-street on the morning named. He was walking in his usual way. When witness got opposite the centre door of the Museum Hotel he saw deceased fall. Blood was flowing from the deceased's nose and forehead. By the advice of witness the deceased was taken to the South Western hotel, and witness went in, in front and acquainted Mr Crocker of the occurrence. Deceased sat on a chair in the left hand room for a minute or so before he returned to consciousness. Mr Crocker, the landlord, asked the deceased to have some brandy, but the deceased refused and made a request for some soda and brandy, which was given him. Witness asked MR KINGDON if he should fetch a doctor, and the deceased said he had seen Dr Moon. Mr Francis Crocker, landlord of the South Western Railway Hotel, said he knew the deceased intimately. Witness saw him on Tuesday morning, when he was assisted into his house by two men. He was bleeding from a wound in the forehead. Some water was procured, and the wound was bathed Witness should not think the deceased had been drinking, but he was in a very weak state. By the Foreman: Deceased had very often complained of pains in his side. Dr Moon, surgeon, practising at Exeter, said he had known the deceased for years. He had attended him off and on. Lately deceased had become worse. On Tuesday about nine o'clock he was called by Mr Tremlett to go to deceased's house, as he had had a fall that morning He went and examined deceased very carefully, but could find nothing to indicate any serious injury. In a post mortem examination last evening witness examined the head and found no signs whatever of a bruise. On opening the body he found several organs diseased. The Foreman: Do you think that deceased died through the fall? Witness: No. - John Howard, a pensioner, stated that yesterday morning about five o'clock he was fetched to go to the house of deceased, as he was dangerously ill. He went at 9.20 a.m., and whilst there deceased succumbed. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from "Natural Causes."

Saturday 20 June 1891, Issue 7489 – Gale Document No. Y3200751081
SUDDEN DEATH AT TEIGNMOUTH - Last evening, at the Teignmouth Golden Lion Inn, an Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of HENRY JAMES BENNETT. Mary Ann Dibble, with whom he lodged, said the deceased was an eccentric man, and during the time – about ten days – he was ill he refused to see a medical man. She last saw him on Thursday about 10.30 p.m., but on going into his room yesterday morning she found him dead. Dr G. H. Johnson said he was of opinion that deceased died from failure of the heart's action. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 4 July 1891, Issue 7501 – Gale Document No. Y3200751156
INQUEST AT EXMOUTH - Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Dolphin Inn, Exmouth, on Monday, touching the death of the female child of JAMES PIM, landlord of the above named house. MRS PIM identified the body. The child was a month old, and had not been registered, but witness called her MABEL. On Friday night about 11.30 witness went to bed with deceased. Not long after witness got into bed she gave the infant the breast. The child appeared to be very healthy, and witness had never seen her have convulsions. About seven o'clock on Saturday morning witness awoke, and found the child outside the bedclothes dead. She at once sent for a nurse named Starr, who came immediately. A doctor was also sent for. In reply to a Juror witness said the baby's face was not covered over with the bedclothes. Mrs Starr, midwife, said on Saturday morning she was sent for by MRS PIM. When she arrived at the house she felt the pulse of the child and found that it was dead. Dr Hodgson, of Exmouth, said he was called to go to the Dolphin Inn on Saturday morning. On his arrival he found the child dead in bed. He made a post mortem examination and found the lungs congested. In his opinion the congestion of the lungs was due to suffocation. He also noticed that the mouth of the child had been pressed on one side and it remained in that position. The Coroner said he thought the child ought not to have been placed against a mother's breast, especially if the mother was a sound sleeper as in this case. JAMES PIM, landlord of the Dolphin Inn, Exmouth aid the child was not insured, neither was it registered. On Saturday morning he got up before his wife. Shortly afterwards his wife asked him to come upstairs, when he saw his wife crying, and he also noticed that the child was dead.
The Coroner said there could be no doubt that the death of the infant was due to suffocation caused by the child being pressed against the breast of the mother. These accidents could be avoided by mothers refraining from placing their infants in such dangerous positions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Suffocation."

Saturday 4 July 1891, Issue 7501 – Gale Document No. Y3200751137
THE FATAL CLIFF ACCIDENT NEAR DARTMOUTH - At the Dartmouth Guildhall on Tuesday, before Mr R. W. Prideaux, Coroner, an Inquest was held on the body of MR R. C. READE, architect, Torquay, who died on Monday at the Dartmouth Cottage Hospital from injuries received by falling over a cliff at Willow Cove, near Dartmouth. Mr F. Robinson, Torquay, said he went to the Cove on Sunday with the deceased to bathe. Witness entered the water first, and while deceased was bathing witness went up the cliffs and waited for him. He left the deceased about twenty minutes to four. He waited till twenty to six, and then, going down, found deceased lying on the rocks. Miss Borrowman came down at great risk and bathed the head of the deceased before a boat came and took him to the Dartmouth Cottage Hospital. Dr Soper said he examined the deceased, and found that he had a compound fracture of the leg, haemorrhage from the right ear, and several scalp wounds. The Coroner and the Rev. R. Reade thanked Miss Borrowman for her efforts on behalf of the deceased.

Saturday 18 July 1891, Issue 7513 – Gale Document No. Y3200751213
SAD DEATH OF AN OLD LADY IN EXETER - Mr Henry Wilcocks Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Exeter Guildhall o the body of SARAH BARRATT, of 134, Fore-street, who was found dead in bed on Thursday evening. LOUISA GILPIN, wife of ROBERT GILPIN, living at 134, Fore-street, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her mother aged 73. On Thursday evening about seven o'clock, witness saw the deceased in her bedroom, when she complained of pains in her chest. Witness left her for about twenty minutes, and on her return found her mother dead. Witness sent for Mr Vlieland but on account of his not being in town Mr Brash came. The last named gentleman said he was called to go to 134 Fore-street, to see the deceased. On his arrival he found her dead. He examined the body and found no marks of violence. In his opinion the cause of death was failure of the heart's action. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 18 July 1891, Issue 7513 – Gale Document No Y3200751223
A CHILD DROWNED IN EXETER - The Inquest. - Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of WALTER HARRY TWIGGS CASLING, who was drowned in the mill leat in Bonhay-road on Saturday. Mr Milford was chosen Foreman of the Jury. SUSAN CASLING, wife of WILLIAM CASLING, a painter, living at No. 11, Eagle Cottage, Bonhay-road, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her son, aged 2 years. Deceased went out on Saturday about eight o'clock, accompanied by his brother who was 4 years old. About five minutes afterwards the elder boy came up to witness, and said his brother (the deceased) had fallen into the water. Witness asked where the deceased was, and he said he was in the water crying. Witness did not hear any more of the deceased until he was brought home. Harry Isaacs, a labourer, living in Anchor-lane, Exe Island, said on Saturday evening he was coming up Bonhay-road between 8.30 and 9 p.m. when he heard that a child was in the water. After a search witness found the body of the deceased against the grating of a mill in the Commercial-road. Inspector Shapcott said there was no evidence to show where the deceased fell into the water. Mr Vlieland, surgeon, said he had viewed the body, and in his opinion death was due to drowning. The Coroner remarked that there was no evidence to show where the child fell into the water, but in his opinion the spot was where the timber was lying. He thought it was a trap more than a fence, as children got on top of the timber and fell into the water. In deference to the wish of the Jury, he would communicate with the Surveyor and request him to provide some protection. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 18 July 1891, Issue 7513 – Gale Document No Y3200751225
SHOCKING ACCIDENT AT TEIGNMOUTH - A little girl named SAMSON, daughter of MR THOMAS SAMSON, of Saxe-street, Teignmouth, met with a serious accident on Tuesday. It appears that the child's clothing by some means became ignited. Her mother was out at the time, and on returning a few moments later found the child terribly burnt. Dr Little was quickly in attendance and ordered the child's removal to the Teignmouth Infirmary. The child id in the afternoon.
THE INQUEST - An Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Infirmary on Wednesday by Mr S. Hacker on the body of the child ALICE RUSH SAMSON, who met her death by burning on Tuesday. Mr C. Northcote was summoned to appear on the Jury, but was not present. After waiting for some ten minutes the Coroner said he should inflict a fine of 10s. on Mr Northcote, as he had been properly summoned, and it was his duty to be present. Mr Ephraim Mullis was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who then viewed the body, which was lying in the mortuary of the Institute. The deceased was very much burned about the neck and chest. The first witness called was ELIZA SAMSON, who stated that she resided at 22, Saxe-street, and was the wife of THOMAS SAMSON, mariner. She left the deceased in bed asleep on Tuesday morning, having occasion to leave the house, and was absent for about five minutes. On her way back she was informed that her little girl had caught herself on fire. On arriving home witness found the child in bed. She told witness how she met with the accident. A doctor was fetched and he advised the child's removal to the Infirmary. The deceased told witness that she was reaching over the fire to get the kettle to put some water into the teapot, and her clothes became ignited, she being in her nightdress at the time. The child was not in the habit of handling the kettle. FLORENCE SAMPSON, sister of the deceased, said she saw her sister coming up the stairs with her chemise on fire. The witness seemed to be very much affected, and could not answer many questions. Mrs Sarah Truman, wife of Richard Truman, said she heard a child scream on Tuesday morning, and she ran across, went upstairs, and saw the child's clothes burning. Her clothes were almost destroyed, with the exception of a small patch on the shoulder. Witness sprinkled the child with flour. The child FLORENCE SAMSON was again called and said she was in bed when her sister caught herself on fire. Mr Edward Blucke, house surgeon at the Teignmouth Infirmary, said about 9.30 on Tuesday the deceased was brought to the institution severely burned. She died at about 2.30 in the afternoon. The girl was very much burned over the chest and abdomen, and he considered she died from the shock caused by the burns. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 1 August 1891, Issue 7525 – Gale Document No. Y3200751285
TORQUAY NEWS - Sudden Death. - ELIZA CHALMERS, a lady seventy-nine years of age, living at Rowley, Vansittart-road, died somewhat suddenly yesterday, at 11.30 in the morning, it is said from heart disease, accelerated by an accident, which she received on the 15th July, but falling in her bedroom, and bruising her face and breaking her left arm. The Coroner has been communicated with.

SUDDEN DEATH AT ST. MARYCHURCH - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquiry this afternoon at the Commercial Hotel, St. Marychurch, into the circumstances attending the death of ARTHUR SMITH, a potter, fifty-two years of age, who died somewhat suddenly at the Commercial Hotel yesterday. A verdict of death from "Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 1 August 1891, Issue 7525 – Gale Document No. Y3200751290
A CHILD SCALDED TO DEATH - On Monday at the Commercial Inn, Cullompton, Mr F. Burrow, County Coroner, held an Inquest relative to the death of the infant son of WILLIAM DUMMELL, junr., a labourer of that place. From the evidence it appeared that on Friday the mother of the child placed it in front of the fireplace on the floor on some flannel some distance from the fire. The dinner for the family was being cooked in a boiler resting on an iron bar across a stove grate. By some means the boiler fell off the stove in the temporary absence of the child's mother, and a portion of the boiling water reached the infant, who did not appear at first to be much injured, but on Sunday it died from the effects of the shock to the system and attack of bronchitis. A verdict was returned of "Accidental Death", in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 8 August 1891, Issue 7530 – Gale Document No. Y3200751305
THE RAILWAY FATALITY AT CULLOMPTON - Mr Coroner Burrow on Tuesday held an Inquiry at the Railway Hotel, Cullompton, into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE WHITE, 21, labourer, who was killed on the Great Western Railway on Saturday last. Evidence having been given by Sidney Bazley, John Frost, James W. Pring, William Burgess, John Cole, and George Whittaker, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the widow.

Saturday 8 August 1891, Issue 7530 – Gale Document No. Y3200751317
INQUEST AT BRIXHAM - Yesterday at the Globe Hotel, Brixham, before Mr Coroner S. Hacker, an Inquest was held touching the death of WILLIAM THOMAS EALES, who it will be remembered was drowned off Fishcombe Point on Bank Holiday. The evidence went to show that deceased, who could not swim, went round the fleet in a sailing boat on Monday, and on the way back, the boat capsized by a squall, the deceased sinking immediately. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned by the capsizing of a boat in a squall of wind in Torbay on Monday, August 3rd."

Saturday 22 August 1891, Issue 7542 – Gale Document No. Y3200751391
FATAL ACCIDENT AT TOTNES - Yesterday a fatal accident happened to a labourer named WHITEWAY at Totnes. It appears that he was engaged in assisting to unload wood to be used in the construction of the grand stand at Totnes Races. Accompanied by several men the deceased was "slewing" round a large baulk in order to get it off a truck, when the timber slipping, caught him near the middle of the body, pressing him against the truck. He was placed on a shutter and carried to the goods station. The services of a medical man were procured, but were of no avail. Deceased leaves a wife and several children, who are grown up. At an Inquest held last evening a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 5 September 1891, Issue 7553 – Gale Document No. Y3200751464
FATAL ACCIDENT AT BRIDFORD - Mr Gould, Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest at Week Farm, Bridford, last evening on the body of WILLIAM BALL BEER, a farmer, aged 67. It appeared that on Saturday afternoon while deceased was harnessing a horse to go to the harvest field the animal ran away, knocking down BEER. Dr Fenwick was called and he found the deceased had fractured his thigh. On Monday deceased vomited blood, and died on Tuesday evening of syncope, produced by the vomiting of blood and shock to the system, the result of the accident. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 5 September 1891, Issue 7553 – Gale Document No. Y3200751455
SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EXETER TRADESMAN - The Inquest. - On Tuesday Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of PETER WESTERN, a butcher, of Goldsmith-street, who was found dead on Monday at his residence. Mr Reed was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
ELIZABETH JANE WESTERN, living at Goldsmith-street, identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her husband. He was a butcher by trade, and was 54 years of age. On Monday he appeared to be in his usual health, which was fairly good Deceased retired to rest in the evening about ten minutes to ten o'clock. After he got into bed he complained of shortness of breath. Not long afterwards he began to sneeze, and witness boiled some water and bathed his head. Deceased then became unconscious, and died within a few minutes. Mr Hartnoll, surgeon, was soon in attendance. Deceased had often complained of shortness of breath and a pain in the heart. He did not partake of any supper previous to going to bed. Mr Henry Thomas Hartnoll, surgeon, residing and practising in Exeter, said he had known the deceased for many years. He had attended the family, but not the deceased himself. Witness was called on Monday night, at about half past ten o'clock, to go to Goldsmith-street. He went immediately, and on his arrival found the deceased in bed dead. He was lying on his back, and he should think the deceased had been dead about half an hour. He examined the body, and found no marks of violence. In his opinion death was due to heart disease The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 12 September 1891, Issue 7559 – Gale Document No. Y3200751492
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A BOY NEAR BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, on Wednesday, by Mr Incledon Bencraft and a Jury, on the body of GEORGE HENRY RICHARDS, a lad 10 years of age. It transpired that about a fortnight ago the deceased, while going from a farm at Roundswell, near Barnstaple, to his home, about a mile distance, called in at a farm occupied by Mr Gear. Unasked by Mr Gear, the boy took charge of a horse which was driving a combing machine. A minute or two afterwards the machine stopped, and on going out from the barn to where the horse was Mr Gear found the lad on the ground groaning He had blood about his face and the front of his head was smashed in. He immediately got a spring cart and conveyed him to the North Devon Infirmary at Barnstaple. He lingered on until Tuesday, when he died. He became conscious a day or two before he died, but had convulsions ultimately. The surmise was that the deceased rode on the shaft and fell off behind the horse and was kicked, but there was no evidence to shew how the accident happened. The owner of the horse said it was a quiet one. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 19 September 1891, Issue 7565 – Gale Document No. Y3200751535
THE DEATH BY POISONING AT TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Infirmary on Tuesday by Mr Sydney Hacker, Coroner, on the body of JOHN JAMES MILTON, aged 9, who met his death on Monday night by drinking weed killer. Mr Chas. Frances was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was JAMES MILTON, father of the deceased, who stated that on Monday afternoon he was informed that his boy had drunk some weed killer. He proceeded to the Exeter-road, and found that the boy had been taken into Trevervan Cottage. Seeing the state of the lad he at once removed him to the infirmary. On their way they passed Mr Pyle, dairyman, of Teignmouth, and asked him to give them a lift in his cart, but he did not do so. The Jury were of opinion that Mr Pyle did not her the request, or that he did not know the case was so serious. The boy was conscious all the way and told witness how the accident occurred. He said he saw the can in the road, and thinking it was clean water he drank from it, the can being an ordinary watering-can, with a long stem or spout to it. The boy died at about ten o'clock on Monday night. Frank Maer stated that he was in the employ of Mr Hannaford, nurseryman, and on Monday afternoon, about four o'clock, he was sent by his master with a gallon of weed killer to take to Miss Ermen, of Yannon. When in the Exeter-road near Miss Richard's he stopped to rest, and had a conversation with Miss Richards' gardener. Whilst they were talking the boys had come out from school, and several of them were coming up the road. Cox, the gardener, thinking the boys had come for the chestnuts, went to drive them away. In the meantime the boy MILTON had come up the road unseen by witness and drank from the can. Witness at once told the boy to spit the stuff out or he would be poisoned. MILTON did so. Witness was standing close to the can all the time; in fact, he did not leave it at all. MILTON then went into the hedge and had a drink of water and was sick. Witness went for the doctor, but on his return found the boy had been taken to the Infirmary by his father. Frank Cox bore out the statement of the last witness. Harry Blackmore, aged nine, a school boy, who was with deceased, said they were going up the road, and when near Miss Richards' he saw MILTON go up quietly and drink out of the can. The boy who had the can was looking the other way, and did not see MILTON until he had commenced to drink. Dr Frederick Blucke, house surgeon at the Infirmary, said the deceased was brought to the Infirmary on Monday afternoon, about a quarter to six, by his father, who said he had been drinking some weed killed, which was poisonous. Witness treated the boy for poisoning, and the lad vomited after an emetic had been given him. He seemed to be in pain, and notwithstanding everything possible was done for him he died about ten o'clock on Monday night. Witness had made a post mortem examination of the body, and found the organs healthy. The stomach was much inflamed by the poison he had drank. Asked by a Juryman if the boy's life might have been saved if he had been immediately attended on taking the stuff, the doctor stated that possibly it might have been, but he could not say for certain. Mr Fred Hannaford, nurseryman, said on Monday a lady came o his shop and ordered some weed killer which she wanted sent at once. He, being out of the drums he usually sent it in, put it into a watering can, the boy Mear knowing it was poison. Asked by a Juryman if he was in the habit of sending the liquid in such a way, Mr Hannaford said he occasionally did so, but did not make it a practice. The Jury, after some deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that Mr Hannaford should be more careful in the future as to the way in which the weed killer was sent out.

Saturday 10 October 1891, Issue 7573 – Gale Document No. Y3200751637
SUICIDE AT BARNSTAPLE - On Tuesday Mr Coroner Bencraft held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, on the body of CHARLES WEBSTER, an elderly man, carrying on the business of a barber on the Strand, who committed suicide on Monday by cutting his throat. The evidence went to show that the deceased, who was living apart from his wife, had received notice to quit his shop, and had arranged to have his furniture removed on Monday morning. At eight o'clock he shaved a man called Tyrrell, with whom he was on intimate terms, and who had promised to remove his furniture, and he told Tyrrell that he should cut his throat before the day was over. Tyrrell having heard the threat before, took no notice of it; but finding in the night that the shop was shut, and had been all day he went and forced the door open, and on going upstairs he found deceased lying on the bed with his throat cut. He asked him what was the matter, and deceased said, "I've cut my throat, I'm dying," and he put out his hand and shook hands with Tyrrell. The latter ran for the police, who came to the house with Dr Jackson. Deceased was attended to, and was ultimately removed to the Infirmary where he died immediately on his admission. He appears to have cut his throat while in the closet close to the bedroom and then to have walked into his bedroom and fallen on the bed. A sister of the deceased some few years ago hung herself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 10 October 1891, Issue 7573 – Gale Document No. Y3200751639
A FATAL FALL AT BROADCLYST - Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Red Lion Inn, Broadclyst, on Monday, touching the death of WILLIAM TREMLETT, who met with a fatal accident a few days ago. GEORGE WM. TREMLETT, of 17, Ferry-street, Mill Wall, Middlesex, identified the body of the deceased as that of his father, a retired boot and shoe maker. He was 84 years of age and died on Friday. On the 25th of August about 10.30 witness found the deceased in the road close to the bridge by Clystow Mills. Deceased told witness that he fell. He was removed to his house and attended by Mr Somer. The deceased was in the habit of walking alone. He did not attach any blame to anyone. Samuel Sotten, a bootmaker, of Broadclyst, said on the 25th ult. he was near the Clystow Mills, where he saw the deceased leaning against a post by the road. He assisted the last witness to remove the deceased to his house. Witness heard deceased say he had slipped and fell. Mr James Somer, surgeon, of Broadclyst, said he attended the deceased on the 25th August last between eleven and twelve. He found him suffering from a fracture of the left thigh bone. Deceased went on fairly well for the first three days, but since that time he had not taken his food. The cause of death in witness's opinion was exhaustion consequent on the injury sustained. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 7 November 1891, Issue 7596 – Gale Document No. Y3200751793
SUPPOSED POISONING AT STOKE CANON - At the Stoke Canon Inn, Stoke Canon, yesterday, Mr H. W. Gould, (Deputy Coroner for the district) held an Enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of CAROLINE MOLLAND, aged 52, the wife of JOHN MOLLAND, tailor, of the above village and who died on Wednesday last. The Rev. F. Robson was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and among those present in the room was Deputy Chief Constable Jesse. The first witness called was JOHN MOLLAND, husband of the deceased. He stated that on Wednesday morning deceased rose about seven o'clock and complained of being rather unwell, but managed to make a cup of tea for witness, he being also in ill-health. She had not left the room to go downstairs more than a minute when she fell, screaming, "Father, come to me; I am poisoned; I'm dying. Send for the doctor; call Joe and Selina. Holman and Ham have sent me the wrong stuff." Deceased usually called witness "father," and JOE her son. MR MOLLAND ran to her and found her paralysed, and in great agony. He asked her what she had been taking, and she replied, "My drops. Holman and Ham sent the wrong stuff. Pull them up; pull them up for it!" Deceased added that the drops were brought home on the Tuesday night, and witness knew that the Thorverton carrier had called. His wife died half an hour after she was taken ill. Witness knew that his wife was in the habit of taking some drops, but he did not know what they contained. She knew witness was averse to her taking the medicine. He did not know for certain where his wife obtained the drops, but had seen "Holman and Ham" on small empty bottles. He had often seen deceased in a very excited state, but he put it down more to "that cursed stuff," as he always called the drops, then to strong drink. This had been going on for years, and several years ago Dr Davy asked him if deceased was responsible for her actions. She was queer and excitable at times, but not so on the morning of her death. She had never attempted or threatened to take her life. Joe Melland, stepson of the deceased, corroborated, and Phillip Foale Rowsell, member of the firm of Holman and Ham, chemists, Exeter, said for the last eighteen months he had been in the habit of supplying deceased with medicine according to the following prescription:- 1 ½ oz. solution of morphia to 1 ½ oz of water. She was supplied with this quantity on Tuesday. The prescription on this occasion was made by one of the apprentices named W. J. Hodges, who put it up without any authority. Witness left the bottle on the counter, and on the carrier calling Hodges made up the drops Witness thought he was qualified to do so. Dr Puddicombe, of Silverton, said he saw the deceased at quarter past nine on Wednesday morning. She was then quite dead. He had made a post mortem examination. There was nothing to account for the death. At this point the Inquest was adjourned in order that the contents of the stomach might be analysed.

Saturday 14 November 1891, Issue 7602 – Gale Document No. Y3200751799
KILLED BY A COW - The Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) has held an Inquest at Yendercott Farm, Shobrooke, on the body of SAMUEL HURFORD, who expired on Sunday from injuries which he sustained from a cow. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 21 November 1891, Issue 7608 – Gale Document No. Y3200751853
SAD DEATH OF AN OLD LADY AT EXMOUTH - At the Beach Hotel, Exmouth, on Thursday an Inquest was held by Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy Coroner) touching the death of an old lady named ANN HOOK, who died suddenly on Monday evening. Mr Thomas Abel was chosen Forman of the Jury A Juryman named Pym came in late and the Coroner, addressing him, said he was liable to a fine of £5. Mr Pym said he had no idea that it was so late. The Coroner: You ought to have an idea. I ought to fine you £5, but I will give you another chance. Mr Pym: Thank you, sir. The Jury then proceeded to view the body, which was at the Maud Hospital. The first witness called was FRANK WILLIAM HOOK, who said he identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of his mother, who was a widow. Witness last saw her a week ago, when he came home from sea. She had been living at Exmouth for six years and a half. She enjoyed good health. FRANK WILLIAM HOOK, son of the last witness, said he was present on Monday about 8.30, when the deceased was taken ill. She was in bed at the time. Witness saw her again at 5.30, and stayed with her until she died, about six o'clock. Just before she expired the deceased frequently talked to him. Polly Densham, servant at the Beach Hotel, said the deceased had stayed at the Beach Hotel for about six years. She was always complaining of pains in her head. Dr Cock passed her bedroom on the day deceased died, and witness asked if she should call him, but deceased said she would not see him if witness would lay down £20. Eliza Ann Richards also gave evidence. Dr Hudson said he made a post-mortem examination, and found the bag which contained the heart was full of blood, caused by the bursting of a blood vessel close to the heart. By a Juror: He could possibly have prolonged the life of the deceased had he been called in a year before The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 21 November 1891, Issue 7608 – Gale Document No. Y3200751841
SUICIDE AT PLYMOUTH - MKR ALBERT CANNICOTT, stationer, of Union Street, Plymouth, committed suicide this morning by shooting himself in the right temple with a colt .880 bore revolver. His body was discovered about eleven o'clock with the revolver tightly grasped in his right hand. In his writing-desk was found a packet of four cartridges, deceased having bought these and the weapon the 17th inst., on which date he was heard to exclaim to one of his shop assistants, "I wish I were dead." To show the determined nature of the suicide, it may be stated that deceased had loaded only one chamber of the revolver. The police were communicated with, and Inspector Hill searched the body and the room, wherein he found a letter addressed to MRS CANNICOTT, 14, Victoria terrace, Exmouth, which will be opened at the Inquest this afternoon. Deceased and his wife had been parted about two years, and recently CANNICOTT himself had been very despondent, due, it is believed, to the strained relations between himself and his wife. Although the body was warm when found, the medical man pronounced life extinct.

Saturday 21 November 1891, Issue 7608 – Gale Document No. Y3200751838
THE FATALITY AT LYDFORD STATION - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Prickman last evening at the South Western Railway Office, Lydford, on the body of RICHARD PRIEST, a porter, aged 25, and a native of Northtawton. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was assisting in shunting near Lydford Station on the previous evening, and was knocked down and killed by the 4.15 train from Exeter. Deceased's father was killed in the same manner. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. No blame was attached to anyone.

Saturday 21 November 1891, Issue 7608 – Gale Document No. Y3200751828
SHOCKING FATALITY IN EXETER - An accident of a shocking character occurred at the foundry of Messrs. Bodley Bros., engineers and iron founders, Commercial-road, on Tuesday, resulting n the death of one of their employees named WILLIAM THORN, who resided with his parents in Holloway Buildings, Holloway-street. The deceased was generally employed in casting trimming, but this morning between ten and half-past was engaged in hoisting castings with other workmen by means of the shear-legs. A casting was conveyed to the hoisting place on a truck, and was being raised when it slipped, and the sudden jerk caused the shear-legs to give way, the whole structure with the casting coming down with a terrific crash. Most of the men managed to get out of the way, but THORN was knocked down by the heavy pulley block, his brains being scattered. Death was instantaneous. The body was removed to the foundry, and Dr Perkins was summoned, but, of course, his services were of no avail. the men engaged in the work had a narrow escape, especially an employee named Crump, who was struck by the falling woodwork. He was, however, able to resume his occupation. The father of the deceased was also at work on the premises at the time. The shear legs were composed of poles about nine inches in diameter, braced together about ten feet from the ground by a triangular frame of wood. The tripod has been in use for a number of years, and is said to have frequently sustained heavier weights than that which caused its collapse that day. The deceased was only 23 years of age, and frequently attended the services at the Salvation Army Temple. It is stated that he was to have been married at Christmas. Much sympathy is felt for his parents.
THE INQUEST - The Coroner and the Jury. - The Inquest on the body was held by Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) on Tuesday evening at the offices at the foundry. On behalf of Messrs. Campion, Mr Charles Ashford represented Messrs. Bodley Bros. The Jury, of which Mr Samuel Yeo was Foreman, having viewed the body.
ALFRED THORN, the father, a labourer, of 5, Holloway Buildings, Holloway-street, gave evidence of identification. His son was twenty-three years of age, and resided with him at the above residence. He was a labourer, and worked for Messrs. Bodley Bros. Deceased was a single man, and witness last saw him alive that morning about seven o'clock, when he was at work, witness being in the same employ as his son. At that time he was wetting some sawdust to damp the office floors. He did not know what the deceased was engaged on after that time. Later on in the morning, about half-past ten, he was attracted to the yard, there being at that time a loud crash, as if from the falling of the shear-legs. He went to the spot, and on hearing there was somebody injured he ran with others for assistance, not knowing at the time that his son was hurt. On returning to the yard he was not allowed to go near the scene of the accident. From where he was standing he saw a pair of legs amongst the debris, and later he identified his son. He did not know who was at work with him at the time, and he did not know how the accident occurred.
Mr Owen Henry Bodley, engineer, said he was Foreman of the works. He was in the office about 10.15 that morning when the accident occurred. He saw two or three men about to swing a casting off a pair of trucks. He did not see THORN from where he was standing. The structure was composed of three shear-legs of wood, and was worked by a winch or crab. He made a remark to the junior clerk, "I see that thing will go over. Something will give way." He meant by those words that either the casting would slip off the trucks or the chain "go" at the higher end. The condenser and its belongings weighed about two tons in his estimation. As the men lifted the condenser near its balancing point it suddenly tilted over. He then saw the structure fall down. He did not see THORN until after the accident. Several men, immediately after the mishap, lifted the shear leg up and took out the body, which was removed to a shed. Deceased was quite dead.
The Coroner: How long have these shearlegs been in use?
Witness: I cannot say. Ever since I can remember.
The Coroner: They have been in use a great many years, I suppose?
Witness: A great many, I should say.
The Coroner: Do you know what wood it is made of?
Witness: Pitch-pine, I should say.
The Coroner: Has the structure ever been tarred or strengthened?
Witness: It has been pickled.
Mr Williams: Was it your duty as foreman of the works to see that the machinery was perfectly safe before it hoisted up such a weight?
Witness: I believed it was perfect.
Mr Williams: Have you ever given a certificate that the structure was safe?
Witness: No, it has been examined by a competent man.
A Juror: I have myself known the triangle for fifty or sixty years. I know it is half-rotten, and the poles never could have broke if they were solid.
In answer to Mr Yeo, witness said the triangle did not give way until the condenser tilted over.
A Juror: The thing itself was half rotten.
The Coroner: I think we had better adjourn this case in order that the Inspector of Factories might be here.
Mr Williams: The opinion of the majority of the Jury is that it is not fair to call us together in the "dimpse" of the evening like this. We are not able to form any opinion now as to the condition of the wood.
The Coroner: You can view it again tomorrow.
A Juror: I should suggest that the crane be not touched until we view it again.
The Coroner: Oh, yes.
Mr Ashford: I suppose there is no objection to taking down the men's names who were engaged there at the time?
The Coroner: The question is with regard to viewing the shear-legs by daylight.
It was decided to view the structure by daylight, and Mr Bodley, on being asked who the men were who were engaged in hoisting the casting, said he could not say.
Some discussion took place as to the time the Jury should meet on Thursday.
A Juror: It will probably take some time before the inspector can get here.
Several Jurors dissented from the Coroner's time, ten o'clock, and Mr Williams said the wishes of the Jurymen should be consulted as well as theirs. The majority of them wished that the Inquest should be held at eleven.
The Coroner: If the case lasts till past three o'clock, I shall adjourn it for another day.
Mr Vaughan (to Mr Ashford): Do you get your expenses paid, because I don't.
The Coroner: I can't allow this, sir.
The evidence of Dr Perkins was then taken before the time for Thursday was fixed. He said that he was called to Messrs. Bodley Bros. about eleven o'clock. On reaching the establishment he saw the body of the deceased in an outhouse dead. He found the top of the head was fractured. A part of the left frontal bone and also the temporal bone was smashed, and projected out some considerable distance. The eyes appeared to have escaped injury, but the nose and part of the face was injured and flattened. No other external injury was noticeable, and he considered that some very heavy and ponderous weight must have fallen upon the deceased, causing instantaneous death.
The adjourned Inquest was held on Thursday when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" caused by the collapse of the defective poles attributing no blame to anyone.

Saturday 21 November 1891, Issue 7608 – Gale Document No. Y3200751839
THE SUPPOSED POISONING AT STOKE CANON – Adjourned Inquest – This Day. - This afternoon at the Stoke Canon Inn, Stoke Canon, Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner for the district) held an adjourned Enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of CAROLINE MOLLAND, aged 52, the wife of JOHN MOLLAND, tailor, of that place, and who died on the 4th of this month. It will be remembered that the Inquest was adjourned from the 6t6h instant in order that the contents of the deceased's stomach might be analysed. Today Mr W. Friend (Friend and Beal, Exeter), appeared on behalf of the firm of chemists who supplied the "drops" to MRS MOLLAND, and Deputy Chief Constable Jesse w3as again present during the proceedings. The Rev. F. Robson was the Foreman of the Jury. Philip Traale Rowsell, chemist, was re-called, and in reply to questions by the Coroner, stated that he was in the habit of supplying a solution of morphia and water to the deceased. On the day in question he supplied her with three ounces of the mixture, being one and a half of morphia and the same quantity of water. The prescription was made up in his absence by an assistant.
Alexander Winter Blythe, M.D., public analyst for the County of Devon, stated that on the 9th November he received the bottle produced and a sealed jar containing a stomach with its contents. Witness had made an examination of the bottle which contained a solution of strychnine, about two grains to the ounce. The exact amount of liquid in the bottle was 4 9-10 ounces – practically five ounces. A solution of strychnine would be perfectly transparent. The bottle contained a little hydrochloric acid, and also a little alcohol. Witness tested the contents of the bottle for morphia, and could not find any. Witness had subsequently analysed the contents of the stomach, and separated from them a very minute portion of strychnine – not more than 2.13 of a grain. That would not be sufficient to cause death, but would be absorbed in the intestines. The strychnine which caused death would not, however, be that in the stomach, but that which had been absorbed into the system. His opinion was that the symptoms as reported in the papers pointed to death from strychnine. By permission of the Coroner, Mr Friend then addressed a few words to the Jury, pointing out that the bottle found could not possibly be the same as that sent out. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Misadventure."

Saturday 5 December 1891, Issue 7619 – Gale Document No. Y3200751906
INQUESTS IN EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Police Court by Mr Coroner Hooper this afternoon on the body of JOSEPH SIDNEY SNELL, 13, who walked into the river from the Quay near the Custom House last evening, and was drowned. HENRY SNELL, stoker at the Gas Works, said deceased was his brother, and was in the employ of Mr Pugsley. He heard yesterday that his brother was in the water, and on going to Commercial-road he saw the body being conveyed to the mortuary. Deceased was short-sighted. Fredk. Matthews said while near the Custom House at about quarter-past eight last evening, he heard a splash, as of someone falling into the water. Witness went back to Mr Yeo's, and a young man named Slee came out, and they went to the spot, but just as they reached it the boy sank. Someone came with a grapnel, and the body was recovered after three-quarters of an hour. By a Juryman: Witness could not have rescued the boy if he had jumped in, as he was unable to swim. William Perriam, who recovered the body, said the life-saving apparatus ought to be kept at the Custom House instead of at the ferry. A Juryman said he quite agreed with the witness. He had a vivid recollection of being nearly drowned there himself. It was the most dangerous part of the Quay. Dr Harrison said he was called to see the deceased, who was apparently dead. Witness tried to restore consciousness, but failed. In his opinion death was due to suffocation by drowning. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The Coroner said he would communicate with the Town Council respecting the dangerous character of the spot where the deceased walked into the water.

An Inquest was afterwards held on the body of SARAH LAKE, 83, widow, of Reynold's-court, Blackboy-road. HARRIETT LAKE identified the body as that of her mother. On November 16th, about 7 a.m., deceased was walking across the room when she slipped and fell heavily. Witness could not lift her, and called in a neighbour, who helped her to put deceased to bed. Deceased complained that she had knocked her knee, which got worse. Dr Bell was called in, but deceased died this morning. Dr Bell said he was called to see the deceased. He examined her leg, and found the left thigh bone fractured. The accident was the cause of death. Witness added that deceased was very well attended by her daughter. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 12 December 1891, Issue 7624 – Gale Document No. Y3200751939
DEATH WHILST KILLING A PIG - On Wednesday a man named WILLIAM HENRY VANSTONE, who was in the employ of Mr Richard Browne, of Dunscombe, Crediton, as a farm labourer, was in the act of slaughtering a pig when he dropped down. At the Inquest, held before the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) last evening, the medical evidence showed that death was due to syncope, accelerated by structural disease of the heart, and a verdict in accordance with this testimony was returned.

Saturday 12 December 1891, Issue 7624 – Gale Document No. Y3200751927
THE ACCIDENT AT QUEEN STREET STATION - Inquest. - On Thursday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital touching the death of SIDNEY MORTIMORE, aged 19, who was killed on the London and South Western Railway at Queen-street station on Wednesday. Inspector Foster was present on behalf of the London and South Western Railway Company, and Mr George Hawkins was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The first witness called was WILLIAM MORTIMORE, goods' guard on the South Western Railway, residing at No. 11, Cotton's Buildings, Mermaid yard, and father of deceased, who stated that the deceased was 18 years of age on the 30th June last He was a number-taker in the employ of the London and South Western Railway. Witness first heard of his death about a quarter to nine n the night. Charles Hurford, telegraph messenger at the Exeter Post Office, said at about a quarter to four in the afternoon he was coming from the engine station in the L. and S.W.R. yard. He did not know the deceased at the time the accident happened. As witness was coming through one of the archways he heard two gentlemen shouting, "Hi up, out of the way." Witness looked around and saw somebody taking the number of a truck. The truck was going along, and the man was running beside of it to take the number. There was no engine attached to the truck. After taking the number the man was crossing the line in order to get between the two lines of rails. The man had one foot out over one of the lines and his back towards the trucks. He was facing Queen-street Station. Before the man had time to get out over the rail the truck struck him in the centre of the back and knocked him down. Some porters then came, and one of them lifted him up. A stretcher was fetched, and the deceased was removed to the Hospital. By a Juror: the truck which struck the deceased was one which witness presumed he was going to return to take the number of. Witness knew nothing of the matter until he heard the gentlemen – who were not in the service of the Railway Company – call out. Charles Bastone, porter on the London and South Western Railway, stated that he was employed at the Queen-street Station, and was in the yard in the afternoon. Witness did not see the accident, but he saw deceased coming up the yard just before. After deceased was knocked down witness went to him. He was lying flat on his back, and did not speak. He w3as not conscious, and witness saw no blood about. MORTIMORE was not dead when witness went to him. By a Juror: When witness went down to the deceased he spoke to him, but the latter did not answer. Mace-sergeant Meardon said the engine driver and yard-foreman were present if the Jury would like to hear them. The Jury were unanimously of opinion that this was not necessary. Inspector Foster said the deceased was a steady man and had been number taker since 1888, and was to have been put on shunting duty that day. Mr R. Martin, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, stated that he received SIDNEY MORTIMORE into that institution about five o'clock p.m. The man was then dead. Witness had made a superficial examination of the body. There were several ribs broken on the right side, but witness should think death was due to laceration of the lung. There were also signs which would point to a fracture of the base of the deceased's skull. Witness should consider that these injuries would be sufficient to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." A Juryman said if he was in order he should like to suggest that the company might place a foreman or someone in the shunting yard to warn the men when the trucks were coming. The Coroner said he thought the suggestion a good one, but thought it would be impossible to carry it out. Inspector Foster said he did not see how this could be done. The deceased had been at this work for three years, and knew every inch of the yard. He (Inspector Foster) did not think the deceased was taking numbers, but thought that he had probably been to the office to make his report, and whilst returning did not notice the truck. The Coroner said he dared say the Railway Company would see what could be done.

Saturday 26 December 1891, Issue 7635 – Gale Document No. Y3200751999
INQUEST AT TIVERTON - An Inquest was held at Tiverton Infirmary on Thursday on the body of THOMAS GILLARD, slaughterman, who died in that institution from lock-jaw. After hearing the evidence of deceased's wife, John Britton, William Mitchell, Mr Cullin, house-surgeon, and Edward Carnell, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died of tetanus, resulting from a wound in his face caused by a fall whilst intoxicated.

Saturday 2 January 1892, Issue 7640 – Gale Document No Y3200752023
A BODY FOUND IN THE EXE - About ten o'clock on Thursday a man named Blight was proceeding along the Quay when he saw an object of unusual size floating down the river opposite the ballast heap. He immediately summoned a man named Robert Stevens, in the employ of Mr Lee. A boat was procured, and the object was found to be the body of a man in a shocking state of decomposition. With some difficulty the body was got into the boat and conveyed to the banks. The police were then sent for, and P.C.'s Bubear and Chaplin soon appeared on the spot and conveyed the body to the mortuary behind the Police Court. It will be remembered that on November 28th a man was reported to have jumped from Exe Bridge. A labourer of Whitstone was reported missing, and although the river in the vicinity of the bridge was dragged, no trace of the missing man was found. It is supposed that the body found is that of the missing labourer.
THE INQUEST - At the new Police Court yesterday afternoon, Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest on the body of RICHARD SLOMAN, aged 39, whose body was found in the river Exe the previous morning. FANNY SANDERS, wife of WILLIAM SANDERS, of Cowick-street, St. Thomas, identified the body, and stated that the deceased was a labourer, working on the road for Mr Bray, of Alphington. The deceased had lived at Whitstone with his wife, who was witness's daughter. Deceased left Whitstone on the 28th November at a quarter to seen in the morning. MARY JANE SLOMAN, wife of deceased, said he left home on the 28th November. He was at that time in good health. Deceased had always been in constant work, and was not given to drink. He was not much of a smoker. By a Juror: Deceased never had fits. James Scanes, ostler at the Okehampton Inn, said he knew the deceased and last saw him alive about seven o'clock in the evening on Saturday, Nov. 28th, in the skittle-alley of the Okehampton Inn. Deceased was not sober, and w3as lying on the ground asleep. Witness spoke to the deceased, who answered, saying that he had been to Mr Bray's at Alphington, and that there he had mixed his drinks. At this time the deceased was drunk. Witness lifted deceased up and sat him on a barrel. After leaving deceased there for about five minutes witness brought him outside. Deceased then "stuck up against the wall," and after a short time told witness that he should go and look for his wife. Witness then went inside the public house, and had not seen the deceased since. Witness knew the deceased well, and used to see him nearly every Saturday. Deceased was in the habit of drinking, but very moderately. He was worse on the occasion witness had spoken of, because he had mixed his drinks, he said. By a Juror: It was about a quarter past seven when witness took the deceased outside the inn. Ellen Hosgrove, a single woman, residing at Bycott's Buildings, said she did not know the deceased. On the evening of Saturday, the 28th of November, witness had just been in the city for her clothes, and was returning across Exe Bridge between seven and eight o'clock on the left hand side of the bridge going down, when she heard something go splash into the water. Witness heard someone cry out twice, "Help me, help me, Lord." Witness did not see the man go in. There were several people on the bridge at the time, and they said "Look at that man in the water." It was very dark at the time. Witness saw the man on the edge of the bridge. Robert Stevens, labourer, of 35, Coombe-street, said he was passing down the Quay about ten minutes to ten o'clock on Thursday when he saw something which he considered was a man's body coming down the stream. Witness borrowed a boat and with the assistance of a man named Baker put off and got the body in. Witness left the body in the boat and sent for a policeman. The body was afterwards removed to the mortuary. At this point the owner of the boat which was borrowed appeared saying he wished to speak to the Coroner. Having been given permission the man informed the Coroner that he had had to pay a man 2s. for cleaning his boat. The Coroner said that had nothing to do with the Inquest, and the man ought not to have interrupted. The taking of evidence was then resumed. John Walrond, innkeeper, of Coombe-street, said he was going up over the bridge from Okehampton-street about 7.30 on the evening of the 28th November. Witness heard a man who was in the river "sing out" for help. Witness said to his son, who was with him, "I think there is a man in the water." He looked out over at the lower side of the bridge, but could see nothing. He then went to the centre and got up on the arch, when he saw a man swimming down the river from Okehampton-street and towards the bridge. The man was calling for help, and witness told him to keep away to the left. The man was at this time about eight or ten yards above the bridge, and witness jumped up on to the bridge. It was witness whom the woman Hosgrove saw on the bridge. When witness called to the man to keep to the left he replied "I can't." Witness then ran to the other side of the bridge, and saw the man again still swimming. Witness again told the man to keep to the left, and he again replied "I can't". Witness then ran down into a yard known as Davey's yard in Alphington-street to see if he could get a boat to give the man assistance. He was, however, unsuccessful, as there were no boats there. Witness saw no more of the man. Mr Taylor (a Juryman) stated that the skittle alley had steps down to the river, where people went to fetch buckets of water. Just above the inn there was a place which was also used for fetching water leading right down to the river from the main street, and this was where he (Mr Taylor) should think the man got in. Mr J. D. Harris, surgeon, said he was called at 10.40 a.m. that day to go down to the Quay to see someone who was supposed to have been drowned. Witness went as soon as possible, and on arriving, there saw the body of the deceased in a boat, and in an advanced state of decomposition. Witness examined the body so far as he could. He should think the man had been in the water several weeks as all the skin was rotten and coming off. Witness attributed death to suffocation from drowning. The Coroner said the evidence of Mr Walrond had turned out to be of a very important character, and the woman Hosgrove, as Walrond said, in all probability, must have mistaken him when he got up on the bridge for the man who was in the water. In his (the Coroner's) mind the man was more likely to have gone out and walked into the river in a state of semi-drunkenness. He did not for a moment believe the man jumped off the bridge. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 2 January 1892, Issue 7640 – Gale Document No. Y3200752019
DEATH OF AN INFANT AT DAWLISH - At an Inquest held Monday before Mr Coroner S. Hacker, at the Castle Inn, Halcombe, Dawlish, and touching the death of CHARLES HENRY UNDERHILL, aged five months, the illegitimate child of ANNIE UNDERHILL, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Suffocation;" the medical evidence being to the effect that death was due to suffocation, accelerated by bronchitis.

Saturday 16 January 1892, Issue 7651 – Gale Document No. Y3200752096
SUICIDE IN ST. LEONARD'S - A Painful Case. – On Thursday afternoon Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at No. 2, Lyndhurst-road, St. Leonard's, Exeter, on the body of MAJOR-GENERAL FRANCIS CONSTANTINE TRENT, who committed suicide at his residence that morning by cutting his throat with a razor. The deceased was well-known in the neighbourhood, and his sad end will be regretted by a large circle of friends. Much sympathy is also felt with his bereaved widow and family, who are also highly esteemed. Major-General TRENT was in the 4th Regiment, and had distinguished service both in the Crimea and the Indian Mutiny. He wore medals for both, and also the order of Medjidie. Mr R. C. Cole was chosen Foreman of the Jury The first witness called was GERTRUDE JULIA TRENT, who identified the body as that of her late father, who was 58 years of age, and resided at 2, Lyndhurst-road. The deceased was a Major-General of Infantry. Witness last saw him alive at a quarter to nine o'clock that morning in her mother's room. Deceased was then rather depressed, but not more so than usually. Witness's mother that morning received a letter from witness's aunt. the deceased had applied to witness's uncle for a loan as he as at the time in pecuniary difficulties. Witness's mother communicated the contents of the letter to the deceased, and this appeared to have affected him. Witness saw nothing further of the deceased until about a quarter past ten, when she thought she heard him moving in his room. No one went to him then as they did not anticipate that anything was the matter. Some time afterwards witness's mother went and knocked at the room door, which was then found to be locked. She received no answer and then witness went and called, but got no answer. Witness then tried to break open the door, and finding that she could not do so she went for Dr Bankart. That gentleman was not at home, and witness went to Dr Thomas, and as that gentleman was not at home she went to Dr Woodgages, but that gentleman was not at home either. Eventually Dr Russell Coombe was called, and the door was then burst open, and GENERAL TRENT was found dead. Deceased had been more than ordinarily depressed during the past week owing to worry. Mr Russell Coombe, surgeon, said he was called after ten o'clock that morning to go to 2, Lyndhurst-road, the reason given being that GENERAL TRENT'S room was locked. Witness went and burst open the door and found the deceased lying on his bed dead with a severe wound in the throat. Witness did not know of deceased's being in difficulties. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity." The Foreman (Mr Cole) at the conclusion, asked the Coroner to convey to MRS TRENT and the family their very great sympathy in the distressing circumstances. The Coroner said he quite concurred with this, and he himself was about to suggest this if the Jury had not done so.

Saturday 23 January 1892, Issue 7657 – Gale Document No. Y3200752112
INQUEST IN EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Police Court this morning before Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of GEORGE LOMAN, of 5, Bartholomew-street. Emily Halwill, wife of a stonemason, living at 64, Bartholomew-street, said the deceased came to lodge at her house on Wednesday. He wanted to go to his wife's funeral yesterday, but she dissuaded him from going, as he could not stand. Witness attended the funeral, and when she came back the deceased was in a chair, and her daughter was holding him. He said he would like to have a drop of beer with Mr Williams. He died almost directly. Deceased was 76 years of age and a shoemaker. Mr Mark Farrant, St Thomas, said he was called last evening t see deceased. He found him lying on some chairs dead. There were no marks of violence. In his opinion death was due to syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

CRUSHED TO DEATH IN NORTH DEVON - Yesterday an Inquest was held by Mr A. Bencraft, Deputy Coroner of Barnstaple, on the body of WILLIAM DYMOND, aged 14, in the employ of Mr J. Mortimer, of Chittlehampton. On Wednesday deceased was engaged in carting manure, and on turning a sharp corner a load turned over, and the horse fell on the lad, who died on his way to the North Devon Infirmary. Dr Penny stated that no bones were broken, but the skull was fractured at the base. In his opinion the cause of death was internal bleeding. The verdict was in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 23 January 1892, Issue 7657 – Gale Document No. Y3200752130
THE SUSPICIOUS DEATH AT TOTNES WORKHOUSE - The Doctors' Evidence. - Last night the Inquest on the body of THOMAS FLOYD, an inmate of the Totnes Workhouse was resumed. The man Thomas, the wardsman at the Workhouse, who had been arrested in connection with the case, was present at the Inquiry in custody of the police. Mr L. J. C. Hains, surgeon, Medical Officer of the Workhouse ,said he had known deceased for many years as an inmate. He was ,paralysed on the right side, and one leg was shorter than the other. Witness visited the House on Sunday, when the nurse informed him the man was ill, and he went to the Eastern Ward and saw FLOYD in bed. He was rather astonished at the man's appearance, and one of the inmates said he had been "served shameful". This made him examine deceased. He saw that he was almost in a moribund state, breathing hard, nearly unconscious, cold, and pulseless. He examined him, and found bruises on him. He did not think deceased would have lived out the night, and he went to the Master and told him deceased's state, and ordered Thomas to be taken away. He saw deceased again on the following day He was then sinking, and died on Tuesday. With Dr Fraser, witness made a post mortem examination of the body. He found an abrasion of the skin, about the size of a two-shilling piece, over the right temple, and a small abrasion over the back part of the head. There was a sign of a blow at the end of the nose, an abrasion of the skin, about two inches long, transversely across the right cheek, a bruise over the breast, a large bruise extending from the nape of the neck over the right shoulder and shoulder blade, abrasions of the skin on the right side of the ribs, a large bruise over the right buttock and hip, and a small abrasion on the back of the right thigh and other side of the right ankle. The body was well nourished. On removing the skull-cap, between four and five ounces of serum escaped which was between the brain and the covering. The brain was congealed more on the right side than the left. The brain substance itself was healthy. There was no laceration of the brain nor effusion of blood. The heart was rather small and contracted. There was no disease whatever. The ventricles were ,practically empty, the left perfectly empty, which pointed to shock. There was a little clotted blood. They examined every organ – they were healthy. The stomach was healthy. - Q: Was there anything in the state of the organs which would account for death by natural causes? - Dr Hains: No, decidedly not. – Q: What in your opinion was the cause of death? - He formed an opinion that deceased died from shock caused by injuries he received such as were found on the body. Q: Were they sufficient to cause death? - Dr Hains: Undoubtedly; not one alone but altogether. Deceased never rallied from the shock. On Sunday he was suffering from concussion of the brain. The blow on the head or on the right temple might have produced concussion. Some of the blows might have been caused by falling against a hard substance. The blows were quite of recent date. Mr D. A. Fraser, surgeon, who assisted Dr Hains in making the post mortem examination, said he agreed with the last witness as to the condition of the organs and cause of death. Several other witnesses were called, but their evidence was very contradictory as to the way in which FLOYD left the room on Saturday, some stating that he walked, and was not dragged. The Coroner again adjourned the Inquest until Monday evening.
At Totnes yesterday the wardsman Thomas was brought before Mr J. Roe, magistrate, on a charge of causing the death of THOMAS FLOYD, and was formerly remanded till today (Saturday) pending the result of last evening's Coroner's enquiry.

Saturday 30 January 1892, Issue 7662 – Gale Document No. Y3200752144
INQUEST AT NEWTON ABBOT - Last evening Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at the Newton Abbot Workhouse touching the death of the newly-born female child of a domestic servant of Torquay, named E. C. CHARKE, who was admitted into the House on Tuesday. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 30 January 1892, Issue 7662 – Gale Document No. Y3200752137
INQUEST AT ST. THOMAS - An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Inn, Alphington-street, on Tuesday, touching the death of JOHN BARTLETT, who was found dead in a pond in Mr Sclater's Nursery, Alphington-street, that morning. ANNIE BARTLETT, daughter of the deceased, said she last saw her father alive on Sunday afternoon. He was about 46 years of age. He had been depressed since his wife died about six months ago. He had often complained of being ill, but he had never threatened to commit suicide. HENRY GEORGE BARTLETT, aged 10, son of the deceased, said when he came downstairs that morning he saw a lamp burning on the table. He had never seen such a thing before. Henry James George Luxton, gardener, in the employ of Mr Sclater, said he was going round the nursery in the morning about eight o'clock, and when near a pond he saw deceased's hat on the bank. On looking further he saw the body in the water, face downwards, dead. With assistance he pulled the body out of the water and put it in a house. Mr W. H. Sclater said the deceased drank excessively. During the last month he had been very little at his work. He was not at work on Sunday or Monday He complained that he had no home. Witness was informed of his death at ten o'clock that morning. P.C. Geary said he searched the body and found several articles (produced) in the pockets. He found the hat on the bank of the pond. There was a step close by leading to the water, which was about 2 ft. 6 in in depth. Mr Vlieland said he was called that morning to see the deceased. He found him in a fern-house at the Exeter Nursery dead. There were no marks of violence, and he considered that death was due to drowning. The Coroner briefly summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 30 January 1892, Issue 7662 – Gale Document No. Y3200752146
BARNSTAPLE NEWS - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Barnstaple this morning on an infant child, the illegitimate daughter of a woman called EVANS, Belle Meadow. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but cautioned the mother as to irregular feeding in the case of infants.

Saturday 27 February 1892, Issue 7685 – Gale Document No. Y3200752283
THE SAD FATALITY AT CREDITON - At Bradley Farmhouse last evening the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) held an Inquest on the body of JAMES PENCHARD, who was killed on Thursday as reported in our lat evening's issue. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 5 March 1892, Issue 7691 – Gale Document No. Y3200752324
DISTRESSING SUICIDE OF A FARMER'S SON - An Inquest was last night held at East Moore Farm, near Harberton, by Mr Hacker, County Coroner, concerning the death of ERNEST ADAMS, a farmer's son. JOHN ADAMS, farmer, father of the deceased, said his son, who was 28 years of age, drowned himself in a small pool near the house on Wednesday morning. He had been a draper in London, but had lately suffered from bad health. He found him with his head and shoulders in the stream which was a tributary of the Harbourne. His hat was lying on the bank, and under it was a note – "I hope all will forgive me. – E.A." About an hour before he saw him, and he then appeared in his usual health. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily insane", and sympathised deeply with the bereaved parents. It is somewhat singular that deceased's younger brother put an end to his life similarly at the same spot about two years ago.

Saturday 5 March 1892, Issue 7691 – Gale Document No. Y3200752316
INQUEST - At the Royal Oak Inn, Sidbury, near Sidmouth, Mr C. P. Cox, District Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of a young man named WILL. HY. RICHARDS, a farm labourer. It appeared from the evidence that deceased was subject to fits, and while crossing the brook which runs by the village, he was attacked and fell into the water, death resulting. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Suffocation."

Saturday 12 March 1892, Issue 7697 – Gale Document No. Y3200752343
FATAL ACCIDENT IN EXETER - Inquest. - A Shocking Death. At the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WM. BRIGHT, who died at the above institution on Wednesday, from injuries received by being run over by a van.
Mr S. Phillips was chosen as Foreman of the Jury.
GEORGE BRIGHT, joiner, of 105, Regent-street, St. Thomas, was the first witness called. He identified the body of the deceased as that of his late father, who had been a carter in the employ of Mr Bailey, furniture remover, of Commercial-road. Deceased was 53 years of age, and his wife was still living. Witness last saw his father alive on Sunday, and he was then in good health. Witness heard of the fatality which had befallen his father shortly after seven o'clock in the evening, but he knew nothing about the injury.
Benjamin Langdon, a youth, apprentice to the cabinet making at Messrs. Warren Bros., said he saw the deceased about four o'clock Wednesday afternoon at Mount Radford engaged in removing furniture from Mrs Manley's, Queen-street. He only had one horse, and had no one to assist him. Deceased, with witness, eventually went with an empty van to Mont-le-Grand. He then took Messrs. Warren Bros' van, which was loaded, with the empty van attached, to Queen-street Station. Everything went well until turning the corner at Polsloe-road into Bath-road. Witness was behind the van, catching hold of the shafts of the empty vehicle. On turning the corner the horse started trotting – he did not know if it shied – down the road. BRIGHT was sitting on the shafts of the front waggon, and had the reins in his hands. The horse gradually increased its pace, and witness got off to see if the animal was running away. On nearing the horse he saw deceased fall off, and one of the front wheels of the front van went over his legs.
The Coroner: Was he sober, or had he been drinking?
Witness: I think he had been drinking but I don't know where.
Continuing, witness said that after the accident he went to stop the horse, but it was not brought to a standstill until nearing the Belmont Pleasure Grounds. He believed the deceased was dragged along by catching hold of the reins. Witness then went to the deceased, around whom several persons had collected. BRIGHT was put in the empty van and the horse taken out of the loaded one and attached to it, the deceased being then taken to the Hospital.
By a Juror: He believed the wheels of the vehicle went over the deceased.
Mr Williams (a Juror): You saw him at four o'clock. Had he been drinking then? - A: Yes.
Inspector Full: From inquiries I have made I find the deceased was a very moderate man.
Several Jurors expressed their opinion that there was a steep incline where the accident happened, and the horse being a powerful one, it was not easily to be stopped, especially if it shied.
Mr H. Andrew, assistant house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was admitted into that institution just about six o'clock in the evening. He was unconscious, but his heart was beating. He did in a few minutes. On examination witness found that deceased's chest was nearly crushed to pieces. (Sensation.) There was no injury to the legs, but there was a slight graze on the chin. The immediate cause of death was rupture of the lungs and shock, the result of the accident.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 12 March 1892, Issue 7697 – Gale Document No. Y3200752341
THE SUICIDE OF A TORRINGTON FARMER - On Monday Mr J. F. Bromham (Coroner) held an Inquiry touching the death of HENRY GENT, who committed suicide on Saturday by hanging himself. Evidence was given by Miss E. A. Passmore (adopted daughter of the deceased), who stated that deceased was a bachelor, aged 65 . Of late he had been much depressed, and had suffered from insomnia. Mr F. Ward (carpenter), Mr S. Pinkham (mason), Mr J. Friendship (ropemaker), the boy Kelly (who first discovered the body), P.S. Edwards, and Dr John D. Jones, having given evidence, the Jury brought in a verdict "That deceased committed suicide by hanging while suffering from Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 12 March 1892, Issue 7697 – Gale Document No. Y3200752362
SAD DEATH ON THE COWLEY-ROAD - The Inquest. - At the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday an Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) on the body of JOSEPH DENNIS STEVENS, who was found in a dying condition on the Cowley-road on Monday last. Mr Hawkins was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
The first witness called was HARRIETT STEVENS, who identified the body viewed by the Jury as that of her husband. Witness resided at No. 23, Smythen-street. Deceased, who was 58 years of age, was a mason by trade, and was working for a Mr Scanes, of Cowley-hill on Monday last. Deceased did not return home as usual on Monday evening, and witness was acquainted with his death about three o'clock on Tuesday morning. He was a temperate man.
John Smith, a labourer, residing at Stoke Canon, said on Monday night about 11.30 he was returning from Exeter to his home, and saw the deceased lying in the road at Higher Duryard, close by Mr Barnes's gate. He appeared to have fallen off the path, which was four feet above the level of the road. Witness found the deceased was unconscious, and took him up in his arms with the intention of taking him to the Cowley Bridge Inn. Witness saw a mark on the man's forehead, and blood was running down over his face. A man and woman named Bullen were passing by, and the woman recognised the deceased. Witness then proceeded towards Exeter, and at Duryard met P.C. Wall. An ambulance was procured, and the deceased was taken to Exeter. The place where the deceased was found was not very dark. By a Juror: There was no fencing at the spot where the deceased appeared to have fallen out over the path.
P.C. Wall said when he arrived on the spot he found the deceased lying across the road with a stick and hat by his side. Witness helped him up in a sitting position, and found he was bleeding from the forehead. He endeavoured to restore animation, but the man was dead. He remained by the side of the body while Smith went to the Police Station to fetch the ambulance. Deceased was taken to the mortuary. The body was searched, and 8s. 6d. in silver, 2 ½d. in bronze, a small foreign coin, a pocket knife, a pair of spectacles, a two-foot rule, a tobacco pouch, and two account books were found.
Mr Bell, surgeon, said he was called yesterday morning, about a quarter to one o'clock, to go to the Police Station. Witness went, and saw the deceased. Witness examined the body, which was cold. There was a contused wound over the forehead leading down to the bone, and the left thigh was fractured. There was concussion of the brain, caused by the blow on the head. Death was due to the shock from the injuries and exposure to the cold. By the Coroner: Deceased had had fits but not recently.
The wife, re-called, said the deceased was wearing a watch and chain at the time, but none had been found on him.
A Juror remarried that it was a very strange thing that the watch should be missing. The case should be investigated.
Mr Bell said the watch might have fallen in the hedge. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 2 April 1892, Issue 7715 – Gale Document No. Y3200752443
SUICIDE AT SAMPFORD PEVERELL - Yesterday Mr Coroner Burrow held an Inquest at Sampford Peverell on the body of JOHN BRAY, labourer, aged about 60, who was found hanging on the previous day by a rope passed through the ceiling of one room and fastened to a bed in the one above After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 2 April 1892, Issue 7715 – Gale Document No. Y3200752446
TORQUAY NEWS - The Fatal Accident. The Inquest. - At the Torbay Infirmary this afternoon, Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENRY CORNALL, who as previously reported, fell over some cliffs near the Torquay Gas Works whilst at work in a field for Mr Bess, of Cockington, on Thursday. Mr Robert Watson was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
The first witness called was EMMA CORNALL, f 14, Higher Union-lane, who said deceased was her husband. He was 38 years of age.
John Parish, labourer, of 2, Daison-cottages, Upton, said on Thursday morning he was at work with deceased scarifying a piece of ground in a field rented by Mr Bess. They had to work with two horses in a scarifier. At the time of the accident he was looking after the front horse, whilst he kept the machine down, as the ground was a bit hard. Deceased started the animals, and the leading horse, he thought, stepped on CORNALL'S toe. Deceased pulled himself away, and swung around near the edge of the cliff. Seeing his danger, he caught hold of the horse, but both fell over. Deceased, however, released his hold of the animal, which hung by the harness to the neck of the other horse, who kept it from falling. He saw that both horses would go over if he cut the harness, which he did, and the horse then fell. It was quite ten minutes after the accident when the animal went over. Witness then went around to the sands, but some other men were bringing CORNALL up.
A Juryman: Do you consider it a safe thing to drive horses in tandem fashion? Witness: Yes; but we usually drive them abreast of each other.
Richard White said he picked CORNALL up. He was dreadfully cut, and was bleeding streams. Witness with assistance took him to the Gas Works, and then brought him to the hospital. The cliff was about 1009 feet high. The place where the accident occurred was more dangerous than any other part of the field.
The Coroner: You had better try and get a fence up for your own protection.
George Northway, Emmanuel Lightfoot, and Dr Watson (house surgeon) also gave evidence.
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 9 April 1892, Issue 7720 – Gale Document No. Y3200752491
TORQUAY NEWS - Inquest at Hele – A Juryman Fined. - In the Schoolroom at Hele, this afternoon, Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of a child named ELIZABETH KATE DUNN, aged eighteen months, the child of a gardener. Mr Uran was chosen Foreman of the Jury. One of the Jurymen, Mr Wm. Ellis, who did not answer to the summons, was find 10s. by the Coroner. JOHN DUNN, the father, identified the body, and said the child had been poorly for about a week, and died on Wednesday evening. It was not insured. Dr Stott Steele said he made a post mortem examination, and in his opinion death was due to bronchitis and congestion of the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 9 April 1892, Issue 7720 – Gale Document No. Y3200752473
DEATH FROM SYNCOPE AT TIVERTON - An Inquest was held at the Tiverton Infirmary yesterday evening by Mr Mackenzie respecting the death of an elderly man named HARRIS, of St. Andrew-street, who was found dead under circumstances reported by us on Thursday. Dr Borrow said he had made a post mortem examination, and found that death was due to heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 16 April 1892, Issue 7725 – Gale Document No. Y3200752515
TEIGNMOUTH – Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Infirmary on Monday by Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL TIDBALL, 62, who cut his throat last week and died from the effects on Saturday last. Mr W. Jones was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
WALTER TIDBALL, a brother of the deceased, and who resides in Coomb-road, Teignmouth, stated that on the 5th of April he was called to the residence of the deceased, and on going into the bedroom saw him on the bed, groaning very much, with his throat cut, and a deal of blood about. Deceased had been curious in his ways for some weeks. The razor produced was the one witness found on the toilet table. Deceased died on Saturday last. Deceased had been suffering from hallucinations for some weeks past, but witness had never heard him threaten to take his life. He had said he had suffered pain and giddiness in his head since he had had the influenza. Deceased fell over a gate some time since, and injured his head and back.
Dr F. Blucke, house surgeon of the Infirmary, said deceased was admitted to the institute on April 5th suffering from a wound in the throat. Deceased was conscious, but could give no account of himself, and died from the wound on Saturday. The wound inflicted was very deep, and witness should say it was self-inflicted. During deceased's stay at the Infirmary witness thought the man was completely out of his mind.
John Elliot residing at 13, Bilton-street; John Huntley, landlord of the Bee Hive Inn; and Sergt. Richards also gave evidence.
The Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide by cutting his throat, he at the time not being responsible for his actions.

Saturday 16 April 1892, Issue 7725 – Gale Document No. Y3200752512
TORQUAY NEWS - Suicide. - Yesterday at Bath-terrace, WILLIAM SHORT, aged 74, and a gentleman of independent means committed suicide by hanging himself at the back of his bedroom door. The Inquest was held at the Torbay Inn today by Mr Sidney Hacker. Mr Joseph Henry Tabor was chosen Foreman of the Jury. HANNAH FLORENCE WHITE, living at No. 13, Bath-terrace, daughter of the deceased, said her father was a retired coachman. On Thursday he went out and when he returned he said he was very ill, but would not let her send for a doctor, as he said he had had the best physicians in London, and they could do him no good she then left him and lit the fire in his sitting room. About an hour afterwards she sent her little boy up to see how he was, and he came down and said that grandfather was hanging by a piece of rope to the bedroom door. Deceased had never threatened to take his life. He was 74 years of age.
FREDERICK WHITE, husband of the last witness, stated that he was called upstairs yesterday, and found deceased hanging by a nail to the bedroom door, his knees touching the floor. Witness pulled the nail out, and deceased fell on his face. He then went for the doctor. Deceased was very well off. Dr William Wilbury Stabb who was called, said death was due to strangulation. Wm. Holland, the owner of the house in which MR WHITE lives, also gave evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 23 April 1892, Issue 7731 – Gale Document No. Y3200752547
INQUEST AT ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held at Ilfracombe on Wednesday on the body of CHARLES HY. PUGSLEY, 12 years of age. It appeared that on Tuesday afternoon the mother of the child went into the wood for the purpose of picking sticks, and soon after her little girl ran out of the house screaming that HARRY was on fire. The flames were extinguished by a neighbour, and the boy was taken to the Tyrell Cottage Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 23 April 1892, Issue 7731 – Gale Document No. Y3200752542
SAD DEATH AT DAWLISH - Yesterday Mr S. Hacker (County Coroner) held an Inquest at Dawlish on the body of EMMELINE SKINNER LOVETT, aged 45. The Inquiry was adjourned until Monday.

Saturday 30 April 1892, Issue 7737 – Gale Document No. Y3200752585
INQUEST IN EXETER - This afternoon Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest touching the death of an infant named JOHN HITT, which was found dead by its mother's side this morning. JAMES THOMAS HITT, jobbing mason, of Hertford-place, Bartholomew-street, and father of the deceased, identified the body, and said the child was born on Easter Monday. This morning witness's wife informed him that the child was dead. Dr A. Mackeith, who was called to see the child, said in his opinion death was due to asphyxia. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 7 May 1892, Issue 7743 – Gale Document No. Y3200752613
TEIGNMOUTH - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday on the body of MR J. A. R. SCLATER, 65, who died suddenly on Tuesday morning. the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TEIGNMOUTH - Inquest. - At the London Hotel, on Monday evening, an Inquest was held on the body of MINNIE BLACKMORE, who was drowned in the reservoir at the top of the Exeter-road, above Hazeldown, as reported in our Saturday's issue. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

SIDMOUTH - The Suicide. - A verdict of "Suicide whilst of an Unsound State of Mind" was returned at an Inquest held on Monday at the Volunteer Inn by Mr Coroner Cox on the body of WILLIAM H. HALL, of London, of independent means aged 72, who had been lodging at Landport since October last, and who was found dead on Saturday morning with his throat cut. It was stated that on a piece of paper deceased had written – "My sufferings are fearful. I must put an end to them to be rid of them, to be out of the misery. Good-bye to all, especially to Mrs Tucke3r, who has been so kind to me."

Saturday 7 May 1892, Issue 7743 – Gale Document No. Y3200752616
An Inquest at Dartmoor Prison on the body of MICHAEL JOHNSON, sentenced to penal servitude for life for attempted murder, and who had given considerable trouble to the prison authorities, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 7 May 1892, Issue 7743 – Gale Document No. Y3200752595
A GUARD KILLED ON THE GREAT WESTERN - A guard named WATKINS, who lived at St. Thomas, Exeter, was run over by a train near Bridgwater on Monday. He sustained shocking injuries, both legs being severed from the body, and died soon afterwards. An Inquest was held on Wednesday on the body of the guard FRANK WATKINS, who was run over by a train and killed at Bridgwater on Monday evening. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER - An Inquest was held at the City Police Court on Wednesday, before Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) touching the death of THOMAS WALTERS, 71, a bricklayer, of Reed's-terrace, Friar's-terrace.
EMILY WALTERS, daughter of the deceased, said he was in the employ of Mr Moxey, but had been out of work for a week. He went out for a walk on Tuesday afternoon, at four o'clock, and when he came home at half-past six he sat down in a chair and died almost immediately. She at once sent for Mr Harrison.
Mr Harrison said in his opinion death was due to cardiac syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 7 May 1892, Issue 7743 – Gale Document No. Y3200752619
THE FATAL TRAP ACCIDENT AT EXMOUTH – The Inquest. - At the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, yesterday Mr Deputy Coroner W. Cox, held an Inquest touching the death of ROBERT KINGDOM, AGED 83, who was killed in a trap accident which occurred at Carlton Hill on Wednesday as reported in our last evening's issue. Mr Frank Clapp was chosen as Foreman of the Jury, the members of which having been sworn retired to view the body.
On their return ROBERT FRANK KINGDOM, son of the deceased was called, and identified the body. Deceased resided at Exmouth, and was Surveyor to the Rolle Estate. He was in good health up to his death. Witness was not present at the time of the accident, and he did not know that it was his father's intention to drive anywhere on the day in question.
Henry Passmore, of 8, Wellington-terrace, Exmouth, and surveyor to the Rolle Estate, deposed to being with the deceased when the accident occurred. Witness and MR KINGDOM, on the day in question, drove from Exmouth to the Half Way House on the Budleigh Salterton-road. They then went up to survey a building and afterwards went to Littleham and collected the rents of some cottages. When the accident happened it was about ten minutes to six. Witness and the deceased were driving in a four-wheeled phaeton, which was drawn by a pony. On the day previous they had driven the same pony to Woodbury. The only fault witness noticed that the animal had was that it shied when anything passed. The animal did this very frequently and it shied before it started off on the occasion of the accident. The accident occurred on the Exmouth side of ~Cranford. Witness did not know what the pony shied at as he and MR KINGDOM were talking at the time, and did not notice. The animal swerved towards the left, and then went forward at a terrific pace. When the pony first bolted they were on a level road, and the animal went towards Exmouth and the beach, but subsequently turned straight down the Salterton-road. Witness should consider the pony had gone about 200 yards when he jumped out. At the time the pony was going as fast as it could, and he (witness) saw no hope of its clearing the turn in the road. In reply to questions by the Coroner, the witness stated that he did not know whether the driver had hold of both reins. It appeared, however, to witness that the lad was trying to pull up the pony.
The Coroner: Where you jumped out the road began to descend, didn't it? - Yes.
Was it towards the beach or still on the Salterton road? - Still on the Salterton road.
Did you fall when you got out? - Yes, sir.
You were not much hurt, I believe? - The witness replied that he only sustained a cut on his knee.
Were you still able to follow the trap? – Yes, I followed it right down.
How long was it before you came up with the horse? - Not long, sir. About five or six minutes.
How far was it from the point where you jumped out? - Oh! I should think six of seven hundred yards.
So much as that? - Oh, yes.
By the Jury: Witness jumped out just before he came to Colonel Naper's house. Deceased was lying in the gutter just under the cliff and near the lime kilns when witness came up with the trap. There were other persons there before witness.
The Coroner: Is the road a good width at the place? - It is rather narrow there. I should say the road and path was about five and twenty feet, but the ordinary road is about forty.
Hardly so much as that, is it? - Oh yes, sir.
The deceased was still breathing when you came up? - I am not sure of that. Proceeding, the witness said Dr Langley came up about the same time as witness did, and he believed that the deceased was then dead.
By a Juryman: There was a brake to the carriage, and witness put it on as soon as the pony started.
Lieutenant Claud Hamilton, R.N., temporarily staying at 3 Alexandra-terrace, Exmouth, deposed that on Wednesday he was walking along Louisa-terrace with his sister, when he saw a trap coming at a great rate. Witness's sister remarked that the pony was running away. Witness next saw the vehicle collide with a lamp-post, and two people were thrown out. He then asked his sister to go back to Mrs Long's and ask that a lady to telephone for a doctor. He then ran down the hill and found MR KINGDOM lying on his face with his head on the kerbstone. Witness took up a rug which had also been thrown out and put it under MR KINGDOM'S head. Witness noticed a deep wound on deceased's forehead, which was also bleeding very much. Deceased breathed twice, but only faintly.
Ernest Jones, a boy residing at the Coast-guard station, Exmouth, deposed to seeing the accident from a distance of about seventy yards. When the vehicle struck the lamp-post part of it went high up into the air. Witness ran up and MR KINGDOM was then alive, but died while witness was present.
Dr Hudson, of the Maud Hospital, to which institution the body was conveyed, gave evidence as to being telephoned for and to meeting the body of the deceased as it was being taken to the hospital on a shutter. He had examined the body, and considered death to be due to a fracture of the skull.
P.C. Geary, stationed at Exmouth, produced the articles found on the deceased, which consisted of £4 3s. 8 ½d., a pencil case, a cigar holder, a pair of spectacles in a case, a rule, a note book, two letters, an ink bottle, three handkerchiefs, and two pocket knives. The Coroner instructed the constable to hand the articles over to the deceased's son.
The Coroner then summed up the evidence, after which the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."
A discussion took place as to whether Mr Lockyer, the owner of the pony, should be cautioned as to letting it out, but no decision was arrived at. It was stated that the boy who was driving the trap was seventeen years of age. Mr Sherwin, a Juryman, asked if the trap was licensed to ply for hire, but was told by Mr Passmore that it was not licensed to by hired publicly. The Jury unanimously decided to give their fees to the injured boy Parker.

Saturday 14 May 1892, Issue 7749 – Gale Document No. Y3200752655
TORQUAY – Inquest. - At the Queens Hotel on Wednesday an Inquest was held on the body of JOSEPH BROWN, a coachman, of Meadfoot-lane, who was found hanging by a rope from a beam in his employer's stable. The Coroner was Mr S. Hacker, and a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned, it being stated that the deceased had been depressed owing to the recent death of his aunt.

INQUEST - At the Police Court, on Tuesday, Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest touching the death of EDWIN CAMBRIDGE, a widower, aged 69. William Morgan, dairyman, residing at 162, St. Sidwell's, said the deceased was a boot and shoemaker by trade, and resided in witness's house. He was very eccentric in his habits. On Monday evening a peculiar noise was heard in the room of the deceased. Witness knocked at the door but received no reply. Two policemen were called and the door was broken open, the deceased being found unconscious under the bed. Medical assistance was summoned. About half-past four on Tuesday morning the deceased expired.
Mrs Bradford, also gave evidence. Mr A. Steele-Perkins, surgeon, of St. Sidwell's, said he was called about 5.30 in the evening to see the deceased. Witness found him on the ground at the foot of the bed half dressed and unconscious. Deceased was making some convulsive movements with his elbows, which would probably make the noise heard by Mr Morgan. He appeared as if he had a seizure and was dying. Witness attributed death to an epileptic seizure. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 14 May 1892, Issue 7749 – Gale Document No. Y3200752664
DAWLISH - Inquest. - At the Royal Albert Hotel last evening an Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker on the body of WALTER JOHN BAKER, who died suddenly while walking near Iddlesleigh-terrace on the previous evening. After hearing the evidence a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TIVERTON - An Inquest was held yesterday on the body of HENRY DAVEY, whose body was found in a leat the previous day. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Saturday 14 May 1892, Issue 7749 – Gale Document No. Y3200752630
THE BOATING FATALITY AT EXMOUTH – Inquest on the body of HARWOOD. - At the Beach Hotel, Exmouth, on Tuesday, Mr W. D. Cox (Deputy Coroner for the district) held an Inquest on the body of the young man WILLIAM HARWOOD, who was found in the Exe on Monday as reported in these columns. It will be remembered that the deceased was drowned whilst boating off Exmouth on the 3rd ult.
Mr Holman was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and a man named Gribben, who had been summoned to serve on that body, and who did not put in an appearance until about a minute after time, was censured by the Coroner, and informed that he was liable to a penalty of £5. Mr Cox at first told Gribben that he would remain at the Inquest and lose his fee, but subsequently finding the room was very crowded he released him with a warning not to be late again.
A young man named Peter Nilson, who was with deceased in the boat, and who himself had a very narrow escape, was first called. The witness, who looked pale and unwell, stated that he formerly knew the deceased well, and on the 3rd of April he, with a young man named Lee, went out with him in a boat called the Shamrock, and belonging to Exmouth. When they found the boat she had a large quantity of water in her. Witness did not see any holes in the boat. – Questioned by the Coroner as to what authority they had for taking the boat, witness said that HARWOOD told him that he could have the boat whenever "he was a mind to."
Several of the Jury said that HARWOOD was often in boats.
The witness said none of them knew how to manage a boat when they were put in such a position as they were on the occasion in question. They first found that the boat was leaking when they got to the end of Boolhill which was a sandbank in the river. HARWOOD then baled her out, but when they got around the bight they found that she was leaking again. They then baled her out again and beached her at the nearest spot, which was on the Warren sand. They then threw the anchor out and went "black-spotting."
Amid some amusement the Coroner asked what "black-spotting" was, and was told the Jury that it meant picking cockles.
Continuing, the witness said they walked to Cockwood. They had two quarts of beer and then returned to the boat, and there was then some water in her. When they got into the middle of the river two of them commenced to bale. It was about half-past seven when the accident happened. The water then seemed to come in all at once, and the boat went "right down under."
The Coroner: What did you do when you found the water coming in?
The Witness: All the three of us took to baling, then, sir.
Did you shout; Yes, sir. Lee was the first to "holler." We left off after about two minutes, and then the boat was gone.
What did you do. Did you go down in the boat yourself? - Yes, sir. I was in the water; the boat sank right under my feet.
Did you see what become of the other two?
Yes, sir. HARWOOD was the first to go down.
Did he keep above water for any time? - Yes, sir, he tried to swim, but he was the first to go down.
Had he got hold of anything? - No, sir, because the boat was right under us.
And Lee. What did he do? - He struck out for a few minutes.
Could he swim? - I don't know whether he could swim. I believe he had a little knowledge of swimming, but he soon went down.
Continuing the witness said that he could swim and managed to keep himself afloat. Witness said to himself "I'll lie afloat on my back, and then I shan't tire myself out." After a time he felt his legs going under him as his clothes were getting heavy. He then turned over on his side and soon afterwards saw the bow of the boat rise out of the water. He swam over and "just grabbed it as he was going." It seemed to him an awful long time before help came. He "hollered" out, and at last he heard a voice say, "alright, I'll be alongside before long." Witness then shouted "For God's sake look sharp for I can't hold on two more minutes." A boat containing a gentleman and a yachtsman called Fletcher came up to him, and witness then caught hold of the stern of their boat and was pulled in. His companions never rose at all.
In reply to the Coroner, several of the Jury said the man in the boat was a Mr Knapman, of Starcross.
The witness further replied that he was not able to swim very much. Witness was taken to Starcross, and from there to the Beach Hotel, Exmouth, on board the steamer, and in charge of Mr Bradford's son He had not got over it yet, as he had been a great shock to his nerves. He had to have a doctor on Sunday night after he had viewed the body.
The Coroner: Had you any words together at all? - The Witness: No, sir. Not a word.
Further questioned Nilson said that HARWOOD did not refuse to go into the boat.
By the Jury: There was no "iteming."
Mr Manley (a Juror): A report is in the town that you had been "iteming," and that HARWOOD withdrew the cork from the bottom of the boat. Is it true? - No, sir.
Was there a cork in the bottom? - Yes, sir, but it was not pulled out.
Mr Manley said that when the boat was found the cork that should have been in the bottom was missing.
The witness said the only way he could account for this was by the fact that the boat had been knocked about in the water since.
Andrew Haydon, residing at Cockwood deposed to seeing the deceased with the last witness and Lee, and to going with them to Mr Coombe's Ship Inn. The young men were perfectly sober when he left them.
Robert Coombes, landlord of the Ship Inn, corroborated.
Maria Steer Pearse, landlady of the Anchor Inn, gave evidence as to the three young men calling at that house and having a quart of beer. They were perfectly sober.
John Martin, a lad living at Cofton, also deposed to seeing the men on the day in question. In his opinion, the tall one (Lee) was rambling, and had had something to drink.
The Jury said Lee rambled in his regular walk.
Alfred Farley also gave evidence to the effect that he saw the three men, and considered that the tallest of them was the worse for drink.
The Coroner said the boys were quite right in saying what they thought on the matter, but from what the Jury said he supposed they were mistaken.
John Fletcher deposed to being on board Mr Knapman's yacht on the night in question and to hearing cries of "Help, save me." Witness said "Who is it," and someone cried out, "Jack – save me – drowning – Boolhill." Witness then jumped into the dinghy and with Mr Knapman rowed towards the cries. When they came up to the boat witness saw that the young man was in the boat sitting on the after thwart. Witness said "Hold on a minutes. I'm coming. Don't holloa so." They hauled the young man into the boat, and he then said, "Help, help, Where's my mates?" Witness said "How many?" and he said "Two." Nilson said nothing more.
P.C. Geary gave evidence as to receiving the body of the deceased, which he searched and found upon it 2s. 1 ½d. Two men named Pengilley and Bamsey assisted witness to take the body to the Hotel.
The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning through a leaky boat."
The Jury further expressed their appreciation of the conduct of Mr Knapman and Fletcher.
Bradford (the owner of the boat) was afterwards called, and denied having given permission to HARWOOD to use the boat and also that the Shamrock was unseaworthy.
Mr Manley called attention to the great need of a mortuary in Exmouth, and a long discussion ensued: it being remarked that it was a reflection on the town that such a place had not been provided, and that it was unfair to publicans to have to receive dead bodies, especially when they were in such an advanced state of decomposition as that of HARWOOD was.
The Coroner concurred with the remarks of the Jury on this subject.

Saturday 21 May 1892, Issue 7755 – Gale Document No. Y3200752696
EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper, at 93, Paris-street, on the body of SARAH TOTHILL, aged 92, widow of ROBERT TOTHILL, late an Excise officer. According to the evidence adduced by Mrs M. A. Hall, a widow at the above residence and Dr Cheese, it appeared that the deceased did on Saturday morning. Dr Cheese was asked on Monday to give a certificate of her death, but on being informed of the time of her demise, and taking into consideration the fact that he had not attended her since November he was unable to comply with the request. Dr Cheese examined the body of the deceased in the morning, and said in his opinion she died from a fainting fit following senile decay. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury.

TORQUAY - Inquest. - At the Torbay Hospital on Tuesday evening, Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest touching the death of GEORGE JOSHUA DODD, aged 74, employed as a mason and residing at 6, Hoxton-road, Ellacombe. The deceased was found dead in the Bonhay-road on the previous day and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. The Coroner expressed his opinion that a mortuary should be provided at Cockington.

TORQUAY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Hacker at the Chelston Coffee Tavern touching the death of JAMES WEBBER, 34, a ganger on the Great Western Railway who was found dead on the beach near the Gas Works on Tuesday, as reported in our issue of last evening. The evidence showed that deceased had been greatly worried about the narrow ganging of the line. A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Saturday 28 May 1892, Issue 7761 – Gale Document No. Y3200752734
DAWLISH - Sudden Death. - At the Dawlish Town Hall on Monday Mr Coroner S. Hacker held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM MORRISH, 41, employed at the Gas Works, who died suddenly on Friday. The medical evidence went to show that the deceased died from syncope. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony as returned.

PAIGNTON - Inquest. – On Monday an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner S. Hacker on the body of JACOB JOHN HANNAFORD, 61, painter, of 6, Hill Park-terrace, who died suddenly. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 28 May 1892, Issue 7761 – Gale Document No. Y3200752709
THE SUICIDE AT UPTON PYNE – Inquest. – At the Three Horse Shoes Inn, Upton Pyne, on Wednesday, Mr H. W. Gould, City Coroner, held an Inquiry touching the death of WILLIAM HOGG, who committed suicide by hanging himself to a beam in the workshop.
Mr Burdoc was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
MARY ANN HOGG identified the body as that of her husband, a machine maker, aged 51. She last saw him alive on Monday afternoon about 4.30 in the kitchen. She saw him go out and heard the door of the workshop close. About ten minutes after five o'clock she went out for the purpose of calling him to tea, when she found him suspended to a beam by a rope Witness went to a neighbour, Mrs Thorne, who cut the body down. There was no one about the premises at the time. The deceased had the influenza just after Christmas, and had since been low-spirited. Deceased's mother died in the asylum, and his sister was at present there.
Elizabeth Thorn corroborated the last witness as to the cutting down of the body.
Mr M. L. Brown, surgeon, residing and practising in Exeter, said he saw the deceased about seven o'clock on Monday last lying on a heap of rugs in the workshop, dead. There was a mark around the neck of the deceased, which was probably caused by the rope. There were no other marks of violence. In witness's opinion death was due to suffocation.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 4 June 1892, Issue 7767 – Gale Document No. Y3200752772
EXETER - The Suicide of a Railway Employee. - At an Inquest touching the death of WILLIAM HENRY SCANTLEBURY, an employee of the London and South Western Railway at Queen-street, who was found in a railway-van, hanging by the neck, dead, a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned.

TEIGNMOUTH - Inquest. – On Saturday an Inquest was held at the London Hotel by Mr Coroner Hacker touching the death of FANNY STONE, aged 53, who was found dead in the kitchen of her residence in Higher Brook-street, on Thursday. Evidence was given by ROBERT STONE, husband of the deceased, and Dr Rudkin, the latter of whom stated that death was due to long standing valvular disease of the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury.

Saturday 11 June 1892, Issue 7773 – Gale Document No. Y3200752794
TWO MEN DROWNED AT EXMOUTH – Five men belonging to Exmouth, and named CHAS. MANN, West, Escot, Gilley, and ROBERT GRANT, were on Sunday afternoon sailing off the Esplanade. There was a strong wind blowing at the time, and about three o'clock the boat capsized. Boats immediately put off, and four of the men – West, MANN, Gilley and Escot – were brought to shore, MANN being apparently dead. Drs. Hodson and Kane were soon on the spot, and, with Mrs Hume Long, endeavoured to restore animation, but without success, and the body was removed to the mortuary at the Maud Hospital. The other three appeared little the worse for their adventure. GRANT was not picked up. MANN was married, but had no children. GRANT leaves a widow and one child. Of the five boats which were so quickly put off one was launched and sculled by P.C. Robins, who was on the Esplanade when the accident happened. The excitement upon the beach and Esplanade was intense. The painful incident has produced a great sensation in the town, the young men who have lost their lives being much liked.
THE INQUEST - The Inquest was held at the Rolle Hotel on Tuesday before Mr C. E. Cox (Honiton), Deputy Coroner. Mr H. Crews was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
The first witness called was THOMAS MANN who identified one of the bodies as that of his son, a tailor, aged 26, a single man.
HENRY GRANT identified the other body as that of his brother, aged 27.
George West, a fisherman, said on Sunday last he in company with CHARLES MANN, ROBERT GRANT, Pengilley, and Escott, put out about three o'clock from the Guns, Exmouth, in a little boat, fourteen feet in length, with the intention of proceeding to Starcross about three o'clock. There were two sails in the boat. All present were acquainted with sailing, and at the time they embarked the wind was a little fresh. They had been out sailing five minutes, MANN holding the mizzen sheet, and were on the point of putting about by the ridge when the boat was caught by a puff of wind and heeled over. Witness shouted out to MANN to let go the mizzen sheet, but witness could not say if he did so. The boat afterwards righted herself, but sank owing to the quantity of water which was in her. MANN swam very well at the start, but witness did not see GRANT at all. Someone was clinging to the mast, but witness could not distinguish who it was. Witness jumped over and tried to get to the Exmouth shore. MANN was swimming beside witness. He did not consider the deceased drowned.
Mark Pengilley also gave evidence.
William Escott, a fisherman, corroborated.
P.C. Robins stationed at Exmouth said he saw the accident and with two men named Jenkins and Hooper went to the spot in a boat. They saw the skirt of a man's coat, and after one or two failings caught hold of it and got MANN into the boat and he also tried to restore animation, but his efforts were of no avail.
Dr Hodgson said he witnessed the accident and rowed to the boat in which the constable was, and found the deceased lying at the bottom of the craft on his back. Witness tried to restore animation, but the man was quite dead. There was a large quantity of water in the lungs which would have been sufficient to cause death.
Mr Hodgson informed the Jury that Mrs Hume Long had taken steps to have an ambulance station on the beach, where the public could obtain requisites in case of accident by breaking a pane of glass.
The Coroner: Another instance of Mrs Hume Long's kindness.
Henry Redma, ferryman, said he found the body of GRANT on the Pole Sands that morning about nine o'clock.
The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased met their death by drowning, and attached no blame to anyone. They also expressed their appreciation of the conduct of P.C. Robins.

Saturday 18 June 1892, Issue 7779 – Gale Document No. Y3200752839
EXETER – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at the Assembly Rooms, Mount Radford on Monday before Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of JOHN THOMAS COLES aged 37, lately employed at St. David's Station and the circumstances of whose death appeared in yesterday's "Evening Post." The Jury, of which Mr Berry was the Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 25 June 1892, Issue 7785 – Gale Document No. Y3200752862
SENSATIONAL DEATH AT PINHOE - On Wednesday Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Poltimore Arms, Pinhoe, touching the death of HARRIET MARTIN, an eccentric old woman, aged 63, who died in circumstances of great squalor, rendered the more painful by the fact that she had a deposit at the Devon and Exeter Savings Bank, the sum of £150, other money being found on her person after her demise.
Alice Edwards said the deceased was a spinster and lived alone at Pinhoe. Witness had been in the habit of waiting on her when she felt inclined to let her. She was most eccentric. Witness saw her on Friday going across the road to fetch water. She had no relations that witness was aware of. On Sunday she heard groans proceeding from her house, and she went to the door and asked her to open it. She replied "In a minute," but as she did not open it witness looked through the keyhole, and saw her on the floor. She broke open the door, but deceased tried to prevent her going in, and said "You shan't come in here." She asked witness to send for her aunt. They both returned and found the deceased in an unconscious state on the floor. They removed her upstairs where she seemed to recover. She said she would not see any doctor but Dr Land. Witness sent for Dr Somer. Deceased was clad in rags and there was no form of any kind of dress, and she was in a very dirty state. She died in about an hour.
Dr Somer said he found no marks of violence but the body was in a very dirty state and was covered with the bites of vermin. The body was wrapped in rags, and was very badly nourished. He had no reason to doubt that she died from natural causes, accelerated by want and proper care and nourishment.
The police officer William James Kent, said he found nothing in the shape of food except a small bit of pudding, black and dry, and a piece of rancid butter. There was no linen of any sort. He found 5s. 2 ½d. in coppers, three bank books, and a deposit note for £150 in the Exeter Savings Bank.
The Jury found a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 25 June 1892, Issue 7785 – Gale Document No. Y3200752876
TORQUAY – Inquests. – An Inquest was held on Monday evening by the Coroner (Mr S. Hacker), at the Clarence Hotel, Torre, touching the death of CYRIL WILLIAM SMALE, aged one year and seven months, son of MR F. C. SMALE, florist, Avenue-road. The circumstances of the case have already been reported. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

An Inquest was also held on the body of JOHN DESBOROUGH, 35, engine driver, who was in the employ of Messrs. Cochrane, the contractors for the new pier works, and who fell into the water from the end of the pier on Sunday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

BROADCLYST - Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Monday by Mr Deputy Coroner Gould, on the body of WILLIAM JOHN BLACKMORE, labourer, 17, of Broadclyst. It appears that he was returning from Topsham with a cartload of limestone on Friday morning, and while crossing Broadclyst Heath, jumped off and fell under the wheels, which passed over him, and he was apparently killed on the spot. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 25 June 1892, Issue 7785 – Gale Document No. Y3200752855
SUICIDE AT ST THOMAS - On Tuesday morning a bricklayer named GEO. HALLETT, aged 49, lately residing in Mary Arches-street, and who last week committed a serious assault upon a woman who has been living with him, was found suspended from a beam in a tool-house in Tan-lane, in the occupation of Mr Tozer, of the Plymouth Inn, by a man named Christopher Holding. It appears that HALLETT entered into conversation with Holding on Monday evening near the linhay, which was subsequently locked, and it is supposed that at this time he must have secreted himself in the workshop. Next morning Holding went to the shed for an agricultural implement and on unlocking the door he saw HALLETT'S body hanging on a beam. Holding left the body hanging and communicated with the police. P.S. Egan and P.C. Norrish proceeded to the spot and cut the body down. Deceased had hung himself with a white handkerchief and a red scarf having tied the latter round the beam and formed a slip noose with the former. He was searched by the police, who found on him some pipes, but no money. It is stated that the deceased has lately been living with another woman at St. Thomas, and that on Monday he was told that the woman whom he had kicked was dead. When found by the police one of the man's feet was touching the ground, and the opinion is that he stood on a truss of hay to tie himself to the beam. On enquiry at the hospital we learn that the woman he assaulted has recovered.
An Inquest on the body was held on Tuesday afternoon by Mr Gould at the Plymouth Inn.
EMILY HALLETT, living at Stepcote hill, identified the body as that of her late husband, a bricklayer, 47, who was living at Synagogue place, Mary Arches street. They had been separated about ten years. Christopher Holding, of Paris-street, said he was working in a field in Water lane, and went into a linhay there for some tools. On opening the door he saw the deceased hanging by the neck to a beam. On Monday morning deceased came into the field where witness was at work and told him if he found that the woman was dead he should drown himself. P.S. Egan said there was a warrant out against deceased for assaulting the woman with whom he had been living. Dr Hunt said he was called in the morning about ten o'clock to see the deceased. The body was stiff, and there was a mark of a dark blue colour between the neck and the chin. Death was caused by suffocation due to hanging. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 2 July 1892, Issue 7791 – Gale Document No. Y3200752913
TEIGNMOUTH - Drowned Whilst Bathing. – GEORGE STOCKMAN, son of a retired farmer, living at Bishopsteignton, and a student at the Grammar School at Teignmouth, was drowned whilst bathing near Floor Point on Tuesday night. Mr James, of Coombe Cellars, picked the body up in mid river. Deceased, who could swim, is supposed to have been taken with cramp. A doctor was at once sent for, and he said the lad had been dead about half an hour. An Inquest will be held.

TEIGNMOUTH – Supposed Suicide. – On Wednesday the driver of a goods train which arrived at Teignmouth Station about 3.30 saw what he thought was a body lying on the beach near the breakwater. He informed Mr Harvey, signalman, who had the sergeant of the police communicated with. He, with some of his men, proceeded to the spot, where they discovered the body of a MR BIGGS, who for many years carried on business as a brush manufacturer in Teignmouth, but who has been away from the town for some years. He is said to be about seventy years of age, and some time since lost his wife and daughter, and has been in a despondent state of mind for some time past. The Sergeant of police has communicated with the Coroner, and an Inquest will be held.

TORQUAY – Inquest at Babbacombe. At the Royal Hotel, Babbacombe, on Monday Mr Sidney Hacker (District Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of SARAH MAJDEX POOLE, the lady who was seriously injured in a carriage accident on the Thursday near Berry Pomeroy Castle, as previously reported. Mr William Bowden was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The evidence showed that the brake broke down when the vehicle was going down a steep incline known as Mill Lane at the back of the well known Berry. The deceased thereupon jumped out of the carriage, and Cribbett, the lad in charge, tried to pull the pony up, but to no avail. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 16 July 1892, Issue 7803 – Gale Document No. Y3200752974
BRAMPFORD SPEKE – Inquest. – Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest on Monday at the Reformatory School touching the death of FREDERICK HOCKADY, of Heavitree, who was drowned in the Exe, as previously reported. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Drowning."

INQUEST IN EXETER – At the City Police Court on Tuesday, an Inquest was held by Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) on the body of MRS PARSONS, aged 80, widow of MR J. PARSONS, lately living in Summerland-street. Mrs Humphreys identified the body. When witness saw her on Wednesday she was failing, but refused to have a doctor called in. Mrs White who had lately been living at deceased's house, said she saw MRS PARSONS in bed on Wednesday bout eleven o'clock, and she then appeared to be asleep. Witness went into her room in the morning about six o'clock and found that she was dead. Mr E. Steele-Perkins, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased in the morning and found her in bed dead. In his opinion death was due to senile decay. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Saturday 16 July 1892, Issue 7803 – Gale Document No. Y3200752969
TAVISTOCK – The Fatal Accident. – At the Temperance Hotel last evening an Inquest was held by Mr R. Rodd, jun., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of MR PHILLIPS, grocer, who was killed on Thursday under circumstances already reported. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 30 July 1892, Issue 7815– Gale Document No. Y3200753030
KILLED ON THE RAILWAY – On Wednesday before Dr Slade an Inquest was held on the body of GEORGE LEWORTHY, 19, farm labourer, who was killed on the line near the Foxhunters Inn by the up train leaving Morthoe at 11.50. It appeared that deceased, noticing the approach of another train, the 11.40 down from Braunton, got out of its way by stepping on to the up set of rails, when the other train, coming from behind, knocked him down. The principal injuries were to his legs and arms. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 30 July 1892, Issue 7815– Gale Document No. Y3200753044
EXETER – Inquest. – At the City Workhouse on Monday Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM HELLIER. The medical evidence showed that death resulted from syncope and a verdict accordingly was returned.

TIVERTON – Inquest. – On Tuesday Mr F. Burrow (District Coroner) held an Inquest at Uplowman on the body of HENRY REDWOOD, aged 85, who met with his death by falling from a waggon in a hayfield on Mr Shattock's farm. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TEIGNMOUTH – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at the London Hotel on Tuesday respecting the death of COLONEL MANNERS NIGHTINGALE, of Barnepark-terrace. Evidence was given to the effect that death was due to apoplexy, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

NEWTON – Inquest. – On Monday evening Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at the Town Hall on the body of a man named JAMES PALMER, labourer, of Victoria-place, who died at the Cottage Hospital on Monday. ANN PALMER, wife of the deceased, said he had received a blow on his head some time ago, and complained of giddiness. On the Monday before last, as the deceased was going to bed, he fell downstairs and injured his head. He was taken to the Cottage Hospital. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 13 August 1892, Issue 7826 – Gale Document No. Y3200753112
TAVISTOCK – Sudden Death. – At an Inquest held on Monday on the body of JOHN CRAZE, a carpenter, of Exeter-street, aged 47 years, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Mr W. T. Leamon said he found a lot of blood in the cavity of the heart sufficient to account for death.

Saturday 20 August 1892, Issue 7832 – Gale Document No. Y3200753140
BARNSTAPLE – The Drowning Case. – At the North Devon Infirmary on Wednesday an Inquest was held on the body of THOMAS GREGORY, aged 14, who was drowned while bathing in the River Taw. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned", and added a recommendation to the Council urging the necessity of providing a proper bathing place for the town.

SOUTH MOLTON – The Fatal Accident. – On Monday at an Inquest held on the body of EDWIN FURZE SANDERS, who was accidently run over by a trap on Saturday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 20 August 1892, Issue 7832 – Gale Document No. Y3200753136
SUICIDE OF A PORTER IN EXETER – This Day. – This morning shortly after 11.30 o'clock the inhabitants of Mary Arches-street were alarmed with the information that WILLIAM DENSELOW, a porter employed at the establishment of Messrs. Wreford, drapers, Fore-street, and residing at 4, Mary Arches-street, had hanged himself on the premises of his employers. The deceased had been missed for some time by a porter named Walter Hitchcock, but could get to learn nothing of him. As he had to look after the horses, it was thought that perhaps he might be in the hay loft cutting chaff, and upon Hitchcock going there he was horrified to find him suspended from a beam. He at once apprised Mr Pinn, the manager, of what he had found, and information of the occurrence was promptly given to Mr Chas. Wreford, who cut the unfortunate man down and sent for the police. P.C. Parkhouse went down immediately, and Mr Steele Perkins, surgeon, who after a brief examination pronounced life to be extinct, and expressed the belief that he had been dead some time. With the assistance of P.C. Guest, the constable who first arrived upon the scene removed the body to the mortuary awaiting the Inquest. No reason can at present be assigned for the rash act, but it is stated that the deceased had just returned from a week's holiday, and was somewhat excited. He was a middle aged man, was married, and leaves a wife and two children. He was well known, and the sad occurrence was discussed in the street for some time by excited groups of people.
THE INQUEST – was held this evening at the Police Court before Mr Coroner Hooper.
CAROLINE DENSELOW said her husband was 37 years old. He had been in Mr Wreford's employ twelve months last May. He had had rheumatic fever five times – four years ago he had the last attack. it weakened his constitution. He came to breakfast about nine that morning. There was no unusual conversation. She heard no more of him till twelve o'clock, when she was told by a neighbour not to be alarmed, but an accident had happened to her husband. She went to Mr Wreford's, and Mr Pinn told her that her husband had hanged himself. There was no unpleasantness between them and none recently. He was not in any financial difficulty. He was a temperate man.
A Juryman (Mr Voisey) suggested that they ought to have seen the place where the affair took place, as there were two nasty blows on the head.
The Coroner agreed, and said he hoped in cases of this kind in future the body would not be removed.
Mr Perkins said it was such an unfortunate place that he ordered the removal of the body.
Mr Wreford said he could account for the blows, as when he cut the body down the deceased fell on to the back of his head.

Saturday 27 August 1892, Issue 7838 – Gale Document No. Y3200753173
BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – Inquest. – At the Feathers Hotel, on Monday afternoon, at an Inquest held by Mr Deputy Coroner Cox, on the body of JAMES PEPPERELL, aged 70, who was trod on by a horse, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 3 September 1892, Issue 7844 – Gale Document No. Y3200753209
ILFRACOMBE – Inquest. – At the Inquest on the body of MR JAMES DENDLE, cab proprietor, who hanged himself on Monday night, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

NEWTON ABBOT – Fatal Accident at Kingskerswell. – An Inquest was held by Dr Fraser at the Lord Nelson Inn, Kingskerswell, on the body of a child named HILDA VERENA GREGOR, who was run over by a waggon laden with a ton of straw. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the waggoner being exonerated from blame.

Saturday 3 September 1892, Issue 7844 – Gale Document No. Y3200753206
SAD FATAL ACCIDENT AT HEAVITREE – Inquest, this day. – At the Horse and Groom Inn, Heavitree, this morning, an Inquest was held by Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy District Coroner, relative to the death of JAMES WILLIAM WEBBER, mason, aged 68, of East Wonford, who met his death under distressing circumstances while at work at St. Loyes, the residence of Mr Battishill. The Jury, of whom Mr J. Hutchings was Foreman, having viewed the body, evidence of identification was given by GEORGE JAMES WEBBER, mason, and son of the deceased, of East Wonford, who stated that when he last saw his father alive about 6.30 yesterday morning at home he was in his usual good health. He was not subject to fits.
William John Hucklebridge, sanitary engineer of Exe Bridge, said he was at work yesterday at St. Loyes, in the forenoon deceased was securing a 26-rung ladder to the house, two lads being at the bottom. Soon afterwards he heard something fall, and being also attracted by the boys screaming he found the decease don the ground dead. The ladder had not slipped and witness could see no cause for the deceased falling. Answering a Juror, witness said the deceased must have turned a somersault, the head being near the bottom of the ladder. He believed the deceased struck one of the boys in falling.
George Millman, 31, Coombe-street, apprentice to the last witness, said he was one of the boys standing at the foot of the ladder, holding it at the request of Mr Hucklebridge. The other boy, also in the employ of Hucklebridge, was named Charles Weston. He saw him go up the ladder, and when six rungs from the top proceeded to make it fast. While "looking through the ladder" he was struck in the back of the head, and on looking around he saw the deceased on the ground. The ladder did not shift, and witness held it the whole of the time. He believed the deceased complained of a pain in his chest.
Mr Hucklebridge, recalled, said this was so, but deceased thought he could continue his work.
Dr Andrews, of Heavitree, deposed to examining the body of the deceased at the house, and as soon as he was removed home. Life was extinct. Deceased's back was broken, the spine being dislocated. This was sufficient to cause death. Answering Mr Lamacraft, Dr Andrews said it was not true, as rumoured, that deceased's neck was broken. Mr Andrews further stated that the deceased probably had an attack of faintness while on the ladder.
The Coroner briefly summed up and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 3 September 1892, Issue 7844 – Gale Document No. Y3200753191
INQUEST AT BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – The Dangers of Benzoline Lamps. – Mr Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Cottage Hospital, Budleigh Salterton, on Thursday touching the death of MARY ANN STONE, who met her death by being burned about three weeks ago. Mr Theobald was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Ellen Marker, wife of John Marker, living at 22, Market-street, Budleigh Salterton, opposite the deceased's house, said on the 3rd of August, she was called in to see the deceased. Deceased who was in bed said she went downstairs to get something, carrying a benzoline lamp with her. On coming back to bed at the bottom of the stairs she let fall the lamp and ignited her clothing.
Mrs Isabella Warrington, matron at the Budleigh Salterton Cottage Hospital, said the deceased was admitted on the 5th of August suffering from extensive burns. She remained in the hospital up to the time of her death. Witness had asked her how it occurred, but all she said was "I don't know." She died on the 29th August.
Dr Semple, having given evidence, the Coroner in summing up, said benzoline lamps were exceedingly dangerous and he supposed they were used to much because they were cheap. He only wished they could be done away with.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

INQUEST AT LITTLEHAM – At Prattshaves, Littleham, on Thursday, Mr C. E. Cox held an Inquest touching the death of ANN EMILY CULLUM, who died suddenly on Tuesday morning. Mr Hallett was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Mr S. D. Pratt said the deceased for the last sixteen years had been a domestic servant in his employ, and was about 46 years of age. She enjoyed fairly good health up to the time of her death.
Mrs Pratt, wife of the last witness, said about 10.30 on Monday evening the deceased complained of pains in her head and arm. The deceased did not ask for a doctor, but went to bed. Witness last saw the deceased alive about one o'clock the same night, when she said, "I am better." About five o'clock witness went up to her room, when she found the deceased to be dead.
Ellen Maud Pratt said she attended to the deceased when she was taken ill on Monday evening last. She looked as if she was faint, and witness sent for some spirits. The deceased was put to bed and witness stayed with her for some time.
Rowenna Deel gave corroborative evidence.
James Lester Pratt proved seeing the deceased eating unripe apples on various occasions.
Dr Shapland, of Withycombe, who examined the deceased, said he found a quantity of unripe apples in the stomach. In witness's opinion death was due to want of breathing, the stomach being distended.
The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 10 September 1892, Issue 7850 – Gale Document No. Y3200753243
TIVERTON – Sudden Death. – A tinsmith named ROBERT PUDDICOMBE died suddenly on Monday. The Inquest on the body of ROBERT PUDDICOMBE, TINMAN, aged 56, was held at the Infirmary on Tuesday evening before Mr F. S. Dayman, and he Jury's verdict was to the effect that death was due to syncope.

TOTNES – Inquest. – "Accidentally Drowned" was the verdict at an Inquest on Wednesday on the body of WILLIAM HANNAFORD HALLETT, a labourer, whose body was found floating in the River Dart near Totnes, as reported in our last evening's issue.

Saturday 17 September 1892, Issue 7856 – Gale Document No. Y3200753277
SAD DEATH OF A MOTHER AT EXMOUTH – The Inquest. – At the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Thursday, Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of a young woman named CANHAM, wife of a labourer named THOMAS CANHAM, living at Pound-street, Exmouth, who died under very sad circumstances on Tuesday. Mr Williams was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Mr Farleigh, a Juryman, came in late, and in reply to the Coroner, said he did not know it was so late. He expressed his regret for not being punctual. The Coroner said he was liable to be fined.
The first witness called was THOMAS WALTER CANHAM, general labourer, of Exmouth, who identified the body as that of his wife, who was 29 years of age. She was delivered of a female child on Thursday night last, about six o'clock. Mrs Horn, a certificated midwife, was present at the delivery. The deceased died on Tuesday night. After the birth witness thought his wife was going on all right.
Ellen Jane Horn, a certificated midwife, said she attended the deceased at her confinement, which took place on Thursday last. The deceased told witness that the previous day she was standing at her door when she fell on her side, causing her great pain.
By a Juror: She said the heel-plat of her boot caused her to fall.
Mrs Willey, neighbour, said she saw the deceased shortly after her confinement, when she seemed all right as far as she (witness) knew. Witness remained with deceased for a good time after the midwife left. Up to 9.30 the child as well as the mother seemed to go on all right. Witness was going to and fro the whole of the next day. Witness asked the deceased how she was getting on, and the reply was "I am feeling nice." Later on deceased complained of pains in her side.
ELIZABETH NOTT, sister of the deceased, said she was present at the confinement and she thought everything passed off all right. On Saturday last the deceased complained of being unwell, but witness did not think a doctor ought to be sent for.
Mr Shapland, surgeon, said he was called in to see the deceased in company with Mr Curtis on Tuesday evening. The woman was then to all intents and purposes dying. Witness made a post mortem examination and found the deceased was a healthy person. He discovered an internal obstruction following diarrhoea. Witness believed that if a medical man had been called two days previous the woman's life would probably have been saved. There was no blame to be attached to the midwife, and death arose from one of the after effects of diarrhoea, viz., puerperal peritonitis. The fall had nothing to do with the cause of death.
The Coroner, in summing up, said he was of opinion that a medical man should have been called in earlier, but no blame could be attached to anyone.
The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. They also expressed their appreciation of the care and consideration shown by Mrs Willey.

Saturday 17 September 1892, Issue 7856 – Gale Document No. Y3200753255
DEATH OF A CHILD THROUGH FALLING DOWNSTAIRS - Mr Coroner Bromham held an Inquest at the Rolle Quay Inn, Barnstaple on Monday touching the death of a child named THOMAS HENRY HILL, aged four years, son of a fisherman, who died on Saturday from the effects of a fall down stairs.
JANE HILL, the mother, said the child fell down stairs on Thursday morning. She picked it up and placed it on a chair, and asked the deceased if he had knocked himself. He replied "Yes," and she carried him upstairs and placed him in bed by the side of his father. Subsequently her husband called to her, and said that the child was either dead or dying. She sent immediately for Dr Manning, but it died on Saturday morning. When her husband came home on Thursday morning she asked him to fetch some brandy which she had left downstairs in a bottle the night before. Her husband replied that there was none left in the bottle, and the child, who was present, said he had drunk the brandy. There was about threepennyworth of spirit left in the bottle over night. She had no doubt the brandy made the child unsteady and caused him to fall over the stairs, but she did not notice anything amiss with him before he told her he had had it.
Dr Manning stated that in his opinion the child when it fell sustained concussion of the spine and brain, which brought on convulsions. The convulsions were not induced by simply taking the brandy.
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 24 September 1892, Issue 7862 – Gale Document No. Y3200753314
BARNSTAPLE – Inquest. – On Saturday an Inquest was held on the body of THOMAS HODGE, 78, carpenter, of Northmolton, who fell over a flight of stairs, sustaining concussion of the brain. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 1 October 1892, Issue 7868 – Gale Document No. Y3200753354
TORQUAY NEWS – Inquest. – Last evening Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at the Belgrave Hotel on the wife of the late REV. – HARRISON, formerly vicar of Kington, Hereford, who was found dead in her room on Wednesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 1 October 1892, Issue 7868 – Gale Document No. Y3200753355
BUCKFASTLEIGH – Suicide. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday touching the death of MRS JANE SEARLE, who committed suicide the previous day by hanging. A verdict of Temporary Insanity was held."

EXETER – An Inquest was held at the City Police Court on Thursday, before Mr Coroner Hooper, touching the death of BEATRICE POLLY WRIGHT, aged 16. MRS WRIGHT, mother of deceased, and wife of the landlord of the Victoria Inn, Paris-street, said deceased had not been in good health for several months. On Wednesday witness looked in her room and found her on the floor with her head against the wall. Dr Domville said in his opinion death was due to cardiac syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 8 October 1892, Issue 7874 – Gale Document No. Y3200753395
THE FINDING OF A BODY IN THE EXE – Inquest. – At the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of SIDNEY CLARK, aged 30, lately living at 41, Paul-street, whose body was found in the river Exe, near the Ballast Quay, on Tuesday afternoon, as reported in our issue of the same evening. Mr J. Grant was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
The first witness called was WILLIAM HENRY CLARK, cab proprietor, of 41, Paul-street, who identified the body as that of his brother, who was a labourer. Deceased was a single man. Witness last saw the deceased on the 23rd of September at Paul-street, but witness had no conversation with him. The following morning deceased was missing. As far as witness knew, deceased was in his usual state of mind on the Friday evening.
By a Juror: There had been no quarrelling home.
Robert Henry, labourer, residing at Ewing's-lane, said on Tuesday afternoon, about 4.30, he was on the Quay, when he saw some lads throwing stones at an object. Witness rowed towards it, and found it to be the body of the deceased.
Mr Harrison, surgeon, said he was called to go down to the Quay, where he saw the body of the deceased moored to the side of a boat. Witness examined the body and found no marks of violence on it. By a Juror: Witness should think that the body had been in the water some days.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 15 October 1892, Issue 7880 – Gale Document No. Y3200753414
INQUEST AT EXETER PRISON – At the Exeter City Prison on Monday, Mr W. H. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of CHARLES PAUL, an inmate at the prison, who died on Saturday last.
Mr Harry Clogg was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Mr L. P. Pennethorne, Governor of H.M. Prison, Exeter, said the deceased was a native of Somerset. He was a labourer aged 47, and formerly lived at Bedminster, near Bristol. He was convicted on the 28th July, 1891, at the Bristol Quarter Sessions for a serious offence, and was sentenced to nine calendar months with hard labour. Deceased was received into the Exeter prison on the 12th August. Deceased's conduct had been good, and his health had also been good. The doctor would always see a prisoner if he complained. His wife spent four days with the deceased previous to his death.
Mr Thomas W. Caird, prison doctor, said the deceased was under his (witness's) care since the 14th September. Deceased was suffering from pains in the bowels and witness had him removed to the Hospital where he remained up to the time of his death. Deceased also suffered from a mild attack of typhoid fever. The drains of the prison had undergone a thorough renovation before deceased was taken ill.
Mr J. Cummings also saw the deceased.
By a Juror: There were no other cases of typhoid fever in the prison.
By another Juror: It was not a case of cholera.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 15 October 1892, Issue 7880 – Gale Document No. Y3200753426
EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Hospital on Wednesday, touching the death of ALICE MAUD SCOBLE, aged three years and nine months, who died at the Hospital on Monday from burns received by turning over a paraffin lamp at Broadclyst on Friday. WILLIAM SCOBLE and ELIZA SCOBLE gave evidence. Mr George Stuart Abram, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted to the Hospital on Saturday evening, suffering from burns, and died on Monday evening. In his opinion death was the result of the burns, with scarlet fever supervening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TOTNES – Sudden Death. – At an Inquest held before Dr Fraser touching the death of MARTHA FOLEY, aged 52, who was found dead in bed, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, the medical evidence being to the effect that death was due to syncope.

Saturday 29 October 1892, Issue 7892 – Gale Document No. Y3200753491
On Thursday Mr Coroner Bencraft held an Inquest at Barnstaple on the body of THOMAS WILLIAMS, a fisherman, who met with his death through burns caused by the upsetting of a lamp. He was sitting at a table and trod on the paw of his dog, and on rising he put his hand on the table which overturned and the lamp fell to the ground and caught some window curtains on fire. In putting them out he burned his hands and arms. He went to the Infirmary, had his burns dressed, and remained there over a week. He insisted on leaving last Monday but he returned again on Tuesday and he died from syncope on Wednesday. While in the Infirmary, some friends brought in some whisky and brandy which the House Surgeon had taken from him, and in his evidence at the Inquest the doctor said that the drinking of the spirits hastened his death, but that the primary cause was shock occasioned by the burns. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER – An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon at 97, Paris-street, by Mr H. W. Hooper touching the death of EDMUND JOHN SPETTITUDE, aged seven months. JESSIE SPETTITUDE, mother of the deceased, said just after seven o'clock in the morning she found the child gasping for breath. It died immediately. Dr Hawkins said the child was dead when he saw it in the morning. In his opinion death was due to convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EXETER – An Inquest was held on Wednesday at 78, Holloway-street, on the body of WILLIAM STONEMAN, a dairyman, aged 59. Evidence of identification was given by MRS STONEMAN, widow of the deceased, who was greatly affected. She said her husband was quite well when he retired to rest on Tuesday night, but she heard him breathing heavily in the morning, and just before seven she found him dead. Mr F. E. Williams, surgeon, deposed to examining the deceased after death. He appeared to have had a weak heart, and in his (witness's) opinion he died from cardiac syncope. The Jury, of which Mr Hawkins was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

TORQUAY – Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Monday on the body of the infant child of JAMES GANT, a labourer, employed at the new Harbour Works. The child, which was three weeks old, was taken ill on Saturday, and died before medical aid could be obtained. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TORRINGTON – Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday on the body of SAMUEL JOHNS, who was killed on Saturday night whilst in charge of a horse and cart. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 5 November 1892, Issue 7898 – Gale Document No. Y3200753523
EXETER – An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the Devon and Exeter Hospital by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, touching the death of SARAH HOOPER, 78. Mrs Rome, of Penitentiary-court, Holloway-street, said deceased rented a room of her. About a month ago deceased after sitting in witness's kitchen went up to her own room, and directly after called witness who found that she had cut herself. The deceased went to the hospital on witness's advice. Mr Andrew, house surgeon at the hospital, said deceased was received into that institution on October 6th. The cut was dressed and she was put to bed. She gradually became worse, and died on the 28th from exhaustion consequent upon the wound. After a consultation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON – Fatal Fall. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the Southmolton Workhouse on the body of ANN JONES, 81, an inmate of the House, who died from injuries received by falling downstairs. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the attention of the Guardians called to the staircase.

Saturday 5 November 1892, Issue 7898 – Gale Document No. Y3200753529
SINGULAR DEATH IN EXETER – At the Exeter Police Court on Thursday Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of JOHN SWEET, a butcher, of Haven Banks, who died suddenly at Luscombe's Coffee Palace on Wednesday. Mr R. Lee was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
ELIZA SWEET identified the body as that of her late husband, who was 44 years of age. Witness last saw him alive Wednesday morning just before eight o'clock, when he went to his work. She did not hear anything of the deceased until the evening, when she saw him dead at the Guildhall. He was not an intemperate man.
William Scoble, a smith, living at Preston-street, said Thursday night, about 9.30 he was in Mr Luscombe's Coffee House, Fore-street, and saw the deceased there. Witness's attention as attracted by the deceased making a peculiar noise. Witness spoke to him, but he did not reply. Witness bathed the head of the deceased. Mr Bell was sent for but deceased had expired before the arrival of the medical man.
William Joseph Luscombe, assistant at the Coffee Palace, said the deceased came there about nine o'clock and asked for some bread, beef, and tea. He was served, and witness noticed that he appeared dazed.
Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said in the night about 9.30 he was called to go to Mr Luscombe's shop. He went there and found the deceased dead. Deceased smelt strongly of drink. Mr Luscombe, senior, told witness that he thought the deceased was under the influence of drink when he came into the palace. Witness made a post mortem examination and found on opening the body that the organs were healthy, but showed signs that the man had been a heavy drinker. The brain was healthy but congested. On opening the stomach witness found it full of partly digested food mixed with a considerable quantity of beer. There were also two or three portions of undigested and unmasticated slow beef which had evidently been taken just before death. Witness could not find any cause of death so he removed the windpipe. Over the top of the windpipe was a piece of beef which completely closed it and prevented any air entering the lungs. Probably the deceased being under the influence of liquor, bolted the meat then felt sick, and became faintly vomited this undigested meat which lodged against the upper portion of the windpipe, and caused suffocation.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Suffocation."

Saturday 5 November 1892, Issue 7898 – Gale Document No. Y3200753525
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT CREDITON – Inquest. A Juryman Fined. An Inquest was held at the Railway Inn, Crediton, Thursday, by Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner for the district, touching the death of FREDERICK PARR, 26 years of age, porter and relieving signalman at Crediton Railway Station, who, it will be remembered, was knocked down and killed on Tuesday evening by a passing train. Inspector Foster watched the proceedings on behalf of the South Western Railway Company. Mr Doddridge, one of the Jurymen, was fined £2 for being late.
Mr Banks, stationmaster, said he last saw the deceased about a quarter to eight on Tuesday evening. He had to attend to the shunting of some cattle wagons which were to be attached to the 9.14 up goods train, and signal to the 8.43 down goods that there were no trucks for it to take on, and that it might pass through without stopping. He first heard of the accident about five minutes to nine when he was in the town. He came to the station immediately, and found the deceased in the porter's room, dead.
William Cole, brakesman, said he was engaged with the deceased in shunting an up goods train from Fremington on to a siding to allow a fast goods train to pass. Witness afterwards went into the goods shed, and the deceased went towards the main line. That was the last time witness saw him alive.
Robert Marle, driver of the down goods, said his train passed the station at eight or ten miles an hour and there was a signal of a white light waved. The man who was signalling stood in the middle of the up main line. Witness saw the up goods coming, and shouted to the deceased, but he appeared to take no notice and was knocked down. Witness did not hear the up goods engine whistle, but the noise of his train would prevent his hearing it, and the same cause undoubtedly prevented deceased from hearing it.
Dr Campbell said he was called to see the deceased about nine o'clock on Tuesday evening. He found him quite dead. His skull was cracked right across the vault of the head, the right arm was cut off below the elbow, the left foot was cut off, and the leg below the knee shattered – injuries quite sufficient to cause immediate death.
The Coroner said no one seemed to be responsible or to blame in the matter. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the widow.

Saturday 12 November 1892, Issue 7904 – Gale Document No. Y3200753566
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of ELIZABETH COLLICOTT, aged 76, who died suddenly t her residence, Sandford-street, Newtown, on Wednesday. The evidence of Mr A. Steele Perkins showed that death resulted from old age. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Saturday 19 November 1892, Issue 7910 – Gale Document No. Y3200753604
BARNSTAPLE – Inquest. – Mr I Bencraft (Borough Coroner) held an Inquest on Tuesday at the North Devon Infirmary on the body of a woman named MARY WITTON, aged 78, who died from the effects of a fall. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BROADCLYST – Inquest. – Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest on Monday at the New Inn on the body of JOHN BLACKMOORE, of Prospect Cottage, who was found hanging to his bedstead on Saturday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

SOUTHMOLTON – Inquest. – Mr Sanders (Borough Coroner) held an Inquest on Tuesday on the body of the illegitimate child of MARY ASTLEFORD, of Corn's Cross. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TAVISTOCK – Sudden Death at Gunnislake – Mr Thompson (District Coroner) held an Inquiry at Gunnislake on Monday relative to the death of MR DENNER, aged 54, of that place. He returned from his work on the same day at Devon Consols Mine, and within two minutes of his arrival home dropped down dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and gave their fees to the widow. The deceased was very much respected, and much sympathy is felt for the widow.

Saturday 19 November 1892, Issue 7910 – Gale Document No. Y3200753612
SHOCKING TRAGEDY NEAR TAVISTOCK – Murder of a Young Man and Woman. Attempted Suicide of the Assassin. All Through Jealousy.
A terrible tragedy, resulting in the deaths of two persons occurred near Tavistock, on Sunday evening.
Between nine and ten o'clock a young woman named DOIDGE, daughter of MR DOIDGE, of Coxtor Farm, Petertavy, was returning home from Petertavy Church, where she sang in the choir, accompanied by a young man named ROWE. Suddenly a young fellow sprang out against them and shot at the girl and her companion. The poor young woman fell dead on the spot, and ROWE received very serious injuries. The assailant in the meantime had decamped. MR DOIDGE was made acquainted with the terrible affair, and immediately fetched the body of his murdered daughter home in a trap.
The cause of the brutal crime is supposed to be jealousy. ROWE did not appear to know who had attacked them. The Rev. Dr Bryant's son immediately rode to Tavistock and informed the police, and three officers, accompanied by Dr Brodrick, at once proceeded to the spot where the murder had been committed.
About three o'clock next morning the police apprehended a young man named Williams on suspicion. He had attempted to commit suicide by shooting himself, having totally destroyed one of his eyes by sending a bullet through it. He was instantly removed to the Tavistock Cottage Hospital. He is the son of Mr Williams, a miller, of Petertavy.
Considerable excitement was aroused when the murder was made known, and the news was rapidly spread throughout the neighbourhood.
A Central News telegram says: The young man ROWE, who was also shot, has since died. The alleged murderer – Wm. Williams – twice attempted suicide, and is now in the Tavistock Hospital.
Sergeant Pike, who showed great promptitude in dealing with the case has given the following particulars to our representative. On Sunday about 11 p.m., I received information that a murder had been committed near Petertavy. Upon going to MR DOIDGE, Hartford Bridge, found EMMA DOIDGE, aged 17, of Coxtor Farm, Petertavy, dead with a bullet sent right through her head completely shattering it. F. ROWE, a labourer, who had been in company with the deceased girl was also severely hurt, rendering him perfectly unconscious, but afterwards stated that a man had attacked them. Having suspicion of a young man who had formerly kept company with the girl, the police found William Williams, a labourer, with his left eye closed and a wound through his left temple, and also covered in blood. Dr Brodrick dressed the wound and sent him, in charge of P.C. Newcombe, to the Tavistock Hospital, where he now remains. On Monday Dr Brodrick extracted from his head a large bullet which had entered near his eye. It was worked to the back of his neck and then taken out. In the afternoon he goes under an operation to have his eye taken out. There are hopes of his recovery. He has not yet clearly confessed the crime, his only statement being that he does not know what possessed him to be so brutal.
The prisoner, in company with P.C. Newcombe passed a restless and painful night. He formerly kept company with the unfortunate girl, and had recently written letters to her. She, however, refused to have anything to do with him, and it is supposed that this fact engendered feelings of jealousy on the part of Williams. He had before apprehension twice tried to commit suicide – first by shooting himself, and then by drowning. His clothes, which are in the police station, are drenched. Before going to church on Sunday, prisoner and the girl's brother had some very harsh words, and almost came to blows. Williams made use of some threats, including "This shall be death for somebody."
There is reason to believe that Williams intended committing the murder some days previously, for on or about the 3rd inst. he bought some cartridges and a six-chambered pin-fire revolver of Mr Blanchard, ironmonger, Brook-street, Tavistock. Williams being a customer of Mr Blanchard's was supplied with the weapon without any questions being asked. He attended church in the evening, and as he is known not to have gone home after the service, it is evident that he had the revolver in his possession whilst in the sacred building.
Sergeant Pike has been very active in procuring evidence as to the case. As there is no trace of any other person being near the fatal spot at the time of the murder, it is almost certain that Williams is the only person who will be charged. P.C. Newcombe has also been actively engaged in the case, and remained during the whole of the night in charge of the prisoner at the hospital.
The excitement caused by the terrible tragedy near Tavistock on Sunday night is still great. MISS DOIDGE, one of the victims, was only 17 years of age, and was the daughter of MR J. DOIDGE, of Cox Tor Farm, which is situated upon one of the Dartmoor spurs, about a mile and a half from Petertavy. She was a singer in the Petertavy Church choir, and was a handsome girl, and a general favourite – in fact, the belle of the quiet little village. She took a great interest in all church matters, and attended the choir and Rector's Bible Class regularly. The DOIDGE family are highly esteemed, and great sympathy is felt for them. In fact, all the families of the persons connected with the crime are so well known and respected that the horrible affair has created a funereal sadness in the neighbourhood. After the murder Williams apparently attempted to take his own life, but probably through nervousness missed his mark and only wounded himself. He then fled. After a few hours' interval he made his way to MR DOIDGE'S, Hartford Bridge, where he aroused the family, about midnight by the continually knocking at the door. Thinking it was some drunken man they hesitated to answer for a while, but subsequently MR DOIDGE descended and let the intruder in. MRS DOIDGE and her stepdaughter were unable t recognise him, although he had been there on the day previous with flour from his father's mill. They were all frightened to see his condition, he being covered with blood and his clothes saturated with water. He was not excited, and said "Go and tell my father and mother where I am." He made a remark about the Tavy, and as his wet condition could not be due to the rain, it is evident that he immersed himself in the water with the intention of putting an end to his life. There are no elements of mystery about the case. The tragedy is one of the most terrible and brutal enacted in the West for many years. Nothing has occurred like it in the neighbourhood since twelve years ago, when a young man tried to shoot a young woman at Milton Abbot, but only wounded her, and afterwards took his own life.
MISS EMMA DOIDGE went to church on Sunday evening with her brother, WILLIAM, two of her younger sisters, and two other girls named Mudge, all of whom sang in the choir. WILLIAM ROWE, one of the rector's men, blows the organ at the church, where his father is organist. Williams, the accused man, after church made use of some words to the effect that he would knock EMMA DOIDGE down, and her brother overhearing it, said "Not while I am about." Williams then offered to fight with DOIDGE, but he declined, saying, "We have our best clothes on now, but tomorrow morning I'll have a round with you." Williams then went away making use of a threat. the party from Cox Tor were accompanied by ROWE and three young ringers who had come over during the afternoon. After service they separated, WILLIAM DOIDGE with the two sisters Mudge from South Down Farm going first, then ROWE and EMMA DOIDGE alone, and the ringers following some distance behind. They had to pass through a narrow lane and by a large ash tree. The first group passed without seeing anything, but when near their destination heard reports of a revolver – three in quick succession, then an interval and another report. Giving the alarm, they hurried back to find their friends, and discovered their sister EMMA lying dead on the road, and ROWE a short distance off perfectly unconscious and bleeding profusely. The party behind heard the reports, and presently a man rushed by with his hat off and muttering to himself, but disappeared in the darkness. The terrible news caused the greatest consternation in the solitary farmhouse. The elder MR DOIDGE had retired to rest, but was aroused and went to the spot and found his unfortunate daughter dead. MRS DOIDGE soon learnt the sad news, as did also MR JOSEPH ROWE, father of the deceased young man, who was at the Rectory. The Rev. Dr. Bryant, with a book in his hand, by the fire, tired by the work of the day, had fallen asleep, but the noise created by ROWE soon awoke him. Immediately he took action. His son (Mr H. P. Bryant) saddled a horse, rode up through Cox Tor-lane, where he found MR DOIDGE almost beside himself with grief, holding his dead daughter in his arms, young ROWE still lying wounded on the ground. Mr Bryant informed those gathered around that his father would be there shortly, and then hurried off to Tavistock to inform the police and Dr Brodrick.
The Rector hastened to the spot, but the poor girl had been taken home in a trap. Dr Bryant and ROWE'S father expressed some hopes of the young man's recovery, although they saw that his injuries were of a very serious nature. A trap was fetched, and, resting in the arms of three kind friends, young ROWE was gently taken back to Petertavy. The murderer had fled, and nobody seems to have heard or seen him after he passed the third party on his way to the village. The girl's sleeve was torn as if the murderer had caught her hold and pulled her.
The Rev. Dr. Bryant describes the girl as a charming little creature, good tempered, and a general favourite of the district. He says, "When I arrived on the spot I found her dead, shot through the temple, and the young man shot in the back of the neck. The bullet is underneath the ear. I never saw a countenance which expressed less pain in death than that of the girl. There was quite a smile upon it." The Rector, much affected, added, "It was one of the saddest things I ever saw. She was confirmed on November 12th, 1891, and murdered on November 13th, 1892. All the party except Williams had been regular attendants at my Bible Class. Nothing so horrible has ever occurred before during my whole time in this country. Universal sympathy is being manifested for the families, including the Williamses. It is a most terrible thing for them.
The motive for the crime was apparently jealousy or disappointment. Although it is evident that MISS DOIDGE had never encouraged Williams, there is no doubt that he was exceedingly fond of her. He continually wrote letters to her, but she would have nothing to do with him, and answered none of his epistles until recently, when she wrote saying he must cease writing to her, as she should have nothing whatever to do with him. He must have nursed this for a few days. Then he purchased a revolver, although he did not use it until Sunday. He was a sportsmanlike young fellow, taking a delight in shooting and fishing.
The Police are very busy in procuring the necessary information. The Chief Constable of Devon (Mr Coleridge) arrived at Tavistock early in the day, and took charge of the Inquiry.
Writing in the afternoon, our reporter says:- The Chief Constable has afforded great assistance in co-operating with Superintendent Nicholls and the police in collecting evidence in the case. Up to the present the prisoner is doing as well as can be expected, and has several times repeated, "I wish I could die." A constable is constantly watching the prisoner. It appears that the prisoner – to whom MISS DOIDGE was not, as has been supposed, engaged – had previously threatened the deceased girl, and the young man ROWE was with her on Sunday night for the purpose of protecting her. Much sympathy is expressed with the parents of ROWE and the girl DOIDGE, and also with Williams's parents. It is said that Williams was always a hard-working and honest young man, and his parents are also much respected in the village. The part of the lane which is rather a wild looking spot, and close to where the young man fell is a large root of a tree which has been pulled down. There is also a piece of timber near where MISS DOIDGE fell. The hedges are covered with moss and ferns, and there is now a considerable quantity of mud and stones in the road. All the blood and traces of the murder have been removed.
THE INQUESTS - The Inquest on MISS DOIDGE was held at Cox Tor Farm at three o'clock on Tuesday, before Mr Coroner R. Rodd, the following composing the Jury:- Messrs T. Martin Rogers (Foreman), Prout, Westaway, Maunder, Collings, Hill, W. J. Bowhay, C. H. Grove, R. Floyd, R. Bowhay, W. Arthurs, H. Reddicliffe, H. Able. Among those present were Supt. Nicholls and P.S. Pike.
The Coroner said he thought it would be better for him to refrain on that sad occasion from making any remarks in the house in which they then were. He would only say that he thought it was better to summon them there, instead of going to Petertavy, in order to save time, and afterwards to the Petertavy Inn and open the Inquest on the other body. Of course, it was his intention to adjourn the Court to a future day, as they could not get witnesses there that day, and it would have been impossible to hear all the evidence. He thought it would be better to adjourn the Court to an early date, and early in the morning. They would view the body and have it identified and then adjourn to the Petertavy Inn.
JOHN DOIDGE, of Cox Tor Farm, in the parish of Petertavy, farmer, identified the body of the deceased as that of his daughter, EMMA HOLMES DOIDGE, aged 17 years. She was killed on Sunday last, the 13th November.
The Coroner said that evidence as to the circumstances of the death would be taken at the adjourned Court.
The Inquest on ROWE was held at the Peter Tavy Inn, the Jury being the same as in the other Inquiry.
WILLIAM ROWE, father of the deceased, gardener, and confidential servant to the Rector, identified the body as that of his son, twenty-one years of age.
The Coroner said Dr Brodrick had made a post mortem of the body, and extracted a bullet from under the back of the neck.
The Inquest was adjourned until Saturday at ten o'clock in the School Room, by permission of the Rector (the Rev. Dr. Bryant.) The body was viewed by the Jury, who chose the same Foreman.

Saturday 19 November 1892, Issue 7910 – Gale Document No. Y3200753611
ADJOURNED INQUEST ON THE VICTIMS. Verdict of "Wilful Murder." - At the Petertavy Schoolroom at ten o'clock this morning Mr R. R. Dodd (Coroner) resumed the Inquest opened on Tuesday last into the circumstances attending the deaths of EMMA HOLMES DOIDGE of Coxtor Farm, Petertavy, aged 17, and WILLIAM ROWE, aged 21, also of Petertavy.
Mr P. T. Pearse watched the proceedings on behalf of the accused, and Superintendent Nicholls and P.S. Pike were present on behalf of the police.
Mr Pearse, on behalf of the relatives of Williams, the accused man, expressed sincere sorrow and sympathy with the relatives of the deceased, and said he hoped no act or word on his part would be attributed in any degree to any wont of sympathy. He had, however, to do his duty in this serious case.
JOHN DOIDGE, farmer, of Coxtor Farm, Petertavy, identified the deceased EMMA DOIDGE as his daughter. He did not go to church on Sunday last, but his daughter went, leaving the house just before six with her sister, but not MR ROWE. After the service, from information received from his daughter, ELIZABETH, who was dreadfully frightened, he went to Coxtor-lane, near Sowton town, where he saw the man named ROWE lying, and on proceeding two or three steps down the lane he found the body of his daughter EMMA. She was lying on the ground head downwards. She was quite dead, and there was blood on her head, and a quantity running down the hill. He called Mr W. Mudge. He found a revolver on the ground near his daughter. The weapon was a six-chambered one. The deceased with the assistance of Mr Mudge was taken to her home. Two black felt hats (produced) were picked up near the spot by his wife.
The Foreman stated that a report was abroad that threatening letters had been sent to his daughter by someone. He wished to know if this was true.
Witness said he had not heard of any such thing.
WILLIAM DOIDGE, brother of the deceased, said he was not at Church on Sunday night, but met his sister returning from the service near Langsford. The accused and the young man ROWE were standing in the road. When he came up he found that Williams was having an altercation with his sister. He heard him say with an oath, "If you don't mind I will knock your head off." Witness turned around and said "You will not do it while I am here." Williams wanted to fight him, but witness said it was Sunday night, and he thought it was not a proper time. He was going down to his place the next day, and if he liked the would "have it out" then. They went on the road towards the farm for about 200 yards, in Creedy Lane. Williams went on ahead of them, the last words he said being "I have finished with you, Bill. Somebody will fall tonight." ROWE and his sister and himself and Miss Mudge, who had also been to Church, went to the top of Creedy Lane-hill. ROWE and his sister then went on together. Witness stopped behind with Miss Mudge for a few minutes, and eventually he heard four shots fired. He went to the spot and there met his father and mother, who was on their way to the Mudges. Williams was wearing a pair of grey trousers, and a dark overcoat, similar to those produced.
By the Foreman (Mr Rogers): Have you heard of threatening letters being sent to your sister?
Witness: I do not know anything about threatening letters. My sister told me before that Williams kept on writing letters to her. She did not say anything about threatening letters. If they had been she would have told me.
By Mr Pearse: The altercation was about my sister telling people he had written letters to her.
Mr Pearse: At that time wasn't Williams complaining about her going about with ROWE?
Witness: I did not hear him say so.
ELIZABETH DOIDGE, sister of the deceased, said on Sunday night she went to Church with her sister having previously met at Mr Williams, bootmaker. On coming out of Church they walked down the lane, witness going on ahead with Miss Mudge towards Coxtor Farm. There were other people about. A young man named Dawe walked with them to Sowton Farm. She did not see anybody with her sister that night. She did not see her sister afterwards until she was brought home dead. About a quarter-past nine, not far from her home, she heard three shots fired. She told her father and mother of the occurrence, and that she saw a man run across the road near Sowton Farm. She went back to the lane in company with three young men named Dawe, Philp and Warne, of Sandford Pinney.
By the Foreman: She returned her steps first before giving the alarm home. She saw a young man lying in the road. She did not see anyone else. She did not know who the man was at the time. She did not hear of any threatening letters being sent to the deceased – merely correspondence.
Mr Pearce: Were they not ordinary love letters of affection sent by Williams? – Yes, sir.
Mr Pearce: Is it not a matter of fact that your poor sister and young Williams walked out together on several occasions? - Yes, sir.
The Coroner: Recently? - No sir, some time ago, before Midsummer.
Mark Bellamy, of Harrowgrove Farm, a youth, said he was at Langford Cross on Sunday evening about half-past eight. John Dart, George Geeke, Henry Rundle, Richard Heale, William Dodd, George Chubb, were with him. He was walking behind WILLIAM DOIDGE and Miss Mudge, and MISS EMMA DOIDGE and WILLIAM ROWE. He did not hear any altercation between them. He saw William Williams in front. He previously saw Williams talking with WILLIAM DOIDGE and Miss Mudge, and also MISS EMMA DOIDGE and MR ROWE. He could not tell what the conversation then was about. After this witness went to Sowton Town Cross. His friends stopped talking together, and eventually he heard four shots fired. They did not move then, and they saw someone pass, witness remarking that it looked something like "Blucher," meaning Williams. The man had his coat over his face.
By the Foreman: He went there because he heard there was going to be a fight.
WILLIAM GEORGE DOIDGE, mason, of Harford Bridge, Marytavy, deposed that on Sunday last about quarter-past twelve someone knocked at the door. He went downstairs and said, "Who's there?" The person said, "Let me in." Witness said, "Who are you?" but the person would not tell, saying, "Let me in." Witness opened the door and let him in. He did not know who it was when he saw him, and the person would not speak. He was sensible, and eventually said he was called Williams. Witness said, "What ever have you been about?" He did not reply directly, but said "Go to my father. He knows of it by this time. This is not the worst of it." Williams was very wet. He did not have any hat or overcoat on. He was blood all over, and his right eye was cut. It was swollen covered with blood, and he could not say if he had any eye or no. Witness went for his father.
Mr Pearse: Was not the prisoner dazed? - He walked in all right and drank tea. He did look dull.
Samuel Joel Cook Blanchard, ironmonger, Brook-street, Tavistock, said he sold a revolver to William Williams on the 9th or 10th of this month, but could not say whether the weapon produced was the one. After some hesitation Williams said he wanted the revolver to shoot a dog.
P.S. Pike produced a six-chambered revolver and four blank cartridges and two loaded ones, which were taken out of the weapon by the Chief Constable of Devon on Monday last. He also produced a black felt hat with two bullet holes. Comparing the hat with the wound on the left temple of the accused Williams, the bullet marks corresponded. He received the hat and pistol from JOHN DOIDGE.
Superintendant Richard Nicholls, of Tavistock, said on Thursday last he searched the banks of the river Tavy, and when about three hundred yards from the Rifle butts towards Tavistock he found a coat (produced) hanging in the bushes. It was very wet. He searched the coat and found an unexploded cartridge similar to those previously produced. There was also a Common Prayer Book in the pocket, but there was no name or mark on it.
The Court here adjourned for luncheon.
On the Court re-0assembling, Mr Brodricke, surgeon, of Tavistock, said the accused was under his charge, but he was not fit to be removed from the hospital at present. If he continued going on as well as he had been he would be able to be removed next week. He had made a post mortem examination of the bodies of EMMA DOIDGE and WILLIAM ROWE. He then gave a description of the wounds. There was no scorching about the face of MISS DOIDGE, which showed that the person was not close to the deceased when the shot was fired. The bullet went right through the brain. ROWE'S hair was singed, showing that the revolver was held very close when it was fired.
William Mudge, farmer, of Sowton Farm, testified to hearing four shots fired, and going to the spot.
This was the whole of the evidence, and the Coroner, in summing up, thanked the Jury for the marked attention they had paid to the evidence brought forward by Superintendent Nicholls, and which was of a very exhaustive nature. The Coroner then dealt minutely with the statements of the various witnesses.
The Jury retired to consider their verdict, and after ten minutes' deliberation returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against William Williams. They at the same time wished to express regret that the sale of revolvers to young persons could so easily be effected.
The Foreman said he was sorry they were situated as they were. He had known Williams well.
The Coroner thought the verdict was a proper one; indeed it was the only one they could have arrived at on the evidence before the Court. As regarded the recommendation of the Jury, he would bring the matter to the notice of the proper authorities. The Coroner then expressed his deepest and most heartfelt sympathy with the relatives of the deceased. They must trust in God above to support them in this, their source of affliction. There was still further trouble and sympathy for the parents of the accused man Williams. He most entirely supported Mr Pearse's remarks at the commencement, and he was sure they condoled with the parents.
Mr Bowhay, a Juror, agreed with the remarks made by the Coroner.
The vicar (Rev. Dr Bryant) then spoke of the considerate manner in which the Coroner had carried out his important duty from the commencement.
The Coroner thanked the vicar for the kindly manner in which he had spoken of him. Superintendent Nicholls and P.S. Pike and the Police had acted in an efficient manner, and to the satisfaction of all. (Hear, hear).
Superintendent Nicholls returned thanks.
During the foregoing remarks the bereaved parents sobbed bitterly, and the scene was very affecting.
The Coroner committed Williams to take his trial at the Lent Assizes for the County of Devon for the Wilful Murder of EMMA DOIDGE and WILLIAM ROWE.
On the application of Mr Pearse the Coroner ordered the accused's removal to Plymouth prison instead of Exeter, as soon as he was well enough, while Mr Pearse was endeavouring to prepare his defence.
The Inquiry then terminated.

Saturday 26 November 1892, Issue 7916 – Gale Document No. Y3200753628
TOPSHAM – Inquest. – After hearing the evidence of Dr Frood, of Topsham, a Jury at Clyst St. Mary on Saturday returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" at an Inquest held on the body of FANNY STRATTON, who died soon after the birth of her child.

TIVERTON – The Suicide at Bickleigh. – At the Inquest on MR ALFRED BOND, farmer and cattle dealer, who committed suicide at his residence, Burn Farm, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind."

SOUTHMOLTON – The Fire. – Mr T. Sanders held an Inquest on Monday relative to the death of the old woman MARY FUKE, an inmate of the Workhouse, who met her death in the fire at the Union. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict that the fire was the result of an accident, and that the deceased met her death by suffocation and burning. They recommended that grater precautions should be taken by the Guardians against fire by the provision of buckets of water and hand grenades and that the use of oil lamps be discontinued. They also desired that the gallant conduct of P.C. Wootten should be notified in the proper quarters.

SOUTHMOLTON – The Fire at the Workhouse. – At the Town Hall on Wednesday Mr Coroner T. Sanders held the Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZA GREENSALDE who died on Tuesday evening from injuries received in the fire at the Workhouse. Deceased's brother complained that she was removed to a room in which no fire was lit, but Dr Taite said this was best for her. Had deceased been removed to a heated room she would not have lives so long as she did. Death was due to catarrh and pneumonia. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, and added that they considered that all chimneys in such an institution should be kept clean and fit for use at all times, and also that there was neglect in not supplying a fire in the room until the Monday following the fire.

Saturday 3 December 1892, Issue 7922 – Gale Document No. Y3200735688
EXTRAORDINARY FATALITY NEAR WOODBURY - The Inquest. – Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Pilshayes Farm, near Woodbury, on Monday, on the body of WM. SMITH, aged 6, son of GEORGE SMITH. The Rev. W. P. Alford was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The evidence taken showed that the deceased was on his way to school when he went to climb over a gate which he thought to be fixed. In so doing he fell back and pulled the gate on top of him. The unfortunate boy, on being taken from under the gate, was found to be dead. Bessie Smith, daughter of Mark Smith, deposed that she found the body under the gate. She afterwards went and informed the mother of the deceased. Mr Furnival, surgeon, deposed that death was due to dislocation of the neck, through the gate falling with the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and added a rider that the gate should be properly hung.

Saturday 3 December 1892, Issue 7922 – Gale Document No. Y3200735670
CREDITON – Sudden Death. – MR WILLIAM GRANT, a well-known tradesman, expired suddenly on Wednesday morning, being found dead on the floor by his wife. At the Inquest a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

EXETER – Mr H,. W. Gould (Deputy District Coroner) held an inquest at the Turk's Head Inn, St. Thomas, on Tuesday, on the body of BEATRICE LILLY KNAPMAN, aged three months, daughter of WILLIAM KNAPMAN, labourer, of Artisan's Dwellings, St. Thomas. From the evidence given by the mother it appeared that she awoke and found her child by her side dead on Sunday. Mr H. Hunt, surgeon, of St. Thomas, deposed to attending the child when suffering from convulsions on former occasions. When he examined the child on Sunday morning he found there was a decided flattening of the face on the left side, which might have been the result of overlying or lying on the face for a length of time after death. Other than that there was nothing in the appearance of the deceased inconsistent with death from natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

SIDMOUTH – A Child Suffocated. – An Inquest was held at the Manor Concert Hall on Tuesday on the body of WILLIAM JOHN DEAN, eight months old. The evidence showed that death was due to suffocation, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Saturday 3 December 1892, Issue 7922 – Gale Document No. Y3200735665
NERVOUS EXHAUSTION AND SUICIDE – Considerable interest centred in the proceedings of an Inquiry held at 9, Salem-place, St. Sidwell's by Mr Coroner Hooper on Tuesday afternoon, touching the death of EMMA VENN, 51, a single woman, residing with her mother at the above address. The deceased has been unable for the past five or six years, owing to a nervous affection, to follow her employment as a sick and monthly nurse. She has been supported by her mother, an old woman of 81 years of age, whose health has latterly given way, and it is thought that the fact preying upon the mind of the deceased led her to commit the rash act.
JANE VENN, 81, the mother of the deceased and the widow of THOMAS VENN, gardener, said she had been living with her daughter for five years at 9, Salem-place. Deceased was a lady's nurse. She had not been out nursing for five years. She had been attended by Dr Brown for an affliction in her head. He said it was "on the brain and on the nerves." She went to bed at seven on Monday. Neither deceased nor witness slept at all during the night. Deceased sat up a great deal watching witness, as she herself was so ill. Witness got up at seven o'clock and went to get her a cup of tea. When she got into the room she saw deceased laying on the floor on her face and hands. Witness screamed for Mrs Sandford to come, and she came and turned her over, and then she said, "Oh, granny, I think she has broken a blood vessel!" They sent for Dr Brown.
Amelia Sandford, wife of William Henry Sandford, deposed that the deceased had lodged with her twelve months, together with her mother. Deceased had not been out of bed half a dozen times during the last twelve months. Her nerves were affected. Witness saw her the previous evening when she fancied a little drop of light dinner ale. The request was unusual, and she was given a wine glass full. Lately the old lady's health had broken down, and witness had taken tea to deceased until that morning, when being unwell she did not do so. When witness saw her on the floor she turned her over and saw a pool of blood near the upper part of her body. When Dr Brown came he found a corn knife on her breast. She was quite dead when found. Witness could not say what the circumstances of deceased and her mother were. They lived happily together, and witness had done all she could to make them comfortable. She, however, thought deceased was not, owing to her illness, quite right at times. She evidently thought that her mother who had looked after her would go before her. She had said there was nothing but the Workhouse for her if her mother died.
Mr M. L. Brown, surgeon, said he had been the medical attendant of deceased for the last five or six years under the Dispensary. She suffered from congestive attacks in the head. He saw her a fortnight ago at her house. She was in a highly nervous state, and was thoroughly over-wrought. She had been much better lately. He was called that morning. He examined her and saw a pool of blood, and lifting her chin he saw a gash in her throat. There was a knife-case in her left hand, and on her chest a pocket corn knife. Her condition was such when he first saw her, that he ordered knives, scissors, &c., to be kept out of her way. The big artery near the carotid was out. He thought she was led to commit the act through anticipation of her mother's death.
The Jury found that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Saturday 10 December 1892, Issue 7928 – Gale Document No. Y3200753717
A Publican Nearly Cuts His Head Off - A Plymouth publican named JOHN NOTTLE, aged 55, committed suicide on Monday at the Antelope Inn, Plymouth. Deceased had been mentally depressed, and whilst his wife was calling the servant, he nearly severed his head from his body with a razor. At an Inquest held in the evening a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 10 December 1892, Issue 7928 – Gale Document No. Y3200753697
SOUTHMOLTON – The Workhouse Fire. – On Saturday Mr Coroner T. Sanders held an Inquest on the body of a young woman, named EMILY CRANG, who died on Friday evening, from injuries received in the fire at the Workhouse. It was stated that deceased was sixteen years old and was classed as an imbecile. The medical evidence showed that death was due to exhaustion accelerated by burns. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 10 December 1892, issue 7928 – Gale Document No. Y3200753718
FATAL ACCIDENT NEAR BURLESCOMBE – The Inquest. – On Tuesday Mr Deputy Coroner, H. W. Gould held an Inquest at Holcombe Rogus on the body of a man named FLAY, who was on Monday found dead near his master's lime kilns at Whitcott. Evidence was given by two of the deceased's workmates to the effect that he was in the habit of sleeping in out-houses, &c., and by a surgeon to the effect that death was due to asphyxiation from the fumes of the lime kiln. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SUICIDE AT REWE – The Inquest. – At the Parish Room, Rewe, on Tuesday, Mr Deputy Coroner, H. W. Gould held an Inquest on the body of JAMES ELSTON, aged 72, till lately a platelayer on the railway, whose body was found in the river Culm, on Saturday night by a man named Joseph Harding, as reported by us on Monday, Mr Edward Osmond was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Deceased's widow stated that since he was pensioned off by the Railway Company, about six months since, he had been very low in his mind. He had no occasion to go near the river on Saturday night.
P.C. ELSTON, son of the deceased, identified the deceased.
Joseph Harding deposed to finding the deceased's hat and stick on the banks of the Culm in the Rectory grounds.
P.C. Drew said he, with the assistance of several men, dragged the Culm on Saturday evening, and with the assistance of deceased's son all day on Sunday. About five o'clock in the evening of the latter day they found the deceased a short distance from where the hat and stick were found. The water at the spot was about six feet deep. Witness afterwards searched the body and found a handkerchief, some pieces of cord, and a pocket knife. These he produced.
Dr Puddicombe said he examined the body just before the Inquest. It had the appearance usually found in cases of death from drowning, and the lungs were full of water.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 17 December 1892, Issue 7934 – Gale Document No. Y3200753751
ASHBURTON – Inquest. – At an Inquest on Tuesday held by Mr Hacker on the body of a child named SYMS, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally suffocated while in bed with its mother."

BARNSTAPLE – Fatal Burning Accident. – At an Inquest on the body of JOHN HUNGERFORD SNOOK, who died on Sunday from the result of burns, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

ILFRACOMBE – Death from Excessive Drinking. – At an Inquest held here on the body of HERBERT HAINES late a barrister and graduate at Cambridge University, evidence was given to the effect that death was due to excessive drinking, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

OKEHAMPTON – Mr J. D. Prickman held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Okehampton Town Hall, touching the death of ARTHUR RICHARD LEE, of James-street, Okehampton, who, as reported in our Tuesday's impression, died suddenly in the morning. Dr Young said in his opinion death was due to stoppage of the heart's action, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TEIGNMOUTH – The Fatal Accident. – An Inquest was held on Saturday evening on the body of ELIZABETH CLAMPITT, 70 years of age, who fell downstairs fracturing her skull. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 17 December 1892, Issue 7934 – Gale Document No. Y3200753745
MYSTERIOUS DEATH AT KINGSTEIGNTON - The village of Kingsteignton was thrown into a state of great excitement last evening by a report that a murder had been committed. From enquiries made by our reporter, it appears that a pensioner and dealer in rags and bones, named THOMAS HENDERSON, returned home in a drunken condition, and in a quarrel which ensued between him and his wife, he struck her in the abdomen. The woman seems to have fallen to the ground, and her son, a boy of 14 years, went to the door and called out, "Father has killed mother." Several neighbours entered the house and a doctor and the police were sent for. HENDERSON, who was subsequently taken into custody, said his wife had a fit, and he went to fetch some brandy to revive her. The Coroner has been communicated with, but so far there seems to be no evidence as to whether the woman died from the alleged blow or from natural causes. The deceased woman is said to have suffered from a weak heart. HENDERSON was brought before the magistrates this morning and formally remanded.
The Inquest was opened at the Kingsteignton Schoolroom at four o'clock before Mr Hacker. Mr J. Hutchings, Teignmouth, represented the prisoner. Mr Buckland was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Dr Colross said he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased. He found no external marks of violence with the exception of a slight wound on the upper lip. The brain was congested, the blood vessels were unhealthy, and there was fatty degeneration of the heart. He had not finished the examination, and could give no definite opinion as to the cause of death. The Inquiry was adjourned until Tuesday.
The Coroner said he should fine Mr Verity, of Newton, £2, if he could not give a satisfactory reason for being absent from the Inquest after being summoned as a witness.

Saturday 24 December 1892, Issue 7940 – Gale Document No. Y3200753785
THE SUDDEN DEATH AT EXETER – Inquest. – At the City Police Court on Thursday, Mr H. W. Hooper, (Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of MR GEORGE AUGUSTUS FULLER, Post Office surveyor, of The Cedars, Bedford, who died suddenly t St. David's Station on Wednesday, as announced in our issue of that evening. Inspector Shattock watched the case on behalf of the Great Western Railway Company. The Jury, of which Mr Mitchel was Foreman, having viewed the body, Mr P. W. P. Colhoun, medical student, of 7, Palace Square, Upper Norwood, Surrey, gave evidence of identification, stating that the deceased was his uncle, 62 years of age, a widower. He was of temperate habits, and had been official to the Post Office authorities for nearly forty years. He had been unwell for some time. Several witnesses were called, and Mr Moon, surgeon, deposed to examining the body after death. In his opinion deceased died from cardiac syncope.
The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a painful case, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 24 December 1892, Issue 7940 – Gale Document No. Y3200753759
THE SUSPICIOUS CASE – An Inquest was held at the Town Hall, St. Marychurch, on Monday, by Mr S. Hacker on the body of the newly-born female child of a young woman named ELIZA SHORT, which was found under circumstances reported in our issue in the evening. Dr Stott Steele said he was called to see the child, and found it dead. He was of opinion that the child had never breathed, but it might have been born alive. A verdict was given to the effect that the child was stillborn, and the Jury censured Mrs Wood, with whom the girl lodged for her careless and cruel treatment.

Saturday 31 December 1892, Issue 7945 – Gale Document No. Y3200753796
FATAL ACCIDENT TO MR C. J. B. SANDERS – While MR C. J. B. SANDERS, solicitor, of Gandy-street, Exeter, was riding to a meet of the East Devon Foxhounds near Ottery St. Mary on Monday, his horse slipped and the rider was thrown off on his head. He was conveyed to the Ottery St. Mary Cottage Hospital, where it was found that he had sustained a fracture at the base of the skull, and an operation was performed, but we regret to say that he died on Tuesday morning.
MR CHARLES JAMES BARON SANDERS was the son of the late MR JAMES SANDERS, hide merchant of this city, and resided at Pinhoe. He was 40 years of age, and was admitted as a solicitor in 1878, practising in Exeter. He was for some time secretary of the Exeter Charity Organization Society, giving up that post about three months ago, when he was presented with a testimonial. He was also acting Chairman of the Directors of the Victoria Hall Company. Since his admission to the Ottery St. Mary Cottage Hospital he received every attention, but succumbed to his injuries at four o'clock on Tuesday morning.
THE INQUEST – At Ottery Cottage Hospital on Thursday Mr Deputy Coroner C. E. Cox held an Inquest on the body of MR CHARLES JAMES BARON SANDERS, who was fatally injured by falling from his horse on Monday.
Mr Pope (Exeter) appeared on behalf of the relatives.
The Rev. W. H. Dickenson was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Henry Foster Carr, wine merchant, of Exeter, and brother-in-law of the deceased, said MR SANDERS was a solicitor practising in Exeter and residing at Pinhoe. Deceased was unmarried and was born on the 9th December 1852. Witness attended the meeting of the East Devon Foxhounds at Half Way House on Monday. He was not with the deceased at the time of the accident. Deceased proceeded there from his residence at Pinhoe and rode his grey mare. Witness could not say from his knowledge whether the mare was quiet, but he had never seen her do anything wrong. Soon after the hunt started witness heard a call for a doctor and subsequently saw Dr Griffin, of Honiton, and another gentleman go back past him. A short time afterwards Mr Gould, the secretary of the hunt, came up to witness and said, "Carr, you'd better go back. Your brother-in-law has had a bad fall." Witness went back and found the deceased lying on the grass. Deceased was afterwards carried into a cottage. Subsequently witness borrowed a dog-cart from Mr Pickthall and deceased was taken to the hospital.
Thomas Short, coachman to Mr Pickthall, said he witnessed the accident from a distance of about three yards. It occurred on Aylesbeare Common, near an old cottage. Deceased was holding the horse in, and the animal evidently heard the hounds and wished to follow them. The horse stepped on a stone about six inches long - which was imbedded in the ground – and slipped sideways, with the result that MR SANDERS was thrown off and his head came up against the side of the road, a flint striking him in the left eye. The deceased's leg got caught in the reins, and as the horse rose it pulled him over on his back. He drew up his legs, and stretched them out again, but never moved afterwards. The horse was cantering previously to the accident. Dr Evans was the first medical man to arrive, he being on the spot about two minutes after the accident. The witness also expressed an opinion that if the horse had been allowed to go at the pace it wished to the accident would not have happened.
Mr Jones, surgeon, practising at Ottery, deposed to being with the hounds on Monday and to returning to the scene of the accident on hearing a call for a doctor. He found deceased lying on his back, and Drs. Griffin and Evans in attendance. Deceased's collar and tie were unfastened, and blood was running from his nose, his face also being covered with blood. The witness deposed to taking deceased to the Ottery Cottage Hospital and to attending him at that institution. He detailed the injuries sustained by the deceased, and said in his opinion death, which took place at 4.10 a.m. on Tuesday, was due to a fracture of the base of the skull, causing haemorrhage on the brain. An operation known as trepanning was performed by Mr Bankart in the presence of the witness, Mr Perkins and Mr Gray.
The Coroner, in the course of his summing up, said he was sure the relatives of the deceased would have the sympathy of all on that sad occasion.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."
Mr Pope said he wished on behalf of MR SANDERS' relatives, to express the great gratitude felt by them to the authorities of the Hospital for the care bestowed on him.
The Coroner said he was glad to hear Mr Pope's remarks, and he considered that the institution had rendered great services.
A Juryman remarked that they were very proud to have such an institution.

Saturday 31 December 1892, Issue 7945 – Gale Document No. Y3200753829
THE BURNING FATALITY AT ST. THOMAS – Inquest, This Day. – At the Falmouth Inn, St. Thomas this morning Mr Deputy Coroner H. W. Gould held an Inquest touching the death of the woman, MARY ANN LENDON, who as reported in the "Evening Post" last evening was burnt to death owing to the explosion of a paraffin lamp. Mr Burnett was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Edwin Kelley, photographer, of Queen-street, Newton Abbot, identified the body. Deceased resided at St. Thomas, and was unmarried. Witness was deceased's cousin, but had not seen her for three or four years. He heard of her from his brother about five months since. Deceased was about 56 years of age. He knew nothing as to her state of health. He believed she lived alone. Her conduct towards her relatives had been somewhat eccentric of late, she having refused to see them. Witness believed this was owing to her having lived alone so long.
John Crump, groom at Franklin, said he called at deceased's house about ten minutes to ten on Thursday evening for a newspaper which was left there every night for witness's master, Mr Snow. Deceased appeared to be in her usual health, and remarked that there was going to be a change in the weather, as it was not so cold.
John Heale, landlord of the Falmouth Inn, deposed that about eleven o'clock Mr Bulley, barber, came to his house to borrow a ladder, stating that something was wrong with MRS LENDON, as the door was locked. Meanwhile Mr Ancliffe and Mr Trood, the postman, had got a ladder and had looked in the window of MRS LENDON'S house, but neither would go in. Witness then went up the ladder – which Mr Burnett held – and on his getting into the room found that the bed was empty. Mr Trood followed witness in, and they both went downstairs. There was a smell of burning in the house. They found deceased laying on her right side across the front of the doorway, inside the washhouse. Deceased had the bottom of a lamp in her right hand. Witness gave the alarm and P.C. Holloway was on the spot in less than two minutes. A doctor was also sent for. Witness knew the deceased, who generally enjoyed good health.
P.S. Egan said he went to deceased's house with P.C. Holloway shortly after eleven o'clock yesterday morning. He found the body as described by the last witness, and with a paraffin lamp close to the right hand. The bowl of the lamp, which contained oil, was shattered in pieces (some portions of the lamp were here produced by the witness). The top of the lamp was near the back door. There was every appearance of there having been an explosion. Deceased had been fully dressed, but every particle of clothing was burnt off the body, and the centre of the back was completely burnt out. Deceased's bed had been slept in. There was no trace of a struggle. Witness and P.C. Holloway examined the house and found on a shelf in the kitchen a purse containing two half sovereigns, a sixpence, a penny, and a farthing. They also found about thirty pawn tickets and a policy in the Pearl Office for £13, which had been paid up to date.
Dr Hunt, of St. Thomas, said he had examined the body, and there were signs of burning all over it. The deceased's clothes were burnt to ashes although they retained their form to a great extent. On the back where the clothes were thickest the skin was completely burnt through. The witness also said that he thought deceased first became unconscious from some cause and then fell. He founded his idea on the fact that she was lying in a natural position and that had the lamp burst, as had been supposed she would have dropped it. He could not, of course, say that this was so with any degree of certainty.
Mr Kelley asked the witness whether a seizure might have caused death, as two other members of the family had died from that cause.
Dr Hunt said he could not say.
The Jury, after a short discussion, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 7 January 1893, Issue 7951 – Gale Document No. Y3200753833
NEWTON ABBOT – Inquest. – On Wednesday afternoon at the Town Hall an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hacker on the body of the illegitimate child of the daughter of MRS NARRAMORE, of Osborne-street, who died suddenly. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

TEIGNMOUTH – Sudden Death. – At an Inquest held at the London Hotel on Monday, before Mr Coroner Hacker, on the body of a fisherman's son named CHARLES WILLIAM RICE, who was taken ill on Friday and died on Saturday, evidence was given by Dr Bartlett to the effect that death was due to inflammation of the membranes of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 7 January 1893, Issue 7951 – Gale Document No. Y3200753853
SERIOUS CASE AT SIDMOUTH – Verdict of Wilful Murder against a Domestic. – Mr C. Cox, of Honiton, held an Inquest at the Commercial Hotel, Sidmouth, on Monday afternoon into the circumstances attending the death of the illegitimate child of ROSALIND RICHARDS, a domestic servant. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against RICHARDS. The alleged crime was stated to have been committed on Saturday at Mount Pleasant.

Saturday 7 January 1893, Issue 7951 – Gale Document No. Y3200753847
THE BURNING FATALITY AT EXMOUTH – This morning Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest at the South Western Hotel, Exmouth, touching the death of MARY BAKER, spinster, of that town, who, as reported in the "Evening Post" of last evening, was found yesterday burned to death in her house in Manchester-street.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and several of them expressed an opinion that the house in which deceased lived was a disgrace to Exmouth.

Saturday 14 January 1893, Issue 7957 – Gale Document No. Y3200753899
FATAL ACCIDENT NEAR EXETER – Inquest, This Day. – At the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning Mr Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM VINNICOMBE PAYNE, who died at the above institution. The Jury, of which Mr W. Stokes was Foreman, having viewed the body, EMMA PAYNE, wife of deceased gave evidence of identification, stating that her husband resided at Exminster, was a labourer aged 53 years, and on the 3rd January was taken to the Hospital in consequence of an injury he received at Double Locks. Samuel Blake, labourer of Exminster said on the day in question he was at work with the deceased at Double Locks cutting off tops of elm trees that had been felled. They were engaged together with a cross-cut saw and subsequently while throwing some of the wood over the hedge a piece struck deceased on the chest, and then on his left thigh. The timber which fell on him was about six inches thick. He had not been drinking, except a little for his dinner. When struck, deceased fell, but assistance was forthcoming and he was conveyed to the Hospital, accompanied by witness. By a Juror: The wood was about eight feet in length, and it overbalanced. Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon at the Hospital, gave evidence as to receiving the deceased into the Institution on the evening of the 3rd January suffering from a fractured left thigh. There were no other signs of injury. He was attended to in the usual way, but he gradually began to show signs of peritonitis. He died on January 12th. Witness had made a post mortem examination. There was extensive peritonitis but no rupture of any organ could be found. In his opinion death was probably due to the rupture with escape at the time of the accident to the intestine which afterwards healed up. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that no blame was attached to anyone.

Saturday 14January 1893, Issue 7957 – Gale Document No. Y3200753866
WOODBURY – Fatal Accident. – Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at Teignmouth on Tuesday touching the death of WILLIAM JOHN PIKE, a labourer, of Woodbury, who died from injuries received through being crushed to death by a tree falling on him. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 21 January 1893, Issue 7963 – Gale Document No. Y3200753902
NORTHTAWTON – The Suicide. – An Inquest was held at the Market Hall on Wednesday on the body of JANE PADDON, who jumped out of a bedroom window on Thursday last. A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Saturday 21 January 1893, Issue 7963 – Gale Document No. Y3200753937
At the Inquest of P.C. BAINES, the constable whose body was found in Sutton Pool, Plymouth, on Thursday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", a rider being added to the effect that the Corporation or the Sutton Harbour Improvement Company should at once take steps to make the place safe.

Saturday 21 January 1893, Issue 7963 – Gale Document No. Y3200753913
SUDDEN DEATH IN AN EXETER CHURCH – The Inquest. A Curious Coincidence. – On Tuesday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court, touching the death of CHARLES HENRY TUPMAN, master mariner of this city, who died suddenly whilst attending Divine Service at St. Petrock's Church on Sunday morning.
Arthur Bromley Sanders, auctioneer and surveyor, of 50, Queen-street, identified the body, and stated that deceased was sixty-two years of age on the 12th of March, 1892. Deceased was married, but had been absent from his wife about 14 or 15 years. He resided with his sister, MRS J. RAMSON. Witness understood that deceased was subject to epileptic fits.
William Callaway, plumber, of Parliament-street, and sexton at St. Petrock's Church, said he saw deceased enter the church last Sunday evening. MR TUPMAN was always very early, and on this occasion entered before the service commenced and took a seat about the middle of the building. Witness said "Good evening" to the deceased, and then went to the vestry, where he stayed about a minute. On returning to the church witness saw the deceased's head had fallen forward on to his breast. Witness went to him and lifted up his head, and as soon as he could get assistance got some water and sent for a doctor. Witness should say deceased was perfectly dead at this time. As soon as the doctor came the body was removed and taken on the ambulance to deceased's late residence. Just after MR TUPMAN died, the Rev. W. David arrived at the church and said some prayers over the deceased.
Dr John Raglan Thomas said he considered death to have been due to cardiac syncope. He thought deceased had been subject to epileptic fits, but there was no evidence, in any way, of his having had one on this occasion.
The Coroner inquired if St. Petrock's Church was properly warmed and ventilated, and remarked that it was curious that two deaths – those of MR TUPMAN and Mr Fouracre – should have occurred in the same church.
Mr Callaway and Mr Sanders both assured the Coroner that the church was a very comfortable one, and a Juryman remarked that the death of Mr Fouracre occurred about five years ago.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 21 January 1893, Issue 7963 – Gale Document No. Y3200753908
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – The Inquest. – On Thursday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at 49, Howell-road, touching the death of MARY COLLINGS, wife of a cab proprietor, who resides at 48 Howell-road. Mr Medland was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
HARRY AUGUSTUS COLLINGS, husband of the deceased, identified the body, and said his wife was 40 years of age last October. Witness last saw deceased alive about quarter to eight o'clock the previous morning, when she was in bed and appeared to be in her usual health. Witness usually went home once or twice during the day, but did not do so that day. About nine o'clock in the evening Mr Palmer, a neighbour, came to witness and told him he thought his wife had had a fainting fit. Witness went home immediately, but on his arriving there his wife was dead. He had never heard his wife complain. By the Foreman: Deceased had never had fits.
Bessie Palmer, wife of William Henry Palmer, postman, of 49, Howell-road, said she had been in the habit of seeing the deceased daily. On Wednesday about two o'clock witness and deceased were watching a military funeral pass, and on witness saying she had a bad cold deceased remarked that she felt faint. About nine o'clock in the night deceased's niece came to witness and said her aunt looked very queer. Witness went to MRS COLLINGS'S house and found deceased sitting in a chair unconscious. Witness lifted deceased's head up and spoke to her, but she only gave three gasps and died in witness's arms. Dr M. L. Brown, said he had attended deceased for some years, and her general health was good. He was called to see her in the evening, but on his arrival she was dead. He considered death was due to failure of the heart's action, he should think owing to a clot of blood or something of the sort. By a Juryman: Witnessing a funeral might have had some effect upon the deceased, especially as she lost a child a short time since. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." Deceased leaves several young children.

Saturday 21 January 1893, Issue 7963 – Gale Document No. Y3200753909
SUFFOCATED BY A PIECE OF ORANGE – The Inquest. – At the Exeter Workhouse on Tuesday Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body of ELIZABETH LIVERTON an inmate, 65 years of age. Mr G. Sweet was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Emily Batchelor, nurse at the Workhouse, said the deceased had been a patient of the Workhouse Hospital since June, 1892. She was the widow of WILLIAM LIVERTON, a tailor, who, previous to his death, carried on business in Paris-street. She had been under medical treatment since her arrival. On Monday afternoon witness was called to the ward at three o'clock, being told that the deceased had a piece of orange in her throat. Deceased, who was in bed, was unable to speak. Witness tried to reach the orange, but could not. A medical man was immediately sent for, but on his arrival deceased was dead. Witness had observed that she swallowed everything with difficulty. She was blind, and had not been in good health for some time.
John James Bevan, porter, said the deceased was admitted in the house on June 20th, 1892, between nine and ten o'clock at night, being brought by the police. She was taken to the hospital.
Dr Woodman said he had known deceased for a great number of years, and had attended her since she had been an inmate at the Workhouse. Witness came in the Workhouse on Monday afternoon, and was asked to go to the hospital. On his arrival he found the deceased in bed dead. the nurse told witness that she had swallowed a piece of orange. He tried to feel the obstruction with his fingers, but did not succeed. Witness had made a post mortem examination, and found a piece of orange (produced) which blocked the wind pipe. Death was due to suffocation caused by the orange.
Catherine Crook, wardswoman, said on the day in question deceased asked for an orange, which witness peeled for her. She saw the deceased take a small piece and made a noise in her throat. Witness found the deceased was choked, and immediately sent for the nurse.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Suffocation."

Saturday 21 January 1893, Issue 7963 – Gale Document No. Y3200753923
INQUEST IN EXETER – At the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of MARY SUSAN ROWDEN, an infant. Mr Thomas Martin was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr E. W. Collings, a Juror, said he wished to affirm according to the provisions of the new Act of Parliament, and the Coroner swore him separately. BESSIE ROWDEN, wife of SAMUEL ROWDEN, a plumber, living at Northernhay-street, said the deceased was three days old. Mr A. A. Mackeith, surgeon, who was called to see the child, said he was of opinion that death was due to suffocation. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

A second Inquest was held on VIOLET EMILY SHORT, another infant. Emma Austin, wife of a labourer, residing at 11 Morgan's-square, Paris-street, gave evidence of identification, and said the child was aged three weeks. It had been in good health since birth. That morning, about half-past six, witness was called to go to MRS SHORT'S room. On her arrival she found the child to be dead. Dr Arthur Kempe, who affirmed, said he was called to see the deceased. In his opinion death was the result of infantile convulsions, caused by gastric intestinal irritation, due to an attack of white-mouth. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 28 January 1893, Issue 7969 – Gale Document No. Y3200753959
TORQUAY NEWS – An Accident Proves Fatal. – Without regaining consciousness, the man JOHN COLLINGS, who fell down a flight of stairs, died at the Torbay Temporary Hospital this morning about four o'clock. The Coroner has been communicated with.

Saturday 4 February 1893, Issue 7975 – Gale Document No. Y3200753976
ASHBURTON – Sudden Death. – A painfully sudden death occurred here on Saturday evening. MARY BARNETT, aged 48, wife of a labourer named JAMES BARNETT, had been preparing the body of WILLIAM NOON – at the Inquest on whom a Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" – for interment, and on subsequently reaching her home, a few houses away, sat down on a chair and expired. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause of death.

SOUTHMOLTON – The Recent Fatal Accident. – At an Inquest held on Tuesday by Mr Coroner Bromham on the body of JOHN MUXWORTHY, aged 59, boot and shoe maker, who was killed in a trap accident last week, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TIVERTON – Suicide. – At an Inquest held on Wednesday on the body of WILLIAM GOLLOP, 52, single, labourer, who cut his throat with a pocket knife in a field at Uffculme, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 11 February 1893, Issue 7981 – Gale Document No. Y3200754012
BARNSTAPLE – At the Inquest on the body of MR KENNEDY, an artist, whose death we recorded on Monday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

TORQUAY – Drowned in a Bath. – On Monday evening an Inquiry was conducted by Mr Coroner Hacker concerning MR JOHN FREDERICK LEWIS JETTER, 59, mechanical engineer, of Bridgetown, Totnes, who was on Saturday found dead in the bath-room at Sealawn, Beacon-terrace. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

UFFCULME – The Feeding of Infants. – An Inquest was held on Monday at the Commercial Hotel on the body of FRANCES MAY WYATT. It appeared that the infant, which was born in November, had been fed chiefly on soaked bread and biscuits with milk and sugar. The deceased, it was stated, only weighed 5 lbs., whereas the normal weight of a child of that age was 16 lb. or 20 lb. Mr Slack, surgeon, attributed death to inanition, the digestive organs being unable to assimilate the food. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Saturday 11 February 1893, Issue 7981 – Gale Document No. Y3200754028
TEIGNMOUTH – Inquest. – Yesterday at the Queen's Hotel an Inquest was held by Mr Sydney Hacker (District Coroner) on the body of the REV. ROBERT DIXON, D.D., Vicar of Aylesbeare, who, as previously reported, died suddenly on Wednesday night. The medical testimony showed that death was due to the neck being broken, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 11 February 1893, Issue 7981 – Gale Document No. Y3200754025
INQUEST IN EXETER – An Inquest was held this morning at the Devon and Exeter Hospital touching the death of SUSAN STEENS, 62, of Paul-street. JAMES STEVENS, son of the deceased, gave evidence as to her falling against a bedstead, and complaining of pain in her back. Dr Cutcliffe, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said she was admitted to that institution on the 19th January, and died yesterday morning. In his opinion death was due to consumption, and was not accelerated by the accident. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

SUICIDE OF AN OLD MAN IN EXETER – A Sad Case. – Residents in the vicinity of Frog-street, in the West Quarter of the city, were this morning startled by the intelligence that an old and respected inhabitant named JOHN PILL, aged about 63, a turner, whose wife keeps a sweet shop in Frog-street, had committed suicide by hanging himself. The deceased left his home about seven o'clock this morning. Contrary to his usual practice he omitted to light the fire and went out without his walking stick, a couple of circumstances which caused his wife some apprehension. As he did not return she became more uneasy, and at quarter past nine went across to the shop of Mr William May, shoemaker, and stated the unusual conditions of his disappearance. She went away, and returning in about a quarter of an hour, she asked May if he would go up to a loft at the rear of Mrs Norrish's premises, which the deceased had formerly rented as a workshop. He immediately complied with the request, and found the unfortunate man hanging by a grass rope from a beam. The chair upon which he had stood had been knocked over. Deceased's toes were touching the floor, but he was quite dead, and from the livid appearance of the face had been so for some time. The witness ran across to Mr Baker's, of the Queen's Head and called out two men named Pulman and Emmett, who returned with May to the loft and assisted to cut down the body. A police officer was sent for, and also Dr McKeith, of St. Thomas's, who could only pronounce life to be extinct. The officer, P.C. Gooding, searched the body and found 12s. in silver and 3d in copper. The cause of the rash act was undoubtedly illness. The deceased has suffered from heart disease for a long time, and for the past three years has been unable to work. Sympathy is expressed with the wife and family.
THE INQUEST. – was held at the Police Station this afternoon, before the Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper). Mr Webber was Foreman of the Jury. MARY JANE PILL, the widow, said the deceased was between 63 and 64 years of age. She last saw him alive when he went out at 7.30. The witness proceeded to corroborate the above statement. William May gave evidence as to finding the body in the loft. There was an attempt on the part of one or two Jurymen to upbraid the witness because he went off for assistance and did not cut the deceased down. The Coroner said he thought the witness had given his evidence very fairly. Henry Pulman spoke as to cutting down the body with Mr May's assistance. Dr McKeith said death was due to strangulation, and the Jury's verdict was in accordance with this testimony. The Jury expressed a vote of condolence with the widow.

Saturday 4 March 1893, Issue 7999 – Gale Document No. Y3200754151
SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EXETER LANDLORD – An Inquest was held on Thursday at the Greyhound Inn, Paris-street, on the body of CHARLES SPILLER, 60, landlord of the house. SARAH LILA SPILLER, daughter, said that she knocked at her father's bedroom door that morning, and getting no response attempted to enter, but was unable to, as his body was as she afterwards found, lying against the door.
Alfred Whiteway said he opened the door and found the deceased on the floor with his face covered with blood. Dr A. Steele-Perkins said he attended deceased several years ago for fits. MR SPILLER had apparently fallen against a chest of drawers, which would account for the blood on his face. In his opinion death was caused by a fit arising from a congested state of the brain. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 18 March 1893, Issue 8011 – Gale Document No. Y3200754212
NEWTON – Fatal Accident. – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest on Monday afternoon touching the death of AGNES FROST, of Beaconsfield-terrace, who died from injuries received through falling downstairs on Saturday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and censured the husband of the deceased for not obtaining medical assistance till the morning after the accident.

SIDMOUTH – The Drowning Case. – At the Commercial Hotel on Monday Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest on the body of FREDERICK ALBERT REYNOLDS, aged three years and four months, who was found drowned in the mill stream on Friday. The Jury, who returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", expressed an opinion that the place was a very dangerous one and ought to be railed off.

Saturday 18 March 1893, Issue 8011 – Gale Document No. Y3200754193
SUICIDE AT BAMPTON – The Inquest. – On Wednesday Mr Deputy Coroner W. H. Gould held an inquest at Bampton touching the death of JAMES WILLIAMS, tailor. Ellen Rowe, wife of Thomas Rowe, labourer, identified the body, and said the deceased was 72 years of age, and had resided with her. Last Monday she left home to go to work at eight o'clock and deceased was then in bed, there being also in the house witness's daughter and son. Deceased had been ill, and was rather low-spirited. When he had been in dreadful pain she had heard him say that he wished someone would cut his head off. Florence Ellen Rowe, daughter of the last witness, deposed to seeing the deceased come downstairs on Monday morning just before nine, and subsequently take a pistol and flask he possessed and go upstairs. She asked him for fun if he was going to shoot himself, and he said "No." She afterwards heard the report of the pistol and a noise of something falling. She went up and saw deceased on the floor, and then fetched a neighbour. There was no one in the house but witness and deceased at the time. The Jury found a verdict of "Suicide whilst not of Sound Mind."

Saturday 1 April 1893, Issue 8022 – Gale Document No. Y3200754280
TAVISTOCK – The Sudden Death. – At an Inquest before Mr R. R. Rodd on Monday, touching the death of HENRY JOHN EDWARDS, 61. Dr Smith deposed that death was due to syncope, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 1 April 1893, Issue 8022 – Gale Document No. Y3200754290
TEIGNMOUTH – Inquest. – A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held on Thursday on the body of ALBERT BENDIERE, aged 16, who was found drowned on Wednesday.

Saturday 1 April 1893, Issue 8022 – Gale Document No. Y3200754277
SUICIDE AT WONFORD – An Inquest was held at the Gardener's Arms Inn, South Wonford, on Monday by Mr H. W. Gould, touching the death of THOMAS VICKERY, 73, formerly a gardener, who cut his throat on Saturday week last. Mr F. Lavers was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
ELIZABETH VICKERY, daughter of the deceased, said on the day in question, as he did not come downstairs, she went up about quarter past eight and found him kneeling with his face on the bed. She went downstairs again, and not hearing him, again went up and found him sitting on the bed. She asked him why he did not come down. He said, "Never mind, I've nearly finished myself now." She then saw that he had cut his throat. On Thursday he said to witness "The Devil put it into my head to take away my life, but God Almighty has took it out of his hands and given me time to repent. I am very thankful." She asked him whether it was her fault and he replied "You! No, don't grieve anybody by saying such a thing." He then asked whether anyone had said it was her fault, and on her answering in the affirmative he said it was a very great shame. Answering the Coroner witness said people had stated that she had driven him to it, which was not true. Some little time after she found he had cut his throat, she found a razor on a shelf, with blood on it. Deceased had often threatened to commit suicide, and witness did not think he had been quite in his right mind for some time. On Thursday he told witness that the reason he committed suicide was that he was in such agonies of pain he did not know what to do.
Emma Shorland said on Saturday, the 18th, the last witness came to her house and asked her to see deceased. She went to the house and found him in bed. She asked him why he had cut his throat, and he replied, "I wish I'd finished myself, I want to go to Whipton."
P.C. Woollacott, stationed at Heavitree, said he was with the deceased on Thursday. He told witness he cut his windpipe because he had such a dreadful pain in his stomach, and he thought it would ease it. Dr Garrett, who took the oath in Scotch fashion, said the incised wound in deceased's throat was from 3 ½ to 4 inches long, the windpipe being severed about half way across. Death was due, in his opinion, to failure of the heart's action accelerated by the wound. He would not say the wound was the immediate cause of death.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 1 April 1893, Issue 8022 – Gale Document No. Y3200754275
THE TAVISTOCK MURDER – Execution of WILLIAM WILLIAMS.
The Inquest. - The Inquiry took place that morning at eleven o'clock before the Coroner, Mr W. Burrow. Mr James Tucker was Foreman of the Jury, which was composed as follows: Philip Rousham, Robert Bradley, Richard Stokes, senr., Richard Stokes, junr., H. D. Clogg, H. Stickland, W. J. T. Berry, William Greaves, Horace M. Milton, James Roberts, James Stokes, James Tucker and S. Diggins.
The Coroner in a few opening remarks said he was thankful to say that executions were not so frequent in the present day as in former years. The last execution which actually took place in Exeter Gaol was that of Annie Tooke on the 11th of August, 1879 and the attempted execution of John Lee took place on the 23rd of February, 1885. The Coroner then made reference to the Act of Parliament of 1868 under which private executions took place, and recited the several sections governing the duties of a Jury making Inquiry as to the cause of death.
The Jury then proceeded to view the body, which was lying in a common black coffin, placed on trestles near the scaffold. The deceased was dressed in a grey coat and waistcoat – apparently that which he wore at the trial. He had a black cap on his head, and had on a dark pair of trousers, and also boots – in fact, he was fully dressed with the exception of his collar and necktie. He still wore the flesh coloured patch over his right eye. The body – which was viewed by the reporters as well as the Jury – presented a calm and placid appearance. The neck was somewhat discoloured, especially on the right side, and it was also swollen as if the rope was tightened principally at that part. The body was also livid in several places.
The gallows was situated under a shed with a slated roof. The woodwork was entirely new, as was also the rope, which was about an inch in diameter. The noose was covered with leather. The lever, trap doors, and rope having been examined, the Jury returned to the Inquest room.
The first witness was the Governor of the Gaol, Captain Pennethorne, who said that the deceased man, WILLIAM WILLIAMS, was indicted on a charge of murder at the last Assizes at Exeter, and was sentenced to death. He (the Governor) was present when judgment of death was executed and carried into effect within the walls of the prison. The body which had been viewed by the Jury was that of WILLIAM WILLIAMS, who was about 19 years of age and a bachelor. The declaration required by Section 4 of the Capital Punishment Act had been duly signed. There was no statement which he wished to make. Sentence was duly carried out in proper form.
A Juryman: What was the drop?
The Governor: Seven feet. (To the Coroner): In my opinion execution was carried out speedily and properly, with decency and in order.
The next witness called was Mr John Mortimer.
The Coroner: You are the surgeon of Her Majesty's Prison at Exeter? - I am.
Were you present at the execution of the deceased within the walls of this prison this morning at eight o'clock? - I was.
In your opinion was judgment of death duly executed without any obstruction whatever? - None whatever.
Have you since examined the body? - I have, and I find it to be the identical body of the deceased WILLIAM WILLIAMS and that he was dead.
Have you signed the certificate of death as required by section 4 of the Capital Punishment Amendment Act, 1868? – I have. Sentence of death was carried out in a proper manner, and that death was instantaneous.
The Foreman: How was his health on the whole? - Very good.
No other question being asked the medical gentleman, the Coroner said: Gentlemen, You have heard the evidence given with regard to the execution of WILLIAM WILLIAMS, which is all the evidence necessary for you to have before you, and your verdict will be in the usual form.
The Jury returned a verdict in the usual form, namely: That WILLIAM WILLIAMS was a prisoner in her Majesty's Prison at Exeter under sentence of death for wilful murder, that judgment of death was duly executed and carried into effect upon the said prisoner within the walls of the prison on the 28th March, 1893. The Inquest was held by the Coroner in whose jurisdiction the prison belonged, and that the Inquest was held within twenty-four hours afterward, and that the body was the identical body of the said WILLIAM WILLIAMS."

FATAL ACCIDENT IN EXETER – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Wednesday by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, touching the death of WILLIAM HARVEY KEEN, 59, painter, who died at the hospital on Tuesday morning. MARY KEEN, widow of the deceased, gave evidence to the effect that her husband had been subject to giddiness. Robert Hawthorne, joiner, said he was at work on a building at Palace Gage on Monday morning. Deceased, who was working at the same place, was walking across a plank when he fell a distance of about nineteen feet on to some stone steps. He was at once taken to the hospital. Mr Andrew, house surgeon at the hospital, said deceased died at about four o'clock from fracture of the skull and cerebral haemorrhage. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 8 April 1893, Issue 8028 – Gale Document No. Y3200754317
NEWTON ABBOT – Inquest. – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at the Marsh school, on Tuesday on the body of a widow, named WHITFIELD, who it appeared was partially paralysed and fell off a chair, breaking her thigh. A verdict of death from "Natural Causes, hastened by the Accident," was returned.

Saturday 8 April 1893, Issue 8028 – Gale Document No. Y3200754324
INQUEST AT BROADCLYST, THIS AFTERNOON – An Inquest was held at Brockhill Farm, Broadclyst, this afternoon touching the death of WILLIAM PYE, who was found dead with the palm of his right hand cut through with a hedge hook. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

THE FATAL ACCIDENT IN EXETER – Inquest, This Evening. – At the Devon and Exeter Hospital this evening an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper touching the death of MRS COOMBE, wife of the late MR REUBEN COOMBE, formerly a dairyman of Whipton, who met with her death through being wheeled over on Monday. The deceased's brother gave evidence, and stated she was in the habit of delivering milk in Exeter every morning. Mr Popman, builder, of Paris-street, said on the day in question he saw deceased delivering milk in Paris-street. After she had served a customer she was getting into her trap when the horse bolted and she fell under the cart, one of the wheels passing over her legs. She was immediately taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Evidence was given by the house surgeon of the hospital, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 8 April 1893, Issue 8028 – Gale Document No. Y3200754309
INQUEST IN EXETER, THIS DAY. A Scene. – At the Exeter Police Court today Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body of FLORENCE MAY BROWN, aged twelve months, daughter of MARY BROWN and FRANK WILLIAM BROWN, of the Golden Ball Inn, St. Mary Arches-street, and who died about seven o'clock this morning in her cradle, before the arrival of the doctor. MRS BROWN gave evidence of the child's sudden illness and death, and in answer to the Coroner said it was insured. Inspector Hart, who watched the case on behalf of the N.SP.C.C., desiring to have a question put to the witness on this point, transmitted a piece of paper containing the question to one of the Jurymen, when several members of the Jury rose in an indignant manner and protested against such a course, at the same time asking the Coroner's opinion as to wether anything could be so passed from an outsider who they maintained had no business there. Mr Hart desired to explain, but the Jurymen interrupted, notwithstanding appeals from the Coroner. Mr Trapnell (a Juror): I propose that the Inspector leave the Court. He has no right here. – Another Juror: What has this to do with the gentleman outside? – The Inspector: I will ask the Coroner to put the question, then. The Coroner (to the Inspector): You must not interfere with the Jury. – Mr Trapnell: You have no business here. – The Coroner: It was not a right thing. – The Foreman (Mr Honey): I think the question should have been put to you. – Mr Trapnell (to Mr Hart): You have nothing whatever to do with the Jury. – The Coroner: But you must recollect this is a public Court, Mr Trapnell. (Hear, hear) - A Juror: I think it is perfectly right to pass it to a Juryman. (Cries of "No, no, he has not a perfect right.") - Mr Honey: I am Foreman of the Jury, and I hope my brother Jurymen will just keep themselves quiet. I think if any question was to be asked it should e put to you (the Coroner). (Her, hear.) – The Coroner: And not to the Jury. – Mr Hart: I apologise if I have made a mistake. The matter then dropped and Dr Brash said the child's death was due to congestion of the lungs. Answering a Juror, Dr Brash said he had no right to give a certificate this morning, for when he saw the child a month ago it was quite well with the exception of the vaccination. The Coroner agreed that it was necessary that an Inquest should be held. A Juror: It is time things are altered. It is done other places. The Jury eventually returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 8 April 1893, Issue 8028 – Gale Document No. Y3200754308
INQUEST AT THE PRISON – An Inquest was held at the County Prison today by Mr Deputy Coroner H. W. Gould touching the death of HERBERT WELLER, a private in the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade. Captain L. P. Pennethorne, Governor of the Prison, said deceased was convicted by court martial at Devonport on the 12th September last of insubordination, and sentenced to one year's hard labour, and received into the Prison in December. He was reported dangerously ill on the 10th March, and died on the 6th instant. Dr Mortimer, surgeon at the Prison, said deceased was admitted into the Infirmary on the 3rd March suffering from a nervous affection of the heart. Cases of the kind were very rare indeed. The cause of death was heart failure and congestion of the lungs. George Hunns, night watchman at the Prison, also gave evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 8 April 1893, Issue 8028 – Gale Document No. Y3200754299
THE FATAL ACCIDENT IN THE CANAL – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at Double Locks on Thursday, touching the death of BENJAMIN RATTENBURY LANG, 10, who, as was reported in our issue of the same evening, was drowned in the Canal, near Double Locks, on Tuesday. Evidence was given by EDWARD GEORGE LANG, Benjamin Thomas Crabb – who rescued two occupants of the boat, Samuel Hutchings, and Mr C. J. Vlieland, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."
The deceased, we understand, was insured last September in the Refuge Assurance Company and in consequence of the accident clause the parents will receive £20.

Saturday 15 April 1893, Issue 8034 – Gale Document No. Y3200754356
INQUEST IN EXETER – At the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of a naval pensioner named WILLIAM THOMAS, of Sowton, who was found in an unconscious state in the road at Sowton on Tuesday. He was removed to the Hospital, where he died the next morning. The evidence of the house surgeon went to show that death was due to natural causes, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 15 April 1893, Issue 8034 – Gale Document No. Y3200754357
THE BATHING FATALITY AT BABBACOMBE - Inquest.
The Want of a Public Mortuary at St. Marychurch. – At St. Marychurch Town Hall on Thursday Mr Sidney Hacker held an Enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE HENRY JOSLAND , who, as previously reported was drowned on Sunday morning last whilst bathing. Mr James Lee was chosen Foreman of the Jury. When the body was viewed it was seen that the face of the deceased was considerably discoloured and the forehead swollen and bruised. SAMUEL JOSLAND, labourer, living at 18, Garwell Cottages, Westhill, said the deceased was his son. He was 17 years of age on February 17th last, and the last time he saw him was on Sunday morning.
Francis Joseph Vosper of 1, Southdown Cottages, St. Marychurch, said that on Sunday morning last by arrangement he went with deceased to have a bathe, having called him about 9.45. On their way down to the beach some remarks were passed about the wether, he (witness) saying that he would not swim that morning because the sea was so rough. However, they undressed, and witness stood in the surf. Deceased, however, went out further and said "Oh, isn't it fine out here; come on out." Witness told deceased to come in, but he would not. He swam out about 100 yards and then turned to come ashore, but on reaching the breakers deceased said he could not come in. Witness tried to help him, but the waves were too high, and he fetched a rope, By the time he returned, however, deceased had disappeared. In answer to the Coroner, witness said he thought JOSLAND was seized with cramp, but when he left to get the rope he was still swimming. The place where they bathed was especially dangerous when rough weather prevailed. Ernest Davey deposed that on the morning of the accident he was stood near Thomas's boathouse. He saw deceased disappear, and he ran for the coastguard. George Huge, fisherman, gave evidence as to the recovery of the body on Wednesday morning. In answer to the Coroner, witness said he believed that the body had not been moved from the spot where he sank. Elijah Hearn, coastguardsman, deposed to seeing the body of the deceased a quarter of an hour after the accident. The Coroner, in summing up, said it appeared that Vosper did what he could to save his friend, but it did not seem to him that the beach was particularly dangerous. He then referred to the outhouse in which the body was lying, saying that it was a dirty place, but he was given to understand that the Local Board, in consequence of riders attached to verdicts of different juries, were taking steps to erect a mortuary, and he hoped that a proper place would be built in the town. Mr Moxhay (a member of the Board) said that the question of a mortuary had been brought before the notice of the Board. The Jury then returned a verdict of "Accidentally drowned whilst bathing," adding a rider calling the attention of the Local Board to the want of a public mortuary for St. Marychurch.

Saturday 15 April 1893, Issue 8034 – Gale Document No. Y3200754349
THE DISTRESSING RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT PINHOE – Inquest, This Day. – This morning an Inquest was held by Mr Deputy Coroner Gould touching the death of JOHN HATCH COAKER, carpenter and joiner, who met his death yesterday under circumstances already reported.
Mr Slessor was Foreman of the Jury.
John Finning, of Pinhoe, a builder, said the deceased was in his employ as a carpenter and joiner. He went to dinner at one o'clock usually, but on Friday he left at five minutes past one.
Walter Smale, of Pinhoe, carpenter, in the employ of the last witness said he left work with the deceased at five minutes past one. They had to go over the crossing. The deceased went to the gate first. Just as he (witness) got his hand on the gate and was looking at some horses he saw the deceased going across. As witness caught sight of the train he saw deceased leap to try and get out of the way. When they got to the gates there was a train in the station – the one from Exeter. To a Juryman: Deceased was perfectly sober. He had had no intoxicating liquor that morning.
Mr Sessor bore testimony to the excellent character of deceased.
Arthur Tidball, a signalman, said he was off duty yesterday. He had come by the 1.5 train from Exeter. Deceased saw the train coming in and he attempted to get out of the way, but was knocked down, being caught by the off buffer. As a signalman he had no instructions to keep the small gates locked or unlocked; it was left to their discretion. He was not on duty that day.
John Hutchings, station master, said he did not see the accident. The 1.5 had been given orders to start, and was leaving. He went down to the wicket gate to collect tickets. Immediately he got there he heard a shout. At the same instant he looked around and saw the engine of the down train and a man's hat flying over the smoke box. Then he saw the poor fellow rolled along under the engine. The down train was five or ten minutes late. The previous witness was off duty.
George Bishop, Yeovil, the driver of the down train, said they were ten minutes late at Pinhoe. He did not see the deceased until he saw them picking him up. He blew the whistle some little distance away, as his mate said there was a man in the way, and he gave it a second touch. Owing to the 1.5 moving out and the other noise it might not have taken the effect it would otherwise.
John Furze, relieving signalman, said he was on duty yesterday. He did not see the deceased. When he gave the departure of the up train he heard someone say, "Oh, my God, look at that poor man under the train." Afterwards he saw him. The small gates were unlocked to accommodate those who wanted to come in and those to go out. Previous to the arrival of the train the gates were locked.
Dr Brash said he examined the body and found extensive injuries to the top of the skull and brain. The left foot was completely crushed. Death must have been instantaneous.
The Coroner said it was clear how the deceased met his death. He (Mr Gould) could not see from the evidence that anyone was to blame. On the other hand it was open to the Jury to condemn the system which appeared to be in existence with regard to the small gates. It was a system which he thought was tantamount to a death trap, seeing that a large number of trains went through the station in a day.
The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death", and considered that it was due to the defective construction of the station. They did not condemn any official, but recommended that a subway be constructed.

Saturday 22 April 1893, Issue 8040 – Gale Document No. Y3200754398
CULLOMPTON – The Fatal Accident. – At the Inquest yesterday touching the death of ALBERT HAWKINGS, 17, who received fatal injuries while working at Longmore Paper Mills on Friday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," exonerated the owners of the mill from any blame, and expressed their sympathy with the parents of the deceased.

KINGSWEAR – The Singular Death of a Lad. – At the Inquest on the body of PERCY SKINNER, 14, who died under peculiar circumstances on Wednesday, the father of the deceased, a signalman at Torquay Station, said the lad, who was employed at the bookstall at Kingswear Station, had been despondent, saying he was some money short. Dr Kendal thought the wound in the chest was hardly sufficient to cause death. The heart's action might have failed owing to the water getting into the lungs. The Inquest was adjourned until Tuesday, Dr Kendal being directed to make a post-mortem examination.

Saturday 22 April 1893, Issue 8040 – Gale Document No. Y3200754395
INQUEST IN EXETER – At Exe Island this morning Mr Coroner Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of FRANCIS LEWIS DOWNEY, aged four months. MARY DOWNEY, wife of LEWIS DOWNEY, a carpenter, identified the body as that of her infant child who died last night between eight and nine o'clock. Mr A. C. Roper, surgeon, gave evidence to the effect that death was due to convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 22 April 1893, Issue 8040 – Gale Document No. Y3200754414
EXETER – Inquest. – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at 21 Elmside, Blackboy-road, as to the death of ANN CALLAWAY, 74, who died on Saturday. Mr Edward Steele-Perkins stated that death was due to failure of the heart's action, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 22 April 1893, Issue 8040 – Gale Document No. Y3200754421
SUSPICIOUS CASE NEAR CHUDLEIGH – Mr Hacker held an Inquest near Chudleigh, on Thursday night on the body of the newly-born illegitimate child of BESSIE COOMBES, daughter of a blacksmith, and who had previously been in service at Kingsteignton. Dr Hounsell gave evidence that there were marks on the front of the child's neck on either side of the windpipe, the skin being broken to the extent of an inch across on each side. Death was caused by asphyxia. It was his suspicion that the marks were caused by the pressure of a person's hand. There was just the possibility of the injury being inflicted by the mother during birth. P.C. Cabe said he asked the mother if the child made any noise when it was born and she replied, "No, nor made any movement, it was born dead." The Jury returned a verdict "That the child was killed by suffocation, caused by BESSIE COOMBES" but they desired to state that they could not say whether it was accidental or not. The Coroner said BESSIE COOMBES must take her trial in another Court.

Saturday 29 April 1893, Issue 8046 – Gale Document No. Y3200754451
THE DROWNING OF A CHILD AT EXETER – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at the City Police Court on Wednesday by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, touching the death of LILY BEATRICE MAUD TAYLOR, aged three years, whose body was picked up in the lake at Commercial-road. SARAH TAYLOR, wife of a sweet vendor, and mother of the child, said she missed the child on Monday morning just before twelve o'clock. William Giles, of Odger's Row, said that at the request of Detective Sergeant Dymond he dragged the Lake, and found the body under the bridge leading to Gabriel's timber-yard. There was a place on the bridge which was not fenced off, and the gates on the bridge were kept open. Mr C. E. Bell said he considered death was due to drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." MR TAYLOR said he should like to thank all those who assisted in the finding of the body, especially Mr Giles.

Saturday 6 May 1893, Issue 8052 – Gale Document No. Y3200754482
The Fatal Cab Accident at Crediton.
Inquest This Day.
At the Duke of York Inn, Crediton, this morning an inquest touching the death of THOMAS D. LANGWORTHY, who was knocked down by a horse and cab in Market-street last Tuesday, and died on Thursday night from the injuries received – as reported in our yesterday's issue – was held before Mr Deputy Corner H. W. Gould, the foreman of the jury being Mr John Venn.
BESSIE GOODERE, wife of Mr Alfred Goodere, editor of the "Salisbury Times," and residing at 98 Fisherton-street, Salisbury, identified the body as that of her father, who was a gardener, but had not done anything recently. He was 70 years of age.
Dr Campbell said he was called to see the deceased at the Constitutional Club, Market-street. He found him suffering from severe scalp wounds on the left side of the head, without a fracture of the skull, though the bone was bare and slightly bruised at one spot. There was also a severe bruise on the right frontal. Deceased was further suffering from shock and never rallied. He died about nine o'clock on Thursday evening from the effects of the shock and meningitis. Deceased told witness he was not able to get out of the way of the fly as he was crippled with rheumatism. He attached no blame to the driver of the cab.
William Lucas, labourer, said he saw the accident occur, at about 1.30 on Monday. The horse jumped and knocked deceased down. The driver said the horse shied at a piece of paper. There were several pieces of paper blowing about in the wind. There was plenty of room in the road for the cab to pass. Deceased was on the right side of the road. On witness suggesting that deceased should be put into a cab and taken home, MR LANGWORTHY said "No, let me have my stick and I can walk home." Witness fetched Dr Campbell, after taking the deceased up.
William Powlesland, the driver of the horse and cab by which deceased was knocked down, said the horse shied at a piece of paper, as he was passing the deceased and knocked the latter down. He could not have avoided the accident, and was very sorry it had occurred.
The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added that they did not consider the driver to blame in any way.

Saturday 13 May 1893, Issue 8058 – Gale Document No. Y3200754541
PINHOE – The Death of MR LAND. – At the Inquest on Tuesday evening at the Poltimore Arms by Mr Gould on the body of MR SEBASTIAN H. LAND, of Plymore Villa, the circumstances of whose sad death we recorded the same evening, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while temporarily Insane," a vote of condolence being passed with the bereaved wife and family.

THE SAD CASE AT TORQUAY – Inquest. – On Thursday in the Board room of the Newton Abbot Workhouse, Mr Sydney Hacker (District Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of an old lady named MARY ANNE TAIT, lately residing at No. 5, Sandhill-road, Ellacombe, Torquay, and who died in the Workhouse. Mr G. Palk was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
The first witness called was Robert Cawse (Master of the Workhouse), who deposed that deceased was 71 years of age, and twice before had been an inmate f the house. On Tuesday, the 9th instant, deceased was brought to the Union in a cab, being accompanied by the landlord of the house where she had resided. Sh