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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1889-1893

Articles taken from Trewman's Exeter Flying Post

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs]

[Names Included: Ackrell; Adams(2); Agnew(2); Alford; Allen(3); Amiss; Amor; Andrews; Aplin; Arbery; Armstrong; Arthurs(2); Ash; Ashford; Ayres; Back; Backwell; Badcock(2); Badgley; Bailey; Baker(2); Bale; Balhatchet; Ball(2); Balsom; Bannister; Barbour; Barker; Barrett; Bartlett(2); Baskeville; Bastin(2); Bastyan; Bater; Battershill; Battishill; Bauer; Bealey; Beckett; Beer(3); Belgrave; Bellamy(2); Bellringer; Belworthy; Bennelick; Bennett(6); Benny; Berry; Bessent; Beswetherick; Bicknell(2); Biggs; Bird(2); Bishop; Blackmore(3): Board; Body; Bollen; Bolt(2); Bond; Boswell; Bovey; Bowden(4); Bowers; Boyland; Bradford(2); Braund; Brayley; Brealey; Brewer(3); Bridgett; Brimblecombe; Briscoe; Britton; Broad; Brock(2); Brooking; Brooks(2); Brown(4); Browne; Browning(3); Brownlow; Bryant; Buckingham; Budd; Budge; Burgess(3); Burgoyne; Burnett; Burns(2); Burridge(2); Burrows; Bush; Bushen; Bussell; Butcher; Butland; Cain; Cameron(3); Cann(4); Carder; Carmen; Carnall; Carslake; Carter(5); Casley(2); Cater; Causley; Chaffe; Challice; Chamberlain; Chandler(2); Chard; Charles; Cheriton; Chessall; Chilton; Chope; Chown; Chudley; Churchill; Clarke(4); Clear; Cleave(2); Clement; Clements(4); Cleverly; Clutterbuck; Cockerham; Coe; Cole(3); Coles(3); Collins(3); Colson; Combear; Concannon; Connett; Conway; Cook(3); Coombe; Coombes; Coonin; Cooper; Coose; Copsey; Coram; Cordery; Cornelius; Cory; Coulman; Cousens; Cox(2); Crago; Cranch; Crocker(2); Crump; Cudmore; Culley; Cumming(2); Cundy; Curral; Curran; Currell; Curry; Cursons; Curtis; Daniel; Darby; Dart; Davey(6); Davie; Davis; Davy; Dayman; Dean; Denley; Dennis; Densham(2); Denssen; Derry; De Viell; Dicker; Dickers; Dimmick; Dister; Distin; Dixon(2); Doble; Dodd(2); Doidge; Dommett; Dowell; Down; Downs(2); Drew(4); Drewe; Duncan; Dunn(2); Dyer; Dymond; Earl; Easterbrook; Eastwood; Egbeer; Ellicott(2); Ellis(3); Elworthy; Endacott; Escott; Essery(2); Ettery; Evans(2); Eversley; Evill; Evins(2); Fenwick(2); Ferris(2); Fewings; Fice; Flannigan; Foale; Foot; Ford(5); Forrester; Foster; Found; Fowler(2); Foxlow; Franks; Free; Freeman(2); French; Fry(2); Full; Furneaux; Furze(2); Gale(2); Galliver; Ganniclifft; Gardner; Gater(2); Geisler; Gent; German; Gibbons; Gibbs(2); Gidley(2); Gillard(2); Glade; Gliddon; Glover; Godbeer; Godfrey; Goodhind; Gooding(2); Gorfin; Goss; Gough; Gould; Gove; Grabham; Grant; Grass; Greaves; Green; Greenslade(2); Greenwood; Greep; Greet; Gregory(2); Gribble; Griffith; Griffiths; Gritton; Guest(2); Guscott; Hacker; Haines; Hallett; Halley; Halls; Ham; Hancock; Hannaford(2); Harding(3); Hare; Harlow; Harper; Harris(6); Hart(3); Hartnoll; Harvey; Hawkins(2); Haydon; Hayes; Haynes; Head(2); Heal(2); Hearn(2); Heath; Heller; Helmore; Hendell; Henderson; Hendon; Herbert; Hern; Hewitt; Hexter; Hicks(2); Hill(5); Hinnem; Hitchcock; Hitchens; Hoar; Hobbs(2); Hoer; Hole; Holland(4); Holman; Holmes(2); Honeywill; Hook; Hooper(3); Hopkins(2); Hore; Horn; Horsford; Horton(2); Hucker; Hunt(2); Hughes; Hull; Hurman; Hurst; Hussey; Hutchings(3); Hutchins; Hyett; Ingersent; Isaacs; Jackman; James; Jennings; Jewell; John; Johns(3); Johnson; Jones(4); Jordan(2); Joslin; Joyce(2); Karswell; Kelland; Kellow; Kenrick; Kenwood; Kerle; Kerswill; Kessell; King; Kingdom; Kingdon(3); Kingsland; Knapman; Knott; Laing; Laird; Lake; Lambel; Langabeer; Langdon; Langley; Larcry; Larsen; Lathrup; Laurence; Lawson; Lazarus; Leavers; Legg(2); Le Grass; Le Voir; Lewis; Light; Lillicrap; Lind; Lindsey; Linklater; Lintern; Lishman; Littley; Litton; Liversidge; Loaring; Lock(2); Lodge; Loveless; Lucas; Luckie; Luscombe; Madge(4); Major; Mallett; Maltby; Manley(2); Marden; Mardon; Marshall; Martin(3); Mashford; May; McCauley; McKeon; Mead; Medland(3); Mensor; Mesney; Metherell; Mickle; Middleton; Milford(2); Millman(3); Mills; Milvain; Mingo; Mitch; Mitcham; Mitchell(4); Mogford; Moisey; Montgomerie; Moore(2); Morgan; Morrell; Morrison; Morrott; Moses; Mould; Moulding; Mountjoy(2); Moxon; Mugford; Murch; Murphy; Murrin; Nattle; Nelson; Newberry(2); Newland; Newman; Newton(2); Nicholas; Nicholson; Norman; Norris; Norrish; North; Northam; Northcott(2); Nosworthy; Nott; Nuttall; Oak; O'Brien; Oldridge; Olver; Orchard; Osborn; Osmond; Page; Painter; Palfrey; Palmer; Pannell; Parker(2); Parkes; Parkhouse(2); Parkyn; Parnell; Passmore(3); Pate; Paternoster; Paterson; Patten; Pawley; Payne(2); Pearce; Pearse; Pemberthy; Pengelley; Pengelly(2); Penny; Pepperell(2); Perington; Perkins; Perrett(2); Perriam; Perrow; Perry; Pester; Pethrick; Phillips(2); Phippen; Physick; Pickard(3); Pidgeon; Pike; Pim; Pincombe; Pinson; Piper; Pitman; Pitts; Pomeroy; Potter; Potts; Powe; Powell(3); Pratt(2); Prescott; Priestly; Pring; Prowse; Purridge; Pyle; Pym; Pyne; Quance; Quantick; Quartly; Quinton; Radden; Ralph; Rattenbury; Rayner; Reed(2); Reeves; Rendle; Restall; Reuben; Reypert; Rice(2); Richards(2); Ridd; Ridge; Ridgeway; Roach; Roberts(4); Robins; Rockett; Rogers(3); Rose(2); Rowden; Rowe(3); Rowell(2); Rudge; Salter(2); Sampson; Sanders(4); Sandford; Satchell; Satterley; Saunders; Savin; Sawdye; Scanes(2); Scoins; Scott; Scroggie; Seagrove; Searle; Selley(2); Sellick; Selwyn; Serpentelli; Setter; Seymour; Shaddick; Shannon; Sharp; Shazell; Shepherd; Sheppard; Sherry; Shrimpton; Shipcott(2); Short; Shuman; Shute; Sibley; Silvester; Simmons; Skinner(3); Slee(2); Smale(2); Smart; Smerdon; Smith(6); Snell(2); Snook; Snow; Sole; Soper(2); Southard; Southern; Sparkes; Spear(2); Speare; Spearman(2); Sprague; Spry(2); Squire; Staddon; Stark; Starling; Steer; Stenning; Stephens; Stevens(2); Stewart; Stocker; Stokes(2); Stone(3); Stoneman(2); Straker; Strong; Summerville; Sussex; Sutton; Swain; Swaine; Symons; Tamlyn(2); Tann; Tape; Tapscott; Tavener; Taylor(2); Teat; Thomas(2); Timms; Toby; Towes; Townsend; Toye; Tozer; Tranter; Trelease; Tremlett; Trigger; Trimmins; Trott; Truman; Tucker(3); Tuffin; Turner(6); Turpin; Uglow; Vanstone(2); Vickery; Vine; Vinnicombe; Voisey; Vosper; Wakefield; Waldron; Wallis; Walsh; Walters; Ward(2); Warden; Warne; Warner; Warren(3); Watts; Way(2); Webb; Webber(3); Wellington; Wench; West(3); Westcott(4); Western; Westlake; Wheaton; Wheeler; Wherwood; White(6); Wicketts; Williams(4); Willis; Wills; Winsor; Winter; Wood(2); Woodford; Woodgate; Woodley; Wooldridge; Woram; Wotton(3); Wright(4); Wyatt(2); Yalland(2); Yeo; Young; Zeal.

Saturday 6 January 1894, Issue 8259 – Gale Document No. Y3200755881
DAWLISH – At the Inquest on the body of LUCY BAKER, 17, daughter of a farmer, of Whitestone, North Cornwall, who was found dead in her bedroom at Mr Paige's, 24, Strand, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

TORQUAY – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hacker on Monday evening touching the death of a girl named HOPKINS, daughter of the Town Crier. It was stated that she was enceinte, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," with a rider censuring the father for neglecting to obtain medical aid before.

Saturday 6 January 1894, Issue 8259 – Gale Document No. Y3200755863
THE SUICIDE AT KINGSTEIGNTON – At the Town Hall on Monday, Mr Sidney Hacker (Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of GEORGE DODD, who, as reported, jumped into the Racher Hay pond on Saturday morning last. Harriett Farley said that deceased lodged with her, and was very much depressed as the man said he had the itch. Samuel White, clay cutter, said that on Saturday morning deceased was looking very strange when he came to see him. Deceased was "in a pickle about having the sack for calling another man Blinker." Deceased then let him and went to the large pond, 150 yards away. Deceased shouted to witness, saying he wanted to be seen go into the water. He called "Here goes"! and dived in. Witness raised an alarm, and with others threw a rope and a stick to deceased, who refused to catch hold of anything. Dr Dempster said he had attended deceased who, two months ago, suffered from itch. On Friday night deceased came to him rather excited, saying that some of the others said he was not rid of the disease, but he (witness) told him that there was no fear. Witness examined the deceased after he was taken out of the water, and in his opinion death was due to drowning. The Jury, of whom Mr Vile was Foreman, returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Saturday 13 January 1894, Issue 8265 – Gale Document No. Y3200755907
EXETER – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at Bystock-place, Holloway-street, this morning, on the body of THOMAS HENRY JAMES GUEST, aged one year and four months, son of P.C. GUEST. The evidence given by MRS GUEST was to the effect that on going to bed last evening she found the child dead in bed. Mr E. Steele Perkins said in his opinion death was due to convulsions. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Saturday 13 January 1894, Issue 8265 – Gale Document No. Y3200755915
BARNSTAPLE – At the Inquest on JOHN PHILLIPS, aged 46, who fell out of bed on Saturday night and was found dead on the floor by his wife next morning, evidence was given that he was subject to fits and he died through lack of attention and the intense cold. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" and added that deceased's wife showed gross neglect in not calling assistance.

BIDEFORD – At an Inquest held on Monday on the body of DANIEL FOUND, who met his death through being jerked out of a cart at Northam, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death resulted from an injury to the spinal cord.

TORQUAY – At the Inquest on Wednesday evening on the body of ANN DODD, who was found dead in bed, Mr Karkeek said death was due to syncope, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

TORQUAY – At An Inquest at Palk Arms, St. Marychurch on Wednesday evening respecting the death of the five week old male child of HENRY CHARLES BICKNELL, of the Albert Inn, St. Marychurch, the evidence of Dr Finch was to the effect that the child was healthy, but death was due to convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 13 January 1894, Issue 8265 – Gale Document No. Y3200755927
DEVONPORT NEWS – Mr J. A. Pearce held an Inquest on Wednesday afternoon on the body of DAVID M. C. LUCKIE, fireman of the steamer Ferguslie, who died from injuries supposed to have been received by his falling down the hold of the vessel in Stonehouse Pool on New Year's night. Several Jurors were of opinion that it was a case of neglect, as the hatchways should have been closed as soon as the work of discharging was finished. The Jury returned an open verdict.

Saturday 20 January 1894, Issue 8271 – Gale Document No. Y3200755963
TORQUAY – At the Chelston Coffee Tavern on Saturday evening, Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest respecting the death of a man named DAVID MENSOR, who died on Wednesday morning. The medical evidence went to show that death was due to a diseased liver and acute pneumonia accelerated by exposure. Verdict accordingly.

TORQUAY – The Recent Fatality in the Harbour. – On Wednesday night about ten o'clock a coastguardsman named Hammond, and a man called Warne, saw something floating in the corner of the new harbour, and on putting off in a boat they found it was the body of a yachtsman. It was much decomposed, and almost beyond recognition, but at the Mortuary Mr Barrett, owner of the schooner yacht Aquadine, identified it as that of WILLIAM BROWNING (one of his crew), who was drowned about a fortnight before Christmas in the storm, whilst endeavouring to moor the yacht safer than before. An Inquest will be held tomorrow.

Saturday 20 January 1894, Issue 8271 – Gale Document No. Y3200755940
INQUEST IN EXETER - Scene in Court. Ordering the Jury to be Locked Up.
Lively Proceedings - Removing a Dead Body in a Cab.
At the Exeter Police Court on Monday Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of ROSE ANNIE LILY HEARN. Mr W. H. Hampton was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Inspector Hart, of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, was present.
CATHERINE HEARN, wife of JOSEPH PATRICK HEARN, a rag and bone collector, residing at No. 2, Cricklepit-street, identified the body as that of her daughter who was fourteen months of age. Witness fed the child on bread, sugar and milk. The child was found dead in bed this morning about nine o'clock. Deceased's life was insured, but "she was not payable."
Mr Hawkins (a Juryman): You say the child's life is insured? Witness: Yes, but I shall not get any money, as the deceased is not payable.
Mr Hawkins: How was the child brought to the Police Station from Cricklepit-street?
The Coroner: In a cab by my orders. I did it for your convenience, because I thought it would be better for you to come here and hold the Inquest than go to Cricklepit-street.
Mr Hawkins: I want to know the name of the cabman who brought the corpse to the station.
The Coroner: I do not know.
Mr Hawkins: Has a cabman a right to take a dead body into his cab?
The Coroner: Certainly; I gave orders.
Mr Hawkins: I doubt whether a man has a right to take a dead body in a licensed carriage.
The Coroner: I know the law on the matter.
Mr Hawkins: I don't care for that. I have my opinion, and the Coroner has his. I shall object.
The Coroner: You can object as much as you like.
Mr Hawkins: I shall sir. I am speaking feelingly. I want to know the name of the cabman who brought the child to the Police Station.
The Coroner: That has nothing to do with it.
Mr Hawkins: We are here as Jurymen, and not to have our mouths shut up.
The Coroner: The cabman brought the deceased to the Police Station through my orders.
Mr Hawkins: I want to know the name of the cabman, and I will have it. We are not a lot of dummies.
The Coroner: I must ask you to sit down and be quiet.
Mr Hawkins: If you answer my question I will. We as Jurymen are entitled to put questions and have answers.
The Coroner: Certainly.
Mr Hawkins: I want the name of that cabman. If you keep us here until tomorrow night I'll have it. I consider that is necessary.
The Coroner: I tell you it was done through my orders.
Mr Hawkins: Do you know the number of the cab?
The Coroner: No, I don't.
Mr Hawkins: I want to know whether a cab driver can put a corpse in his cab?
The Coroner: Certainly.
Mr Hawkins: I shall find out.
The Coroner: So you can.
Inspector Hart: Mr Coroner, I should like to ask the witness (MRS HEARN) a question.
The Coroner: Are you on the Jury?
Inspector Hart: I am here watching the proceedings on behalf of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.
The Coroner: Then you can ask questions.
Mr Hart then asked questions.
A Juryman (to MRS HEARN) How long ago did you say the child was ill?
The mother: About seven or eight weeks ago.
A Juryman: How long ago did you insure the deceased.
Witness: About a fortnight before her illness.
Mr Clapp, surgeon, residing and practising in Exeter, proved attending the deceased a good time before death. Witness was called yesterday morning when he found the child dead in bed. He examined the body, and found no marks of violence. In his opinion death was due to convulsions. All the children of the previous witness were unhealthy.
The Foreman: Would the way in which the mother fed the child have anything to do with the death?
Mr Clapp: I don't think so.
Mr Hawkins: You say, sir that the children of the woman are unhealthy?
Mr Clapp: Yes.
Mr Hawkins: You last visited this child on the 24th of December, did you not?
Mr Clapp: Yes.
Mr Hawkins: then did you consider that the child was perfectly well?
Mr Clapp: I considered the deceased was then in tolerably good health. I thought she was sufficiently well.
Mr Hawkins: Are you a parish doctor?
Mr Clapp: I am.
Mr Hawkins: I thought so. Not that I am going to comment on that. If another medical man had been called in would he not have visited the child later than you did?
Mr Clapp: I shall not answer that question. At that time I considered the child was sufficiently well.
Mr Hawkins: What is the state of health of the children of MRS HEARN?
Mr Clapp: Not very good. One of them died a short time since at the Sanatorium.
Mr Hawkins: Was there any fever in this particular case?
Mr Clapp: No, sir.
Mr Hawkins: I was going to suggest that the Sanitary Inspector might disinfect this cab.
The Coroner: There was no infection.
Mr Hawkins: I want to know the name of the cabman. I shall not consider the verdict without that. If you are (turning around to his fellow Jurymen) I am not. I want to know the name of that cabman.
Mace Sergeant Meardon: I don't know exactly where to find him now.
Mr Hawkins: I don't care where he is. He may be gone out to Ide for all I care.
The Coroner: I will pledge you that you shall have his name.
Mr Hawkins: I am here, and I have been sworn as a Juryman. It is necessary to have it, and have it I will.
Mr Clapp: There is no law that corpses shall not be taken in a cab.
Mr Hawkins: I am talking to the Coroner, and not to you, Mr Clapp.
The Coroner (to Mr Hawkins): I must ask you to be quiet.
Mr Hawkins: Then why not stop Mr Clapp. I am not going to consider the verdict until I have seen that cabman.
A Juryman: That is rubbish.
Mr Hawkins: That may be so. You can keep me here until nine o'clock if you like, but I will have the name of the cabman. If the cabman is allowed to take a corpse through the city in a licensed hackney carriage I can do my funeral work five shilling cheaper.
A Juryman: That has nothing to do with the cause of death.
Mr Hawkins: I know that. I want to know if a cabman has a right to put a corpse in his licensed cab. I am not going to be sat upon by a Coroner, doctor, or eleven Jurymen!
The Coroner: Gentlemen, I must ask you to consider your verdict.
Mr Hawkins: I shall not agree.
The Coroner: Then, gentlemen, I shall have to lock you up until you have agreed.
Mr Hawkins: I shall not sign the paper until I have seen that cabman. If you had got thirteen Jurymen I would retire.
A Juryman: That has got nothing to do with the Inquest. The cabman does not know whether he has a right to put a corpse in his cab or not.
The Foreman: We are not in a pot-house, gentlemen.
Mr Hawkins: That cabman has not been brought here yet.
The Coroner: I cannot have this wrangling, gentlemen. I am here to do my duty.
Mr Hawkins: I want that cabman.
The Coroner: Mr Clapp will tell you that there was no infection.
Eventually Mace Sergeant Meardon came into Court and said that the cabman's name was Brooks. The latter came into Court, and several questions were put to him by Mr Hawkins.
The Foreman: Mr Coroner, what are we to do?
A Juryman: You have had the man's name, Mr Hawkins, and is that not enough.
Another Juryman: You are like a fool, Mr Hawkins.
Mr Hawkins: I may be so. I have a perfect right to speak out what I think.
A Juryman: For your own benefit.
Mr Hawkins: Not for my benefit, but for the benefit of the poor of Exeter.
The Coroner: I can't allow this.
Mr Hawkins: A Juryman has called me a fool, and I am not going to allow anyone to round on me. I am not speaking out of any ill-feelings.
The Coroner: I don't think you are.
Mr Hawkins: I am satisfied as to the cause of death.
A Juryman: Why do you want to keep us here for?
Mr Hawkins: I would suggest that the cabman be paid for coming here.
A Juryman: Out of your own pocket, Mr Hawkins.
Mr Hawkins: No, not out of my pocket. The city can pay for bringing a corpse to the Police Station, and should therefore pay for obtaining evidence.
A Juryman: You pay the cabman.
Mr Hawkins: There was no necessity to bring the child to the Police Station. It was my desire to go and see how the poor lived. The Inquest ought to have been held at Cricklepit-street.
The Coroner: I had the Inquest held here for the convenience of the Jury.
The Foreman: The Jury are of opinion that the death was a natural one.
Mr Hawkins: I shall not sign unless you add a rider to the effect that a Juryman considered that there was no necessity to bring the child's body to the police station.
The Coroner: I cannot do that.
Mace Sergeant Meardon: Shall I get another Jury?
The Coroner: You cannot do that.
Mr Hawkins: I have given my opinion, and I shall stick to it.
The Foreman: You won't agree unless the rider is added?
Mr Hawkins: No, I won't. I was asked to sit on the Jury, and I have a perfect right to hold an opinion.
A Juryman: Better fit you had stopped away. We should have been home and had some tea by this time.
The Foreman: What's the alternative, Mr Coroner?
The Coroner: I shall have to lock you up until you have agreed. I am very sorry, gentlemen, that this court should be disturbed in such a manner.
Mr Hawkins: I should have liked to have gone to the house in Cricklepit-street.
A Juryman: then I should not.
Mr Hawkins: You can take the verdict of the eleven gentlemen if you like, but I will stick out.
The Jury were then locked up, and the reporters were asked to retire.
After a lapse of about ten minutes the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 20 January 1894, Issue 8271 – Gale Document No. Y3200755960
An Inquest on JAMES FURZE, who met with an accident at the Sourton Lime Quarries on November 21st, the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased met his death from inflammation of the brain, the result of an accident caused by an explosion of gelignite.

Saturday 20 January 1894, Issue 8271 – Gale Document No. Y3200755967
SUDDEN DEATH AT TEIGNMOUTH – Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Teignmouth Infirmary, relative to the death of SARAH GERMAN, who died sudde3nly at the residence of her master (Mr W. H. Whiteway), Inverteign, on Monday afternoon. AMELIA JACKSON, of Ashburton, sister, stated that deceased was a spinster, and was forty-six years of age the day she died. The deceased formerly lived with a Dr Forman, who told her that she would die suddenly, because she had more spirit than strength. Lena Philips, a nurse in the same employ ,said deceased went out for a walk on Monday and returned about one o'clock. A little while after she heard one of the children screaming, and with the housemaid went to the nursery, where they found deceased lying on the floor. They rubbed her and called the master. She had been complaining of pains in the head. After hearing the evidence of Mr Whiteway-Wilkinson and Dr Sittle, who attributed death to sudden syncope, the heart being in a very weak state, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 20 January 1894, Issue 8271 – Gale Document No. Y3200755953
INQUEST IN EXETER – This Afternoon. - Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the City Police Court this afternoon touching the death of FRANCES JANE VANSTONE, wife of WILLIAM VANSTONE, of Alphington-place, Paul-street. The husband said his wife, who had been unwell for some time, died shortly after three o'clock on Friday morning. Dr M. L. Brown deposed to having previous attended the deceased, but said that when he examined the body yesterday he found it emaciated and dirty. In his opinion death was due to haemorrhage, caused by extreme weakness. The death was a natural one, and although he did not consider it a case of neglect, the apartment in which she lived was not a fit place for a woman in her condition.
The husband replying to the Jury said he had not been in constant work lately. He had had a dispensary recommend for the deceased, but it had lapsed, and he was unable to get another. Dr Brown, however, gave him a prescription. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 27 January 1894, Issue 8277 – Gale Document No. Y3200755983
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – The City Coroner Mr Hooper, held an Inquest in Crickepit-lane on Monday on the body of SELINA FERRIS, who died suddenly on Saturday at reported in the Flying Post. From the evidence adduced it appeared that on Saturday the deceased, who was 44 years of age, and the wife of EDWIN FERRIS, residing in Colleton-buildings, The Friars, left her home to go to the residence of her mother-in-law, in Cricklepit-lane to do some house cleaning. She was scrubbing the stairs when the bucket she was using was heard to fall. This attracted the attention of a single woman named Grace French, residing in the same house, to the spot, and she found the deceased at the bottom of the stairs apparently dead. A woman named Westcott fetched MR FERRIS, and a medical man was sent for. Mr Perkins, of Palace Gate, arrived soon afterwards and pronounced life extinct. He had known the deceased as a very energetic woman, but of a very nervous and excitable temperament. There was no doubt death was due to cardiac syncope. A verdict was returned accordingly.

Saturday 27 January 1894, Issue 8277 – Gale Document No. Y3200756003
A diver named DAVID NELSON was diving in Dartmouth Harbour on Monday, and as he remained under water for threequarters of an hour without signalling to the men above, he was pulled up and found to be dead. At the Inquest the same evening Dr Harris said death was due to heart disease or a fit, and a verdict of "Death from syncope" was returned.

Saturday 27 January 1894, Issue 8277 – Gale Document No. Y3200756006
DAWLISH – Mr Coroner S. Hacker held an Inquest at the Town Hall on Wednesday touching the death of FREDERICK ERNEST HARRIS, aged three years, son of WILLIAM HARRIS, labourer, of Stockton-road. A post mortem examination showed that death resulted from continued pain from abscess in the internal ear. Dr Lovely drew attention to the need of a mortuary in the town, and the Coroner concurred.

Saturday 27 January 1894, Issue 8277 – Gale Document No. Y3200756008
PLYMOUTH NEWS – An Inquest was held at Stonehouse on Monday on the body of EDWARD NORTHCOTT, who expired during a fit of coughing on Saturday afternoon. Dr Waterfield said death resulted from suffocation due to the rupture of a blood vessel during the coughing fit. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.
A butcher named NORTHCOTT, of Battery-street, Stonehouse, was suddenly seized with a fit of coughing and fell on Saturday. A medical man, on being summoned, pronounced life extinct.

Saturday 10 February 1894, Issue 8289 – Gale Document No. Y3200756070
ROMANTIC SUICIDE OF A TEIGNMOUTH WOMAN – A Lass who Loved a Sailor. - An Inquest was held at Kensington on Thursday night relative to the death of EMILY MARTHA HELLER, aged 38, a lady's maid in the service of Miss Nicholson (daughter of Captain Nicholson), of South Kensington, who committed suicide on Monday under circumstances of a romantic character.
JAMES HELLER, of 43, Parsons-street, Teignmouth, identified the body as that of his sister, whom, he said, he last saw in August last. She had corresponded with a first-class petty officer in the Royal Navy, and they were engaged to be married. When he left Teignmouth the last time to go to sea he promised to write to her, but did not do so, and this seemed to prey upon her mind. The Coroner said a number of letters had been left behind by the deceased. They were all couched in the same terms, and one addressed to Miss Nicholson read as follows:
"Sunday, February 5th. – Madam – I am sure I am mad or I should never do what I am about to, but I feel I cannot live. I have had very strange ideas in my head lately. I am very unhappy but the doctors can prove I am a respectable woman. No one is the same to me lately; Captain Herbert looks at me in a very strange way, and I am sure he thinks there is something wrong with me, but thank God I have never been let fall in that way. I have done things I am very sorry for now. I ask of you to forgive me. May God forgive me for what I am about to do, but I cannot live. I hope and trust that poor dear Captain Nicholson will recover. I am sure it will make you very happy. May you all forgive me and think what a poor, unhappy woman I am. Oh, great God! This is a dreadful thing I am going to do; but I cannot live. Good-bye. From your poor, unhappy servant, EMILY HELLER."
Dr Brinton attributed death to oxalic acid poisoning, which was undoubtedly self administered. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 10 February 1894, Issue 8289 – Gale Document No. Y3200756068
THE FATAL ACCIDENT TO A HEAVITREE MAN – Inquest This Day. – Mr J. D. Prickman, of Okehampton, held an Inquest today at the Halwill Junction Hotel on the body of JOHN CLEVERLY, aged 39 of 5, Alpha-terrace, Heavitree, a telegraph labourer, in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, who met with a shocking accident while walking from Ashbury to Halwill yesterday as reported in last evening's Post. Inspector Foster, of Exeter, watched the case on behalf of the Railway Company. Thomas Salter, telegraph labourer, in the employ of the company, deposed that he was walking along the line with the deceased yesterday. It was raining fast at the time and the wind was blowing a gale, and when passing under a bridge about a mile and three quarters east of Halwill Junction the deceased was blown against the engine of the 12.5 p.m. train from Okehampton. He fell under the wheel and was cut in two, the remains being afterwards taken to Halwill Junction. Thomas Davy, of Delabole, fireman on the train in question, said he saw the deceased and the last witness walking in the pathway clear of the train. He thought the engine passed them all right, and knew nothing of the accident until his return at 2.43. P.C. Cousins deposed to going to the spot and assisting in gathering up the remains of the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 10 February 1894, Issue 8289 – Gale Document No. Y3200756077
THE SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EXETER TRADESMAN – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquiry on Wednesday into the circumstances touching the death of MR AMBROSE EDWARD GATER, china merchant, of South-street, who died suddenly, as reported in our special edition of Tuesday evening. Mr F. R. Bradbeer, brush manufacturer, of St. Thomas, identified the body. Deceased was only 51 years of age. Witness last saw him alive in the Cathedral Yard on Saturday night, when he appeared to be in his usual health, and apparently very cheerful. Mary Counter, a servant in the employ of the deceased, also gave evidence. Mr John S. Perkins, surgeon, proved being called to see the deceased in the evening. He found him dead and lying on a sofa. Witness could discover no marks of violence. In his opinion death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 17 February 1894, Issue 8295 – Gale Document No. Y3200756118
INQUESTS AT EXMOUTH – Two Inquests were held by Mr Coroner Cox at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Wednesday concerning the death of the infant son of CHARLES CARDER, 58, Bicton-street, and also the infant son of EDWARD VANSTONE, 2, Montpellier road. Mr E. Arnold was chosen Foreman of the Jury. In the first case, in which it was stated the child died on Sunday. Dr Hodgson said he had made a post mortem examination and found that death was due to Syncope, caused by the presence of fluid in the pericardium. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.
In the second case EDWARD VANSTONE said the child which was always weak, died on Saturday morning. Dr Martyn said he had since made a post mortem examination, and found that death was due to suffocation from bronchitis, the bronchial tubes and windpipe being full of phlegm. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was given.

Saturday 17 February 1894, Issue 8295 – Gale Document No. Y3200756131
PLYMOUTH NEWS – Inquest. – At the Inquest on the body of JOSEPH RALPH, 66, who was found on the rocks near the West Hoe Pier, Dr Woollcombe said deceased probably had a fainting fit and fell into the water. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Saturday 3 March 1894, Issue 8307 – Gale Document No. Y3200756180
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – Vote of Censure by the Jury. – At the Exeter Police Court on Monday Mr H. W. Hooper held an Inquest on the body of EMILY BALL, aged 14 months, daughter of RICHARD BALL, signalman at Queen-street Station, of 20, Church-street, St. Sidwell's, who stated that he was not residing with his wife, and the child had consequently been in the charge of his housekeeper. The child was found dead in its cradle that morning when witness awoke. He did not send for a medical man, but called in a midwife named Mrs Whitfield. Mr Perkins, surgeon, of Palace Gate, said the body was exceedingly pale and emaciated, and there were several superficial marks over the face and the right arm, but that had nothing to do with the death of the child. There were no marks of violence, and in his opinion death was due to convulsions, brought on by dentition. After some discussion the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes," and severely censured "those people for living as they have and neglecting the child."

Saturday 3 March 1894, Issue 8307 – Gale Document No. Y3200756182
THE ACCIDENT AT ST. DAVID'S STATION – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday touching the death of THOMAS BELWORTHY, a shed labourer, in the employ of the Great Western Railway at St. David's Station, who, as reported in our issue of the same evening, was knocked down by a South Western train while crossing the line near the station on Tuesday. Chief Inspector Shattock and Mr Sansom (Loco Department) were present on behalf of the Great Western Company and Inspector Foster represented the L. and S.W.R. CHARLOTTE BELWROTHY, widow of the deceased, said he had been treated for deafness, and his sight was a little dim. He had been in the employ of the company for over twenty years. James Westcott, engine driver, said that whilst driving his engine into St. David's, he saw a man walking towards where witness's train had to pass, and as he did not appear to notice the train witness blew the whilst several times and applied the brake, but the man was knocked down. Geoffrey Hoare, South Western engine driver, who witnessed the accident from another engine, also gave evidence. Mr Andrew, house surgeon at the hospital, said when deceased was brought to the institution he was suffering from a severe shock, a large scalp wound, bruising about the back and left side. The lower four ribs were broken. He died last night. As a result of a post mortem examination, witness found he had a broken spleen, and there was extensive haemorrhage of an abdominal character. The Coroner said if the accident had happened at the crossing it might have been a serious matter for the Great Western Railway. When a man was killed there in 1886, one of the Local Government Board Inspectors, who examined the crossing, said it was one of the most dangerous crossings he had seen in England. To make a roadway over the crossing would probably cost nearly £20,000. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 3 March 1894, Issue 8307 – Gale Document No. Y3200756205
TIVERTON – Mr L. Mackenzie held an Inquest on Tuesday on the daughter of JOHN MORRELL, of Adams's-court, Barrington-street. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death probably resulted from suffocation while the child was sleeping with her parents. It appeared that the child, who was only five weeks old, was partially fed on boiled bread, milk and water, sweetened with sugar. Mr Liesching said bread was certainly not a good article of diet for children so young.

TORQUAY – At the Inquest on the body of MR JEAN PAUL FETER DENSSEN, proprietor of Gibbons's Hotel, who died suddenly on Friday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 10 March 1894, Issue 8313 – Gale Document No. Y3200756221
A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned at an Inquest held at Northleigh, near Honiton, on Wednesday, on the body of a man named THOMAS WHITE, who committed suicide by hanging.

Saturday 10 March 1894, Issue 8313 – Gale Document No. Y3200756240
BRIXHAM – At an Inquest at Fowey, relative to the death of JOSEPH SHUTE, of Brixham, who died from fracture of the skull caused by falling into the hold of the ship, Ellen Harrison, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 10 March 1894, Issue 8313 – Gale Document No. Y3200756234
INQUEST AT CREDITON - This Day. – This morning an Inquest was held at Lower Creedy Farm by the Deputy Coroner, Mr W. H. Gould, respecting the death of WILLIAM POWELL, aged 49, of Lower Creedy Farm, near Crediton, who died as the result of injuries caused through falling off a threshing machine. MARY POWELL, widow of the deceased, identified the body. Deceased told witness he had met with an accident, having fallen from a threshing machine and injured his back and leg. He was seen by a doctor the same day. Mr Henry Martin Body, surgeon, said he saw the deceased on the 5th instant. He was suffering from laboured breathing and complained of great pain in the spine. He expired yesterday. Upon examination of the body he found a bruise on the right hip and on the lower part of the back. He attributed death to concussion of the spine, followed by inflammation. During deceased's illness, he told witness that in jumping off the threshing machine he fell. He did not attach blame to anyone. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Saturday 10 March 1894, Issue 8313 – Gale Document No. Y3200756248
DEATH OF A CHILD IN EXETER – A Sad Story. – At the City Workhouse on Monday evening Mr H. W. Hooper, the City Coroner, held an Inquest touching the death of GERTRUDE BREALEY, aged six weeks. Inspector Hart, local inspector for the N.S.P.C.C., watched the proceedings on behalf of the society. Susan Clark, nurse at the Workhouse, identified the body, and said the deceased was the illegitimate child of MARY JANE BREALEY, an inmate at the Institution. It was born in the Workhouse on January 19th. The mother had three other illegitimate children in the House at the present time. She was in the habit of taking the children in and out of the Workhouse. On Nov. 11th the woman returned to the institution in a state of intoxication with her three children. On two other occasions witness had seen her return in a similar state, and was detained in the receiving ward. On February 17th she took her discharge, and left the institution with her children, but returned the same evening. In reply to Inspector Hart witness said she thought the child was very healthy, and was in good condition when it left the house. MARTHA BREALEY, aged 11, said on February 17th her mother took her, her sister, and deceased out about nine o'clock. They went as far as Paris-street, where her mother went into a "beer shop," telling them to go to their aunt's house in Smythen-street. The deceased was in her mother's arms. Witness did not see her mother until two o'clock in the afternoon, when she came from a public house in King-street in company with a man. They then went to witness's aunt, who said "The baby is a fine one, and would be all right if mother did not drink." Mother was "a little bit drunk" and had the baby in her arms. Witness was afraid the baby would come to harm, and asked her mother to let her have it, which she did. When in Paris-street on the return to the Workhouse, her mother fell down. She was subject to fits, but on this occasion she did not have one. The man who was with her was "nearly drunk too." MRS YOULDEN, MRS BREALEY'S sister-in-law, spoke to her coming to her house with a man and her children. She had been drinking, but was not drunk. Mrs Moore, porteress at the Workhouse, gave evidence as to MRS BREALEY'S condition when she entered the House. Dr Woodman said the child died on Thursday last from bronchitis accelerated by exposure, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," but that death was accelerated by exposure on February 17th, and asked the Coroner to censure the woman. MRS BREALEY was called and said she was not so drunk as had been represented.

Saturday 10 March 1894, Issue 8313 – Gale Document No. Y3200756253
SUDDEN DEATH AT THE "GAZETTE" OFFICE - An Inquest was held at the City Police Court on Monday by Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of JAMES CHARD, newsvendor, in the employ of the Devon and Exeter Constitutional Newspaper Company. Evidence of identification was given by James Blackmore, labourer, at Exmouth Junction, of Alexander Cottage, Cheeke-street, who stated that the deceased was 47 years of age, a bachelor, and resided alone. William Pin, publisher, of 113 Clifton-street, stated that the deceased came to the office for his papers about half past six that morning, and soon after they were handed him he fell backward on the ground, unconscious. Mr Russell Coombe was sent for, but on his arrival life was extinct. Mr Russell Coombe stated that death was probably due to disease of the heart. Mr Gratwicke observed that he had heard the deceased hurried down to the office that morning, and that fact would confirm the medical gentleman's opinion. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 17 March 1894, Issue 8319 – Gale Document No. Y3200756270
INQUEST IN EXETER – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper at Clarendon-place, Bartholomew-street on Monday, on the body of MARY ANN BACK, who was found dead in bed that morning. Mr Faulkner, surgeon, said he considered death was due to apoplexy, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 24 March 1894 – Issue 8324 – Gale Document No. Y3200756333
THE DROWNING CASE AT CREDITON – An Inquest was held by Mr Deputy Coroner H. W. Gould at Crediton on Tuesday touching the death of WILLIAM BENNETT, 56, shoemaker, who was found dead on Sunday in the River Yeo. WILLIAM BENNETT, son of the deceased, said his father had been out of work, and he was very low-spirited. Louisa Merrifield, a neighbour, said she had thought him strange at times, but had never heard him speak of suicide. Mr T. R. Elston, Exeter, said he went with a friend to the river Yeo to search for the deceased, and found him in the water on the opposite side from Crediton, near Mr Gregory's house. P.S. Clements said the body was in about four feet of water. Mr Leslie Powne, surgeon, said death was probably due to drowning, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Saturday 24 March 1894 – Issue 8324 – Gale Document No. Y3200756343
TAVISTOCK – An Inquest was held at Bournemouth on Thursday on the body of MR C. STRAKER, Postmaster of Tavistock, who was found drowned. An open verdict was returned.

Saturday 24 March 1894 – Issue 8324 – Gale Document No. Y3200756339
PLYMOUTH NEWS – Sudden Death. – At an Inquest on the body of ABIGAIL LINDSEY, wife of EDWARD LINDSEY, who died suddenly on Wednesday evening, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 24 March 1894 – Issue 8324 – Gale Document No. Y3200756328
At the Inquest on the body of WILLIAM FRANCIS SAMUEL TROTT, gardener, one of the men drowned off Brixham by the capsizing of a boat, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider asking the Coroner to urge upon the Board of Trade the necessity of a slipway being constructed at the Coastguard Station from which a boat might be launched.

Saturday 24 March 1894 – Issue 8324 – Gale Document No. Y3200756332
PLYMOUTH NEWS – On Monday an Inquest was held on the body of THOMAS COOMBE, a retired police-constable. About three weeks ago he cut his corns, and the razor penetrated his flesh. Inflammation set in, and Dr Wayner was subsequently sent for. Gangrene set in and spread as far as the knee. Inflammation of the lungs supervened, and deceased died on the 16th inst. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH – At Grove Park, Lisson Grove, Mutley, on Monday, an Inquest was held on the body of MR THOMAS DALHATCHET, who met his death through wrenching his side while riding a colt on the 6th ult. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased died from injuries accidentally received on February 6th last." Mr P. Gentle proposed and Mr Mara seconded a vote, which was unanimously carried, of condolence to the family. MR BALHATCHET is the fourth Guardian who has died since the election of the present Board. The deceased gentleman worked zealously in the interests of the poor, by whom, together with a large number of friends, he will be sadly missed.

Saturday 31 March 1894, Issue 8330 – Gale Document No. Y3200756372
THE FALL FROM A CLIFF AT TEIGNMOUTH – Fatal Result. The Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Teignmouth Infirmary yesterday morning by Mr Coroner T Hacker, relative to the death of GEORGE BREWER, son of MR CHARLES BREWER, who, as already reported in our columns, fell off East Cliff on Tuesday evening, and who subsequently died from the injuries received. Mr H. Marks was chosen Foreman of the Jury. CHARLES BREWER, deceased's father, said his son was eight years old. He related the circumstances of the accident, as previously published. He had cautioned his two boys several times the same evening about going so near the edge of the cliff. Henry Hannaford residing at 4, Somerset-place, said he assisted a gentleman who took the boy from an ivy bush, and whom he did not know, to convey the lad to the Infirmary. CHARLES BREWER, aged ten years, brother of the deceased, said his father had cautioned them several times. They were playing hide-and-seek, but he did not see his brother fall over the cliff. Dr Forrest, house surgeon at the Infirmary, said the boy was brought there about seven o'clock on Tuesday evening. He had a wound on the left temple and extensive bruises on the left side of the face. He was quite unconscious when admitted and never regained consciousness up to the time of death, which occurred on Wednesday midnight. In his opinion death was due to concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 31 March 1894, Issue 8330 – Gale Document No. Y3200756373
OKEHAMPTON – At an Inquest on Monday evening touching the death of FRED MADGE, 13, son of MR G. MADGE, Exbourne, and who was killed through being thrown from a cart, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 31 March 1894, Issue 8330 – Gale Document No. Y3200756356
SUPPOSED SUICIDE AT DAWLISH – A man named SELLEY, in the employ of a farmer named Dunsford, of the Warren, Dawlish, was found suspended from a beam, by a buckle strap, in a barn on Tuesday about 5.30 p.m. He left his home on Monday morning, and was last seen at the Mount Pleasant Inn drinking a glass of ale. Deceased leaves a wife and a long family, but had never shown any disposition to commit suicide. The body is at Dawlish where it awaits an Inquest.

Saturday 31 March 1894, Issue 8330 – Gale Document No. Y3200756353
PLYMOUTH NEWS – Drowning Accident. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday on the body of JOHN DUNCAN, aged 46, chief-engineer of the steamship Harraton. The deceased on Tuesday night was returning to his ship, lying off the jetty at Richmond Water, when he slipped from a plank placed from the pier to the vessel and sank before assistance could be obtained. Deceased leaves a widow and four children. A verdict of Accidental Drowning was returned.

Saturday 31 March 1894, Issue 8330 – Gale Document No. Y3200756371
SUDDEN DEATH AT EXETER – The City Coroner, Mr H. W. Hooper, held an Inquest at the Dove Inn, South-street, on Thursday, on the body of MARY ANN HOLLAND. Mr T. R. James was chosen Foreman of the Jury. JOHN HOLLAND, landlord of the inn, identified the body as that of his wife, who was aged 58 years, and who had enjoyed good health of late. On Monday morning last, about ten o'clock, the deceased left the bar and went into the kitchen to breakfast. Being holiday time witness was very busy and when he went into the kitchen about an hour later, he found his wife lying on the floor unconscious. A messenger was sent for a medical man, and although the person went to the residences of six doctors, they were not at home. Mr Harrison eventually arrived, but the woman was dead. Mr H. B. Harrison, surgeon, said he was called about three o'clock, but on his arrival at the Inn he found the woman dead. In his opinion the cause of death was apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 31 March 1894, Issue 8330 – Gale Document No. Y3200756373
DAWLISH – At the Town Hall on Wednesday an Inquest was held by Mr County Coroner Hacker on the body of CHARLES SELLEY, aged 58, who was found by his employer, Mr Thomas Serle, hanging to a beam at Clogstall Farm, near Slatterton, on Tuesday night. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide while of Unsound Mind." The Jury returned their fees to the widow.

Saturday 7 April 1894, Issue 8336 – Gale Document No. Y3200756396
INQUEST IN EXETER – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper on Wednesday held an Inquest at Summerland-row, Summerland-street, into the circumstances attending the death of the infant daughter of WILLIAM CLEMENTS. Mr J. McKeith said death was probably due to convulsions, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

THE SUPPOSED SUICIDE AT DAWLISH – An Inquest was held on Monday at the Dawlish Town Hall, before Mr S. Hacker, on the body of WILLIAM MARTIN, a Dawlish gardener, who was found drowned on Saturday morning on the beach. Mr Matthews was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Samuel Blackmore stated that he was the nearest relation – nephew – to deceased in Dawlish. All his sons and daughters were away. Deceased was about seventy-two years old. He last saw him alive on Thursday morning, when he seemed all right.
Charles Pike said deceased lodged in his house. He ate his breakfast heartily with witness on Friday morning, and when he saw him again later in the day he seemed just as usual. He never complained of anything. He owed witness £2 10s. for lodging. Augustus Shilston said he saw deceased on Friday night about 9.30, when he seemed quite happy and cheerful, and had a drink with witness. He seemed quite sober when he left. James Mutters deposed that on Saturday morning he found deceased lying half-buried in the sand on the beach, about eight yards below high water mark, and about eight yards from the breakwater. His hat and coat were missing, and up to the present had not been found. P.C. Braund said that he found a sixpenny piece, 1 ½d. and a pocket knife in deceased's possession, and judged that his body had been lying high and dry for some hours. The Coroner said there was not sufficient evidence to show whether deceased had committed suicide or had accidentally fallen into the water. After a lengthy consultation the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 7 April 1894, Issue 8336 – Gale Document No. Y3200756407
THE SAD DEATH OF MR SHRIMPTON – Inquest – This Day. - At the Bude Hotel, Exeter, today Mr H. W. Hooper (the City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of JOHN KIRKBY SHRIMPTON, who died suddenly yesterday as rep9orted in last evening's Post. Mr J. H. Warren was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he had known the deceased ever since he had been in Exeter. He identified the body. The deceased was aged 63 years and witness had attended him and his family. He usually enjoyed very good health indeed, and the last time he attended him for any illness was about two years ago for influenza. Just after five o'clock last evening, witness met the deceased in Southernhay, and he said, "I am coming down to see you as I am not feeling very well." He went into witness's house and there said "I am suffering from shortness of breath." Witness examined him and found he had an aneurism, and said to him, "You are not very well," but knowing he was a nervous man he did not tell him what was the matter. He told him that he would write out a prescription for him but that he must be careful. The deceased was a very abstemious man. They talked over various matters, when suddenly the deceased, who was sitting on a chair, dropped forward. Witness laid him on the hearthrug. He then loosened deceased's clothes, but he gave one gasp and died. He did not have any medicine at witness's house. The cause of death was rupture of the aorta. The deceased must have had the complaint for some time, and might have died at any moment. The Coroner said he was sorry to say that he lost a son some days ago from the same cause. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and passed a vote of condolence with the widow and family in their sad bereavement.

INQUEST IN EXETER – A Bed Not Fit For a Dog to Lie On. The Coroner and his Duty.
An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court this afternoon by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, touching the death of ARTHUR SMALE, rag and bone gatherer, about 70 years of age, of Stone's-court, Preston-street, who, as reported in our last evening's issue, was found dead in bed yesterday. Alfred Trend, labourer, also of Stone's-0court, said that as deceased did not answer to calls yesterday morning, witness cut the rope which fastened the door of his room, and found him dead in bed. Some questions were put to the witness as to a certificate of death, whether deceased had been attended by any relatives, how the deceased came to be put in the mortuary, &c. One of the Jurymen said he thought a lot of ridiculous questions were being asked. Mr E. Steele-Perkins said the deceased had suffered from dropsy. He probably died from failure of the heart's action. By a Juryman: He should say the deceased had been properly looked after by Mr Clapp, the doctor, but the room was in a shocking state. The bed deceased was on was not fit for a dog to lie on. A question having been raised as to the necessity of holding an Inquest, the Coroner said he was the sole judge as to whether or not an Inquest was necessary. He had held the office of Corone3r for forty years, and he had never had a disagreement in reference to it. He sat there as a magistrate of the city, and as such as he considered himself the poor man's magistrate, for he believed a Coroner held that position. He had never made any difference between the rich and the poor. If they relied on a doctor's certificate in very many instances the doctor would act as Coroner, and an Enquiry would be frustrated, but as long as he held the office he should do all in his power to elucidate deaths among the poorer classes. He should do his duty, and not allow himself to be dictated to by anyone. A Juryman said he hoped it would not go forth that the Jury thought an Inquest was unnecessary. The Coroner said he had done his duty, and he hoped the Jury agreed with him. If they did not he could not help it. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 7 April 1894, Issue 8336 – Gale Document No. Y3200756416
PLYMOUTH NEWS – An Inquest was held on Tuesday on the body of RICHARD DOWNS, formerly porter at Chubbs Hotel, who was found drowned that morning by Thomas Davis, a fishbuyer of Granby-street, between some rocks under the citadel. Dr Dutton said an inspection of the cornea of the eye indicated that deceased suffered from fatty degeneration of the heart, and in his opinion deceased had become suddenly exhausted and had fallen into the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 14 April 1894, Issue 8342 – Gale Document No. Y3200756465
HONITON – Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquiry on Monday into the death of the illegitimate infant child of a laundress named ELIZABETH PURRIDGE. A verdict of "Accidentally suffocated through being overlain" was returned.

NEWTON – An Inquest was held at the Workhouse on Monday evening, relative to the death of MARY JANE BUDGE, an inmate. Mr R. H. Cawse, the master, said deceased was formerly a domestic servant, and belonged to Torquay. She was admitted to the Workhouse on May 27th last year, apparently suffering from softening of the brain. About the beginning of last February she began to lose control of herself, and was placed in the infectious ward. Dr Nesbit said a doubtful case was received from Dawlish while deceased was in the ward with another persons. An isolation hospital was required at the Workhouse. The Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased came to her death from erysipelas, following on a wound in the head received in an accidental fall out of bed." The following rider was added – "In consequence of the evidence produced at this Inquiry, the Jury strongly recommend to the Guardians the immediate provision of an isolated building for the reception and treatment of doubtful and infectious cases."

Saturday 14 April 1894, Issue 8342 – Gale Document No. Y3200756442
SAD DEATH OF A CHILD AT ST. THOMAS - Mr Deputy Coroner Gould held an Inquest at the Turk's Head. St. Thomas, on Tuesday touching the death of ALICE MAUD BELLRINGER, two years of age, of 32, Beaufort-place, St Thomas. Mr Ballhatchet was chosen Foreman of the Jury. MR ALBERT BELLRINGER, glazier, said on Saturday evening he was informed that the deceased had been knocked down while at play. She was apparently all right then, but shortly after she became unconscious, and a medical man was sent for immediately. The child had been suffering from whooping cough about a month previous. She died on Sunday. Mr A. A. McKeith said on examining the deceased he found a bruise on the back of her head. Death was due to an injury to the brain, the result of a fall or blow. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

FATAL ACCIDENT AT EXETER - At the Exeter Police Court on Monday, the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of JOHN CHALLICE, of 141 Sidwell-street, who died on Saturday from injuries he received in an accident on Friday.
RICHARD MARKS CHALLICE, surveyor, of Glenmore, Pennsylvania, identified the body as that of his father, who was a retired glue merchant, aged 68. Mrs Emma Hart, wife of the Inspector of the N.S.P.C.C. of 9, Bystock-terrace, St. David's, said on Friday morning last she had an appointment with MR CHALLICE at 26, Oxford-terrace, to make arrangements about putting the house in proper repair, witness being about to take it. She knocked at the door but receiving no answer she went into the house. On proceeding into the court at the rear she found the deceased lying on the ground. There was a ladder close to him. She immediately went for assistance, and a passer-by went in. She also went for Mr Sanford, a builder, and did not return again. The deceased was unconscious at the time. George Sanford, builder, deposed to being called by the last witness, and said that when he went into the yard he found the deceased lying on the ground, the lower part of his body being on a ladder, which was about ten rungs in length. He was being supported by a man from the country. He was unconscious and witness immediately sent for a doctor. Dr Barstow came, and the deceased was conveyed to the residence of MR GEORGE CHALLICE in Sidwell-street. There had been a little rain in the morning and in witness's opinion the ladder slipped and deceased fell backwards on his head. Mr Barstow, surgeon, said when he arrived deceased was breathing heavily, nearly unconscious, bleeding from the nose and left ear, and vomiting a mixture of blood and half digested food. There was a pool of blood on the ground freshly clotted . Witness assisted in getting the deceased with a cab and in conveying him to the residence above mentioned. He attended him for a time. The deceased was suffering from a very severe fracture of the base of the skull, and a fracture of the left collar bone. There was a very considerable quantity of brain substance escaping from the left ear together with a large quantity of blood. He died on Saturday from the injuries he had received. Mr Sanford, answering a Juror, said the deceased spoke after the accident, but it appeared to be to himself. He heard him say "Jesus, my Saviour." A youth named Woodland, an apprentice to MR GEORGE CHALLICE, also gave evidence, tending to prove that the deceased must have gone up the ladder as a matter of curiosity rather than to have done any work. The Coroner said he could not close the Inquiry without expressing his personal deep and heartfelt sorrow at the loss of a high-minded and most estimable citizen, who had been removed from their midst in so painful a manner, for he had known and highly respected the deceased for a great number of years. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and endorsed the Coroner's remarks, which were acknowledged by MR R. CHALLICE.

Saturday 21 April 1894, Issue 8348 – Gale Document No. Y3200756515
DEATH OF A CHILD AT WONFORD – At the Gardeners' Arms, Wonford, Thursday Mr Deputy Coroner, H. W. Gould held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of EMILY PERRY, aged 15 days. ELIZABETH PERRY, mother of the deceased, and wife of JAMES PERRY, labourer, of 3 Wonford-terrace, said the child was poorly from birth. On the 11th inst. a medical man was called in to see the deceased and prescribed for her, but on Sunday it died while in bed with witness. The child appeared to have convulsions just before death. Mr J. W. Yellett, surgeon of Heavitree, said as the result of a post-mortem examination found both lungs congested, which was sufficient to account for death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 21 April 1894, Issue 8348 – Gale Document No. Y3200756513
BARNSTAPLE – At an Inquest held by Mr Coroner Bromham, on the body of WILLIAM BATER, labourer, who was thrown off a corn drill and killed while passing through the village of Dalton, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 28 April 1894, Issue 8354 – Gale Document No. Y3200756538
DEVONPORT NEWS – Suspicious Case. – Mr J. A. Pearce, Borough Coroner, opened an Inquest at the Crown Hotel yesterday touching the death of LOUISA BADCOCK, aged 26, who died on Thursday, at 11, Cumberland-street. From the evidence of Mrs Jacobs, deceased's mistress, it appeared that BADCOCK had complained of being unwell, and on Wednesday morning witness found her lying on the bed face downwards. She refused assistance, and Dr Rae was sent for, but she died the next day. Dr Rae said deceased resisted an examination, but he found she had had a child or was about to have one. Later in the day he called and found she had been confined, the child being in the bed, dead. It was about a five months child. On Thursday morning he found her in a very low condition, and thought she would probably die. From a post mortem examination he was suspicious that the girl had been tampered with mechanically, either by herself or someone else. His opinion was that she would have lived, but for the injury. The Coroner said in cases where females were interfered with either mechanically or medicinally, it was a crime punishable with great severity. In order to, if possible, find out the perpetrator of what had been referred to, he proposed adjourning the Inquiry until that day week at the Guildhall. The Inquest was adjourned accordingly.

Saturday 28 April 1894, Issue 8354 – Gale Document No. Y3200756547
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held at Ashburton on Saturday on the body of FRANCIS KITTS DISTIN, who, while proceeding from the railway station, fell and sustained concussion of the brain.

Saturday 28 April 1894, Issue 8354 – Gale Document No. Y3200756529
INQUEST AT EXMOUTH – An Inquiry into the death of ERNEST WILLIAM WEBBER, aged four months, son of FREDERICK and JANE WEBBER, of Fore-street, Littleham, was held by the Deputy Coroner Mr C. E. Cox, at the Rolle Hotel on Thursday. Mr J. W. Winter was Foreman of the Jury, one member of which was sworn in the Scotch manner. FREDERICK WEBBER, painter, said deceased was his son, and had been a sickly child. It had been under Dr Shapland's care for bronchitis, and had recovered. Witness, his wife, and the infant were sleeping in the same bed, and his wife on waking in the morning found the child dead. Dr Hodgson, who was called, said he thought from appearances the child was suffocated. He made a post-mortem examination and found the lungs congested as though death resulted from suffocation. The weight of the bed-clothes could not have caused death. The marks might have been caused by the mother overlaying the child. He thought the child might have been dead about a couple of hours. The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said it was clear from the evidence that the child was in good health the previous night, and it was also clear that the face of the child must have come in contact with the mother, a thing which never ought to happen with proper care. A verdict of "Found Suffocated in Bed" was returned, a rider being added to the effect that the mother should be more careful in the future as to the position in which she placed her children.

Saturday 5 May 1894, Issue 8360 – Gale Document No. Y3200756606
DEVONPORT NEWS – The Suspicious Death of a Servant. – At the adjourned Inquest yesterday touching the death of LOUISA BADCOCK, servant at Mr Jacob's, Cumberland-street, a verdict was returned that deceased died from exhaustion and shock, brought on by an unlawful operation, but that there was no evidence to show by whom the operation was performed.

Saturday 5 May 1894, Issue 8360 – Gale Document No. Y3200756578
PLYMOUTH NEWS – At an Inquest held on Tuesday on the body of THOMAS PERRETT, aged 31, a carpenter of Southpool, near Kingsbridge, who committed suicide by cutting his throat and died in the Plymouth Hospital, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide while Temporary Insane.

Saturday 12 May 1894, Issue 8366 – Gale Document No. Y3200756613
SUICIDE AT ST. MARY'S CLYST – A Dead Man Standing Upright. – An Inquest was held at St. Mary's Clyst on Monday by Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy District Coroner (of Honiton) on the body of WILLIAM CHOWN. William Mid[?], nephew, said the deceased was seventy six years of age. Ellen Alford, with whom the deceased lodged, said when he was in drink he threatened to commit suicide. W. J. Heywood, farmer, deposed that he saw the deceased on Saturday morning and he made an observation to witness that he had had robbers with him the night before, and had lost 6s. 6d. Frank Pe[?]on said he saw the deceased on Saturday morning. Richard Woollen, landlord of the Half Moon Inn, said he assisted in search for the deceased on Saturday night and found him in the river Clyst near the bridge standing upright in the mud with his stick in his hand. Witness thought he must have been drowned by the tide. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

THE SHOCKING ACCIDENT AT WOODBURY – An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday afternoon by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, on the body of ROBERT GOODING, farm labourer, 35, who died from injuries sustained through being [?] by a cow at Woodbury on April 28th. Deceased's brother and nephew gave evidence. Frederick Pasmore who helped drive the bullock, said deceased tried to stop it with the shovel [the rest of the article is very faint] A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Saturday 19 May 1894, Issue 8372 – Gale Document No. Y3200756665
INQUEST AT EXMOUTH – The Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Cox) held an Inquiry at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Tuesday into the cause of death of ANN SPEARMAN, 70 years of age, of 10, Rill-terrace. Mr J. W. Winter was chosen Foreman of the Jury. JULIA SMALLDON, daughter of deceased, said on Friday her mother said she felt sick, and she was put to bed at four o'clock, and Nurse Harris came in. She seemed better at seven o'clock, but an hour later witness found her dead. Dr Shapland, who was sworn in the Scotch fashion, said he had attended the deceased for some time till April 27th for jaundice. He was called on Friday evening about 9 p.m. and saw deceased next morning. He made a post-mortem examination and found that the primary cause of death was chronic disease of the kidneys with abscesses, the immediate cause being violent sickness due to the undigested food, which ultimately brought on syncope. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 19 May 1894, Issue 8372 – Gale Document No. Y3200756691
PLYMOUTH NEWS – Fatality in the Docks. – At an Inquest on the body of JOHN NATTLE who was knocked into the Western Docks by a steam crane and who died within a few minutes from a severe scalp wound, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 26 May 1894 – Issue 8378 – Gale Document No. Y3200756722
TEIGNMOUTH – At the Inquest on Monday, on the body of FREDERICK COLES, who was found in the water on Saturday, the medical evidence showed that death was due to apoplexy, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 26 May 1894 – Issue 8378 – Gale Document No. Y3200756697
DROWNED AT EXWICK – An Alleged Dangerous Bank. – At the Lamb Inn, Exwick, on Monday, Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of SIDNEY RICHARDS, who was drowned in the mill leat on Saturday. Mr H. Jacomb was chosen Foreman of the Jury. HENRY MATTHEW RICHARDS, a labourer of Exwick, identified the body as that of his son, who was aged 10 years. So far as witness knew deceased could not swim. FREDERICK RICHARDS, aged 8, a young brother of the deceased, deposed that on returning from Weir Cliff on Saturday morning about 10 a.m. with three other boys deceased went inside the hedge by the side of the mill leat to pick some ferns, telling witness to go on. They proceeded for some distance down the road, but finding his brother did not return witness went back, but nothing could be seen of deceased. There was a mark on the bank, apparently where the deceased had fallen in, and a fern broken off by the side. Witness then proceeded home and told his mother of the occurrence. Sidney Horsham, who was with the last witness, gave corroborative evidence.
John Hookway, labourer, of Exwick, proved recovering the body from the mill leat on Saturday afternoon about 2.30. There was about five feet of water where the body was found. Mr Mark Farrant, junr., surgeon, said the body presented the usual appearance of death from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." One of the Jury drew attention to the dangerous state of the bank. The matter was brought forward at an Inquest held about six or seven years ago on a little girl who was drowned in the leat. The Coroner promised to make a representation to the owner of the property.

Saturday 2 June 1894, Issue 8384 – Gale Document No. Y3200756737
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held at 17, James-street, on Wednesday, by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, touching the death of ELIZABETH PLAYER DENNIS, wife of a gardener. JOHN DENNIS, deceased's husband, said she had not been well for four or five years, but went out yesterday afternoon. In the night she complained of sickness, and died almost immediately. Mr H. Harrison, surgeon, said death was due to syncope following rupture of a blood vessel in the lungs, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 2 June 1894, Issue 8384 – Gale Document No. Y3200756744
DEVONPORT NEWS – At an Inquest held on Monday on the body of ROSINA TUFFIN, aged 48, wife of the landlord of the Royal Oak Inn, Brownlow-street, Stonehouse, the husband said he last saw his wife alive at half-past eleven, on Saturday night, when she was sitting on the landing in the centre of the stairs. He endeavoured to help her up, but she refused his assistance, and he went to bed. He had repeatedly left his wife lying on the floor and various other places in a state of intoxication all night. He awoke about five o'clock in the morning, and on going to look for his wife, found her lying on her back with her head facing towards the bottom of the stairs. On raising her he found she was dead. In his opinion she had tried to get to her bedroom and had fallen over the stairs. Dr Waterfield said the direct cause of death was suffocation, caused by the weight of the body resting on the neck. The Jury were of opinion that the deceased died from suffocation, but there was no evidence to show how she was suffocated, and they added a rider censuring the husband for going to bed without rendering assistance to his wife as he ought to have done.

Saturday 9 June 1894, Issue 8390 – Gale Document No. Y3200756778
MACE-SERGEANT SHIPCOTT'S DEATH – A Coroner's Jury was empanelled at the Turk's Head Inn, St. Thomas, on Monday afternoon, by Mr H. W. Gould, to inquire into the circumstances surrounding the death of MACE-SERGEANT WILLIAM SHIPCOATT, aged 53 years, of 23, Oakfield-road. Mr P. Rousham was the Foreman of the Jury, and evidence of identification was given by the son of the deceased, WILLIAM HENRY SHIPCOTT, house painter, of 21 Oakfield-road, who further stated that he saw his father in bed about three o'clock on Saturday afternoon, when he said, "I fell a bit better, but my head is swimming, and my heart beats very loud." Witness left him, but about half-past four his mother informed him that his father had gone out, and he was subsequently apprised by a postman that something had happened to the deceased in Exwick fields. He went there and saw his father on the grass dead. The witness was examined at some length as to whether the deceased left a note behind. He at first said his mother destroyed a note on Friday, but that he did not know the purport of it as he did not see it, but on being pressed by the Coroner he said his mother told him there was something on the note about "kisses for the children," but nothing to lead his mother to suppose the deceased was going to make away with himself. The Coroner said it was important the wife should be there if possible and he deputed Mr MacKeith to go and examine her. The witness further stated that his father had complained about pains in his head and heart lately. He had never heard him speak about committing suicide. He had always spoken against suicides, for as Coroner's officer he saw many cases. He was about to retire. Richard Thomas Hewish, tailor and cutter, of 4, Haldon-road, St. David's, said he met the deceased in Exwick-fields on Saturday afternoon coming from St. Thomas. He passed witness, but subsequently returned near to where he was standing and said "There is a fine lot of grass here isn't there." Witness replied, "Yes, they are waiting for fine weather, no doubt." Witness then proceeded on his walk, but subsequently returned and found deceased's hat on the bank, and the body floating in the leat near where it emptied into the river. P.C. Vanstone, who recovered the body, said amongst other things and money witness found a bunch of keys belonging to the city authorities on deceased, and that was handed over that morning. In witness's opinion deceased could not have fallen in the water, or there would have been marks to have shown it. Mr A. A. Mackeith said he had examined MRS SHIPCOTT and found her suffering from heart disease. She was consequently not in a fit state to attend. He had had a conversation with her about the letter, and she said that during Thursday night her husband rose from bed and sat down and wrote something. She got up and took it from him. It read in effect – "If I had listened to you twenty years ago I should not have been in this plight." He had an idea that he would have to go into the Workhouse or something like that. MRS SHIPCOTT further stated to him that she tore the note up. He examined the body, which presented the usual appearance of death from drowning. The Jury returned an open verdict – That Deceased was found in the water, but that how he came there, there was no evidence to show.

Saturday 9 June 1894, Issue 8390 – Gale Document No. Y3200756777
SAD DEATH OF A ST. THOMAS PAINTER – MR CHARLES ROBERTS, painter, of 25, Cowick street, St. Thomas, was found early on Sunday morning by his son, hanging to a beam in his workshop. He was immediately cut down, and Mr Mark Farrant sent for, but MR ROBERTS was dead. He seems lately to have been much worried over a delusion that his business was going back, and he had been suffering from pains in the head. At the Inquest, held by Mr Deputy Coroner Gould on Monday, Mr Farrant said the appearance of the body was consistent with death from strangulation, and a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 16 June 1894, Issue 8396 – Gale Document No. Y3200756864
DIED WHILST AT PLAY – At an Inquest held at the Cross Keys, Tavistock-road, Stoke, on Monday, on the body of WINIFRED AGNEW, aged 8, daughter of a staff engineer on H.M.S. Vivid, it was stated that on Wednesday last the deceased, who apparently been playing on the banister on Wednesday night, overbalanced herself and fell downstairs, the fall producing haemorrhage, from which she died on Saturday. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 28 June 1894, Issue 8406 – Gale Document No. Y3200756944
At an Inquest on the body of JAMES RIDD, who was drowned through the capsizing of a boat at Bishop-tawton, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Coroner remarking that fishermen on the river should ascertain the process adopted for resuscitating bodies if recovered from the water. The deceased leaves three orphans.

Saturday 7 July 1894, Issue 8416 – Gale Document No. Y3200756997
At an Inquest held on Friday on the body of WILLIAM MITCHELL, aged 65, who fell into the water late on the previous night when returning to the tug Trusty, lying alongside the Devonport Dockyard, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 14 July 1894, Issue 8423 – Gale Document No. Y3200757007
FATAL PLAY WITH MATCHES – Mr Coroner Johns held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital this morning into the circumstances attending the death of a child named EDITH SARAH BIRD, the two year old daughter of WILLIAM A. BIRD, a stoker of the navy. The evidence showed that on Thursday morning the child's mother left the infant in a room for a few minutes. She heard it scream. Returning immediately she found it in flames, the girl having only a nightdress on. The mother gallantly endeavoured to extinguish the flames, and severely burnt herself in doing so. With the aid of Bessie Dyer, who lived in the house, the infant child was conveyed to the hospital. It there expired on Friday morning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 21 July 1894, Issue 8430 – Gale Document No. Y3200757045
SINGULAR DEATH AT MORETONHAMPSTEAD – At the Union Inn an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner S. Hacker on the body of ELIZABETH T. CANN, landlady of that inn, who on Monday was seized with a fit while blowing the fire, and fell backward, striking her head violently on the lime and sand floor. The medical evidence went to show that death was due to a fracture of the base of the skull and rupture of blood vessels. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Saturday 21 July 1894, Issue 8430 – Gale Document No. Y3200757037
THE SUICIDE AT LYNTON – An Inquest was held at Lynton yesterday on the body of SAMUEL BODY, a mason, aged 69. Deceased some time ago lost his brother in Bristol, who was accidentally killed. He (deceased) had also found work scarce and lately appeared to be depressed. He resided with his son at Lynton, but the latter never suspected anything wrong. On Wednesday evening, however, deceased was found hanging by a rope by the side of a hedge, the rope being attached to a thorn bush. He was seen there some time before an alarm was given, the children who saw him thinking he was intoxicated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 21 July 1894, Issue 8430 – Gale Document No. Y3200757030
An Inquest was held on Friday at Plymouth on the body of BEATRICE ALICE HEARN, aged two years, of 29, Hampton-street, who died on Thursday from injuries received on Monday by falling out of a window, a distance of eleven feet. A verdict of Accidental Death.

At an Inquest held on Friday on ELIZABETH MARY LISHMAN, aged 72 years, of 7, Edgcumbe-place, Millbridge, near Stoke, it was stated that the deceased fell over a pair of stairs in her house, and was found lying senseless at the bottom. She died on Wednesday last. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 18 August 1894, Issue 8457 – Gale Document No. Y3200757134
PLYMOUTH NEWS – At an Inquest held on Friday on the body of WILLIAM HENRY MAY, vegetable hawker, aged 69, of 19 Grenville-road, P.C. Hewings said he found the deceased hanging some six inches from the floor in his room, and he was quite dead. It was further stated that some ten months ago the deceased had an accident by which several ribs were fractured and this had preyed on his mind ever since. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 8 September 1894, Issue 8478 – Gale Document No. Y3200757200
THE SHOCKING FATALITY IN EXETER – Inquest, This Day. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of RICHARD HUTCHINGS, 38, of Exe-street, who died from injuries received whilst at work at the Head Weir Paper Mill on Thursday, was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning – before Mr Deputy Coroner, H. W. Gould. Mr J. Jones, Inspector of Factories, represented the Board of Trade, and Mr W. W. Tremblett was present on behalf of the firm owning the mills. William chamberlain, rag engineer at the mills, said deceased was his assistant. About twenty minutes to ten in the night he heard deceased shouting and on going to him found him unconscious on the platform between the engines, with his arm torn off and lying beside his body. When witness saw him before the accident, he had in his hand a small belt which he was about to put on the engine. Mr J. Jones factory inspector, said there was no fencing to the engine, and he did not think fencing requisite. The accident could only have happened through a slip or fall. Messrs. Tremlett had always been most anxious to carry out any recommendations he might make. Mr R. L. Meade-King, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted into the Institution with his right arm torn off above the elbow, and suffering from fracture of the skull. His case w3as hopeless, and he died the same night. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Mr Tremlett said his family had carried on the business for considerably over seventy years, and this was the first time that anything like a serious accident had occurred at the mills. In answer to a Juryman, the Coroner said he had no power to give the Jury fees on account of the adjournment of the Inquest.

THE BOATING FATALITY OFF DAWLISH – Inquest, This Day. - At the Queen's Hotel, Teignmouth, this morning an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MR FREDERICK WILLIAM GRITTON was held by Coroner S. Hacker. Mr T. Hambly was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
James Holman, coastguard officer, stationed at Dawlish, deposed that he brought a medical man's certificate to certify that MRS GRITTON was, owing to illness, unable to attend the Inquest. He also said that he had seen the boat, which was, to his mind, of too cranky a character for MR GRITTON'S purposes. It was a lug and mizzen boat.
Charles Cruwys, boat proprietor, of Beech-street, said that on Thursday morning he saw deceased and the missing lad Monk in the boat cove preparing to go fishing. Witness had previously put in new halyards to the boat, and the sails were in a very good condition. He considered the boat sea-worthy. About ten o'clock on Thursday night he received a message from Mr Huskisson, who stated that he had passed a capsized boat, when he immediately got some men together and proceeded to the spot indicated with five boats. They could not see the craft, but on going out again they found it just before break of day.
Fred Trout, boatman, said that he was out fishing in his yacht, when, on hauling in a line he brought up a man's coat. This was about half-past seven on Friday morning. About half an hour afterwards he saw MR GRITTON'S body floating, in an upright position, with the lines of the mizzen sail twisted round his hands. There were also near the body the sail and small spar. He hooked the body in and lashed it to the yacht's side, bringing it to Teignmouth and leaving it in charge of the coastguard.
John Sealey, fisherman, also gave evidence and said that deceased was perfectly sober when he left the New Quay for Dawlish.
Harry Gordon Huskisson, of The Holt, Dawlish, said that he was coming from Torquay about half-past nine on Thursday night when he saw a boat, bottom up. He sent word to Cruwys, and also went out in one of the five search boats.
John Hurvid, barman at the New Quay Hotel, and Sergeant Richards having also given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally drowned."

Saturday 15 September 1894, Issue 8485 – Gale Document No. Y3200757227
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT ST. THOMAS - Inquest, This Day. - At the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of GEORGE HENRY PRING, 23, a carter, who met his death in endeavouring to stop a runaway horse in St. Thomas, on Tuesday last, as previously reported in our columns. Mr G. R. Shorts (Town Clerk) and Mr D. Cameron (City Surveyor) were present on behalf of the Exeter City Council, by whom he was employed. JOHN PRING, deceased's step-father, of Bartholomew-street West, said deceased told him in the hospital after the accident that he was leading the horse by the check rein, when the animal shied and he was knocked down. He did not attach blame to anyone. George Breading, painter, said deceased held on to the reins, but after going some distance tripped and the left wheel of the cart passed over his body. Mr Meade-King, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said a post mortem examination revealed the fact that deceased had sustained a rupture of the intestines and haemorrhage of an abdominal character, from which he died. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." In reply to a question by the Foreman, the Coroner said the delay in holding the Inquest was due to circumstances over which he had no control.
The funeral of the deceased will take place at the Higher Cemetery tomorrow. The Exeter Engineers, of which he was a member will attend, falling in at 2.30 at Bartholomew-street.

Saturday 22 September 1894, Issue 8492 – Gale Document No. Y3200757260
DEVONPORT NEWS – Mr J. A. Pearce, Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Friday on the body of JOSEPH LIVERSIDGE, a private in the R.M.L.I., who committed suicide on the previous evening in Keyham-Dockyard. The deceased had been engaged as a messenger by Captain Dunlop, captain of the Dockyard Reserve's office, and he was found hanging by the neck to an iron ladder in a staircase leading to the niggers' loft. From the evidence it appeared that deceased had failed in business, and on the previous afternoon had neglected his work. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 22 September 1894, Issue 8492 – Gale Document No. Y3200757250
STRANGE DEATH OF A CHILD AT EXETER – The Inquest Adjourned. – At the Exeter Guildhall on Friday evening Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest touching the death of the infant child of MARY CASLEY, daughter of MR CASLEY, South-street. The Chief Constable and D.S. Vickery watched the case on behalf of the police. ELIZABETH CASLEY, grandmother of the deceased, said when born the child's head was dark. Witness wrapped the child in a blanket until the midwife arrived. Two hours later the child was taken away by witness's sister, MRS OSMAN. Elizabeth Davey, of Magdalen-street, said she was not a certificated midwife, but was called on Thursday morning to the house of the last witness. She found the child on the bed wrapped in a blanket. Half-an-hour later MRS OSMAN arrived and took the child away.
Witness, in answer to a Juryman, said she was related to MRS CASLEY. ELIZA OSMAN, West-street, said she was called in by GEORGE CASELEY, husband on the first witness. She took the child away because she thought she could take better care of it. She washed and dressed it. The child commenced to make a noise, and she gave it some drops of brandy. She had milk in the house, but did not give deceased any. A medical man was not called until after the child died. The Coroner said that as they only had the evidence of three persons, who were related to each other, he thought the case should be further inquired into. The Inquest was accordingly adjourned until Monday week.

Saturday 29 September 1894, Issue 8499 – Gale Document No. Y3200757280
DEVONPORT NEWS – At the Inquest held on Friday evening on the body of SAMUEL FOWLER, aged 68, of 7, Wilton-street, Stoke, who met with his death that day by falling from a broken ladder, Dr C. B. Rendle said the deceased had a fractured base of the skull from which he died. P.C. Ashton said the ladder was in a rotten condition. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." A rumour gained currency that a murder had been committed in the town, probably due to the wording of the following telegram which Mrs Lock, sister-in-law, to the deceased, sent her husband, who is coxswain to Captain Osborn, Staff-Captain of the Dockyard: - "Come quickly, FOWLER killed Kate." There should have been a stop after the word "killed."

Saturday 13 October 1894, Issue 8513 – Gale Document No. Y3200757325
TEIGNMOUTH – At the Paddington Coroner's Court on Friday, Dr George Danford Thomas, coroner for Central London, held an Inquest on the body of EDWARD TURPIN, aged 37, a carpenter, lately living at Dawlish-road, Teignmouth, and who was found dead in Regent's Canal, on Monday. WILLIAM TURPIN, builder, of Teignmouth, deceased's brother, said deceased had never at any time threatened his life. He was quite unable to account for his brother's death. P.C. Porter proved assisting to get the body from the water. He searched the clothing, and found on it a copy of the Evening News and Post, dated October 1st, two pocket handkerchiefs, a brass cheque, three pieces of paper, a comb, a pocket knife and a cigarette case, inside of which was a halfpenny. He noticed that one pocket was, turned inside out. The medical evidence was to the effect that there were no marks of injury or violence on the body, which was rather decomposed. The appearances were consistent with death having taken place from drowning. The appearance of the body led to the belief that deceased had been in the water from three to seven days. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned but that as to how the deceased came into the water of Regent's Canal there is not sufficient evidence to show."

Saturday 20 October 1894, Issue 8520 – Gale Document No. Y3200757352
DEATH OF A COLOURED MAN AT EXETER PRISON – Inquest – Today. – At the Exeter Prison today an Inquest was held into the circumstances attending the death of ALBERT FREEMAN, a coloured man, who in the early part of the year was sentenced at the Castle of Exeter to nine months' imprisonment. Ever since deceased has been in gaol he had been off and on under the treatment of Mr Mortimer, the Prison Surgeon, and died yesterday morning through exhaustion from ague and rheumatism. Evidence was given by the Governor of the Gaol, and Mr Mortimer, and the Jury, of which Mr J. C. Clogg was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 3 November 1894, Issue 8534 – Gale Document No. Y3200757399
SUDDEN DEATH AT HEAVITREE – The Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) held an Inquest on Tuesday at the Royal Oak Inn, Heavitree, on the body of GEORGE CUDMORE, aged 59. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

SUICIDE OF AN EXONIAN NEAR BRISTOL – At Bedminster on Monday an Inquest was held by the Bristol Coroner on the body of WILLIAM HENRY GUEST, aged 56, upholsterer, who, previous to his death, resided at No. 6, Dinham-road, Exeter. MR GUEST was found in a timber-yard in Canon's Marsh hanging from a plank across two piles of timber. An uncle from London stated that deceased had lost his father, mother and brother during the past year, besides being in pecuniary difficulties. He left Exeter three weeks ago without saying where he was going. A verdict of "Found Dead, having apparently hung himself" was returned.

Saturday 3 November 1894, Issue 8534 – Gale Document No. Y3200757413
INQUEST IN EXETER – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at 19, Mansfield-terrace, Exeter, today on the body of ERNEST PRATER ALLEN, aged 7 months. SARAH ANN ALLEN, mother, said the child died in her arms on Thursday. Ever since it was three months old it had kept up a noise like that of a cock-crowing. Mr Barstow, surgeon, having given evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 17 November 1894, Issue 8546 – Gale Document No. Y3200757478
PLYMOUTH NEWS – Death in a Surgery. – At an Inquest held yesterday at the Guildhall on the body of WILLIAM COLSON, aged 4 months, the mother stated that she took her baby to Dr T. H. Williams the previous day, but whilst waiting in the surgery the child died. Dr T. H. Williams said the deceased died in a fit. "Natural Causes" was the verdict returned.

At the Stonehouse Workhouse yesterday an Inquest was held on the body of GRACE RAYNER, aged 67, previously residing at 2, Wesleyan-cottages, East-street, Stonehouse, who died in the Workhouse on Wednesday. Dr Leah stated that death was due to fresh injuries to a diseased hip, sustained through falling in her court some weeks ago. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 24 November 1894, Issue 8552 – Gale Document No. Y3200757515
MYSTERIOUS SUICIDE AT EXETER - On Wednesday, a gentleman named SKINNER, who it is stated, is an American farmer, and who has been living with Mr Knapman, of 43, Bartholomew-street, was found dead, on a seat on the Cowley Bridge road, Exeter, with a portion of his face blown off and a revolver by his side. The discovery was made by two passers-by and information was at once given to the police. P.C.'s Bubear and Guppy at once proceeded to the spot with the ambulance and brought the body to the Exeter mortuary. Dr Bell, who accompanied the policemen, pronounced life to be extinct. The revolver, which is an old-fashioned one, of six chambers, had five chambers loaded and the other discharged. It is believed that the deceased sat on the seat, and placing the revolver in his mouth pulled the trigger. He had been seen about the city for some time, and apparently did no work. On the body were found 2s. 9d in silver, fourpence in bronze, a watch and chain, and some papers.
The Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court on Thursday by the Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper). Mr F. Chown was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
The first witness called was LEWIS SKINNER, farmer, of Buckerell, Honiton, who identified the body as that of his brother, a farmer, 41 years of age, single. He had been in Manitoba, America, for twelve or fourteen years, and returned last November, since which time he had lived with his brothers and sisters. He left witness's place about three weeks or a month ago with the intention of coming to Exeter, but witness did not know until that morning where deceased lived. While with witness he seemed low-spirited about the effects of a paralytic stroke he had had in America, and said it had effected his speech. He was paralysed on one side. Dr Mackenzie had given him medicine and told him that the stroke might effect his mind. The reason of his coming to Exeter was that he wanted to obtain Sir Stafford Northcote's influence to get him into a hospital.
Miss Mary Knapman, living with her brother at 43, Bartholomew-street, said deceased had been lodging at her house for the last fortnight. At times he seemed depressed. He was lame and walked with a stick. He went out just after ten o'clock on Wednesday morning, after having his breakfast saying he should not be back in the evening. That was the last she saw of him, and her brother told her at half-past one that MR SKINNER had shot himself. She had never seen him with firearms.
P.C. John Bubear said he was on duty at mid-day on Wednesday when a gentleman who drove in through Queen-street told witnesses there was a man on a seat in the Cowley Bridge-road – he was informed, with his throat cut. Witness went to the Police Station, and with P.C. Guppy took the ambulance to the spot, calling on Dr Moone on the way. Just past Duryard he saw the deceased sitting on the seat apparently dead, and by his right side a six-chambered revolver, which had been fully loaded, one chamber being discharged. He was taken to the mortuary. On him were found an envelope bearing the words, "Mrs Knapman, 43, Bartholomew-street," in black-lead, a silver watch, with chain, a leather purse, containing half-a-crown, a threepenny piece, three pennies, and two halfpennies, a bunch of keys, a glove, a piece of gutta-percha tubing, and a Theatre programme. At his lodgings was a box of cartridges. Witness produced all the articles named.
Mr Moone, surgeon, said he was called by the last witness about half-past twelve on Wednesday to go to Cowley Bridge-road. Witness took his emergency bag and drove to the spot, where he found deceased with his clothes, even his hat undisturbed. Blood was issuing from his mouth. There was a large hole in the roof of the palate. He could not have been dead long. Death resulted from the firing of the pistol in his mouth, and must have been instantaneous. Witness had seen two similar cases, and in both there was a wound where the bullet had left the skull, but in this case there was no exit wound.
The Theatre programme was one relating to the engagement of Mr Thomas Thorne's Repertoire Company, and on it were three entries in black lead written across the print, and which could only just be deciphered. They were as follows:- "Mrs W. Row, 33 Sheppard-street, New Swindon, Wilts"; lent Lewis eleven pound fifteen. He paid me three pounds fifteen. Would have paid more if I'd written him but thought he could pay the funeral expenses. God bless you all"; and "Mrs T. Pidsley, wife of the Relieving Officer, Broadclyst." In regard to the second entry Mr Lewis Skinner said deceased let him have some money to keep for him as he did not like to keep it in his pockets.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity".

Saturday 1 December 1894, Issue 8558 – Gale Document No. Y3200757551
SAD SUICIDE IN EXETER – EDWIN BREWER, a one armed man who was employed as a newsman at the Gazette office, and who was formerly a vendor of the Evening Post, committed suicide shortly before twelve on Tuesday night at his residence, 20, Exe-street, by cutting his throat with a pocket knife, he being found by the landlord (Mr Cox) lying on his face and hands in a pool of blood in his bed in a room in which a man named George Delve also slept, and who first discovered that something had happened by the deceased making a strange noise. Life was found to be quite extinct when Mr Hawkins, surgeon, arrived. At the Inquest the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

SHOCKING FATALITY AT TORQUAY – A shocking fatality occurred at Torquay on Monday. A married woman named MARY ANN MOORE, wife of a fruit hawker, residing at Pleasant-place, Torre, was descending the staircase to fetch some coals from the cellar. She had a shovel in one hand and a paraffin lamp in the other. By some unexplained means she fell over the top of the stairs and was precipitated to the bottom. The lamp exploded and set fire to the woman's clothing and the place. An alarm of fire was raised and the Corporation Fire Brigade summoned. On their arrival the fire was promptly extinguished. The woman, however, was then dead. She was badly burned about the upper part of her body, but whether death was due to that or to a fracture of the neck is not known. At the Inquest on Tuesday the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding that Webber should have done more towards saving the deceased's life.

Saturday 1 December 1894, Issue 8558 – Gale Document No. Y3200757546
PLYMOUTH NEWS – The King-street Fatality. – At the Inquest yesterday on the body of MRS TRIMMINS, of 11, Belmont-street, who died at the Hospital yesterday from injuries received through being run over by an empty lorry, the property of Mr Turpin, contractor, on Thursday evening in King-street, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 1 December 1894, Issue 8558 – Gale Document No. Y3200757545
INQUEST – At an Inquest held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, at 2, Woodvale-cottages, Well-street, yesterday, touching the death of the infant son of WILLIAM WOODGATE, the medical evidence showed that death was caused by want of vitality, due to the child being born prematurely, and convulsions. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 8 December 1894, Issue 8564 – Gale Document No. Y3200757588
INQUEST – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at 27, Melbourne-street, Exeter, this morning on the body of WILLIAM HENRY STADDON, aged 7 months, child of EMMA STADDON, domestic servant, which was born in the Workhouse. Mrs Woolgar said she was paid 4s. a week to look after the infant, which she fed on thin corn flour and other things. On Monday it was taken bad in its inside, and she sent for Dr Harrison, but it died on the Wednesday. Mr Harrison, surgeon, said he was of the opinion that the child died from diarrhoea and convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 8 December 1894, Issue 8564 – Gale Document No. Y3200757578
INQUEST IN EXETER – At York-place, Coombe-street, yesterday, Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM JOHN SCANES, aged one year and eleven months, who died on Thursday morning. WILLIAM SCANES, a warehouseman, residing at No. 6, York-place, Coombe-street, identified the body as that of his son, who had recently been suffering from measles. Mrs Mary Lee, who had nursed the child during the measles, said it died on Thursday about 4 a.m. Dr Brash deposed that death was due to congestion of the lungs after measles. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 15 December 1894, Issue 8570 – Gale Document No. Y3200757605
INQUESTS IN EXETER - An Inquest was held at 2, Turner's-buildings, Stepcote-hill, Exeter, on Monday by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, on the body of SIDNEY THOMAS BROWNING, 18 months old, who died on Friday. Dr Mackeith said death was due to measles, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Mr Hooper also held an Inquest that afternoon at 69, Sidwell-street, touching the death of MR PETER SILVESTER, the well-known gymnastic instructor. Mrs Murray identified the body as that of MR SILVESTER, who was 74 years of age. He had been taken ill twelve months ago. He went out on Saturday evening, and was brought home by Mr Piper and Mr Easterling, living but unconscious. A medical man was sent for, and Dr Edwards came about an hour afterwards. Deceased died about half-past nine. Mr J. F. Ralling explained that the delay was not caused through any fault of Dr Edwards. Mr Kellaway, of the Old Coach and Horses, said MR SILVESTER called at his house a little after eight and asked for a drop of brandy as he did not feel well. He thought the fog had affected him. He then asked that a cab be sent for, and was assisted into it. Mr C. Piper, Old Tiverton-road, said he was called into Mr Kellaway's house, where he saw MR SILVESTER in a prostrate condition. Witness accompanied him home in a cab. Dr Faulkner, medical attendant to the deceased, said he had attended him for about sixteen months for valvular disease of the heart, but ceased attending him professionally nine or ten months ago. Witness was called about ten o'clock, and found deceased on a sofa, dead. He appeared to have been dead about an hour and a half. Cardiac syncope was in witness's opinion the cause of death. A verdict accordingly was returned. The Coroner remarked that a more straight-forward man he had never known than the one over whose body they had performed their painful duty. He had known him for many years, and entertained for him a deep affection. Mr J. F. Ralling, on behalf of the Jury, said they deeply deplored MR SILVESTER'S death. He was a man who had taken as great an interest in the young citizens as any, and in his death they mourned a loss which it would be very difficult to replace.

At an Inquest held on the infant child of GEORGE and JANE SHEPHERD, of Honiton, which was found dead in its cot, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

INQUEST IN EXETER – At 20, Robert-road, Larkbeare, on Tuesday, the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of FLORA C. SOPER, aged 10 weeks, daughter of a machine fitter. Dr P. F. Casey said he considered the child had a convulsion from which it died, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 22 December 1894, Issue 8576 – Gale Document No. Y3200757640
SUDDEN DEATH AT EXMOUTH – An Inquest was held on Tuesday at the Exmouth Inn, Exmouth, by Mr C. Cox, on the body of JOHN EDGAR BRADFORD, six weeks old, son of JOHN HENRY BRADFORD, mason, of Meeting-street, Exmouth, who was found dead in bed. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 29 December 1894, Issue 8580 – Gale Document No. Y3200757676
An Inquest was held at St. Matthias's Schoolroom, Torquay, on Wednesday evening on the body of CAROLINE ANN BENNETT, 72, widow of the REV. THEOPHILUS BENNETT who was found dead in bed on Monday morning. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned."

SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at Ewings's-square, West Quarter, Exeter, yesterday, touching the death of WILLIAM JOHN WESTCOTT, the infant son of a labourer at the Gas Works, and who was found dead in bed on Christmas morning by his mother. Mr Clapp, surgeon, thought the child had had a convulsion, and being unable to free itself from the clothes, died. A verdict of "Natural Causes" was returned. Mr Howard was Foreman of the Jury.

Early on Wednesday morning a shocking fatality occurred at the Old Quay, Teignmouth. The mate of the Freide named THOMAS LINKLATER, aged 65, was stepping from the side of his vessel on to the wharf, when a truck that was being pushed along knocked him against the buffers of another waggon, the result being that he was very badly crushed. He was attended by Dr Stevenson, and Dr J. Little, and removed to the Infirmary, where he expired shortly after his admission. At the Inquest the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," a rider being added that the Jury did not consider there was sufficient space between the line of rails and the edge of the wharf so as to allow of a person standing there with safety.

Saturday 29 December 1894, Issue 8580 – Gale Document No. Y3200757671
Yesterday, at an Inquest held at Plymouth on the body of NICHOLAS CLEMENT, aged 44, a merchant seaman of 8 New-street. Dr Woollcombe attributed death to heart failure, due to excess of alcohol. "Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 5 January 1895, Issue 8586 – Gale Document No. Y3200757721
FATAL ACCIDENT IN EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday on the body of ANN BEALEY, 83, spinster, of No. 6, Francis-cottages, Clifton-road. Emma Phillips, living next door, said deceased had been very feeble for a long time past and lived alone. On December 6th witness took her a cup of tea in the morning,, and while downstairs a few minutes afterwards she heard a noise. On going up to the deceased again witness found her on the floor. She said she had had a fall and hurt herself. Deceased was put into bed, and a medical man summoned, on whose suggestion she was removed from her home to the hospital. Mr Henry Andrew, house surgeon t the Hospital, proved receiving the deceased suffering from a fractured thigh. She gradually lost strength and died on December 13th. The cause of death was congestion of the lungs which supervened on the accident. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

INQUEST IN EXETER – At Elmside on Wednesday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest on the body of ABRAHAM CHANDLER, aged seven weeks, son of MR E. H. CHANDLER, who died suddenly the previous morning. The evidence of Dr Mortimer was to the effect that the child died from convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 12 January 1895, Issue 8592 – Gale Document No. Y3200757751
At an Inquest held at the Fortescue Hotel, Morthoe, on the body of ROSA ELLEN BUSHEN, who was found dead in the road near Trimstone, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death through failure of the heart's action."

ALLEGED INFANTICIDE AT PLYMOUTH – Mr R. B. Johns, the Plymouth Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of the illegitimate child of EMILY BENNY, who had been in service in Plymouth about five months, having come from Cornwall. It was stated during the Inquiry that on Sunday last the mother went into a water-closet and there gave birth to a female child, which she placed in a dust-bin where it was subsequently found by Beatrice Rendle, a fellow servant. The child was placed in bed with its mother, but died on Monday night. Dr T. G. Vaudrey, 4 Buckland-terrace, who attended to the deceased before death and who had made a post-mortem examination said there were abrasions on the left side of the face and neck and on the left forearm. All these injuries were of a superficial character. Death was due to debility, accelerated by exposure and want of proper treatment at birth. The child being placed in the dust bin lessened its chances of life. In answer to a Juror, Dr Vaudrey stated that the exposure accounted for the congestion of the lungs. It contributed towards death. Dr Cash Reed corroborated. He thought the child was a feeble one, but there was a reasonable probability of its living if it had received proper attention at birth. The Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder," and a warrant was subsequently issued for the mother's arrest, but she will not, it is expected, be apprehended until she is fit to be removed.

Saturday 12 January 1895, Issue 8592 – Gale Document No. Y3200757762
THE SUDDEN DEATH AT EXMOUTH – The Inquest on the body of MRS MARIA SMERDON, of the York Hotel, Exmouth, was opened at the Rolle Hotel on Monday by Mr Coroner Cox. Mr S. B. Firch was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
WILLIAM HORSWELL, boot and shoe maker, and brother of the deceased, said she was 68 years of age and proprietress of the York Hotel. He last saw her alive on Friday just after mid-day, when she made no complaint of being ill. He did not know whether her life was insured. By P.C. Dymond: His son never, to his knowledge threatened the deceased, who had been healthy and strong all her life.
Florrie Ingham, niece of the deceased, said about five weeks ago her aunt had some new bread for tea and afterwards felt a pain at her heart. She sent witness to Mr Bickford's, the Strand, for some camphor, of which she took ten drops on a piece of sugar and felt better afterwards. She would not send for a doctor. Mrs Slocombe came in about quarter to ten on the night of the day in question, and witness and deceased went to bed at five minutes to twelve. MRS SMERDON felt a great deal better after getting into bed. When witness woke up about half past six the next morning she put her hand on her aunt's face and found it quite cold. She called Florrie Down, the servant, and she and Horswell came into the room together, the latter going for a doctor. By Dr Kane: Her aunt was quite strong before going to bed, and did not complain of shortness of breath nor of giddiness. About five weeks ago her mouth was very sore after eating celery and her throat was burning hot, but they all ate of the celery and did not taste anything wrong.
Florrie Down, servant at the York Hotel, said deceased had been in good health up to five weeks ago. she suffered from soreness in the mouth, but she complained of her throat being sore before she took the celery. She got quite well again. The night before she died she complained of her feet and heart being cold. She had supper at eleven o'clock, eating the crust of a new loaf and taking some whiskey. By Dr Kane: it was a very small drop – not three-pennyworth.
Dr Kane said he attended the deceased on the 24th November when she complained that two nights previously she awoke with a suffocating sensation and with her tongue swollen. She could only attribute the soreness and swelling to having taken the celery the night before. The symptoms generally arose from poisoning of the stomach, but it struck him at the time that the case was a very remarkable one. The deceased attributed it to the celery being very coarse. She was quite convalescent on the 4th December. He was called to see her on Saturday morning and found her dead, having apparently died in her sleep. There was no sign of any struggle and he thought she must have passed away very peacefully. He did not notice anything about the room. By deceased's side was a little whiskey and water. He made a post-mortem examination yesterday. He removed the heart, which was much dilated with fat at the bottom, one side being filled with blood. The muscle of the hart was thick and in a state of fatty degeneration. It was quite possible that she died from the state of the heart, so far as he had examined. He found that the stomach was inflamed in patches. He found the second contents of the stomachs, the first having been removed by vomiting. He thought it wise to remove parts of the body. He preserved one kidney, the heart, and part of the stomach. He examined the brain and found it perfectly healthy. He suggested that the parts should be analysed.
Mr Coles (a Juryman) asked whether there was any sign of poison about the house.
Sergeant Dymond said he had searched a box and found bottles labelled "Poison."
The Inquest was adjourned for a fortnight.

Saturday 12 January 1895, Issue 8592 – Gale Document No. Y3200757747
INQUEST – Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest at 46, Preston-street, Exeter, today on the body of ELIZABETH WOODLEY, 52, who was found dead in bed yesterday morning. Dr Woodgates said death was due to cardiac syncope (failure of the heart's action), and a verdict accordingly was returned. Mr T. Williams was Foreman of the Jury.

Saturday 19 January 1895, Issue 8598 – Gale Document No. Y3200757788
"Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Okehampton on Wednesday on the body of a lad named WILLIAM DOWNS, who died suddenly.

At the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday an Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) on the body of an infant named SIDNEY JOHN PAGE, aged six weeks, son of WILLIAM JAMES PAGE, a tailor, residing in Paul-street. MRS PAGE said the child had been healthy since birth, and had not been attended by any medical man. On awaking about nine o'clock on Tuesday morning she found the child dead. It was not insured. Mr E. Steele Perkins, surgeon, said in his opinion death resulted from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

A WOMAN'S BODY FOUND AT TORQUAY – The body of a woman, name unknown, was found on the sands near the Ladies' Bathing Cove under Corbyn's Head, Torquay on Wednesday by Frederick Setters, a gardener, residing at Bath Cottage, Torquay. The deceased was respectably, but poorly, dressed, and her general appearance leads to the impression that she does not belong to this part of the country. Nothing was found upon her by which she could be identified. She is about five feet two inches in height, and apparently about fifty years of age. She was attired in a black dress, and had on a much worn wedding ring. she was also wearing nearly new felt boots. The symptoms were indicative of death by drowning, and the body did not seem to have been in the water for any length of time. There were cuts on the face, but it is supposed that these were caused by contact with the rocks after death. P.C.'s Goodman and Whitefield removed the remains to the mortuary adjoining the Chelston Coffee Tavern, where they await the Inquest.
The body was afterwards identified by MRS EMMA STANLAKE, wife of a cab driver, of Avenue Stables, Torquay, as that of her mother, ANN MASHFORD, widow, 69, of Fore-street, St. Marychurch. Deceased resided alternatively at St. Marychurch and Torquay with her married daughters. She left MRS STANLAKE'S place on Tuesday afternoon in her usual state of health, and not returning, enquiries were made for her at the Torbay Hospital. She was subject to epileptic fits. At an Inquest held on the body on Thursday evening a verdict was returned of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 19 January 1895, Issue 8598 – Gale Document No. Y3200757800
INQUEST AT EXMINSTER – At the Royal Oak Inn, Exminster, today, Mr H. W. Gould held an Inquest respecting the death of SOPHIA GALE, 77, wife of FREDERICK GALE, carpenter. The husband stated that early on Thursday morning deceased woke up and complained of pain. He called his daughter, but before she came his wife, who had been unconscious for some time, expired. Mr E. Lipscombe, surgeon, said deceased's heart was much diseased, and one of the valves was ruptured, which would account for sudden death. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 26 January 1895, Issue 8604 – Gale Document No. Y3200757806
At an Inquest held at Brentor on Monday on the body of ELIZABETH DOIDGE, who committed suicide by hanging herself on Friday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 26 January 1895, Issue 8604 – Gale Document No. Y3200757821
RAILWAY PACKER KILLED NEAR BARNSTAPLE – Yesterday an old man named JOHN BALE, aged 68, a packer on the London and South Western Railway, was knocked down by the 11.45 train from Exeter as it was about a mile from Barnstaple. The wind was against the train and he did not hear the whistle. the train came upon him and knocked him on the right shoulder and head, precipitating him over the embankment. On the train reaching Barnstaple an engine was dispatched to the spot and the poor fellow was found by Inspector Bird lying at the bottom of the embankment. He was quite dead. His body was removed to Bishops Tawton village close by and Dr Hayter was sent for. An Inquest will be held.

INQUEST IN EXETER – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, held an Inquest at Southard's-court, St. Sidwell's, Exeter, on Tuesday on the body of the two-days old son of WILLIAM PYM, labourer. The evidence showed that the child was born on Friday and died on Sunday as the doctor came to see it. Mr J. Mackeith said death was due to insufficient vitality, owing to premature birth, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 2 February 1895, Issue 8610 – Gale Document No. Y3200757855
SUICIDE IN EXETER – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Monday, on the body of SUSAN MILLMAN, of 58, Paris-street. WILLIAM MILLMAN PILE, her grandson, said deceased had been in bad health for a long time, and ever since her husband's death she had been strange in her manner. P.C. Chaplin said he was passing Spiller-street when his attention as drawn by people rushing into one of the almshouses in Paris-street. He saw MRS MILLMAN with a cut about 3 ½ inches across her wind pipe, which was nearly severed, and a large quantity of blood was on the floor. He found a blood-stained razor on the table. He fetched Dr Mackeith, and took deceased to the hospital in the ambulance car. Mr J. E. Williams, assistant house surgeon, said he received the deceased into the Hospital on the 18th with a cut in her throat. On examination he found that the windpipe was nearly severed, but the gullet was not injured. Deceased died at eleven o'clock on Sunday. She had attempted to strip off the bandages and used violence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 2 February 1895, Issue 8610 – Gale Document No. Y3200757862
BURNING FATALITY AT EXETER – A child named JOHN HUNT, aged 2 years, of Morgan's-square, Paris-street, who was admitted into the Devon and Exeter Hospital in the earlier part of this week suffering from burns sustained through falling in a fire died this morning from the injuries. The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) has been communicated with, and an Inquest will be held at that institution on Monday.

Saturday 9 February 1895, Issue 8616 – Gale Document No. Y3200757886
SUDDEN DEATH AT TORQUAY – ELIZABETH MILFORD, 54, married, of Torre, was found dead in bed this morning shortly before seven o'clock. The Coroner has been communicated with.

At the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on Wednesday, at an Inquest held on the body of Staff-Commander WILLIAM EDWARD PARKER, of H.M.S. Prince Albert, the Jury returned a verdict of blood poisoning, occasioned by wounds which were self-inflicted whilst deceased was temporarily deranged.

EXETER – Inquest.– An Inquest was held at 38, East John-street, yesterday, by Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of the seven weeks old child of JOHN and ROSE STARK. Mr E. B. S. Perkins, surgeon, said that death was due to convulsions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

SUDDEN DEATH AT DARTMOUTH – MRS MARY BARBOUR, wife of MR HENRY COURTNEY BARBOUR, landlord of the Albion Inn, Dartmouth, died suddenly on Thursday morning. At the Inquest Mr T. O. Veale was elected Foreman of the Jury. MR BARBOUR said deceased was 69 years of age. She had been in her usual health, but had complained sometimes of general weakness and tightness of breath. On the evening of the 6th she went to bed about 10.30, and about 11.15 on his going to bed she said her breath was very tight. She complained of coldness and asked for some brandy and water, which was fetched, and she drank a small drop, saying she fancied she was better, but there was a pain in her chest. Witness called her sister and fetched a doctor, but on his arrival she had passed away. ANN FREEMAN, sister of deceased, gave corroborative evidence. While MR BARBOUR was away for the doctor, deceased said she was very ill. She died a few minutes after midnight. Mr R. W. Soper, surgeon, said he was called to see deceased on Wednesday about midnight. He went immediately, and on his arrival found she had been dead only a few minutes. In his opinion she died of syncope. He had attended her about three years since, when she was suffering from influenza and bronchitis from which she had not properly recovered. A verdict was returned of "Death from Natural Causes, probably syncope."

Saturday 9 February 1895, Issue 8616 – Gale Document No. Y3200757876
THE BROADCLYST BURNING FATALITY – At the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest, the second of its kind this week, on the body of EDITH PITMAN, aged 6, of Broadclyst, who died at the institution suffering from extensive burns as reported in the Evening Post. The Jury, of which Mr W. Rossiter was Foreman, having viewed the body, GEORGE PITMAN, farm labourer, of Elberry Cottage, Broadclyst, the father, gave evidence of identification. He said his daughter lived at home with him and enjoyed good health. There were two other young girls. On Monday last the deceased was in the house with her sisters, but witness being away at work was unable to give an account as to how the child received her injuries. He was fetched by a neighbour to go home "as one of his little children was burning." He went and found his daughter in the house standing against a table. She was in a very bad state. The flames had been extinguished, but the woollen garments she had on were very much burnt. A doctor was sent for and Doctor Somer came. The wounds were dressed and on his advice she was removed to the hospital in a trap. A wood fire was in the grate. The deceased told him that she did not know how the accident happened. There was no guard to the fire. One of the other children stated that the apron caught first. His wife had gone into the village on an errand. The girl died on Wednesday morning. By a Juror: The child was insured in the Prudential Office, but he did not expect anything as the insurance had not covered a period of twelve months. ANN ELIZABETH PITMAN, wife of the last witness, stated that on Monday last between ten and eleven she left her children in the house whilst she went into the village. She was away about an hour, and on returning she found the doctor in the house dressing the deceased. There were no matches about. The doctor advised the girl's removal to the hospital. She had on a print apron, and she thought that caught on fire first. A Juror: Don't you think it rather foolish to leave a child without anyone in charge of it. – Witness: A neighbour resides close by and I always ask her to look after the children when I am away. – Mr J. E. Williams, acting assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased was admitted an in-patient on Monday afternoon last. She was burnt all over and in an extreme state of shock, but quite free from pain. The wounds had been dressed and the girl was put to bed. Fortunately she never rallied, so she was not in pain. She could never have recovered. She died about one o'clock on Wednesday morning, the cause of her death being shock. The Coroner, in summing up, dwelt on the necessity for fire guards placed over fires in houses where children were left by themselves. s The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 9 February 1895, Issue 8616 – Gale Document No. Y3200757901
At an Inquest held at Paignton yesterday on a gardener's child named AMELIA BURRIDGE, aged four, who died on Wednesday night from extensive burns caused by her pulling a lamp off a table, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and Mr Coroner Hacker made some remarks on the danger of glass paraffin lamps.

Saturday 16 February 1895, Issue 8622 – Gale Document No. Y3200757926
At an Inquest held at Dawlish Town Hall on Monday, on the body of JOHN LOCKYER KERLE, 73, who died suddenly, a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

INQUEST AT EXETER – At the City Guildhall on Tuesday, the Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of ELIZABETH WHERWOOD, a spinster, aged 81 years. Ann Mayne, a single woman, residing at 20, Mary Arches-street, said the deceased lived with her. Witness had paid her rent of late. She had enjoyed good health, but on Sunday morning last she became ill in bed and died soon afterwards. She had been in receipt of 4s. a week relief. Seeing that deceased was ill, witness sent for Mr Brash, but she expired before his arrival. Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, deposed to arrived at the house of the deceased after death, and stated that in his opinion death was due to syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

INQUEST – Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner held an Inquiry last evening at the Country House Hotel, Ellacombe, Torquay, into the circumstances attending the death of ANN CATER, as single woman, aged 70, who lived at No. 5, Elstow-terrace, Hatfield-road, Ellacombe. The evidence was to the effect that deceased, who had small independent means, lived with her sister. She had been ailing for some years, and on Friday she went to bed, as she felt ill and had a cough. She took only beef tea, jelly and sponge cake, and refused to have a doctor, saying she would be better in a few days. On Tuesday night about eleven o'clock she was not in so much pain, but on Wednesday morning, her sister, who took her a cup of tea, found her lying dead across the bed. Dr Cook said he was called about eight o'clock, and when he arrived at the house deceased had been dead for four or five hours. He made a post mortem examination, and considered death was due to congestion of the lungs. The Jury, of whom Mr C. Lethbridge was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 16 February 1895, Issue 8622 – Gale Document No. Y3200757916
STRANGE DEATH OF AN EXETER BOY – An adjourned Inquest was held at 47, Lower North-street, Exeter, on Tuesday, by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) on the body of WALTER CLARKE, aged 7, who was found dead in bed on Sunday. The Inquest was adjourned from the previous day to enable Mr Moon, surgeon, to make a post mortem examination, he being unable to account for the cause of death. It appeared that on Thursday the lad came home from school, and, complaining of pains in his head, was given a magnesia powder by the mother, and kept in. On the Sunday morning the deceased went to his sister, CAROLIEN CLARKE, who slept in the same room as her brother, and he was then apparently alright, but suddenly a change came over him. He went back to bed and a medical man was sent for, but he was subsequently found to be dead. At the resumed Inquest that afternoon, Mr Moon stated that he made a post mortem examination about eight o'clock that morning, and found the lungs and the heart healthy. The stomach contained a small quantity of partly digested food. The liver and spleen were normal, and both kidneys were healthy. On examining the intestines he discovered a mucous discharge. There was also a small perforation, and on slitting it open he found the part all around the opening covered with mucoid discharge, slightly tinged with blood. He had no doubt that the perforation of this ulcer in the intestine was the cause of the collapse. He had since found out that the deceased had been suffering from severe diarrhoea lately. Death in his opinion, resulted from natural causes. Replying to Mr Spicer (a Juror), witness said he did not think the ulcer formed as the result of an accident. MR CLARKE, sen., rose to put a question to the doctor, but the Coroner requested him to sit down and be quiet, as he was not a Juror: MR CLARKE: I merely wish to ask a question. – The Coroner: I can't allow you. You must not interfere. – MR CLARKE: Don't you interfere with me. – The Coroner: Sit down. I cannot allow you to address me in that way. You can put any question through me if you like, but I cannot allow you to interfere. – MR CLARKE: The little boy fell down and injured his elbow about twelve months ago, and I want to know if that had anything to do with it. – The Coroner: No, no. The doctor has stated what the cause of death is. – MR CLARKE: Then I withdraw what I have said. – The Coroner: I sit here as the representative of her Majesty, and while I hold the office, I shall endeavour to carry it out properly. – MR CLARKE: I HAVE RESPECT FOR YOU. – The Coroner; You can only put a question through me. – MR CLARKE: All right, you can have the last word if you like.
The Inquiry was then proceeded with, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 16 February 1895, Issue 8622 – Gale Document No. Y3200757936
SAD SUICIDE OF AN EXETER LADY – Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on Thursday at Mount Pleasant touching the death of HELEN FLORENCE DAVY (whose singular disappearance on Sunday was referred to in our issue of the following evening), who was found on Tuesday morning under her bed with a wound in her throat and another in her arm. Mr Crump was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
JAMES HINGSTON DAVY, a draper of No. 33, High-street, identified the body as that of his sister, who was a spinster and aged 33. She resided with her parents at Mount Pleasant House, Exeter. Of late deceased had been in delicate health and about six months ago she was under medical care, but only for a short time. About three weeks ago she showed symptoms of insanity. Deceased lost a friend some time since, and this seemed to affect her mind. The last time she was out was on Saturday. She had been unable to sleep for nights. She left the house on Sunday last about 9 a.m. to take her Sunday school class and was seen by an old servant of the house at the bottom of Bath-road, and from that time he heard nothing more of the deceased until nine o'clock in the evening. She then came home very exhausted. From her appearance, witness was under the impression that she had been walking, and on witness asking her where she had been she said she did not know. She went up to bed at once, and after a sleep she seemed rather better on Monday morning. On that day someone remained with her. She got up on Tuesday morning, partially dressed herself, and went into another room. She did not return again. She could not be found in the sitting-room, and on going upstairs she found the deceased in her bedroom lying beside the bed with a wound in her arm. The Coroner: Was there not a wound in the throat? - Witness: Not that I know. - The Coroner: Don't you know of the wound in her throat? - Witness: I have not seen it. - The Coroner: Was there any instrument near her by which she could have done it? - Witness: There was a small nail knife. She died on Wednesday about nine o'clock. By a Juryman: Deceased did not complain of having pains on Sunday night.
Lucy Harding, in the employ of MR SAMUEL DAVY, said she saw the deceased when she came home on Sunday night. She looked in a very wild state, and said she thought she was killing them all by running away. Miss Webber slept with her the same night and deceased seemed better. On Monday she was queer all day. Deceased was discovered to be missing, and on Tuesday morning about nine o'clock MRS DAVY enquired from witness if she had seen her, and witness replied in the negative. Witness made enquiries of another servant who said she had seen a shadow come from the bathroom to go upstairs. s That was about eight o'clock. Witness then ran into the top bedroom where she saw the deceased by the side of the bed. She was lying flat on the floor and blood was on the wall. Witness then went downstairs and informed her master and mistress of what she had seen. Witness did not see a knife or any other instrument near the deceased. Witness then ran for a medical man. Deceased was given some brandy and the wound in the throat was examined. There was also a wound on the left arm. – By a Juryman: Witness had the impression that the deceased was not herself on Sunday evening when she returned. Deceased appeared alright on the Monday. She was watched all the time. When she came back on Sunday she did not say where she had been, but it had been found out that she had walked to Rockbeare. Mr Bowden ( a Juryman): After going away on the Sunday like she did, she might have been watched.
Mr R. Picard, F.R.C.S., proved being called to see the deceased on Sunday evening. Witness found her in the parlour very excited and somewhat incoherent in her replies. Witness prescribed for her. Witness was again called on Tuesday morning about 10.15 and he found the deceased lying on the floor in a room upstairs in a fainting condition, and with two wounds – a slight one on the front of the neck and a deep one on the left arm, just above the elbow. Witness dressed both wounds temporarily but her condition was too critical to do much for the arm. In the course of Tuesday bronchitis set in; that increased and MISS DAVY died on Wednesday evening, witness being present at the death. Witness had not been shown any instrument by which the wounds could have been caused. They must have been caused by a sharp instrument, and could have been done by a penknife. Witness could not say whether it was a long or short instrument, as the wounds were jagged. In his opinion deceased would have got over the wounds had not the bronchitis set in. Death was caused by the injuries to the throat and arm with bronchitis supervening.
The Coroner said there could be no doubt that there was insanity and the parents had his, and he was sure the Jury's, deepest sympathy in their sad bereavement. It was a very sad thing to have their child taken from them under such distressing circumstances. s There was little doubt that the death of her friend had greatly affected her mind and the insanity had been clearly demonstrated. the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst of Unsound Mind, and endorsed all that had been said by the Coroner.

Saturday 23 February 1895, Issue 8628 – Gale Document No. Y3200757061
ACCIDENTAL DEATH IN EXETER – At 57, Sandford-street, Newtown, on Monday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of ANNE MURPHY, 76, widow of a traveller. Mrs Hannah Northam said deceased lodged with her. On December 18th she was sitting in a low chair attending to witness's child when she overturned the chair and fell on the arm. She said she thought she had broken her thigh, and witness sent for Dr Mortimer. MRS MURPHY died on Friday. Dr Mortimer said death was due to fracture of the neck of the left thigh bone, together with congestion of the lungs following on heart failure. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

INQUEST IN EXETER – Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on Thursday on the body of FLORENCE BESSIE MCCAULEY, aged five months, who, previous to her death lived with her parents at Law's Buildings, Commercial-road. Deceased was found about 6 o'clock in her mother's arms dead. Dr Smith, of St. Thomas, gave evidence and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

BEATRICE SARAH WHEELER, five years of age, residing with her parents at 37 John-street, Morice Town, was received into the Royal Albert Hospital on Sunday evening suffering from burns. She was reaching up to the mantel-piece when her pinafore caught fire, and the child received deep burns about the face, neck and arms. She died on Tuesday morning At the Inquest held at the hospital on Wednesday by the Borough Coroner, Mr A. J. Pearce, Dr Morris, house surgeon, stated that there was very little prospect of the child doing well from the first. She died from shock. A verdict accordingly was returned.

SUICIDE AT EXWICK – LEONARD PRIESTLY, 36, gas man employed at St. David's Station, and residing at Foxhayes, Exwick, committed suicide on Thursday by shooting himself with a revolver. He had been unwell for a few days, and this morning about 9.30 his landlady (Mrs Lockyer) took him up some tea and toast. Not long after she had left him she heard the report of fire-arms, and on hurrying up found a quantity of blood on the pillow and the bed. She then ran to P.C. Vanstone, who happened to be near, and he on going to the bedroom found PRIESTLY with a bullet wound on the right temple, there being a quantity of blood about. The man was still holding a revolver in his right hand. The constable spoke to him, but he did not answer, and die din about ten minutes. The weapon was a six-chambered one, two chambers having been loaded. Mr Farrant was sent for, but life was extinct when he arrived. Deceased was a widower and had a daughter nine years of age. His wife died about six months ago, and this seemed to have considerably affected him. At the Inquest a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

INQUEST IN EXETER – Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry eyste3rdayinto the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARTNOLL, aged 7 months, residing with his parents at Pavilion-place. ANN ELIZABETH HARTNOLL, wife of WILLIAM HENRY HARTNOLL, a coal miner, identified the body as that of her son. He had been delicate since birth. On Wednesday last witness was nursing the deceased in her lap when he lost his breath, clenched his hands and died about five minutes afterwards. Mr Faulkner, surgeon, said he had attended the deceased for convulsions. He was sent for on Wednesday, and on going to the parents' house found the child dead. There were no marks of violence, and in his opinion death was due to convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 2 March 1895, Issue 8634 – Gale Document No. Y3200757999
The Borough Coroner, Mr J. A. Pearce, held an Inquiry at the Dockyard on Tuesday relative to the death of WILLIAM SEYMOUR, able seaman of the Admiralty store vessel Discovery, whose body was found in the water on the previous afternoon. It appeared from the evidence that deceased went fishing at noon, and when last seen was standing on the stone coping of the jetty. He was told by a comrade to "look out as it was very slippery." The crew were not surprised when he did not turn up to dinner, as others also absented themselves. His cap was subsequently found floating in the water, and a search was then made for deceased. As he could not be found a diver was fetched, and deceased was found by the side of the jetty. The Jury, of whom Mr Ball was Foreman, returned a verdict that deceased was Accidentally Drowned. Mr J. P. Goldsmith represented the Admiralty.

Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest at the Five Bells Inn, Ottery, on Tuesday touching the death of GEORGE PAYNE, shoemaker, of Ottery St. Mary, who died suddenly the previous evening. Dr Isherwood gave evidence to the effect that the deceased had suffered from heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

SUDDEN DEATH IN THE STREET – A painful case of sudden death occurred in Exeter on Wednesday. It appeared that an employee of the City Council named GEORGE MARDEN, aged 33 years, of St. Sidwell's, was engaged in some work outside Messrs. Stedhall's establishment in Queen-street, when he suddenly fell down and expired. He was conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital in a cab, but, of course, human aid was of no avail, life being extinct. The cause of death is said to be heart disease. The deceased, who is stated to have been a pensioner, had been ill for some time, and that morning was the first occasion on which he had been to work since his illness. The Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday, by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper. RICHARD MARDON, of Plantation-buildings, Newtown, identified the body as that of his brother, a labourer, single, and 32 years of age, in the employ of the Exeter City Council. He went to work on Wednesday for the first time for a considerable period, he having been ill, on and off, about three months. He left home after breakfast just before nine to go to Queen-street, where the road was to be opened for the purpose of laying an electric cable. He Had complained of pains in his chest and had a bad cough. Robert Greenslade, labourer, George's-square, Stepcote-hill, said while at work with deceased in Queen-street Wednesday, he saw him fall back unconscious. He was taken to the Hospital. Mr H. H. Lloyd, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was received there about a quarter to ten on Wednesday morning. He had apparently been dead a few minutes. At the request of the Coroner he made an examination of the body, and found the heart badly diseased and the kidneys inflamed. Death was due to syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Mr R. W. Prideaux, Deputy Coroner for the District, held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Dartmouth Guildhall on WALTER HEAD LANGLEY. HENRY MILL LANGLEY, sailor, identified the body as that of his son, between 17 and 18 months of age. Deceased was never a very strong child. Witness last saw him alive at 3.30 on Tuesday, when he was quite bright, but shortly after he had a kind of fit, with coughing and struggling, and then died almost immediately. MRS LANGLEY said deceased never had a fit before to her knowledge. Charlotte Partridge also gave evidence. Mr A. K. Crossfield, surgeon, said he was sent for, but was out, and on arriving home about six o'clock he found a note and went to the house. He found the deceased to be a fairly well nourished child. It was quite cold, and from the symptoms he should say it died of natural causes, probably heart disease. He did not think it had a fit. A verdict was returned in accordance with the doctor's evidence.

SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) at 67, Clifton-road, Exeter, on Thursday, on the body of a widow named FANNY DAVIS, aged 77. Evidence of identification was given by a daughter named FANNY THICKPENNY, a widow of Newport Pagnell, Bucks, who stated that she had not seen her mother for two years. On Tuesday morning she received a letter stating that she was unwell, and two hours and a half afterwards had a telegram calling her to Exeter. She found her mother dead. Mrs Mary Ann Lewis said the deceased had lodged at her house for about two years. She would not allow anyone to go into her room, and she was rather strange in her manner. On Saturday she was attended by Dr Mackeith, and on Monday when she last saw her alive, she appeared in her usual health with the exception that she coughed a little. the next morning witness knocked to her door and called her, but receiving no answer she went into the room and found her dead in bed. The deceased had been in receipt of parochial relief amounting to 3s. 6d. per week. Mr J. Mackeith, surgeon, said he had attended the deceased occasionally during the past year and a half for a generally pulmonary condition. He visited her on Saturday when he found her suffering from a chill with a slight attack of bronchitis. He intended calling on her the following Tuesday, but before he was able to do so he was informed of her death. In his opinion the cause of death was Natural Decay, accelerated by bronchitis and syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 2 March 1895, Issue 8634 – Gale Document No. Y3200758010
THE FATAL ACCIDENT TO AN EXETER MAN - Inquest, This Day. - The Inquest on the body of the employee of the St. Anne's Well Brewery who met with the fatal accident at Newton St. Cyres, was held at the Crown and Sceptre Inn this morning by Mr Coroner H. W. Gould. GABRIEL TIMMS, of Kingsbridge, identified the body as that of his father. His real name was GABRIEL TIMMS, but he was generally known as WILLIAM SIMMONS. He was a drayman, fifty years of age. Thomas William Pash, Paul-street, Exeter, drayman, in the employ of the St. Anne's Well Brewery Company, said on Thursday he went to Crediton with deceased, each being in charge of a dray, and arrived there about quarter-to-three, and left there, he should think, at half-past six. Witness's horse went on in front. Just before reaching Newton St. Cyres deceased's horse tried to pass witness, who on looking saw there was no driver. He stopped the horses, and leaving his own in charge of a man he went back, as far as he could judge, about a mile to look for deceased. On the way he met a gentleman driving, and he told witness he had seen a man sitting in the road. Witness found the deceased in the middle of the road near the railway arch sitting tailor fashion. When asked what was the matter he said "Nothing," and got up on the waggon, telling witness to drive on as he was alright. Witness tied deceased's horse behind his own waggon, as SIMMONS appeared to have fallen asleep. Deceased kept on shouting "Whoa, and {?] stopped it broke the reins, until witness remonstrated with him, and he then desisted. Arriving at the Crown and Sceptre witness had a glass of ale, deceased then being apparently asleep. At the top of the hill witness went to change the wagons so that deceased's should lead, but as witness's horse broke its bridge. Witness went to wake up deceased to tell him that he must drive his own dray, when he found that he was dead. He was a little affected when he left Crediton, either by the drink he had had or a cigar he had smoked, being unused to smoking. Deceased was a steady man as a rule. Mr H. M. Mallett, Downes Mills, Crediton, said on Thursday he was driving to Newton St. Cyres about quarter to eight. Near the railway bridge his pony shied at something in the road, which as he passed he saw was a man sitting in the road. His pony bolted for about thirty yards, and when he reined it in the last witness came up. Witness went back with him. Could not say what condition deceased was in. Arthur Bonner, baker, of St. Cyres, said about half-past nine on Thursday night he was driving home, and when near the school Pash told him he thought his mate was dead, and asked him to go for a policeman. Deceased was then on the waggon with blood on his face. Dr Vlieland said he had examined deceased and found a contused wound on the forehead extending to the bone. The inner table of the skull was fractured, and a large blood vessel was lacerated, the brain having been compressed with haemorrhage, which was, in his opinion, the cause of death. The Injury might have been the result of a fall. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. A Juryman suggested that a rider should be added that drivers of such wagons should be provided with lamps, but the Coroner said he thought the subject was one for private individuals, and no hard and fast line could be drawn.

Saturday 2 March 1895, Issue 8634 – Gale Document No. Y3200758011
FATAL ACCIDENT IN EXETER – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest this morning at Belmont-road, Exeter, on the body of MARY BOLT, aged 87. The deceased on Sunday week last fell out of bed and fractured her thigh. She gradually sank and died yesterday morning. Dr Mortimer gave evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 9 March 1895, Issue 8640 – Gale Document No. Y3200758035
SUDDEN DEATH – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, held an Inquest at 24, Sun-street, on Wednesday, on the body of WILLIAM OAK, 35, foundry labourer. MRS OAK said her husband went to work on Monday. When she woke up about half-past four on Tuesday morning he was apparently dead. He had complained of palpitation of the heart. Mr Harrison, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased, whom he found warm, but dead. The probable cause of death was syncope from heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 9 March 1895, Issue 8640 – Gale Document No. Y3200758048
At the Inquest held at the Axminster Workhouse on the body of the infant male child of ELIZABETH ROCKETT, a single woman, who, as reported in our issue of Thursday, was confined by the roadside a verdict of "Born Dead" was returned.

Saturday 9 March 1895, Issue 8640 – Gale Document No. Y3200758042
SAD BURNING FATALITY AT BABBACOMBE – Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Wednesday evening at the Royal Hotel, Babbacombe, on the body of FANNY FOXLOW, aged 51. ANNA FOXLOW, daughter of the deceased, said he mother lived with her husband and children at Milo, All Saints'-road, Babbacombe. When she left home on the morning of February 15th she was looking quite well, but about five o'clock witness was fetched by Mr Folland, who said that her mother had had an accident. On reaching home she found her mother in bed, severely burnt about her left leg and stomach. ELSIE FOXLOW, aged 11, stated that her mother was left in the house alone when she went to school about two o'clock. On returning home about half-past four, she found her mother lying on her back, on the hearth-rug, in the sitting-room. Her dress was smoking, and she was screaming, "Oh my! oh, my!" Witness ran and fetched Mrs Folland, a neighbour, who put the smoking out. Mary Folland said that she was called to the house by the last witness. She ran and wrapped her own clothes around deceased and extinguished the smoking with the assistance of witness's husband. She dressed and bandaged the wounds and put deceased to bed, and nursed her until her death. Surgeon-Captain Cunningham, who was called in about six o'clock, said he found deceased in bed. She was carefully bandaged and the wounds had been skilfully dressed. Deceased was frightfully and extensively burnt about the legs and stomach. He could get [?] from the deceased herself about the occurrence. He had been in constant attendance until her death. In spite of the shock and severe burns, she was recovering when about a week ago pneumonia set in. This was got over all right, but internal haemorrhage followed, of which she died. He thought that deceased must have had an epileptic seizure while sitting before the fire. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 16 March 1895, Issue 8646 – Gale Document No. Y3200758060
INQUESTS AT EXMOUTH – An Inquest was held at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Thursday by Mr Cox on the body of GILBERT VICTOR BADGLEY, the infant son of COLONEL BADGLEY. COLONEL BADGLEY, of Mansfield, Littleham Valley, aid the child was born on the 24th of May, and was in perfect health. On the 6th inst. his wife was called to the nursery, and subsequently witness saw the child on the bed and his wife pouring olive oil over it. It appeared that the nurse, Miss Crossan, a lady by birth, and eighteen years of age, undressed the baby and just dipped it into the water taking it out again on her lap. The bath was nine inches deep. She then noticed that the child's legs were scalded. It never screamed or cried. The child died on the 12th inst., at 11 o'clock in the night. Witness thought the fires had been kept in rather late the previous night, and that the water in the boiler did not require so much heating the next morning and that the nurse did not think it was so hot when she drew it. Mr Dalley (a Juryman) thought the nurse ought to be present. Rebecca Lloyd, housemaid, gave evidence, and Dr Curtis said the child was badly scalded, some of the outside skin hanging in patches. He thought the water must have been almost boiling and that the severe shock kept the child from screaming. Deceased was not scalded above the hips, and everything was done that was possible. He considered the nurse to have been very careless in omitting to try the water. the Coroner said it was for the Jury to consider seriously whether Miss Crossan should be called, and whether anything would be gained by it. COLONEL BADGLEY said the Nurse was an orphan and quite destitute. She was very fond of the deceased, and she had every inducement to keep her situation. She was now staying with Miss Vane at Worthing. He was quite certain she was not criminally to blame. Ultimately the Jury found that death resulted from scalds received from the water in the bath being too hot, and not being properly tested.

An Inquest was also held at the Rolle Hotel, on the body of ELIZABETH HARRIS, of 14, Bicton-place. MISS EVA REW said deceased was her aunt and was 74 years of age. she had enjoyed good health. MRS SARAH REW, the principal witness, was too ill to attend. Dr Martin said he was called last Tuesday and found deceased lying on the floor quite dead before the fire. He afterwards made a post-mortem examination and found death to be due to fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Natural Causes.

Saturday 16 March 1895, Issue 8646 – Gale Document No. Y3200758069
TORQUAY – REBECCAH HAYNES, aged 71, living at 5, Pennsylvania-road died suddenly at about 11 a.m., yesterday morning. Death is supposed to be due to chronic bronchitis and failure of the heart's action. As deceased had not been attended by a doctor, the Coroner has been communicated with.

In the Upton Parish Rooms, Torquay, last evening, Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of BETTY FRANCES GODFREY, a spinster, aged 58, of steps-cottages, Warren-road. Dr Richardson, who had made a post mortem examination, considered death was due to a clot f blood which got into circulation from an ulceration, entered the heart and stopped the circulation, causing embolism of the heart. The organs were also diseased. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 23 March 1895, Issue 8652 – Gale Document No. Y3200758110
At the Enquiry held on Monday touching the death of MISS CLAIRE KNOX RUDGE, of Beaumont House, Stoke, who was killed near Cornwood on Saturday whilst hunting, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 23 March 1895, Issue 8652 – Gale Document No. Y3200758117
SUICIDE OF AN EXETER TRADESMAN – MR A. RESTALL, dyer, carrying on business at 132A, Sidwell-street, Exeter, committed suicide on Monday afternoon. It appears that MRS RESTALL, on going into the workshop in the rear of the house between two and three o'clock found her husband in the act of drinking from a small bottle. She knocked the phial from his hand, and seeing that it contained poison and that her husband had apparently taken a portion of the contents immediately sent for a medical gentleman. Mr Edward Steele-Perkins soon arrived and administered an emetic, but MR RESTALL expired shortly after.
The Inquest was held on Tuesday by Mr H. W. Hooper. MARY RESTALL, the widow, said deceased came into the shop about a quarter to two on Monday afternoon, and she asked him to have some dinner, but he went into the dye house at the rear. As he did not return she went to him and saw him swallowing something from a mug. He did not answer when she asked him what he was doing, and she knocked the mug out of his hand, called the assistant and went for a doctor. Deceased's health had not been good, and he had been much worried in his business. Cyanide of potassium, which deceased had swallowed, was sometimes, though not often, used in the business for cleaning. He had threatened to take it once or twice before, but he had never previously attempted to take his life.
Charles Betteridge, assistant, said he was called to deceased, whom he found standing beside the dye-house copper. He mumbled some words which witness could not understand, and then ran across to the corner of the room, as if in a fit. Deceased had talked in the morning of going to America, and witness thought he was out of his mind. Mr E. Steele-Perkins, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased, whom he found alive, but too far gone to take an emetic, and by the time witness had fetched a stomach-pump he was dead. Death was due to the swallowing cyanide of potassium, a deadly poison. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 30 March 1895, Issue 8658 – Gale Document No. Y3200758138
At an Inquest held by Mr H. W. Gould at the White Horse Hotel, Bampton, on Monday on the body of MRS SARAH WOOD, aged 83, who was found drowned in the river Ratherum on Saturday, a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

At an Inquest at Paignton touching the death of HANNAH MOISEY, aged 52, a cook, who died suddenly after eating a hearty tea, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned in the case of CAROLINE MILLMAN, a widow, aged 45, at an Inquest on Tuesday at the Torbay Inn, Torquay. A neighbour saw the deceased in her house getting ready to go to work when she remarked that her brother Joe was dead at Exeter and then fell to the floor, dying soon afterwards.

Saturday 6 April 1895, Issue 8664 – Gale Document No. Y3200758197
SAD OCCURRENCE AT DEVONPORT – A warrant officer of H.M.S. Dreadnought, lying in Keyham Basin, Devonport, named WILLIAM REYPERT, was found in his cabin late last night. A bottle labelled "Cholorodyne" has been found and it is supposed deceased took an overdose. He was thirty-six years of age, has a wife and family, and is a native of Portsmouth. The Borough Coroner has been informed of the occurrence, and an Inquest will be held on Monday.

THE TEIGNMOUTH FATALITY – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at the London Hotel, Teignmouth, this afternoon on the body of the little girl, DOROTHY SAMPSON, three years old, who, as we reported last evening, was run over and killed by a runaway horse. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 6 April 1895, Issue 8664 – Gale Document No. Y3200758167
ANOTHER SUICIDE AT EXMOUTH – On Tuesday about six o'clock CAPTAIN HENRY GREAVES, of Manchester-street, Exmouth, committed suicide by hanging himself. Deceased at one time was a master mariner, and was 64 years of age. He leaves a widow and grown up children. A young man named Litton found the deceased hanging from a ladder in the back yard of Mr R. Hine, stonemason. A doctor and the police were at once communicated with, and P.C. Weeks was soon on the spot, and found deceased quite dead, but warm. Dr Kane soon followed the policeman.
The Inquest was held by Mr Cox on Wednesday at the York Hotel. MRS GREAVES, deceased's wife, who had to be assisted to stand to take the oath, said her husband was 63 years old, and had been a master mariner, but latterly had acted as boatman, and had also gone fishing. He had not been in good health lately, suffering in the chest and had seemed low spirited. He had, however, not seen a doctor for two years. He had also seemed depressed through the trouble he had had in taking the charge of his grandchildren. She last saw him alive on Monday evening about nine o'clock. A man named Redman called her husband about 5.30 the next morning to go to work, and she heard him go down stairs. she did not hear the front door open, and thought she had heard him go out to the back. She called her daughter, who pulled up her bedroom blind and saw deceased's shoes at the bottom of the wall. They went downstairs and called a man named Gliddon, who refused to render assistance, stating that he had his work to attend to. MINNIE GREAVES, daughter of deceased, corroborated, and said they went out and called a Mr Litten. H. Litten, who lives at Albion-place, and is a mason's labourer, said while going to his sister's he was called by MRS GREAVES. He went and found MR GREAVES having by a rope to a ladder quite dead. Witness went out again and met a man named Knight, who assisted to cut the body down. Witness then sent Mrs Bridle, a neighbour, for Dr Hudson, to the police. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary Insanity." The Foreman (Mr Peters) considered the man who was called and refused to come in the first place deserved the Coroner's censure, and he hoped the Press would take notice of it. It is stated that deceased's sister and mother died in asylums.

Saturday 6 April 1895, Issue 8664 – Gale Document No. Y3200758176
At an Inquest held on the body of MR WILLIAM ELWORTHY, at Stone Barter, Southmolton, on Monday, who broke his leg and was found lying on the floor and died on Sunday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from fracture of the thigh and subsequent exhaustion."

At the Inquest held on WILLIAM GRABHAM of Broadhembury, who died from injuries received by falling off a waggon, the sister-in-law of the landlord of the Greyhound Inn, at which house it was stated that deceased was supplied with drink, was called as a witness, but failed to appear, although she had been summoned. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died from the effects of an accident, caused through falling off a waggon while in a state of drunkenness.

An Inquest was held at the Lansdown Hotel, Dawlish, on Tuesday, on the body of ELIZABETH GIDLEY, aged 58, wife of JAMES GIDLEY, labourer, who dropped down dead. Mr A. de W. Baker, surgeon, said he had made a post mortem examination on the body and considered death was due to embolism of one of the arteries of the brain. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, and the Foreman of the Jury (Mr Discombe) was requested to lay before the Newton Abbot Board of Guardians the fact that the body had not been placed in a coffin.

FOUND DEAD IN BED – The Exeter Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at 32, Poltimore-square on Thursday on the body of FLORENCE PYLE, aged about three months, the daughter of a young woman named KATHLEEN ELIZABETH PYLE. The mother stated that on awakening yesterday morning she found the child by her side dead. Mr Alfred S. Perkins said death was a natural one, and the Jury, of which Mr Russell was Foreman, returned a verdict accordingly.

Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at his offices at Newton on Friday on the body of ANNIE BARKER, aged four months, daughter of a house painter. The evidence showed that the child had suffered from diarrhoea since Monday. On Wednesday it was put to bed and slept between its mother and a Mrs Milton. Next morning the child was found dead. Dr Hunt said the child had been given food which had not agreed with it. The mother said it had had bottled milk and prepared oats. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 6 April 1895, Issue 8664 – Gale Document No. Y3200758193
"Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest at Torquay yesterday on the body of EMMA BRITTON, aged 47, who died suddenly on Thursday morning.

Saturday 6 April 1895, Issue 8664 – Gale Document No. Y3200758165
THE SUICIDE AT EXMOUTH – At the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, Monday, Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest touching the death of THOMAS TOBY, baker, of Hillsborough-terrace, who took his life on Friday morning last by cutting his throat with a penknife. The Jury, of which Mr T. A. Redway was Foreman, having viewed the body, WILLIAM TOBY, son of the deceased, said his father was 55 years of age. He had been in good health of late. On Thursday night last witness came home at nine o'clock, and retired to rest half an hour later, the deceased at the time being downstairs. He was very pleasant and did not seem in any way depressed. Witness had no conversation with him, and that was the last time he saw him alive. Just after six o'clock next morning witness went into deceased's bedroom with the intention of calling him, but he was not there. He then went downstairs and found his father in the bakehouse in a kneeling position bending over a tub, the water in which was coloured with blood. Witness laid his father down, but he did not speak. He noticed there was a cut across his throat, but he did not see any instrument lying about. Witness called a neighbour who at once came, deceased being alive at the time. His father had been depressed over financial troubles and had said that if he could only get the money that was owed him he should be happy. In reply to a Juryman, witness said deceased had never threatened to take his life.
Mr Long, a neighbour, said on Thursday night he spoke to deceased about the weather and he then appeared to be depressed. He had suffered very much from a wound in his leg, and witness had known that he had been in straightened circumstances. Witness was called on Friday and found the deceased lying in the yard on his side with a cut in his throat. The knife with which he committed the act was in the bakehouse. Medical assistance was immediately summoned and deceased was taken indoors and laid down. He died the same morning.
Mr William Fisher, surgeon, assistant to Mr Hodgson, proved being called on Friday morning last. Deceased was in the bakehouse lying on his back unconscious. He had a serious wound in his throat, about two and a half inches long. It was obviously a self-inflicted wound. Witness saw a knife covered with blood with which the wound could have been inflicted.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

INQUESTS IN EXETER – An Inquest was held at No. 5, Bishop's-buildings, Exeter, on Tuesday on the body of the newly born child of MR and MRS DOWN. Dr J. Mackeith said death was due to insufficient vitality, caused by the child sleeping on his face. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court on Tuesday, touching the death of MR LEONARD TRELEASE, 23 years of age, of the firm of Messrs. Trelease Bros., hosiers, &c., of High-street. WILLIAM TRELEASE, cashier to Messrs. Garton and King, and residing at 4, Springfield, Old Tiverton-road, said that the deceased was his son. They breakfasted together on Sunday morning, and witness then went upstairs. On coming down again he was horrified to find his son lying on the floor almost on his face unconscious. Having called his wife, he went for Dr Perkins, who came at once, but his son was dead when they arrived at the house. The deceased was a steady young man, and, as far as he knew, an abstainer. Deceased occasionally complained of a pain in his left side. Mr E. B. Steele-Perkins, surgeon, said in his opinion death was due to heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

An Inquest was held by Mr H. W. Gould at Digby's Asylum on Tuesday on WALTER SCOTT, aged 75, an ironmonger's assistant formerly living at 10, Dinham-road, Exeter, and who became an inmate of the Asylum on Saturday, dying the next day. Dr Rutherford, medical superintendent of the institution, said he had made a post mortem examination and found the cause of death to be fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 6 April 1895, Issue 8664 – Gale Document No. Y3200758194
THE SUPPOSED SUICIDE AT EXETER - Inquest. Today. – The Inquest on the body of ELIZABETH PERINGTON, a widow, aged 72 years, of No. 2, St. Leonard's-terrace, Wonford-road, Mount Radford who died yesterday morning as reported in last evening's Post, from self afflicted injuries, was held at the Exeter Police Court today by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper). MISS ELIZABETH STONE, grand-daughter, residing at 2, St. Leonard's-terrace, gave evidence of identification. On the 27th March she went into the deceased's bedroom with a cup of tea and she noticed some blood on her pillow. she was in bed and witness called her father. It was then seen that the deceased had cut her left arm near the elbow and which had stopped bleeding. There was a blood stained razor in an arm chair near the bed. Witness asked her grandmother what was the matter, but she gave her no answer. Dr Kempe, who was immediately sent for soon arrived at the house and had continually attended her until her death which took place yesterday morning at half past three. She had not been strange in her manner, but troubled because she could not get about. Deceased's mother died insane. The razor belonged to her father, but had been on a shelf unused for years. Not long since she had a severe attack of bronchitis. Dr A. Kempe, deposed that on the 27th March, about twenty minutes to eleven, he was called by a messenger in a cab and on arriving at the house he found the deceased in bed in an unconscious condition. There was a good deal of blood on a shawl that had been carefully folded and placed underneath the left elbow. On examination he found that she had four incisions across the bend of the elbow, and had cut the two main veins there. The artery was not severed owing to the bluntness of the razor. She also had made two incisions at the back of the wrist and one in the front. He continued to attend her until her death. He had been her medical attendant for some years. He considered the injuries caused the deceased's death. The Jury found that deceased committed suicide whilst of Unsound Mind.

Saturday 13 April 1895, Issue 8669 – Gale Document No. Y3200758219
At an Inquest held at Plymouth on Monday on the body of THOMAS OLDRIDGE, fisherman, aged 35, who fell into the water in Sutton Pool, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 13 April 1895, Issue 8669 – Gale Document No. Y3200758232
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT SIDMOUTH – An Inquest was held at the Bedford Hotel, Sidmouth, on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Gould (of Exeter) touching the death of EDWARD LEDGER BROWNING, 13 years of age, of Spencer Lodge, Wandsworth, Surrey, a visitor at Sidmouth, who was killed on Monday while riding a bicycle down Peak Hill, Sidmouth. ARTHUR BROWNING, brother of the deceased, stated that they were on a visit to Sidmouth and he and his brother were out bicycling at Peek Hill about 12 noon on Monday. They were descending the hill, when his brother passed him. Witness called to him to jump off, but he was going too fast to be able to stop him. Witness jumped off and ran after him. When he turned a sharp corner he heard a scream,. and on getting there Mr Fletcher and a woman was picking him up. There was no break on the bicycle. Mr Spencer L. Fletcher said he had been for a walk, and on coming down Peek Hill, at the top of which was a danger board, he heard a noise, and on turning round he saw the deceased lying full length on the ground. He went back and saw that blood was issuing from deceased's head. He was groaning at the time. The deceased's machine was close by. Witness endeavoured to stop the blood with his handkerchief, and his brother coming on the scene witness and a woman carried the injured lad to a place close by. There were traces of blood, and pieces of the skull on the road. He should think his head came in contact with the road, as the largest patch of blood was there. He did not consider his head struck the stones. He went for a doctor as soon as possible. Dr Williams stated that he went to Willoughby House, where he saw the deceased lying on the ground, groaning a little, but quite unconscious. There was an extensive injury to the right side of the skull. A large piece of the bone was removed and the brain protruding, the injuries were the cause of death. The Coroner in summing up said there was no evidence at all that the stones at the side of the road had anything to do with the accident. The Jury, of whom Mr Field was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 20 April 1895, Issue 8675 – Gale Document No. Y3200758255
INQUEST – An Inquest was held at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, on Tuesday, on the body of WALTER ERNEST LOARING, whose body was found in the Exe the same morning. While playing on the banks on the 27th ult., with another boy deceased fell into the river. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Drowning," and added a river to the effect that the Coroner should bring before the proper authorities the desirability of doing something to prevent people falling into the water at the spot where the deceased fell in.

Saturday 27 April 1895, Issue 8681 – Gale Document No. Y3200758294
An Inquest was held at Okehampton on the body of CHARLES WEST, carpenter, in the employ of the S.W.R. Company, who was seen to fall into the hedge. Dr Passmore said that death was due to heart disease. Deceased lived in Paris-street, Exeter, and leaves a widow and a child.

Saturday 27 April 1895, Issue 8681 – Gale Document No. Y3200758308
SUPPOSED SUICIDE AT EXMOUTH – The Day Before Marriage. – Quite a sensation was caused in Exmouth last night on it becoming known that a young man named FRANK SANDERS, well known as a dancing master and a member of the "Star" Minstrel Troupe, had been found dead in bed, having, it is supposed, taken poison. The case is all the more sad as the deceased was to have been married today at Paignton. It appears that last evening Mr Clapp, at whose house SANDERS lived, went to call him, and getting no answer burst open the door and found the deceased, who was about 29 years of age, on the bed quite dead, with a Bible and Prayer book by his side together with a small bottle which it is said contained oxalic acid. P.S. Dymond was sent for, and Dr Hodgson, who was summoned, found life to be extinct. The Coroner has been communicated with and an Inquest will in all probability be held on Monday.

Saturday 4 May 1895, Issue 8687 – Gale Document No. Y3200758320
INQUEST IN EXETER – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquiry at the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday touching the death of CHARLES FEWINGS, 55, navy pensioner. Mrs Webber, of 88, Sidwell-street, said deceased, whom she had known for the last eleven years, lived by himself at Davey['s-cottages, Mary Arches-street. She was called on Monday to see him, but he was dead when she arrived. Bessie Harris, 12, of Mary Arches-street, who was not sworn, was the last to see deceased alive. Henry Nicholls, painter, of 24, Friernhay-street, said he saw deceased on Saturday night, when he complained of tightness on his chest. When he went to deceased again on Monday morning he found him in bed dead. He did not want for food, and had only drawn his pension on the 1st of last month. Mrs Webber said deceased's life was insured for £11 17s. Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said his opinion was that deceased died in an epileptic fit, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 4 May 1895, Issue 8687 – Gale Document No. Y3200758332
An Inquest was held on Monday at Tiverton Infirmary on the body of JOHN PRESCOTT, bookmaker, Morebath, who died suddenly. Mr H. C. Barnes, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination of the body, attributed death to extensive and long standing heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

An Inquest was held at Dartmouth on Monday on ALONZO HARLOW, second officer on board the steamer Universal, of Sunderland. Capt. Scarborough said the deceased complained of illness at Bilbao, and witness wanted to leave him in a hospital, but got a doctors certificate that he was able to proceed. On the 28th inst. about 12.30 the steward said deceased was dying, and at one o'clock he was dead. He did no duty on the homeward passage. Deceased had taken a lot of medicine A verdict of death from heart failure following on bronchial pneumonia was returned.

Saturday 4 May 1895, Issue 8687 – Gale Document No. Y3200758336
SUICIDE AT DAWLISH – At the Town Hall, Dawlish, on Friday Mr Fraser (Deputy Coroner) held an inquest on the body of ROSETTA BESSIE BEER, a servant, aged 17, who committed suicide by throwing herself over Hole Head on Wednesday evening. Mr Avant was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
MRS RHODA BEER, of Cove, Tiverton, gave evidence of identification and said there was no insanity in the family. Deceased was always healthy.
John Quick, draper of Dawlish, said the deceased was in his employ until a month ago when his business passed over to his son, and she still stayed on with him. Witness was constantly on the premises and saw the deceased. She used to have fits of low spirits and would frequently sit down and have half an hour's cry to herself without giving any reason for it. Witness had never had any cause to find fault with her as to how she had done her work. Lately things had been missed from the establishment, and suspicion had fallen on the deceased. On Wednesday last the suspicions were confirmed. Witness, knowing her means, and seeing her frequently send away parcels, took her to task on Wednesday morning. In the first place he asked her if she had sent away a certain article as a present to her brother, and she said she yes. He then asked her where she bought it, and she said at Mr Beer's. She was then asked where she got the money, and she replied that her mother had sent her it the previous morning. Witness said he did not believe that statement, and witness again taxed her with sending parcels away and informed the girl that he did not consider her truthful or honest. He then asked her to come with him to her room, which she did. On the way up witness got her to unlock her drawers and on her doing so he found several articles which had been missed from his son's shop and which were identified. Witness said to her "These articles belongs to me, BESSIE, and who served you with them," and she replied that no one had. Witness then asked her how she got them and she turned very pale and began to cry. Witness again put the question to her. She did not reply, but ran downstairs. Witness called to her to come back, and she came up two stairs and then turned back again, and in a very excited state ran out of the house as hard as she could go without saying anything. Witness's daughter was coming in the door at the time the deceased was going out, and BEER nearly knocked her over. Witness's daughter said to witness that she thought BESSIE (meaning deceased) would go and drown herself, and witness asked her why that thought was in her brain. She replied that she looked so depressed and wild and that the deceased had said that she would drown herself on a previous occasion. After that witness fearing the consequences sent his son to go and search for a policeman to go and find the deceased and tell her to come back.
By the Coroner: Before the girl went out of the house he did not threaten to fetch a policeman for her. He did not threaten her in any way. When she went out of the house he did not hear anything about the deceased until he was informed that she had taken her life by jumping over the cliff. He received that information about 7.45 in the evening.
A Juryman: There has been a lot of rumours in the town as to what was found in her drawers. Is it true that a jacket was included? - Witness: No. There was an inside dress, some underclothing, pair of gloves, silk square, and some gentleman's stockings.
Another Juryman: Is it a fact that she was under notice to leave? - Witness: She gave the notice to leave herself.
A Juryman: There was no chance for anyone else to have put these things in the girl's drawers? - Witness: No.
MRS BEER, recalled, in answer to the Coroner, said it was not true, as her daughter had stated to Mr Quick, that she had sent her 6s. on Tuesday last. She had not sent her any money at all lately.
P.C. Rounsefell said on Wednesday he met Mr Quick, junr. at the top of Queen-street. He informed witness that his father wanted to see a constable, and witness went at once. In consequence of a communication from Mr Quick, senr., witness went in search of the girl, who he had previously seen running very fast around Sanford-terrace. Witness went towards Teignmouth and made enquiries of some persons as to whether they had see n a young girl running. After a prolonged search he eventually aw a figure right on the very top of Hole Head, which is 150 feet high, and situate between Dawlish and Teignmouth. She was going to and fro from some wire fencing to the edge of the cliff. He crawled up to within twenty yards of her, but she had her face towards him, but he did not let her see him as he feared she would immediately throw herself off. After making several attempts to throw herself over she put her back to the sea and walked over the cliff. Inside the fencing witness found her jacket, hat, a silk handkerchief, and brooch. On to her hat was pinned a letter which had been sent to her that morning by her mother. The letter did not throw any light at all, but only told the deceased to cheer up. Just before she committed the act she looked in a very depressed and excited state. Witness saw a man named Crews and with the assistance of Tom Cotton and Frederick [?] the body was recovered about 10 o'clock the same evening.
Charles Crews proved finding the body of the deceased between some rocks at the place where the deceased jumped over. He could not say whether the body was mutilated because it was dark.
Mr George Fortescue Webb, surgeon, proved examining the body. The deceased had little or no clothes on, and her right fore arm was broken, and most f the bones were through. There was no other injury, but the body was covered with contusions. The cause of death w3as the fall. He did not think she was drowned.
The Coroner summed up, and remarked that the deceased was very much depressed at the time, no doubt owing to being found out to have taken the things. He considered that the constable did the right thing in not rushing out to her while she was near the edge of the cliff.
A Juryman here observed that there were certain rumours about the town and he should like the evidence of Mr Quick, jun. taken.
Mr Frank Edmund Quick, draper, said the deceased had been in his employ. He corroborated his father in every detail. The deceased gave notice to leave the day of her death, before anything had been made as to the missing articles. s The reason given was that she wanted to improve her condition.
A Juryman: Did you chastise the girl with a stick just before she left your premises. Witness: No, certainly not.
A Juryman: There is a rumour to that effect about the town. Witness: It is a scandalous report.
The Jury after a short deliberation returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Saturday 11 May 1895, Issue 8693 – Gale Document No. Y3200758368
FATAL ACCIDENT AT NEWTON – At the Newton Town Hall on Monday Dr Fraser held an Inquiry relative to the death of GEORGE JORDAN, aged 11, who on Saturday night succumbed to injuries sustained through being run over by the Highweek Fire Brigade engine on the previous Tuesday. Evidence was given by deceased's father, the two chief officers of the Fire Brigade (Captain Murrin and Lieutenant Wottos), the Highweek postman, the hospital nurse, and Dr Nisbet, showing that whilst returning from a fire on Tuesday the deceased ran in front of the engine as it was coming down over Highweek hill, the wheels going over his body before it could be pulled up. He was immediately conveyed to the Newton Cottage Hospital where he died on Saturday. The horses were being driven at a slow pace at the time and no blame was attached to anyone. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

INQUEST – Dr Fraser (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the York Hotel, Torquay, on Monday on the body of ARTHUR HAROLD NEWLAND, aged four months, the son of ALTER NEWLAND, yachtsman, and SARAH ANN NEWLAND, of 18 Victoria-park, Plainmoor. Mr J. H. Pope was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The father said the child had had a cold and was tight on the chest, but on Friday evening it seemed better. The child was put to bed about ten o'clock, and when he woke up about quarter to three to give another child a drink he called his wife and asked what was the matter with the baby, as it was white and still and looked as though it was dead, and he could not hear it breathing. They at once sent for the nurse and the doctor. the mother corroborated and said the child was quite warm when she awoke. George Mitchell Winter, surgeon, attributed death to syncope. The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a bad practice to have the child in bed with the parents. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 11 May 1895, Issue 8693 – Gale Document No. Y3200758386
At an Inquest held yesterday at West Alvington on the body of ANN DISTER, who committed suicide by hanging herself, the jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide while in a state of Unsound Mind.

Saturday 11 May 1895, Issue 8693 – Gale Document No. Y3200758379
POISONING CASE AT EXMOUTH – Supposed to Have Died Through Eating Tinned Salmon. – At the Country House Inn, Littleham, on Tuesday, Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest on the body of LUCY HART.
EMMA HART, a barmaid, of Walworth, identified the body as that of her stepmother, a widow. On Thursday she was telegraphed for as her mother was dying. She left her situation and came home. the deceased died at two o'clock on Sunday afternoon. The Coroner: Did you hear of her being poisoned? The Witness replied that the deceased said it was through eating a rabbit, and also that it was caused by eating tinned salmon. She found the empty tin downstairs. Part of the salmon was in a small basin, and she threw it over a hedge.
The Coroner: Can you swear that before throwing the salmon away you did not hear that the salmon was the cause of death?
Witness: I never heard that it was. If I had I would have saved it. The doctor said that the rabbit had poisoned her.
Charlotte Hillman, a neighbour, said the deceased had not complained of any illness. She recognised the salmon tin produced as the one deceased brought to her son Edward on Saturday, the 27th April for him to open. Deceased took the salmon out and put it in a clean basin. She then threw the tin away. Witness had some of the salmon on the following Tuesday in the deceased's house. It was not so much as deceased had, and she did not notice anything wrong with it when eating it. The deceased remarked the salmon was very nice. She saw her next day, and she was then in her usual health. Witness was not aware that anything was the matter with her until Thursday morning when she said she was not very well. She afterwards heard the deceased call out "Come quick, or I shall die." She found her in bed suffering great pain in her stomach. Dr Shapland was sent for. The woman died in witness's arms at two o'clock on Sunday. She stated that the doctor told her that the rabbit had probably poisoned her. The doctor was sent for between eleven and twelve in the morning but he did not arrive until the evening.
Mrs Franks corroborated. Deceased had inflammation to one of her eyes.
Thomas Hale, of Market-street, Exmouth, said his wife was a niece of the deceased. Deceased came to his place on the 24th April and stopped to dinner. She showed them the tin of salmon and said it was the best she could get in Exmouth. She also stated that she obtained it at Mr Wilson's, and that she bought a rabbit of Mrs Adams, pouterer.
Mr F. S. Wilson, grocer, of Chapel-street, Exmouth, said he knew deceased well. He had no recollection of their coming into his shop that week. Witness then produced a tin of salmon steak similar to the tin purchased by deceased and said it was the best on the market.
Dr J. D. Shapland, in practice at Withycombe, said he was called on Thursday to see deceased. He never saw such a thing before, the room being covered with vomiting. He inquired what had upset her, and he was shown some rabbit and pork. These things upset people sometimes. He said probably the rabbit had caused the illness, and then the deceased told him that she had had some salmon. He did not examine the rabbit at the time. Rabbit would sometimes cause sickness and diarrhoea. Deceased was not a strong woman, her digestive organs being very weak. He had made a post mortem examination this morning, which showed that death was due to inflammation of the stomach and intestines, which were very black. He attributed the inflammation to the eating of tinned salmon. Salmon left open for three days would be dangerous. He was strongly of opinion that the salmon had poisoned deceased. The witness was asked numerous questions about tinned salmon, and said he would never allow tinned salmon to be eaten. The cause of death was inflammation of the stomach and mortification of the intestines excited by eating salmon.
The Coroner: It is a very important case.
Mr Wilson said he should like to say in the interest of the trade that the salmon was the best in the market, and had been obtained from a Bristol firm.
The Coroner addressed the Jury at some length, pointing out the danger of eating tinned salmon which had been opened several days. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from inflammation of the stomach and mortification on the intestines, the cause of which was unknown.

Saturday 11 May 1895, Issue 8693 – Gale Document No. Y3200758354
THE BURNING FATALITY NEAR CHUDLEIGH – At the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body of EDITH ALICE CAUSLEY, a little girl, who met her death through being burnt at Chudleigh on Monday last. MARIA ANN CAUSLEY, wife of CHARLES CAUSLEY, labourer, residing at Trusham, near Chudleigh, identified the body as that of her daughter, aged 12. She lived t home with her parents, and on Monday in company with other children went to play on a piece of ground covered with gorse about a quarter of a mile from her home. Witness did not hear of anything of the deceased until about six o'clock the same night, when she was informed that the girl had burnt herself. She immediately went to her daughter and found her badly burnt. She was taken home and a medical man immediately sent for. He advised witness to send the deceased to the Exeter Hospital, which was done. In reply to a Juryman, witness said her daughter did not take any matches with her when she left the house on Monday afternoon. She had heard that another little girl had the matches and set alight to the furze. Deceased had permission to play on the gorze from the owner.
Margaret A. Karey, who was staying at the Rectory, Trusham, gave evidence as to seeing the gorse alight on Monday, and on going to see the cause found the deceased on the ground burning, and crying. All her clothes were burnt off, with the exception of her stockings. The deceased was conscious, but did not say anything as to the accident. Witness ran back to the Rectory, got some clothing and the child was taken home. Mr H. Andrew, surgeon at the Exeter Hospital, proved receiving the deceased at the institution on Tuesday suffering from burns on the abdomen and the chest. She was put to bed and attended, but became worse just after twelve o'clock on Wednesday when she suddenly collapsed and died. Witness did not think it did her any harm to remove her from Chudleigh. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and attached blame to no one.

Saturday 11 May 1895, Issue 8693 – Gale Document No. Y3200758382
The Exeter Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquiry at 3, Albion-place, Old Tiverton-road, today, touching the death of ELIZABETH TRANTER, 80, widow of a Royal Marine pensioner. Mrs Tole said deceased was in receipt of parish relief and had lodged with her for two years. About three months ago she fell while getting out of bed. She had been paralysed in one arm for twelve years. Dr J. Mackeith said that in her fall deceased broke her right arm which was paralysed. He could not say whether the fall accelerated death, but it was, in his opinion, due to paralysis and the shock attending the accident. He did not at first see that the arm was broken but he afterwards set it in splints, and it had healed. Mrs Tole asked why the doctor did not bandage the arm a month before. She never knew the arm was broken until she saw the certificate. It was a perfect disgrace. The Coroner asked her to be kind enough to hold her tongue and not insult himself and the Jury. The doctor said the arm being paralysed did not show the injury as it would in ordinary circumstances. Mrs Tole was present when the arm was bandaged. The Jury, of which Mr W. Coombes was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 11 May 1895, Issue 8693 – Gale Document No. Y3200758384
THE SUPPOSED SUICIDE IN THE CANAL – Inquest, This Afternoon. – The Inquest on the body of GEORGE KERSWILL, of St. Thomas, who, as reported last evening, was found drowned in the Canal yesterday, was held at the Plymouth Inn, Alphington-street, this afternoon by Mr F. Burrow, Coroner for the Cullompton division.
ALMA KERSWILL, widow of the deceased, said he was 45 years of age, and had been a carter for his brother for about ten years. She last saw him alive about twenty minutes past eleven on Thursday night, when he came in, washed, unlaced his boots, and went out again without saying where he was going. As he did not return she sent to the police about half-past eleven. The next she heard of him was yesterday morning, when she was told his body had been found in the canal. He had never threatened to destroy himself, though when he went out he seemed strange. He had nothing on his mind, and was in no trouble as far as she was aware. He had been drinking heavily for the last fortnight, previous to which he had been an abstainer for two years and a half.
MARY JANE KERSWILL, 20, daughter of the deceased, said when he came home on Thursday he said he had been to Cowley-bridge, but did not say what he did there. He was the worse for liquor. He went down Alphington-street towards the water, and the police were communicated with. Some years ago when he drank very hard he had threatened to commit suicide, but they took no notice of it.
P.C. Lang said he had known deceased for the last eighteen months. For the last fortnight he had seemed as if in great trouble, and had been very strange in his manner. Yesterday morning about six o'clock he was informed by the night duty constable that the deceased had left his home and had not since been heard of. Witness went to his house in Alphington-street, and deceased's wife told him deceased had gone down the Haven Banks. Witness went down the Canal banks, and near the second drawbridge found deceased's hat and vest, the latter folded very neatly. In the coat were a handkerchief and a billhead of the firm of Kerswill and Grafton. When he told deceased's wife she told him she was afraid something of the kind had happened. On the body Sergeant Holloway found a half-crown, two sixpences, one threepenny-piece and a halfpenny.
George Mitchell, 13, said yesterday morning about half-past six he saw some clothes on the bank. He left them there without touching them, and about a quarter top nine he and his father dragged the Canal. The grappling-iron caught the body on the first throw-in.
James Mitchell, father of the last witness, corroborated his evidence.
Mr M. Farrant, junr., surgeon, said he was called about eleven o'clock yesterday to examine the body, which presented the usual appearance of death by drowning. There was only a slight graze on the bridge of the nose.
The Coroner, in summing up, said all the circumstances pointed to suicide, but at present they had no evidence at all pointing to that, and the only proper verdict for them to give would be one of "Found Drowned," which was returned.

Saturday 18 May 1895, Issue 8699 – Gale Document No. Y3200758407
At the City Police Court on Friday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENRY SOPER, aged nine months, son of WILLIAM HENRY SOPER of No. 9, Arthur's-Buildings, Paul-street, who died yesterday afternoon. The mother said she saw the child change suddenly and took it to a neighbour's house. A medical man was sent for, but before he arrived the child died. Mr Clapp, surgeon, said there were no marks of violence on the body of the deceased and in his opinion death was due to convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 18 May 1895, Issue 8699 – Gale Document No. Y3200758414
TRAGIC DEATH OF AN EXONIAN – Shortly after ten o'clock on Wednesday the Colchester police were informed of the tragic death of one of the leading tradesmen of the town, MR JOSEPH AGNEW, gunsmith, of 118, High-street, about 42 years of age, and second son of MR AGNEW, the well-known gunsmith of South-street, Exeter. The deceased was found in his room with his brains blown out. He was unmarried and resided in the house alone. He has been very strange in his manner, and some ten months since was in an institute at Brentwood, but appeared to have recovered sufficiently to return home. Upon the table the police discovered written upon a piece of paper the addresses of two of the deceased's brothers, who have been communicated with, and an Inquest will be held.

Saturday 25 May 1895, Issue 8705 – Gale Document No. Y3200758457
ELIZABETH PINCOMBE, 47, died at Torrington from shock and burns received by falling while carrying a lamp downstairs. At the Inquest yesterday a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 25 May 1895, Issue 8705 – Gale Document No. Y3200758445
Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest at Sidmouth on Thursday on the body of LILIAN DUNN, who fell into the river. The medical evidence was to the effect that death was due to drowning and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Saturday 25 May 1895, Issue 8705 – Gale Document No. Y3200758434
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER WORKHOUSE – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at Exeter Workhouse on Tuesday on the body of HENRY BUTCHER, 52, an inmate, who died there on Sunday. WILLIAM BUTCHER, wheelwright of Bonhay-road, identified the body as that of his brother, a blacksmith. Henry Thorne, messenger in the House, said he was awakened twice early on Sunday morning by the deceased vomiting violently. He said he did not want any assistance, but seeing that he was very ill witness called the assistant nurse (Mr Clarke), about six o'clock, and he came down about seven. Witness went in after chapel to see deceased and found him nearly dead. He reported the case to the wardsman. By a Juryman: He told Mr Clarke that deceased was ill. Charles Wills, the wardsman, who has been an inmate of the house, said he spoke to deceased three or four times during the night. Mr Clark gave him some medicine, and he seemed to be better, but he could not take some tea which the taskmaster sent up. He died not long after. Thorne reported the case to witness. William Clarke, the assistant nurse, said he was called about six o'clock on Sunday morning, to go, as he understood, to see a man named Grimshaw, who had previously complained of biliousness. He dressed, went to see two serious cases in the hospital, and then went to the old men's ward. Wills and two or three others were in bed, and on his enquiring who was ill Wills told him it was BUTCHER. Deceased complained of pains in the stomach, and witness gave him a small dose of castor oil, leaving him to go to the hospital. There appeared at that time nothing serious the matter with him, and witness intended calling the attention of the doctor, who was expected between eleven and twelve. Just before eleven the industrial trainer told him the matron wished him to move BUTCHER to the hospital, which was done, and witness, seeing he was much worse, requested the trainer to ask the Master to send for the doctor. Brandy and water was administered, but he died in about half an hour. The Coroner commended the witness of his conduct. Dr Woodman said he was called about half-past eleven, but when he arrived BUTCHER was dead. The most probable cause was a spasm of the heart, resulting in syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," adding that they considered that deceased had received every attention, both from the inmates and the assistant nurse.

Saturday 25 May 1895, Issue 8705 – Gale Document No. Y3200758436
CHILD DROWNED AT EXWICK – Alleged Inhuman Conduct. – At the Lamb Inn, Exwick, on Monday Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZA SHARP, five years of age, who met her death by falling into the mill-leat at Exwick on Saturday evening. Mr Jacombe was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
CHARLES COLSTON SHARP, labourer, having identified the body as that of his daughter. Kate Rice, aged 8 years, said she was playing with the deceased on Saturday afternoon near the small iron bridge, when she left witness and went down to the mill-leat with a little paper bag for the purpose of washing her hands. While in the act of dipping up the water she fell in and was carried down the stream. Witness ran down the pathfields and informed an elderly gentleman of what had occurred. Charles Pyle, whitesmith, living at No. 10, Iron-bridge, Exeter, said he was going through the Exwick pathfields on Saturday afternoon last about 5.30 when a young man said a girl was in the water. Witness looked and saw the deceased floating down the stream. Witness sent the dog in, but the weight was too much for the animal. The young man then immediately ran off, saying "I have to go to my work," and leaving witness there. The Coroner: That is a nice sort of young man. – A Juryman: Yes, he is. – The father of the deceased: He is a nice sample of humanity.
Witness, continuing, said where he saw the deceased the water was between four and five feet deep. Deceased was washed further down the stream and in about ten minutes several persons arrived on the scene and a man waded up to his knees and took the body out. Every possible effort was made to restore animation but with no result. – The Coroner: You don't know the young man? - Witness: No, I don't. I should like to find out, leaving me in this manner. – P.C. Gollop: I have made every enquiry but I have been unable to find out. – A Juryman: (to the witness): Was it not rather strange for you to send your dog into the water seeing that it is not a retriever. It would worry the girl would it not? - The Coroner: No, I don't think so. – The Juryman: We have heard of retrievers being sent in to rescue people. – The father of the deceased: The dog did its duty more than the man who ran away. – Witness: (to a Juryman): You would not have expected that an old man like me would have gone into the water. – A Juryman: No, I am not talking to you. I am asking whether the dog was brought to retrieving. It was very strange that the man who had not the courage to enter water between five and six feet asked you to send in your dog.
Mr T. Smith, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said the body presented the usual appearance of drowning. The Coroner, in summing up, said he should certainly like to have had the young man before them. One could hardly think any person would look on and see a person drowning in five feet of water and not make any attempt at rescue. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," several of them commenting on the action of the young man.

Saturday 1 June 1895, Issue 8711 – Gale Document No. Y3200758474
THE SHOCKING FATALITY TO AN EXETER BOY – At Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of LEONARD HARRY BENNETT, aged seven years, of 81, Holloway-street, who died soon after admission at the above institution from shocking injuries received on Tuesday evening through being run over by a timber waggon in South-street. The Jury, of which Mr Mead was Foreman, having viewed the body, KATE BENNETT, the mother, wife of SIDNEY BVENNETT, a clerk, gave evidence of identification. About twenty minutes to eight on Tuesday evening the deceased went from his home in the direction of South-street with two older boys. About five minutes to eight she hard that he had been run over and had been taken to the Hospital. She went and saw him at once. He was conscious, and she asked him "how he came to get on the back of the wagon." He replied that he wanted to ride. He died about half-past eleven the same night. She had heard that he had been seen riding on wagons before.
John Stamp, of 50, South-street, stated that about a quarter to eight on Tuesday evening he was standing at his door and saw a timber waggon laden with a long tree trunk turn into South-street from Magdalen-street with two boys riding on the cross-piece underneath the timber. One of the waggoners on arriving opposite his door came back to the hinder part of the waggon and one of the youngsters, seeing him coming, jumped off and ran out in front of him. The deceased, instead of doing the same, made for the back of the waggon, the result being that he was caught by the wheel which ran over him. A young man pulled him out and witness assisted in taking him to the Hospital.
By Mr Howard (A Juror): He supposed that the waggoner was going to the hinder part of the waggon to put the drag on.
By the Coroner:- The tree was so long that the waggoners had to take a long sweep in turning the corner in order to clear everything. In his opinion the waggoners were not to blame. Charles Hooper, working for a Mr Gooding, of 27, Cowick-road, said he was in charge of the waggon. He did not know there were any boys on the waggon when he turned into South-street. He heard that a boy was run over just as the driver pulled up the horses for the drag to be put on. Mr H. H. Lloyd Patch, assistance house surgeon, deposed to admitting the deceased into the Hospital on Tuesday evening. The left leg was severely crushed from the foot to the thigh. The skin was practically stripped off, and there were severe contusions of the left thigh, and other injuries. He was in a very collapsed condition. A consultation of the medical officers was held, and an amputation was performed of the right thigh, but the lad died two hours afterwards. The Coroner said there was no doubt that death was purely accidental and that no blame was attached to anyone. It was, however, much to be regretted that children would continually ride on wagons. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their opinion that no one was to blame.

Saturday 1 June 1895, Issue 8711 – Gale Document No. Y3200758485
INQUEST – An Inquest was held at the Police Court on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Hooper touching the death of SYLVIA REUBEN, aged four days, of 3, Smythen-street. Dr G. T. Clapp said in his opinion the death was a natural one, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Royal Hotel, Babbacombe, on Monday, on the body of JULIA TERRY WYATT, aged 21, daughter of a gardener living at No. 6, Haredown-terrace, Babbacombe. She left her home on Sunday morning and was found drowned in the afternoon at Black Head. Mr James Lee was chosen Foreman of the Jury. SARAH GRACE WYATT, mother of the deceased, stated that her daughter had lived with her for five months, having previously been out to service. She was in her usual state of health on Sunday morning when she left at 7.30 a.m. to go for a walk. She did not return, and witness sent a little girl to look for her. She also went herself, but the deceased could not be found. The police were then informed of the matter. In reply to the Coroner witness said there was no insanity in the family. Alfred George Diggines, fisherman, said he saw a hat and jacket on the banks between Anstey's Cove and Black Head. He looked over the cliff and there saw the body of the deceased. Dr Steele said from all appearances death w3as due to drowning. The Jury retired and after a short consultation returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 8 June 1895, Issue 8717 – Gale Document No. Y3200758525
An Inquest was held at Dawlish on Wednesday on the body of WILLIAM J. INGERSENT, aged 27, foreman baker, of Teignmouth, who was found drowned in Church Meadow on Tuesday evening. The evidence showed that deceased left a letter stating to his wife that when it was received he should be in his long last sleep. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind," and expressed deep sympathy with the widow and family.

Saturday 8 June 1895, Issue 8717 – Gale Document No. Y3200758541
LOCAL INQUESTS – Mr Deputy Coroner H. W. Gould held an Inquest at the Plymouth Inn, St. Thomas, this afternoon, touching the death of WILLIAM JAMES DANIEL, a tailor, residing at 11, Marshplace-Paris-street. EMMA DANIEL, of 15, Russell-street, identified the body as that of her nephew, who was aged 39. Witness last saw him alive on Thursday evening about seven o'clock at his house. He then seemed very excited, and complained of pains in his head. He could not work, and witness told him he had better go to bed, and get up and do it the next morning. She had never before seen him so excited, although he was occasionally queer in his head. The deceased was married, but his wife was an invalid, and consequently unable to attend the Inquest. She had told witness that she missed her husband about five o'clock yesterday morning. He was in an excited state all the night. He awoke up about three o'clock and wanted to dress, but she told him he had better go to sleep, which he did, but on her awakening again about five o'clock he was gone. Deceased attempted suicide last November by taking laudanum. Charles Tucker, postman of No. 25 Mansfield-road, said he was returning from his round on Friday morning when he saw a hat on the right bank of the canal just below Salmon Pool drawbridge. A note inside contained the following words:- "My poor head is so bad I cannot bear it. Forgive me. I wanted to speak to you this morning, but my head was gone. – DANIEL, Paris-street." P.C. Gallop gave evidence as to recovering the body which Dr Smith said presented the usual appearances of death from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

This morning at the Exeter Prison, Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of THOMAS NEWHAM, alias PAINTER, who died on the evening of the 6th inst. Mr Langwin was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Major Matthison, Governor of the prison identified the body, and said the deceased was 26 years of age. He was admitted into the prison on November 16th, having been sentenced to three years' penal servitude at the Usk Quarter Sessions on the 17th October for false pretences. Dr Mortimer said the deceased, when admitted, was suffering from a rupture and from stone in the bladder, for which an operation was performed. He went on very well for a month, but afterwards sunk [?} and died on the 6th inst. Warder [?] gave evidence as to nursing the deceased, who, he said, had every care and attention. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 8 June 1895, Issue 8717 – Gale Document No. Y3200758535
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held at the Town Hall, Dawlish, last evening on the body of GEORGE LASKAR, a labourer of Cockwood, who was found dead near Cofton Church on Sunday.

Saturday 15 June 1895, Issue 8723 – Gale Document No. Y3200758563
SHOCKING DEATH OF A TEIGNMOUTH LADY – MISS SARAH ANN KELLAND, a Teignmouth lady, met with a terrible death at Penarth, on Tuesday morning. It appears that John Jenkins, a Penarth boatman, went to attend to his boat near the Seven Sisters, Penarth, about quarter past eight, when he saw the body of a woman lying on the beach with a piece of loose twine tied around her neck. The skull was fractured, and the body bore other severe injuries on the face and elsewhere, caused, apparently, by a fall over the cliff, which at the spot is about one-hundred feet high. Jenkins immediately hurried to give information to Inspector Roberts, and medical aid was quickly summoned. Life, however, was found to be extinct. MISS KELLAND, who had recently suffered from influenza, had been on a visit to her niece, MRS MINTON, of 7, Albert-road, Penarth, since the 30th of May. Before going out yesterday morning she arranged the fire and performed other household duties.
In the course of an interview, MRS MINTON, made the following statement: - The deceased, who was a spinster, about 60 years of age, had been rapidly improving in health, especially during the last two days. In fact, she was quite bright and well. On Saturday she went for an outing to Caerphilly, and seemed in better spirits on her return. On Monday night she was in the best of spirits. She bade us all good night, and then went upstairs with her niece. On Tuesday morning she got up between six and seven, without saying anything, and went downstairs; but that was not an unusual act. She often got up early, but had never before been out at such an hour. She was practically a stranger to Penarth, although she had visited the place last summer. With regard to MISS KELLAND falling over the cliff, MRS MINTON said, "I am afraid it was not an accident. I wish I could believe that such was the case. It would make it much better for us to bear it, if it had been. Where she got the twine from I cannot say. She did not get it from this house, so far as I know. I can give no reason for the act. She was a lady fairly well off, and lived by herself, and had no trouble whatever, so far as I know. Indeed, she had no anxiety as to how she could live. She has a sister and nephew living, who have been telegraphed to."
THE INQUEST – The Inquest was held at Penarth on Wednesday. ALICE DENLEY, niece of the deceased, stated that on Monday night she slept with her aunt, and in the morning found that she had dressed and gone out. The body was found at the foot of a cliff by a boat man. Deceased must have got over a fence three feet high. Richard Denley, of Teignmouth, said deceased had had a severe attack of influenza. She had been very low spirited since the doctor had ordered her away for change. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 15 June 1895, Issue 8723 – Gale Document No. Y3200758548
INQUEST AT TEIGNMOUTH – Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Mr McBryde's London Hotel, Teignmouth, on Thursday, touching the death of AMELIA ELIZABETH MORROTT, of 16, Northumberland-place, who dies somewhat suddenly on Wednesday afternoon. Mr Sidney Lear was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
FLORENCE MORROTT, of 16, Northumberland-place, daughter of the deceased, stated that her mother's name was AMELIA ELIZABETH MORROTT. She was 49 years of age, and the wife of GEORGE JAMES MORROTT, a yachtsman. Two sisters and a little brother lived in the house besides witness. Deceased had always complained of pains in her head, and in May of last year she underwent an operation. She generally appeared to enjoy good health, but complained of giddiness. On Tuesday night the family had supper together, deceased making a hearty supper of bread and cheese and some salad, with a small piece of beef as well. On Wednesday morning deceased had breakfast with witness and she appeared all right, although she said she had not had a very good night. At breakfast they had a small piece of ham and an egg. Up to ten o'clock deceased was quite well and went out to see after the business in the Teign-street shop. About twenty to eleven she came back, and at eleven o'clock deceased called witness and said she was feeling very ill, and was dying. Witness called her sister and they gave their mother a dose of brandy, and at once sent for Dr Stevenson, who ordered the deceased to be put on the bed-chair in the kitchen. Deceased was insensible and remained in that condition until her death, which took place at 3.30 in the afternoon. Deceased had had a good deal of business worries lately.
William Dymes Stevenson, surgeon, practising at Teignmouth, deposed that he was called at 11.15 on Wednesday morning, acting for Mr Johnson. He found the deceased sitting in the w.c., insensible, suffering from apoplexy. Mr Johnson came as well, and the symptoms were that the deceased was vomiting undigested food. The symptoms were unusual, and they could not give a certificate. A post mortem examination had revealed a ruptured blood vessel at the base of the brain. She would become insensible at once and would possibly live a few hours. She also suffered from a fatty heart and congested liver. The stomach contained nothing and its appearance was normal. In his opinion death was from apoplexy, and there was nothing unnatural which would contribute to her death. The bleeding in that particular part of the brain would cause the vomiting.
May Churchill, of 6, Sun-lane, said she saw the deceased in the morning as she was passing by witness's house. Witness was called shortly afterwards to go to the house and she remained until the deceased died.
The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased died from apoplexy.

Saturday 15 June 1895, Issue 8723 – Gale Document No. Y3200758556
RICHARD HARDING, son of a North Devon farmer, has died from injuries received in a pony race. At the Inquest a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

WILLIAM LILLICRAP, a labourer on Plymouth Fish Quay, who was subject to fits, was drowned in Sutton Pool on Wednesday, and at the Inquest a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Saturday 15 June 1895, Issue 8723 – Gale Document No. Y3200758547
SAD FATALITY AT TORQUAY – The Dangers of Window Cleaning. – Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday, in the Upton Parish Room, Torquay, on the body of ALLAN CAMERON, 35, tin plate worker, of no fixed abode, who on Saturday evening, whilst cleaning a window outside the Athenaeum, Fleet-street, fell to the pavement on his head, and died on his way to the hospital. Mr J. W. Cockram was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
WILLIAM CAMERON, fisherman, of 2, Allman-terrace, nephew of the deceased, said deceased had been living at Newton for some weeks. Deceased was a single man and was working for himself. Witness did not know anything about the fall. Deceased's brother, who was also present, said he knew nothing about the occurrence.
William Hore, caretaker of the Athenaeum, stated that he engaged deceased to clean the windows of the Athenaeum on Saturday evening, as the man who had been engaged did not turn up. Deceased was in great distress, and told witness he had only a penny in his pocket and that he would be glad of the job. Witness showed him the windows and he said he would clean them. He then went to clean the window outside, whilst witness was cleaning inside. Deceased was holding on by the ledge. Witness pointed out a dirty spot which he wanted cleaned and deceased bent down to clean it. Witness at the same time turned round to get his duster, and when he looked around again he saw deceased falling. He could only see deceased's side then. He had only been at work for about five minutes. Deceased had told witness he had been out of work for some weeks. He had no appearance of having been drinking.
The Coroner: How is it they do not have a staging so that a man could sit on it and clean the window in safety?
Witness: That has often occurred to me. The proprietress, Miss Hickey, of Newton Abbot, will be down this morning.
The Coroner: You should tell her about it.
Witness: I am sure she would do anything.
Robert Prowse, town porter, said he was standing outside the Athenaeum and saw deceased at work and also saw him fall. He had the rubber in his right hand and was looking around to hear the conversation which was taking place below between two cabmen. Deceased fell as he looked round. The window was closed. Deceased fell right on his forehead on to the crossing going into the Brewery, the distance being about twenty feet. With the assistance of P.C. Partridge, he picked deceased up and they took him to the Torbay Hospital in a cab. Deceased was bleeding very much indeed.
P.C. Partridge corroborated and said when he searched deceased he found 1s. 8 ½d. and some tobacco in his pockets.
Edwin Percy Wrinch, assistance house surgeon at the Torbay Hospital, said that deceased was brought to the Hospital at 6.15 p.m. on Saturday. He was dead, but the body was warm and covered with blood. There were two wounds on the back of his head, the skull being fractured. He should say death was almost instantaneous.
The Coroner, in summing up, said the case would not give the Jury much trouble as to how it happened. Deceased came to his death in an accidental manner whilst cleaning windows. Window cleaning should be carried on, not by putting the man outside to take his chance of life or death and giving him nothing to hold on with, but by putting a staging where the man could have a safe seat, or in a manner in which the window could be turned round on a pivot and be cleaned from the inside. It seemed to him that precautions should be taken in every place by fixing a platform outside the window and he could see no reason why such a plan was not used at the Athenaeum. A Juryman: I have never seen it used in Torquay. – The Coroner: If it is not done in Torquay it is time that it was, as it is responsible for a large number of deaths every year.
The Foreman and a Juryman said they thought the accident was caused by deceased's carelessness. The Jury, after consideration, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider that in future window cleaning at the Athenaeum and other large establishments should be carried out with greater precautions for the safety of those doing the work.

Saturday 22 June 1895, Issue 8729 – Gale Document No. Y3200758600
DEATH FROM LOCKJAW – A man named ALBERT SCOINS, of St. Sidwell's died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital about ten o'clock this morning from lockjaw. It appeared that SCOINS ran a nail into his foot last week. The wound caused him much pain, but he was able to go to his work as usual. Subsequently, however, symptoms of tetanus began to appear, and SCOINS' condition was so serious that he was last evening taken to the above institution, where he was made an inpatient, and where he remained until death. The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) has been communicated with, and an Inquest will be held at the Hospital on Monday. A correspondent writes: About a fortnight since ALBERT SCOINS, a bricklayer, of Southern-court, St. Sidwell's, met with an accident on a scaffold, a nail penetrating his foot. Yesterday he was taken to the hospital and died there this morning, leaving a wife and seven young children totally unprovided for. His employer has offered to supply the coffin. The deceased – who was not a member of any club – and his wife were always industrious and respectable, and it is a case well deserving the support of the generous an charitable public of Exeter, there being not so much as a shilling in the house for the family.

Saturday 29 June 1895, Issue 8735 – Gale Document No. Y3200758616
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held on Monday on the body of AMY BROOKS, of Bickleigh, who was drowned on Friday.

BATHING FATALITY – An Inquest was held at Barnstaple on Wednesday on the body of CHARLES PEARCE, aged 10, of Green-lane, who met his death by being drowned at Pottington on Tuesday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Drowning," and added a rider to the effect that there was a great necessity for a bathing place. The Foreman remarked that this was the usual rider, and he supposed it would be like threshing the wind to ask the Town Council to do anything in the matter. The Coroner said some of the proposed embellishments of the town could well be dispensed with until such time as they had a bathing place. The Jury gave their fees to the parents of the deceased.

Saturday 6 July 1895, Issue 8741 – Gale Document No. Y3200758644
INQUEST AT EXMOUTH – Coroner, Jury, and Doctor. – Before the Deputy Coroner (Mr Cox) at Exmouth on Monday an Inquest was held touching the death of MARY ALEXANDRA STEWART, aged 65. Mr J. Podbury was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Miss A. Stewart Cox, niece of the deceased, said her aunt was the widow of CAPTAIN ARTHUR STEWART, of the Royal Navy. Witness, who had not seen her for seven years, was sent for the day after deceased met with an accident, and remained until she died Mr E. Ingham, a butler, living at North-street, said on Wednesday, 12th June, at 12.30, he was in his house looking out of the window and saw deceased fall. No-one was with her, and he could not say what caused her to fall. He was the first person to go to her assistance. She appeared to be in great pain. His wife brought out a chair, upon which deceased rested for about five minutes, and they gave her a glass of water. She said she was afraid she had broken a bone and her right foot seem to slip under her. With help, witness took her back to her own house and she appeared to be in great pain. Mary Buckland, servant in the employ of the deceased, said MRS STEWART suffered from bronchitis, but was in good general health. She left the house at 11 a.m., and was subsequently brought home and placed in the drawing-room. Mr Curtis came and deceased was put to bed downstairs. Witness had been in her service for two and a half years, and no doctor had attended her during that time. Dr Kane said he had attended the deceased two years ago as she had been suffering from Bright's disease. When called to her after the accident she was suffering from a fracture of the right thigh, and she was placed on a water bed, where she remained until her death. He gave a certificate as to the death as he thought it was sufficient. the Coroner, I think, Dr Kane, it is a great pity that you gave this certificate, as it is a case the Jury and the Coroner ought to look into, and it also delays the burial. Dr Kane said the cause of death was Bright's disease accelerated by the accident. He did not think it was his duty to report to Coroner. The Coroner: It is not a case like this for you to have any opinion at all, but to report to me. The Coroner said he hoped the case would be the means of Dr Kane being more careful in future as to granting a certificate. Mr Peters (a Juryman) said he considered there was no necessity for the Inquest; it was a waste of time, and in his opinion the Coroner's remarks were uncalled for. Dr Kane was quite justified in giving a certificate.
Mr Bennetts proposed that the doctor's certificate be accepted. Mr Peters seconded.
On their opinion being taken the Jury decided that in their opinion the certificate of Dr Kane was sufficient. A verdict was returned that death was due to Bright's disease accelerated by fracture of the thigh bone and pneumonia.

Saturday 6 July 1895, Issue 8741 – Gale Document No. Y3200758652
At the Inquest on the body of JOHN PARKHOUSE, 64, of Kilmington, Axminster, who committed suicide by jumping in front of a train from Seaton Junction on July 1st, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst Temporarily Inane.

INQUEST – At No. 10, Dix's Field, Exeter, yesterday, Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of ANN EARL, a cook, employed at that house, and who was found dead Thursday afternoon. Evidence of identification was given by Jane Dauncey, who said deceased was aged 55 years. Frederick Symons, who happened to be at the house at the time, said he was asked to fetch the deceased, and on going into the larder found her lying at full length on the floor. Witness thought she was in a fainting fit, and after a short time a medical man was sent for. Mr E. J. Domville proved being called and examining the body. There were no marks of violence, and in his opinion death was due to an apoplectic fit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 13 July 1895, Issue 8747 – Gale Document No. Y3200758694
JOHN HICKS, a naval pensioner, of 29, Clowance-street, Devonport, who a few days ago attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat with a table knife, succumbed to his injuries at the Royal Albert Hospital, and at the Inquest on Tuesday evening a verdict of Suicide during Temporary Insanity was returned.

Saturday 13 July 1895, Issue 8747 – Gale Document No. Y3200758682
DEATH OF AN EXONIAN AT BARNSTAPLE – At the Guildhall Chambers, Barnstaple, on Monday evening, the adjourned Inquest on the body of MR TOM ROWE, commercial traveller, of St. Thomas, Exeter, whose sad death w3as reported in our columns recently was resumed. On June 19th, ROWE spent the evening with a fellow traveller and had a drink at the Queen's Hotel and Spirit Vaults, in Cross-street. MR ROWE was afterwards seen to fall heavily. He shortly afterwards became unconscious and was conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary, but on regaining consciousness he insisted on being removed to the Commercial Hotel, where he died on the Saturday night. A post mortem examination showed that deceased's skull was fractured and there was also laceration of the brain. Mr G. Dennis and Mr H. Clarke gave evidence as to seeing MR ROWE at Mr Cockram's, the former saying he played skittles with him. John Charles Adams, commercial traveller, said he spent the evening with deceased, and after a row up the river they visited the Queen's Hotel, and had several drinks. He saw ROWE fall and went to find a doctor, but on returning found one there. Witness at once returned to the hotel, but if he had known that matters were so serious he should have stood by his friend.
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Mr M. Toller represented the family of deceased and Mr J. P. Ffinch the Ocean Accident insurance Company.

Saturday 20 July 1895, Issue 8753 – Gale Document No. Y3200758722
INQUEST IN EXETER – At the Exeter Police Court on Monday Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest on the body of HARRY STANLEY BUDD MOGFORD, aged 9, who died suddenly on Saturday morning. Mr Full was chosen Foreman of the Jury. ELIZABETH MOGFORD, wife of the late MR HENRY MOGFORD, residing at No. 3, Marsh-place, Paris-street, identified the body. He had always been from his birth a delicate child, but had not been under medical treatment. On Thursday morning deceased was, in the course of his play at his school playground, when he knocked his head and back, and when he came home he complained of his head and back, and witness did not let him go to school in the afternoon. In the evening deceased was taken ill and medicine was procured. Deceased stayed in bed all day on Friday and early on Saturday morning he had convulsions and before medical assistance could be procured he had expired. By Mr Hawkins: There was a blow behind the ear. Mr J. Mackeith proved being called on Saturday morning and on arrival found life to be extinct. There were no marks or bruises about the body. Witness had since made a post mortem examination. He found that the surface of the left kidney showed bruising and there were also indications of bruising on the interior of the stomach, and a large portion of the exterior was reddened. There was also a small bruise on the liver. The blood vessels on the surface of the brain were very much engorged with blood. The body of the lad was well nourished and he was undoubtedly delicate. In witness's opinion death was due to convulsions, most likely arising from injuries to the organs above mentioned. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 20 July 1895, Issue 8753 – Gale Document No. Y3200758733
At an Inquest held at Bawden Hayes, Sandford, on the body of HERMAN CHERITON, aged 2 ½ years, who died from the effects of scalds received by falling into a pan of boiling water, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 20 July 1895, Issue 8753 – Gale Document No. Y3200758731
INQUEST – At the Police Court this morning – Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner_) held an Inquest on the body of EMILY SOUTHARD, aged 24 hours the illegitimate daughter of EMILY SOUTHARD, a single woman residing at Paris-street, who was found dead in bed about 2 a.m. yesterday. The evidence of Mr J. Mckeith was to the effect that the child died from asphyxia. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 27 July 1895, Issue 8759 – Gale Document No. Y3200758785
SUDDEN DEATH AT EXMOUTH – Inquest Today. – At the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, this morning, the Deputy District Coroner (Mr Cox, of Honiton) held an Inquest on the body of JAMES HENRY SPEAR, who died suddenly on the previous morning. The Jury, of which Mr B. Bridle was Foreman, having viewed the body, ELIZABETH SPEAR, the widow, gave evidence of identification, stating that the deceased was 564 years of age, and had been a captain in the merchant service. He enjoyed good health, but sometimes suffered from spasms. On one occasion they were going for a trip on the Duchess of Devonshire when he complained of being ill, but he would not go to a doctor as he said it was only indigestion. On Wednesday he went to Dr Heale. He retired to rest at 9 p.m., and after partaking of a glass of milk slept very well until about twelve o'clock when he seemed very restless. At about quarter to three he said "I am very bad; give me a little Jamaica ginger." He was afterwards dressing when he was taken ill, and witness called his sister Laura to her assistance. The doctors at Port Elizabeth and Johannesburg had attributed the attacks to spasms of the heart. MISS LAURA SPEAR, housekeeper at Shell House where the deceased, her brother, was staying, gave corroborative evidence. Emily Stuart said she went for Dr Hudson about three o'clock yesterday morning, and on her return the deceased was dead. Dr Heales deposed to giving the deceased a prescription for indigestion. Dr Hudson said when he arrived at the house he found the deceased on the floor dead. He had made a post mortem examination, and found that he had inflammation, pleurisy and heart disease. Death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 27 July 1895, Issue 8759 – Gale Document No. Y3200758767
THE FATAL ACCIDENT TO A CULLOMPTON CHILD – Inquest, This Day. – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning on the body of FREDERICK CHARLES STONE, aged twenty months, of Cullompton, who died at the above institution on Wednesday night from injuries received in an accident. JOHN HENRY STONE, manager of the gas works at Cullompton, deposed that on the 25th June the deceased went under a shed away from the rays of the sun, but soon afterwards he was brought to his house with his head bleeding. There were some boxes in the shed and also some pieces of boarding from which some nails were projecting. It was supposed that the boy fell off the box on which he sat, his head coming into contact with a nail. The mother bathed his head and the child was taken to Dr Gidley. He gave them some lotion for the treatment of the wound. After the lapse of a week the doctor ordered the child's removal to the Hospital, which was done. Replying to the Jury, witness said the deceased was playing with other children.
Mr H. H. Lloyd Patch, assistance house surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased was admitted on July 3rd, suffering from a very small swelling on the upper part of the head, and a small wound in the centre. Inflammation of the brain afterwards set in, and on July 9th it was found necessary to operate and it was found that there was an abscess in the brain substance. That was the cause of his death, some sharp instrument having penetrated the brain carrying into its substance hair and dirt. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 27 July 1895, Issue 8759 – Gale Document No. Y3200758772
At the Royal Albert Hospital, Devonport, on Monday the Coroner, Mr J. A. Pearse, held an Inquiry relative to the death of ROBERT JOHNS, a seaman of the sailing vessel Catherine, who was admitted to that institution on Wednesday last. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased fell overboard on Wednesday afternoon, and on the advice of Dr Corbett, of Stonehouse, he was removed to the Hospital. Moone saw the deceased fall into the water. The House Surgeon, Mr Nixin Morris, deposed to the deceased being under the influence of liquor when admitted. The day after he developed symptoms of pneumonia and inflammation of both lungs. He gradually got worse and died on Saturday. Death was due to inflammation of the lungs, caused by immersion in the water, accelerated by habit of intemperance. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 27 July 1895, Issue 8759 – Gale Document No. Y3200758776
DROWNING CASES AT PLYMOUTH – At an Inquest held in Plymouth on Tuesday on the body of FREDERICK JOHN LUCAS SIBLEY, aged 16, who was drowned while bathing under the Hoe at Plymouth, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Devonport, on Tuesday, on the body of PATRICK COONIN, a gunner in the Sierra Leone detachment of the Western Division of the Royal Artillery, stationed at Picklecombe Foot, whose body was picked up near the breakwater. Deceased was a good swimmer. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 27 July 1895, Issue 8759 – Gale Document No. Y3200758788
At the Inquest yesterday on the man FREDERICK DAVEY, of Torrington, who was found dead at the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, with a wound in his throat, a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Saturday 27 July 1895, Issue 8759 – Gale Document No. Y3200758763
THE SUICIDE IN ST. THOMAS – A Sad Case. – Mr H. W. Gould, the Deputy District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Moreton Inn, Cowick-street, St. Thomas, on Wednesday afternoon, relative to the death of HENRY LEGG, a gas fitter, aged 44, of Moreton Inn-court who committed suicide by hanging himself on Tuesday morning.
ARTHUR HENRY LEGG, of Moreton Inn-court, cellarman, identified the deceased as that of his father, with whom he lived. He last saw him alive at his door about 8.25 on Tuesday morning. He told witness then that he was going to work after breakfast. He appeared strange in his manner, and had been so for the last week. He would scarcely speak to anyone. His wife was in the asylum and that troubled him. The cost of her maintenance was also in arrears. He had been pressed for payment.
Mary Jane Weeks, wife of Frede3rick Weeks, chief stoker in the Royal Navy, said the deceased was her brother, and she lived next door to him. About 8.30 Tuesday morning she went to his house and found him in an outhouse hanging. The only persons in the house were her mother and the deceased's little daughter. They told her that they thought he had gone out previous to her finding him. The deceased had appeared strange in his manner for nearly twelve months.
John Metherell, of Mermaid Yard, cabman, said about 8.30 on Tuesday morning he heard someone screaming in the Moreton Inn yard. He went there and found the deceased hanging by the neck from a beam in an outhouse. He took him down. He was unconscious, but he opened his eyes twice. He showed no further signs of life. The doctor came very quickly. Mr Mark Farrant, junr., surgeon, of St. Thomas, said he was called to see the deceased at 8.45. On his arrival a few minutes afterwards he found the deceased dead lying on the ground in a shed next to his house. There was a deep mark around his neck such as might be caused by a rope. His face and head were of a deep red colour and congested. His neck was not broken, and he attributed death to a rupture of a vessel of the brain caused by hanging. The Jury, of which Mr T. P. Helmore was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 27 July 1895, Issue 8759 – Gale Document No. Y3200758778
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Police Court on Thursday touching the death of WILLIAM LITTEN CAIN, 70, hawker. ADA CHENNOEUR, daughter of deceased, living at 25, Coombe-street, said her father lived at her house. He had been troubled with spasms, and had been attended by Mr E. Steele-Perkins. He was taken ill early on Wednesday morning, and she sent for Mr Perkins, but he was not at home. Her father died soon after 3 o'clock. Mrs Fagan, a neighbour, said she was with deceased when he died. Dr Faulkner said he was called on Wednesday morning, to see deceased and found him in bed, dead. He considered death was due to failure of the heart's action. He did not think that if a medical man had come when first sent for deceased's life would have been saved. A Juryman said he should like to ask, in consequence of a newspaper report and the talk which had been going about the city, how many medical men were sent for. MRS CHENNOEUR, said there were several gentlemen sent for, but they were out. Mr Faulkner came immediately he was fetched. The Coroner said they should not take notice of reports outside. There was nothing in the evidence to show that there had been any neglect on the part of the medical men. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 3 August 1895, Issue 8765 – Gale Document No. Y3200758818
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – Inquest, Today. – The Inquest on the body of ROBERT WARD, who, as we reported, died suddenly in North-street, Exeter, last evening, was held at the Police Court this morning by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper. Mrs Amelia Fewins, of 50, Northernhay-street, identified the body lying in the mortuary as that of her lodger, a retired artist, who had been at her house for fifteen years. He went out yesterday morning about half-past twelve, apparently in his usual health and she did not hear anything of him until about four o'clock, when she was told he was dead. He was a bachelor, and 52 years of age. P.C. Guppy said yesterday afternoon he was called to North-street, and he there saw the deceased lying on the footpath. Witness felt his pulse, which was beating feebly, and blood had come from his mouth. Witness fetched Dr Clapp, but WARD was dead before he arrived. The body was taken to the mortuary. On it were found 10s. in silver, 1 ½ d. in bronze, two pipes, a pencil-case, and tobacco-pouch. He had a nephew living at Norwich. Dr Mortimer said as he was going through North-street he saw deceased lying dead on the pavement, a quantity of blood being over his clothes and on the path. The cause of death was probably the rupture of a blood vessel in the lung. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 3 August 1895, Issue 8765 – Gale Document No. Y3200758805
At Cawsand Beacon Hotel, South Zeal, on Monday, a verdict of "Death by Hanging while in an Unsound State of Mind" was returned on the body of ROBERT HOLMAN, who committed suicide by hanging himself.

At an Inquest held at the Beach Hotel, Seaton, on Monday on the body of MR AMBROSE HENDALL, a timber merchant, of Hinton St. George, who was found drowned at Seaton, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

INQUEST – At No. 8, Eldon-place, Longbrook-street, Exeter, on Thursday, an Inquest was held on the body of MRS ELIZA EVINS, wife of MR THOMAS EVINS, portmanteau manufacturer, carrying on business in High-street, who died suddenly on Tuesday. MR THOMAS EVINS deposed that as deceased was serving out the dinner to her two sons she said she felt a little faint and asked for some brandy, but before it could be fetched she fell and died soon afterwards. She had complained of shortness of breath. Mr E. J. Domville, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased, whom he found on a couch in the front room dead. Witness found two recent bruises on the face which were probably caused by the fall. There was nothing in the appearance of the body enabling him to say what was the cause of death. He had since, with the assistance of Mr Andrew, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, made a post mortem examination, which in his opinion showed that death was due to failure of the heart's action. The heart w3as much enlarged. The Coroner said it was a most distressing case and he was quite sure that MR EVINS had the sympathy of everyone present. The Jury concurred with the remarks of the Coroner and returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 10 August 1895, Issue 8770 – Gale Document No. Y3200758854
FATAL ACCIDENT AT EXETER – At the Exeter Police Court this morning an Inquest was held on the body of MABEL BRAUND, aged two years and six months. WILLIAM JOHN BRAUND, house painter, residing at Albert-place, Paris-street, identified the body as that of his daughter. On the 27th July, deceased while playing outside her parents' front door fell down and was brought in by a neighbour. Witness examined her, but could not discover any blow. She got worse and died on Wednesday last. Eliza Wright, wife of a compositor, proved seeing the child fall down. Witness did not consider the child hurt herself by the fall. Mr Clapp, surgeon, said he examined the deceased and found no sign of injuries. In witness's opinion death was due to inflammation of the brain accelerated by the fall. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 10 August 1895, Issue 8770 – Gale Document No. Y3200758843
"Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at High Bickington on Tuesday on the body of JOHN SLEE, a butcher, who shot himself on Monday morning.

At an Inquest at the Golden Lion Hotel, Ashburton on Monday on the body of MOSES CLEAVE, 27, farmer, of Hexworthy, Lidford, who committed suicide by cutting his throat with a knife, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

The Inquest respecting the fatal quarry accident near Okehampton was held on Thursday and adjourned for a week as it was thought the injured man Horn would be able to give evidence. A subscription list has been opened for assisting the widow of NEWTON, who is left with eight children.

An Inquest was held at Ilfracombe on Wednesday respecting the sudden death of MR WALTER WARNER, of Bath, whilst bathing at Rapparree Cove, the Jury returned a verdict of "Sudden failure of the heart's action."

An Inquest was held at Newton Abbot Workhouse on Thursday on the body of LEONARD GEORGE PICKARD, aged four months, the illegitimate child of a Brighton domestic servant. The evidence shewed that the sister of the child's mother fetched it from Maidenhead on Saturday last, and left it with a labourer's wife named Branch, of Beaumont-road, Newton, who was to keep the child for 4s. 6d a week. The child died on Monday, and Dr Calross, who examined it, said it was very much emaciated. It weighed 6 lbs. and was 21 ¾ inches high. He attributed death to wasting, followed by a cold. The Inquest was adjourned for a week for further evidence.

Saturday 17 August 1895, Issue 8776 – Gale Document No. Y3200758890
The resumed Inquest on the body of the female infant of ELIZABETH GREENWOOD, a servant at 64, Durnford-street, Stonehouse, which was found between the roof and partition of the scullery, was again adjourned yesterday until September 2nd., the mother being too ill to attend.

Saturday 17 August 1895, Issue 8776 – Gale Document No. Y3200758876
At the Inquest on Monday on the body of RICHARD HENDON, 32, second yeoman of signals on the Impregnable, who committed suicide in the morning by hanging himself in a horse-box in Devonport Station, and who was reported to be £11 short in his mess money as caterer, a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

An Inquest was held at Ilfracombe on Tuesday on the body of MRS ELIZA JANE KENRICK, of Ilfracombe, who died suddenly on Sunday. Dr Poyne said death was due to failure of the heart's action through an excessive use of alcohol. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 24 August 1895, Issue 8782 – Gale Document No. Y3200758913
"Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest at Pinhoe yesterday on the body of ERNEST FORD, the boy who was run over and killed by a waggon.

The body of a man named JOHN MOSES, a sawyer, aged about 70, was on Thursday evening found in a boat drifting in Dartmouth Harbour. At the Inquest the medical evidence went to show that death was due to heart disease, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 24 August 1895, Issue 8782 – Gale Document No. Y3200758915
At the Royal York Hotel, Sidmouth, on Monday, an Inquest was held touching the death of FREDERICK BROOKS, who was found dead in bed early on Saturday morning. Dr Pullin said death was due to apoplexy, and a verdict accordingly returned.

There was an Inquest at Torquay on Monday concerning the death of MARION PIDGEON, aged 71, single, who died at 3, Lucius-street, last Thursday from the effects of injuries incurred in an accident last December. Deceased was then in the service of the Rev. C. Coles at Bristol, and, while working in the kitchen, caught her foot in a piece of canvass and fell, injuring her leg. She had recently been attended by Dr Black, Chelston, who gave a certificate of death. Mr Tozer, the Registrar, however, refused to register the death as it was the result of an accident. Hence the Inquest, which was conducted by Mr Hacker, and which resulted in a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 31 August 1895, Issue 8788 – Gale Document No. Y3200758971
At the Inquest on the body of MRS PHIPPEN, wife of MR T. PHIPPEN, of Axminster, who was found in the river Axe on Thursday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 31 August 1895, Issue 8788 – Gale Document No. Y3200758961
At the Inquest held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Police Court on Tuesday on the body of MRS B. PEARSE, wife of MR A. S. PEARSE, registrar of births and deaths, who died suddenly on Sunday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

At the Beach Hotel, Exmouth, on Tuesday Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of KATHERINE ELIZABETH DIXON, aged 10 months, daughter of SAM DIXON, boat builder. The child had been delicate since birth, and had suffered from bronchial affections. On Sunday afternoon the child became ill and died before the arrival of the doctor. Dr Hodgson, who made a post mortem examination, said death was due to the congested state of the child's brain as the result of teething. The Jury, of which Mr Jarman was Foreman, returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 7 September 1895, Issue 8794 – Gale Document No. Y3200758999
At the Inquest on the body of MATTHEW FREE, aged 343, who was crushed to death near Torquay on Monday by a traction engine, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Mr H. W. Gould, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Thursday evening at Crediton, on the body of MR R. JENNINGS, 65 (Messrs. Thomas and Jennings). The evidence showed that he was knocked down by a pony which had been frightened by two lady cyclists, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 7 September 1895, Issue 8794 – Gale Document No. Y3200759008
THE FATAL ACCIDENT TO AN EXETER MAN – At the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM JOHN LITTLEY, aged 34 years, a waggoner in the employ of Mr W. H. Horwill, forage dealer, and of James'-terrace, James'-street, who died on Saturday evening from shocking injuries received through being run over by one of the Exeter Tramway Company's buses at Alphington.
Mr Orchard appeared on behalf of Hancock, the driver of the omnibus, and P.C. Adams, of Kennford, watched the case on behalf of the County Police, whilst Mr Woodrow, manager of the Tramway Company, was also present.
The Jury, of which Mr S. Browning was Foreman, having viewed the body, ELIZABETH ANN LITTLEY, widow of the deceased, gave evidence of identification, and stated that her husband left home about half-past eight on Saturday morning to go to work, and about half-past nine in the night a gentleman named Chorley came and told her that he had met with a sad accident and had been taken to the hospital.
John Scanes, assistant schoolmaster at St. Sidwell's School, Exeter, of 65, Sandford-street, deposed that on Saturday night about ten minutes past nine he was returning from Alphington and when about twenty yards from Alphington Brook Bridge he was passed by a large waggon closely followed by two traps. Behind the last trap came on the deceased with a waggon loaded with hay, the horse being in full trot. Whilst the three preceding vehicles were being passed by the Exminster 'bus the unfortunate man endeavoured to wedge himself between the last trap and the 'bus, with the result that he collided with the latter. Consequently the two vehicles became interlocked. The 'bus driver endeavoured to get the deceased's name, but LITTLEY refused to give it. The side of the 'bus was broken, and an altercation took place as to the expense of repairing the damage. Witness asked the driver (Hancock) for his whip and with the help of the 'bus boy measured the distance of the off hind wheel of LITTLEY'S waggon from the kerb and found it to be approximately 4 ft 3in, the near front wheel of the 'bus then being about 8in from the kerb. Witness was proceeding to turn LITTLEY'S horse towards the hedge to allow the 'bus to pass, but found that the deceased was at the horse's head before him. After moving his horse LITTLEY ran towards the heads of the horses attached to the 'bus and began tugging at the reins. ultimately he lost his hold, and commenced striking HANCOCK. Consequently LITTLEY brought his head in contact with the front portion of the 'bus and fell, the wheels then passing over his body. Witness lifted him up with the help of a young man, and Mr Frank Chorley then came along, and after looking at the body said he thought the man was dead. This was not the case, he having breathed two or three times very heavily while in witness's arms. He, however, died whilst in that position, and witness sent the young man to go to Mr Wippell's for a trap to convey the man to the hospital. Mr Thomas Wippell, junr., came out and said he had a trap but the horse was in the field. Witness offered to help catch it with him, but before they had time to go to the field, a waggonette with a pleasure party came along. The driver was called Turner. The party turned out and Mr T. Wippell, junr., Mr Chorley and witness lifted the deceased into the waggonette and drove him to the Hospital. On arrival at the Hospital witness was detained until two constables came to take his statement.
By the Foreman: He did not consider there was any blame attached to the 'bus driver.
Further evidence having been given. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their opinion that no blame was attached to the driver of the 'bus.

Saturday 14 September 1895, Issue 8800 – Gale Document No. Y3200759030
SUICIDE OF AN EXETER TRADESMAN – A Touching Letter. – An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court on Tuesday by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) touching the death of GEORGE MITCHELL, aged 67, of 164, Fore-street, Exeter.
THOMAS ISAAC MITCHELL stated he was the son of the deceased, a decorator, of 164, Fore-street. He last saw his father on Monday morning when he took him a cup of tea, as usual, in his room. He had lately complained of pains in his head, caused by illness.
JOHN MITCHELL, son of the deceased, who resides at 164, Fore-street, said about one o'clock on Monday he was called by his mother to go to his father's room. He went there and found his father dead suspended by a piece of rope from a peg behind the door. He hesitated at first to cut the body down, but did so afterwards and laid it on the floor; and his brother went and fetched Dr Brash. A letter (produced) was found by witness in deceased's teacup.
The Coroner, in an undertone, read the letter, in which deceased stated that he could endure the pains in his head no longer. The pains were getting worse and worse every day, and they were a great trouble to him. The letter, which chiefly referred to the pains, concluded "From your broken-hearted GEORGE."
Mr Brash, surgeon, stated that he knew the deceased because he had attended him once or twice about two or three years ago. He was then suffering from a disease, and was rather eccentric. Witness was called on Monday morning, and found deceased lying on a bed dead. He examined him and found a mark round his neck with froth hanging about the lips. There were no other marks on the body. The cause of death was due to strangulation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 14 September 1895, Issue 8800 – Gale Document No. Y3200759029
THE TEIGNMOUTH DROWNING CASE – Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest on Tuesday at Teignmouth on the body of CHARLES WILLIAM TRUMAN, of Torquay, found drowned at Teignmouth on Monday. Mr W. Watson identified the body. Mr H. G. Wright, a visitor to Teignmouth, deposed that on Monday evening he saw the deceased, very drunk, sitting on the breakwater. Later, witness pulled ashore the dead body of the deceased. After other evidence had been given, the Coroner considered it was most important that they should have the evidence of the wife, and for that reason he adjourned the Inquest until Tuesday, the 17th inst.

Saturday 21 September 1895, Issue 8806 – Gale Document No. Y3200759089
THE DROWNING CASE IN THE DART – The body of the man found drowned near the Totnes Weir in the river Dart on Thursday evening, and which was first thought to be that of a man who travelled with a boxing booth, remained unidentified until this morning, when it was found to be that of a labourer, from Curtisknowle, near Totnes named WALLACE GEORGE BROOKING, who lately resided with his uncle at Plymouth. He left Curtisknowle on the second day of Totnes Races, and as he did not return it w3as supposed that he had returned to Plymouth, but after seeing in the papers the account of a body being found drowned, the father came to Totnes this morning and identified the body as that of his son, who was only twenty years of age. There is nothing to show how the unfortunate man got into the river, which adjoins the racecourse, but the post mortem examination shows that death was caused by drowning. The Inquest will be held this evening.

Saturday 21 September 1895, Issue 8806 – Gale Document No. Y3200759082
At Ilfracombe on Monday an adjourned Inquest was held on the body of MRS LEWIS who died suddenly last week. Dr Payne aid death was due to congested oedema of the lungs. A verdict was returned accordingly.

INQUEST IN EXETER – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, at 50, Sandford-street, Exeter, on Tuesday on the body of MRS MILLMAN. Dr J. Mackeith said he had made a post mortem examination and found death to be due to a tumour. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

The adjourned Inquest on the body of WILLIAM CHARLES TRUMAN, of Chelston, Torquay, whose body was found in the water near Teignmouth Breakwater on Monday week last was held on Tuesday. A verdict to the effect that the deceased walked into the water whilst intoxicated was returned. Before the Jurymen were dismissed, the Coroner stated that the County Council did not intend to allow the Coroners of the County to pay Jurymen any fees for sitting on an adjourned Inquest. The Foreman remarked that it was the old story, stop a thousand men in a dockyard, but not one admiral. A member of the Jury (Mr Hartnoll) said the County Councillors should be made to serve as well as other ratepayers.

Saturday 28 September 1895, Issue 8812 – Gale Document No. Y3200759108
An Inquest was held on Thursday at the Four Horse Shoes, Kentisbeare, on the body of SARAH WHITE, the landlady of the inn. According to the medical evidence, death was due to epilepsy, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 28 September 1895, Issue 8812 – Gale Document No. Y3200759128
THE SAD BURNING FATALITY AT HEAVITREE – At the Windsor Castle Hotel, Heavitree, on Tuesday, an Enquiry was held by the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) into the circumstances attending the death of ANN WHITE, aged 74, who met her death by burns received on Monday. Mr J. Searle was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
MR GEORGE WHITE, a printer's manager, residing at No. 2, Mont-le-Grand Road, identified the body as that of his mother. She was a widow, her late husband being EDMUND WHITE, a stationmaster, of Portsmouth. Deceased was 74 years of age, and witness last saw her alive about 9.15 on Sunday evening, when she retired to rest. About half-past one on Monday morning he was aroused by the barking of a dog, and on going to ascertain the cause saw fire and smoke in his mother's room. The smoke was so dense that it prevented him from entering, but obtaining some water with assistance he subdued the flames. Witness called repeatedly to the deceased, but she did not answer, and on going into the room he saw her on her knees on the floor with her head on the bed. She was quite dead. There was a candle close by on a box, but witness did not think it was alight. It was not upset, and there was no other light in the room. The deceased slept in the room by herself. By a Juror: Witness thought the candle must have ignited the bedclothes. He should suggest that deceased got out of bed and had a paralytic stroke. Some years ago she had a stroke. – By the Coroner: Witness thought the bed had been occupied. Deceased's night dress had been completely burnt off.
Fanny Hammond, servant in the employ of the last witness, proved being aroused. The bottom of the bed was on fire and the smoke and flames seemed to be going up underneath the deceased's face. The box on which the candle was placed was also on fire. The deceased was lying on the top of the candle. On the Sunday night witness went to the room and saw the candle had been extinguished. Witness generally went to the deceased after she had got into bed to see that everything was safe. The deceased always kept a candle on a box beside the bed. – By a Juror: Witness had known the deceased get out of bed during the night. Mr Richard James Andrews, surgeon, practising at Heavitree, proved being called just before two o'clock on Monday morning. The deceased was lying on the bed dead. The trunk of the body and upper limbs were considerably marked, and the skin was peeling off. There were no marks of violence, and in witness's opinion death was due to shock and the result of burning. Probably she was seized with paralysis, fell on the candle and became burnt. The bedding was destroyed, and there was a strong smell of burning in the room.
MR WHITE, recalled, said he did not hear any shrieks for help during the night. The Coroner, in summing up, said there could be no doubt that death was quite accidental, and in all probability the deceased received a stroke, became unconscious, and fell on the candle. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 5 October 1895, Issue 8818 – Gale Document No. Y3200759166
SHOCKING FATALITY ON THE RAILWAY NEAR TAVISTOCK – Guard Killed on the Top of a Carriage. – A mysterious affair occurred on Wednesday on the South Western Railway near Tavistock. On the 6.57 South Western train from Friary reaching Tavistock the body of a man was noticed lying on the top of the carriage next to the rear guard's van. The head was shattered in a shocking manner, the scalp was stripped, and there was a severe gash at the back of the head as if it had come in contact with one of the bridges. Portions of the brain were scattered over the top of the carriage. The train was in charge of Head Guard Shute of Exeter, and WALTER NICHOLLS, an assistant guard of Glenville-road, Plymouth, who rode in the rear van, and was last seen by Shute at St. Budeaux. When the train got to Tavistock, the head guard informed Mr Hicks, the stationmaster, that he had missed his colleague from the train, and asked that inquiry might be made at Beerferris, and St. Budeaux. Shortly afterwards the body was found on the top of the carriage. It was removed to the waiting-room and seen by Dr Snowden Smith. The deceased, who was about 33 years of age, leaves a widow, but no children. As no part of his duty rendered it necessary that he should be on the top of the carriage, the fatality is shrouded in mystery.
The Inquest on the body of the deceased was opened at the Tavistock Station on Thursday by Mr Coroner Rodd. Evidence of identification was given by his brother, ARTHUR NICHOLLS, of Princetown, and the Coroner formally adjourned the Inquest until that day week. Inspector Foster (Exeter) watched the proceedings on behalf of the L. & S.W.R. Company.

Saturday 5 October 1895, Issue 8818 – Gale Document No. Y3200759170
THE KENNFORD FATALITY – A Victim to the Excessive Heat. – At the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday an Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) relative to the death of HENRY GEORGE OSMOND, aged 20 years, of Dorchester, who died at the above institution on Sunday evening from injuries sustained last week at Kennford as previously reported in the Evening Post. R. S. Adams, of Kennford, watched the case on behalf of the County police. The Jury, of which Mr Vanstone was Foreman, having viewed the body, JANE OSMOND, of Cerne Abbas, Dorset, said so far as she knew the deceased was her son. She could not recognised him herself but could only believe it was her son from what she was told. He was a single man, and had been residing at Exeter for the past nine weeks. He worked for Messrs. Eddison and De Mattos (Dorchester) and was employed in connection with a traction engine. His duty was to help load the wagons, steer the engine at times, and occasionally to walk in front of the engine. On Sunday she received a letter from the firm stating that her son had met with a slight accident and was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. She then wrote to that institution to know what injuries he had sustained, but next morning she received a telegram to say he was dead. The deceased, so far as she knew was sober. By the Foreman: Her son did not look so old as the person whose body she had seen in the mortuary. Mr Hamlyn (a Juror) said the body resembled a much more older person than a man of 21 years of age. The Jury expressed the opinion that the clothes of the deceased should be produced to see if she could identify them as belonging to her son. On the clothes being brought into the Court eh witness identified a letter found in one of the pockets as being in her handwriting. Frank Joyce, steersman of the traction engine, in the employ of Messrs. Eddison and De Mattos, deposed that his home was at Spittisbury, Blandford, but he had lately been residing at Exeter in order to follow his employment. He had known the deceased for about ten weeks. On Thursday afternoon they were driving the engine between Alphington and Kennford. Witness was steering, and the deceased was in front carrying a red flag. Two empty wagons were attached to the engine, and the deceased was supposed to be about twenty yards in front of the locomotive, but on nearing Kenbury Lodge witness looked out and saw the deceased lying on his stomach about a pace away from the engine. He told the driver to stop, saying, OSMOND was under the wheel. The driver pulled up instantly and witness got down and said, "GEORGE, however did 'e come there." He replied "I don't know, Frank. I felt giddy and fell down." It was very hot at the time. One of the wheels of the engine had gone over his right foot. They extricated him and conveyed him into a cottage close by, and then took the engine into a field. The man was subsequently taken to the hospital in a trap. By a Juror: They could look out on either side but could not see anyone direct in front.
William Gilbert, driver of the engine, of Dorchester, gave corroborative evidence. Mr Stevens, assistant house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased into the institution on Thursday evening. He was very much collapsed, and was just conscious. He had a lacerated wound on his right foot extending from the tip of the leg to the ankle. Two of the small bones of his foot were broken, and he had a large swelling about the knee and the lower part of the thigh bone. He was treated and put to bed remaining in a critical condition till about midnight when he rallied somewhat. On Saturday signs of mortification in the foot appeared, and in the evening it was deemed advisable to remove the foot, but he died on the following evening. In his opinion death was due to shock to the system, the result of the injuries. A question was raised by the Jury as to the prevision made on traction engines for seeing people in front of them. It was stated that the drivers could see a good way ahead, but not very close up to the engines unless they looked out around the sides. The Coroner called the representative of the firm, who said that under the present arrangements the person driving the engine could not see immediately in front of him. The Jury suggested that some alterations should be made so that accidents of this kind might be prevented in future. The Coroner said he would make a representation of the feeling of the Jury to the employers with a view to some provision as suggested being made. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 5 October 1895, Issue 8818 – Gale Document No. Y3200759173
THE SUDDEN DEATH OF A WITHYCOMBE MAN – Inquest, Today. – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper), held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this afternoon on the body of JOHN WARD, a retired farmer of Westcott's Farm, Withycombe, Exmouth, who died suddenly on Thursday afternoon. Mr Vanstone was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr John Pope (Messrs J. and S. Pope), represented the deceased's family. JOHN MICKLEN WARD, a retired farmer, of Northcott, Crediton, identified the body as that of his father, aged 75 years. He last saw him alive on Wednesday morning at Mr Snell's, Keynelford Farm, near Yeoford. He had been suffering from a cold but he said he was better. Witness heard of his death on Thursday evening when Mr Snell sent him a letter by a mounted messenger. He had never been under medical care in his life, and took no physic. The deceased had been to Messrs. Pope, solicitor, on Thursday afternoon. His wife died last December. Joseph Henry Norman, porter in the employ of the London and South Western Railway Company, deposed that he was in Queen-street on Thursday afternoon about half-past two, and was walking behind the deceased when he saw him fall against the shop door of Mr Rogers, grocer. He raised him up with assistance and asked him if he had hurt himself. He remarked "Down there," meaning the ground. He sank away again, and w3as placed in a cab and taken to the Hospital. Deceased was going towards High-street. He breathed heavily on being taken to the Hospital, but on reaching the institution he gave three heavy sighs and expired. By the Jury: The deceased was not walking fast and there was no obstruction on the pavement. Mr R. Stevens, Assistant House Surgeon at the Hospital, said he received the deceased into the institution on Thursday between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. He was dead. Witness examined his body at the time. There was a small scratch on the bridge of the nose. He had since made a post mortem examination of his body. His heart showed signs of valvular disease, and was somewhat dilated. The other organs were tolerably healthy. He attributed death to the valvular disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 12 October 1895, Issue 8824 – Gale Document No. Y3200759201
An Inquest was held at Devonport on Thursday on the body of JOHN DUNN, 69, whose death was caused by a fall the previous day at 3, Keppel-terrace, Stoke. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

At the resumed Inquest held at the Tavistock Guildhall on Thursday relative to the death of WALTER GEORGE NICOLLS, assistant guard, who was found dead at Tavistock on the top of a South Western railway carriage, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Saturday 12 October 1895, Issue 8824 – Gale Document No. Y3200759186
At the Inquest on the body of ALFRED PENGELLY, aged five months, of Dartmouth, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the mother, MARY PENGELLY, and asked the Coroner to strongly censure the father for not seeing that the child had proper care a week ago.

Saturday 12 October 1895, Issue 8824 – Gale Document No. Y3200759206
MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF A TEIGNMOUTH WOMAN - A sad case of neglect came before the Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Hagan) at the King's Arms Hotel, Wellington, on Tuesday. An old woman living with her son-in-law, Samuel Mogridge, a tailor, died on Saturday morning. Dr Fletcher, the doctor concerned, stated that death was due to starvation, and deceased had been sadly neglected.
JAMES CURRY, a gardener, of Teignmouth, said the deceased was his mother, a widow, aged 69 years and lived up to the time of her death with her son-ion-law, Samuel Mogridge of Mantle-street, Wellington. Formerly his mother and father, THOMAS CURRY, resided at Teignmouth. His mother was put in the Exminster Asylum for six months. Although his parents lived separately his father sent money to Mogridge for her maintenance up to the time of his death. Mogridge's wife had requested him not to send anything. His mother was insured in £6 with the Prudential, by his brother. He could not say if anyone else had insured her or not. Several of the family had died of consumption.
Elizabeth Ann Hawkins, residing at 68, Mantle-street, Wellington, stated she was called to the house, where she saw the deceased lying in filth which did not appear to have been cleaned from her for some time. She was very emaciated. Her feet and nails were also sadly neglected. She at once fetched a doctor. There was also another dirty bed in the garret, and the window as closed and a very bad smell in the room, which made her ill. The Jury fund that death was due to exhaustion, caused by starvation, but there was insufficient evidence to show if death was brought about by lack of food or by injudicious feeding. As a rider the Jury added that they considered there was gross neglect on the part of Mogridge and his wife in not calling in a doctor earlier, and that both ought to be severely censured. The Coroner, in censuring Mogridge, said he entirely concurred in the rider of the Jury.

Saturday 12 October 1895, Issue 8824 – Gale Document No. Y3200759211
DROWNING FATALITY AT DEVONPORT – An Inquest was held at the Clarence Hotel, Morice Town, at noon today, relative to the death of ALFRED SAMUEL FREEMAN, stoker, H.M.S. Empress of India, who was drowned in Hamoaze on October 2nd. The evidence showed that the deceased fell overboard whilst getting on board his vessel from a steam barge where he had been stoking. He missed the guy. A seaman named Bamsey saw the accident and jumped over after him. He held him up, but after a short time he had to let him go, and he saw no more of him. The proper way to get on board was by way of a rope ladder. John White, leading stoker, also jumped after him, and he was of opinion that deceased struck his head under the barge and he saw him no more. The body was picked up on Friday being floating off North Corner. Life buoys were on board the ship and also in the barge, but none were thrown to deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Drowning. The Jury expressed their high approval of the prompt action of Bamsey and his colleagues in their endeavours to rescue the deceased.

Saturday 19 October 1895, Issue 8830 – Gale Document No. Y3200759246
THE FATALITY ON THE LINE NEAR TORQUAY – Inquest, This Afternoon. To Have Been Married Today. - This afternoon at the Upton Schoolroom, Torquay, Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquiry into the death of HARRY EDMUND ACKRELL, mason's labourer, of Paignton, who was found in an unconscious state on the railway near Torquay Station yesterday morning. MABEL ACKRELL, sister of deceased, gave evidence of identification, and said her brother was 26 years of age. she last saw him alive on Wednesday evening, when he was a little the worse for drink. He was in the habit of getting intoxicated. Sarah Jane Satchwell, a young woman of Brunswick-square, Torre, said she had kept company with deceased for several years, and they were to be married this afternoon. She last saw him on Thursday evening and went for a walk with him for about an hour and a half from Torquay railway station round to her home at Torre, leaving him about 10.45. He was then in good spirits, and though he had apparently been drinking he was sober and able to take care of himself. They had no quarrel, and so far as she knew there was no reason why he should put an end to his life. She was not aware of anything likely to unhinge his mind. She arranged to meet him again at 6.45 on Friday evening. Their marriage was the solo subject of their conversation on Thursday. William Bond, platelayer, deposed to finding the body by the side of the metals early on Friday morning. There were marks on the rails, showing that deceased had pulled himself along or about seventeen yards, towards Torquay Station. Dr Watson, of Torbay Hospital, said the deceased was covered with blood when admitted into the Institution, and was very cold and collapsed. He remained in an unconscious condition until he died at 1.30. There were severe wounds on the face, which was terribly mangled, and death was due to these injuries. No testimony was forthcoming as to how deceased got on the line or how he came by the injuries. The train which passed the spot during the night had been examined but no marks or blood were found upon it, nor had the engine drivers heard any cries. It is suggested that deceased might have been knocked against the bridge which crosses the line near Livermead, but it was pointed out that this was not his nearest way home, and that he would have to go through a long and dark tunnel. the Coroner commented on the absence of evidence, but P.C. Goodman said nothing further could be obtained. Mr Masters (stationmaster at Torquay Station) and Inspector Hockaday having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 26 October 1895, Issue 8836 – Gale Document No. Y3200759256
At the Inquest on Tuesday at Barnstaple respecting the death of the three year old son of MR JOHN JORDAN, borough accountant, who fell from a window the previous night, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 2 November 1895, Issue 8842 – Gale Document No. Y3200759286
An Inquest was held at the Exeter Gaol on Monday by Mr Deputy Coroner Gould on the body of FREDERICK ROBERT WOOD, labourer, a prisoner who died on Saturday. Mr P. Rousham was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Major Matheson, Governor of the Gaol, said he was sentenced on the 17th September at Exeter to three months' hard labour and had been there ever since. At first he was employed at picking oakum, and afterwards attending to the fires – second class hard labour – as was medically certified as unfit for first-class hard labour. He saw him on Saturday morning, when he made no complaint, and his death was reported to witness the same evening. Philip Sharp, warder, said he saw the deceased alive about half-past five in the central hall of the prison, on his way to his cell. He then appeared in his usual health. Warder Stephens said he went to deceased's cell at 6.4 to light his gas, and found him lying on the floor, apparently dead. His supper-bowl and gruel were on the table, untouched. Dr Mortimer, prison surgeon, said on deceased's admission he was in fair general health, but had heart disease of old standing, and witness certified that he was unfit for first-class labour, and the labour to which he was put was very light. When witness saw him on Saturday he was dead, though warm, and witness had no doubt that death was due to heart failure. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 2 November 1895, Issue 8842 – Gale Document No. Y3200759302
ELLEN MITCHELL, a young woman committed suicide on Thursday at Devonport by taking salts of lemon. At the Inquest it was stated that a sailor had promised to marry her, but would not do so. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 9 November 1895, Issue 8848 – Gale Document No. Y3200759341
SUDDEN DEATH AT EXETER – An Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) at No. 77, Holloway-street, on Tuesday on the body of MARY RICE, a widow, aged 65 years, who resided alone at the above address. Mr Samuel Hodge was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
SARAH ANN HAWKINS, wife of Alfred Hawkins, who is employed at the Heavitree Brewery, and of 9, White's Cottages, Heavitree, identified the body as that of her mother, whom she last saw alive on Saturday last at Heavitree, when she was in her usual health. On Sunday morning she was informed that she was dead. William Mardon, a printer, said the deceased rented a room of him at the above address. He had never heard her complain of her health. On Sunday morning at a quarter to twelve, the deceased not having made her appearance as usual, witness forced open her door and found her dead in bed. He then sent for her son and also a doctor. the deceased was a very temperate woman. The Coroner complimented the witness on the straightforward manner in which he had given his evidence. Mr H. B. Harrison, surgeon, of Magdalen-street, said he was called on Sunday and on arrival at the house he found the deceased lying in bed dead. He examined the body, which was cold and rigid. She had been dead many hours, and in his opinion death was due to spasms of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 9 November 1895, Issue 8848 – Gale Document No. Y3200759344
SUICIDE OF AN ALPHINGTON LADY – On Tuesday evening at the Church Rooms, Richmond, Mr A. Braxton Hicks held an Inquiry with reference to the death of MRS LUCY MAXWELL BROWNLOW, aged 60 years, residing at Exe View, Alphington, who was found drowned in a pond in Kew Gardens on Sunday Morning. Mrs Richards, the wife of a civil engineer, of Gloucester-street, Warwick-square, a first cousin of the deceased lady, stated that the latter was the widow of EDWARD MAXWELL BROWNLOW, late of the old East India Company's Navy, who died about seven years ago. She had latterly been very strange in her manner, and witness induced her to come up top London to consult a speciality, Dr Lankaster, of Upper Wimpole-street, by whose advice she went to stay with a friend at Kew Palace, in order to get away from the noise of London, of which she complained very much. MRS BROWNLOW often said she would drown herself, but witness did not think she meant what she said. Further evidence was given showing that on Sunday morning MRS BROWNLOW was missed, and that on a search being made her dead body was found in the pond opposite the Palm House in Kew Gardens. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane.

SUDDEN DEATH AT THE EXETER WORKHOUSE – At the Exeter Workhouse on Tuesday, the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of an inmate named GEORGE FOWLER, aged 79 years. Mr F. G. Brand was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr W. G. Newall, the master of the Workhouse, gave evidence of identification and said the deceased had been an inmate since March 1880, about 15 years. He had been a hawker and scissor-grinder in Exeter for many years. He was a widower and up to within the past three years his health had been fairly good, but since then he had been failing. Just before two o'clock on Sunday morning last, witness was called to the old mens' dormitory by one of the wardsmen – William Stokes – in consequence of FOWLER being very ill. He went and found him in bed, apparently conscious although unable to speak. He indicated to witness that he was suffering pain in his chest. Seeing that the man was dying, witness immediately sent for the medical officer, Dr Woodman, and in the meantime the matron gave the deceased a little drop of brandy. On witness returning to the ward he found that the man was dead. Dr Woodman arrived soon afterwards. FOWER appeared to be all right when he went to bed. William Stokes, the wardsman referred to above, deposed that between one and two o'clock on Sunday morning his attention was called to FOWLER by another old man who was sleeping in the same ward. He went to him and seeing that he was breathing with difficulty he propped him up with pillows and at once communicated with the Master, who came within a short time after he called him. FOWLER expired shortly afterwards. Dr J. Woodman, the Medical Officer, spoke to being called on Sunday morning, and stated that on arrival at the Workhouse he found FOWLER – whom he had known more than thirty years – dead. He used to have chronic bronchitis every month, but witness had not attended him for some months past. Witness had examined his body and in his opinion death was due to cardiac syncope, brought on by an attack of coughing. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 16 November 1895, Issue 8854 – Gale Document No. Y3200759359
At the Budleigh Salterton Cottage Hospital on Wednesday an Inquest was held by Mr Deputy Coroner C. E. Cox on the body of a little child named SARAH ANN PRATT, who met her death through being scalded. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 23 November 1895, Issue 8860 – Gale Document No. Y3200759395
An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, at 36, North-street, Exeter, on Monday, touching the death of MRS CAROLINE PINSON, widow of a coach-trimmer, who occupied a room there, and who died on Saturday. WILLIAM PINSON, of Little Silver, tailor's traveller, and deceased's son, said she had been ill for three or four winters, but when he saw her on Saturday morning she said she was feeling better. When he visited the house again in the evening she had been dead about ten minutes. Mr Shooter, occupier of the house, said MRS PINSON told her she was feeling better in the morning, but in the evening she was taken suddenly ill, and died before a doctor could come. Dr Bremner said deceased probably suffered from indigestion and perhaps inflammation of the stomach, and, feeling better, she might have eaten more than was good for her. Death was probably due to failure of the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 30 November 1895, Issue 8866 – Gale Document No. Y3200759427
Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Railway Hotel, Teignmouth, on Monday, on the body of VIOLET HEXTER, aged five months. The father, EDWARD ARTHUR HEXTER, gardener, residing at Glenymor Lodge, said the child's life was insured. It had been weak ever since its birth. For a fortnight before death the deceased was fed on condensed milk. It caught a cold on Saturday, and witness and his wife put a linseed meal poultice on its chest as it had great difficulty in breathing. They did not consider it necessary to call in a doctor, but on Sunday morning witness sent for one. Dr Hallinghas, surgeon at the Infirmary, said he was called, but the child was dead when he arrived. From examination he found that death was caused by inflammation of the lungs, which was due to convulsions. The child had been dead about five or ten minutes. Since its birth it had received plenty of nourishment and had been well taken care of. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

"Found Drowned" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Tiverton on Tuesday on the body of GERTRUDE CLEMENTS, aged 14, who met her death in the Canal on Monday last under circumstances already fully reported.

Saturday 14 December 1895, Issue 8878 – Gale Document No. Y3200759494
An Inquest was held at Newton on Tuesday on the body of WILLIAM FRANCIS DENSHAM, Aged 13 months, son of ALFRED DENSHAM, of Brooke-street. The medical evidence showed that death was due to inflammation of the brain following on concussion, the result of falling off a chair. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death, the result of falling off a chair."

Saturday 21 December 1895, Issue 8884 – Gale Document No. Y3200759528
INQUEST IN EXETER – At Lions Holt on Tuesday an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH PASSMORE, a widow, aged 66, who died on Sunday. The deceased, who resided at Sidwell-terrace, was found by her son on Sunday morning dead. She was subject to fainting fits. Dr Duncan, attributed death to syncope, and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony as returned.

SUDDEN DEATH AT MORCHARD BISHOP – Mr Deputy Coroner Gould held an Inquest at Woodgate Cottage, Morchard Bishop, on the body of ALBERT EDWARD WRIGHT, three years of age. BESSIE WRIGHT, mother of the deceased, said he died on Saturday morning, within half an hour of her noticing anything the matter with him. Mr G. A. H. Burton, surgeon, of Crediton, proved making a post mortem examination. He found a quantity of fluid round the heart, and the stomach was much distended with gas, which, pressing on an already embarrassed heart, was the cause of death. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 28 December 1895, Issue 8888 – Gale Document No. Y3200759552
An Inquest was held at the Dawlish Town Hall on Monday, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of HORACE HUGHES, aged two months, the child of HORACE AND LOUISA HUGHES, travelling hawkers. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 4 January 1896, Issue 8894 – Gale Document No. Y3200759588
SUDDEN DEATH AT DEVONPORT – MICHAEL JOHN KESSELL, shipwright, in H.M. Dockyard, Devonport, was found dead at 24, Granby-street, on Wednesday He returned from work at five o'clock, had a good tea, and shortly after expired. He had been ailing for the past five years. Dr Hinvest made a post mortem examination, and said death was due to syncope and a verdict accordingly was returned at the Inquest on Thursday.

Saturday 4 January 1896, Issue 8894 – Gale Document No. Y3200759590
"Found Dead in the Water" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Dartmouth on Tuesday, on the body of FRANK ERNEST CARTER, second engineer of the S.S. Winstanley who had been missing for some days.

INQUEST – At an Inquest held at the Guildhall on Wednesday on the body of MARY CANN, an elderly person of Poltimore Square, St. Sidwell's, who died from failure of the heart, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

INQUEST AT TAVISTOCK – Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquiry at the Tavistock Guildhall on Tuesday touching the death of GEORGE EDWARD KINGDON, aged four years, son of a moulder, Tavistock. Dr Brodrick deposed that the child's chest w3as abnormally contracted, and its lungs, bowels, and liver were in an unhealthy state. Death w3as due to exhaustion and convulsions. Verdict accordingly.

Mr G. Gard, Deputy Borough Coroner for Devonport, held an Inquest on Tuesday respecting the death of a spinster aged 63, named MARY ANN CURRAN, who was found dead in a room she occupied at 10, William-street, Morice Town. On her room being searched a bank book, which credited £160 to her, was found. She was most eccentric in her manner, and allowed no one to visit her room, in which was found a small piece of dry bread, a piece of stale meat, and butter. Mr F. E. Row, surgeon, said the fingers and thumbs of both hands had apparently been nibbled by mice. The body was in an extremely emaciated condition, externally and internally, and entirely devoid of fat. The stomach contained no food, and the internal organs were shrivelled up and contracted. In his opinion death was due to exhaustion, produced by starvation. She had been dead about three days. s The Jury returned a verdict of Death from Starvation.

Saturday 11 January 1896, Issue 8900 – Gale Document No. Y3200759625
At Lympstone Wednesday an Inquest was held touching the death of ALBERT EDWARD PESTER, aged five months. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. Inspector Whethem, N.S.P.C.C., who was present, called attention to the unhealthy state of the house the family were living in.

An Inquest was held at Torquay on Tuesday on the body of CHARLES ALBERT SNOW, 18, assistant to Mr Bathe, chemist of Fleet-street, who was found dead in Mr Bathe's store room on Tuesday afternoon, having apparently taken poison. Deceased's father said there was insanity in the family. Mr Bathe gave evidence as to finding deceased. Dr Gardner, who as called, said that when he arrived the deceased was quite dead, and there was a strong smell of prussic acid in the room, and from a glass measure. He had made a post mortem examination, and found prussic acid in the stomach and in other parts of the body. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased met his death by taking prussic acid whilst temporarily insane.

Saturday 11 January 1896, Issue 8900 – Gale Document No. Y3200759633
INQUESTS AT TORQUAY – A Dangerous Practice. Child Burned to Death. – In Upton Schools, Torquay, this morning, there were a couple of Inquests. The first was on WILLIAM MARTIN, aged 61, formerly in the employ of the Torquay Brewery Company, who committed suicide in Torbay, off Livermead, on Thursday afternoon. Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, conducted the Inquiry, and Mr J. Day was chosen Foreman of the Jury. JOHN MARTIN, son of the deceased, was the first witness, and said he was a shoemaker. He identified the body. Last Tuesday witness saw deceased for the last time. He was then ill in bed, suffering from pleurisy, and complaining of pains in the head. Deceased was cellarman at the Torquay Brewery. He had just given a week's notice to leave, feeling that the work was too heavy for him. The Brewery Company had taken away men working under him and substituted boys, whose work he had to do as well as his own. It was this that affected his head. ELIZA MARTIN, widow of the deceased, said her husband gave up work last Thursday week owing to illness. Last Thursday deceased rose at 6 a.m. He was quite "lost in his head," and thought people were carrying things away. Dr Eales strongly advised him to go to bed, and he promised to, but as soon as he got to the top of the stairs he returned saying he could not go to bed. He was on the verge of insanity, and she watched him throughout the day. In the afternoon he slipped out. As soon as she missed him she ran out, but could not see him. She got her clothes and made inquiries, but could not find where he had gone, and as soon as she returned home, someone came to say he had drowned himself. Susan Gillard, domestic servant, said deceased jumped into the sea. Edwin Cornhill, plumber, Paignton, said as soon as he saw the body he pulled off his clothes and jumped in after him. There was a heavy surf, and witness experienced some difficulty. After further evidence, a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

ELSIE HEWITT, aged 4, died as the result of burns under circumstances already reported. The mother said she could not account for the child's clothes taking fire; she took every precaution. The Coroner commented on the danger of leaving children alone with fire. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 18 January 1896, Issue 8906 – Gale Document No. Y3200759666
At the Sadler's Arms Inn, Lympstone, on Wednesday, an Inquest was held on the body of WILLIAM TREMLETT, aged 76, who according to medical testimony died from shock. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 18 January 1896, Issue 8906 – Gale Document No. Y3200759699
INQUEST – At the Inquest today on the body of GEORGE COLES, who died from the effects of being thrown out of a trap in the Bonhay-road, Exeter, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 25 January 1896, Issue 8912 – Gale Document No. Y3200759731
SUPPOSED SUICIDE – William Hammett, labourer, found the body of a man on the beach at Mount Wise bathing place early this morning. He communicated with the police, and the body was conveyed to the Mortuary, where an Inquest will be held on Monday. The body has since been identified as that of ROBERT JOHN BESWETHERICK, a tailor, residing at 5, Mill-street, Devonport. Deceased had been in a despondent state of mind for the past fortnight, and was only 35 years of age.

Saturday 25 January 1896, Issue 8912 – Gale Document No. Y3200759720
THE SUICIDE OF A FARMER AT BRADNINCH – The Inquest on the body of WILLIAM HOLE, farmer, of Winham House, Bradninch, who was found dead and mutilated on the Great Western Railway, was held on Thursday at Winham House by Mr Burrows, of Cullompton. MISS MARY HOLE identified the body as that of her brother. Eliza Bray, a servant girl, said that on going into the stable about one o'clock on Tuesday afternoon she found an empty envelope (produced) on which were written the words "Dearest Mary, - By the time you read this I shall be no more. Weep not for me as I have been a great trouble to you. – WM. HOLE."
At the side of the envelope was written, "My body will be found somewhere in the neighbourhood." The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind.

Saturday 25 January 1896, Issue 8912 – Gale Document No. Y3200759705
At the Inquest at Braunton on Tuesday on the body of MR E. C. INCLEDON WEBBER, of St Brannocks House, Braunton, who was killed by the explosion of a gun while rabbiting a few days since, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, a rider being added to the effect that the Jury considered the man Huxtable, who was carrying the gun the discharge of which was the cause of MR WEBBER'S death, was a totally unfit person to have the charge of a gun, and that it was through his carelessness deceased came to his death.

Saturday 1 February 1896, Issue 8918 – Gale Document No. Y3200759737
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held on Monday at the Windsor Hotel, Bradiford, Barnstaple, on the body of GLADYS AMY SHADDICK, aged fifteen months, who died from scalds.

DEATH FROM BURNS – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday touching the death of ELIZABETH FRY, aged 59, charwoman, of 39, Paris-street, who died from burns received through falling into the fire under circumstances already reported. After hearing the testimony of several witnesses the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

An Inquest on the body of ROBERT JOHN BESWETHARICK, tailor, thirty-seven years of age, who was picked upon the beach at Mount Wise bathing place on Saturday was held on Monday, and the Jury found a verdict that deceased committed suicide whilst Temporarily Insane. Deceased had been in a despondent state for some time, and had been away. He had on him a receipt for board and lodgings at Underhill's Refreshment House, St David's, Exeter.

Mr Sidney Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquest at Shaldon on Tuesday afternoon on the body of EMILY SHANNON, two months old, who was found dead in bed on Monday. Mr G. Sercombe was Foreman of the Jury. The mother stated that the child was in the best of health on Sunday night, but when witness woke up on Monday morning she found the child dead. The medical evidence was to the effect that the infant died from Natural Causes, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Mr Jones, Government Inspector of Factories, attended the Inquest on Wednesday at Bideford on the body of GEORGE MOUNTJOY, who was killed by the bursting of an emery wheel at Meredith's Foundry on Friday last. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and everybody in the workshop being exonerated from blame. The medical evidence was that death was due to haemorrhage and the ribs pressing on the lungs. One of deceased's arms was stripped from the shoulder to the elbow. The inspector said the bursting of emery wheels was frequent, a man being decapitated in Shropshire not long since. He recommended that the wheels should be inspected before starting.

Saturday 1 February 1896, Issue 8918 – Gale Document No. Y3200759744
At the Inquest on the body of MRS MARY JANE HUTCHINGS at Dartmouth yesterday, it was stated that she went upstairs to get some potatoes, and hearing a heavy fall her husband found her lying dead upon the floor. Dr R. W. Soper attributed death to syncope, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF AN EXETER GIRL – The Body Found in the Tavy. – It will be remembered that some short time since we published an account of the mysterious disappearance of a domestic servant named RACHEL MITCHAM, daughter of a widowed woman residing at Trinity-street, Exeter, on Christmas Eve, from Maristow, where she was in the service of the Rev. Mr Scott, who has charge of the church adjoining Sir Massey Lopes residence at Roborough. Although her hat and umbrella were found in close proximity to the river, nothing further was heard of her until yesterday, when her body was recovered in a very decomposed condition near Warleigh. MITCHAM who although only fourteen and a half years of age, was 5 feet 10 inches in height, was employed as a domestic servant by the Rev. Mr Scott, was on Monday evening, and December 23rd, in the house of the rev. gentleman about eleven o'clock, but on the following morning, when the family rose, MITCHAM, who was under notice to leave, was nowhere to be seen. It was discovered that she had not slept in her bed that night, and a further search resulted in her umbrella being found sticking in the mud near Maristow Quay, and her hat some distance down the river, stranded on the bank. Yesterday Frederick Kitt, a bargeman, who, with his sons, was loading a barge with sand, noticed what appeared to be a bundle of rags being carried down the centre of the River Tavy. Within a very few minutes he saw that it was a human body. He thereupon launched his boat and with the assistance of his sons succeeded in getting the remains ashore at Warleigh Beach, after which he fetched P.C. 20 Miller, of the H. Division of the Devon Constabulary, station at Tamerton. P.C. Miller procured a cart and conveyed the body to the Queen's Hotel, Tamerton, where it was afterwards identified by the Rev. Scott as that of the missing girl. The remains were very much decomposed, the left eye having completely disappeared, but identification was easy by means of the clothes. The body was fully dressed, and on the left hand was a fur-lined glove. On being searched a pockethandkerchief, marked "RACHEL MITCHAM," A prayer and hymnbook, a small key, and sixpence were found in the pocket of the deceased. No marks of violence can be detected to lead one to suppose that the ill-fated girl met with foul play, as was rumoured at the time of her disappearance. Notwithstanding the fact that the closest investigations have been made in the neighbourhood, no evidence can be gleaned as to the unfortunate girl having ever stated her intention of "doing away" with herself. On the contrary, it is generally believed, as the umbrella was discovered sticking in the mud near the ford at Maristow Quay, that the girl intended crossing over to Beerferris, and was carried off her feet by the tremendous rush of water which was in the river at the time. The mother of the deceased was communicated with yesterday, but the police have been unsuccessful in their efforts to discover the address of a sister residing in the neighbourhood of King-street, Plymouth, who is said to have married a man named Williams. An Inquest was held this afternoon by the County Coroner (Mr Rodd, senr.) at the Queen's Hotel, Tamerton.

Saturday 8 February 1896, Issue 8924 – Gale Document No. Y3200759791
INQUESTS IN EXETER
At Exe-street on Tuesday an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper on the body of MRS CATHERINE COOMBES, who met her death by falling downstairs on Saturday evening. Mr Voysey was chosen Foreman of the Jury. WILLIAM COOMBES, a plasterer, lodging at No. 8, Exe-street, with Mr and Mrs Cox, identified the body as that of his late wife, aged 51. On Saturday night about eleven o'clock witness heard a noise as if someone had fallen downstairs and on going to the staircase he saw the deceased at the bottom lying on her side. He tried to lift her, but was unable to do so, and he called Mr Cox. Deceased was unable to speak. Robert Cox corroborated, and said there was no handrail to the stairs. Mr Smith, surgeon, proved being called on Saturday night just before 12 o'clock. Witness on arriving found deceased dead and lying at the bottom of the stairs. There was a contusion on the right cheek bone which had bled freely. The neck was broken, and that was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Higher Barracks on Tuesday touching the death of ELSIE MARIA TURNER, aged 5, who died suddenly on Monday. WILLIAM J. TURNER, messenger, at the Royal Engineers office, identified the body as that of his daughter and stated that she had been failing in health and subject to bronchitis. About seven o'clock on Monday morning his wife, not hearing the deceased breathing, went to the bed and found her dead. Surgeon-Major O'brien stated that he examined the body and found no marks of violence, death being due to syncope brought on by bronchitis. A verdict of Death from "Natural Causes" was returned.

Mr Coroner Burrows held an Inquest at the Exeter Prison on Tuesday, on the body of OLIVER SELWYN, aged 31, who died in the Prison. Mr Rousham was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The Governor, Major Matheson, identified the body, and said the deceased was sentenced to five years' penal servitude on the 17th of June last at Worcester Assizes for horse stealing. He first came to the prison on the 11th of July. His conduct was good. He died yesterday morning at 1.50. George Lenthall, warder in charge of the prison hospital, said that deceased had been very ill and was visited every day by the doctor. His friends visited him on Saturday and Sunday. James Milford, night nurse, said deceased never made no complaint. Charles James Davis, night watchman at the prison, gave corroborative evidence. Dr Mortimer, prison surgeon, stated that he examined the deceased when he was first admitted into the prison and was suffering from a disease of the lungs. On the 30th of December he ordered him to the hospital and visited him every day. He considered death was due to consumption. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Wednesday at No. 7, King William-terrace, into the circumstances of the death of ALBERT FRANCIS SYDNEY GRIFFITHS, aged one month who died suddenly on Monday morning. Mr Turner was chosen Foreman of the Jury. BESSIE GRIFFITHS, a single woman, mother of the child, said that she did not suckle the deceased, but gave it new milk and a little boiled biscuit on Sunday night. when she woke about six o'clock in the morning the child was alive, but at 8.30 she found it dead. She then fetched a doctor. Dr Bremner stated that he was called to the house. He made a post mortem examination and found all the organs healthy, but the lungs were collapsed. He considered death was due to suffocation. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Coroner said that he thought, and the doctor agreed with him, it was a very improper thing to feed children under nine months old with biscuit.

An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court on Thursday by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of MAUD ALICE ROGERS, aged four years, whose parents live at No. 2, Brunswick-square, Paris-street. ELIZABETH ROGERS, the mother, said her child came home about four o'clock on Monday afternoon and was taken ill. Mrs Mitchell, a neighbour, advised her to see a doctor about her, but she was afraid to go, and Mrs Mitchell went for her. The child died on Tuesday about one o'clock. Annie Mitchell said deceased had a nasty cough and she advised MRS ROGERS on Monday morning not to let her go out again. The next morning witness went to the Dispensary and saw Dr MacKeith, who told her the child was dying, and advised her to take it home again, giving directions as to treatment. Deceased was put to bed and hot flannels applied to her feet, but she died at one o'clock. Mr John Mackeith, surgeon, said he called at MRS ROGERS' about four o'clock on Tuesday and then ascertained that the child had died at one o'clock. Death was due to congestion of the lungs, possibly caused by exposure. Mr Roberts, a Juryman, said the deceased would knock at a door, and when the people would come out she would be found sitting on the door step. The Chief Constable said the mother was summoned in July for illtreating her children, and was then discharged with a caution. The Coroner, in summing up, said the mother could be committed for trial on a charge of manslaughter, but that rested with the Jury.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and considered that the mother was deserving of severe censure. The Coroner, addressing MRS ROGERS, warned her as to her treatment of her children.

Mr Coroner Hooper subsequently held an Inquest at No. 6, Silver-lane, touching the death of an infant named JOHN GORFIN, who died yesterday morning. Mr Pearse was chosen Foreman of the Jury. JOSEPH GORFIN, labourer, the father, said deceased was born on Tuesday morning about 7.15. They had given the child little milk and water. It died yesterday morning about four o'clock. Annie Hepworth, certificated nurse, of 7, Friars Gate, who attended MRS GORFIN, said the child was not strong when it was born.
Mr Duncan, surgeon, who was called to see the deceased, said the body showed no marks of violence. The child was well developed and fairly well nourished. He considered the death was a natural one. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 8 February 1896, Issue 8924 – Gale Document No. Y3200759768
An Inquest was held at the Beach Hotel, Exmouth, on Tuesday by Mr Deputy Coroner C. Cox, on the body of THOMAS DOVE DIXON, a retired boat builder, age 76, who died suddenly whilst in the Beach Congregational Chapel on Sunday morning. JOHN THOMAS DIXON, the elder son of the deceased, stated that his father came into his pew during the service, and shortly afterwards he heard him make a gurgling sound. Witness went to him, and with assistance took him down into the body of the chapel, where he expired before the arrival of Dr Hodgson who had been sent for. Evidence was also given by John Frost and Mrs Bastin, and both stated that the deceased had always been a very healthy man, but within the last fortnight he had complained of pains in the head. Dr Cock said he had attended on him for thirteen years. He had always found him a very healthy man. He had made a post mortem examination. The cause of death was fatty degeneration of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned on Tuesday at an Inquest held on the body of ALFRED JOHN JOYCE, aged 52, a commercial traveller, of 9, Ermington-terrace, Mutley, who died from a fracture of the skull, caused through falling downstairs.

Saturday 15 February 1896, Issue 8930 – Gale Document No. Y3200759834
TOTNES – At the Bull Inn, Totnes, yesterday, Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest on the body of MRS SANDERS, who died at 2, Plymouth-road, on Thursday. Deceased was 87 years of age and on Christmas Eve fell off a chair and broke her thigh. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 15 February 1896, Issue 8930 – Gale Document No. Y3200759804
A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned at an Inquest held at Tiverton on Tuesday evening on the body of JOHN KINGDOM, butcher, of Westexe North, who committed suicide by hanging himself.

THE FEEDING OF INFANTS – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on Monday touching the death of WILLIAM HOOPER, the infant son of DANIEL W. HOOPER, of 26, Exe-street, and who died suddenly on Friday. The child had been fed on soaked farthing cakes. Mr Moone, surgeon, said he considered that death resulted from infantile convulsions, caused by improper feeding. a verdict accordingly was returned. The Coroner spoke on the practice of improper feeding of infants, and called attention to the notice sent out by the Corporation on the subject.

INQUEST – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at the Parade Room, at the Police Court, on Thursday, on the body of ELLEN HINNEM, aged 48, of 8, Sandford-street. GEORGE SMITH, mason's labourer, identified the body as that of his daughter, who was a widow. She was taken ill and Dr Mackeith was called, but she was dead when he arrived. Dr Mackeith said that for the last two or three years he had attended deceased intermittently. she suffered generally from bronchitis. He examined the body and he considered death was due to cardiac syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 29 February 1896, Issue 8942 – Gale Document No. Y3200759892
At an Inquest held on Monday at the Dockyard by the Borough Coroner, Mr J. A. Pearce, relative to the sudden death of WILLIAM HILL, a pensioner, and employed as a skilled labourer in H.M. Dockyard, the Jury brought in a verdict of "Natural Causes." The medical evidence went to show that deceased suffered from heart disease.

Saturday 14 March 1896, Issue 8954 – Gale Document No. Y3200759964
An Inquest was held on Tuesday at Smallridge, Axminster, on the body of a six months old child belonging to MABEL ELLEN HUTCHINS, single woman, who died after a fit of crying, being unable to recover its breath. A verdict of "Accidental Suffocation" was returned.

At the Teignmouth Infirmary an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hacker on the body of KATE ANNETTE HOOK, aged 13, who died on Sunday morning from burns received on January 28th. Dr Allingham said that the deceased was received into the institution suffering from severe shock. She recovered for a time, but at the end of a fortnight from the extensive surface of the wounds on the legs suppuration set in and she died from exhaustion. Mr Polybank, who gave evidence that he put his coat around the deceased as she was enveloped in flames, was complimented by the Coroner, who said everything had been done to save the life of the deceased. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 14 March 1896, Issue 8954 – Gale Document No. Y3200759972
INQUEST – At the Exeter Police Court this morning, Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest on the body of a widow named ELIZABETH DREW, aged 62, who occupied a room at 39, Paris-street. Mr W. D. Pyle gave evidence of identification and Mr J. McKeith surgeon, stated that in response to a call he visited the deceased on Thursday. On his arrival he found her dead on the floor near the fireplace, in front of which was a low chair, from which she had evidently fallen. The body was in a very emaciated condition and witness attributed death to syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 21 March 1896 – Issue 8960 – Gale Document No. Y3200760012
An Inquest was held at Hookway, near Crediton, on Thursday on the body of FRANCIS MOORE, aged 14, who died on Wednesday last from shot wounds received through the bursting of a gun which his brother was carrying. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Coroner cautioned the brother as to the way in which he handled guns in the future.

Saturday 28 March 1896, Issue 8966 – Gale Document No. Y3200760064
EXETER PAUPER'S FATALITY – At the Exeter Workhouse this morning the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of an inmate named EDWARD WAY, who died on the previous day from burns received on the Monday before through his clothes catching fire from a lighted pipe which he put in his pocket. Mr W. G. Newall, the master, said deceased, who was a labourer 78 years of age, was admitted to the lunatic ward in 1878, being of weak intellect. He was a very great smoker; on the recommendation of the medical officer he was supplied with tobacco by the house. Henry Mugford, inmate and wardsman in the male lunatic ward, said he lighted the deceased's pipe on Monday afternoon. He then left the ward to attend to a bird and shortly afterwards he was called to go to the water trough where he found deceased with his coat on fire. Mr Broom, the attendant, was also attracted to the spot, and they rolled WAY on the floor and poured a bucket of water over him, extinguishing the flames. Deceased usually carried his pipe with his handkerchief in his coat pocket. Those things were found together in the water trough. Henry Broom, male lunatic attendant, also gave evidence, and in reply to a Juror, said he thought he was doing what was best in throwing a bucket of water over the deceased. Dr Woodman, the medical officer, said on hearing of the accident whilst in the House, he went to the lunatics' dormitory, and found Mr Clarke (the nurse) and Mr Broom dressing the burns, which were very severe. Witness attended to him from then up to his death. His left thigh and various parts of his trunk were scorched black; in fact he had not seen such burns since the Theatre fire. He did not suffer much pain because he never recovered from the shock. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and the Coroner remarked that the case showed how careful smokers ought to be in putting pipes in their pockets.

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT DIGBY'S – An Inquest was held at Digby's Asylum this afternoon on the body of the inmate WILLIAM MEADE BRYANT, who, as reported, died from injuries received by jumping off a railway bridge near the Asylum on Tuesday. Mr Brewer was chosen Foreman of the Jury. William Holman, of The Quarries, Sowton, said he was working near the railway arch on Tuesday and saw the deceased climb over the railway bank. An attendant followed and nearly caught him, but deceased gained the bridge and cast himself off. So far as he could see everything was done to prevent him. William Robert Gunn, attendant at the Asylum, said he was in charge of BRYANT, with other patients on Tuesday. Nothing attracted his attention to the deceased until he was near the railway bridge, when deceased gained the bank by means of a pillar. Witness shouted to him to come back and ran after him, but slipped, and BRYANT gained some yards on him. Reaching the parapet of the bridge, he looked back, and seeing witness jumped off. Witness had not previously seen any suicidal tendency in deceased. Charles Luscombe and Charles Syms, attendants, corroborated. Dr Rutherford, medical superintendent, said the deceased was admitted there on January 30th, 1895, when he was said to be suicidal. His condition improved, but in January of this year he became worse and a "Suicidal" caution was given to the attendants. After the occurrence Dr Bell was called and deceased's left leg was then amputated. He rallied after the operation, but died on Thursday. In his opinion death was due to shock and the effects of the operation. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from shock, and that at the time he jumped over the bridge he was not of sound mind, adding that no blame could be attached to anyone, as every precaution had been taken.

Saturday 28 March 1896, Issue 8966 – Gale Document No. Y3200760048
A shocking accident befell a dairyman named WILLIAM LOCK, of Brimfield Dairy, Clayhidon, near Honiton on Thursday evening. LOCK had been engaged hauling manure and was on his way home riding in an empty cart. When near Glady's Bridge he appears to have in some way over-balanced himself, and fallen from the cart into the road, pitching upon his head and causing almost instantaneous death. The deceased, who was highly respected, was 40 years of age, and leaves a widow and four young children. The Inquest was held today.

Saturday 28 March 1896, Issue 8966 – Gale Document No. Y3200760045
COLYTON WOMAN'S SUICIDE – Juryman Fined. – Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest at the Colcombe Castle Hotel, Colyton, yesterday, on the body of MRS A WORAM, who was found drowned in the river Coly on Thursday. P.C. Derges discovered the deceased in about three feet of water near Cadhayne, and life was quite extinct. Mr M. Roberts was Foreman of the Jury. Mr W. Farmer, a Juryman, was fined £1 for being half-an-hour late, and Mr J. White and Mr J. Warry were deprived of their fees for being five minutes late. A verdict was given of "Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 28 March 1896, Issue 8966 – Gale Document No. Y3200760059
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN THE EXETER THEATRE – The Inquest on the body of WILLIAM HILL PHILLIPS, who, as reported on Monday, died suddenly at the Exeter Theatre on Monday, was held at the Police Court on Tuesday by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper. Frederick John Southcott Toby, brother-in-law of the deceased, clerk at the Commercial Union Office, High-street, said deceased lived in Park-road, Polsloe Park, and was 36 years of age, and married, with a family of three. He last saw him alive about three days since, when he appeared in his usual health. Arthur Pitt, assistant to the scenic artist at the Theatre, said on Monday afternoon as he was going up the steps leading to the dressing-rooms, he heard groaning. He looked on to the landing and saw the deceased lying on the floor of his workshop with his head in the passage. Witness fetched Mr Galt, the acting-manager, and a doctor was sent for, but deceased died within three or four minutes of the time when witness found him. Mr E. J. Domville, surgeon, said he knew the deceased, who was one of the most trusted employees at the Theatre. Witness was called at half-past two on Monday afternoon to see him. He was quite dead. By the Coroner's direction the body was removed to the mortuary, and by his orders, and with the assistance of Mr Andrew, house surgeon at the Hospital, witness made a post mortem examination. The heart was very much dilated and filled with venous blood, the whole giving signs of weakness of long standing. Some of the small intestines had slipped under an unnatural band and become partially strangulated. This probably caused pain and the faintness from which he died. The cause of death could not be ascertained without a post mortem examination. The management of the Theatre had always found the deceased a most hard working and trustworthy man, and it was owing to his very great attention to his work which made him hurry back from his dinner, which seemed to be partially the cause of his death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 4 April 1896, Issue 8971 – Gale Document No. Y3200760100
At the Inquest on Thursday on TURNER, the mason, aged 71, of Stockland, near Axminster, who died through drinking weed killer from a stone jar labelled "Poison" in mistake for cider, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Poisoning."

Saturday 4 April 1896, Issue 8971 – Gale Document No. Y3200760074
Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Tuesday on the body of the infant son of MARK PENGELLY, of Queen's-court, Queen-street. The child, it was stated, died on Saturday. Mr R. Martyn who made a post mortem examination, said death was due to suffocation, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Mr S. Hacker held an adjourned Inquest at Torquay on Tuesday evening touching the death of WILLIAM MUGFORD, a carrier of St. Marychurch, whose death has already been reported. Sarah Ford, of Kingskerswell, said she was walking home last week and saw Mr Fenton's engine approaching a wagon which deceased was driving. The deceased jumped from the wagon, and led his horse past the engine, which the driver brought to a standstill. As soon as the horse had gone about twelve yards past the locomotive restarted and the animal began to plunge and bolted. Afterwards she saw MUGFORD lying in the road. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury attaching no blame to the driver of the engine, but expressing the hope that in future reasonable time would be allowed for vehicles to pass before restarting the engine.

Saturday 4 April 1896, Issue 8971 – Gale Document No. Y3200760103
EXETER LADY'S SUICIDE – A Life of Trouble. – At the Inquest at Weston-super-Mare on the body of MRS SUSAN CLUTTERBUCK, of Cookside Villa, whose melancholy death has been already recorded, CHARLES CLUTTERBUCK deposed that he was the son of the deceased lady, who had only arrived in Weston from Exeter a fortnight before. Witness's opinion was that his mother had acted on a sudden impulse and taken her life. she had had a good deal of trouble all her life. MISS EMILY CLUTTERBUCK, daughter of the deceased, said when she left home in the morning her mother accompanied her to the door and wished her "Good-bye." Deceased then appeared in her usual health. On arriving at Weston her mother was depressed in spirits, but three or four days prior to her death she had greatly improved. After being left in the morning the deceased had evidently done all the housework. P.S. Designey described the position in which he found the deceased lady lying, on being summoned to Cookside Villa at midnight on Tuesday. He should imagine death had taken place fully ten hours previously. A razor, produced, he found lying at a distance of about a foot from her right hand. He noticed deceased's cap lying on a chest of drawers close at hand. There were no indications of a struggle. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."
The deceased lady had been residing for some months previous to her departure for Weston, with a married daughter, the wife of Mr T. P. Halmore, jun., of Cowick-street, St. Thomas.

Saturday 4 April 1896, Issue 8971 – Gale Document No. Y320076008
At an Inquest at Plymouth on Wednesday on the body of a fisherman's wife named JOHANNA LE GRASS, 44, who died of syncope on Monday shortly after giving birth to a stillborn child, it was stated that the deceased had given birth to thirteen children.

Saturday 11 April 1896, Issue 8977 – Gale Document No. Y3200760130
At Cornwood on Tuesday Mr R. R. Dodd, County Coroner, held an Inquiry respecting the body of ELIZABETH ARMSTRONG, a lady about 45 years of age, whose body was found on the River Yealm on Saturday. It was stated that deceased had undoubtedly been wandering in her mind lately. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 11 April 1896, Issue 8977 – Gale Document No. Y3200760114
An Inquest was held at Devonport on Tuesday on the body of ELIZABETH SMALE, aged 72, who fell over a banister whilst left in charge of 52, Cornwall-street, during a funeral on Saturday and fractured her skull. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

"Accidental Death" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Tiverton on Wednesday on the body of WILLIAM HITCHCOCK, aged 72, of East Worlington, who met his death by falling from a cart.

THE TORQUAY CLIFF FATALITY – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at St. Marychurch on the body of P. AMOR, who met his death by falling over the cliffs at St. Marychurch on Tuesday. Deceased's father, a publisher, of Leytonstone, identified the body, and said deceased was a keen athlete and was on a walking tour around the coast of Devon. He was aged 18, and was very fond of cliff climbing. Mr H. Carpenter, of the Ladradore Tea Gardens, said the deceased came to him on Monday afternoon and asked the way to Babbacombe. John Henderson, a tourist, proved finding the body on the cliffs and said it was terribly gashed about the face. Evidence was also given by P.C. Hill, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 18 April 1896, Issue 8983 – Gale Document No. Y3200760180
An Inquest was held by Mr Prickman at Dartmoor Prison yesterday on the body of a convict named WILLIAM BELGRAVE, a native of Chester, who died on Monday, aged 67 years. After hearing the evidence of the chief warder and medical officer, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Pleurisy."

Saturday 18 April 1896, Issue 8983 – Gale Document No. Y3200760174
HEAVITREE GARDENER'S SUICIDE – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday on the body of JOHN LANGABEER, aged 36 years, of 5, Park-street, Heavitree, who died at the above institution on Sunday from self-inflicted wounds. The Jury of which Mr William Godsland was Foreman, having viewed the body, MARY LANGABEER, the widow, gave evidence of identification, and said her husband worked in the grounds of the Hospital five days a week. They had a family of four children. On Friday morning about half-past four, hearing a noise she called her father who was in the habit of getting up early, thinking he might have fallen down in a pit. He replied "It's not me, it's JOHN." Witness ran downstairs and found him in the back kitchen in a crouching position. She again called her father who came to her with a light. She then found her husband kneeling in a pool of blood with his left hand resting on the table. In his right hand was a razor and with the assistance of her father she took it away. deceased was unable to speak and witness called a neighbour who went for a doctor. His health had been very good lately. She had not seen him in a despondent state, and there was no disagreement between them. – By a Juror: The deceased was in the Army in India six years and three months, and had the fever whilst there but he had never complained of his mind having been affected in consequence. JAMES HUMPHRIES, labourer, father of the last witness, also residing at 5, Park-street, Heavitree, gave corroborative evidence. By the Jury: Witness had never noticed anything strange in deceased's manner. There had been no disagreements between LANGABEER and his wife of late years. There were in former years when he used to drink.
Dr R. J. Andrews, of Heavitree, said he had known the deceased for several years, but did not know his habits. He had attended him for slight ailments. He was called on Friday night about ten minutes to five to go to his house. On arriving there he found him lying on the floor of the back kitchen in a pool of blood. He had an incised wound across the throat but none of the large vessels were cut. Witness bandaged the wound and on his advice he was taken to the Hospital.
Mr R. Andrew, house surgeon at the Hospital, stated that the deceased was admitted into the Hospital on Friday morning about six o'clock. He was collapsed with a wound in the throat. The man was attended to, but he developed sceptic pneumonia, from which he died on Sunday night. He was conscious when admitted into the institution and he said he was sorry for what he had done. By the Jury: Witness had seen the deceased working in the Hospital grounds, and he did not appear to be a man likely to commit suicide. He was, however, inexplicable occasionally. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 18 April 1896, Issue 8983 – Gale Document No. Y3200760155
An Inquest was held at the Colcombe Castle Hotel, Colyton, on Tuesday into the death of HAROLD LOVELESS, aged four years, who fell down and knocked his forehead on an iron weight, and who died after an operation. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

An Inquest was held at the Tiverton Infirmary on Tuesday touching the death of MR THOMAS COOK, carrier, who fell down in a fit in Fore-street on Saturday and died on Monday morning. Dr Welsford said death was due to epilepsy, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 18 April 1896, Issue 8983 – Gale Document No. Y3200760164
TORQUAY – An Inquest was held at Torquay last evening touching the death of WALTER JAMES TUCKER, porter, of Newton Abbot, who met with an accident while assisting in shunting at Torquay Railway Station, and who died a short time afterwards. When the train was being shunted, he, contrary to regulations, went in between the trucks to couple instead of using a coupling stick. The deceased slipped and his legs were jammed between the wheels. It was found that the wounds were covered with black grease off the wheels, which had entered the wounds and caused blood poisoning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 25 April 1896, Issue 8989 – Gale Document No. Y3200760225
TORQUAY – The Inquest on JAMES BOWDEN, the child who was burnt to death on Thursday, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 25 April 1896, Issue 8989 – Gale Document No. Y3200760227
An Inquest was held yesterday respecting the death of CHARLES COUCH BURGOYNE, aged 7, who, whilst trespassing with other boys on the Great Western Railway at Laira on the previous evening, was run over and killed by a goods train. In recording a verdict of "Accidental Death", the Jury suggested that the company be asked to erect a fence, which would prevent boys from getting on to the line, and the Plympton District Council to remove rubble, which assisted children in climbing on to the line.

Saturday 25 April 1896, Issue 8989 – Gale Document No. Y3200760193
At an Inquest on Tuesday touching the death of MARY CARTER GREENSLADE, of the Valley Cottage, Georgenympton, about two miles from Southmolton, who died from the effects of a fall. The medical evidence showed that death was due to shock to the system and gradual exhaustion. A verdict accordingly was returned.

The Inquest on the body of MR HENRY QUARTLY, who as we reported the same evening, was killed on the Devon and Somerset Railway on Saturday, took place at the Black Cock Hotel on Monday. Dr Hind, medical attendant to the family, said there were three cuts on the head, the occipital, parietal and frontal bones being fractured and the principal contents of the head gone, and both bones of the right leg were fractured. James Green the driver of the train, said there was ample time for deceased to have got out of the way if he had heard the whistling of the engine. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the railway officials being exonerated from all blame.

Saturday 25 April 1896, Issue 8989 – Gale Document No. Y3200760188
SINGULAR DEATH – Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Stonehouse on Wednesday relative to the death of JOHN KINGSLAND, who was driver for the Devonport Tramway Company. Deceased had been constantly attended by Dr Waterfield for inflammation of the bowels caused by a blow on April 8th. He had a habit of kicking the ratchet which keeps the brake of a car in its place instead of using his hand. He had had several blows at different times, and on this occasion the handle f the brake struck him in the bowels, and was undoubtedly the cause of his death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 25 April 1896, Issue 8989 – Gale Document No. Y3200760217
THE TEIGNMOUTH TRAGEDY – The Inquest. - The Inquest on the bodies of HENRY GEORGE HAINES, aged 39, FOWLER ROCKETT HAINES, aged 10 months; DAISY MAY, 3 years; and JOHN EDWARD GEORGE HAINES, 4 ½ years, was held at Mr Marks's Railway Hotel on Tuesday before Mr Coroner Hacker. Mr F. G. Coleridge (Chief Constable of Devon) and Superintendent Williams, of Bovey, watched the proceedings on behalf of the police. Sergeant S. Richards was also present during the Enquiry. Mr H. Marks was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
The Coroner: The case which comes to your notice today is of a very serious nature and unusual for Teignmouth. It is a case in which the violent deaths of four persons have occurred – those of three children and a man. Their deaths occurred yesterday under circumstances which evidently point to a series of crimes having been committed. It will therefore behove you to very carefully investigate this case and to ascertain upon proper evidence all the circumstances relating to the deaths and to the manner of them, and as to who was responsible for them, and to return your verdict accordingly. Although Dr Johnston saw the bodies and will tell you the nature of the wounds, yet you will see for yourself so that you will be able to thoroughly understand the evidence that will be brought before you. I must tell you, Mr Foreman, that I cannot until I have heard the evidence say whether we shall be able to complete the Inquiry today, but if we can complete it we will. Our first duty is to view the body.
The Jury then left for the house at Spring Gardens, where the bodies were lying.
ANNIE HAINES said she lived at No 1, Spring Gardens, Teignmouth. Her husband, HENRY GEORGE HAINES, had followed the occupation of an hotel proprietor, but since they had resided at Teignmouth – about three years – they had kept a lodging house.
The Coroner: Have you seen the persons lying at the house dead?
Witness: No.
Have you not seen them since death? - No, but I know they are my children.
Have you seen them since death? - No, but I saw sufficient yesterday to tell me who they were.
Will you tell the Jury who these three children were – They are my children.
All your children? - Yes.
How many have you had? - Three.
Those are the three children? - Yes.
Are they children by your late husband? - Yes.
In reply to further questions the witness said she had been only married once. The children's names were – JOHN EDWARD GEORGE HAINES, aged four years last birthday; DAISY MAY HAINES, aged three years; and FOWLER ROCKETT HAINES, aged ten months.
The Coroner: Is there any other person lying at the house dead?
Witness: Yes.
Have you seen him? - No; but I know it is my husband. He was 39 years of age. Previous to coming to Teignmouth he was a hotel proprietor at Croydon. In the house at Teignmouth there resided besides witness and her husband and family, Captain Pierson and Mrs Ramsay, but they had left since the tragedy. Witness attended to the lodgers, and her husband assisted at times.
The Coroner: Will you tell us about yesterday.
Witness: I got up earlier than usual yesterday morning as my husband seemed strange. I went for a walk on Sunday evening, with a Mrs Way, and we met my husband, who appeared to be friendly disposed towards us. IO had noticed of late that he had been very peculiar in his manner. On Sunday he went to bed first. Nothing unusual happened until about four o'clock in the morning when he got up and asked me if I did not think he was mad. I did not reply, as I thought his health was telling on him. I had observed that he had been ill for a long time and that it had affected his temper. I thought at times that he was out of his mind, but I did not make any statement to that effect to anyone. I had told the doctor that he had been very strange.
Continuing, witness said when her husband asked her if she thought he was going mad she told him to lie down again. He sat up in bed for a time and then went downstairs to get a cup of tea and brought her up one, which was a most unusual thing. He then lay down again, and witness got up about five, her husband walking about the room saying he was mad. He was about the house most of the morning, and gave the children their dinner about one o'clock. He wanted to send the servant girl to post a letter, but witness suggested that the boy HARRY should go and he was sent. All the four children were in the house until then. Witness then went upstairs to attend to the lodgers, and came down again after about five or ten minutes. She went to the pantry and there saw the bodies of three children lying on the ground, apparently dead. She ran into the passage and screamed, and Mr Roberts, living next door, came in. The servant girl, who had been in the kitchen at work, apparently knew nothing about it. Her husband had threatened her life several times, the last being on Sunday.
Henry Littlefield, of 13 King-street, said yesterday morning about eleven o'clock MR HAINES came to his shop with a razor, and waited while it was being sharpened. He complained of pains in his head, and, referring to the Portsmouth tragedy, said Matthews ought to be shot without judge or jury.
The little girl Newlands said she was in the kitchen at work when MR HAINES went into the pantry and closed the door on her. He must have gone into the pantry and killed the children, but she heard nothing about it, and nothing until MRS HAINES came downstairs. While she was in the kitchen she heard MRS HAINES say the children were all dead. She looked into the pantry, and saw DAISY'S face, the other children lying beside her. After dinner MR HAINES said, "Bertha, make haste and post a letter," but after she had finished her work, the boy HARRY was sent.
John Roberts, a visitor from Clifton, lodging at 2, Spring Gardens, said he heard screams about half-past two yesterday afternoon, and went into HAINE'S house, where he saw MRS HAINES on the floor just outside the door sobbing, and saying that her husband had killed her children and murdered himself. Witness did not take much notice of this at first, thinking she was suffering from hysteria, but on going into the pantry, found the three children dead. He did not see the man. The screams came from MRS HAINES alone, and not from the children.
Frederick Groves, assistant to Mr Denny, photographer, said while he was standing outside the studio he received information of the occurrence and went to the house, where he saw the three children, dead. Not seeing the father, and thinking he might be upstairs, witness took a poker and went in search, with the police officer. On going up six or seven stairs to the room over the pantry they found HAINES lying on the landing with his throat terribly gashed.
Dr Johnson said he was called yesterday about three o'clock to see the bodies. The three children were in the pantry, lying on their faces, all with terrible gashes in the throat, all the vessels being severed, and death must have been instantaneous. The bodies were quite warm. In a small back room upstairs he found HAINES on the floor in a pool of blood, with a gash in his throat, dead, and with the razor beside him. Death must have been almost instantaneous. He thought the deceased was affected in his mind, and there was no doubt that when he committed the murders he was insane.
P.C. Martin gave evidence as to finding HAINES with his throat cut.
Mrs Eleanor Ramsay said she had not met MR HAINES many times. Yesterday afternoon she heard MRS HAINES screaming and found her on the floor crying "My children are murdered."
HARRY HAINES, aged 8, said the previous day his father sent him to post two letters, but he did not notice to whom they were addressed.
The Inquest was resumed on Thursday, when the first witness called was Police-Sergeant Richards, who said on the afternoon of Tuesday he sent a telegram to Mrs Burgess, 52, Dartmouth-road, Forest-hill, London, requesting her to forward him any letters she might have received from MR HAINES. The next morning he received two letters, one addressed to Mrs Burgess, and the other which was enclosed, addressed to Mrs Ramsay (a lodger with the HAINES').
Mrs HAINES, mother of the deceased, gave evidence, and said she was the widow of a veterinary surgeon of Newbury, Berkshire, who died about eighteen years ago.
By the Coroner: There was nothing wrong mentally, and as far as she knew with him or his family, but her son was a very passionate and irritable man. Deceased had not written to any of his family for a long time past. She identified two letters as being in his hand writing. The first was dated 20th April and posted at Teignmouth between the hours of 2.30 and 31.5. It was as follows:-
ANNIE, I can stand it no longer. My knowledge of your movements last night is more than I can swallow. The [?uance} of your bad doings is making me mad. I have begged and prayed of you for these (or three) years. ANNIE, you have murdered me. What I said of Mr Way was said in temper, as you know. That I withdraw as I know nothing bad of him. [The letter here became incoherent and partially undecipherable. Then it proceeded]: "I, however, told you their names, - Your broken husband. If you could not be my wife why did you not say if you could not have only.
The letter ended in this strange manner without the signature.
The letter addressed to Mrs Ramsay ran as follows:- Madam, - My wife was at Captain Pearson's room last, I think you should know this. I can stand it no longer. She has driven me mad, if mad I am. Yours obediently, H. HAINES.
By the Coroner: Witness last saw the deceased about four months ago at Dartmouth-road, London, when he seemed very strange in his mind, but as he was very irritable and of a very violent temper she did not take very much notice of it. He did not complain to witness about his wife.
MRS HAINES, widow of the deceased, was the next witness called, and said she had nothing to add to her previous evidence.
In reply to the Coroner, she said she had no quarrel with her husband on the day of the murder, but there was some unpleasantness between them in the morning. He accused her of being too intimate with Captain Pearson on Sunday morning. He had complained of the same thing before, but there was absolutely no foundation for his jealousy. It was one of his delusions.
The Coroner, in summing up, pointed out that the Jury must have some reasonable evidence of insanity before they could find the deceased man insane, but the letters undoubtedly disclosed that there was something working in his mind, although it appeared that there were no grounds for jealousy.
The Jury, after a short retirement, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" in the case of each of the three children and of felo de se in the case of the father.

Saturday 25 April 1896, Issue 8989 – Gale Document No. Y3200760195
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Station House, Waterbeer-street, on Tuesday touching the death of EMILY BUDD, of Odgers Row, Commercial-road, who died suddenly under painful circumstances on Saturday evening. ELIZABETH BUDD, wife of THOMAS BUDD, an invalid of No. 1, Cornish's-court, Paul-street, identified the deceased as that of her daughter, a single woman aged 30 years. She last saw her between four and five on Saturday afternoon at her (witness's) house and she appeared in her usual health. She was a temperate woman. She had a baby two months old in her arms, and she was also the mother of four other illegitimate children. She lived with a man named Squires. Later in the evening she heard that her daughter was dead at the Shakespeare Inn, Bonhay-road. She found her lying on the floor in the bar. The boy was afterwards removed to the mortuary. Sidney Squires, brass worker, said he had lived with the deceased for some years. On Saturday evening they were at the Shakespeare Inn about seven o'clock. Deceased did not have anything to drink. He rose up to go home, when she suddenly dropped down with the child in her arms, and died about a minute afterwards. By a Juryman: She did not ask him for any money. Mr Mark Farrant, junr., stated that on his arrival the deceased was dead. There were no marks of violence. He made a post mortem examination and found that the left side of the heart was contracted and the right side dilated, both chambers being healthy. The liver, brain, lungs and kidneys were also healthy. He considered death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 2 May 1896, Issue 8995 – Gale Document No. Y3200760249
An Inquest was held at Totnes yesterday touching the death of NOAH BEER, of Loddiswell, who died from injuries received through being crushed between two trucks attached to a traction engine. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury attaching blame to no-one.

Saturday 2 May 1896, Issue 8995 – Gale Document No. Y3200760239
At an Inquest on Wednesday on the body of GERTRUDE MAY WEST, two years old, the daughter of JOHN JAMES WEST, carpenter, Smallridge, Axminster, who died on Monday from convulsions brought on by rickets and improper feeding, the Coroner administered a severe reprimand to the parents.

Saturday 2 May 1896, Issue 8995 – Gale Document No. Y3200760248
THE SUICIDE AT SEATON – A Victim of Religious Mania. – The Inquest on the body of AMBROSE WILLIAM PAYNE, retired grocer, of Seaton, was held yesterday. EDWARD PAYNE, said his brother had slight religious mania, believing he was not so good as he should be. Witness believed he intended getting married on Wednesday at Axminster to his housekeeper. Cora Hatchley, deceased's housekeeper, said she had found a note which he left. The note ran, "Dear Friends. This sin is all my own, and I do no desire to be forgiven on earth. Take care of Cora. I love her dearly. Put her with good people. There is time for her to seek the Lord. We have both tried hard to find him, but failed. I am mad, and have been for some time. Seek ye the Lord. Good-bye. I trust this will be a warning to others to seek the Lord while He is to be found, before it is too late. Good bye to all that I love. – A. W. PAYNE." A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 2 May 1896, Issue 8995 – Gale Document No. Y3200760261
POISONED BY MISADVENTURE – Death of a Torquay Tradesman. – At the Half Moon Hotel, Torquay, on Monday, Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, conducted an Inquiry concerning the death of MR JOHN CHUDLEIGH PARKER, retired house decorator, aged 68, who died early on Sunday morning from the effects of drinking spirits of salts on Saturday. Mr W. B. Smale was chosen Foreman of the Jury. HUMPHREY ABBERLEY PARKER, son of the deceased, identified the body, and said his father was nearly 69 years of age. Deceased had been nervous of late, but last week he was a good deal better, so much so that witness allowed him to drive the pony himself. Deceased had had no worry of late that witness knew of. His wife died ten years ago. On Saturday morning he got up as usual and witness arranged for him to go for a drive. He had hardly left him three minutes and gone up Market-street, when someone ran after him saying there was something the matter with deceased. Witness hurried back and found Mr Knight with his father, giving him what appeared to be chalk and water. Asked what he had done, he made no reply, beyond saying "For God's sake let me walk." They let him walk into the next room and back. Then he became unconscious, and slept right away till he died.
By Mr Briscoe Hooper, who watched the case for the family, witness said they sold spirits of salts in the trade, and deceased knew perfectly well its terrible nature. He had used it on his corns. WALTER EDGAR PARKER, another son, aid deceased seemed better than usual on Saturday evening. After the arrangements about the drive deceased went upstairs to take his medicine. Witness heard deceased shouting for someone, and witness hurried up to him. He said "I am afraid I have made a mistake," and witness saw that he had taken spirits of salts. Frederick George Hannaford, assistant in the shop, said he frequently sold spirits of salt. Last Monday deceased asked him for a few drops of poison for his corn; and witness gave him a few drops in a bottle. Last Thursday witness let him have more, deceased saying he had split what he had already received. In the same bottle witness gave him more. At deceased's request witness labelled the bottle "Poison". On Saturday morning witness saw deceased in the shop. He seemed about as usual. – By Mr Hooper: His eyes were bad. - By Mr Smale: During the three years he had been there he had never before supplied deceased with spirits of salt.
Benjamin Knight, chemist, Union-street, said he was sent for on Saturday morning and ran in, finding him with his elder son. When asked what he had been doing, deceased made no reply, beyond saying "My God, let me walk." Witness gave him milk, and afterwards chalk and water. He recognised that deceased had taken commercial spirits of salt. He fetched Dr Eales and soon after deceased vomited. He should not have thought deceased a man who would have committed suicide. Dr Richardson said on Saturday morning he saw deceased, who was suffering from collapse. They gave deceased some magnesia, which he swallowed with difficulty, and vomited almost immediately. Later witness gave him some milk and egg. Deceased was too collapsed to answer any question. The back of the mouth showed considerable signs of inflammation, and he seemed to be suffering very great pain. He injected morphia but he never recovered consciousness. He had been suffering from insomnia, and was generally nervous. Witness had advised a change. A teaspoonful would have caused death. The fact that he died so quickly indicated that death was due to shock. Witness saw no reason why deceased should commit suicide. W. J. PARKER, another son, of London, said deceased wrote to him last Thursday saying that he had arranged to go to his daughter at Swansea, and that then he should go on to witness in London. A verdict of "Death from Misadventure" was returned.

Saturday 9 May 1896, Issue 9001 – Gale Document No. Y3200760294
EXWICK CROSSING FATALITY – Scene at the Inquest. – The Inquest on the body of SIDNEY HOLMES, the young man who was fatally injured through being knocked down by an engine at the Exwick level crossing was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) on Tuesday. Chief Inspector Shattock (Exeter Division) watched the proceedings on behalf of the G.W.R. Company, Mr Lewis D. Thomas represented Mr W. R. Mallett of Exwick, who with Mr S. C. Snow, was also present in court. Mace Sergeant Gillard, the Coroner's officer, took part in the proceedings a course which is not customary, and Mr W. Sansome, Locomotive Department, G.W.R., attended the court.
Mr G. F. Caseley was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
WILLIAM HOLMES, an employee of the Tiverton Town Council, identified the body as that of his son, a shoemaker in the employ of Mr Baker, of High-street, Exeter. He was 20 years of age, and lodged with Mr Loney, in Bear-street. Witness last saw him alive on Good Friday. He was a sober man. Witness first saw the account of his son's death in a newspaper. – By the Foreman: His hearing and his eyesight was all right.
Sidney Mills, goods' porter in the employ of the G.W.R. Company, said on Friday evening last just after seven he was on the Exwick level crossing and saw the deceased enter the gate from the Exwick side. There was a down train running in at the time and the deceased stood in the up road. Witness just then saw an engine coming on the up line from the direction of the Station, and shouted out to the deceased "Look out mind an engine is coming." He did not seem to hear owning to the noise of the down train. Witness shouted out again "Look out" but the engine struck the deceased in the back and he fell on his face. The engine passed over him and witness went over and picked him up. He was unconscious and an ambulance being procured, he was conveyed on it to Dr Moone's and subsequently taken to the Hospital. The deceased appeared to be sober. – By the Foreman: The deceased could not see the engine as he had his back to the station. – By Mr Thomas: The deceased was standing in the road about half a minute. The big gates were closed to vehicular traffic but pedestrians were able to walk across.
Aaron Griffiths, an engineman in the service of the G.W.R. Company, and residing at 11, Hastings-street, Plymouth, said on Friday evening he arrived at Exeter at 7.10 with a train of ocean passengers. His engine was immediately disconnected from the train, and he took it a sufficient distance to allow another engine to be connected. On approaching Exwick crossing his mate called out to him to stop. He pulled up at once, but found that the deceased had been run over. He did not see the man until after the engine had stopped. – By the Jury: Witness saw the crossing within twenty or twenty-five yards away, and the deceased was not there then. It was not unusual to see persons crossing over when the engines were being run to and fro.
Edwin Escott, fireman in the employ of the G.W.R. Company, residing at 9, Cecil-street, Plymouth, who was on the engine with the last witness at the time in question, gave corroborative evidence. The engine was being run at a speed of five or six miles an hour. – By the Foreman: They had no special instructions to drive carefully over this spot. The whistle was sounded. – A Juror: They could not drive very much slower than they were on this occasion.
Sergeant Gillard was proceeding to call Mr Andrew, the Hospital surgeon, when the Coroner asked where Dr Moone was, whereupon the officer replied that he did not summon him as he did not think his attendance was necessary.
The Coroner: I think he is necessary.
Sergeant Gillard: It is an unusual thing, that's all I know.
The Coroner: It is not for you to tell me if it is usual or not. It is for me to conduct this Court as I think right.
Sergeant Gillard: You gave me the warrant to summon the witnesses that were required.
The Coroner: I saw Dr Moone, and I think it is right he should be here.
Sergeant Gillard: I never knew a case before like it.
The Coroner: Never mind, sir; I don't want to discuss the matter with you.
Sergeant Gillard: Those who know best had better summon the witnesses.
The Coroner: I don't want to wrangle with you, Gillard.
Sergeant Gillard: I don't wish to wrangle with you. I only want what is fair and proper.
The Coroner: It is for the Jury to say if they want the witness. Shall I can him, gentlemen?
A Juror: There can't be any harm in that.
Sergeant Gillard: I call it absurd to call an outside doctor when the man was brought to the hospital and lived two hours afterwards.
The Coroner: (excitedly and hammering the table with his fist): I will not allow you to say it is absurd. You telling me what I am doing is absurd! How dare you do such a thing.
Sergeant Gillard: I do say it s absurd.
The Coroner: Here am I representing her Majesty, and you tell me that what I am doing is absurd. I will not allow it.
Sergeant Gillard: So do I represent her Majesty.
The Coroner: Don't talk to me. I call it a great piece of impertinence. It is a very important question, and I want all the evidence it is possible to get.
Dr Moone, who had been in Court eh whole of the time this scene took place was then sworn and said he was called by a porter at half-past seven to go to the Exwick Crossing. Witness saw the deceased on an ambulance. He was groaning very much, and seeing he was seriously injured witness ordered his removal to his house previous to his being conveyed to the Hospital. The man was seriously injured in his head and back, and blood was flowing from his nose. He had a fracture of the base of his skull and a contusion of the lower part of the spine.
Mr H. Andrews, house surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said he received the deceased into the institution about eight o'clock on Friday evening suffering from severe concussion and shock. He was unconscious. He had numerous bruises about the extremities and one on the upper part of the back. He died without recovering consciousness the same night. Witness had since made a post mortem examination, and found four distinct fractures of the skull which caused death.
The Coroner, in summing up, referred to two or three fatal accidents that had occurred at the Exwick crossing, and said no doubt it was an excessively dangerous spot and ought to be closed both for vehicular and pedestrian traffic. On a former occasion when he represented the matter to the Board of Trade, Colonel Riche, R.E. inspected the spot, and said it was the most dangerous crossing he had ever seen in England, and that it ought to be closed at once or a bridge erected across. To do that would cost a considerable amount of money. They, however, must not look at that, but to the safety of the public. He should have to again report to the Board of Trade on the matter.
In a discussion that ensued several Jurors agreed with the Coroner that a bridge should be erected across the lines, whilst others expressed their opinion that the danger would be averted if the wicket gates were closed to pedestrian traffic in the same manner as the large gates were closed to vehicular traffic on the approach of trains. The Foreman said the place was a death trap and he thought they should represent to the company the desirability of erecting a bridge. Inspector Shattock said the road being a private one the company could stop the traffic altogether. The wicket gates could be shut in the signal box by means of a lever. During the past fifty years only four or five fatal accidents had occurred at the spot, although about 1,000 persons went across in a day, including many school children.
The Jury, after some deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and strongly recommended that the railway company be asked to close all gates to traffic on the approach of trains.

INQUEST AT NEWTON - An Inquest was held at Highweek Boys' School, Newton Abbot, on Thursday on the body of THOMAS SATTERLEY STEPHENS, 71, gardener, who died suddenly on Tuesday. Mr T. S. Underhay was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The evidence showed that deceased was in his usual health up to Tuesday at 5.30 p.m., but about three hours later he was found dead in the garden of Halcyon Villa, Highweek, where he had been at work. A post mortem examination made by Dr Grimbly shewed that death was due to fatty degeneration of the heart, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 9 May 1896, Issue 9001 – Gale Document No. Y3200760275
An Inquest was held at the Torbay Inn, Torquay, on Wednesday on the body of ANN SAUNDERS, aged 79, who occupied a room at 3, Moorland-terrace, Upton. The deceased on Monday morning was burning some camphor to keep away disease when she accidentally caught her handkerchief on fire. She threw it down, but the flames soon ignited the bedclothes. She died on Tuesday morning from the shock sustained. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 16 May 1896, Issue 9007 – Gale Document No. Y3200760312
A REJECTED LOVER FOUND DROWNED – A Pathetic Letter. – At an Inquest held at Crownhill, near Plymouth on Monday on the body of DAVID SCROGGIE, aged 22, of 150, North-road, Plymouth, who was found drowned on Saturday in the reservoir, it was stated that deceased had lately seemed depressed about a young lady named Emily who had given him up. The following letter, which was found on the body, was read:- "My dear father and mother. – I hope both God and you will forgive me for this; but it is my only resource. Emily has rejected me ,and death to me will be a treat indeed in preference to this awful torture. I have no wish to live. Emily was the only thing I lived for in this world. Oh! father, you will be the first to find this; but try and keep a brave heart. I believe God will take me in His charge, as I have prayed to Him to forgive me of all my past sins, and also for this terrible act. I am not insane; I am quite in my right mind, but am driven to this through no fault of my own. Perhaps Emily will not trifle with the love of another now. I loved her with all my hart, with all my soul and body; but may this be a lesson to her. She has played with me for 15 months, but now she shall suffer. Do forgive me, dear father and mother, John and Maggie. May we all meet in Heaven above, where all in peace, and joy, and love. – Sorrowing son, DAVID." The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 16 May 1896, Issue 9007 – Gale Document No. Y3200760344
An Inquest was held at Raddon, Shobrooke, yesterday, touching the death of the infant child of ANNIE DREWE. A verdict of "Accidental Death, caused by the child being overlain by its mother during the night," was returned.

Saturday 16 May 1896, Issue 9007 – Gale Document No. Y3200760317
Mr Coroner Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest at Barnstaple on Monday on the body of MR GEORGE HANCOCK, aged 25, who was drowned in the Taw while attempting to rescue a little boy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning," and devoted their fees to the purchase of a wreath.

Saturday 16 May 1896, Issue 9007 – Gale Document No. Y3200760343
CYCLING FATALITIES – At the Inquest yesterday on the body of MISS ETHEL HUSSEY, 16, daughter of MR T. D. HUSSEY, of Honiton, who was killed by running into a horse while riding a bicycle. Dr Shortridge said he thought the deceased's stomach was ruptured by the knee of the horse as it rose to jump over her. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 16 May 1896, Issue 9007 – Gale Document No. Y3200760329
NEWTON DROWNING CASE - Inquest: A Dangerous Spot. – An Inquest was held at Newton on Tuesday on the body of ROBERT JAMES MADGE, aged 8 years, who was drowned in the pond in the Marsh Recreation Ground on Monday. A similar accident occurred at the same place four years ago, and this is the fourth death that has taken place there. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider as follows: - "The Jury consider that in the face of the recommendation of the Jury on the occasion of the last accident and this being the fourth death at this spot, that there has been unnecessary delay in filling the pit, and also consider that there has been an error of judgment on the part of the Urban District Council in allowing the fence to be removed without taking means to prevent accident during the time the fence was down, and they call upon the Council to immediately provide means to prevent the close approach of children to the pit, and to proceed to fill in the pit as rapidly without delay.

Saturday 23 May 1896, Issue 9013 – Gale Document No. Y3200760383
FATAL FALL DOWNSTAIRS – MR RICHARD STRONG, landlord of the New Inn, Bickleigh, four miles from Tiverton on the Exeter-road, met with his death on Wednesday through falling downstairs. The deceased, who was in a very weak state, was 92 years of age, and had been suffering for some time from an internal complaint, for which he was medically attended. Deceased had been in his time a true follower of Izaak Walton, and was known for miles around. Much sympathy is felt for the family. The Coroner (Mr L. Mackenzie, of Tiverton) was communicated with, and an Inquest will be held this afternoon at Bickleigh.

Saturday 23 May 1896, Issue 9013 – Gale Document No. Y3200760382
APPLEDORE - Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Monday touching the death of CAPTAIN STEPHEN HARE, who died from injuries received through falling off a barge. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 23 May 1896, Issue 9013 – Gale Document No. Y3200760388
Mr Prickman held an Inquest at Lifton on the body of the infant illegitimate child of HARRIET WALTERS, of Stowford, which died suddenly. the medical evidence showed that death was due to peritonitis, probably caused by the child being fed on boiled bread.

Saturday 23 May 1896, Issue 9013 – Gale Document No. Y3200760380
THE SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EXETER ENGINE DRIVER – An Inquest on the body of MR JAMES CHIVERS LUCAS, engine driver on the London and South Western Railway at Exeter and who died suddenly on Tuesday morning, was held before the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) at 11, Culverland-road, St James's, on Wednesday morning. Mr Burrington was chosen as the Foreman of the Jury. MRS MARY HOOPER the wife of a plumber, of Bideford, said the body was that of her brother, a bachelor 55 years of age. John Bollen, who took the Scotch oath, said he was a goods guard on the South Western Railway, and deceased had lodged with him for some years. He was always very healthy. About half-past nine on Tuesday morning witness was called by his wife and found the deceased in a stooping position in the kitchen unconscious. With assistance he lifted him on to the couch and went for a doctor. Mr E. Steele-Perkins, surgeon, said he was called on Tuesday morning, but the deceased was dead when he arrived. Witness was of opinion that cardiac syncope was the cause of death and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 30 May 1896, Issue 9019 – Gale Document No. Y3200760426
TORQUAY – Inquest. – At an Inquest held on Monday night on the body of JOHN KNAPMAN, fisherman, aged 23, a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. With another fisherman named Moist, KNAPMAN took off a couple of sailors to H.M.S. Magnificent late on the night of April 20th last, and on the return journey the boat was capsized and he was drowned.

Saturday 6 June 1896, Issue 9025 – Gale Document No. Y3200760446
THE POISONING CASE AT EXETER – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Wednesday on the body of HARRY JAMES HOER, aged 10 weeks, who died at the institution on the previous day from the effects of poison.
MAUD LOUISA HOER, wife of CHARLIE HOER, a fireman on the Great Western Railway, residing at 8, Wyndham-street, Plymouth, said she came to Exeter with her child on Saturday week last for a holiday. She was stopping with her mother, MRS SPILLER, at 5, Bartholomew-street. The deceased had been suffering from a cold and witness had been rubbing his chest with camphorated oil. Her mother said she should give him a dose of castor oil, further remarking that she had some in the house. She went upstairs for the bottle, and when she came down she poured out half a teaspoonful of the liquid, adding some moist sugar to it. Her mother then gave the mixture to the child who suddenly "started." The bottle had originally been used for castor oil, but here was a second label on the bottle on which was printed "Creasote." Finding that a mistake had been made, witness then endeavoured to wipe out any mixture that might be in the child's mouth. She then sent him to Mr Farrant, surgeon of St. Thomas, who ordered him to be taken to the Hospital where he died on the previous day.
JANE SPILLER, a widow, and mother of the last witness, said she advised some castor oil for the child and went upstairs to get it. She brought down the bottle (produced), which she thought contained castor oil. She did not observe that the bottle was labelled "Creasote." She could not read it. She did not know she had such a mixture in the house and could not smell it. She supposed that another daughter who resided with her had obtained the creosote for toothache.
Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon of the Hospital, said the deceased was admitted into the Institution on Monday suffering from the effects of poison. The usual treatment was adopted, but the child died on the previous day at half-past one. The symptoms corresponded with poisoning by creosote, which was an irritant poison and a tar preparation.
Mr H. Richards (a Juror) thought a poison label ought to have been placed on the bottle when the mixture was sold by the chemist, but the Coroner while agreeing with Mr Richards said he did not think it was compulsory as creosote was not a scheduled poison. He, however, thought it was very clumsy for a chemist to stick a "Creasote" label over a castor oil label, as was done in this case. Mr Andrew said he thought a poison label should be put on a bottle containing such a mixture. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Misadventure."

Saturday 6 June 1896, Issue 9025 – Gale Document No. Y3200760456
SAD DEATH OF A COMMERCIAL TRAVELLER AT TORQUAY – Inquest, This Morning. – This morning Dr Fraser, Deputy Coroner, conducted an Inquiry at Upton Parish Rooms, Torquay, concerning the death of WILLIAM HENRY CRAGO, commercial traveller, who was found dead in Victoria Parade about mid-night on Thursday. Mr W. G. Wood was Foreman of the Jury. ALBERT HENRY CRAGO, of 15, Victoria-avenue, Walthamstow, identified the body as that of his father, who was 60 years of age, and who travelled for Messrs. Corbie, Palmer, and Stuart. Deceased suffered from shortness of breath. Witness last saw him about a fortnight ago. Jane Norman, of ill-fame, said she saw deceased on Victoria-parade on Thursday night about 11.45. Witness was going in the direction of the Bath Saloons and met deceased. She saw him stagger and fall. He muttered something but she could not understand. Thinking it was someone the worse for liquor she said, "Hullo, old boy, what's up?" He made no reply and she went for a constable. She thought he fell on the back of his head. Michael Holmes, chief officer of coastguard, said the last witness called him. He found deceased lying on his face and tried to produce artificial respiration, thinking possibly deceased was suffering from drink. There were no signs of breathing. P.C. Rowse relieved him, and then Dr Pollard was sent for. P.C. Rowse corroborated. Alexander Crago Pooley, Clifton-terrace, Torquay, said deceased was his uncle. At 9.45 on Thursday witness went to deceased in the stock room at the Queen's Hotel, and helped him pack his goods. About an hour later they went out, and calling at the Marine Hotel deceased had a bottle of lemonade and a small gin. He was perfectly sober. They left the Marine Hotel at eleven o'clock, and stood talking by Messrs. Kitson's bank till 11.20. Deceased made no complaint during the evening. Dr Pollard, who, on sanitary grounds, affirmed instead of taking the oath, said he was called to the deceased and found him on his back quite dead. In his opinion the cause of death was syncope, due to the diseased condition of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 6 June 1896, Issue 9025 – Gale Document No. Y3200760473
THE SUPPOSED SUICIDE IN THE EXE – The Inquest. The Coroner and Sergeant Gillard. - The Inquest as to the death of MARY ANN EVANS, alias CARTER, whose body was found in the Exe near Cowley Bridge yesterday was held at the Police Court this afternoon by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper.
Mace-Sergeant Gillard was in attendance as Coroner's officer. The Coroner said he had given the warrant to Inspector Wicks. – Gillard: He is out of town. - The Coroner: I don't care for that. – Gillard: But I am here in his place. – The Coroner: I can't allow you to appear here in the present state of affairs. – Gillard: Very good, sir. – The Coroner: The officer I gave the warrant to, Wicks; he is not here; he should be here; it is his duty. – Gillard: Very well, sir, I don't want to have an argument; if you want to have Wicks I will go and look for him; but he is out of town, and I summoned the Jurymen. – The Coroner: I don't care; I gave the warrant to Wicks and gave him my instructions. – Gillard: Do you want Wicks, sir? - The Coroner: Certainly. – Gillard: Then I'll go and look for him, but the Jury will have to wait. – The Coroner: I shall sit here till he comes. I cannot allow you to appear at the present moment, whatever may be done in the future. – Gillard: I'm not dismissed from the service. – The Coroner: I don't know anything about that. Until I hear from the Watch Committee or the Council I cannot allow you to appear as my officer. You will please to get Mr Wicks to whom I gave the warrant. – Gillard: Very good, sir, I'll go to his house in St. Sidwell's. - The officer then left the Court, and Wicks subsequently appeared.
FREDERICK CARTER, general dealer, of Mary Arches-street, identified the body as that of MARY ANN EVANS, wife of a sailor in the Navy, 34 years of age, and who had been living with witness for the last sixteen or seventeen years. She was addicted to drink, and was often in the Police Court. – By a Juryman: Deceased was married at seventeen, and lived with her husband about two years. Her husband had been married again, to her cousin. The witness was cross-examined by several Jurymen as to whether the deceased had had sufficient food and shelter of late. He said he had sent home provisions and paid the rent. Wm. Gribble, coachman to Colonel Wyatt-Edgell, said he saw the deceased walking near the bridge and saw the body just after it was taken from the water. Henry White, cowman, proved seeing the body in the water by the bridge, taking it out, and endeavouring to restore animation. Dr Moone said in his opinion death was due to drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," and expressed their approval of White's conduct.

Saturday 13 June 1896, Issue 9031 – Gale Document No. Y3200760522
At the Inquest on JAMES BROWN, 38, a carter of Plainmoor, St. Marychurch, who was killed at Churston Ferrers by falling off the shafts of a cart and being run over, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. A Brixham sailor named Burman said deceased looked to be ill, but before he could reach him he fell off, the horse kicking him on the face and both wheels going over his stomach and thighs. A companion of deceased, who was asleep on the top of the hay with which the waggon was loaded, stated that they had had about three pints of cider at a farm and a couple of glasses of beer after.

Saturday 13 June 1896, Issue 9031 – Gale Document No. Y3200760488
THE ACCIDENT NEAR CHUDLEIGH – At the Inquest held at the Bradley Hotel, Newton Abbot, relative to the death of MARIA HACKER, aged 80, Mr John Taverner, of the Bradley Hotel, said he drove the deceased to Chudleigh, and on returning by way of Ugbrooke Park the pony shied and began backing. witness jumped out of the vehicle, but before he had time to seize the pony it bucked the trap over the weir, falling a distance of 30 feet. MRS HACKER died soon afterwards, but the pony stood at the bottom of the weir trembling and with hardly a scratch upon it. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 20 June 1896, Issue 9037 – Gale Document No. Y3200760555
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of HENRY JONES, 48, stonemason, who died suddenly on Tuesday morning at the Round Tree Inn, where he was lodging. James Berry, landlord of the inn, stated that he was called by a lodger about four o'clock in the morning to go to the room of JONES, who was dying. Witness gave him some rum and water, and afterwards fetched Dr Clapp, but death took place before his arrival. Deceased had been ill for some time, and witness advised him to go to the Workhouse, but he had a dread of going there. Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said he attributed death to syncope, following chronic bronchitis. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

THE ST THOMAS FATALITY - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday on the body of GEORGE MILFORD, a farm labourer, married, aged 57, of 11, Weir's-buildings, St. Thomas, who died in that institution on the previous day from injuries received in an accident on Saturday, the 30th May. John Burnett, labourer, of Water-lane, St. Thomas, said he had worked with the deceased for some years. On the 30th May they were haymaking in a field belonging to Mr H. M. D. Wilcocks when deceased fell off a ladder-cart load of hay and injured himself. He drove the horse and cart to Barley farm and walked home. Mr R. Stevens, assistant house surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased was admitted in the Institution on the 31st May with a swelling in the neck and upper part of the chest. There was no external wound. He progressed fairly well for a few days, but alarming symptoms set in and he died on the previous morning. He had since made a post mortem examination and found that he had broken two of his ribs one of which had lacerated his right lung. An abscess was found there and also one outside the lung; and this together with the injuries were the case of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 20 June 1896, Issue 9037 – Gale Document No. Y3200760537
BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – The Fatality on the Railway – An Inquest was held on Wednesday on the body of WALTER HART, of Colaton Raleigh, who was killed on the railway works. It was stated that the deceased and others were riding in tip-wagons against orders between Kersbrook and Otterton, and when cautioned he replied "We're all right, guv'nor." Shortly afterwards he fell off, and a wheel passed over his arm, severely crushing it. He also sustained internal injuries. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury exonerating the contractors from blame.

FOUND DROWNED – At the Rolle Hotel on Monday an Inquest was held on the body of SAMUEL GIBBS, shoemaker, who was found drowned on the beach at Littleham Cove on Saturday. He had been in his brother's employ for the last 28 years, and had only left him last week owing to a dispute as to the manner in which he had finished some work. He was observed walking rapidly along the shore on Saturday afternoon, close to where his body was discovered later in the day by Wilton Kensington. The deceased was fully dressed save for his coat and hat and it is presumed he had gone, as was his wont, to collect mussels for bait. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 20 June 1896, Issue 9037 – Gale Document No. Y3200760536
At the Inquest on Tuesday at Huish, Marwood, relative to the suicide by cutting his throat of NICHOLAS PASSMORE, labourer, aged 58. It was stated that deceased had for years been a confirmed invalid. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

THE DROWNING OF AN EXONIAN – At the Plymouth Guildhall on Wednesday Mr R. B. Johns, the Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ROBERT POMEROY BARRETT, aged 17 years, who was drowning whilst bathing beneath the Citadel on Monday evening. Deceased's father, ROBERT BARRETT, a teacher of music, residing at 1, Milk-street, Exeter, said his son was a shop-assistant in the employ of Mr Oliver, boot dealer, Frankfort-street, Plymouth. William Henry Irish, tailor, 7 High-street, with whom deceased had lodged, said they went to bathe on the evening in question, he (witness) first diving into water about 20 feet deep. BARRETT jumped in afterwards and was drowned. He believed deceased was alive when brought ashore by George Knight, but he did not think deceased struck his head, as he was too far off the rocks. P.C. Moulding tried artificial respiration until Dr Cooke and other medical gentlemen from her Majesty's training-brigs arrived. Dr Cooke believed the lad must have been dead before his arrival. There were no signs to show that he had struck himself in diving. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 27 June 1896, Issue 9043 – Gale Document No. Y3200760598
INQUEST – Coroner Hacker held an Inquest on Friday evening on the body of SAMUEL REDNAL BRISCOE, who died from the effects of scalding on Wednesday. Mrs Bruce, the mother, said she went out before the child came home to school, but in less than ten minutes Mrs Knight, a neighbour, sent for her, saying her child had tipped a boiler from the stove and scalded himself. The child was taken to the hospital, where he was attended to by Dr Baker, but died the following morning. The deceased must have tried to get at a small kettle which hung over the stove and in doing so caught hold of the boiler, and slipped, pulling the boiler with him. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 4 July 1896, Issue 9049 – Gale Document No. Y3200760631
NEWTON – Accident. – A little boy named RICHARD BAKER, aged eight, was drowned while bathing, on Sunday afternoon near Whitelake Bridge, between Newton Abbot and Kingsteignton. He got out of his depth, and being unable to swim, was drowned before assistance arrived. The body was recovered. The Inquest was held at the Town Hall on Monday. From the evidence it appeared that while bathing with three other lads he stepped into a pit and sank. George Best went to his assistance and attempted to rescue him, but the deceased [?] so violently that he had to release his hold. The body was discovered about half an hour afterwards by Mr Widdicombe. The Jury, of which Mr S. Dobell was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", and added that the town authorities should provide a safe bathing place.

TORQUAY – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at Babbacombe on Monday evening, on the wife of WILLIAM HARVEY, who was found dead in bed on Sunday morning. WILLIAM HARVEY, house painter, said he sat up with her until three in the morning, and then after making her a cup of tea, lay down and went to sleep. He awoke about six and found her dead. Dr Finch said the cause of death was pneumonia, and the woman ought to have been treated. The Coroner asked the husband why he did not call in a doctor, and he replied that his wife would not let him, saying her illness would pass off. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 11 July 1896, Issue 9055 – Gale Document No. Y3200760679
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – The Inquest on the body of WILLIAM PIKE, gardener, of Magdalen-street, who died suddenly in Southernhay yesterday, will be held on Monday morning.

Saturday 18 July 1896, Issue 9061 – Gale Document No. Y3200760716
BIDEFORD – Inquest. – At Bideford Infirmary on Tuesday, an Inquest was held on the body of ROBERT SQUIRE, aged 58, a horseman at the London and South Western Railway, who died from being run over while shunting. It appeared from the evidence that while the trucks were in motion the deceased tried to get on the buffer of the leading waggon to ride, and his hand slipping, he fell in front of the truck two wheels passing over him, and nearly severing his legs from his body. Mr Dailey, stationmaster, said the deceased in riding, or attempting to ride, on the buffers was acting against the stringent regulations of the Company. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

THE OKEHAMPTON RAILWAY FATALITY – The Inquest. – An Inquest was held at the Okehampton Town Hall on Wednesday on the body of MR WALTER J. PALMER, veterinary surgeon, who met with a shocking death at the Okehampton Railway Station the same day as reported in the Post. Mr Alderman Coombe was Foreman of the Jury. MR W. PALMER, of Lew Down, said deceased, his brother, was 42 years of age, and had been in practice as veterinary surgeon at Okehampton for seventeen years. William Henry Born, foreman porter at Okehampton Station, said just as the 11.43 train was leaving deceased rushed into the station and ran across to the train. He called to him to stop, but he made a jump at the door of a third class carriage. He put his hand towards the handle of the door but missed it and slipped round falling back on his left shoulder, and tumbled in between two coaches. The train was stopped as quick as possible, but not before one of the carriages had passed over him. Thomas Short, a horseman in the employ of the Railway Company, corroborated. P.C. Bidgood said on deceased he found a telegram which reached Okehampton at 11.20 requiring him to come to Morchard Road. He also found £4 10s. in cash and several articles. Dr Burd said the head was nearly severed from the trunk, and death was instantaneous. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 18 July 1896, Issue 9061 – Gale Document No. Y3200760705
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – Inquest. – At the City Police Court on Thursday an Inquest was held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper on the body of LOUISA ALLEN, of 22, Pancras-lane, and who died, as already reported, on Wednesday morning. HENRY TURNER ALLEN, husband of the deceased, said she was 58 years of age. Yesterday morning she went to the School of Art, as she had done for the past twelve years, about seven o'clock and returned about half past nine. She had some bread and cheese for breakfast, and some of it seemed to stick in her throat. She tried to relieve herself of it, and then said she would go upstairs and lie down. As she went to the door she reeled, and fell, became unconscious, and never spoke after. He knelt by her side till his son came home to breakfast, but she was then dead. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he was called about half past ten, and found the deceased lying on the floor, dead. He found nothing in the windpipe, and had no doubt that she died of failure of the heart. By the Coroner: He did not think the heat had anything to do with it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 18 July 1896, Issue 9061 – Gale Document No. Y3200760724
DAWLISH – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at the Town Hall on Friday evening before Mr Coroner Hacker on the body of ELIZABETH HOOPER, who resided at Commercial-road, and who died suddenly early the same morning. MARY HOOPER, daughter-in-law, stated that she last saw deceased alive about eight o'clock the previous evening, when she gave her some brandy and water. She did not seem to be unusually ill. Deceased was about 81 years of age, and was the widow of a naval pensioner who died about 20 years ago. She did not see deceased again until the next morning when Mrs Andrews came for her saying her mother-in-law was dead. She at once went, and saw her in bed apparently dead. Deceased had 4s. a week from the Parish, and she lived in a single room. Witness used to send most of her meals to her. Elizabeth Andrews said she lived in the next room to deceased and saw her every day. On the night previous to her death she saw her at one o'clock and gave her some brandy and water. She then seemed in her usual health. She very often used to remain in bed for two or three days to rest. Witness went to bed, but going into deceased's room again about three o'clock found her dead. She did not seem to have struggled. Witness went for Mrs Hooper and for Dr Baker. Dr Baker said he found deceased in bed dead. He considered death was due to weakness of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes.

Saturday 18 July 1896, Issue 9061 – Gale Document No. Y3200760713
THE SUDDEN DEATH AT EXETER – The Coroner and the Jury. A Scene. – An Inquest was held at the Parade-room of the Exeter Police Court on Monday by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper on the body of WM. PIKE, gardener, of 65A Magdalen-street, who died suddenly on Friday afternoon last on Southernhay. MRS ELIZABETH PIKE, the widow stated that her husband had fainted in Southernhay. Witness thereup0on went to Southernhay in a cab, and at the top of the thoroughfare found her husband lying on the footpath dead.
Mr H. Richards (A Juror): Had the deceased been under medical treatment?
Witness: Yes; under Dr Kempe.
Mr Richards: Up to what date has Dr Kempe been attending him? - Tuesday.
Mr Richards: Has he prescribed medicine for him? - Yes. He took a dose during the dinner time.
Mr Tucker (the Foreman): Was Dr Kempe prepared to give a certificate of the cause of death? - Yes.
The Coroner: Gentlemen, that has nothing whatever to do with the Inquiry. I am the person to decide upon holding an Inquiry.
Mr Tucker: I suppose I have a right to ask a question?
The Coroner: Certainly, by all means.
Mr Richards: Me Kempe ought to be here.
The Coroner: Mr Perkins was the medical gentleman called at the time.
Mr Richards: Mr Kempe will have to be here as well.
The Coroner: Well, I cannot have two doctors.
Mr Richards (rising from his seat): I take your own precedent, sir.
The Coroner: I don't see in this case any necessity for two doctors.
Mr Richards: I go upon a precedent which you treated some time since.
The Coroner: Stop a moment. We cannot have any wrangling if you please.
Mr Richards: We want Dr Kempe here.
The Coroner: I don't think it is necessary myself.
Mr Richards: We as Jurymen do that is all.
The Coroner: Then you will have the Inquest adjourned. Dr Kempe had not seen the man from Tuesday to the Friday, and that is quite enough reason why the Inquest should be held.
William Thomas Body, gardener, of the Wynards, Magdalen-street, was then called and said on Friday last he saw the deceased fall while walking along the footpath in Southernhay. He lay on his face and hands. Deceased was carrying a pair of fence trimmers and a hammer. Witness went over to him and found him unconscious. With the assistance of two young men named Marks and Passmore. Witness laid him on his back. Life was extinct. The police arrived soon afterwards, and the body having been examined by Mr E. B. Steele-Perkins, was conveyed on an ambulance to his residence in Magdalen-street.
Mr Richards, taking out his watch, said it was the wish of the Jury that Dr Kempe should be at once sent for.
The Coroner: Is that the unanimous wish of the Jury?
The Foreman: Yes.
The Coroner: But you are speaking only for yourself.
A voice: That is the Foreman of the Jury.
The Coroner: I cannot see it is necessary at all.
Mr Richards: We consider it very necessary.
The Coroner: For what reason?
Mr Richards: We consider Dr Kempe should be here.
The Coroner: I am willing to call any witnesses coming before me, but I am not going to send for Dr Kempe at the present moment.
Mr Richards: But the Jury want him here.
The Coroner: Then the Inquest will have to be adjourned. I object to the city being put to the expense of two doctors.
The Foreman. You ought to have objected to that before.
The Coroner: That is a different thing. You must take each case on its merits.
Mr Richards: We are taking this case on its merits.
The Coroner: I don't see it at all.
Mr Richards: Then we do. That is twelve or thirteen against one.
Mr Tucker: We are business men and our time is valuable.
Mr Richards (to the Coroner): We don't get paid for our work like you.
The Coroner (sternly): Pray don't be impertinent.
Mr Richards: I am not impertinent.
The Coroner: But you have no right to speak to me in that way.
Mr Denham (a Juror, producing a paper): There is a report in the paper, Mr Coroner.
Mr Richards: Newspaper reports ought not to come into this.
Mr Denham: At any rate it is the unanimous wish of the Jury to have Dr Kempe.
The Coroner: I will take Dr Perkins's evidence, and if you want Dr Kempe the Inquest will have to be adjourned. I cannot send for Dr Kempe and you are not likely to find him if you do.
Mr E. B. Steele-Perkins, surgeon, of Sidwell-street, was then called and said he was called to see the deceased on passing the top of Southernhay about two o'clock. The deceased was lying on his back and life was extinct. In his opinion deceased suffered from heart disease and death was due to cardiac syncope. There was a blow on the face caused by the fall.
The Foreman: Do you think the deceased had suffered from heart disease for some time?
Witness: I cannot say for certain. I should think he had from the sudden way in which he dropped down.
The Foreman, again observed that Dr Kempe was prepared to give a certificate in this case.
The Coroner: But I have power to override any certificate.
Dr Perkins: If my evidence is the same as that which Dr Kempe would give I don't see why it is necessary to adjourn the Inquest for his evidence.
A Juror said the feeling of the Jury was this: that as Dr Kempe was prepared on Saturday to give a certificate of the cause of death, this Inquiry was wholly unnecessary.
The Coroner: I cannot discuss that with you, gentlemen. I have a certain duty to perform.
Mr Stoneman repeated that the doctor was able to give a certificate.
The Coroner: I have a right to over-ride a certificate.
Mr Richards: It is needless pain to the relatives and needless expense to the city.
The Coroner: It is not needless pain.
The Foreman also remarked that in this warm weather the Inquest ought to have been held before.
The Coroner replied that the Inquest had been held at the earliest opportunity.
The Foreman remarked that the Coroner ought to take a lot more trouble seeing the way he was paid.
The Jury again asked for Dr Kempe to be called, whereupon the Coroner remarked that he wished the public to clearly understand that they would have to pay for his attendance.
Mr Denham: I wish you to understand that I am not protesting against you, but against the law which compels you to do it under the circumstances.
After further animated proceedings, Mace-Sergeant Perriam was requested to communicate with Dr Kempe by telephone and in the meantime Mr Richards remarked that a short time since a Juror dropped down dead at the Assizes at the Castle of Exeter. His body was removed from there to Torquay and no Inquest was held.
The Coroner: That may be. Perhaps the Coroner does not know his duty.
Mr Richards: Oh! I see. You know better than him.
Mace-Sergeant Perriam here returned with the message that Dr Kempe was out visiting his patient, probably at Heavitree.
Mr Venton (a Juror) I am in favour of proceeding with the case under the circumstances instead of calling the Jury together again.
The Foreman: As Me Kempe is not here the Jury will be satisfied with Dr Perkins' evidence.
The Coroner: I think you have done quite right, gentlemen.
Mr Richards: But we enter our protest against his not being called.
The Jury then returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."
Mr Richards: We knew that before the Inquest.
Mr Denham: On behalf of the Jury, we wish the Press to note that we enter a strong protest against this Inquest being held, especially as Dr Kempe was not called, and consider it dangerous to health that sixteen citizens are compelled to see the body in such a state.
The Coroner: I don't agree with it.
Mr Denham: That is the Jury's wish.
The Coroner: Very well, I don't agree with it. The proceedings then terminated.

Saturday 25 July 1896, Issue 9067 – Gale Document No. Y3200760735
INQUEST – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at No. 2, Laurel-cottages, Quay Steps, on Wednesday, on the body of ALFRED ELLICOTT, aged eight years, who died suddenly on Monday. STEPHEN ELLICOTT, the father, said his son was taken suddenly ill on Sunday, and became worse on Monday, dying in the afternoon at four o'clock. The deceased had been weak all his life. Dr Brash stated that death was due to syncope, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

SUDDEN DEATH – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper on Thursday at Headweir Vale, Devonshire Place, on the body of EDITH LOUISA TUCKER, aged 32, a schoolmistress. KATE MARIA TUCKER, sister, stated that on Tuesday whilst out for a walk deceased complained of feeling ill and consequently they returned. After tea the deceased went into the dining room and sat down, and when witness subsequently went into the room she found her sister dead in the chair. Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased. Death was due to heart disease. The Jury, of which Mr Hobbs, was foreman returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 25July 1896, Issue 9067 – Gale Document No. Y3200760745
THE SHOCKING AFFAIR AT TORQUAY – The Widow Before the Magistrates. Sent to the Workhouse. – The Inquest on JOSEPH COPSEY, who was found dead in his room in Alma-terrace, Rock-road, was held by Mr Hacker at the Upton Parish Room on Tuesday night. The evidence was that deceased and his wife occupied one room, and he had not been seen since Thursday. The wife stated that she believed he was asleep all the time. The medical evidence showed that death was due to heart disease, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and expressed themselves as doubtful of the woman's sanity.

Saturday 1 August 1896, Issue 9073 – Gale Document No. Y3200760788
BLAKE EXPLOSION – The Inquest concerning the death of GEORGE WILLIAM EVILL, stoker on board H.M.S. Blake, who was killed by the explosion of the boiler during a steam trial, was resumed on Monday at Plymouth. Admiralty experts attributed the explosion to insufficiency of water in the boiler, and testified that the gauges were partially obscured by a deposit of india rubber which mislead the officers as to the quantity of water in the boilers. The Jury held there had been culpable negligence, and returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against Fleet Engineer Burney.

Saturday 8 August 1896, Issue 9078 – Gale Document No. Y3200760842
EXETER DROWNING CASE – Open Verdict. – An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police station on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Hooper into the circumstances attending the death of JAMES HUCKER, whose body was found in the river at Head Weir on Tuesday morning. Mr T. Ham was chosen Foreman of the Jury. BESSIE HILL, wife of Samuel Hill, printer, of 6, Russell-terrace, St. David's Hill, identified the body as that of her late father. He was a sawyer by trade, but kept the Round Tree Inn for some years. He was about 70 years of age and was a widower. About two years ago he went to the Workhouse, and she last saw him alive at her house the last Friday in June. His health was very good, and he did not complain. He was an intemperate man and given to drink. On Thursday witness sent a message to the Workhouse asking him to come down, but he replied that he was too poorly. Mr Newall (Master of the Workhouse) said the deceased had been an inmate for some time. He had been in the hospital for a week, and on Monday discharged himself. Witness had noticed for the last three weeks that there was something strange in his manner, and he seemed to wander about the yard. He had been suffering from weakness. Richard Rickards, of 33, Princes Cottages, Bonhay-road, spoke as to finding the body in the river, the face being stuck in the mud. It looked as if the deceased had walked in. P.C. Guppy, who was called to the spot, said he searched the body, but did not find anything. Mr Bell, surgeon, who examined the body, said there were no marks of violence, and death was due to drowning. Deceased had been dead for some time. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Saturday 15 August 1896, Issue 9084 – Gale Document No. Y3200760861
DARTMOUTH – Singular Death. – An Inquest was held at Townstal Farm on Wednesday afternoon by Mr Prideaux on the body of MR J. F. FOALE, who died under singular circumstances. PHILIP TRANT FOALE, son of the deceased, said he left Blackawton soon after midnight, and at 2.20 a.m. found his father about 50 yards below Townstal Farm. The horse and trap were standing by the wall, and deceased was hanging out, quite dead and cold. His feet were in the trap, and his clothes caught in the step, while his left shoulder was touching the ground. There was blood on his face, from which it appeared that he had been dragged along on the ground. Dr J. H. Harris said the injuries themselves were not sufficient to cause death, but they showed that deceased was dragged along face downwards, and when the horse stopped he remained face downwards, and was suffocated. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

TOTNES – Inquest. – At the Totnes Union Workhouse an Inquest was held on Wednesday evening on the body of JOHN LEGG, aged 73, who was found dead in a piggery at the Workhouse on Wednesday. Death was due to syncope, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 15 August 1896, Issue 9084 – Gale Document No. Y3200760883
HORRIBLE AFFAIR AT NEWTON – Murder and Attempted Suicide. The Inquest. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, opened the Inquest at the Town Hall, Newton Abbot, on Thursday on the body of SARAH GRANT, who died on Tuesday evening from the shocking injuries alleged to have been inflicted with a hammer on her on Sunday by her husband, HARRY GRANT, a one-arm painter, who now is at the Cottage Hospital suffering from injuries he received on the railway in attempting to commit suicide. Grant interest was taken in the proceedings, many of the townsfolk being present. Superintendent Roberts, of Torquay, watched the case on behalf of the police. Mr John W. Pascoe was elected Foreman of the Jury.
The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner in opening the Inquiry, said it became their painful duty that day to investigate a very serious case and in which death had resulted from injuries inflicted. The deceased person into whose death the Jury would have to enquire died at her house on Tuesday last under circumstances which pointed to the conclusion that her death was the result of some violent occurrence, an occurrence for which it seemed there must be some person criminally responsible, and therefore it would be a very serious Inquiry for them to hold. If it was a case of homicide it would be a question for them to decide whether the person who was responsible for her death was guilty of the crime of murder. He would say nothing more about the case at present. It would be proper for them in the performance of their duty to view the body of the deceased person, and then he should think that it would be also well for them to visit the spot where the injuries by which the deceased came by her death were supposed to have been inflicted, so that when they took the evidence they would have the thing in their mind's eye. Having done that, they would return and have the case carefully explained to them. It was right he should say to the Jury that there was a person at present in custody under suspicion of having inflicted those injuries. That person was not able to be present that day in consequence of his being in a dangerous condition owing to the injuries which happened to him on the same day. He proposed, therefore, to go into the case that day and take all the evidence they could, and then they would adjourn the Inquest for as long as it seemed necessary to enable the person under suspicion to be present so that he could have an opportunity to put any question to the witnesses if he might desire. He would not ask the Jury to return a verdict that day, even if they could take all the evidence.
The Jury then proceeded with the Coroner and Superintendent Roberts to view the body at the Mortuary, and subsequently went to the house in Lemon-road in which the decease lived with her husband.
On returning into Court eh Jury proceeded to hear the evidence.
The first witness called was WILLIAM DAYMOND a mason, of Bovey Tracey. He said he had identified the body at the house in Lemon-road, but not at the mortuary.
The Coroner (to the officer of the Court): Then you must take him to identify the body at the Mortuary.
The witness was then conducted to the mortuary and on returning into Court said he identified the body as that of his daughter. She was 38 years of age on the 5th November last, and was the wife of HARRY GRANT, of Newton Abbot. They resided at 2, Lemon-road. Her husband was a house painter. His daughter had been married between twelve and fourteen years. He did not see her very often. There was one child, but he could not tell when it was born. Although he did not see his daughter very often he was on good terms with her. She was generally away at work when he came to Newton. Prior to Sunday last he had not seen her for the past three months, when she came to Bovey.
The Coroner: Cannot you tell us when the child was born?
Witness: No, I cannot.
The Coroner: I thought the father was the right one to come to for these particulars.
Witness: Not always, sir.
The witness stated that so far as he understood there was only one child. So far as he knew his daughter was living with her husband three years ago. On Sunday last, on receiving certain information he came to Newton and saw his daughter in bed at her house in Lemon-road. She was being attended by a nurse. She did not recognise him; she was quite unconscious.
The Coroner: Do you know anything which bears any way on her death?
Witness: I have never had very much conversation with her since she had been married. She has made complaints about her husband's bad conduct on various occasions, and he tried to persuade her to leave him, but she would not. The witness also made some incoherent reference about the wife having jumped from her bedroom window some time ago in consequence of her husband's treatment. He had not seen her husband for the past twelve months.
The Foreman: Did she give you any reason why she jumped out of the window?
Witness: She said she jumped out of the window from her husband as he followed her with a knife.
The Coroner said he could not take that as evidence unless they had it from an eye-witness.
Mr Henry Arthur Bluett Davies, surgeon, practising at Newton Abbot, said he was called to 2, Lemon-road, at ten minutes to eleven on Sunday morning last, and he found MRS GRANT lying on the floor in the bedroom behind the door and almost under the bed which was near the door. He knew her. She was lying partly over on her face in a pool of blood. There was also a pillow saturated with blood on the floor. Witness got her on to the bed. She seemed semi-conscious, that was to say she understood and nodded her head when he asked if she would have some water. She understood nothing more. She was breathing quietly and regularly. The pupil of the right eye was contracted. She had facial paralysis on the right side, and partial paralysis of the right arm. There were six distinct wounds extending along the forehead, chiefly on the right side, extending towards the centre. Three of them were fairly clean cut from an inch to an inch and a quarter long. There was one on the right temple through which the brain was protruding. It was about two inches long. There was another fracture of the skull adjacent to this one. The bone appeared to have been punched through by some blunt instrument. He attended the deceased in the same house up to the time of her death. She had a skilled nurse with her nearly all the time. She was the parish nurse. The deceased died on Tuesday evening. She never made any improvement. She gradually got worse. Witness had since made a post mortem examination. There was some bruises about the neck and also a bruise on the back of the left hand about the size of a shilling. Under the scalp there was considerable bruising with an effusion of blood. There were three fractures of the skull. In each case the bone had been driven into the brain. Very considerable force would have been required to have inflicted those injuries. The size and shape f one of the wounds corresponded with the sharp end of the hammer produced. Another wound appeared to have been caused by a blow from the same hammer, although in a different manner, the wound being wedge shaped. There was a large clot of blood under the membrane covering the brain on the left side. The fracture of the temple extended to the base of the skull and opened up the cavity of the ear, the result of a terrific blow. All the other organs were healthy. she was a healthy woman. She died from the injuries to her brain caused by the blows, which in his opinion were given by the hammer produced. From the first he had no hopes of her recovery. So far as he could see, there were no signs of a struggle. It was possible that the bruise on the hand was caused by deceased putting it up to protect herself.
The Coroner: It does not look as if she struggled to save herself.
Witness: I am certain there was not much of a struggle. The witness further stated that when he first saw the deceased she was in her nightdress. Either one of the wounds would most probably have stunned her and rendered her incapable of defending herself. From the character of the wounds and the state of the hammer he was of opinion that her assailant stood on her right side and a little behind her. He did not think her assailant struck her by reaching over her. Witness first saw the hammer in the house, and he noticed it was covered with blood and hair. The latter corresponded in colour with that of the deceased.
The Coroner: Could these injuries have been self-inflicted?
Witness: Certainly not.
By a Juror: He was of opinion that the wounds were all inflicted with the sharp end of the hammer.
The next witness called was Albert Rowell, of 14, Lemon-road, a labourer in the employ of the Urban Council. He said he knew the deceased and her husband by sight. He last saw MRS GRANT on Saturday night about five minutes to eleven, walking in Queen-street towards her house. There was no one with her, and witness did not speak to her. He knew nothing of what happened that night or recently.
P.C. Creech deposed that on Sunday morning about 10.45 he went to Lemon-road and saw several people standing outside No. 2, the residence of HARRY GRANT. the people said they feared something was wrong in GRANT'S house, as his wife had not been seen that morning, and GRANT had thrown himself under a train. The front door was locked, and a ladder having been procured, P.C. Ashby, followed by witness, entered the room by the window, which was open. The blind was down, and the cord broken. When witness entered the room he found MRS GRANT lying on the floor on her face, partially under the bed. Witness shouted for someone to run for a doctor, and a man named Harry Shepherd then entered the room by the window. they lifted the deceased out from under the bed and laid her beside the bed. She was naked with the exception of her chemise. There was a pillow (produced) saturated with blood on the floor, and there was also a pool of blood on the floor. The left side of the bed was also sprinkled with blood, and there were spots on the wall. Witness found the hammer produced on a table in front of the door. There was blood and hair on the hammer. Witness also saw smears of blood on the right side of the staircase as if someone had wiped his hands down over it. On entering the kitchen witness found the window fastened and the blind down. The door leading to the backyard was bolted. The front door was locked, as there was no key visible, it was burst open. The key was afterwards found on the kitchen table. the front room window was fastened and the blind drawn down. It appeared as if someone had recently slept on the couch in the same room. A candlestick was on a chair close by, and there was a jug with some cold tea on the floor. Dr Davis arrived within five minutes after the discovery of the body. He saw nothing of HARRY GRANT. There were two bloodstained cloths on the table with the hammer. Witness also saw some water in a bucket outside the back door, and it appeared to be bloodstained. It was thrown away as the pail was required.
The Court then adjourned for luncheon, and on re-assembling, Henry Winser, of 16, Lemon-road, stated that he knew the deceased and her husband quite well. On Saturday night about half-past eleven or quarter to twelve he was passing their house on his way home when he heard voices proceeding apparently from the kitchen. He heard MRS GRANT say "This is mine," and her husband then called her a ___ liar and a ____ cow. He believed it was a ____ cow. That was generally his words to her. Witness heard no other noise and proceeded home.
Superintendent Roberts: Have you heard this sort of thing before?
The Coroner: You have heard what? Quarrels between the deceased and her husband?
Witness: Yes. The witness further stated that he had known him about 20 years. He was formerly ship's mate with him. He was plumber's mate with witness, and he was with him when he had his arm off in 1872.
Henry Whittley of No. 1, Lemon-road, an upholsterer, said he had known the GRANTS very well. He saw nothing of them on Saturday, but on Sunday morning about a quarter to eight he saw HARRY GRANT in his backyard. Witness was in his washhouse at the time. He was fully dressed, but witness did not notice anything particular about him. He remembered him bolting the back door on his going into the house. Not long after that there was a knock at witness's front door. Witness answered it and a woman enquired if he had seen or heard anything of MRS GRANT. Witness told her that he had not, but said he expected she had gone out to her work. The woman said she had enquired next door, but could get no answer.
The Foreman: Did you see Grant wash himself in the yard?
Witness: No sir.
By the Coroner: Witness had never seen GRANT fully dressed so early before. He did not, however, suspect anything was wrong. He did not think MR and MRS GRANT lived comfortably together. They were frequently quarrelling, in fact the quarrels were so frequent that the neighbours had not taken notice of them. During the past few weeks they had been quieter. He had not seen GRANT use any violence towards his wife. MRS GRANT had one child which was born about two years ago. He could not say what was the cause of the quarrels. He had heard the husband threaten the deceased, saying, "I'll do for you." He had heard him call her a cow and a ___.
The Coroner: There was no jealousy between them so far as you know?
Witness: Not that I am aware of.
Edward Clarke, of Exeter-road, Highweek, a labourer, said he had known the GRANT'S for a long time. He saw GRANT on Sunday morning, about a quarter past eight, whilst on his way to the station, he saw him coming from the direction of his house. Witness said "Good morning" to him, and he returned the compliment. He walked with him towards the station and then witness turned off across the Park. The man was just as usual in his manner.
John Blatchford, of 6, Lemon-road, corn merchant's foreman, deposed he knew the GRANTS, but had not seen them lately. On Sunday morning he entered the bedroom with the policeman and corroborated what he had said. He had heard the GRANTS quarrelling on several occasions. they used disgraceful language to each other. He last heard a quarrel between them a month ago. they seemed to have been quieter lately. On the occasion of the last quarrel he heard the man say to the deceased "You cow; I will do for you before very long." She said, "No you won't. That is what I want you to do. Strike me! But you know better than that." He said, "I have been maintaining you in ___ for the last two years." She replied, "More like me maintaining you."
Mrs Susan Hales, of 53, Lower St. Paul's-road, wife of an engine driver, said she saw MRS GRANT on Saturday last. She was at witness's house to see her child which she (witness) kept for her. The child was born about two years ago. She had no children before that and had been married about fourteen years. The deceased had worked at the house of Miss Smale in Powderham-road as a general servant every day for years. Witness kept her child because she was away to work all day and could not attend to it, and had done so ever since it was six or seven months old. The deceased paid witness for taking care of the child. She had told her that her husband had threatened to do for her. They lived together very unhappily. She believed the cause to be jealousy.
The Coroner: Who was jealous?
Witness: The husband was jealous of the wife. The witness further stated that she had to fetch a policeman on one occasion in consequence of a quarrel between them. Deceased had told her that she was afraid of her husband.
John Endacott, of 65, Queen-street, boat builder, said his back premises adjoined those of Lemon-road. About three weeks ago when he retired to rest he heard a row in GRANTS house, the quarrelling being so bad that he thought of calling the police. GRANT swore at his wife and said he had to maintain her and her bastard for the last two years. She replied that she had maintained him. He had frequently heard the parties quarrelling.
John Jackson, of Steer's Cottages said he had been to GRANT'S house delivering coal which he had bought from his employers, on various occasions. He had seen the hammer produced in the coal cellar.
William Palmer, engine driver on the Great Western Railway, deposed that on Sunday morning he worked the train from Millbay to Newton Abbot, arriving at 8.27. The engine was then detached, and was then shunted on to the down line. After the train had been detached from the engine and was leaving for Exeter witness saw a man come from off the platform and enter the six-foot way, and when the train was approaching him he laid himself on the line. The brake was immediately applied and the train brought to a standstill, but not until the iron guard in front of the wheel struck the man. Witness ran to him and discovered that it was a man who had worked on the line some time ago.
Henry Sheppard of 64, Osborne-street, a labourer on the railway, said he saw GRANT place himself on the line as the train was approaching.
P.C. Cole said he saw GRANT in Queen-street on Saturday about 11.30 very drunk.
P.C. Ashby said he was at the station about 8.30 on Sunday morning and saw GRANT on the platform. He was standing quite close to him, but he did not notice any bloodstains about his clothes. Witness afterwards saw him at the hospital. He searched his clothes and found the second door key of his house in his waistcoat pocket.
This concluded all the evidence, and the Coroner said that in order to give the man upon whom suspicion rested the opportunity of attending to hear the evidence that had been given and to ask questions of the witnesses, he would adjourn the case until that day fortnight at 11.30. In all probability he would have sufficiently recovered to be present.

Saturday 15 August 1896, Issue 9084 – Gale Document No. Y3200760860
At Abbotskerswill on Monday evening, CLEMENTINA TAYLOR, aged 17 months, daughter of RICHARD TAYLOR, mason, was found by its mother dead in a bath in the garden. The child is supposed to have fallen in while playing with the water. At the Inquest this morning the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

At Ilfracombe on Monday an Inquest was opened by Dr Slade King, Deputy Coroner, relative to the death of MRS WEBBER. The husband stated that deceased suffered from neuralgia. Mrs Seldon, who acted as nurse, said deceased tried to get out of bed on Saturday afternoon, but she prevented it. In the evening she ran to the window, jumped out, broke both her knees, and sustained internal injuries. Dr Payne, who had been previously called to see her, was again summoned, and he consulted with Dr Gardner. Deceased died on Sunday evening. As Dr Payne was attending an urgent case in the country, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry.

Saturday 15 August 1896, Issue 9084 – Gale Document No. Y3200760880
An Inquest was held at Torrington on Tuesday, relative to the death of FLORENCE EVELYN SUSSEX, aged four months. According to Dr Burt, who had attended the child it had not been properly cared for, but rebutting evidence was called, and the Jury without hesitation returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 22 August 1896, Issue 9090 – Gale Document No. Y3200760925
INQUESTS IN EXETER - An Inquest was held at the Police Court on Monday by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) on the body of CHARLOTTE SHEPPARD, 70, the widow of a labourer. Mrs Wright, wife of a stonemason, of Navy-cottages, Friar's-hill, said the deceased was her aunt, and lived with her. On Saturday morning at half-past two as she was going downstairs she spoke to the deceased, who did not answer, and she then found that she was dead. Witness's husband went for a doctor. Her mother, who was sleeping with her aunt, knew nothing about the matter. Mr Ransome Pickard, surgeon, said he found the deceased in bed, dead. When he saw the body about four o'clock it was cold, and the deceased had apparently been dead about two hours. The most probable cause of death was cardiac syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Mr Hooper also held an Inquest on Monday at 23, Magdalen-street, on the body of FREDERICK CHARLES NORTHCOTT, the 10 months old child of MR WILLIAM NORTHCOTT, blacksmith and plumber. The child had been medically treated during the past five months for a spasmodic cough, teething and convulsions. He, however, had not been seen by a doctor for ten days and died on Friday evening from exhaustion following upon diarrhoea, just before the arrival of Mr Harrison, surgeon of Magdalen-street, who had been summoned. The Jury, of which Mr J. F. Ralling, was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

An Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr H W. Hooper) at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday on the body of EGBERT WILLIAM BENNETT, aged 15, of 2, Cobley's-court, Smythen-street, who died at that institution from injuries received in an accident in the Bonhay-road on the previous Friday. WILLIAM JOHN BENNETT, labourer, the father, said his son worked as a leader boy for Messrs. Pickford and Co. carriers. Witness last saw him alive at 10.30 on Saturday night in the Hospital when he asked him how he met with his accident. He replied that he had been riding on the shafts, got off to whip up the leader and was getting on the shafts again when he missed his foot and fell under the wheel. John Phillips, the driver, said he was going through Bonhay-road on Friday with a trolley laden with barley. There were two horses – leader and shaft. Witness had the reins and the boy was riding on the shafts. The deceased got off to give the front horse a whip up, and on trying to jump up on the waggon he missed his footing and fell under the wheel. Before witness had time to pull up the horses the front and hind wheels went over the lad. Witness picked him up and he was taken to the hospital in a cab. He was only driving at a walking pace when the accident happened. It occurred just on the St. David's side of the railway bridge. By the Jury: The trolley was laden with about two tons. Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon at the Hospital said he received the deceased into the institution on Friday between one and two, suffering severely from shock. He had a bad compound fracture of the right thigh extending to the knee joint, and there was also a deep wound on the front of the left leg. He died from his injuries on Saturday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and attributed no blame whatever to the driver. The Jury condemned the dangerous practice of riding on shafts. It was pointed out that it was the custom of these boys to do so as there were objections to their riding the leader horse. The horse could not then exert itself so well when pulling and might slip down and break the rider's leg.

Saturday 29 August 1896, Issue 9096 – Gale Document No. Y3200760950
THE ILFRACOMBE CLIFF FATALITY – Dr E. J. Slade King held an Inquest on Wednesday on the body of MR H. V. MOXON, the young man who was found dead at the foot of the cliff at Ilfracombe. Colonel Hopkinton identified the body, and said deceased was a young man of great promise and most cheerful disposition. He was a medical student of the University College of London. He was particularly fond of botany and frequently visited the Ilfracombe cliffs in search of specimens. Witness last saw him alive on Sunday, when he was in good health. Richard Souch, boatman, said he found the body of the deceased on the beach below the Torrs Walks. The clothes were saturated with water, and the coat was found about 200 yards away. CAPTAIN MOXON, the father, said the deceased lunched with him about 1 o'clock and left for a walk afterwards. He did not see his son alive again. Dr Gardener said the base of the skull was fractured and the neck broken. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." A rider was added expressing a deep sympathy with the parents.

NEWTON TRAGEDY – At the Town Hall, Newton Abbot, on Thursday Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, resumed the Inquest on the body of SARAH GRANT, who died on the evening of August 11th from shocking injuries alleged to have been inflicted with a hammer on her on the previous Sunday by her husband, HARRY GRANT, a one-arm painter. Superintendent Roberts, of Torquay, watched the case on behalf of the police and Mr John W. Pascoe was Foreman of the Jury.
In anticipation of seeing the accused GRANT present, a large number of townspeople attended the Court and many were unable to gain admittance.
The Coroner, having read over the names of the Jury, pointed out that the Inquiry was adjourned to enable further investigations to be made. It was hoped that the person against whom the evidence appeared to direct suspicion named, HARRY GRANT, would have by this time been sufficiently well to be able to be present so that he might have an opportunity of hearing the evidence read over to him and of questioning the witnesses. He was informed that GRANT was not present and that he was still in the hospital. Therefore it was necessary for him to consider what course to adopt under the circumstances. having thought over the matter, he had decided to call the doctor under whose care GRANT was at the hospital. If he expressed an opinion that GRANT'S condition was such that the time when he would be able to appear was indefinite, the public interests would be best met by returning a verdict now. That would be rather unusual, but it would be no use adjourning again, unless the doctor could give a fixed date on which GRANT could appear.
Dr Stanley Stevens deposed: I am a surgeon practising in Newton Abbot. HARRY GRANT is in my charge at the Cottage Hospital at the present time. A few days' after he was admitted the wound at his elbow became suppurated, but since then he has been going on favourably. He is still getting better and recovering though he is confined to bed and consequently unable to leave the Hospital. It is tolerably certain that he will be able to appear on Monday week, unless anything unforeseen should occur in the meantime.
Henry Billings was then called, and said I live at No. 17, Fairfield-terrace, Newton Abbot, and am a cabdriver in the employ of Mr G. Carnell, cab proprietor. About eight o'clock on the morning of Sunday, August 9th, HARRY GRANT came to the stables and wished me "Good morning." He asked me if Mr Carnell was down. I told him he was not. He then walked away without saying what he wanted him for. I never knew him come there before. I noticed nothing peculiar about him. He had no marks on his clothing. I did not look closely. I glanced at him once, and then went on with my work again.
Ann Ferris was the next witness. She said: I am in service with Mr J. Goodman at No. 3, Devonia, Courtenay-Park. HARRY GRANT called there between 10 and 15 minutes after eight o'clock on Sunday morning, August 9th. He asked if Mr Goodman was about, and I told him he was not down. He remarked, "Not down yet?" and walked away. I knew him by sight. I saw nothing unusual in his manner.
William Steer said: I live at No. 17, Lower St. Paul's-road, Newton Abbot and am a carriage examiner at the Newton Railway Station. Whilst walking up beside the train leaving Newton at 8.30 a.m. I saw GRANT on the Exeter side of the platform. In passing I said "Good morning." I also said "It's cooler this morning after the storm." That was all that passed. I then went on to the other side of the train. I noticed nothing strange about GRANT.
William Blatchford, foreman for Mr A. Coleridge, corn merchant, of Lemon-road, Newton Abbot, who gave evidence at the first hearing as to hearing quarrels between GRANT and his wife, was recalled and gave the following evidence: I heard a quarrel between GRANT and his wife about eighteen months ago on a Saturday night shortly after MRS GRANT'S child was born. I heard MRS GRANT run down the yard followed by GRANT but at that moment I came out into the yard and on seeing me GRANT stopped, turned back and went into the house. MRS GRANT jumped over the party wall and I heard next morning that she spent the night in the next house. I did not see anything in his hand.
Mrs Massey, who attended MRS GRANT when the child was born eighteen months ago, gave evidence as to having heard GRANT repeatedly threaten to kill his wife and to kill himself at the same time. The child was born on Monday morning, September 8th, 1894. On the afternoon of that day GRANT came up to the bedroom, and whilst witness was downstairs she heard MRS GRANT scream. Running upstairs, she saw GRANT standing by the side of the bed in a threatening attitude, holding a brandy bottle above his head as if going to strike her. MRS GRANT was in bed with her left arm uplifted and with the other covering the child. When approached by the nurse he said he meant to torture his wife as a cat tortured a mouse. On another occasion, on April 1895, he fetched his wife from witness's house and on being told to be ashamed of himself, he said he would knock her brains out.
William White, landlord of the Devon Arms, produced the will which GRANT made six or seven months ago and left in his possession, with instructions that should anything happen to him, to send to the name and address on the address on the envelope – Frederick Zople, No. 10, St Mary's-cottages, Plainmoor, St Marychurch, Torquay. Mrs Zople was GRANT'S sister.
P.S. Coles stated that GRANT made no answer to the charge. When asked if he was going to have a solicitor he replied that he had no means and he didn't see the use of it.
The Coroner again adjourned the Inquest until Friday, September 11th.

Saturday 29 August 1896, Issue 9096 – Gale Document No. Y3200760970
THE TOTNES FATALITY – Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at the Totnes Guildhall on Monday on the body of HARRY HEATH, packer, employed at Totnes Station, who was killed on Saturday by a pilot engine. J. H. Currell, the engine driver, said he had been to Rattery with a pilot engine. He arrived at Totnes about 7.43. He noticed the signals were right for the engine to pass on the up platform line to the water tank. As he passed the signal-box he looked up the line to the water tank, but saw nothing on either line. As they passed the crossing he felt something catch the engine. He stopped the engine about three yards from where deceased was. The six wheels must have passed over him, both legs being severed. Deceased was alive and conscious when they picked him up. He said "It's nobody's fault; it is my mistake. I thought you were coming on the other line." William Penfound, a fireman, on the pilot engine, corroborated and John Coleman, engine driver said he saw the deceased working in a stooping position, and expected to see him jump out of the way. Mr W. C. Sim, permanent-way inspector, said it was probable deceased might not have been seen by the engine driver if he was standing between the pillars. Deceased was a steady man, and very well used to the yard. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and exonerated the railway officials from blame. They also expressed their sympathy with the widow, and handed their fees to her.

Saturday 5 September 1896, Issue 9102 – Gale Document No. Y3200760991
DEATH AT THE PRISON – An Inquest was held by Mr Deputy Coroner F. Burrow at the Prison on Monday, into the circumstances of the death of JOHN WALLIS, aged 67, a convict with died in the Prison hospital on Saturday. Richard Warren, chief warder at the gaol, said the deceased was admitted to the gaol on May 18 last, and George Lenthall, assistant warder, stated that deceased complained, the day before being admitted to the hospital on August 20th, that he felt too ill to work. Dr Mortimer, medical officer of the prison, deposed that on August 20th he examined WALLIS and found him suffering from debility, and he was in a melancholy mood. Witness examined him on his admittal to the prison and ascertained that he was suffering from a feeble heart. Deceased died from congestion of the lungs and haemorrhage, the result of the feeble action of the heart. "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned. It was stated that the deceased had not a relation in the world.

Saturday 5 September 1896, Issue 9102 – Gale Document No. Y3200760993
THE HONITON SHOOTING FATALITY – An Inquest was held by Mr C. E. Cox at Deer Park, Buckerell, the residence of Lady Linday, near Honiton, on Wednesday, relative to the death of ARTHUR MONTGOMERIE, aged 14, son of MR FREDERIC BUTLER MOLYNEUX MONTGOMERIE. ROBERT MONTGOMERIE, 18, a brother of the deceased, stated that on Tuesday about noon he went out with deceased, Mr Horaford, a farmer, and Henry Taylor, a footman, shooting. In getting over a hedge witness stumbled, and his gun, which was half-cocked in both barrels, went off, the charge entering the back of his brother. MRS MONTGOMERIE, the mother, said the deceased had never been out shooting before. The boys had her permission to go out on that day. They were on very good terms. William George Horaford, farmer, said Robert seemed to know how to handle a gun. Although he did not consider them under his supervision he once or twice cautioned Robert, who was inclined to run ahead. The accident occurred at Witch, at the higher end of Buckerell. The party were getting over a gap. Henry Taylor, footman to MR MONTGOMERIE, said he was quite certain Robert, with whom he had been out shooting four times previously, when about a dozen paces from the gap, half-cocked both barrels of the gun, and carried it with the muzzle pointing upward in the act of climbing over the hedge.
Dr T. W. Shortridge said he found deceased suffering from a gunshot wound at the lower end of the spine, the charge appearing to have been received at a very short distance. The bone was shattered, so that it could not be traced. The charge had been deflected somewhat by the bone, and had evidently gone upwards, riddling the intestines, and reaching the base of the lungs and liver. The Coroner thought a little more supervision might have prevented an accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," attaching no blame to anyone.

Saturday 5 September 1896, Issue 9102 – Gale Document No. Y3200761012
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper on Monday at the Police Court on the body of MARY ANN THOMAS aged 65, widow of SAMUEL THOMAS, farmer of Chumleigh, but who had recently lived in Paul-street, Exeter, with Mrs Mortimore. BESSIE THOMAS, daughter of the deceased, residing at Bodmin, identified the body as that of her mother. She last saw her about a month ago and she was then in good health. Elizabeth Mortimore, wife of Robert Mortimore, of 25 Paul-street, and with whom the deceased resided, stated that MRS THOMAS came down on Sunday morning about 9 o'clock and had her breakfast. She then went out for about five minutes and when she came in she complained of being faint. Witness gave her some brandy, but she sat down on a chair and died before the doctor arrived. Mr Faulkner, surgeon, of Exeter, said when he went to the house he found the deceased in a sitting position, dead. Witness examined the body and considered death was due to syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 5 September 1896, Issue 9102 – Gale Document No. Y3200761015
INQUEST – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at 8, Russell-terrace, this morning on the body of EDWIN ASHFORD, aged 45, who died suddenly as reported in our last evening's issue. MRS MARY ASHFORD, the widow, said the deceased was in the employ of Mr Veale, sweet manufacturer, as clerk. Yesterday morning he brought her a cup of tea as usual, and when he had got half-way down the stairs he said he felt giddy. Witness dressed and went down just in time to save the deceased from falling. She laid him on the bed and Dr Bremner was sent for. Dr Bremner stated that death was due to the rupture of a blood vessel. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 5 September 1896, Issue 9102 – Gale Document No. Y3200761016
TORQUAY – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at No. 18, Dunmore-road, Ellacombe, on Friday afternoon, on the body of the week-old female illegitimate child of FLORENCE POWELL, which was found dead in bed the previous day. Dr Andrew stated that death was due to suffocation. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Coroner condemned the practice of children sleeping with their parents.

Saturday 5 September 1896, Issue 9102 – Gale Document No. Y3200761009
An Inquest was held on Thursday on the body of ALFRED HEAL, aged 4 ½ years, whose body was found by two ladies near Lincoln House Steps, Kingswear, in Dartmouth Harbour, on Wednesday, a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Saturday 12 September 1896, Issue 9108 – Gale Document No. Y3200761033
BOVEY TRACEY – At an Inquest held on Tuesday on the body of RICHARD BRIMBLECOMBE, who fell from a railway bridge on Monday, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 12 September 1896, Issue 9108 – Gale Document No. Y3200761032
At an Inquest at Devonport on Monday, on the body of MRS BESSIE GREEP, the wife of a police constable, who died from natural causes after her first confinement. Mrs Blatchford, the midwife, was severely censured for her cold, unkind, and neglectful treatment of deceased.

Saturday 12 September 1896, Issue 9108 – Gale Document No. Y3200761045
RESUMED INQUEST – Verdict of "Wilful Murder." – The Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of MRS SARAH GRANT, the victim of the Newton Abbot tragedy, was resumed at the Newton Town Hall yesterday, when GRANT was able to attend for the first time. Public interest in the proceedings was not as keen as the trial on Tuesday the Court being less than half full. GRANT was looking much as he did on Tuesday, again taking much interest in what transpired, watching the Coroner, Mr Sidney Hacker, and the witnesses narrowly all through as they came into the witness box to hear their evidence, given at the two previous hearings and read over.
The Coroner first explained that the Inquest had been adjourned to give HARRY GRANT, the suspected person, an opportunity of hearing the evidence read over, and, if necessary, questioning the witnesses. Mr F. J. Carter, GRANT'S solicitor, was present.
having read over the evidence of the last two witnesses, WILLIAM RAYMOND, mason, of Bovey Tracey, father of the late MRS GRANT and Dr Hunt, the Coroner addressed GRANT and informed him that if he wished he could question the witnesses.
Mr Carter replied that acting under his advice, no questions would be put.
Jane Zaple, called at the request of Mr Carter, said she was the wife of Frederick Zaple, carpenter, of St Mary's Cottages, St. Marychurch, Torquay. HARRY GRANT, the accused, was her brother. He was formerly in the Navy. She produced his discharge, dated October 4th, 1872. In the Navy he was a plumber's mate. About October, 1872, GRANT met with an accident on the railway. On his way home, whilst stepping out of a railway carriage, he fell between the platform and the carriage. As a result his left arm was cut off. In her opinion his mind had been deranged ever since. At Chiswick on April 19th, 1873, he attempted to shoot himself and was brought before the magistrates for attempted suicide and discharged. She had never witnessed any quarrels between GRANT and his wife. About three weeks after her confinement MRS GRANT told witness that her husband had acted very kindly to her – in fact, could not have been kinder.
Dr R. H. Grimbly, surgeon, practising at Newton, said GRANT had been a patient of his for the past six years. He had always been of an irritable temperament – quickly roused to passion without sufficient cause. He had had fits of depression; at times he had been very depressed.
Mr Carter: If such a deed as he is accused of had been committed by him, do you consider from his mental condition that he would be responsible?
Witness: From what I know of him I should say he might in the heat of temper and without being able to stop to reflect, do such an act, for which he would be scarcely responsible. This irascibility may have been brought about by some brain disorder, which has been aggravated by the accident he had when his arm was torn off at Torquay.
Mr Carter: From your observations do you know that he has shewn frequent signs of that form of insanity known as mania?
Witness: I could not say that. But these conditions are sometimes evidence of that form of insanity.
The Coroner: The question of mental incapacity is not one which a Coroner's Jury can take into consideration at all.
Mr Carter: That is quite so, but I thought the Jury would like to hear the few witnesses we had here to form an opinion.
The Foreman: That question had better come before the magistrates.
Summing up the evidence, the Coroner pointed out that it was now for the Jury to consider the evidence given before them and give their verdict as to how the deceased, SARAH GRANT came to her death, and who was responsible for it. Upon the evidence, the questions of course for them would be – Who killed deceased? Was she killed by HARRY GRANT or some person unknown? If she was killed by HARRY GRANT he need hardly point out that that would be murder by him, and unless there was, in their opinion, clear evidence to absolutely satisfy them that there was no malicious intention in his killing her, they could not reduce the crime to that of manslaughter. There was no eye-witness of the crime, but there was a large amount of circumstantial evidence. Neither of the witnesses who met and spoke to GRANT on the Sunday morning noticed anything unusual about him. Much of the evidence showed that GRANT had a motive. Dominated by the idea that his wife had been unfaithful to him and that the child born two years ago was not his, he frequently threatened to take his wife's life and "do" for himself. Although not trying HARRY GRANT for his life, still if the Jury considered a prima facie case had been made out they must commit him for trial. A Coroner's Jury had nothing to do with the state of mind of the accused. The only question for them was whether he committed the deed.
The Jury, after an absence of ten minutes, returned, and the Foreman read the following verdict: The Jury are unanimously of opinion that the deceased, SARAH GRANT, came to her death by injuries wilfully and maliciously inflicted on her head, with a hammer, by her husband, HARRY GRANT. The Jury therefore returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against HARRY GRANT.
The Coroner, addressing the accused, informed him that he was committed for trial at the next Assizes on the charge of murdering his wife.

Saturday 12 September 1896, Issue 9108 – Gale Document No. Y3200761053
SHOCKING AFFAIR – Mr E. S. Cox held an Inquest at the Saddlers' Arms Inn, Lympstone on Wednesday, touching the death of MARY ANN HALLETT, aged 58, widow of an Army pensioner, who died under exceptionally distressing circumstances at Lympstone on Tuesday.
The first witness was ALICE HALLETT, daughter-in-law, who said that about nine weeks ago the deceased stayed with her at Kingsbridge, when she appeared to be in her usual health. On Friday morning last she received a letter from a man named Maynard, of Withycombe, saying that the deceased was very ill. Witness arrived at Lympstone on Monday evening and found deceased in a most filthy and distressing condition. She was partly in bed and partly on the floor. She was covered with vermin, and her bed witness described as a dung heap. Witness did not think it necessary to call a doctor on Monday night, but sent for Dr Barton on Tuesday morning. The deceased, however, died before he arrived.
Mary Jane Norton, wife of a labourer, was the next witness called, and stated that she did not consider the deceased had been sober since her husband died, ten weeks ago.
Mrs Maynard was next called. She said that the deceased had stayed with her and her husband at Withycombe for five days. A fortnight ago witness and her husband went to Lympstone with the deceased as her guests for five days, but they remained until the evening previous to her death. the deceased was frequently drunk. By a Juryman: She had never fetched drink for deceased but once.
Henry Maynard, husband of the last witness, said deceased stayed with them at Withycombe, and during the time she was with him he did not supply her with any drink, although he considered she was always in a state of intoxication.
Mr Williams, landlord of the Saddlers' Arms, Lympstone, said he had frequently refused the last witness drink for the deceased as he considered she had been taking too much.
Dr Barton, of Lympstone said he had made a post mortem examination. He found that the stomach was quite empty and slightly congested. The rain was also slightly congested. He considered death was due to alcoholic poisoning. The deceased was in a most filthy condition, and he had to disinfect the head before he could open the skull.
The Jury, after about ten minutes deliberation returned a verdict that the deceased died from alcoholic poisoning and requested the Coroner to recalled Mr Maynard and his wife and censure them, which he did in very severe terms.

Saturday 19 September 1896, Issue9114 – Gale Document No. Y3200761095
EXETER SUICIDE – JAMES FRANKS, a painter, aged about 40 years, and a married man residing at 10, Pancras-lane, committed suicide in his house by hanging himself. The deed must have been committed either late on Monday night or early on Tuesday morning, for when he was discovered between eight and nine o'clock in the morning his lifeless body was quite cold. There are many causes which apparently led him to commit the rash act. His had been a life not worth living. He was known as a lazy and worthless fellow, much addicted to drink and constantly at variance with his wife, who is a hard-working and respectable woman and gains a livelihood by the sale of shellfish at the Higher Market. Owing to the frequent disturbances with his wife he had occasionally been brought before the Magistrates, and at the present time there is a summons out charging him with assaulting his wife on Friday night. It is stated that he had seriously threatened his wife and family of late, and they were in bodily fear of him. The summons was returnable for Monday, but the police had been unable to serve it as FRANKS'S whereabouts were not at the time known, he not having slept at his house since Friday night, the date of the alleged assault. Consequently his case was adjourned for a week. The man must have arrived home late on Monday night, and appeared to have gained an entrance through a window. there was no one home at the time, and when his daughter LAURA entered the house between eight and half-past in the morning she was horrified to find her father hanging from a balustrade by a rope attached to a patent screw which he had driven into the woodwork. An alarm was raised and two men named William Soper and Hugh Facey went into the house and cut the body down. MRS FRANKS gave information to the police and on Inspector Sullock arriving on the scene he found the body lying on the bedroom floor. Mr C. E. Bell, the police surgeon, was sent for and on his arrival he found that death was due to strangulation, the appearance being consistent with hanging by a rope. Considerable sensation was caused in the vicinity at the time of the discovery.
THE INQUEST – The Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) at the Police Court on Tuesday evening. Mr F. Force was Foreman of the Jury.
ELIZA FRANKS, the widow, said her husband was 37 years of age. He had been in a bad state of health. At Christmas last he fell and injured the back part of his head. She must say that he drank a great deal. She had not seen him alive since Friday. This morning about eight o'clock when she went into her house she saw him apparently standing on the stairs. She went out and a man named William Soper told her that he had hung himself.
The Coroner: Have there been any proceedings before the Magistrates?
Witness: Yes, sir; I summoned him on Saturday morning last.
The Coroner: What did you summon him for?
Witness: For ill-using me sir.
The Coroner: Was the summons to have been heard this morning?
Witness: Yesterday morning, sir; but he did not make his appearance.
What did you occupy?
Witness (evidently mis-hearing the question): I left him in fear a day or two because he had been drinking heavily.
The Coroner: When in this state was he violent?
Witness: Very violent. He acted like a mad man when in this state. The witness further stated that her husband had not done any work for a long time. She had one child.
By the Jury: He must have gone into the house after 11 o'clock last night. When in drink he was of a very excitable temperament. When out of drink he was a good husband at times. Witness had not slept in the house since Friday night last.
Robert Andrews, porter at the Establishment of Messrs. E. James Rowe and Co., residing in Newtown, said he had known the deceased for thirty years. He last saw him alive on the previous evening, between six and seven o'clock by the Acland Arms, St. Sidwell's standing still. Witness spoke to him, and deceased asked him if he would stand a pint for him. He replied "I can't. I haven't got it in my pocket. If I could I would." He was sober. Witness then left him.
William Soper, porter, of Pancras-lane, said he was looking out of his bedroom window this morning when he was called by MRS FRANKS, who shouted "Come down and see what's up." Witness entered her house and saw the deceased hanging in the stairs by a rope (produced). He was dead. He had his trousers, waistcoat and stockings on. Witness lifted the body up whilst another man cut the rope and they carried it in to the bedroom. The police inspector then arrived, subsequently followed by Mr Bell, who pronounced life to be extinct.
Replying to the Coroner, Mace-Sergeant Perriam stated that as the deceased did not appear before the Magistrates yesterday the case was adjourned for a week. No warrant was issued for his arrest.
Mr Soper, in reply to the Jury, said the rope was fastened to an eye screw.
Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, stated that he was called this morning just after half-past eight, and on arriving at the house he found the deceased lying on the floor of the bedroom, dead and stiff. Witness examined his body and found a double mark around his neck. The skin was broken in front, and the marks were such as could have been caused by the rope produced. Death was due to strangulation. The holdfast to which the rope was fastened had been very carefully screwed in. The man had been dead several hours. If he had not heard the evidence of the witness who saw the deceased last evening he should have thought that the man had been dead for eighteen or twenty-four hours.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."
The Coroner concurred, remarking that the deceased's mind was probably affected by the fact that magisterial proceedings were instituted against him and that he was seemingly not sure whether there was a warrant out against him or not. He was also a man given much to drink.

Saturday 19 September 1896, Issue 9114 – Gale Document No. Y3200761074
SINGULAR DEATH – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner B[?] junr., at No. 20, Pinhoe-road, Exeter, on Tuesday on the body of LOUISA GREENSLADE, widow, aged 72, who died suddenly on Tuesday evening. Ernest Boucher, a tailor, said he visited the house on the day named and took deceased up a glass of milk, which she usually drank before going to bed. He knocked at her bedroom door but received no answer, and was about to put the glass on the table, when he notice deceased lying on the floor. A doctor was sent for immediately. Deceased has been in good health lately. Mr E. Steele Perkins, surgeon, said that he arrived about 9.15 p.m., the deceased being dead about five hours. On opening the wind pipe he found a piece of pork which the deceased had evidently tried to eat for dinner, but which had stuck in her throat and caused suffocation. The Jury, of which Mr E. Cause was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

A verdict of "Suicide while in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned at the Inquest held on JOHN CHUDLEY, a labourer of Kingsteignton, who committed suicide by hanging himself.

Saturday 19 September 1896, Issue 9114 – Gale Document No. Y3200761087
DART VALE HUNTSMAN'S DEATH – An Inquest was held at Staverton last evening by Dr D. A. Fraser, Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN NICHOLSON, the huntsman of the Dart Vale Harriers, who died on Wednesday. ELIZABETH NICHOLSON, the widow, said he arrived home on Saturday afternoon between 5 and 6 p.m. when he stated that he had sustained a fall and his horse had rolled over him. He continually vomited, but declined to have medical aid on Sunday. He died on Wednesday. Mr T. Maye, Master of the harriers, said the hounds met at Harberton at 8 a.m. on Saturday, when deceased appeared as if he had been drinking, but rode steadily over the fences. On Monday, hearing the deceased had met with an accident, he saw him, when he said the horse fell at a large boundary fence between Painsford and Standcombe farms and kicked him in the chest. Dr Johnson, Buckfastleigh, stated that on Sunday, finding no bruises of any kind, and deceased telling him he had been indulging freely, he treated him for a serious bilious attack, induced by drink. At sic o'clock on Tuesday night he found deceased in a state of collapse. A post mortem examination showed death due to syncope, caused by internal injuries, which might have resulted from the accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fees to the widow, who has seven children under 13.

Saturday 19 September 1896, Issue 9114 – Gale Document No. Y3200761103
THE SUICIDE AT WHIMPLE – Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy District Coroner, of Honiton, held an Inquest at Whimple on Thursday on the body of MR KENWOOD, an aged resident of Whimple, who committed suicide on Tuesday by shooting himself. The deceased it will be remembered was found dead by his wife on her return from Exeter Market, where she usually occupies a stall with farm produce. Evidence was given to show that the deceased, who was between 70 and 80 years of age, had been strange in his manner of late, and had threatened to take his life. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 3 October 1896, Issue 9126 – Gale Document No. Y3200761164
NORTHTAWTON – An Inquest was held at the Gostwyck Arms Hotel, Northtawton, on Wednesday, on the body of FRANK NORTHAM, aged 17, son of MR NORTHAM, farmer, of Skinnersland Farm, Coleridge, who was accidentally killed on Wednesday. The deceased was driving a pair of horses in a waggon to fetch bricks from Northtawton Station, and when near the top of High-street the horses bolted, knocking the deceased down, and the wheels passing over his head killed him instantaneously. A verdict of "Accidental death" was returned.

TORQUAY – Inquest. – An Inquest was held at Upton Parish Room, Torquay, on Tuesday, on the body of JOHN HENRY SHORT, aged 14 months, who died suddenly on Monday morning. The medical evidence was to the effect that death was due to convulsions, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 3 October 1896, Issue 9126 – Gale Document No. Y3200761187
INQUEST AT PINHOE – An Inquest was held at the Poltimore Arms Inn, Pinhoe, on Wednesday, by Mr F. Burrows, Deputy Coroner, of Cullompton, on the body of THOMAS FULL, aged 29, son of ex-Mace Sergeant FULL, of the Exeter City Police Force, formerly of Brook Green-terrace, Well-street, Exeter, and who lately went t reside in the Station-road, Pinhoe. Sergeant Brownson, of Heavitree, watched the proceedings on behalf of the Police. Mr George Holland was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who proceeded to the house to view the body.
JOSEPH FULL, father of the deceased, said his son was a porter and boots at the Athelstan Hotel, Paul-street, Exeter. He last saw him alive on Monday last. Witness and his son went to bed at the same time on Monday evening. For the last six or seven weeks deceased had seemed another man. He was restless and could not sit still, and had lately been drinking heavily. The Coroner: He did not say why he was so low. – Witness: No, sir. The deceased was ten years at the Athelstan Hotel, and he came home on Saturday night with everything packed up. Witness wanted to know the reason why he was home, and he replied, "Oh! me and missus have had a fall out." Deceased did not stay in the house five minutes before he went back to Exeter and did not return until ten o'clock. The Coroner: And that is the reason he gave for leaving? - Witness: Yes, sir. Witness added that deceased had not been himself since he had ceased keeping company with a girl with whom he had been for some years, and who about six weeks ago married another young fellow. On Sunday night deceased opened the door of his bedroom and said "What are you calling me for, mother?" His mother being awake said "I did not call you, TOM." On Tuesday morning she went downstairs, and on coming up again outside the deceased's bedroom said "THOMAS, how is it you are not up so early this morning." Getting no reply she looked in and saw that the bed was empty and everything but his nightshirt still there. She at once informed witness, who told her to go and feel the bed, which she did and found it to be quite cold. Witness at once began to search the house, and at length found the deceased strung up to the closet door with a piece of rope (produced). His back was against the door and his head resting in a loop. Medical aid was at once sent for. The witness also stated that Mr. Evered (deceased's employer) lost him on Thursday last, and he was found locked in the washhouse. He had given a great deal of trouble during the last six weeks, and Mrs Evered told him to go on Saturday last. The witness added: He has always been good and has never had an angry word with me. – The Coroner: You think it is in consequence of this girl. - Witness: Yes, sir.
Frederick Memor, of Pinhoe, said he resided in the house next to MR FULL. Witness saw deceased on Monday, and he then seemed very cheerful. MR FULL came in to him on Tuesday morning and said his boy had hanged himself. Witness went in and assisted in taking the body down, it being then quite cold.
Susan Hoare, lately a cook of Exeter, stated that she had kept company with the deceased for the last ten months. She last saw him on Sunday. – The Coroner: Was his conduct the same as usual? - Witness: No, sir; he was very restless and could not keep still. She asked him what was the matter, but he did not reply. She left him on Sunday night about ten minutes to nine. She said something about the girl he had kept company with so long, and said she had deceived him. On Thursday night witness went down to the Hotel, and was told that he had not been seen for two or three hours. She went down to some friends in Paul-street, and someone came down and told her that deceased was locked in the washhouse and would not come out. She then proceeded to the hotel and after some persuasion deceased put the key out over the door. She did not stop there and see him come out, as she thought something might have happened to him. In answer to the Coroner, witness said she considered he was miserable because he was out of work. She had never seen him the worse for liquor.
Dr Sandoe, of Broadclyst, said he did not know deceased. He was telegraphed for about nine o'clock on Tuesday morning to go to Station-road, Pinhoe, where he arrived at half-past nine. The body was cold. There were two marks passing round the neck. Death was due to strangulation.
The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a very sad case, and the Jury would not have an arduous task in returning a verdict. From the evidence it was clear that the deceased died from hanging, the only question being whether he was of sound mind when he committed the act. He (the Coroner) and he was sure the Jury, sympathised with the deceased's relatives. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

AT EXETER – The Exeter City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at 11 Park-road, Longbrook-street, on Wednesday touching the death of HARRY VANSTONE SPEARMAN, commercial traveller, aged about 37 years, who was found dead at the above address on the previous day with a gun shot wound in his breast. Mr William Lee was Foreman of the Jury, and the body having been viewed, MRS BESSIE SPEARMAN, the widow, who appeared deeply affected, gave evidence of identification. Her husband had been suffering from natural wounds in his legs and feet of late. He had been under the care of Dr Alfred Perkins, but previously was treated in the Hospital. He suffered much pain and at times was greatly depressed. She last saw him alive at a quarter past eleven on the previous morning, when she left him in fairly good spirits at the corner of Queen-street. She promised to meet him at quarter-past twelve, but in the meantime he appears to have gone home and sent her little boy to her with a note asking her to come home. She went home at once and found her husband on his bed undressed. He was just breathing. She saw a lot of blood on his neck and breast and immediately called Mrs Gunson, a neighbour, but he was dead when she came in. She did not see a pistol or revolver near her husband. Dr Perkins was sent for, but was not at home and Dr Thomas came.
The Coroner: Has your husband ever threatened to commit suicide?
Witness: He has often said when in pain it would be better out of the word than in it.
Mr Howard (a Juror): What was the state of his mind?
Witness: He seemed strange at times.
Madge Gunson, wife of Robert William Gunson, of 12, Park-road, said she was called by MRS SPEARMAN at half-past twelve, and on going into the house she found the deceased lying on his back on his bed. His shirt front was open, and there was blood all over his chest. She felt his pulse and found that he was dead. Witness ran for a doctor. She last saw him alive on Monday night. She knew he suffered from bad legs and feet. He seemed depressed at times. He was in dreadful pain on Sunday.
Dr J. Raglan Thomas said he was called on Tuesday just before one o'clock, and on arrival at the house he found the deceased lying on the bed dead. There was a small round blackened wound on his left breast. He was lying on his back and witness found a revolver under him. Five chambers were loaded and one had recently been fired. He considered death was due to the discharge of the weapon into the breast.
MRS SPEARMAN re-called, said she did not know that her husband had a revolver in his possession. She produced a note which the deceased let her boy have to give to her. It was written on a scrap of blue paper in pencil and the words could hardly be deciphered. It read as follows:- "Have met party, but can manage here if you come."
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 3 October 1896, Issue 9126 – Gale Document No. Y3200761163
SUDDEN DEATH – Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday on the body of MR JAMES EDWARD MORRISON, retired commercial traveller, of 13, Alexandra-terrace, Bath-road. HERBERT MORRISON, son of the deceased, said that his father's health had been failing of late. On Sunday soon after 1 p.m. witness heard a fall in the bedroom, and on proceeding there he found his father on the floor bleeding profusely. Medical aid was sent for, but the deceased died before the doctor arrived. Mr A. R. Steele Perkins, surgeon, said he considered that death followed a rupture of the large aorta. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 3 October 1896, Issue 9126 – Gale Document No. Y3200761166
INQUEST AT EXMOUTH – Mr Sam Pulling Firth and the Coroner. - An Inquest was held by Mr C. E. Cox at the Albion Inn Wednesday, touching the death of MRS JANE MARY CARTER, wife of MR A. A. CARTER, accountant, and a District Councillor, who died suddenly on Monday evening. Mr S. P. Firth (who particularly requested that his name should be recorded as Sam Pulling Firth) was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and as his custom, desired to be sworn in the Scotch manner. The Coroner requested Mr Firth to hold up his right hand and to repeat the formula after him. Mr Firth held up his hand, but no words issued from his lips. Two or three times the Coroner repeated the opening phrase of the Scotch oath, but Mr Firth was silent.
The Coroner: Why don't you repeat the words after me?
Mr Firth: I'm not going to.
The Coroner: But you have expressed a wish to take the Scotch oath.
Mr Firth: Quite right.
The Coroner: Then why don't you repeat the words after me?
Mr Firth: Because I'm not going to.
The Coroner: Well, sir, I'm presiding in this court, and if you refuse to take the oath I do not know how to treat you.
Mr Firth: There is no necessity for me to repeat the words.
The Coroner, who appeared perplexed, requested the Jury to choose another Foreman, and Mr Joel Dyer was selected.
Mr Firth objected to this, and produced a type written letter which he said came from the Home Secretary saying he was acting quite right.
The Coroner then requested Mr Firth to leave the Court, saying that he would fire him for contempt, but that he would not do so.
The Inquest was then proceeded with. MR A. A. CARTER identified the body as that of his wife, who was aged 61. He last saw her alive about two o'clock on Monday at dinner, when she appeared in her usual health, and he made arrangement to bring back the Rev. Humphrey Davies t tea at 4.30. About that time he returned and heard a violent screaming. His daughter had just discovered her mother dead in her bedroom.
MISS ELIZABETH CARTER, daughter, said she found her mother dead in a chair in front of her dressing table about 4.30 on Monday.
Mrs Bricknell, of Albion-street, corroborated.
Dr Hodgson, who had made a post mortem, said deceased had died from the bursting of a large blood vessel near the heart.
A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned and the Foreman expressed the sympathy of the Jury with MR CARTER and family.

Saturday 3 October 1896, Issue 9126 – Gale Document No. Y3200761172
SCALDED TO DEATH AT ASHREIGNEY – At an Inquest at Riddlescombe, Ashreigney, it was shown that a little boy, named HARRIS, about two years of age, while playing in his mother's house fell into a crook of brine which had been set on the floor to cool. The child died from shock, consequent on the scalds, the following day. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 10 October 1896, Issue 9132 – Gale Document No. Y3200761227
SUDDEN DEATH – Mr H. W. Gould, the Deputy Coroner for the City, will held an Inquest on Monday on the body of an old woman named PARKYN, of Paris-street, who fell down dead in Summerland Crescent this morning.

Saturday 10 October 1896, Issue 9132 – Gale Document No. Y3200761228
THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF A CREDITONIAN – Singular Case of Poisoning. An Open Verdict.
The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning on the body of GEORGE SPEAR, aged 22 years, who died at that institution on Thursday last under mysterious circumstances as reported in last evening's Post. Mr F. Denham was Foreman of the Jury.
ELIZABETH ANN LUXTON, wife of SAMUEL LUXTON, a farm labourer, of 6, Duke-court, Crediton, identified the deceased as that of her brother, formerly a gardener, but who had lately been in the Navy and stationed on H.M.S. Lion at Devonport. He came to Crediton on furlough on the 21st August and intended to stay with witness for two days. He was then apparently in good health, and did not complain of anything. On the Sunday, the last day of his visit, the deceased went to see his father, and on returning he said he felt very unwell. Witness asked him what was the matter and he said there was something burning in his stomach. He also said he had picked up an apple near Fordton and he had been unwell ever since he had eaten it. He thought there must have been something in it. At his request witness gave him a cup of milk and after he had taken it he vomited. He suffered great pain. He subsequently left the house to go to the Station to return to Devonport but a young sailor named Lane took him to Dr Campbell who gave him some medicine and ordered him to bed. He was consequently put to bed in witness's house and remained there until he was conveyed to the Hospital on the 1st October. He continued taking the medicine prescribed by Dr Campbell but none other. He was always in his right mind. He entered the Navy as a sailor boy and appeared fond of the Navy. He had no complaint against him. He joined the Navy on the 27th May last.
By the Coroner: Deceased said he did not discover anything distasteful until after he had eaten the apple.
By a Juror: There might have been a wasp in the apple.
Several Jurors expressed the opinion that the deceased might possibly have been stung.
Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon, said the deceased was admitted into the hospital on the 1st October. He was very emaciated and complained of a difficulty in breathing and swallowing. He was put to bed but gradually got worse. Some ulceration could be seen far back in his throat. He died on Thursday last. Witness had since made an examination of the of the body. There were three ulcerated strictures of the oesophagus, a large ulcer in the stomach, ulceration about the lungs, intense inflammation extending into the lungs. In witnesses opinion the cause of death was poisoning by corrosive acid.
The Coroner: Do you think, as some of the Jury think, that it might have been produced by deceased swallowing an insect in the apple? - No, sir.
The acid might have been in the apple? - I do not see how it could have been.
The Jury returned an open verdict to the effect that the deceased died from corrosive poisoning, but how or by whom it was administered it was impossible to tell.

Saturday 17 October 1896, Issue 9138 – Gale Document No. Y3200761238
INQUEST AT TOPSHAM – An Inquest was held by Mr Burrow on Monday at the Salutation Inn, Topsham, on the body of JOHN FRANK SWAINE, age 33. Mr May, a Juryman, asked why the Inquest had been held as the deceased had been ill for some time. Mr Burrow said that if the Coroner thought the case ought to be inquired into it was his duty to hold an Inquest, and without the sanction of the Jurymen. JOHN SWAINE, father of the deceased, stated that his son worked as a mason. He was, on the 16th of September in last year, painting a house in Topsham, and whilst standing on a ladder he was seized with a fit. William Thomas, a bootmaker, said he saw the deceased standing on the ladder. The deceased was all right when he saw him, but witness had not been in his house long when he heard somebody shout out "Run for a doctor." Witness went out and saw the deceased lying on his back. He was carried into his house and Dr Frood sent for. LEWIS SWAINE, brother, said he was at the time working with the deceased. Witness went into his house, and on coming out found him lying on the ground in a fit. He had apparently fallen from the ladder on to his back. Dr Frood said when he was called he was just recovering from a fit. The cause of death was the fall which brought on paralysis which caused death. He had attended the deceased for similar accidents. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

THE SUDDEN DEATH AT EXETER – Sequel to an Exeter Fire. – In the absence of the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper), Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court on Monday on the body of MARY ANN PARKYN, a widow, aged 63 years, of 26, Paris-street, who died suddenly on Friday night. ELIZA PARKIN, daughter, residing with the deceased, stated that at five o'clock on Friday evening she went out, leaving her mother at home in her usual health and spirits, and on going home at half-past five she found her mother sitting in a chair in a dying state, in the presence of her sister, who had sent for her. She died half an hour afterwards. Her mother had at times been attended by Dr J. Mackeith for attacks of faintness. Replying to al Juror witness said her mother was the person who was rescued by means of a fire escape from a fire in Summerland-crescent about two years ago. She had been worse in her attacks since that. BESSIE FAWDEN, wife of a forage dealer, of Summerland-street, and the sister of the last witness, stated that her mother sent her grandchild for her as she was ill, and on going to her house she found the deceased sitting in a chair in an unconscious condition. She died soon afterwards. Dr J. Mackkeith said he was sent for to go and see the deceased and on arrival at the house found her sitting in the arm-chair quite dead. He had attended her off and on for the past three years. She suffered from a weak heart. In his opinion the cause of death was syncope. The fact of a person having been rescued from a fire would affect a weak heart, through the nervous system. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 24 October 1896, Issue 9144 – Gale Document No. Y3200761292
INQUEST AT TORQUAY – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at Torquay on Tuesday on the body of WM. EDWARD AMISS, a master house decorator and lodging-house keeper, of Belgrave-terrace. It was stated that on Sunday morning he fell down in the kitchen after carrying a box of coals and died about five minutes afterwards. The widow of the deceased complained of the conduct of Dr Richardson, who conducted a post mortem examination. She said that he entered the house without knocking and abruptly asked to see the body, and afterwards requested her and her mother to lift the body out of the coffin. She did not know he was coming. The undertaker (Mr Hawkin) also complained. P.C. Partridge said he gave the widow notice of the examination. Dr Richardson denied the allegations and said he was most kind, and replaced the flowers on the body. Nothing was prepared, and he had to call in a cabman to assist him. The Coroner said the doctor was not to blame and that Dr Richardson was well known for his kindness. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 31 October 1896, Issue 9150 – Gale Document No. Y3200761316
BARNSTAPLE – Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Tawstock on Tuesday touching the death of SIBELLA YOUNG, widow, aged 85, who resided in a cottage by herself and was found dead on Monday. Deceased was subjected to fits and Mr T. Copp, a farmer, who entered the house through the bedroom window, because deceased had not been seen, stated that he saw her dead at the bottom of the stairs in such a position that he considered she had fallen down. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 7 November 1896, Issue 9156 – Gale Document No. Y3200761377
SUICIDE OF A BRIDEGROOM AT BARNSTAPLE – A very sad case of suicide was investigated by a Jury presided over by Mr Coroner Brougham at Barnstaple yesterday. The Inquiry was as to the death of AMOS TAMLYN, farm labourer, forty years of age, whose body had been found in the river Bray at Challacombe. Evidence was given that deceased was about to be married. Another labour named Anthony Leworthy said deceased told him the wedding was to come off on Saturday, and that he had saved £38. Witness added that deceased seemed strange at the time, and a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 7 November 1896, Issue 9156 – Gale Document No. Y3200761378
SAD DEATH OF A BROADCLYST WOMAN – Inquest at Exeter Hospital. - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this morning on the body of MARY ANN RICHARDS, aged 27, of Jarvishayes, Broadclyst, who died at the Institution on Wednesday evening. The husband, EDWIN JOHN RICHARDS a farm labourer who was much affected, stated that a fortnight ago today he found his wife, who was enceinte lying on the floor of the kitchen of his house with a broken leg, and she said she had slipped down. He went for her mother, who lived at Dog, and with her assistance lifted his wife from the floor. Dr Somer came and dressed the limb, and on his advice she was re moved to the Hospital in a trap. Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon, said the deceased was admitted with a fracture of the right leg, and she was also suffering from cystitis owing to her condition. She was treated, but did not progress very favourably, showing signs of constitutional disease. She became suddenly worse and died on Wednesday evening. Witness had made a post mortem examination and had come to the conclusion that the child had been dead some weeks. The primary cause of death was cystitis, which was unconnected with the accident. The secondary cause of death was suppurative nephritis. The death was a natural one and unconnected with the injuries she sustained by the fall. Mr W. Perriam questioned the necessity for the holding of an Inquest, but the Coroner pointed out that without the Inquest they would not have been able to have found out whether the death was natural. or accidental, and Mr Andrew admitted that the accident had complicated matters. If the deceased had not met with the accident an Inquest might not have been held. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 14 November 1896, Issue 9162 – Gale Document No. Y3200761391
BARNSTAPLE – Inquest. - On Wednesday Mr Coroner Incledon Bencraft and a Jury held an Inquest on the body of LOUISA BARTLETT, aged 57, of Vicarage-street. Deceased was picked up in her back kitchen, she having fallen and received a cut in the head, from which blood was flowing. The deceased's husband, an old man of 80 years, who was in bed, got out and picked her up and placed her in a chair beside the fire. Thinking she had fallen asleep he returned to bed. He allowed her to remain in the chair until the next day when a neighbour and doctor were sent for. She was then put to bed and died on Tuesday. The evidence showed that the cause of death was haemorrhage in the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORQUAY – Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday on the body of ALFRED BOSWELL, 39, coachman, in the employ of the Hon. Evelyn Cubitt, of Lyn Court, who, it is thought, accidentally drowned himself in a tank on Monday morning. It appears that deceased, whilst repairing the ball cock of the cistern, slipped and fell in, drowning himself. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 28 November 1896, Issue 9174 – Gale Document No. Y3200761487
INQUEST ON AN EXETER MAN – At the Inquest at Newport on Wednesday on the body of JOSEPH SERPENTELLI, foreman waggon examiner on the Great Western Railway, who was knocked down by an engine and fatally injured, Frederick William Constant, fireman, said his engine was coming out of Waterloo Junction and it struck something, which went against the retaining wall of the higher line. Witness got off the locomotive and found deceased lying close to the wall, unconscious. A verdict of "Accidentally Killed" was returned.

Saturday 28 November 1896, Issue 9174 – Gale Document No. Y3200761467
At the Inquest yesterday, relative to the death of RICHARD LEAVERS, mason, who fell dead at Dartmouth, Dr A. K. Crossfield attributed death to failure of the heart's action, accelerated by the cold wether. Deceased when brought to his surgery was stone cold.

Saturday 5 December 1896, Issue 9180 – Gale Document No. Y3200761528
EXMOUTH – AT the Holly Tree Inn, Withycombe Raleigh today Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest on the body of MARY ANN ELIZABETH HART, who was drowned the previous day. Mr Taylor was chosen Foreman of the Jury. PETER HART, brother, aged 11 years, said deceased was 9 years old last April. After returning from school yesterday deceased and another girl named Lizzie Mortimer, witness and his brother Tom, and Dorah Gilliland proceeded to the house of Mr Ward, farmer. A plank bridging a small stream known as the Bradham Brook lay in their way. Witness in returning carried or assisted across Gilliland and his brother and told deceased to wait until he could return to help her. Deceased, however, attempted to cross by herself. Witness heard a splash, and on looking around saw deceased being carried down the stream. He shouted to her to try and clutch a stake which lay in her course, but her hands slipped and deceased passed into a pool about six foot deep. After hearing further evidence, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased was Accidentally Drowned, no blame attaching to anyone. They also expressed their sympathy with deceased's parents, to whom they gave their fees, and recommended that the plank should be made smooth, it being supposed that the deceased tripped over a transverse piece of wood in the centre. Mr Ward promised to comply with the Jury's recommendation.

Saturday 5 December 1896, Issue 9180 – Gale Document No. Y3200761529
An Inquest was held at Ballaford Cottages, Sandford, on Tuesday on the body of FANNY TURNER, wife of JAMES TURNER, a farm labourer who died suddenly. The medical evidence showed that death was due to syncope and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 5 December 1896, Issue 9180 – Gale Document No. Y3200761516
INQUESTS AT EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court on Tuesday by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of WILLIAM GLIDDON, aged 7, the illegitimate child of JESSIE GLIDDON, of Ewing's-lane, who found the deceased dead on Monday morning about six o'clock. On the previous night she gave him a liquorice powder, but she did not know where she obtained it. The child had been insured, but she had not paid anything lately. She did not know what office it was insured. in. The Coroner: You don't seem to know anything. – A Juryman: Were you sober on Sunday night? Witness: Yes, sir. Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said the cause of death was acute inflammation. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

The Coroner held another Inquest on Tuesday at 10, St. Sidwell-avenue, on the body of CECIL WILLIAM HEAL, aged six months, son of MR SAMUEL HEAL. Early on Sunday morning the mother was awakened by the child screaming and shortly afterwards he died. Mr J. Mackeith said he could not definitely ascertain the cause of death which was probably due to a spasm of a wind pipe. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 12 December 1896, Issue 9186 – Gale Document No. Y3200761545
INQUEST IN EXETER – Mr Coroner Hooper held an Inquest at 45, Longbrook-street, Exeter, on Tuesday on the body of LOUISA DOWNING WILLS, aged 34, wife of MR WILLS, an employee at the Theatre, of 45 Longbrook-street, and who died suddenly on Sunday morning. After evidence had been given a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 12 December 1896, Issue 9186 – Gale Document No. Y3200761572
INQUEST – An Inquest was held this morning at Sun Inn,. Sun-street, by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of IVY BOND, aged 9 months, daughter of MR and MRS BOND, of the Sun Inn. MRS BOND deposed that she found the child, which had lately suffered from the measles, dead in its cradle the previous morning. Dr Brash said death was due to convulsions and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 19 December 1896, Issue 9192 – Gale Document No. Y3200761589
INQUEST – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Parade Room, Police Court on Tuesday on the body of GEORGE EDWARD ROSE, aged 13 months, the child of a tailor of 5, Prospect-cottages, Bath-road, and which died suddenly on Monday morning. SARAH EMMA ROSE, mother of the deceased, said the child had had the measles, for which she had not had a medical man, but obtained medicine from a chemist. Witness found him dead about six o'clock on Monday morning. Mr T. Duncan, surgeon, said he examined the body and considered there had been some brain trouble, a convulsion following. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 26 December 1896, Issue 9197 – Gale Document No. Y3200761632
TEIGNMOUTH FIRE – Inquest on the Victim. Alleged Illegality by the "Express." Censure by the Coroner. Singular Revelations.
Mr S. Hacker (County Coroner) held an Inquest at Mr McBryde's London Hotel, Teignmouth, on Thursday on the body of ELIZABETH YALLAND, wife of GEORGE YALLAND, head brewer to Mr Campbell ward, owner of the brewery and mineral water works, Mere-lane, Teignmouth, and who met with a shocking death on the previous morning by being burned in a fire at her house adjoining the brewery, as reported in our issue of last evening.
At the outset of the inquiry the Coroner referred to the case and said the Jury would have carefully to look into the circumstances and to say whether death was due to burning, and if so whether it was accidental or whether there was any reason for supposing that the occurrence was in any way consequent upon any person's conduct or neglect.
The Jury then proceeded to view the body, but before doing so
The Coroner said: There is just one thing I want to say to you before leaving, and that is this: I am sorry to have to remark it because I always find that the Press has a real respect for the freedom which they have in this country, and abide by what they know is their legal position; but now I find that the Devon Evening Express – it is right that I should mention it – has published a verbatim account of an interview with a witness, a principal witness, who will have to give evidence before you at this Inquest. As soon as this death occurred the law required an Inquest, and it is then that a judicial proceeding is pending. You , as a Jury, have to be unbiased, and, looking to the circumstances, give your verdict. It is, therefore, very wrong that any witness who is to give evidence in this public inquiry should be interviewed and a verbatim report of the interview published. It is illegal, and the Press as a rule know that and respect those conditions, because it is subversive of justice that anyone should interview a witness who is to give evidence at a public Inquiry, before that Inquiry is held. As a rule, I say, the Press know that, and I am glad to say that all journals of high-class respect it, and I am very much surprised, and regret very much that the paper I refer to on this occasion has forgotten it. I don't wish to make any severe comment upon it, but it seems to me that a paper of any standing would be ashamed to take such a course. The usual plan in such a case is to put in a short paragraph of what has occurred and say that an Inquest will be held. That is what respectable journals do; but this is not legitimate journalism. It is, as I say, illegal; and although I shall not put the law into motion, it is a question or not whether the case ought not to go before a higher authority. I, personally, shall do this. If such a thing is repeated I shall refuse, in my discretion, to allow the representative of that paper to be present at the Inquiry. I think it my duty, as a public officer, in the interests of the public, that I should make these remarks.
The Jury then proceed to view the remains, and on returning
GEORGE YALLAND, of 'Myrtle Cottage', Maer-lane, said he understood when he married the deceased as a widow in August last that she was 58 years of age, but her brother had informed him that she was 67. She had been suffering from a bad leg, and witness had also been unwell. On the night proceeding the fire they went to bed as usual, and about one o'clock in the morning the deceased went over to the fireplace to rub some lotion into her leg. Witness went to sleep again, but some time afterwards was awakened by the smell of smoke. He then saw his wife lying on the floor surrounded by flames. He jumped out of bed and called to her, but she made no answer. He pulled all the clothes off the bed and threw them over her to put out the flames which he then thought he had done. He could not stop in the room owing to the smoke. He sent his grand-daughter who lived with them for the police, and when they came they tried to re-enter the room, but could not on account of the smoke and fire. Witness afterwards went to the infirmary. He did not alarm the neighbours because he had none, but he sent his grand-daughter to ring the bell of the nearest house. He was insured against fire, but he did not know whether his wife was.
ROSA YALLAND, grand daughter of the last witness, proved giving the alarm to
P.C. Sanders, who said he was on his beat at the time. When he got to the house he tried to enter the bedroom, but could not owing to the smoke and fire. He had no idea that there was a woman in the room and YALLAND did not tell him at first. Witness went to the Captain of the Fire Brigade and on his return the husband told him that his wife was in the bedroom and that he expected she was dead. They made another effort to get into the bedroom, but failed, and witness afterwards placed the ladder against the house and looking into the bedroom saw the woman lying on the floor in a mass of flames, everything having been burned off her. Eventually the flooring gave way and the flames being extinguished the charred remains of the woman were found in the debris. the remains were removed to the Mortuary.
Mr Drake, captain of the Fire Brigade, corroborated.
Dr Johnson said death was due to burning, MRS YALLAND had been suffering from eczema, and was naturally weak.
Mr J. H. Searle, bootmaker, of North Bridge, Exeter, identified the body as that of his sister.
The Coroner: What is the meaning of this marriage certificate; have you seen it? - Witness: Yes.
She is here described as ELIZA SUSANNAH GOSS. Her name before she was married to YALLAND was Hill, and she was the widow of GEORGE HILL, of Underhill Park, Lympstone.
Will you examine the certificate? I cannot explain anything about it. GOSS was the name of her first husband, and he was foreman in a factory at Tiverton. She was married a second time to MR GEORGE HILL, of Lympstone. I was present at St. David's Church when she was married.
The Coroner (to MR YALLAND). Who gave the information for the marriage certificate? YALLAND: We both were there.
Who informed the clergyman that she was ELIZA SUSANNAH GOSS, and that she was a widow? - Deceased informed the minister that she was called GOSS, and I never knew she was married a second time. I understood that I was her second husband. She never mentioned the name of HILL to me.
Mr Searle explained that the only reason he could give was that the deceased did not get on very well with HILL and that she left him after three or four months.
The Coroner briefly summed up, remarking that it was curious that YALLAND did not mention to the policeman the first time that his wife was in the burning room.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 26 December 1896, Issue 9197 – Gale Document No. Y3200761641
BUDLEIGH SALTERTON – Neglect. – At the Inquest on the body of the six-weeks old illegitimate child of EMILY ALFORD, of Chapel-street, a verdict of "Death from Malnutrition aggravated by exposure, neglect, and improper treatment" was returned.

COLYTON – Inquest. – An Inquest was held on Tuesday by Mr C. E. Cox on the body of WILLIAM TUCKER, aged 81. Deceased was a retired farmer and resided at Colyton. He went to bed the night previous to his death somewhat the worse for liquor. Without divesting himself of his clothes he laid down on the bed and fell asleep. When Mr Fry went to his bedroom the next morning he found deceased lying on the bed quite dead. Dr Sinclair gave his opinion that death was due to failure of the heart's action, which was caused by excessive drinking and exposure to the cold. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 26 December 1896, Issue 9197 – Gale Document No. Y3200761620
Inquests – An Inquest was held on Tuesday at 28 Friars Walk by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of ARTHUR EDWARD BROWNE, aged 64, retired. It appeared that the deceased had suffered for some time from bronchitis, but had not recently been under medical treatment. Mr Farrant, junr., surgeon said he examined the body and considered that death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Mr Hooper held another Inquest at No. 2, Little Silver, St. David's, in the afternoon, on the body of JOHN FORD GANNICLIFFT, Aged 58, who died suddenly on Sunday night. Mr W. G. Hoskins was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The widow gave evidence to the effect that deceased had been indisposed for a fortnight, but had continued at work. He went to bed about 8.30 on Sunday evening, and on witness taking him some water about 10.30 he said "Oh! my God," breathed three times, and expired. Mr Bremner, surgeon, said death was due to failure of the heart's action, probably from heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned, and the Jury expressed their sympathy with the widow.

Tuesday 5 January 1897, Issue 9205 – Gale Document Y3200761678
Inquest – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at 4, Silver-lane, Blackboy-road, this morning on the body of ELIZABETH BARTLETT, aged three months, who was found dead in bed on Sunday morning. the Jury returned a verdict of death from "Natural Causes."

Wednesday 6 January 1897, Issue 9206 – Gale Document No. Y3200761712
THE DEATH OF MR W. B. CARTER – Inquest, This Afternoon. – The Inquest on the late MR WILLIAM BRAUND CARTER, Surveyor of Taxes at Exeter and a well-known cricketer, whose death we announced on Tuesday, was held at Frankfort Villa, Union-road, before Mr Coroner Hooper. MR F. B. CARTER, stationmaster at Lincoln, identified the body as that of his brother, aged 51. Mr Eustace Milton Ford, solicitor of Exeter, said he, in company with his brother, the deceased, and others, was shooting at Stoke Canon. About quarter past one, while they were in a furze-brake, a rabbit was started and was shot at, witness thought, by a Mr Vosper. The animal went by MR B. T. Ford, who fired at it and almost immediately shouted to witness to come, as the deceased had been shot. Witness then saw that the deceased's right eye was black, and he was bleeding, but when asked whether he could see with that eye he said "Yes." He was taken to a stream where the eye was washed and the bleeding stopped, and he was conveyed to a cottage about a quarter of a mile away. Dr Puddicombe happened to be in the village, and he attended deceased before his removal home. He repeatedly said, "Do not blame poor Bertie (witness's brother). I am very sorry for him, but he could not help it." Witness asked deceased whether he had shifted his position in the brake without shouting to the other, and he replied that he could not remember, but that he thought he must have. Witness's brother took a berth on November 25th for South Africa, and left on December 16th. Witness at that time fully believed that MR CARTER would recover. Witness's brother was a good shot and very careful with the gun. Dr Roper said he found the deceased suffering from severe shock, and had six or seven shot wounds in the face, all unimportant except one, which had entered the nose under the right eye. Deceased wanted witness to remove some of the shots immediately, but in the state deceased was then in he refused. Witness found later that MR CARTER was suffering from irritation of the brain, which continued up to his death, and he also developed pneumonia. Drs. Davy and Bell were called in, but MR CARTER died on Monday. Witness made a post mortem examination and found that the shot had travelled to the base of the brain, causing meningitis, which was the cause of death. It would have been absolutely impossible to remove the shot from such a situation. The Coroner, at the conclusion, expressed his deep and heartfelt sympathy with MRS CARTER and family in their sad bereavement. He had known MR CARTR ever since he had held the office of Surveyor of Taxes, and he felt he was only expressing the feelings of all his fellow-citizens who had had transactions with him in expressing his regret at their loss. By his untimely death the Government had lost a valuable officer and the citizens an honest and straight-forward man. Mr Ford, on behalf of MR CARTER'S relatives, thanked the Coroner for his expressions, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 6 January 1897, Issue9206 – Gale Document No. Y3200761718
THE SERIOUS CHARGE AT PLYMOUTH. A Ten Hour's Inquest. Verdict of "Wilful Murder" Against Cormack and his Wife.
Early this morning the adjourned Inquest was concluded at Devonport respecting the death of JESSIE MAY OLVER, domestic servant, aged 23, who died on December 20th at the house of Edwin Alfred Cormack, who has practised in the district for several years under a diploma of Doctor of Medicine purporting to be issued by the Glasgow University, but now declared by that faculty to be spurious. Deceased was in service at Devonport, but was discharged on the 17th ultimo and was driven to Cormack's house, where she died. Mrs Cormack subsequently called on deceased's aunt and stated that deceased had met with an accident in the street. The medical evidence shewed that deceased died from peritonitis directly caused by an illegal operation. When arrested ten days ago Cormack declared that the girl persisted in going out on the 18th ult, and saw a female fortune teller at Devonport who performed the operation. Despite the lateness of the hour, the Jury – consisting of 22 of the principal tradesmen of the town – refused to adjourn, and it was not until one o'clock this morning after a hearing lasting nearly ten hours that they returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against Cormack and his wife. The wife was arrested in Court.

Thursday 7 January 1897, Issue 9207 – Gale Document No. Y3200761750
An Inquest was held at Lamerton on Wednesday on the body of RICHARD ELLIS, farmer, who committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Saturday 9 January 1897, Issue 9209 – Gale Document No. Y3200761820
A SHALDON CHILD'S DEATH. Inquest at Teignmouth. The Mortuary: "A Disgrace." - An Inquest was held at the London Hotel, Teignmouth, this morning by Mr Coroner S. Hacker on the body of the thirteen-days' old male child of CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH BUSH, occupying one room in a house at Dagmar-street, Shaldon. The mother of the child said she was a widow of a sailor. The child had been neither christened nor registered. It was born a fortnight ago yesterday. Her husband was drowned eight years ago and she had two children when he was alive. There had been nothing the matter with the child when born, and seemed to get on all right. She went to bed with the baby at nine o'clock on Thursday and was awakened by its crying at two and four o'clock. It was all right about half-past six. About half-past eight she looked at the child and was frightened at its looks, and called Mrs Bluett's girl to take the child to her mother (the landlady) to see what was the matter with it, and when she brought it down again it was dead. She thought it might have been dying, because she heard a noise in the throat. The baby, when she woke up, was some little way below the bed-clothes. She had two blankets doubled, a sheet, and quilt. She could not think what caused the child's death. – The Coroner: But if you have a child lying close to you under two blankets and a quilt up over its head, would you not expect that it was enough to prevent the child breathing? - No; I always covered it up, it seemed so delicate and small. She had had no other children since her husband died. Of her two other children one died when a few months old. She did not know what it died of or whether there was an Inquest on it as her sister had charge of it, and witness was ill. That was when she was living at Sidmouth. Susan Tothill, nurse, proved attending the child, which was very small, but seemed well. Dr Johnson said the child was very puny and ill-nourished. The brain was healthy but slightly congested, and the heart and lungs were much congested, the right side of the heart being distended with blood. The abdominal organs were also congested. In his opinion death was due to suffocation, but how caused he could not say. Dr Johnson said there was one matter which he should like to bring forward, and that was that he wished to condemn in the strongest terms possible the very poor accommodation afforded to medical men of the town for investigating matters of this kind. There was a building close to the Police Station, and had more the appearance of a dungeon than a mortuary. Medical men were dependent entirely on the kindness of the officers at the Police station for the provision of water, washing materials and towels and he thought it was a disgrace to the town that the Local Board had failed to take action in the matter. (Hear, hear.) - Robert Bluett, landlord of the house in which MRS BUSH lives, said she took every care of the child, and the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the child died from accidental suffocation, adding the following rider:- "The Jury consider that the disgraceful condition of the building used a s a public mortuary, and the fact that the shed is badly lighted, unclean, and unhealthy, is a standing disgrace to Teignmouth and the reputation of its Council, and urge upon that body to take immediate steps to provide a suitable building for holding post-mortem examinations."

Wednesday 13 January 1897, Issue 9212 – Gale Document No. Y3200761871
SUICIDE AT BARNSTAPLE - The wife of an army pensioner named WILLIAM BRAYLEY, of Trinity-place, Barnstaple, was yesterday found hanging by a small cord in the kitchen of her residence. It appears that her son, aged 15, a telegraph messenger, left to go to his work and on returning at four o'clock found his mother suspended from a nail in the wall. The woman was not dead and the boy cut her down and fetched Dr Penny, but despite all efforts the woman died two hours later.
THE INQUEST – Mr Coroner Bencraft held the Inquest this afternoon at the Infirmary. It was stated that deceased was only 46 years old. The son said he found his mother hanging by a rope to a nail. He cut her down, and then she was not dead. He sent for Dr Penny, who artificially tried to restore her, but she died two hours afterwards. Deceased was not sober. She started drinking on New Year's day. He fetched his father from the Exeter Inn. Witness had had to get his own dinner every day for a week past. The husband of the deceased said he gave deceased the black eye she had owing to a quarrel between them. She had been drinking that day, and he found fault with her. Otherwise they lived happily together. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Thursday 14 January 1897 Issue 9213 – Gale Document No. Y3200761903
THE SOMERSET TRAGEDY. Accused a Crediton Man. - The District Coroner (Mr T. Foster Barham) held an Inquest today on the bodies of the murdered woman ELIZABETH ROACH and her infant daughter JESSIE, the victims of the North Petherton tragedy. The alleged perpetrator of the crime, CHARLES ROACH, is a native of Crediton. His parents now live a short distance down the line towards Yeoford, from Crediton Station. On Tuesday morning they received a letter from their son, and later in the day they received a telegram requesting them to come at once.

KINGSBRIDGE MAN'S DEATH – Shocking State of Things. - Mr Sidney Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest respecting the death of JOHN ENDACOTT, aged 55, farmer, of Bowcombe, who was found dead in bed on Monday. GEO. ENDACOTT, his brother, said deceased had lived alone at Bowcombe Farm about three years. Mary Priter, married woman, living at Bowcombe Cottage, said she used to do the washing for deceased. The house was dirty and untidy. Witness went for the clothes to wash as usual on Monday morning. She and a boy named Griffin broke a pane of glass, and the lad go t in and opened the door. Deceased's bedroom door was bolted from the inside. She called a neighbour and they sent the boy for the police. Dr W. H. Webb, who made a post-mortem examination, said he found deceased had fatty degeneration of the heart. He was of opinion that the cause of death was syncope. There were a lot of rats in the house, three being found dead in the next room. He thought it possible the deceased had excited himself in trying to kill the rats prior to going to bed. The house was in a wretched condition. In reply to the Coroner, Dr Webb said he thought it was a public disgrace to Kingsbridge that there was no public mortuary. P.S. Howard said it looked as if the house had not been swept for years. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 16 January 1897, Issue 9215 – Gale Document No. Y3200761971
DAWLISH - THE DEATH OF ME SAWDYE - At the Inquest last evening on the body of the late MR W. H. SAWDYE, of 11, Priory-terrace, Dr F. M. Cann said death was due to the rupture of a large blood vessel near the heart, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Monday 18 January 1897, Issue 9216 – Gale Document No. Y3200761990
DROWNED AT EXMOUTH – The body of MR HERMAN STEPHEN WHITE, aged 60, a basket maker living in South-street, was found by Mr Type, the porter to the Steam Ferry Company, about 7.30 yesterday morning, floating near the steps in the dock entrance.
The Inquest was held by Mr Coroner C. E. Cox this morning at the Rolle Hotel, Mr Rooke being chosen Foreman.
EMILY ANN NORTHCOTE, daughter of the deceased, said her father had not been like he was before the death of his wife. He took more to drink, and did not know what he was saying or doing. He was very low spirited at times, but his health was very good otherwise. On Saturday he went out about eight o'clock to go to the Builders' Arms, and arrived home about 11.30, and witness thought he went to bed, hearing nothing further until informed of his death on Sunday morning. Mr Rooke: Has he ever tried to commit suicide before? - Witness: No, but about nine months ago he drank a little too much and I found him unconscious on the sofa. His father committed suicide.
FREDERICK NORTHCOTE, husband of the last witness, said as defendant was in drink on Saturday night witness advised him not to go out, but he went, and returned about 11.30. Witness did not hear him go out again. He felt sure that deceased must have committed suicide. About twelve months ago witness topped up with him for two nights, when he said he should like to die.
P.C. Richards said he saw the deceased about five o'clock on Sunday morning at the Docks. In the course of a conversation witness remarked that it was very unusual to see him down there at that time of the morning. The deceased replied that he had had a little too much the previous night and could not sleep, so he thought he would take a walk, adding that he should return and make a cup of tea. Deceased said he was going down to see if there were any herrings in, but witness told him the boats were not in. Witness walked so far as the sea wall with him.
Andrew Type gave evidence as to finding the body and as to efforts made to resuscitate animation.
William Hocking deposed to being called by the last witness to help him in pulling the deceased out of the water.
Dr Cock said he was called to go to the Docks, where he saw the deceased, who was quite dead. He had probably been dead about an hour.
P.S. Dymond said about nine months ago deceased's daughter asked him to see her father, who seemed rather eccentric. A doctor was sent for, but deceased continued to be like it for about a week or two.
The Jury after a consultation in private returned a verdict of "Found Drowned," there being no evidence to show how deceased came into the water.

Monday 18 January 1897, Issue 9216 – Gale Document No. Y3200761981
BURRATOR EXPLOSION – The Inquest. – At the Tavistock Cottage Hospital today, Mr R. R. Rodd, Deputy Coroner, opened an Inquest on the body of JOHN KNOTT, aged 19, who was killed by an explosion of dynamite at the Burrator Water Works on the 6th instant, whilst employed as a labourer under the Plymouth Corporation. WILLIAM PHILLIPS, labourer, and brother-in-law of the deceased, who was working with him at the time of the occurrence, gave evidence of identification, and the Inquiry was adjourned for a week, in order that the matter might be reported to the Home Office in accordance with the requirements of the Explosives' Act.

Monday 18 January 1897, Issue 9216 – Gale Document No. Y3200761986
TORQUAY – At the Inquest on GEORGE ISAACS, gardener, of Cavern-road, who was found dead in bed on Saturday morning by the side of his wife, a verdict of Death from Natural Causes was returned. Deceased had been suffering from Bright's disease, and had been attended by Dr Eales.

Wednesday 20 January 1897, Issue 9218 – Gale Document No. Y3200762033
Sudden Death at Newton – WILLIAM PETHRICK, aged 73, a native of West Ogwell, a village near Newton Abbot, died suddenly in Newton Workhouse this morning. An Inquest will be held.

Thursday 21 January 1897, Issue 9219 – Gale Document No. Y3200762059

INQUEST – An Inquest was held at the Anchor Inn, Exe Island, on Wednesday, by Mr H. W. Hooper on the body of JOHN CANN, aged 62, butcher, of Anchor-lane, who died on Monday. Mr Alfred S. Perkins, surgeon, who was called to see the deceased, attributed death to spasms of the heart, brought on probably by the intense cold which prevailed at the time. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 23 January 1897, Issue 9221 – Gale Document No. Y3200762131
INQUEST – The City Corone3r (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at No. 1, Little Silver, this morning on the body of JOHN MARDON, aged 79, a retired guard of the Great Western Railway Company, who died suddenly on Thursday. Mr W. G. Hoskins was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mary Milford, niece of the deceased, and wife of John Milford, joiner, of 159, Cowick-street, said the deceased was married and was 79 years of age last December. He was out walking n Wednesday evening, and when she saw him the following morning at nine o'clock he was in an unconscious condition and dying. A doctor was sent for, but deceased expired at half-past one. He had not been under medical treatment for some time past. Mr J. Moone, surgeon of Exeter, said he had known the deceased for over sixteen years. Witness was called on Thursday morning and found deceased dying. He was a very eccentric man. Death was due to apoplexy. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Wednesday 27 January 1897, Issue 9224 – Gale Document No. Y3200762199
PAIGNTON – Inquest. – At the Town Hall on Tuesday an Inquest was held on the body of MRS MARGARET WHITE, aged 59, who died on Sunday from the effects of a scald. The evidence went to show that deceased was sitting in front of a stove on which were a kettle and teapot. Deceased's grandson accidentally knocked over the teapot and some of the hot tea fell on deceased's legs. She was suffering from heart disease, the shock from the scald accelerated this, and caused death. A verdict accordingly was returned.

Thursday 28 January 1897, Issue 9225 – Gale Document No. Y3200762208
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – Inquest Today. – An Inquest was held by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) at No. 72, Paris-street, Exeter, this morning, on the body of JOHN NUTTALL, painter, of No. 2, Portland-place, Paris-street. SUSAN NUTTALL, wife of the deceased, said her husband had been out of employment for the last four months. His health was such that he had never complained. On Tuesday evening, about five o'clock, deceased was standing in the front doorway, and not answering to her all witness went and found him lying on his right side in the passage. Witness spoke to him, but he did not answer, and she called a Mr Anstey, and then Mr Duncan, surgeon. Deceased used to say that when he did die he would die suddenly. Mr Duncan, surgeon, stated that when he went to the house he found the deceased on his back in the kitchen dead. He examined the body, but found no marks of violence. He attributed death to syncope, and a verdict accordingly was returned. the Coroner sympathised with the widow in her bereavement.

Saturday 30 January 1897, Issue 9227 – Gale Document No. Y3200762279
INQUEST AT CREDITON – An Inquest was held today at the Star Inn, Crediton, by Deputy Coroner Mr F. Burrow3s, touching the death of JANE LAKE, a widow, aged 71, who died on the previous day. On the 28th December deceased fell down in her backyard and sustained a fractured thigh. Dr Campbell said the deceased died from bed sores following her injury and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Monday 1 February 1897, Issue 9228 – Gale Document No. Y3200762288
SUDDEN DEATH AT NEWTON ABBOT – Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest at the Queen's Hotel, Newton Abbot, this morning on the body of WALTER HUNT, aged 64, railway labourer, who died suddenly at his residence, 37, Station-cottages, on Saturday morning. The evidence of MRS HUNT showed that her husband was unwell on Friday and did not go to work, though he fetched his wages. On Saturday morning about five o'clock he got out of bed and shortly afterwards went back again. About 5.30 MRS HUNT awoke and heard a gurgling sound proceeding from her husband's throat. She called her neighbours, but he died almost immediately. Dr Hunt's post mortem examination shewed that deceased had suffered from fatty degeneration of the heart, and a verdict accordingly was given.

Tuesday 2 February 1897, Issue 9229 – Gale Document No. Y3200762323
KINGSWEAR – The Suicide. – An Inquest was held at the Royal Dart Hotel on Monday on the body of LIEUTENANT-COLONEL J. R. GIBBS, who shot himself. Dr J. H. Harris considered the muzzle f the revolver must have been placed in the deceased's mouth. A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Wednesday 3 February 1897, Issue 9230 – Gale Document No. Y3200762345
At an Inquest at Plymouth on Tuesday on the body of the illegitimate child of ELLEN ADAMS, single, which was found in a cupboard, the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against the mother.

Friday 5 February 1897, Issue 9232 – Gale Document No. Y3200762396
DEATH FROM LOCKJAW – Sad Case At Kingsteignton. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner held an Inquest at Kingsteignton on Thursday on the body of SABINA MALLETT, aged 38. It appeared that the deceased, who was of intemperate habits, was found by her son on the 23rd ult in an unconscious state, with her head on the front lap of the stove. He put her to bed and told his father on his return from work. Next morning he noticed a wound in her head, and that the hair was burnt. On Sunday following the husband noticed blood on the pillow, and advised deceased to see a doctor. On Monday morning Mrs Covey, a neighbour, was fetched, and found deceased partially paralysed, with her teeth set, but she afterwards was able to walk about. Dr MacLeroy was called in on Monday evening and on Tuesday morning found symptoms of lockjaw. He prescribed for her, but did not see her again, and she died the same day. The Coroner considered there had been gross carelessness on the part of the husband, who had given his evidence in an unsatisfactory manner. The Jury, however, considered the husband was not to blame, and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 8 February 1897, Issue 9234 – Gale Document No. Y3200762440
TIVERTON – Inquest. – The Borough Coroner (Mr Mackenzie) held an Inquest on Saturday at the Infirmary on the body of MARY A. MARSHALL who died suddenly on Friday. MRS MARSHALL was 53 years of age and had 15 children. Mr Michelmore said he was called to see the deceased who was unconscious when he arrived. He had made a post mortem examination, and in his opinion death was due to haemorrhage on the brain. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Wednesday 10 February 1897, Issue 9236 – Gale Document No. Y3200762505
SIDMOUTH – Inquest. - Mr C. E. Cox held an Inquest at the Commercial Hotel yesterday on the body of the daughter of ALBERT BEN SMITH. The mother said the child made a rattling noise in the throat on Monday, and a doctor was sent for. A post mortem examination made by Dr Pullin showed that death was due to suffocation. The Coroner observed that the evidence pointed to the child having been suffocated by the bed clothes. A verdict of "Accidental Death by Suffocation" was returned.

Saturday 13 February 1897, Issue 9239 – Gale Document No. Y3200762567
The adjourned Coroner's Inquiry into the cause of death of CHARLES FURZE, one of the three workmen who lost their lives by the dynamite explosion in Devonport Harbour on December 30th. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from drowning, and that no one was to blame for the accident.

Tuesday 16 February 1897, Issue 9241 – Gale Document No. Y3200762657
At the Inquest at Plymouth on Monday on the body of ALBERT JOHN ROWE, who was found dead in his bed on January 31st after a brawl with a soldier named Sage, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Sage.

Wednesday 17 February 1897, Issue 9242 – Gale Document No. Y3200762667
THE RECENT DROWNING CASE. – An Inquest was held last evening at the Ship Inn, St. Thomas, on the body of ALBERT EDWARD DAVEY, aged 8, who fell in the River Exe about a week ago. The evidence went to show that while trying to reach a stick which was in the water deceased fell in. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. The Jury called attention to the dangerous state of the bank where the boy fell in and the Coroner suggested that the Foreman (Mr Langdon) should call the attention of the District Council to the matter. The Coroner also drew attention to the need of a mortuary for the district.

Friday 19 February 1897, Issue 9244 – Gale Document No. Y3200762715
SUDDEN DEATH – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest this morning on the body of ANNA PENGELLEY, aged 73, who resided in the house of Mr Steer, baker, at 42, Paris-street. On Wednesday last the deceased was taken suddenly ill and died before the arrival of Mr J. Mackeith, surgeon, who now pronounced death to be due to cardiac syncope. A verdict of death from natural causes was returned.

Friday 20 February 1897, Issue 9245 – Gale Document No. Y3200762771
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court on Monday by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of MARY GREGORY, of Brownston's Court, Guinea-street. MARY JANE BARRINGTON, of Magdalen-street, said the deceased was her aunt, a widow, 61 years of age. Deceased was addicted to drink. Witness heard of her death on Sunday morning, being told that she fell over the stairs and killed herself. The deceased had parish pay. By a Juror: She was quite sober at 10.30 on Saturday night. Edwin Rundell, of No. 9 Brownson's-court, Guinea-street, said he saw the deceased at eleven o'clock on Saturday night, when she seemed to be intoxicated. Witness got a light and she went as far as the first landing, where she said she could go up the rest of the stairs by herself. About 7.30 the next morning witness found her at the bottom of the stairs in a sitting position. He touched her cheek and found that she was dead. Mr Bell, surgeon, said he was called by the police and found deceased on the landing opposite the last witness's bedroom dead. There were no marks of violence or bruises about her. Death was due to failure of the heart's action. By a Juror: There were no signs of her neck having been broken. The deceased had been dead probably about six hours. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." The Foreman (Mr Tucker) said that drink had nothing to do with the matter.

Tuesday 23 February 1897, Issue 9247 – Gale Document No. Y3200762816
SINGULAR DEATH AT TIVERTON – An Inquest was held at the Tiverton Infirmary on Monday evening on the body of CHARLES SMITH, 55, ostler at the Queen's Head Inn, Tiverton, who died on Saturday night. George Lewis, mason's labourer, said he heard groans in the Queen's Hotel yard, and found deceased on his back. His head was cut and bleeding. He was taken to the infirmary. On the way he said no one had knocked him down. Mr William Males, house surgeon at the infirmary, said deceased was brought to that institution on Saturday evening. Witness found a wound on the back of the head on the left side. He cleaned the wound and offered medicine, which deceased refused. Witness put an electric battery round his neck, but deceased knocked it down. Deceased seemed to have been drinking. Having left the infirmary, he became worse and witness was sent for, but death ensued about ten minutes to twelve the same night. Witness had since made a post mortem examination and had found several ribs broken and other internal injuries. The Jury found these injuries had caused death, but there was no evidence to show how they were sustained.

Tuesday 23 February 1897, Issue 9247 – Gale Document No. Y3200762824
STARCROSS DEATH – Choked by Steak. - An Inquest was held at the Courtenay Arms, Starcross, this afternoon, by Mr Burrow, junr. on the body of HENRY BICKNELL, of independent means, lodging at Larkbeare Farm, Mamhead. Deceased went into the Ship Inn at Starcross on Friday night and ordered half a pound of steak, and died while eating it. Dr Lipscomb said he found a very large piece of meat in the gullet, death being due to asphyxia. Mr Hawkins, undertaker of Dawlish, said burial could not take place until Saturday, and asked the reason for the delay in holding the Inquest. The Coroner answered that as far as the law was concerned burial could take place immediately. Mr Hawkins said he had been at Dawlish Cemetery, and was there told that forty-eight hours' notice was necessary after the issue of the Coroner's warrant for burial. The Coroner repeated that burial could take place immediately. He had nothing to do with the cemetery authorities. The reason for the delay was that he received a notification on Saturday and had to communicate with the doctor and order a post mortem. He was in attendance at Cullompton Sessions yesterday, as Magistrates' Clerk so that this was the first day on which an Inquest could be held. A verdict according to the medical evidence was returned.

Wednesday 24 February 1897, Issue 9248 – Gale Document No. Y3200762844
FATAL ACCIDENT – The lad ALFRED CURRAL, the inmate of the Deaf and Dumb Institution, who sustained severe injuries to his head by falling down a flight of stairs in the old part of the Institution on Monday, died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital last night, and an inquest will be held tomorrow.

Thursday 25 February 9249 – Gale Document No. Y3200762876
NEWTON BOY'S DEATH AT EXETER – Inquest Today. - At the Devon and Exeter Hospital today the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of ALFRED JAMES CURRELL, aged 13 years, of Newton Abbott, who died on Tuesday evening from injuries received through falling down a flight of stairs at the Deaf and Dumb Institution in Topsham-road, where he was an inmate. Mr B. P. Jones (the Superintendent of the Institution) was present during the proceedings. Mr William Godsland was Foreman of the Jury.
Annie Tryphena Wright, wife of William Wright, a labourer, of 4, Coombe-street, stated that the deceased was the son of an engine driver residing at Newton Abbot. He had been an inmate of the Deaf and Dumb Institution since last September. He was deaf but not dumb. Witness last saw him on Tuesday last, the day following the accident. She had been in the habit of visiting him. On the Monday she went to the Hospital with his mother, but the boy said nothing about the accident. By a Juror: The boy had only been deaf four years.
Mr Edwin Haines, a teacher at the Deaf and Dumb Institution, stated that on Monday morning last, just before half-past eight, and immediately after breakfast, the boys filed past him through the teachers' dining-room and up the stairs to the dormitory to finish making their beds. Witness was finishing his own breakfast in the teachers' dining-room when he heard a sound of a fall. At the same time a boy rushed into the room to say that another boy had fallen over the stairs. Witness went out and saw CURRELL lying on his side in a crouched position on the lower landing of the stairs. It was supposed that the lad fell from the top, a distance of 20 feet. When picked up the boy was found to be unconscious. There was a pool of blood on the floor, and the boy's face was covered with blood, there being also a large swelling over the right temple and the right eye. Witness called for help and reported the occurrence to Mr Jones. A doctor was sent for and the boy was attended to in the meantime. He appeared to be in great pain, and on the advice of Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, he was removed to the Hospital. His friends were telegraphed for.
By the Foreman: The accident occurred in the old part of the building, not in the new wing. So far as could be ascertained no one saw him fall. By another Juror: It was possible the boy might have been sliding down the handrail, but there was no proof of it.
Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased was admitted into that institution suffering from a severe shock, and there were signs of a fracture of the base of the skull, an severe abdominal injuries. He steadily got worse, and died on Tuesday evening. A post mortem examination was made by Mr Stevens, the assistant house surgeon, who found a rupture of the liver and spleen.
It was stated that additional protection was now being placed over the hand-rail of the baluster in the shape of an iron rail. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and attached blame to no-one.

Friday 5 March 1897, Issue 9256 – Gale Document No. Y3200763078
INQUEST AT CREDITON – An Inquest was held this afternoon at the Duck Inn, Crediton, before Mr Deputy Coroner Burrows, concerning the death of JOHN ZEAL, late a coachman in the employ of Mr H. O. Smith, solicitor, and who met with his death on Wednesday morning by the gale by the collapse of a greenhouse. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death, caused by the fall of a greenhouse."

Wednesday 10 March 1897, Issue 9260 – Gale Document No. Y3200763187
INQUESTS IN EXETER – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at No. 10, Albert-street, Newtown, this morning on the body of DOROTHY CATHERINE TURNER, aged three years today, and who died suddenly yesterday morning. Mr H. Denham was chosen Foreman of the Jury. WM. TURNER, the father, stated that last week deceased was taken with sneezing and after that an eruption came out. Up to yesterday morning she seemed to be doing well, but he was called by his wife about three o'clock that morning, and he nursed the child. He was going for a doctor about six o'clock. His wife turned the child on its face to wash her when deceased gave a scream and seemed to faint. Witness gave her a little brandy and a medical man was sent for. Mr J. A. W. Pereira, surgeon, said when he arrived yesterday he found the child dead. He considered death was due to strangulation of the bowels. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Mr H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this afternoon on the body of SARAH RATTENBURY, 56, wife of JOHN RATTENBURY, tailor. Mr Stamp was chosen Foreman of the Jury. JANE SPRAGUE, daughter of the deceased, said her mother lived at No. 5, Trinity-street. About half-past five on Monday witness was sent for because her mother was ill. Witness found her on the floor in the kitchen insensible. She sent for a doctor who said she was to be taken to the Hospital, where she died on Monday night. Deceased had complained to the neighbours of feeling pains in the head. Mr Stevens, assistant House surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased never regained consciousness after being admitted to that Institution. He made a post mortem examination and found death to be due to extensive haemorrhage on the brain. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Thursday 11 March 1897, Issue 9261 – Gale Document No. Y3200763216
SUDDEN DEATH AT DREWTEIGNTON – Inquest This Day. - Mr Coroner J. D. Prickman held an Inquest this morning at Bowden Farm, Drewsteignton, on the body of a girl named ANNIE BADCOCK, who died suddenly on Sunday last, aged 16 years. MRS JANE HOOPER, of Bowden Farm, aunt of deceased, said up to Sunday last deceased had been in good health. About quarter to seven on Sunday evening whilst washing the tea things she suddenly fell back in the kitchen and struck against a cupboard in her fall. She afterwards said "faint," but spoke nothing else and died in about ten minutes. Mr Joseph Hall Hooper, husband of the last witness, corroborated. Dr Hunt, of Chagford, said he attended deceased twelve months ago for general debility and found her heart disease. She had previously suffered from fainting fits. In his opinion she died partly from faintness and partly from the blow she received in falling. The faintness was in his opinion brought on from natural causes. He considered she died from syncope. The Jury (of whom Mr George Ellis was Foreman) returned a verdict of "Death from syncope arising from natural causes."

FATAL ACCIDENT IN EXETER – Inquest This Morning. - A fatal accident, under very sad circumstances, occurred to Master GEORGE LUXMORE STOCKER, son of MR G. STOCKER, chemist, of No. 1, East Southernhay, Exeter, on Tuesday morning.
The Inquest was held at No. 1, East Southernhay, by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) this morning. MR GEORGE STOCKER, chemist and father of the deceased, stated that his son was 11 years of age last October. His health had been good, and he returned on Tuesday about five o'clock from school and afterwards asked to go out with a schoolfellow named Harry Birdsall. The two lads went along Heavitree-road, and about half an hour afterwards they returned, the deceased crying. He said he had been knocked down by a St Bernard dog and his head ached. Witness gave him a dose of saline, after which he was put to bed. Dr Thomas was sent for, and finding the deceased unconscious went to fetch Mr C. E. Bell. Dr Davy also came and did everything to restore life by artificial respiration. Peter Slader, dairyman, of 28 Paris-street, said while in the Heavitree-road near the Workhouse gates he saw a large St. Bernard dog knock the deceased down. Witness asked him if he should drive him home. The lad appeared dazed but when they got him to the step of witness's trap deceased declined to ride, and said he would sooner sit on the seat by the Workhouse gates. The deceased did so, but when witness returned shortly afterwards the two lads were gone. Miss Emily Granger, of No. 5, Higher Summerlands, said her dog, which knocked the deceased down, was a very quiet animal. Dr. J. Raglan Thomas said he found the lad unconscious. He required immediate consultation and left the house and went to see Dr Bell, but met a messenger who told him that the boy was dead. By the Coroner's order he made a post mortem examination and discovered a fracture of the skull from which deceased died. The Coroner said the case was a very sad one and very painful to the parents, with whom he deeply sympathised in the loss of their promising lad. As to Miss Granger there was no blame to be attached to her; Miss Granger did everything in her power for the lad. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 11 March 1897, Issue 9261 – Gale Document No. Y3200763223
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held yesterday at the London Hotel, Ottery St. Mary, on the body of JOHN PRATT. The evidence showed that during the recent gale the deceased was endeavouring to close an open door when a gust of wind forced the door back and crushed the deceased.

Friday 1 March 1897, Issue 9262 – Gale Document No. Y3200763232
THE SHOCKING FATALITY IN EXETER – Inquest, This Morning. - The Inquest on the body of JAMES HILL, coachman to Lord Poltimore, who met with his death at Queen-street Station, Exeter, yesterday, under circumstances already reported, was held in the parade-room of the Police Station this morning by Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner. Mr Douglas Banfield was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and Inspector Percival watched the Inquiry on behalf of the South Western Railway. After the Jury had viewed the body in the mortuary adjoining the Station,
William Allinson was called, and said he was butler to Lord Poltimore. He identified the body as that of the head coachman, who was married and lived at the stables. He had been in Lord Poltimore's service for 33 years; was 49 years of age, and a steady, temperate man. He came into Exeter soon after eight yesterday morning with a horse, and witness did not hear anything more of him until after his death. He was wearing a long black mackintosh.
James Vincent, commercial traveller, of Parr-street, said he was on the station platform yesterday morning and saw the deceased jump from the platform and fall across the metals. A train backing into the station to take passengers for Barnstaple was upon him immediately, being only about four yard from him when he jumped, and went over his body. Witness at once reported the matter to Inspector Greening, and the officials took charge of the body. – By a Juryman: deceased would not have time to rise before the train was on him. The occurrence took place at a spot between the ticket office and the refreshment room. He could not say whether deceased slipped when he jumped or whether his foot caught in his mackintosh
William Patey, engine-driver, living at Heavitree, said he was shunting coaches at the station yesterday morning to form the 9.32 train for North Devon. A loaded carriage-truck was attached to it, and shunter Salter told witness to pull the train up to the platform. Witness saw several people standing on the platform, but did not see anyone attempt to jump down on the rails. The shunter called out for witness to stop and he felt the wheels of the engine pass over something, the fireman putting the brake immediately. They were going at the rate of seven miles an hour. - By a Juryman: The train was being shunted from the siding near the Victoria Hall, and the carriage truck was in front of the engine. He did not know at the time why Salter ordered him to stop.
Walter Salter, carriage shunter, said the carriage truck in front of the engine was for the 9.30 up train. When the train got to the down booking office witness saw a man jump off the platform. Witness shouted to him and gave the driver the stop signal, but it was too late. The carriage truck and the engine passed over the deceased. The engine and carriage truck were pulled ahead to allow of the stretcher being put down in the four-foot way. Deceased's reason for jumping appeared to be to catch the up train then waiting on the other side.
John Elworthy, coal merchant of Pinhoe, said deceased came to his house for some hay on Tuesday, and on witness telling him that he had none fit for him said he was going into Exeter on Thursday, and would meet witness on his return at half-past nine.
A Juryman said he could not understand why the deceased, who had come to Exeter on horseback to fetch a mail phaeton, should want to return by train. The Coroner pointed out that the deceased had an appointment with the last witness at half past nine. Mr Elworthy said there was a train back to Exeter just after ten, and an employee of Messrs. Standfield said deceased came there yesterday morning to fetch the phaeton, but the men being away, he promised to call again.
Mr A. S. Perkins, surgeon, said he was crossing the bridge at Queen-street yesterday morning, and seeing a small crowd on the platform went to see whether he could be of any service. He, however, found that the deceased was dead. The head and body were between the rails and the lower part towards the platform. On subsequently examining the body witness found it was nearly cut in two between the ribs and the pelvis. The spleen was badly ruptured, and death must have been instantaneous. So far as witness could see no bones were broken. Witness knew the deceased, whose hearing w3as a little defective, and he believed he was also short-sighted.
P.C. Rounsley said he searched the body and found on it a purse containing money, a watch and chain (the watch being stopped at 9.15), and a slip ring with several keys, the ring being completely mashed.
The Coroner, in summing up, said the evidence showed the case to be a very sad one. Lord Poltimore would feel the loss of a good, valuable, and faithful servant. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and Mr Allinson promised to convey the Coroner's expression of sympathy to the deceased's relatives.

Saturday 13 March 1897, Issue 9263 - Gale Document No. Y3200763285
INQUEST – An Inquest was held at the Parade Room of the Police Station this morning by Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) on the body of BESSIE BISHOP, aged about six months, daughter of JOSEPH BISHOP, constable of the City Police Force of 42, Clifton-street, St. Sidwells. MR BISHOP said that the child had been delicate since her birth, and had been attended by a medical man. About ten o'clock yesterday morning his wife took the child from the cradle and it began screaming. A medical man was sent for, but death took place before he arrived. Mr E. B. Steele Perkins, surgeon, said death was due to convulsions, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Wednesday 17 March 1897, Issue 9266 – Gale Document No. Y3200763355
THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT NORTHAM – The Inquest. - Mr J. F. Bromham, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Northam, on Tuesday evening on the body of the little child FRANCIS MAY BLACKMORE, daughter of a police constable, and who was knocked down by a bullock on Saturday. Mr S. Fulford was Foreman of the Jury. P.C. BLACKMORE said his child was two years and ten months of age. After the accident he fetched Dr Mahood from Appledore, but the child died on Sunday about twenty minutes to twelve. John Stone, labourer, living a few doors from P.C. BLACKMORE, said just after two o'clock on Saturday afternoon he was in Cross-street, Northam, and saw a bullock come round the corner. The child was in the roadway and the bullock ran against it, knocking it down. it did not try to toss the child, but ran straight on. Thomas Gover, a drover, of Bideford, stated that he was driving the bullock, which belonged to Mr Main, of Northam, from Woolfardisworthy to Northam. The bullock had come on very quietly, but witness sent a man to see if the street was clear. The child had on a red cloak. The bullock knocked the child down and then ran on.
Mr Pecherward: You say the bullock was quiet; why did you bring the other man with you? - The bullock was rather shy. - Mr Ashplant: Were there not other children about? - No. – Mr Sercombe: Have you the man from Woolfardisworthy here? - No. – Dr Mahood said he was called to see the deceased, who was suffering from shock. She had a slight abrasion on the upper lip. On Sunday he was again called by the father and found the child much worse. It was intended to perform an operation on Sunday but the child died before preparations could be made. The cause of death was haemorrhage from a ruptured blood-vessel in the skull. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and sympathy was expressed with the parents.

Saturday 20 March 1897, Issue 9269 – Gale Document No. Y3200763429
CHUDLEIGH – Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday on the body of JOHN METHERELL, who died in the Clifford Arms on Monday. The medical evidence showed that deceased had been suffering from Bright's disease and that the immediate cause of death was rupture of the heart. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

FATAL LAMP ACCIDENT – Inquest at Exeter. - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on Thursday on the body of CAROLINE BASTONE CLARKE. EMMA CLARKE, wife of HENRY CLARKE, labourer, of Dulford, in the parish of Broadhembury, said the deceased was her daughter, who was aged 22. On the 26th February witness was away from home, and about five o'clock she was sent for because the house was on fire. When she arrived home she was told that her daughter had been badly burnt. Witness saw her at a neighbour's house. She told witness that she had been trimming the lamp. Mary Ann Trickey said deceased ran across to her house with her clothes on fire. Witness at once put a damp bag around her. Witness asked her how it occurred, but she only replied, "I was trimming the lamp." The jar in which the benzoline was kept was all in pieces, and the benzoline was running on the floor. Witness could not say whether there was any fire in the grate. Mr Andrew, surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased was received into the Hospital on the 27th. There were extensive burns about both legs, and the deceased expired on Tuesday from exhaustion caused by the burns. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 22 March 1897, Issue 9270 – Gale Document No. Y3200763481
At the Inquest on the body of WILLIAM HOLLAND, labourer, of Chittlehampton, who died from the effects of a knife-cut received while assisting in the killing of a pig, a verdict of "Death from Anthrax" was returned.

Monday 22 March 1897, Issue 9270 – Gale Document No. Y3200763480
EXMOUTH – Inquest. – Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest this morning at the Rolle Hotel on the body of the male child of EDWARD BRADFORD, of Manchester Quay. The evidence showed that the child was put to bed on Saturday afternoon and on the father going to it some time afterwards he found it dead. Dr Martyn stated that death was due to congestion of the right lung, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Monday 22 March 1897, Issue 9270 – Gale Document No. Y3200763474
THE FATALITY NEAR BIDEFORD – Inquest, This Afternoon. - Mr J. H. Bromham, County Coroner held an Inquest at the Bideford Infirmary this afternoon on the body of RICHARD WICKETTS, 54, a sawyer, of Alwington, who died on Thursday night from injuries received by the falling of a tree. Mr Daniel Harvey was chosen Foreman of the Jury. MRS MORRIS, sister of the deceased, identified the body. She saw her brother shortly after he was brought to the Infirmary and had seen him daily since, being with him when he died. He left a wife and five children. Richard Pennington, carpenter, said he was working with deceased in company with a man named Daniel at Buck's Cross Copse cutting down trees for Mrs Pine-Coffin. One tree, which was close to a small lake, fell on the deceased. With the assistance of Daniel and other men, they removed the tree. In reply to the Foreman, witness said the tree was a 15-inch one, and was cut down in the usual way. There were no ropes used as the tree was not a large one. It was purely an accident. Reuben Daniel corroborated. Dr Gooding described the injuries, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 22 March 1897, Issue 9270 – Gale Document No. Y3200763478
HELE – The Railway Fatality. - At the Inquest on the body of WILLIAM SANDERS, 21, packer on the Great Western, who was run over by the 12.25 train from Tiverton Junction, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 27 March 1897, Issue 9275 – Gale Document No. Y3200763587
INQUEST – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Police Court on Monday on the body of ELSIE CASLEY, the illegitimate child of ELIZABETH CASLEY. Mr E. Glade was chosen Foreman of the Jury. ELIZABETH CASLEY, the mother, said she resided at 5, Chapple's-buildings, St. David's. On Friday last she was nursing the child when it was suddenly taken ill and died in the afternoon. Dr Brash said he was called to see the child, but by the time he arrived it was dead. To all appearances the child died from convulsions. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Saturday 27 March 1897, Issue 9275 – Gale Document No. Y3200763588
THE SUDDEN DEATH AT SAMPFORD COURTENAY – The Inquest. - Mr J. D. Prickman, (County Coroner) held an Inquest on Wednesday at the New Inn, Sampford Courtenay, on the body of JOHN WESTLAKE, aged 65, a pensioner from the Army, who was found dead in his bed at Beacon Cottage on Tuesday.
Elizabeth Medland, wife of a labourer, of Brightley, Okehampton, said deceased, who was in receipt of a pension of £1 10s. 6d. a quarter, formerly lived with her. She saw him on the 15th, when he promised to come again on the following Friday. As he did not turn up the door of his house was burst open on Tuesday. Dr Middlemist, of Okehampton, said he considered the cause of death was apoplexy. Death had occurred three or four days before, as there were signs of decomposition. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from an Apoplectic Fit arising from Natural Causes."

Monday 29 March 1897, Issue 9276 – Gale Document No. Y3200763625
SEATON – Found Drowned. – At the Inquest on the body of JOSEPH AYRES, 51, a Beer fish hawker, whose body was picked up off the beach, a verdict was returned that he was found drowned, but how he got into the water there was no evidence to show.

Tuesday 30 March 1897, Issue 9277 – Gale Document No. Y3200763658
THE STARCROSS DROWNING CASE. Inquest. – At the Stowey and Daniell Arms, Exminster, last evening Mr A. Burrow (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest inquiring into the circumstances of the death of MARY ANN CARSLAKE, aged 68, wife of LOUIS CARSLAKE, carrier, of Starcross, who was found drowned in the Exeter Canal near Turf on Saturday morning. Deceased's husband stated that he last saw his wife alive on Friday morning, when she complained of pains in the head. She often suffered in this manner and witness took no notice of it. Witness did not make any inquiry until Saturday when he found she did not return home. George Murphy, shipwright of White-street, Topsham, deposed as to finding the body of the deceased in the canal some distance from Topsham Bridge. Emma Little, a widow, of Topsham, proved seeing the deceased on Friday evening about 6 o'clock. Deceased told her that she had been to the Exeter Eye Infirmary; she was so bad in her head she did not know what to do with herself, and deceased believed she should go out of her mind. George Warner, a lad living at Topsham Locks, and P.C. Beer also gave evidence, and Mr R. S. Lipscomb , surgeon of Starcross, said death was due to drowning. The Coroner said it was remarkable that the husband, when he found his wife had not come home, did not make inquiries. He hoped it was not the custom of many people at Starcross to allow their wives to stay away from home at night without ascertaining the reason. After a short deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Wednesday 31 March 1897, Issue 9278 – Gale Document No. Y3200763679
INQUESTS IN EXETER – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper, held an Inquest at No. 10, Grant's-buildings, Sidwell-street, this morning on the body of ARTHUR FREDERICK JOSLIN, aged four days, who, according to the evidence was suffocated with the bed clothes while in bed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Suffocation."

Mr Hooper held a second Inquest at the Police Court this afternoon on the body of VIOLET ETHEL WOTTON, aged two years. MARY ANN WOTTON, mother of the deceased, said the child was suffering from measles, convulsions, and bronchitis, and died between six and seven o'clock the previous morning. Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said he was called, but by the time he arrived the child was dead. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Thursday 1 April 1897, Issue 9279 – Gale Document No. Y3200763706
SUICIDE OF A DEVONSHIRE BAILIFF – An Inquest was held at Kingsbridge on Wednesday on the body of JOHN CRANCH, aged 61, boot and shoe dealer, and high bailiff of Kingsbridge County Court. KATE ELIZABETH CRANCH said her father on Monday morning left home for his shop, saying good-bye, as usual. He had complained of his "poor head" of late, but she did not know he had any worries or troubles. Edwin Widgett, mason, Dodbrooke, deposed to forcing an entrance into deceased's shop on Monday night and finding deceased lying on the floor in a pool of blood. W. R. Beer stated that deceased told him, within the past month that he had possessed a certain amount of money belonging to the County Court, which he did not know how he could make up. Dr C. E. Baskall said there were three gashes in the throat made from left to right. Mr J. Harris Square, solicitor, deputy registrar, said that from a cursory examination he had made there was £60 or £70 due from the deceased to the County Court. Deceased was served with a judgment summons for £18 from a foreign court lately. Deceased had not been up to the County Court office for the past ten days, and it was his usual custom to come up twice a week. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Friday 2 April 1897, Issue 9280 – Gale Document No. Y3200763730
THE SUICIDE AT ST. THOMAS – Inquest, This Afternoon. – Mr A. Burrow (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquiry at the Plymouth Inn, Alphington-street, St. Thomas, this afternoon, into the circumstances of the death of GEORGE GALLIVER, aged 36, of Old Brewery-place, St. Thomas, and whose body was yesterday found in the Exeter Canal. Mr Phillip Rousham was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
EMILY GALLIVER, the widow, said deceased was a cellarman at the City Brewery, and she last saw him alive about six o'clock on Wednesday morning last. He was then going to work. Deceased did not return to dinner, and witness went to the Brewery to inquire. She saw one of his fellow workmen named Thomas Gale, who said "Hasn't GEORGE been home?" and witness said "No." Deceased did not say anything when he left home in the morning, and was in his usual health. He had been complaining lately of his head, and had been troubled about the deaths of his uncle and sister. He had never said anything which would lead her to think he would destroy himself. He had been very strange. He had no disturbances or difficulties at the brewery that she knew of. Witness heard yesterday between two and three o'clock in the afternoon that her husband had been found drowned, at which she was rather surprised. She had four children, and she and her husband always agreed.
The Foreman of the Jury: Had you any quarrel with him the morning or night previous? - Witness: No, sir.
Witness stated in answer to the Foreman that deceased became excited when anything displeased him.
Mr John Norman, partner of the firm of Messrs. Norman and Pring, of the City Brewery, stated that deceased was under-cellarman in their employ, in which position he had been for twelve years. Witness had nothing to complain of. Deceased was a very good man for his work and very civil, and there had not been any unpleasantness between him and the firm. In answer to the Coroner, witness said he had a conversation with deceased about 8.30 on Wednesday morning. Witness was on his way to catch the 8.45 train at St. Thomas for Plymouth. He went into the Brewery to get any letters that might have been received, and on coming out of the office at the bottom of the steps leading into the Brewery he saw deceased come out of the cellar and go up the steps towards the entrance. Thinking he looked rather suspicious about the pockets, witness watched him. From his movements witness presumed that he was trying to conceal something, and going up the steps he called him, saying "GALLIVER, what have you in your pockets!" Deceased said "Nothing, sir," and witness replied "I think you have." Witness at the same time took him by the coat and took out of one of his pockets a small bottle of beer. Witness then said "Have you any more?" and GALLIVER replied "No." In answer to witness, deceased replied that he was not in the habit of doing it every morning. Witness said "What are you going to do with it, and who is it for?" to which GALLIVER replied "It is for my wife." Witness told deceased that that sort of thing must be put a stop to, and GALLIVER said "I hope you will overlook it this time," but witness replied that he could not, and he would be fined 2s. 6d. GALLIVER rather demurred at that, and witness told him he could choose whether he would be prosecuted or pay the fine of 2s. 6d. Deceased made no answer and went off, as witness thought, to his breakfast. GALLIVER did not appear upset, and there was nothing in his appearance that would lead witness to think that he meant to destroy himself.
A Juryman: Is it customary to fine men for any little thing like that? - Witness: It isn't a custom; it is seldom we do it, but we have to be strict. The money generally goes to some charity.
George Hill, maltster, of 30, Oxford-street, St. Thomas, said he had known deceased for about fourteen years. He had been strange in his manner lately. Witness with assistance took deceased's body from the Canal about twenty yards on the Double Locks side of Salmon Pool bridge.
The Foreman: What made you go down there? - Witness: Having heard that a hat and coat had been found on the banks, and knowing that one of my fellow workmen was missing, I went down.
Frederick Slack, of Alphington, proved finding a hat and coat on Salmon Pool Bridge. Witness kept it, and having heard that a body had been found yesterday he took it to Sergeant Holloway, of St. Thomas.
Deceased's wife was called, and identified the clothes as that of her husband.
Wm. Pethybridge, Maltster, of Old Brewery-place, St. Thomas, stated that deceased had been very strange lately.
Mr Mark Farrant, jun., surgeon, of St. Thomas, said death was due to drowning.
The Coroner considered deceased did take his life, and that his mind was not sound when he did so. The Jury after a short deliberation returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Monday 5 April 1897, Issue 9282 – Gale Document No. Y3200763802
DEATH OF A SIDMOUTH CHEMIST – A Case of Suicide. - Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest at Sidmouth on Saturday, touching the death of MR ROWLAND CHESSALL, 64, chemist. It appeared that he was found on the floor of his shop on Thursday morning dead. Dr Bingley Pullin said deceased had taken about half an ounce of Schaell's prussic acid – enough to kill many men. Mr F. H. Mitchell, Mayor of Chard, and a nephew of the deceased, said on March 27th he arrived at witness's father's house quite unexpectedly, and immediately asked for a carriage and pair to take him back. He was, however, persuaded to stay over the Monday. There was no cause for the marked change visible in him except a little business opposition. He had examined the deceased's papers and found them in perfect order, showing a good balance at the bank. A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Tuesday 6 April 1897, Issue 9283 – Gale Document No. Y3200763811
INQUEST AT THE PRISON – Mr A. Burrow (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Prison this afternoon on the body of JOHN BURNS, who died on Saturday morning. Mr R. Burnett was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Major Matheson, Governor of the Prison, said the deceased, who was described as a labourer, was received at the Prison in December, 1896. He was convicted for four years for burglary at Aldershot, and was employed at the Prison making gloves. He died on the 3rd April. Alfred Robert Harding, night nurse at the Prison, said he had been under his care since he had been in the hospital, about three weeks. He had had nourishing food, and said he was satisfied with the treatment he received while in prison. Mr Mortimer, surgeon of the prison, said deceased was suffering from heart disease when he was admitted to the prison, and was unfit for hard labour. He had every attention, and died from heart disease. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Tuesday 6 April 1897, Issue 9283 – Gale Document No. Y3200763829
HONITON – Inquest. - Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy District Coroner) held an Inquest at the Railway Inn on Monday on the body of MISS WESTCOTT, who died suddenly on Saturday. Dr Alleyne stated that he had made a post mortem examination and found that death was due to syncope, accelerated by fatty degeneration of the heart and a diseased liver. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Monday 12 April 1897, Issue 9288 – Gale Document No. Y3200763953
SUDDEN DEATH NEAR TAVISTOCK – Curious Case. - Today an Inquest was held at the Tavistock Workhouse by Mr R. R. Rodd, County Coroner, touching the death of HARRIETT BOLT, a widow, aged 77, of Tavistock. Evidence was given that deceased went for a walk on Saturday, and was found in a dying state about a mile and a half out of the town. Mrs Creber, niece, stated that the deceased left her house on Saturday in a great state of excitement, having been teased by a number of boys. Sergeant English said that boys used to call after the deceased. Dr Smith thought the excitement would have worn off on deceased leaving the town, and that having heart disease, the exertion of going up a steep hill might have caused her death. The Jury, of whom Mr T. Brock was Foreman, found that death was due to Natural Causes.

Saturday 17 April 1897, Issue 9292 – Gale Document No. Y3200764044
BURRINGTON – On Tuesday Mr Coroner J. F. Bromham held an Inquest in this parish on the body of MRS EMMA DREW. The evidence was that deceased, who was a widow, resided with her son. She was left alone last Saturday evening for a few hours, and on the son returning home he found his mother lying dead across the bed. Medical and other assistance was at once procured, and Dr Manson, of Chulmleigh, gave it as his opinion that the cause of death was cerebral haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Tuesday 20 April 1897, Issue 9294 – Gale Document No. Y3200764120
INQUEST IN EXETER – An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this evening by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) on the body of ALFRED PALFREY, who died under circumstances reported in our Saturday's issue. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 22 April 1897, Issue 9296 – Gale Document No. Y3200764153
EXONIAN FOUND DROWNED AT TOPSHAM – Inquest Today. – Mr Deputy Coroner A. Burrow held an Inquest at the Salutation Inn, Topsham, this morning touching the death of JAMES COUSENS, of West-street, Exeter, who, as previously reported was found dead in the river Exe. Mr G. Hopewell was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
John William Bolt, ferryman, living at the Passage House Inn, said on Tuesday night he was fishing in company with a man called Luxton up the river, and saw a body in the water, covered in mud. He called to Mr Newman to help it into the boat, and that was done. The body was taken ashore at the causeway, and taken to the Salutation Inn. By Mr May: The body was on the mud about a foot under water. James Luxton, a lad, said he was with Bolt when the body was found. He gave corroborative evidence. Mr Duncan McArthur, surgeon, said he was called to see the body, and on examination found that in the operation of scraping the mud off the face the skin had come off also. Death was undoubtedly due to drowning. He should say the body had been in the water from eight days to a fortnight.
ELIZABETH COUSENS, widow of the deceased, said he was a baker, and 47 years of age. He had been missing since April 8th, when he went outdoors, saying he wanted some fresh air. He had enjoyed good health and had made no complaints, but was sometimes strange in his conduct. He had never threatened to commit suicide. By the Foreman: He left her for a week at Christmas, so that she did not become alarmed at his non-arrival the same night. By the Coroner: Deceased sometimes took more drink than was good for him, breaking out sometimes once in two or three months. She knew of no reason which could lead him to commit suicide. In summing up, the Deputy Coroner observed that the case was unsatisfactory, because there was no evidence as to how the deceased came into the water – whether he fell in, was pushed in, or threw himself in with the intention of destroying himself. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Tuesday 27 April 1897, Issue 9300 – Gale Document No. Y3200764270
FOUND DEAD AT EXETER – Inquest, This Afternoon. - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court this afternoon on the body of WILLIAM TAMLYN, a bachelor, aged 68 years, who for the past month had been lodging at the house of Mr Isaac Steer, shop porter, of 4, Colleton-row, the Friars. MRS MARY MARLOW, wife of a mason's labourer, of Ilfracombe, identified the deceased as her brother. Mrs Steer deposed that on Sunday the deceased, who suffered from heart complaint and asthma, was attended by Mr Harrison, who gave him a bottle of medicine. She last saw him alive at a quarter to twelve on Sunday night, and the next morning she found him dead in bed. She sent for the police, and the doctor. The deceased had not had any solid food since Friday, because he could not take any but liquid refreshment. Mr H. B. Harrison, surgeon, of Magdalen-street, deposed to having attended the deceased on the Sunday for seizure and to being called in after death on the Monday morning. The deceased appeared to have been dead some hours and in his opinion death was due to syncope. the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Wednesday 28 April 1897, Issue 9301 – Gale Document No. Y3200764295
TORQUAY – At the Inquest on the body of MARY HARRIS, widow, aged 64, who committed suicide by hanging herself at St. Marychurch, the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind."

Thursday 29 April 1897, Issue 9302 – Gale Document No. Y3200764325
DAWLISH – At the Town Hall this morning Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest on the body of ANNE ELIZA BOWDEN who died at The Priory, Dawlish, on Tuesday morning. After hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 29 April 1897, Issue 9302 – Gale Document No. Y3200764328
SAD SUICIDE IN EXETER – A sad case of suicide took place in Exeter this morning, when MR THOMAS BENNETT, a retired farmer, of 41, Haldon-road, shot himself. Since his retirement the deceased had suffered from a heart complaint, and had been under the care of Dr Bremner. It appears that he rose about eight o'clock and having partly dressed went down to the wash-house, where he was found with a wound in his head, after the report of a gun had been heard. He had evidently placed the muzzle of a double-barrelled gun, which was beside him, in his mouth. A discharged cartridge was found in the weapon, the trigger of which, it is considered, was worked with a clothes peg, which deceased had in his hand. Much sympathy is expressed for the family. An Inquest will be held tomorrow by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper.)

Friday 30 April 1897, Issue 9303 – Gale Document No. Y3200764357
At the Inquest at Marshford Farm, Hatherleigh, on the body of GEORGE CROCKER, who was struck by lightning on Wednesday, a verdict to the effect that "Death arose from shock to the system, occasioned by a lightning stroke," was returned.

Friday 30 April 1897, Issue 9303 – Gale Document No. Y3200764341
THE SUDDEN DEATH – An Inquest was held at No. 107, Sidwell-street, this afternoon by Mr H. W. Hooper, on the body of EMILY FORD, aged 60, whose sudden death was reported in our last evening's issue. Mr W. Jarman was chosen Foreman of the Jury. EDWARD HENRY FORD, shipbroker's clerk, London, identified the body as that of his mother, wife of THOMAS FORD, builder, of Willoughby-road, London. Witness last saw her alive on the previous Friday, when she went to Exeter on a visit to Mr Plowman, brother-in-law. Her health had been indifferent, she having a weak heart. Louisa Plowman said deceased did not complain before going to bed on Wednesday, but about half-past eleven she came to the stairs and called to witness to give her her medicine, but she could not take it, and asked to lie down, which she did, and suddenly expired. Dr A. Steele Perkins said death was due to syncope, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Friday 30 April 1897, Issue 9303 – Gale Document No. Y3200764346
ALDERSGATE-STREET EXPLOSION – Opening the Inquest. - An Inquest was opened this morning into the circumstances attending the death of HENRY PITTS, ENGINEER, a native of Bradninch, who died in St. Bartholomew's Hospital on Tuesday night from injuries received in the explosion at Aldersgate-street Station. The Coroner announced that after the taking of formal evidence the Inquest would be adjourned until May 25th to give the Government authorities full time to complete their investigations.

Tuesday 4 May 1897, Issue 9306 – Gale Document No. Y3200764446
At Plymouth on Monday an Inquest was held on the body of JOHN JOYCE, stoker of H.M.S. Magicienne, who met with a terrible death by scalding during the vessel's trial on April 22nd. Engineer Whyens attributed the defect to a leak in the mud hole which had previously withstood the steam and water test. Gunner Kitto said when he first saw steam issuing from the stokehole grating he heard deceased shouting from beneath. Owing to the steam being so powerful they directed a steady stream of cold water from the hose upon the deceased as the only means of keeping him alive. After a quarter of an hour they succeeded in extricating JOYCE, who had been scalded to death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 6 May 1897, Issue 9308 – Gale Document No. Y3200764476
THE SUDDEN DEATH IN PAUL-STREET – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper at the Exeter Police Court this morning on the body of EMMA WRIGHT, who, as we reported last evening, was found dead at her house in Cornish's-court, Paul-street. Mr W. H. Morton was chosen Foreman of the Jury. JAMES WRIGHT, tailor, of Commercial-street, Hereford, identified the body as that of his mother, the widow of an hotel proprietor of the city, and 78 years of age. He had not seen her for about six years. Sarah Woodward, a neighbour, said deceased had been medically attended. She saw her in bed on Tuesday night and knocked at her door. Getting no response she opened the window, pushed back the bolt of the door, and found the deceased dead on the floor beside the bed. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said deceased had been dead five or six hours when he saw it just after 7 o'clock. Her death was due to failure of the heart's action. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 8 May 1897, Issue 9310 – Gale Document No. Y3200764545
A Coroner's Jury yesterday returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" at an Inquest held at the Dartmouth Guildhall on the body of FREDERICK O'BRIEN, the infant son of a naval pension of St Saviour's-place, Dartmouth, who died from shock caused by the upsetting of a cup of tea on April 25th.

Monday 10 May 1897,m Issue 9311 – Gale Document No. Y3200764598
CHILD DROWNED AT KINGSTEIGNTON – An Inquest was held at the King's Arms Hotel, Kingsteignton, this morning by Mr Sidney Hacker, District Coroner, on the body of EUNICE GERTRUDE CARNALL, aged three, daughter of JAMES CARNALL, claycutter, who was drowned in a well on Saturday. The evidence shewed that about mid-day on Saturday deceased was playing in the garden at the back of the house. Mrs Heard, a neighbour, seeing her trying to fill a small stone bottle with water from an open well, sent her away. Shortly after, the mother was in the garden and saw the child throwing grass to the fowls. Ten minutes later the child was found in the well with her head stuck in the mud at the bottom. MRS CARNALL'S screams attracted Edmund Mason, a blacksmith, who took the child out. Dr McLeroy and Mr C. W. Freestone tried for half an hour to restore animation by artificial means, but without avail. The Coroner commented severely on the danger of open wells in places to which children had access, and the Jury in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death" recommended the owner of the property to have the well covered and secured with a padlock.

Tuesday 11 May 1897, Issue 9312 – Gale Document No. Y3200764612
THE FATALITY AT DAWLISH – The Inquest on the body of FREDERICK TAYLOR, compositor apprentice, who died from injuries received through falling between a train and the platform at Dawlish Station on Sunday morning, is being held at Dawlish this evening by Mr Sidney Hacker.
Chief-Inspector Shattock of the Western Division, represented the Great Western Railway Company, and Mr H. W. Hooper (Exeter City coroner) was also present.
WILLIAM JAMES TAYLOR identified the body as that of his nephew. Witness was at Dawlish on Sunday morning and was on the platform when the accident occurred, but he did not know that deceased was on the platform when the accident occurred. There was a large crowd which he considered was most unruly, several persons being intoxicated. There were only two or three officials on the platform, which he thought were insufficient to control the number of people present.
There are nine more witnesses to be called, so the Enquiry is not expected to finish until late.

Wednesday 12 May 1897, Issue 9313 – Gale Document No. Y3200764644
THE FATALITY AT DAWLISH – The Inquest on the body of THOMAS TAYLOR compositor apprentice, who died from injuries received through falling between a train and the platform at Dawlish Station on Sunday morning, was held at Dawlish last evening by Mr Sidney Hacker.
Chief Inspector Shattock, of the Western Division, represented the Great Western Railway Company, and Mr H. W. Hooper (Exeter City Coroner) was also present.
WILLIAM JAMES TAYLOR identified the body as that of his nephew. Witness was at Dawlish on Sunday morning and was on the platform when the accident occurred, but he did not know that deceased was there. There was a large crowd which he considered was most unruly, several persons being intoxicated. There were only two or three officials on the platform, which he thought were insufficient to control the number of people present.
Henry Herbert Hicks, builder of Union-road, Exeter, who was standing beside deceased on the platform, said when the train came in several persons made a rush for the compartments, deceased being one of them. He tried to catch one of the handles of the last compartment of a carriage, when the train was pulling up, but missed his aim and fell between two carriages.
James Salter, of 33 Quay-lane, Exeter, Charles Greenaway, Summerland-street, Exeter and Tom Gale, of Water-lane, St. Thomas also gave evidence.
James Spry Osborne, parcel porter at Dawlish Station, and residing at Lansdowne-terrace, Dawlish, said he was in charge of Dawlish Station on Sunday morning, being assisted by another porter. There was a large crowd and when the train was coming in he told them to stand back. Some of them rushed to get seats while the train was in motion.
P.C. Rousefell, stationed at Dawlish, and George Parkings, of Exeter, the guard in charge of the train, gave evidence.
Mr G. F. Webb, surgeon of Dawlish, said the deceased, who was conscious after the accident, was removed to the Infirmary at Dawlish, where his right leg was amputated just above the knee, but deceased expired from the loss of blood. Witness considered the wheel of the carriage went over the leg.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and recommended the Railway Company to increase the staff for Sunday mornings. Inspector Shattock said he would communicate the recommendation to the proper authorities.
The Inquiry lasted three hours.

Friday 14 May 1897, Issue 9315 – Gale Document No. Y3200764685
THE ACCIDENT NEAR BARNSTAPLE – Another Death. – Early this morning FRANK STEVENS, who was partly buried by the falling clay at Mr Brannam's clay pit at Bickington on Wednesday, died in the North Devon Infirmary at Barnstaple. He had no bones broken, but he suffered some internal injury, which was not at first considered serious. He died peacefully, and with little pain. This makes the second death, as one man was killed on the spot. An Inquest was held on his body this afternoon at Bickington by the County Coroner (Mr J. F. Bromham), but it was not over in time to allow of the result being telegraphed. The Inquest on the body of STEVENS will be held at the Infirmary, Barnstaple, tomorrow by the Borough Coroner.

Saturday 15 May 1897, Issue 9316 – Gale Document No. Y3200764748
THE FATALITY NEAR BARNSTAPLE – This morning at the mortuary of the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple, Mr Coroner Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest on the body of HENRY STEVENS, 45, the second victim of the clay pit disaster. Arthur Latham, carter, working for Mr C. H. Brannam, the lessee of the pit, said he was present in the pit at the time of the accident. Deceased was loading a butt of clay when a big bulk fell on PASSMORE, another workman, and killed him, and portions of it knocked down deceased and another man named Patteson. He got into the butt and drove off for help. Deceased continued to render help for some time, but complained of aches around his waist. Dr Cooper, of Barnstaple, said he was called to the clay pits, and some time after he got there deceased, who was walking about when witness arrived, collapsed and fell to the ground. Deceased was removed to the Infirmary and appeared to be recovering until the Thursday evening, when grave symptoms set in and he died early the next morning. Witness had made a post mortem examination and had found extensive peritonitis, which had been caused by the rupture of a portion of the intestines which had previously been diseased. That was quite sufficient to cause death. There was no external mark about the body, therefore the rupture could not have been caused by a direct blow by sudden exertion, but it might have been caused when deceased tripped his butt, or when he fell to the ground by the fall of clay upon him. The Coroner did not think that the quarry was worked in the safest way. It was quite clear that the deceased's death was the result of an accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 17 May 1897, Issue 9317 – Gale Document No. Y3200764771
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at Plymouth on Saturday at the adjourned Inquest on the body of JOHN KARSWELL, artificer, of Dartmouth, who was killed on board the Racer.

Wednesday 19 May 1897, Issue 9313 – Gale Document No. Y3200764819
NORTH DEVON SHOOTING FATALITY – An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple yesterday on the body of ARTHUR LEOPOLD REEVES, aged 12, son of MR W. H. REEVES, schoolmaster of Filleigh who was shot while out rook shooting on Monday. Philip Richards, labourer of the Home Farm, Filleigh, said he was asked to have a shot and was handed a double breech-loading gun. He had fired one shot and had reloaded. Upon closing the weapon, the muzzle of which was pointing to the ground, it suddenly discharged, and deceased, who was standing near, received the shot in his abdomen. Witness could not say what caused the gun to go off. He held it by his right hand quite clear from the triggers. Had previously used a gun, and had shot his bird just before the accident. Drs. Penny and Lemarchand deposed that the deceased died about a quarter of an hour after his admission to the Infirmary. The abdomen was completely shattered, and death was bound to result. A verdict of "Accidental death" was returned.

Wednesday 19 May 1897, Issue 9313 – Gale Document No. Y3200764821
At Axminster on Tuesday an Inquest was held on CECIL HENRY GEORGE WENCH, the six week old child of ROSE ELLEN and GEORGE WENCH, brushmaker. The child had been chiefly fed on milk, but was given a little crushed biscuit occasionally. Dr Padbury stated that the child, which died from atrophy and exhaustion, weighed only 3 ½ pounds. It was a very improper thing to give a baby biscuit. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 22 May 1897, Issue 9322 – Gale Document No. Y3200764921
DROWNED IN EXETER BASIN – Mr F. Burrow, Deputy District Coroner of Cullompton, held an Inquest at the Buller's Arms, Alphington-street, St. Thomas, this afternoon, on the body of SAMUEL SANDFORD, aged 6 years, of St Thomas, who was drowned in the Exeter Basin on the previous day. On the Jury being empanelled, Mr Nathan Goodfellow, who had been summoned to attend, failed to put in an appearance. Sergeant Holloway called him three times in the usual manner, but there was no response, and Holloway said he warned Mr Goodfellow to attend the Inquest at 345. He, however, did not show him the warrant. There being twelve Jurymen present, the Inquest was proceeded with, Mr P. Rousham, being chosen Foreman. The body having been viewed, Mr Goodfellow entered the Court, and on being questioned by the Coroner, said he understood the Inquest was to be held at four o'clock. Perhaps it [?] his mistake. The Coroner: I don't [?] in the face of that, to take [?] steps to fine you; but, perhaps you will be more careful in future. Goodfellow: Quite so; it is my mistake I suppose. JOHN SANDFORD, labourer, the father of the child, gave evidence of identification. John Scanes, aged 12, of Shooting Marsh Stile, said he saw the deceased about 3.30. He was running down to the Basin and could not stop himself, falling head first into the water. Witness caught him by the coat after he fell in, but he could not hold him up and cried for help. Some sailors from a ship came over and a man named Summers dived for the deceased, but could not find the body. SANDFORD said he wanted to go down to the Basin to drink. A grappling hook was afterwards brought to get the body out. HARRY SANDFORD, deceased's brother, was also with them. Deceased fell in near the step. A Juror: A word of praise is due to the boy for trying to save deceased. – The Coroner: Quite so; he did very well, and has given his evidence very well. Thomas Came, of Alphington-street, who was near by when the alarm was raised, deposed to grappling for the body which was recovered after it had been in the water about half an hour. William Summers, labourer, of Haven Banks, St. Thomas, said he was attracted to the Basin by screams, and on hearing someone was in the water, jumped into a boat and dived in, fully dressed. He could not find the deceased and swam to the bank, and taking off his clothes dived again, but could not get hold of the body. He dived the third time and saw the body stuck in the mud, face upwards. He had not breath enough to bring the body out, and called for assistance. The last witness then came, and the body was dragged out. Witness helped to "pump" the body, but could not restore life. Summers remarked that he had saved several lives before and had not previously failed. He showed the Court a silver medal which he had had for saving lives from drowning. He did his utmost to rescue the deceased in this case. The Coroner and the Jury commended Summers on his courageous conduct. there was no doubt he did all he possibly could to save the child's life. Mr Mark Farrant, junr. surgeon, who was called after the body had been recovered, deposed that it had the appearance of death by drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added a rider commending Summers for the brave manner in which he tried to rescue the child.

Monday 24 May 1897, Issue 9323 – Gale Document No. Y3200764944
At an Inquest at Devonport on Saturday on the body of JOHN ROGERS, which was found floating in the Hamoaze, it w3as stated that the deceased had lately been in a state of poverty. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Monday 24 May 1897, Issue 9323 – Gale Document No. Y3200764926
INQUEST – Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, held an Inquest on Saturday evening on the body of RICHARD BURNETT at 1, Magdalen-street. Deceased, who was 68 years of age, went out on Friday and returned about half-past eight, when he had some cold beef and went to bed. He then knocked for someone, and JANE BURNETT, sister of the deceased, went to him and found him sitting in bed complaining of being sick. She fetched brandy, but he was unable to take it. Deceased did not speak again, and Mr H. B. Harrison, surgeon, was sent for, but he died before the doctor arrived. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Tuesday 25 May 1897, Issue 9324 – Gale Document No. Y3200764966
SUICIDE AT 72. Axminster Coachman Drowns Himself. - At Axminster on Monday Mr C. E. Cox (Deputy Coroner of Axminster) held an Inquest on the body of JOHN LODGE, a coachman, aged 72 years. Deceased, who had been in the employ of Mr G. Barnes for 30 years, had lately suffered from bronchitis and heart affection. He had lived with his niece for the past two years. Mr Wood, carpenter on the Clockham Estate, on Sunday afternoon was passing over Cloakham Bridge, underneath which the River Axe runs, when his attention was attracted to a man's hat and coat on an alder tree near the river. After a search he found deceased in the river on his left side, face downwards. Thomas Love, shoemaker, of Axminster, stated that when deceased was taken out of the water there were no signs of life, although his watch was going. Mr G. Barnes said he promised deceased he would provide for him. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death was due to drowning while deceased was in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 27 May 1897, Issue 9326 – Gale Document No. Y3200765006
TORQUAY – The Shooting Fatality. - Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest on Wednesday on the body of ALFRED CROCKER, aged 22, who died at the Torbay Hospital on Tuesday from injuries received through being shot in the head while employed at Ware's shooting saloon at Ellacombe, Torquay, on Saturday evening. Evidence was given to the effect that while a man named Boyce was in front of the saloon an attendant named Ripley was loading a rifle, when the deceased dropped down. The Inquiry lasted four hours, and a verdict was returned that the deceased was Accidentally Shot, but from whose rifle the shot came there was no evidence to show. A rider was added asking the Coroner to make representations in the proper quarter in order to put a stop to the reckless fashion in which shooting booths are conducted.

Wednesday 2 June 1897, Issue 9331 – Gale Document No. Y3200765142
SUICIDE IN THE EXETER CANAL - Inquest, This Afternoon. - Mr A. Burrows (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at Mr Bowden's Countess Weir Inn, Countess Weir, this afternoon, inquiring into the circumstances of the death of ERNEST ALBERT NOSWORTHY, carpenter, of Plymouth. Mr Eli Pring was chosen Foreman of the Jury. HENRY NOSWORTHY, gardener of Topsham, identified the body as that of his brother, aged 23 years. He last saw him alive on Monday morning at Topsham, when he was cleaning himself to go and enlist in the 2nd Life Guards. The deceased had constant employment t Plymouth as gardener to Sir John Jackson. The deceased had often threatened to commit suicide when he was intoxicated. On his way to Exeter witness believed the deceased had drink; a little always affected him. Witness considered that he must have thrown himself into the water when under the influence of drink. Emma Collard, wife of Henry Collard, of the Country House Inn, stated that about 11 o'clock on Monday morning the deceased came to the inn and had a glass of beer, being sober at the time. John Heard, fisherman of Topsham, deposed to seeing the deceased going across Countess Weir Bridge. He appeared to be sober. Samuel Sharland, labourer, of Countess Weir, said he found a hat and coat on the bank of the Canal. He obtained the drags and found the body. HENRY NOSWORTHY, gardener, of Plymouth, father of the deceased, stated that deceased had been strange in his manner, especially when he had had some drink. Dr McArthur, Topsham, said deceased died from drowning. A verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Thursday 3 June 1897, Issue 9332 – Gale Document No. Y3200765182
The County Coroner (Mr Bromham) held an Inquest at the Heavitree Arms Hotel last evening touching the death of THOMAS CORY, who hanged himself at his employer's workshop on Monday night. Mr J. Lugg was Foreman of the Jury. MR JOHN CORY, of Abbotsham, the father, said he believed the deceased was concerned at the loss of his leg, although he never complained. He always spoke in highest terms of Mr Cowee, his master, and of his fellow workmen. He had only been to the trade a year and nine months, but did well. Mr Cowee only agreed to pay him 3s per week, but he had been paid as much as £2 5s. in a month. He was depressed at times. The Jury brought in a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane.

Friday 4 June 1897, Issue 9333 – Gale Document No. Y3200765202
THE DARTMOUTH FATALITY – At Dartmouth yesterday afternoon an Inquest was held touching the death of JAMES MICKLE, foreman labourer at Simpson, Strickland and Co.'s works. The evidence showed that the deceased was at the reversing gear of a crane, which was being used to hoist a boiler, when the boiler slipped. The handle flew round and knocked him over. When picked up he was found to have sustained a fracture of the skull. The managing partner in the firm said the deceased had nothing to do with the work he was about, and ought not to have been there. Replying to the Jury, he said it was left to the discretion of the deceased when he was in charge of the carne to use guys if he thought it necessary to keep the things from slipping. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and recommended the use of guys in future.

Tuesday 8 June 1897, Issue 9336 – Gale Document No. Y3200765298
GORDON BOVEY, aged three months, was found dead in bed by the side of his parents, MR and MRS JOHN BOVEY, Hatfield-terrace, Cockington, on Sunday morning. An Inquest was held this morning.

Tuesday 8 June 1897, Issue 9336 – Gale Document No. Y3200765294
THE DROWNING CASE AT EXETER – Inquest, This Afternoon. - The Exeter City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Police Court this afternoon touching the death of CHARLES SPRY, 20 years of age, who resided with his parents at 2, Strong's-cottages, Bartholomew-street, and whose body was found in the leat in Bonhay-road on Sunday afternoon.
Mr Young was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and the body having been viewed RICHARD SPRY, a joiner, identified it as that of his son, who was apprenticed to Mr Rice, of Sidwell-street, as a plumber. Witness last saw him alive at dinner time on Friday at home. Witness passed the remark, "CHARLIE why don't you eat your dinner, my dear?" and he replied "Father, I have had a long walk around Ide and Alphington, and my legs are aching. After I have had a rest I shall have my dinner all right, and don't you trouble so much about me." The deceased went out in the afternoon for a short walk and when witness came home from work just after six he had gone to bed. Just after nine his mother took his supper up to him, and he said to her, "I am better, mother. I think I shall have a good night's rest." That was the last they knew of him whilst he was alive. His mother left him in bed. On the following morning witness got up about 3.45, and coming out of his bedroom – which was immediately under that of deceased's he noticed by the light in the staircase that his door was open. Witness went downstairs and found his candlestick which he had used on the kitchen table. He at once went to the front door and found it unbolted. It was bolted the night before. Witness at once hastened to his bedroom and found his son missing. He dressed himself as quickly as possible and called his eldest son, and they left the house in different directions to try and find the deceased. Before witness went out he found that he had worn away a pair of white sandshoes. Witness went up Bartholomew-terrace, and over the Barbican steps, and saw prints of his footmarks in the dust. He followed them until a few yards above the higher weir in Bonhay-road. Then he lost the track and went forward and backwards several times until he found a footprint of a person who had apparently been looking over the rails into the river. On Monday week deceased walked to Exmouth after he left work, and on Sunday morning witness enquired of some friends there if they had seen him, but they had not, and, having his suspicion aroused, witness had the fenders lowered later in the day on Sunday, and within a quarter of an hour afterwards deceased's body was discovered in the Mill Leat. Deceased had lately complained of pains in the head and back. After deceased's return from Exmouth on Monday week, his mother went to Mr Edward Perkins, surgeon, and explained to him her son's state of health. He had suffered from sleeplessness and Mr Perkins prescribed for him. He, however, did not think there was much the matter with him. Deceased had complained that he was so ill that he did not think he should live long. No father could wish for a better son. The witness then sobbed. By a Juror: His son had never threatened to commit suicide.
Samuel Hannaford, scavenger of Beedle's-terrace, deposed to recovering the body. Witness had recovered twelve bodies before. A man named Slack assisted him in getting SPRY'S body out of the water.
Mr C. E. Bell, police surgeon, deposed to being called to the mortuary to examine the body. There were some scratches on the face which were caused before death. There was an incised wound over the left eyebrow, which was caused after death. Death was due to drowning. The scratches were probably caused by the gravel.
Replying to the Coroner, MR SPRY said his son had not shown any signs of insanity.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, there being no evidence to show how deceased came into the water." The Jury also expressed their sympathy with MR SPRY. The Coroner concurred. It was a very sad case and he deeply sympathised with MR SPRY, who was a very respectable man and who appeared to have done all he possibly could for his son.

Wednesday 9 June 1897, Issue 9337 – Gale Document No. Y3200765311
THE BURNING FATALITY AT WITHYCOMBE – Inquest Today. - An Inquest was held at the Holly Tree Inn, Withycombe, this morning by Mr Coroner Cox touching the death of FLORENCE ROSINA PANNELL who was burned to death yesterday morning. WALTER JAMES PANNELL, father, said the deceased was one year and eight months old. She was quite healthy and when witness left the house the previous morning she was quite asleep. He did not see a lamp burning, but one was always left on a table beside the bed. There were no matches about. ROSINA PANNELL, mother, said about 7.30 she went downstairs leaving the deceased asleep in bed. The lamp was filled with paraffin. She was talking to a neighbour called Chapman when she observed fire in the bedroom. The lamp was on the bed, which was on fire, and she took up a pillow and put out the flames. She then discovered that the baby was on fire. (The witness here broke into deep sobbing). Eliza Chapman stated that as she was receiving her milk about 9.45 she saw smoke coming from the window of MRS PANNELL'S room, and when witness went into the house she saw MRS PANNELL coming down the stairs with the baby in her arms on fire. Oil was at once sent for and rubbed in, and a doctor was fetched. Henry Grant, a labourer, gave evidence as to putting out the fire in the bedroom. Dr Shapland said he was fetched to see the deceased, who was lying in its grandmother's lap and was more or less burnt. There was no possible hope for the deceased. The Coroner said it was a distressing case. He thought it very dangerous to leave a lamp beside a bed. The deceased must have reached and pulled the lamp over. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased was burned to death through misadventure, owing to the parents leaving a light beside the bed.

Saturday 12 June 1897, Issue 9340 – Gale Document No. Y3200765419
FATALITY AT THRUSHELTON – WM PIPER, horse trainer, of Lew Down, while riding home from Bridestowe, was thrown and fell in front of a horse and cart which went over him, inflicting fatal injuries. He leaves a large family. Mr Coroner Prickman held the Inquest last evening at the New Inn, Lew Trenchard. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and considered there was no negligence or blame to be attached to any one.

Monday 14 June 1897, Issue 9341 – Gale Document No. Y3200765433
FATALITIES IN DEVON – The Fall at Teignmouth – On Saturday evening Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest at the Teignmouth Hospital on the body of MRS PARKHOUSE, aged 49, who met with her death the previous day by falling from a window at the premises of Messrs Tozer, Whidborne and Tozer, at 3, Orchard Gardens, where she and her husband were caretakers. Mr J. Copp appeared for the firm named. JOSEPH PARKHOUSE, the husband, a brewer at the Teign Brewery, deposed that he and his wife occupied the top part of the offices. On Friday he was away, and on returning at five o'clock he was made acquainted with what had occurred. He found his wife in the passage, being attended by Dr Stevenson. She did not regain consciousness afterwards. He had never known his wife get out of the window or clean the windows from the outside. Witness could not suggest any reason for her looking out. The bottom sash was kept open in hot weather and the sill was about three feet from the level of the floor. Edward Mitchell Henwood, clerk at Messrs. Tozer, Whidborne, and Tozer's, solicitors, who was in the room below deceased's apartments facing the street, said he saw an object pass the window and heard a thud, and on looking out he noticed MRS PARKHOUSE lying on the pavement. She was terribly injured and was carried indoors. Witness went upstairs and in the room from the window of which she had fallen he saw a footstool standing against the wall below the sill. It was no part of MRS PARKHOUSE'S duty to clean windows, as a man was always engaged, and she was at liberty to call in a man whenever she thought it necessary. Maple Walters, a lad, said he was passing near the Baptist Chapel when he saw the deceased sitting out of the windows above the cornice. Her head was inside the sash, but her arms were outside. He did not see her fall as a horse and cart passed, but before he had gone many steps he found she was lying on the pavement. Mr H. Stanbury ran out of his shop as soon as deceased fell. She had a duster in one hand and had clutched at a branch of a lime tree with the other and broken the limb. Mr V. Chapman, house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased died within two hours after admittance to the institution. Her left leg was broken, the pelvis fractured, and the spinal column injured. Death was the result of shock and collapse through a fall of 40 feet. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

FATAL FALL AT TOTNES - Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at the Totnes guildhall on Saturday afternoon on the body of MARY JANE HONEYWILL, 60, who died on Friday from injuries received by falling down a few stairs at a neighbour's house on Thursday evening. The evidence of WILLIAM HONEYWILL, the husband, and his daughter shewed that she was brought home unconscious, and that no medical assistance was summoned until between three and four o'clock next day. The husband said he could not afford to pay a doctor, and that he did not think she was so bad, as she had been in the habit of falling about. Dr Cupperidge said he went immediately he was summoned, and considered the woman had then been dead an hour or two. There was no fracture of the skull, death being due to haemorrhage of the brain. Death would have supervened so rapidly in such a case that medical attendance would have been of no avail. The Coroner commented strongly on the conduct of the husband and daughter in not summoning a doctor before, as the parish medical officer could be obtained. The Jury, of whom Mr W. Westaway was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Coroner refused to allow either husband or daughter any fees as witnesses.

ST. THOMAS CHILD'S DEATH - At the Devon and Exeter Hospital today the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of FREDERICK DAVEY, aged 13 month, who died in the Institution on the previous evening from the effects of a fall. The mother, MINNIE DAVEY, wife of RICAHRD DAVEY, a labourer, of the Mission Hall, Alphington-street, deposed that on Friday morning, June 4th, she left the deceased in bed asleep. Witness was dressing when the child rolled over the bed on to the floor. It was rather a high bed. Witness ran and picked the child up and found that it had injured its right thigh. She did not send for a doctor, but afterwards took the child to the Hospital. The accident happened at six o'clock in the morning and the child was admitted to the Hospital at two o'clock. Witness had seven other children. The child died last night. Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon, said the deceased was admitted into the Hospital suffering from a fracture of the right thigh. The child was said to have fallen on its head, but there were no signs f injuries there. Deceased looked very ill and had signs of a disease of the nose and ear. Witness considered death arose from meningitis, which, in his opinion, was quite unconnected with the injury. The Jury, of which Mr R. H. Cummings was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

CULLOMPTON PUBLICAN'S DEATH – Mr Hooper also held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital today respecting the death of ROBERT BOARD, aged 44 years, who died in the Hospital on Friday evening from injuries which he received in a fall. ELIZABETH BOARD, the widow, stated that her late husband was the landlord of the Merry Harriers Inn, in the parish of Cullompton. On the 5th of May last about five in the evening, he left the Inn in a spring cart drawn by a colt. He was accompanied by a young man named Frank Chilcott and went out to exercise the colt. They proceeded down the main road to Plymtree and then into a bye-lane which brought them into the Exeter-road. Shortly afterwards witness was informed by a lady on a bicycle that an accident had occurred. She did not know it was her husband, but she gave the lady some brandy to take back. Witness went out and saw the colt and trap coming towards her. Her husband was in the bottom of the trap, and the young man was walking. Deceased was bleeding from the ear and nose. He was conscious, but unable to give her any particulars of the accident. He was taken in and laid on the sofa, but a doctor was not sent for until the next morning, when Dr Gidley, of Cullompton, was summoned. He attended the deceased up to the time he was taken to the hospital on Friday morning. The colt was a quiet animal. Her husband had driven the animal before to break it in. It had not been out for a few days before the day of the accident. Her husband was used to horses. Frank Chilcott, labourer, of Bradninch parish, who accompanied the deceased on the occasion in question, said they went on the main road to go to Plymtree, and afterwards turned to go on the turnpike road to Exeter. The colt wanted to turn back towards home and the cart turned over at a sharp corner. Witness was thrown out, but got clear. MR BOARD, however, was underneath the trap. Witness lifted up the vehicle until he got deceased free. He then helped the deceased on his knee and with assistance he placed him in the trap and took him home. The trap was somewhat damaged. Both were sober. By a Juror: When the trap turned over it was dragged some yards. Mr H. Andrew, House Surgeon, said the deceased was admitted into the Hospital on Friday last in a state of deep coma. He died soon after admission. An examination was made, and it was found that the deceased had a fracture of the base of the skull, meningitis, and extensive haemorrhage at the base of the brain. Death was probably due to an extension of the haemorrhage into the brain.
By the Foreman: Witness considered the removal quite justifiable. MRS BOARD explained that her husband was getting well, but had a relapse on Thursday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Monday 14 June 1897, Issue 9341 – Gale Document No. Y3200765431
DEATH UNDER CHLOROFORM AT EXETER - The Exeter City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) will hold an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital tomorrow afternoon into the circumstances attending the death of a young man named F. WHEATON, who died at the institution on Saturday from the effects of chloroform. The deceased, it appeared, had been under treatment at the Hospital either as an inpatient or as an out-patient for the past twelve months. He was suffering from hip disease, and on Saturday it was deemed advisable to perform an operation. In the course of the operation, chloroform was administered to the patient, but he succumbed to the effects of the anaesthetic. The deceased belonged to Newton Poppleford.

Tuesday 15 June 1897, Issue 9342 – Gale Document No. Y3200765459
EXMOUTH BAKER DIES Under Chloroform at Exeter. Inquest at Exeter, Today. - At the Devon and Exeter Hospital this afternoon the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of FREDERICK WHEATON, a baker, aged 18, of Exmouth, who died at that Institution on Saturday whilst under chloroform.
WALTER WHEATON, baker, of Newton Poppleford, identified the deceased as that of his brother, who was employed by Mr Thorne (of the Commercial Hotel), Exmouth. The deceased had been treated at the Hospital either as an in-patient or out-patient for the past four years. He suffered from hip disease. Witness last saw him alive on Sunday week last, but had very little conversation with him, neither did he refer to any operation which was to be performed on him. He was not attended by anyone outside the hospital. He was not aware that his brother met with any accident.
MRS WHEATON complained that she was not informed of the operation before it was performed. She had no knowledge that such was going to be done.
The Coroner: That may be.
Mr W. Ashford assistant house-surgeon at the Hospital, said on Saturday he was called to the operating room to give an anaesthetic to the deceased so that an operation might be performed on him. It was decided to perform the operation after a consultation with the surgeons. It was intended to open the hip joint. Witness commenced to give the deceased chloroform. All the surgical staff were present – Mr Domville, Mr Harris, Mr Bell, and Mr Roper. Witness had given deceased chloroform for about five minutes when he noticed that his pulse suddenly stopped. Deceased went on breathing for a little while longer, and everything was done to try and start the heart's action again, but without avail. The man had not had enough chloroform to make him unconscious.
The Coroner: What quantity of chloroform had you given him? - Just about three grains.
Did you observe any blueness about the features? - Oh, yes.
Did he exhibit any alarm at all when the chloroform was about to be administered or try to stop it in any way? - He did not.
Were any restoratives applied? Brandy and ether were injected under the skin and artificial respiration was kept up for about three quarters of an hour but without avail.
Do you know if he suffered from imperfect circulation of the heart? - No, there was nothing to show that.
Did you observe any shortness of breath? – No.
Do you say that the chloroform administered by you was administered with due and proper precaution? - Oh, yes.
And in the presence of the gentlemen named? - Yes.
Do you know the difference between the effect of the administration of chloroform and the administration of nitrous oxide? - In the administration of nitrous oxide the person is practically suffocated for a while. Chloroform acts as a sedative and sends the person to sleep.
Three grains of chloroform you say is not too much? - It was not enough to make him unconscious.
Continuing, witness said that since death he had, by the Coroner's orders, made a post mortem examination. They could find nothing wrong with the heart. It was perhaps rather small. They could also find nothing wrong with the other organs which could account for death. The liver was slightly enlarged, and the kidneys were a little congested. Death was due to cardiac failure, attributable to the chloroform. Undoubtedly, chloroform had a great deal to do with it and he was probably frightened over the proposed operation.
By Mr E. J. Domville: Deceased did not struggle before the operation was commenced or object to it.
Replying to the Coroner, Mr Domville said the chloroform was administered with due precaution and not in any undue quantity. This was about the fourth operation he had had. The operation was for the purpose of examining one of deceased's hips from which a large abscess had been previously removed. Witness watched the administration of the chloroform and noticed that the patient's breathing became irregular and noisy. On putting his hand to his wrist witness fond his pulse stopped. The administration of chloroform was at once discontinued, brandy and ether was injected underneath the skin, and the breathing assisted by artificial respiration. This and other means of resuscitation was kept up for about an hour without avail. Witness agreed with Mr Ashford's evidence except that he believed the cardiac failure was chiefly due to fright and not so much to chloroform. By a Juror: The patient was never unconscious. The deceased was a very nice young fellow and he believed if he had any objection to what was proposed he would have told witness so. The deceased for two months was at the Convalescent Home at Torquay. Witness considered it his duty to attend the Inquest (with Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon) because it was a very unusual thing to have a death in the Hospital in that way, and because he wished it to be clearly understood that Mr Ashford had done his duty, that he had administered the chloroform properly.
The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a somewhat novel case and one that required thorough investigation. The Jury had to satisfy themselves whether the necessary precautions were taken in administering the chloroform and whether the necessary inquiries were made of the patient before the attempt to administer it. Personally he did not think there was any lack of precautions.
The Jury, of which Mr R. Wreford was Foreman, returned a verdict to the effect that death was due to cardiac failure, induced by fright at the operation it was proposed to be performed under chloroform.

Tuesday 15 June 1897, Issue 9342 – Gale Document No. Y3200765461
THE SUICIDE IN EXETER - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at No. 17,. Eagle's Cottages, Bonhay-road, Exeter, this morning on the body of ROBERT MURRIN, aged 54. ELI CHARLES MURRIN, core maker, identified the body as that of his father, who was a masons by trade. Witness resided with his father, and last saw him alive on Sunday morning last. About four o'clock on that morning the deceased came to him and asked for his shaving materials, but witness did not give them to him. Witness saw his father to bed, where he stayed for some time, and then left, thinking his father to be asleep. About nine o'clock witness was called by a neighbour, Mrs Wilkins, who told him that his father had cut his throat. Witness went and found the deceased on his bed with his throat cut. Further questioned by the Coroner witness stated that about nine o'clock deceased asked his daughter to fetch his shaving materials, which she did. ELIZABETH LETHBRIDGE, wife of Frederick Lethbridge, daughter of the deceased, gave evidence to the effect that she heard knocking in her father's room, and on going there saw blood issuing from a wound in her father's throat. He was called "Fred." Witness fetched her husband, who obtained a medical man. There was a razor covered in blood on a box at the bedside. Her father had been strange in his manner for some time past. Mr R. V. Solly, surgeon, stated that he had attended the deceased for some months for nasal asthma but did not find that affected his mind. He was called on Sunday morning and attended the deceased for a cut throat, from which he died at twenty minutes to twelve. A verdict of "Suicide whilst temporarily insane," was returned.

Friday 18 June 1897, Issue - 9345 – Gale Document No. Y3200765537
FATAL ACCIDENT TO A COLATON RALEIGH LABOURER – Inquest at Holsworthy. - Mr J. D. Prickman, Coroner of Okehampton, held an Inquest at the Holsworthy Workhouse on Thursday into the circumstances attending the death of a labourer named HENRY TAPSCOTT, of Filleigh, in the employ of Mr Shepherd, of Colaton Raleigh, who died at that institution on Tuesday last from injuries which he received on the previous day whilst unloading timer at Mr W. Wiffen's timber yard, Holsworthy. The evidence showed that whilst unloading the timber a tree fell on the deceased, who sustained a fatal injury to his back. He was removed to the Workhouse Infirmary, but died at 10.45 on Tuesday morning. Dr Kingdon described the injuries which the deceased sustained, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Friday 2 July 1897, Issue 9356 – Gale Document No. Y3200765555
EXMOUTH FATALITY – Adjourned Inquest, Today. The Home Manufacture of Fireworks. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of FREDERICK HENRY SELLICK, 14, of Union-street, Exmouth, died from injuries received by the bursting of a tin of coloured fire at Exmouth on Jubilee night was resumed at the Rolle Hotel at noon today by Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy District Coroner. The deceased and Mr Frank Abell (a naval engineer student, and son of Mr Councillor Abell) were members of a break party which proceeded to Chudleigh and on returning Mr Abell lit some coloured fire, the tin containing which exploded, injuring his hand so severely that it had to be amputated and inflicting such injuries to the lad SELLICK that he died on Thursday week from shock. Evidence of identification and of the purchase of the materials for the fire at Mr Stevens's having been given the Inquest was adjourned until today to allow of the attendance of a Government Inspector of Explosives.
This morning Colonel Ford, Board of Trade Inspector of Explosives, watched the proceedings, Superintendent Jesse was present on behalf of the police, and Mr E. J. Vine, solicitor, appeared for Mr Abell, whose father, Mr T. Abell, was also present. The attendance also included the Rev. G. Every. The first witness was the injured passenger.
Miss Adela Mary Dawe took the oath in Scotch fashion, with uplifted hand. Her right arm was still in a sling. She said she was a morning governess of Birmingham. She was on a visit to Exmouth, where she resided at 94, St. Andrew's-road. She went with a break party to Chudleigh Rocks on Jubilee Day with 26 or 27 other passengers. No fireworks were let off until the return to Exmouth, about eleven o'clock. The break stopped at the house of Mr Abell, the father of Mr Westcott Abell, one of the passengers. He and Mrs Abell got out and after going into the house he got into the break again. She noticed that he had a wooden handle with the cover of a tin (produced) at the end of it, and a can. She held the spoon while he emptied some of the contents of the tin. He put a light to the contents of the spoon, producing a vivid red light. A few minutes later she assisted him by holding the spoon while he poured some more of the stuff into it; she could not say whether he poured it from the same tin. She could not remember whether he applied a second light to the contents of the spoon, but there was a bang. The first finger of her right hand was severely injured and had been amputated, but she did not know at that time that anyone else was hurt. She did not notice a flash of light at the time of the explosion. By Mr Vine: there were some boys at the corner of the street throwing coloured lights like matches into the break, and one fell on her dress. She was at the rear of one side of the break, and Mr Abell was at the other; and the boys were running after the break and throwing the matches into it. They continued throwing the lights up to the time the explosion took place, but she could not say whether or not it was caused by the lights. Witness signed her depositions with the left hand.
The Coroner put a question as to whether the passengers each paid a fare, o wether the break was hired privately, the object of the question being to ascertain whether the vehicle came under the definition of a public conveyance or not. Mr Abell answered that he hired the break, and understood the passengers would pay him their proportion of the cost of hiring the break.
Dr Cock, under whose care Miss Dawe is, said he had strained a point to bring her to the Inquest in order to expedite the Inquiry. Her injuries were not confined to the finger. Her thumb and palm were also injured.
Gilbert Charles Tucker, of Staple's-buildings, errand boy to Mr Abell, said on Saturday week he went to Mrs Bennett's grocer, for a quarter of a pound of sulphur for Mr Westcott Abell.
James Prowse, Shoot-meadow-street, said he was a postboy in the employ of Mr Sellers. He drove the party to Chudleigh Rocks. On returning to Exmouth he stopped at Mr Abell's house. He could not say who got out. The deceased was engaged by Mr Sellers as conductor for the day, and had never been so engaged before. Witness did not know anything about the explosion, except the fact that he heard it. The horses bolted at the top of Chapel-hill, and witness could not pull them up for about fifty yards. – By Colonel Ford: It was a four-horse break.
Thos. Bertrand Abell was next called, and was cautioned by the Coroner, who said the Inquiry was a very serious one, affecting several persons. It was therefore his duty to caution the witness that he was not bound to give any evidence which might incriminate himself and could refuse to answer any question on that ground.
Mr Vine said by his advice the witness would make a full statement.
Witness said his brother Westcott brought home the ingredients for making red, white and blue fire on the evening of the 19th June, and witness manufactured the lights at home on the morning of Monday, the 21st, mixing the ingredients in the proportions appearing on page 177 of "Inorganic Chemistry," by V. V. Lewes. – By Colonel Ford: He had a knowledge of chemistry, obtained at school. He knew that chloride of potash, one of the ingredients, was easily decomposed in the presence of sulphur. He had no license to manufacture fireworks. He was not aware of any special danger in the admixture of chloride of potash and sulphur, or that Order in Council had been issued in 1894 prohibiting the manufacture of fireworks containing the ingredients. He was not in the break at the time of the accident. He was not aware of an additional danger caused by the presence of sulphate of actimony. - By Mr Vine: He had passed the examination of the College of Preceptors, first in all England in chemistry, but did not profess to know much about explosives. The book was by a Government man, and he therefore thought the formula would be safe. After making the lights he tested them and they went off very quietly. He had no idea he was infringing the law by making the lights. By the Foreman: (Mr Blackmore): The light which exploded was the white one.
Colonel Ford elected to give evidence as an expert. He said he was a late Colonel R.A., a C.B., and an Inspector of Explosives. He had inquired into the accident as far as he was able. The mixture of chloride of potash and sulphur in fireworks was dangerous and on that account was absolutely prohibited except by permission of a Government Inspector. No such permission was given, and it was not intended to give any. He had very little doubt that the explosion was caused by the white fire being poured into the spoon which had already been heated by the burning of the red fire in it. Had the fire being lighted in the ordinary way no explosion would have occurred. The temperature of the tin might have been 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, and the igniting point of sulphur was only about 500. A provision in the Explosives Act made the manufacture of fireworks except in a licensed factory or in a small firework factory illegal, and another provision that fireworks should not be discharged in the public streets. Mr Vine: The Order in Council prohibiting the mixture named was published in the London Gazette, Edinburgh Gazette and Dublin Gazette.
Mr Vine: Which scarcely anyone every sees.
Arthur Henry Teone, chemist, of Rolle-street, said he lent a pestle and mortar for Mr Abell's son to make coloured fires. He did not know that the manufacture of coloured fire was illegal.
The Coroner enquired whether Mr Sellers, the owner of the break, was present, pointing out that he, as owner of the vehicle, as well as the person in charge of the vehicle, was liable to penalties for permitting the fires to be let off.
The Deputy Coroner, in summing up said the case was a very serious one, endangering the safety of the public, and requiring a careful enquiry. It was for the Jury to consider whether the breaches of the law which had been committed amounted to gross negligence. He understand that Mr Westcott Abell was still confined to his bed.
The room was cleared, and the Jury deliberated in private for a few minutes, eventually bringing in a verdict of "Accidental Death." In reply to a request from the Deputy Coroner for a more definite verdict the Foreman said they found that death was due to shock caused by an explosion in the break, which they considered was carrying a private party.
The two other tins of the composition, which were produced at the Inquest, were ordered to be taken away in water.

Monday 5 July 1897, Issue 9358 – Gale Document No. Y3200765633
A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned at an Inquest held at Buckfastleigh on Saturday on the body of JOHN RICE, who committed suicide by cutting his throat on Thursday.

Tuesday 6 July 1897, Issue 9359 – Gale Document No. Y3200765640
A Coroner's Jury at Devonport yesterday found that WILLIAM WINSOR, aged six, died from misadventure through having taken an excessive quantity of brandy.

Tuesday 6 July 1897, Issue 9359 – Gale Document No. Y3200765647
THE FATALITY AT TAVISTOCK – At the Tavistock Cottage Hospital this morning, Mr R. R. Rodd, Deputy County Coroner held an Inquest on the body of SIDNEY WILLIAM CUNDY, aged two years, son of a general labourer residing at Tavistock, and whose death from burns was reported by us last evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and gave their fee to the parents.

Saturday 10 July 1897, Issue 9363 – Gale Document No. Y3200765768
THE TRAGIC DEATH OF A TORQUAY WOMAN – Inquest – This Day. - Mr H. W. Hooper (the City Coroner) held Inquests at the Exeter Police Court this afternoon into the circumstances attending the deaths of MRS BERTHA GEISLER, a native of Torquay, and her newly born child, who were found dead in bed yesterday morning at 47, Howell-road, under the distressing circumstances reported in last night's Post. Mr T. Ham was chosen Foreman of the Jury. In answer to the Coroner, Sergeant Perriam said the birth of the child had been notified to the Registrar, but had not yet been actually registered. Its name would be EMMA. The Coroner said he proposed taking only one set of depositions respecting the two bodies but there would have to be two inquisitions.
HARRIET SETTER, single woman, of 5, Princes-road, Torquay, identified the body of the woman as that of her sister, the wife of ALFRED GEISLER, ship's cook, but she did not know on what ship. Sergeant Perriam said the vessel was the Nile. Witness continuing said her sister was about 37. She did not know, but believed she lived at 47 Howell-road. She had not seen deceased since last August, and knew nothing about her confinement or when the child was born.
Mrs Maria Clynick, of Mary Arches-street, said she was a certificated midwife. She was engaged to attend the deceased in her confinement, which took place on Wednesday night. Her boy fetched witness on that night, but by the time she arrived the baby was born, and was on the bed. It was apparently a healthy child. Witness, after attending to the deceased, asked whether she had anyone to stop with her the night, and she replied that she had not, adding that "She never had anyone." Witness offered to stop a couple of hours, but deceased said she was going to send for the woman who did her washing – Mrs Facey. Witness went about one o'clock, having been there since eleven, and Mrs Facey came about six o'clock. Witness went to deceased again on Thursday, about one o'clock, and again attended to the deceased, who said she never felt better in her life; and the child was "looking nicely." Witness promised to call again on the following morning – Friday, but deceased's boy came to her house on that morning and told her that his mother and the child were dead. As far as witness knew no medicine was given the mother. By the Jury: She had seen the deceased some two months ago.
But is it not usual for the nurse to visit woman twice in one day instead of once? - Yes, but I offered to stop with her, and she said she did not want me.
Did you stop a sufficient time with her at her confinement? - Yes.
Mrs Alice Facey, wife of Hugh Facey, of Pancras-lane said she had known the deceased for two years. Witness spoke in a hoarse whisper which was inaudible to the Jury, and the Coroner had difficulty in hearing. Sergeant Perriam said he spoke to the witness yesterday, and she could speak all right then. - Witness: Yes; it is more fright than anything else. - The Coroner: I shall have to commit you if you don't speak up. I shall know what to do with you; it is absurd.
The Foreman: Then it is put on. - Continuing, witness said she was fetched by deceased's son on Thursday morning, but the statement was made in the same whisper, and the Coroner repeated his admonition.
Witness: I can't help it sir.
The Coroner: But I'm told you can help it.
Witness, continuing, said she found the deceased in bed and said "Old gal, what's the matter?" Deceased showed her the baby and asked her to make a cup of tea, which she had with a piece of bread and butter. She asked witness to get the children ready for school, which she did. She had to leave to go to work at nine o'clock, but came again about five, when deceased told her she was going on wonderfully. Witness left at ten, going again on Friday morning, about ten minutes to nine. A little girl opened the door, and when witness asked how her mother was, made no answer. She found the deceased lying across the bed on her face. Witness touched her and finding she was cold called in a neighbour. Witness did not see the child. The police were fetched, and soon came. Witness remained downstairs with the children. She did not know if MRS GEISLER had taken any medicine or was in the habit of taking any.
By the Jury: She had heard the woman complain of a weak heart. Her husband had been away six weeks. She did not promise him to stay with his wife and attend her. She asked her if she should remain throughout Thursday night and deceased replied "No."
Mr Alfred Steele-Perkins, of St Sidwell's, said he did not know the parties. He was called to the house about half past nine On going upstairs to the front bedroom he found the body of the deceased on the bed. She was lying on her face and hands, and partially covered with the bedclothes. Witness moved her up a little and found the body of the infant under the right side of her chest. He removed the child, which was quite dead, but warm. The face was a good deal flattened, and very congested. He then examined the woman and found her face was partly buried in the pillow, and very highly congested. She was a woman of stout build. There was a good deal of haemorrhage in the bed, and on the clothing. By the Coroner's order he made a post mortem examination in the afternoon. The whole of the internal organs were healthy and there were no marks of violence; but the brain was very highly congested. There was a clot of blood at the base of the brain, at the fourth ventricle. That in itself was quite sufficient to account for death, which was due to haemorrhagic apoplexy. It was a natural death. Women in her condition were liable to that. It was proper to mention that in the room he found a small bottle marked as containing laudanum, horebound and paregorin. There was no trace of that to be found in the stomach, which was practically empty. The woman had been dead for five or six hours when he saw her. Her hands and feet were cold, but the body was quite warm. The child died from suffocation through having been overlaid. From the position of the woman's body he should say that she got out of bed, and on returning had the attack and fell over the child.
The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a very painful case, and one to be deplored. It was very sad that a woman in the prime of life should be taken away in such a manner. The evidence, however, clearly showed that the death of the woman was natural, and that the child was suffocated through being overlaid by the mother. It was a very sad case indeed; a more painful one had not come before him for a long time.
Mr J. Piper (a Juror): It was evidently her own fault that she did not have a person with her.
The Coroner: I agree with you.
Mr Piper: The neglect was on her own part.
Mrs Clynick, in reply to the Coroner, said the woman was a stranger to her.
Mr E. Parr (a Juror) said he knew the deceased woman for three months when she lived in Portland-street, and she seemed a temperate person.
Mace-Sergeant Perriam said she was very much respected by her neighbours in Howell-road.
The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that, in the case of the woman, death was due to Natural Causes, and that in the case of the child death was due to Accidental Suffocation.

Wednesday 14 July 1897, Issue 9366 – Gale Document No. Y3200765842
An Inquest was held at Newton by Mr Coroner Hacker last evening touching the death of EMMA HOPKINS, 47, wife of THOMAS HOPKINS, railway porter at Newton. Deceased fell down stairs early on Tuesday morning and died two hours after from concussion of the brain and shock. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 21 July 1897, Issue 9372 – Gale Document No. Y3200766014
THE EXWICK DROWNING CASE. A Dangerous Spot. - At the Exeter Police Court this morning the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest touching the death of CHARLES GEORGE DE VIELL, of Exwick, whose body was found in the mill leat near the Bonhay-road on Monday evening. Mr Henry le Grosie Hird was chosen Foreman of the Jury. WALTER DE VIELL, father of the deceased, and a labourer of Exwick, said his son was about three and a half years of age. He last saw him alive about nine o'clock on Monday morning, when he was standing at the door, which was close to the leat. Deceased was playing with a ball, and witness warned him against going near the water. Witness missed him soon after. Nothing was heard of him until he was picked up in the leat near Bonhay-road. Soon after they missed him witness's wife asked deceased's younger sister (who was two and a half years of age) where he was and she replied "CHARLEY is in the water." They searched the whole of the neighbourhood and dragged the river, but deceased could not be found. In answer to the Coroner witness said the railing along the side of the leat was insufficient to keep the children from getting in. Frank Sharland, of Cricklepit-lane, stated that he was going up Bonhay-road on Monday evening about 6.30 when he saw some boys running along by the leat. He looked into the leat and saw the body of a child which he fetched.
Mr Thomas Smith, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said he examined the body and found that death was due to drowning. The Coroner in summing up said there was no doubt the spot where it was supposed the child fell in was dangerous to children and he would call the attention of Sir Redvers Buller to the matter. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Friday 23 July 1897, Issue 9374 – Gale Document No. Y3200766076
SUDDEN DEATH AT EXETER – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Parade Room of the Exeter Police Court this morning touching the death of JOHN WOTTON, millwright, who died suddenly on Wednesday night. SUSANNAH C. WOTTON, widow, stated that during Wednesday night deceased was breathing heavily and she told her son that something must be the matter with him. Witness lifted the deceased's head, but he signed three times and expired. Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, said death was due to syncope, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 24 July 1897, Issue 9375 – Gale Document No. Y3200766129
An Inquest was held on Thursday at Langbeer Farm, Stockland, touching the death of SARAH BEATRICE, aged one year and ten months, daughter of GEORGE GLADE, Land-end cottage, Stockland. Mr Atkins, surgeon, said a post mortem examination showed that deceased had eaten berries of the nightshade, which caused her death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death through Poisoning."

Wednesday 4 August 1897, Issue 9383 – Gale Document No. Y3200766373
DEATH FROM EXCESSIVE DRINKING – Mr Deputy Coroner Michelmore held an Inquest at Torcross on Tuesday on the body of WILLIAM THOMAS CLEMENTS, a sailor, who was found dead in a chair in the house of Charles Chadder, a mason's labourer. Charles Chadder stated that he and deceased had been drinking on Saturday evening last. They bought a bottle of whiskey and drank about four-fifths of it between them. He left deceased downstairs about half-past eleven and went to bed, leaving him with his head resting on his arm on the table. When he came down in the morning he found CLEMENTS stiff, and quite dead. There was then about only one glass of whiskey left in the bottle. Mr William Doughty stated that there was not an iota of food in the body, with the exception of a small piece of cheese. There was no doubt that death was due to excessive drinking. Deceased must have been drinking heavily for some time previous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Alcoholic Poisoning, brought on through excessive drinking."

Friday 6 August 1897, Issue 9385 – Gale Document No. Y3200766425
BIDEFORD – Inquest. - A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned at the inquest held on the body of BERTIE BLACKMORE, aged 16, who was drowned while bathing in the Torridge on Wednesday afternoon. The Coroner was desired to write to the Town Council and impress on them the necessity for the provision of a public bathing place.

Tuesday 10 August 1897, Issue 9388 – Gale Document No. Y3200766522
CHOCKED BY A SHIRT COLLAR AT CULLOMPTON – An Inquest was held at Cullompton by Mr A. Burrow on Monday touching the death of HARRY ROGERS, 76, a native who was found dead in a garden at Lower Mill-lane. He had no home, and was in search of work. The medical evidence shewed that death was due to suffocation, caused by the tightness of deceased's collar during unconsciousness. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

Tuesday 10 August 1897, Issue 9388 – Gale Document No. Y3200766544
INQUST IN EXETER – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at 11, Little Silver, St. David's, this morning on the body of ANNE REED, aged 90, a widow, who was found dead in her house on Saturday evening. Mr Clapp, surgeon, said in his opinion death was due to syncope. The Jury, of which Mr Hoskins was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Wednesday 11 August 1897, Issue 9389 – Gale Document No. Y3200766549
INQUEST AT DARTMOOR PRISON – Mr J. D. Prickman (County Coroner) held an Inquest at Dartmoor Prison yesterday on the body of WILLIAM BENJAMIN TANN, assistant warder, who died suddenly on Monday, aged 38 years. Dr Frew, the Medical Officer of the Prison, said death was due to rupture of the blood vessels of the heart arising from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Tuesday 17 August 1897, Issue 9394 – Gale Document No. Y3200766720
INQUEST – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquiry this morning into the circumstances of the death of HENRY TURNER ALLEN, aged 71, retired plasterer of No. 3 Lower Brunswick-place, Paris-street. Mr J. Roberts was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Evidence was given by HENRIETTA ROWE, daughter of the deceased and wife of Frederick Rowe, journeyman baker, of No. 3 Higher Brunswick-place, to the effect that deceased had not been under medical treatment for some time, although being in a weak state. He died on Sunday. Mr G. Clapp said that death resulted from Natural Causes, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Friday 20 August 1897, Issue 9397 – Gale Document No. Y3200766823
SUDDEN DEATHS IN EXETER – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Exeter Police Court last evening on the body of ANNIE MITCHELL, aged 44, of Brunswick-place, Paris-street. The deceased had been ill for a long time, and had been treated at the Dispensary. She was taken worse on Tuesday and died suddenly. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Mr Hooper held another Inquest at the Police Court this afternoon on the body of MATILDA HARRIETT VINE, of Twigg's-court, St. Sidwells. It appeared that her husband left her at nine o'clock yesterday morning and on going home at 1.30 found her lying on a cot dead. Mr Perkins was called in, and he stated that death was due to an apoplectic fit. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Monday 23 August 1897, Issue 9399 – Gale Document No. Y3200766892
CHARGE AGAINST AN EXETER SERVANT – Alleged Concealment of Birth. A Singular Verdict. - At the Exeter Police Court today the City Coroner held an Inquest on the body of a newly-born female child.
Mr C. Young was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and the Jury having been sworn, the Coroner said the case they had to enquire into was a case of a female child whose name was unknown, not having been registered. It was for them to enquire whether the child was born alive, and how it came by its death. If it was a case of concealment of birth they would have nothing to do with that. That was a matter for the Justices to deal with.
The Jury then viewed the body in the mortuary.
Mrs Rippon, wife of Mr H. E. Rippon, of Colleton Villa, the Friars, stated that she had had a servant in her employ named ETHEL MAUD EVERSLEY. She told witness she was 21 years of age next birthday. She had been in her service for two months. On Friday morning last about ten o'clock she went to her bedroom and saw that the carpet on the floor was very much stained with blood, while a bucket under the bed contained stained linen. Later in the day witness had a conversation with the girl in the kitchen. Witness said, "ETHEL, I am afraid there is something very serious the matter with you." She replied that she was sure there was not. Witness said she felt sure she had had a miscarriage. She also told her that she would go at once for a doctor. The girl repeated several times that there was nothing the matter with her. Witness said "If you are a wise girl you will tell the truth. If I can do anything for you, I will." After a great deal of persuasion she said, "Well, I will tell you if you won't tell anybody." She replied, "I cannot promise you that. It all depends on what you have to tell." The girl then said "Something did come away from me. I think it was a baby." Witness asked her where she had put it, and she answered "In the back." Witness then sent for her husband.
The Coroner: Did you notice the girl's condition previously?
Witness: Not very much at all. I spoke to her, and she said she had not been well for some time; that she had been under a doctor, and was taking medicine and pills. That satisfied me.
Florence Peckham, who wept whilst giving evidence, said she was a housemaid in the service of Mrs Rippon, and slept with EVERSLEY. On Wednesday night EVERSLEY was restless, remaining in bed but a few minutes at a time. On Thursday morning witness was awakened by her and asked her what was the matter. She replied "Lie down; I fell better now." Witness asked her what was the time, and she said "It's better now. It's quite early. I am going to dress and go downstairs." She dressed herself and called witness's attention to the pillow. Witness turned around to see what it was, and EVERSLEY slipped out of the room and went downstairs. Witness saw a stain on the carpet. Shortly afterwards witness went downstairs, and saw EVERSLEY in the kitchen. She told her she felt very weak. Witness went out on Thursday afternoon and evening and returned just after ten, when she again saw EVERSLEY and asked her how she had been all day. She said she felt "very feeblish." She went to bed, and no further conversation took place.
A Juror: Did you know the girl had a baby?
Witness: No sir; I did not until Friday evening.
Did you hear a baby cry on Thursday morning? - I was awakened on Thursday morning by a noise, but I did not know what it was.
The Foreman: Had you any cause to suspect her condition? - Not at all.
Elizabeth Jarman, female searcher, said on Friday she received certain instructions from the Chief Constable and went to the residence of Mrs Rippon. She was called to the bedroom where she saw the young woman EVERSLEY. she said "How are you? and she replied "I fell very poorly," and began to cry. Witness asked her what was the matter, and she answered "I've had a baby." She then asked where it was and she replied "In the cellar." She asked "when it happened" and EVERSLEY replied "Half-past six yesterday morning." She also asked if witness wanted to see the baby, and witness answered "I must." EVERSLEY then went downstairs with witness to the cellar door. The girl went inside and took up a parcel from the ground. Witness took it from her, and found it to contain the body of a full grown female child. P.C. Guppy was then called and the parcel was conveyed to the mortuary at the Police Station.
The Chief Constable: When you went into the room did you see any baby's clothes about?
Witness: No, sir.
A Juror: Did the girl say the child was born alive? - She said repeatedly that it never cried.
P.C. Guppy stated that on Friday last he received certain instructions from the Chief Constable, and went to Colleton Villa, where he met the last witness, who said that the servant there (meaning EVERSLEY) had had a baby, which was hidden in a cellar. EVERSLEY was then called forward, and the parcel containing the body of the child was handed to him. Witness cautioned the girl as to what she said, and then asked her if it was her child. She replied "Yes." Witness then charged her with concealment of birth. She made no reply, and was brought to the Police Station, whilst the body was conveyed to the mortuary.
Mr C. E. Bell, police surgeon, deposed that on Friday evening last, about half past six, he was called to the Police Station, when he found the body of the child, wrapped in brown paper. It was a fully developed female child which had not been attended to at birth or after. By the Coroner's order witness made a post mortem examination the same night. There were no external marks of violence. The lungs were fully inflated. They floated freely in water and supported the weight of the heart. The brain and all the other organs were healthy. The body and organs contained little or no blood. The child had had a separate existence and bled to death.
The Coroner, in asking the Jury for a verdict said he must tell them that he thought this was a case of concealment of birth, but with that they had nothing to do. A Coroner had no power over concealment of birth, which was a case for the magistrates to deal with and doubtless the case would come before them, and be so dealt with unless the Jury found any other verdict.
After a few minutes' deliberation, the Foreman said the decision of the Jury was that it was a case of concealment of birth.
The Coroner: That you cannot find. You have no power to do that. That is the difficulty. We have no power over concealment of birth. That is a question for the Justices. You might find an open verdict of "Found dead."
Mr W. P. Little (a Juror): "Accidental Death," sir?
The Coroner: No, no; you cannot bring in "Accidental Death."
Mr Little: through bleeding to death.
The Coroner: It is not accidental.
Mr Little: It was an accident that the child bled to death.
The Coroner: It was through want of attention.
The Jury further considered their verdict, and Mr T. P. Wilson, a Juror, next asked: "Could we, Mr Coroner, bring in a verdict of "Accidental Death," caused by inattention at birth?
The Coroner: You can hardly say "accidental" death.
Mr Wilson: There was no one there when the child was born. The fellow servant slept with her, and she must have known something about her condition.
The question of "Accidental death" was discussed at some length, the Coroner eventually suggesting that the verdict should be "That the child was found dead, and that death was caused by inattention at birth."
Mr Little: What would she be charged with?
The Coroner: We don't charge her with anything. She is charged in another Court.
Mr Little: I think that "Accidental Death" would meet the case myself.
After deliberation the Foreman presented a verdict in writing, "That the child was found dead, and that it died through inattention at birth, and that the mother was unaccountable for her actions at the time."
The Coroner: (perplexed): Is that your verdict, gentlemen?
The Foreman: That is the verdict of us all.
The Coroner: Very good.
It is stated that EVERSLEY is at present in the Workhouse Infirmary, and is making satisfactory progress towards recovery, but it is not probable that she will be formally brought before the justices this week.

Saturday 28 August 1897, Issue 9404 – Gale Document No. Y3200767093
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER - £100 a Year and Nothing To Do. - Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquiry at the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday into the circumstances attending the death of ROBERT PATERSON, of 6 Colleton-buildings. Mr John Voisey was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The evidence went to show that the deceased was of independent means, and had lodged for the past twelve months at the address named with Mrs Loweth. About fifteen years ago his father died, leaving him £100 a year, and out of this he paid 12s. a week for his board and lodging. His remittances came from London weekly, and one of the Jurymen thought he was a member of a family associated with one of the great carrying businesses of the Metropolis. He had no employment, and seemed to have spent his time in taking walks and frequenting public-houses. He was at the Hour Glass Inn, Melbourne-street on Saturday night, when he was taken ill, but recovered sufficiently to go to his lodgings, with the assistance of a man named Bowers. this was at ten o'clock, and at one o'clock on Sunday morning Dr Harrison was sent form, but PATERSON died about half an hour afterwards. The doctor said he considered death to be due to sanguineous apoplexy. He had attended him last October for a severe cut on the back of his head sustained through falling down some steps. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Thursday 2 September 1897, Issue 9408 – Gale Document No. Y3200767218
SCENE AT AN EXMOUTH INQUEST – A Juryman Sent to Prison. Witness Fined £2. - Mr Burrow, of Cullompton, acting for Mr Cox (Coroner for the District) held an Inquest at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, last evening, on the body of THOMAS BURROWS, a seaman, aged 43, of Exmouth, whose body was found on Monday, after having been missing since June 5th.
The first witness called was George Bradford, sailor, who stated that he had known deceased for several years, and last saw him alive about four months ago, in his usual health. Witness heard that the deceased had gone out to sea in a boat, and was not afterwards seen alive. The boat drifted to Brixham. Witness found the body on Monday afternoon about two o'clock, near the Temple steps. The body was much decomposed, but he identified it by the clothes and the deceased's watch, knife, and other effects.
Sergeant Dymond said he saw BURROWS shortly before he disappeared. Deceased was a steady man It was thought he went out on the night he was lost to look after his master's yacht. Witness produced the articles which were found in deceased's pockets.
SARAH JANE BURROWS, widow of the deceased, said her husband was lost on June 5th. He went out with the intention of taking some articles off to his master's yacht. He was not intoxicated. He knew what he was about. It was a fine night. MRS BURROWS was much distressed at the sight of the watch, which Sergeant Dymond kindly removed after the necessary identification.
George Axon, sailor, was called as a witness. He refused to take the oath. The Coroner was proceeding to swear him after the Scotch fashion, when Axon tried to dictate the method to the Coroner.
The Coroner said he had presided over a considerable number of Courts, but he had never before known a witness who declined to take either the English or Scotch oath. He ordered the witness to be detained until the Inquiry was over.
Axon then made a rude remark, and the Coroner appealed to the Jurymen for an expression of their opinion; whereupon a Juryman said that he thought the witness was treating both the Coroner and his office contemptuously. It was decided to dispense with Axon's evidence.
The Coroner summed up ably and clearly. After some consultation, in which "Found Drowned" met with no approval, a unanimous verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.
The Jurymen presented their fees to MRS BURROWS, and signed the sheet. then the Coroner politely thanked and dismissed them. Before they had all left the room, however, and whilst the Coroner was still seated at the table, engaged with official documents connected with the case, a most regrettable scene occurred.
Mr S. P. Firth, who was in the room during the Inquest, assumed his hat and put his pipe in his mouth, and said to the Coroner:- "You evidently do not know your business. I understand that the Court is over, and therefore I should like to tell you that you do not know how to administer the oath." Mr Firth then lit his pipe.
The Coroner ordered the pipe to be taken away from him.
Sergeant Dymond sent for a constable to keep the door. Meanwhile, several of Mr Firth's friends and some of the Jurymen resumed with Mr Firth; begged him to remove his hat, and express his regret for having addressed the Coroner in the way he did. But he was obdurate. All this time the Coroner was ominously writing. Presently he had finished and sealed a warrant for the apprehension of Mr Firth and handed it to the Sergeant, remarking "That is an order for you to take that man into custody and convey him immediately to Exeter Prison where he will remain until I order his release."
The Coroner, the Jurymen and the public then left, Mr Firth remaining in custody on the premises, whence he was shortly removed to the police station.
Excitement ran high in the town when the news of the incident spread, and speculation was rife as to what course would be adopted. Nothing further, however, transpired last night. The Coroner went away, and with the removal of Mr Firth to the cells his destination was assured. He was brought to Exeter this morning by the 9.30 train in charge of P.C. Weeks, and a small crowd assembled to see him off, but were not allowed on the platform. On arrival at Queen-street, a quiet move was made to the Prison.
It is being freely rumoured that the solicitors advising Mrs Firth in the matter have applied to the Lord Chancellor for a anandamus to procure Mr Firth's release. Enquiries made this afternoon were fruitless in regard to ascertaining what action is being taken. A good deal of discussion has arisen on the subject in legal circles, and in some quarters a modicum of doubt is expressed as to whether objection cannot be taken on a technical point to the Coroner's action.

Thursday 2 September 1897, Issue 9408 – Gale Document No. Y3200767219
ANOTHER INQUEST AT EXMOUTH – The Coroner and Last Night's Meeting. - The second Inquest held by Mr Deputy Coroner A. Burrow, of Cullompton, on behalf of Mr Cox, the Coroner for the district, this week, took place at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, today. It was held for the purpose of inquiring into the death of JAMES FREDERICK SMITH, yachtsman on Mr C. J. Ross's yacht, Yagve. Mr William Sampson was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and Deputy Chief Constable Jesse was present at the hearing.
JANE SMITH, the widow, gave evidence of identification, and said her husband was 34. She last saw him on Tuesday morning about half-past seven. He suffered in his head and had fainting fits, and had been under several doctors. She heard he was ill on Tuesday evening, but did not see him, and on Wednesday morning she was told he was dead. When he left on Tuesday morning he took some ham and tea with him. She did not know whether he had been taking medication from a chemist. By Mr Hine (a Juryman): Deceased usually came home about six in the evening. – By another Juryman: A doctor had told deceased he must keep away from paint, or it might be fatal. She did not think he had had a fit for a good while, though it was a common thing for him to have them. James Fox, shipwright, said deceased took him across to the Warren on Tuesday morning about half past one. Witness started work, and deceased lit the fire in Mr Ross's boathouses, subsequently leaving to bale out the yacht. Witness did not see him again until he was brought ashore at the Pier. Deceased left witness between three and half-past. The deceased put his dinner in the boat-house, eating part of it and leaving the remainder, which was there still. John Hawkins, sailor, of the town, said he knew deceased for years. He rowed out to see where deceased was, as the last witness told him he did not know where deceased was, as he had promised to meet him (Fox) at five o'clock and had not done so. Witness went to the yacht and found the deceased lying across the stern near the crutch of the mainboom, where he must have fallen; it was not the place he would go if he wanted a nap. Witness rubbed his hands, and hearing him groan slightly took him ashore at the pier. There was no bottle or glass near where he was lying. P.C. Robinson said he saw deceased at the Dock landing stage being attended to by Dr Shapland. By the doctor's orders he performed artificial respiration until half-past nine. He examined the body and searched the yacht, but could find nothing. this morning he had made enquiries of all the chemists in the town, who all said they had not sold poison or anything else to the deceased. - By a juryman: He believed there was a chemist's shop at Lympstone, where deceased lived, but he had not enquired there. Dr John G. Shapland said about eight o'clock on Tuesday evening, he was called to the deceased, who was insensible. His breathing was laboured and his pulse feeble and irregular. Witness tried to rouse him, but was unsuccessful. He then treated him for organic poisoning, giving him an emetic and got a stomach pump. The emetic had effect and there was a strong odour of what seemed to witness like tincture of opium. At the Coroner's direction he had made a post mortem examination, and found the deceased to have been healthy, though showing symptoms of lead poisoning. The contents of the stomach had been roughly analysed, and as near as the test would go it showed slight traces of opium. He could not swear to the presence of opium owing to his not having all the reagents he required. It was just possible the lead poisoning might have caused death, but it would not have done so under the circumstances he found. Lead poisoning might have accelerated death, which was, he believed, due to poisoning, probably opium, but he had no idea of the quantity he had taken. MRS SMITH, re-called, said she was sure her husband had not been in the habit of taking opium. She had no opium in her house, and did not know the smell of it. Deceased only took bilious pills and the medicine prescribed for him by his doctor. Dr Shapland, in answer to a Juryman, said if the deceased was kept at painting it might bring on lead poisoning. the use of tobacco would not produce the symptoms he found. Mr C. J. Ross, the deceased's employer, said the man had been with him for about three months and was a very honest, conscientious, sober man. Last week he told witness he had been unwell, and complained on one occasion that his sight was going, and that he was unable to read a newspaper. He had also suffered from colic. - The Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a somewhat difficult one. They had the opinion of the doctor that death was due to poisoning. One would have expected under the circumstances that the wife of someone would have been able to say where the opium was obtained, but that did not seem to be the case. If the Jury were of opinion that death was due to opium or lead poisoning, or both, they would, of course, return a verdict to that effect, but whether the deceased took the opium with the intention of alleviating pain or taking his life would be a question for them to consider. If he might venture to make the suggestion he thought the proper verdict would be that the deceased died from the effects of poisoning, but the precise nature of the poison and by whom it was administered there was no evidence to show. The Jury, after4 a short deliberation, found that death was due to Natural Causes, but had been accelerated by chronic lead poisoning. The Coroner, in dismissing the Jury, thanked them on behalf of the county for their services, and expressed his pleasure at the fact that the Inquiry had terminated very differently from that of yesterday – a remark that was received with applause. The Jury gave their fees to the widow.

Tuesday 7 September 1897, Issue 9412 – Gale Document No. Y3200767344
FATALITY AT INSTOW – Torquay Man Killed. - An Inquest was held yesterday, before Mr J. F. Bromham, at the Marine Hotel, Instow, on the body of RICAHRD KING, who met with his death on Sunday. Mr E. Nicholls, proprietor of the Marine Hotel, stated that deceased had been a waiter in his employ, and came from Torquay. Deceased was 47 years of age, and was a married man. He slept away from the hotel, and witness saw nothing of him until half-past six o'clock the next morning, when he was informed that he was dead. Witness then went to the house where he lodged, and found him lying at the bottom of the stairs. Witness at once sent for a policeman and a doctor, who pronounced life extinct. The body was then conveyed to the hotel, and witness telegraphed to the deceased's wife. KING was a steady, well-conducted man. John Ridge, gardener, at whose house deceased lodged, said deceased came home on Saturday night after witness had gone to bed. The next morning, on coming downstairs, witness saw deceased lying at the bottom, apparently dead. There was a box of matches some distance up the stairs. Witness then sent for Mr Nicholls. He had never seen deceased the worse for liquor. Dr A. E. Mahood, of Appledore, said he had made a post mortem examination of deceased, and had found an extensive fracture of the skull, with a large effusion of blood on the brain, an injury sufficient to cause a speedy death, and which might have been caused by falling backwards over the stairs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 7 September 1897, Issue 9412 – Gale Document No. Y3200767353
TAVISTOCK – At the Inquest at Taunton yesterday on the body of MARION CULLEY, of Park Wood Villa, Tavistock, whose death was reported last evening, the medical evidence showed that death was due to cerebral haemorrhage and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Monday 13 September 1897, Issue 9417 – Gale Document No. Y3200767521
THE DOUBLE FATALITY ON THE DARTMOOR RAILWAY - At the Plympton Workhouse on Saturday Mr Coroner Rodd held an Inquest on the bodies of P.C. VOISEY, of the Plymouth Police Force, and GEORGE HENRY CUMMING, carriage and waggon examiner on the Great Western Railway, who were killed on the Moorland Railway on Thursday. The accident took place on an incline leading to the Lee Moor Clay Works. The deceased were on a blackberrying excursion, when they were overtaken by a number of trucks ascending the hill at great speed. It was found, when removing the clothes from the bodies, that one man had his left arm almost flattened, while the other was similarly injured on the right arm. James House deposed to seeing the men pass up the line on Thursday morning. the trucks were going at full speed at the spot where the bodies were found. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Mr Martin expressed, on behalf of the owners of the works, their very deep sympathy with the relatives of deceased. The Jury contributed their fees to the widow of P.C. VOISEY, CUMMING having no one dependent upon him.

Saturday 18 September 1897, Issue 9422 – Gale Document No. Y3200767684
SINGULAR FATALITY IN SOUTH DEVON – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at Loddiswell on Monday, relative to the death of the only son, aged three years, of MR YALLAND, postmaster. On Friday the deceased was in the house of its grandfather sitting by the fire, whilst his uncle, a lad of 14 years, was making a jug of cocoa. As the boiling cocoa was carried across the room the little fellow, who had got off his chair, was struck or ran against the jug in his uncle's hand. The bottom of the jug came out, and all its contents were spilled over the left side of the chest and arm, resulting in a very severe scalding. The deceased never rallied, and died from exhaustion on Saturday evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sincere sympathy with the bereaved parents.

THE KINGSTEIGNTON FATALITY – Resumed Inquest. - Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held the adjourned Inquest at the National School, Kingsteignton, on Monday, touching the death of WILLIAM MEAD, claycutter, who was buried alive by the collapse of a clay pit at Kingsteignton on August 25th. Mr T. W. Windeatt, Totnes, appeared for Messrs. Hexter, Humphreyson, and Co., clay merchants, employers of the deceased; Mr J. Martin, H.M. Inspector of Mines and Factories, and Mr J. Hutchings, Teignmouth, were also present. John Maynard, claycutter, acting Foreman of the deceased's gang, stated that on August 25th Harris, Toodle and MEAD were working in the pit in the morning. They returned from dinner about twenty minutes past two and the three then went down to work again. Shortly after the men called him to throw down an upright. Witness went to get an upright, but before he could get back to the pit the men had come up. They said that some gravel had run out. He called Mr Mudge, the foreman, who, after looking down the pit, said, "It is finished." The men said they were going down to get their tools, and Harris went first. Witness lowered the water cask for them to send up the tools in, and afterwards heard some shouting. Toddle was coming up the ladder, with Harris climbing up the stays. Witness saw some of the timber falling off, and the gravel running in. He saw nothing whatever of deceased. When the men went down witness did not know there was any danger. In his opinion the clay, which he should think was a foot or eighteen inches thick, had slipped, and the gravel ran in. – Mr Hutchings: Is it not a fact that as soon as Mr Mudge came over and the men got to the top the men knocked away the rest of the stays and began filling in the pit? - Witness: Someone knocked one or two stays off. The pit was then half filled in. - George Mudge, foreman of Messrs. Hexter, Humphreyson & Co.'s Works, said he went down the pit at 6 o'clock in the morning, and everything was secure. The last stay was only three feet from the bottom. About 23 minutes past two he saw that the side had burst through by the bottom timber, and some gravel had run in. He saw the pit was not safe, and said, "That pit is finished; nothing more to be done there." Certainly he did not regard the pit as too dangerous to go into, although it was for work, and the men might have gone down to fetch their tools. The cause of the fatal occurrence, was, in his opinion, the heavy pressure on the sides of the pit, due to the recent heavy rains that filled the old workings. Mr S. J. Martin, H.M.'s Inspector of Mines for the district, as an expert witness, said he had no fault to find in the timbering of the clay pit in question. The cause of the collapse of the pit was due to the running away of the sand at the back of the boards which lined the sides. In this case the men re-entered a pit without the leave or the consent of the foreman, and in mines this would be contrary to rules. Pits should be examined daily to ensure safety. Mr James Vallance, manager for 38 years for Watts, Blake, and Bearne, clay merchants, of Newton, also gave evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and while attaching no blame to anyone, expressed the opinion that the supervision should be improved.

Thursday 16 September 1897, Issue 9420 – Gale Document No. Y3200767635
DEATH FROM LOCKJAW – Inquest at Ashwater. – Mr J. D. Prickman (County Coroner) held an Inquest at Thorny Cross Cottage, Ashwater, last evening on the body of JOHN BROCK, son of HENRY BROCK, mason, who died on Tuesday last, aged 10 years. The father stated that three weeks ago the deceased was out nutting and fell off a hedge, and he afterwards complained of a sore shoulder. Dr Kingdon, of Holsworthy, was sent for a day or two after as the boy did not get better, and he found that the deceased's collar bone was broken. Dr Kingdon said he had attended deceased constantly since the 1st inst., and gave it as his opinion that death was due to tetanus, or lockjaw, brought on by an injury to the collar bone, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly, adding that it was accidently caused by the deceased falling off a hedge.

Friday 17 September 1897, Issue 9421 – Gale Document No. Y3200767641
THE EXMOUTH BURNING FATALITY - Inquest Today. The Jury and Doctor Martyn. - At the Devon and Exeter Hospital today Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest into the circumstances attending the death of BESSIE BASTIN, daughter of WILLIAM H. BASTIN, labourer, of No. 2, Albert-place, Albion-street, Exmouth. EMMA BASTIN, mother, said deceased was six years' and seven months old. On Monday witness went away to work about half-past nine, leaving her three children alone in the house, BESSIE being the eldest. The baby was in bed and the other two downstairs, the younger, Lily, being two years and six months old. There was a little fire in the grate. Witness knew nothing of anything happening until she came home about eleven. On opening the door she found the house full of smoke, and going to the back door called "BESSIE," repeating the call in the front room and upstairs. She found her in witness's room rolled up in the clothes, in bed. She said "Mother, cover me up; I have burnt myself." She said she had touched the fire. Witness carried her downstairs and cried for help. The neighbours came to her assistance, and she went to the Maud Hospital. She found, however, that it was closed, and was advised to go to the dispensary. There she saw Dr Martyn, who recommended her to go to Exeter Hospital, which she did, the child remaining unattended. She arrived at the Hospital about one o'clock. When she returned there was no fire in, but she saw the mantelpiece had been burnt. She had left the matches on the mantelpiece when she went away, but she did not notice whether they were there when she returned. BESSIE was in a chair by the fire when witness went away. Mr Richards, a Juryman, elicited the fact that the Maud Hospital was closed for a month for repairs. Mr W. Ashford, assistant house-surgeon at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said deceased was received about one o'clock on Monday. She was very badly burned about the arms, chest and neck, but was quite conscious. Her clothes were cut off and the burns dressed. On Tuesday she continued in a collapsed state, and died on Wednesday morning about five o'clock, death being due to shock from the burns. By a Juryman: He did not think that if the child had been treated at Exmouth it would have made any difference. The Coroner thought the children rather young to be left alone with an unprotected fire. He advised MRS BASTIN to always have the fire guarded when she went out in future. Mr Leat expressed the opinion that Dr Martyn should have done something to relieve the child's sufferings. A delay of at least three quarters of an hour must take place before anyone from Exmouth could reach the Exeter Hospital. Mr Richards, another Juryman, thought that in an institution supported by voluntary subscriptions, like the Dispensary, something should have been done to treat the child before it was sent to Exeter, and he should like to have a rider added to the verdict to that effect. The Coroner said he could not accept such a rider, and Mr Richards said he would make the suggestion. Another Juryman said Dr Martyn in sending the child to Exeter evidently thought he was doing the best thing for it. The Coroner said he did not think any blame attached to Dr Martyn, who, he took it, ordered the child's removal in order to save it's life.
Mr Chown thought that some arrangements for treating serious cases should be made whilst the Maud Hospital was closed. A verdict of "Accidental Death," without any rider, was eventually returned.

Tuesday 28 September 1897, Issue 9430 – Gale Document No. Y3200767949
DEATH OF A BRIDGWATER GIRL – Inquest in Exeter. - An Inquest was held this morning at the West of England Institution for the Blind, Exeter, by the City Coroner, Mr H. W. Hooper on the body of ADA HELENA ROSE, of Bridgwater Water-Works, and an inmate of the West of England Institution for the Blind. Mr W. Leatheren was chosen Foreman of the Jury. HENRY ROSE, engine driver at the Bridgwater Waterworks, identified the body as that of his daughter, who was 127 years of age. She was totally blind, and had been in the Bridgwater Infirmary. Mr R. W. Rose, superintendent of the Institution, stated that the deceased was admitted to the Institution on the 27th February last. On Saturday evening she complained of feeling unwell and went to bed, attended by a nurse. She declined to be attended by a medical man. Deceased was seen shortly afterwards and appeared to have had a fit. A medical man was sent for and everything was done to restore animation, but she died before the doctor arrived. Mr R. V. Solly, surgeon to the Institution, stated that when he arrived deceased was dead. The death – a natural one – was most probably due to asphyxia, arising from blood in the air passages. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. The Coroner remarked that it was a most painful case. Everything was done for the deceased, and the greatest kindness and consideration was always shown in the Institution, which was a most beneficial one to the city.

Friday 1 October 1897, Issue 9433 – Gale Document No. Y3200768022
THE EXETER SUICIDE – Inquest, This Afternoon. - The Inquest on the body of ALFRED BURGESS, cellarman in the employ of Messrs. Spiers and Pond at Queen-street Station, Exeter, and the circumstances of whose death was detailed in last evening's Post, was held at the Police Court this afternoon by the City Coroner, Mr H. W. Hooper. Mr F. Burrington was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Mr Armand, local manager to Messrs. Spiers and Pond, represented the firm.
WILLIAM BURGESS, stationer, of 27,. Lambeth Palace-road, London, identified the body as that of his son, a single man, aged 27. He had been in Exeter about five years. Witness had not seen him since last October, and was first brought acquainted with his death by a telegram yesterday.
Emily Wensley, cook at the refreshment rooms, said she had known the deceased for about five years, and was engaged to be married to him. She was last with him between ten and eleven on Wednesday night, when he was quite sober. He usually went to Queen-street station in the morning about eight o'clock. Yesterday morning about nine o'clock she was informed that he was very ill in the cellar, but she was not allowed to see him, and was afterwards told that he was dead. He was not excited when she last saw him, and they had no angry words. By a juror: She knew of nothing to cause him trouble so far as she knew, except that he was rather excited as to whether his stock would come out right at the stock-taking.
William Moore, porter at Queen-street Station, said he saw deceased at five minutes to seven yesterday morning at the entrance to the cellar. Beyond passing the time of day witness did not make any remark to him. He had never known deceased there so early before. He should say BURGESS was a temperate man.
John Pearce, pastry boy, of 4, Gatty's-court, St. Sidwell's, said he was sent to the cellar by the cook to call BURGESS to breakfast. He found the cellar door closed, and receiving no answer after several calls he went down the steps. He saw a man, whom he did not recognised, with something hanging from the ceiling over his face. He ran up the steps and told the barmaid what he had seen and reported the matter to Mr Mellison (who had come to take stock).
Mr Mellison, stocktaker to Messrs. Spiers and Pond, living at 2, Bath-terrace, Pinhoe-road, said the last witness told him there was a man standing in the cellar with something over his face. Witness rather ridiculed the idea, but on looking into the cellar saw deceased hanging to an iron bar. He sent for assistance and Mr Amand, witness, and another man cut the rope by which BURGESS was hanging. By the Coroner: Deceased's stock was in a very good state and was balanced very well.
Dr Bremner said he was called to the station, and in the cellar saw the deceased in a sitting posture on a cask, with a rope round his neck. He was dead, the body being partly warm. Death had probably taken place an hour or more.
A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Tuesday 12 October 1897, Issue 9442 – Gale Document No. Y3200768354
DEATH OF A DAWLISH MAN – An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital by Mr H. W. Hooper this afternoon on the body of HENRY EASTERBROOK, aged 54, of Dunsford, and formerly watch and clockmaker, of Dawlish. Deceased fell downstairs, and the medical testimony shewed that death was due to cerebral haemorrhage, which probably caused the fall. A verdict of death from "Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 16 October 1897, Issue 9446 – Gale Document No. Y3200768471
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – The Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on Tuesday at No. 101, Portland-street, Exeter, on the body of SOLOMAN CHARLES, gardener. HARRIET SOPHIE VODDEN, wife of Mr Richard Vodden, schoolmaster, identified the body as that of her father, who was 69 years of age. His health had been failing of late, and on Friday she found him lying on the ground in the garden unconscious. Mr F. Casey, surgeon, said he had known and attended the deceased for some time past. He was suffering from a weak heart, and witness considered that death was due to heart disease. He could have given a certificate of death. A Juryman: If Dr Casey could have given a certificate what was the good of us coming here? - The Coroner: That is a question for me and the public. I don't hold unnecessary Inquests. Circumstances arise sometimes when it is necessary to hold an inquest. A Juryman: Anybody would have thought that Dr Casey might have given a certificate, he having known and attended the deceased. The Coroner: Here is a man drops down in the garden. - A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was subsequently returned.

EIGHTY FITS IN A DAY - Mr Prickman, County Coroner, held an Inquest at Dartmoor Prison on Tuesday on the body of a convict named JAMES BIGGS, aged 38. The deceased came to Dartmoor from Exeter on the 21st June 1897. He was convicted on the 19th January last at the North London Sessions of counting-house breaking, and staling a safe, and was sentenced to seven years' penal servitude. Mr P. R. Mander, Deputy Medical-officer of the prison, said on the 5th instant he found the deceased in his cell suffering from a fit of an epileptic form. Witness had the deceased taken to the infirmary. From that day down to his death on the 9th deceased was continually having fits, one day having as many as eighty. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Tuesday 19 October 1897, Issue 9448 – Gale Document No. Y3200768521
EXETER LIFT FATALITY – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this afternoon touching the death of CHARLES HENRY ANGWIN THOMAS, 17, who fell down a lift at the "Times" Stores, of Messrs. Clarke, Russell and Co. - William Osborne, porter, stated that he saw the deceased coming towards the lift, which was used for taking up goods. It went down into the cellar and deceased was on the second storey. Witness saw him jump and catch hold of the lift and start swinging. He swung back once, but whilst trying to swing again he fell to the cellar. The assistants were not allowed to go up or down the lift. Seymour Warner, warehouseman, said deceased was supposed to be going up stairs for some bags, but seeing the lift coming down, he rushed over and took hold of the bottom of the cradle. Witness saw him hanging on to the bottom of the lift, but in a moment he had disappeared. Witness immediately went down and found him lying in the cellar. He was nearly dead, and a cab was at once sent for and deceased taken to the Hospital. By a Juror: It was a practice for witness and his men to go down the lift. The deceased must have done it for a lark. Mr William Ashford, assistant surgeon at the Hospital, said the deceased only lived about ten minutes after admission to the institution. It was quite plain he had fractured his skull, and he was also very much bruised. Death was due to the fracture of the skull. The Coroner said it was clear that deceased had no right to touch the lift. Mr Plimsoll said the lift was a caged one, and notices were posted at each floor that the doors were to be closed on the lift passing through. The Coroner said every precaution should be taken to prevent another accident. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and expressed their sympathy with the family in their bereavement.

Friday 22 October 1897, Issue 9451 – Gale Document No. Y3200768633
SUDDEN DEATH AT TAVISTOCK – The sudden death of JOHN SPRY, aged 37, married, carpenter, of Tavistock, was the subject of an Inquiry at the Guildhall this afternoon before Mr R. R. Rodd, junr., Deputy County Coroner. ALICE SPRY, the widow, deposed that they retired to rest at 10 o'clock on Wednesday evening, and at four o'clock the next morning she was disturbed by her husband making a noise as if choking. He died before a doctor could be fetched. Dr De Beauvais attributed death to apoplexy, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes." - The Funeral on Sunday will be a military one, as the deceased was a Sergeant in the Tavistock Volunteer Detachment.

Tuesday 2 November 1897, Issue 9460 – Gale Document Nod. Y3200768953
FATAL ACCIDENT AT BUDLEIGH SATLTERTON – At the Salterton Cottage Hospital on Monday Mr Cox (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of WALTER CHARLES GOODING, a farm labourer in the employ of Mr William Lawrence, of Tidwell Farm, who died on Saturday from injuries received through falling from a waggon on the 17th October. GEORGE GOODING, father of deceased, said he saw his son just before the occurrence. He was then going to the station with a load of wool, to return with a load of grain. He did not see the accident, but hearing cries for assistance went to the spot. He spoke to his son, who told him that he was getting off the shafts of the waggon when his foot slipped, and the waggon went over his leg. The deceased was taken to the Cottage Hospital, where every possible attention as shown him. Thomas Andrews, photographer, said he was in a field adjoining Barn-lane, and saw the deceased pass him standing on the front part of a farm waggon, which was travelling at an ordinary pace, and was going down hill. He heard cries soon after and found deceased lying on his left side by the side of the road. The deceased said "The wheels have gone over my leg. I was getting off the waggon and my foot slipped." Witness held two certificates from the St. John Ambulance Society, and temporarily dressed the wounds. Deceased was conveyed to the Hospital. William Lawrence said the deceased was in his employ, and that morning had been sent to the Salterton station. He saw the deceased after the accident, and asked him how it occurred, and if the horse had run away. He replied that it was no fault of the horse whatever; that he was standing on the shafts, and his right foot slipped and knocked the other off. Mr Evans said he saw the deceased at the hospital after the accident. He had been a patient of his, and he considered him a steady man. He found a very bad comminuted fracture of the left leg, and also bad wounds on the right leg. Deceased was a healthy, strong man, and he went on fairly well for fourteen days, when symptoms of tetanus set in, and after consultations with Dr Walker and Mr Semple, they agreed to amputate the leg. The deceased underwent the operation fairly well, and gradually improved for a week, but eventually succumbed to a sudden spasm of tetanus. In reply to questions, the doctor said in his opinion the operation was the only possible chance of saving life and that the deceased would have got over the operation had not tetanus supervened. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 2 November 1897, Issue 9460 – Gale Document Nod. Y3200768946
SUDDEN DEATH – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper, this afternoon at 33, West Southernhay, Exeter, touching the death of WILLIAM DENSHAM. Deceased carried on business at St. Thomas as a timber merchant and died at the address named while on a visit last evening. Dr Davy stated that he had attended deceased for kidney and heart disease. Death was due to failure of the heart's action. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Wednesday 3 November 1897, Issue 9461 – Gale Document No. Y3200768961
SUDDEN DEATHS IN EXETER – Two Inquests were held by Mr Coroner Hooper today. The first was at 41, Sandford-street, on the body of MARY ANN VICTORIA MANLEY, aged 42, who died suddenly yesterday morning. It appears that the deceased was in a sitting position on the floor. Dr Mortimer was sent for, but deceased was dead before his arrival. Dr Mortimer stated that deceased died from haemorrhage on the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

The second inquest was at 16, Longbrook-street, on HARRIETT LAURENCE, aged 68. The deceased who died suddenly yesterday, asked for a cup of beef tea, but before her husband could bring it to her she was dead. Dr A. S. Perkins said death was due to failure of the heart's action and a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Friday 5 November 1897, Issue 9463 – Gale Document No. Y3200769039
SAD BURNING FATALITY – Mr R. B. Johns held an Inquest at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, on Wednesday, relative to the death of MARTHA HURST, aged nine years. Arthur Clatworthy, of 17, Cambridge-lane, Plymouth a steward in the Navy, said he heard screams proceeding from MRS HURST'S room in the same house on Tuesday evening, and on going to the landing saw deceased with her clothes on fire. He wrapped a sheet around her and put the fire out, and conveyed her to the hospital. EMILY HURST, mother, said she knew nothing of the accident as she was at work. Dr Hamilton attributed death to shock caused by the burns, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 November 1897, Issue 9468 – Gale Document No. Y3200769215
FATALITY AT SALTERTON – An Overdose of Chloral. - At Salterton on Wednesday Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ARTHUR DAVIDSON MILVAIN, aged 32, a medical student. Miss Emily Moon, aunt of deceased, residing at Dawlish, visited him on Friday last as he was unwell. He had been in the habit of taking narcotics for sleeplessness. When she saw him he was very weak and complained that speaking was very painful to his throat. On Monday morning Charlotte Heathron, his landlady, found him lying on the bed in his sleeping suit. Mr F. Sanders deposed to making up a bottle of sleeping mixture, containing six does, for the deceased last Saturday night, the chief ingredients being opium and chloral. Dr Evans said deceased had been suffering from a diseased liver, the effect of his habits. He was suffering from insomnia. The dose taken was an extremely strong narcotic. He had told witness that he had once taken two doses of a night, and he had warned him of the very great risk he was thereby incurring and that much less than that quantity might prove fatal. Witness had found the liver and kidneys much diseased. There was pleurisy of the right lung, together with other complications. The Jury returned a verdict that death was due to syncope, caused by an overdose of narcotics.

Monday 15 November 1897, Issue 9471 – Gale Document No. Y3200769321
THE COLYTON FATALITY. Censure By the Jury. - Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest on Saturday into the death of HARRY HAWKINS, 20, labourer, in the employ of Mr Pavey, farmer, of Roadpit Farm, Colyton, whose death we have already reported. It appeared that one of Mr Pavey's sons, aged 15, had been rabbit shooting, and left a loaded gun on the kitchen table. In his absence his brother aged 16, picked up the weapon to return it to its owner, Mr Pearcey, and according to his own statement "meddled with the trigger," while the muzzle was pointing towards the kitchen where HAWKINS and others were at dinner. The charge entered HAWKINS'S neck, and he bled to death in a few minutes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," censuring the lad who left the gun loaded on the table.

Monday 15 November 1897, Issue 9471 – Gale Document No. Y3200769320
DEVONSHIRE GIRL'S SAD DEATH - EMILY RADDEN, aged four years, the daughter of a photographer in business at Wilmington, near Honiton, some time back met with an accident, cutting the tendons of the fingers of her right hand. She was attended by a local surgeon, but was taken to London to see if by an operation the use of her hand could be recovered. She was admitted to the Middlesex Hospital and there on Tuesday she was placed under an anaesthetic by Dr Norton, the operation to be performed by Dr Gould. Mr Mannington being the assistant surgeon. She sank, however, and death ensued from syncope or failure of the heart. At the Inquest held in London on Saturday by Dr Danford Thomas, at St. Marylebone, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Wednesday 24 November 1897, Issue 9479 – Gale Document No. Y3200769556
SUDDEN DEATH AT EXMOUTH – Inquest, This Day. - Mr Deputy Coroner Cox held an Inquest at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, this morning, touching the death of JOHN ROBERT COLLINS, the four year old son of EDWARD J. W. COLLINS, a labourer, of Exmouth, who was found dead in bed on Tuesday morning. The father stated that the child had had a cold and had also been confined to its bed for two days. He slept with the child on Monday night when it appeared to be very restless. When he woke the next morning at about a quarter to seven the child was dead. The mother of the child gave corroborative evidence. Dr Martyn stated that he examined the child and found its lungs slightly congested, and it might have been sickening for measles. He thought the actual cause of death was convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly, and gave their fees to the parents of the deceased.

Wednesday 24 November 1897, Issue 9479 – Gale Document No. Y3200769567
A small party of gipsies named ORCHARD, had encamped on a field at Hitt's Farm, Clyst St. Lawrence, on Sunday, and during the afternoon, a boy, JOSEPH, aged 16, fell down and expired. An Inquest was held on Tuesday and it was shown that death was due to heart disease.

Thursday 25 November 1897, Issue 9480 – Gale Document No. Y3200769589
TEIGNMOUTH FATALITY – The Inquest. - At the London Hotel, Teignmouth, on Wednesday evening, Mr S. Hacker, District Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of HENRY FREDERICK DURANT MURCH, who accidentally fell off the sea wall the previous night. The Coroner said that after viewing the body it would be advisable for the Jury to visit the scene of the accident, as this was the fourth fatal accident there which had occurred within the last ten years. The evidence showed that the deceased was 28 years of age, and was of defective sight. Henry Bidwell, of Pound-lane, said he met the deceased on Tuesday evening at 7.15, and they started to walk to Dawlish by way of the sea wall. Deceased was perfectly sober. The night was very dark. When about 200 yards on the wall deceased fell off into the water below, which was about 7 ft. deep. Deceased could not swim, and it was impossible to get a boat near because of the reefs. Witness then ran towards Teignmouth for assistance.
William Henry Heard, seaman, said he met two ladies near the first tunnel, who said that something had happened along the wall. Witness, with two companions, went back and met Bidwell, who said "Man overboard." They all went over but could see nothing of deceased. They heard a gurgling noise. Evidence as to the finding of deceased's body having been given, Mr Christopher Jones, Surveyor to the Teignmouth Urban District Council, said the sea wall was the property of the Great Western Railway. There were no lights on the wall belonging to the company. The District Council had put railings in what was considered the most dangerous part to the extent of sixty yards. This was done by permission of the Company. The road was certainly dangerous after dark. The Coroner: Have any steps been taken to get the rest of the wall fenced in? - Mr Jones: None at all. Mr Jordan, Clerk to the Council, said that it was entirely owing to pressure brought to bear on the Company that the present railing was erected. – The Coroner: The Company have taken the right of way that formerly existed on the beach, and erected a wall as a substitute. It was not the sort of thing that ought to exist, as the thoroughfare was a public one, and one of the ordinary ways to Dawlish. It was for the Jury to say whether they were content to let the nuisance remain any longer. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and added the following rider:- "That the Jury consider the present condition of the sea wall is dangerous to the public by reason of the total absence of lighting and fencing, and they suggest that the Teignmouth Urban District Council should bring pressure to bear on the Great Western Railway Company by a test case or otherwise, to properly protect the wall, so as to make it safe for the public to walk thereon at all times."

Friday 26 November 1897, Issue 9481 – Gale Document No. Y3200769604
INQUEST AT ST. THOMAS - At the Mission Hall, Alphington-street, this afternoon, Mr A. Burrows, Deputy Coroner, of Cullompton, held an Inquest on the body of ANNIE LOUISA JACKMAN, Aged three months, daughter of FRANK JACKMAN, labourer, of 17, Oxford-street, St. Thomas. Mr W. Scott was chosen Foreman of the Jury. ELIZABETH JACKMAN, the mother, said the child was put to bed on Tuesday last apparently in the best of health. About six o'clock next morning she found her dead. FRANK JACKMAN, husband of the last witness, gave corroborative evidence. Mr T. Smith, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said death was due to suffocation. The Coroner commented upon the danger of young children sleeping with their parents. The returns of the number of children who were suffocated through being overlain was getting somewhat alarming. A verdict of "Accidental Suffocation" was returned.

Monday 29 November 1897, Issue 9483 – Gale Document No. Y3200769658
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper this afternoon t No. 4, Paris-street, on the body of MARY ANN SHERRY, who died suddenly on Friday last. Florence Mary Bawden stated that the deceased was a widow, and on Friday last, noticing that deceased was not looking very well, she asked her what was the matter, but not getting any reply witness sent or Dr Brash. She was dead before his arrival. Dr Brash said the cause of death was an apoplectic attack, which caused a blood vessel on the brain to burst, and which was also the cause of her death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Tuesday 30 November 1897, Issue 9483 – Gale Document No. Y3200769674
"Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned at an Inquest held at Silverton on Monday on the body of JOHN DYMOND, aged 60, who dropped dead outside his door on Friday last.

Tuesday 30 November 1897, Issue 9483 – Gale Document No. Y3200769695
FATALITY AT SALTERTON – At Salterton on Monday Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of JOHN DALEY COOPER, aged 75, a retired painter. Deceased had latterly been somewhat strange in his behaviour. On Thursday he was left having his tea in a room on the ground floor. A few minutes later he was seen to fall from the window of a bedroom not usually occupied by himself on to an outhouse and then to the ground. Death took place on Saturday morning. Deceased could give no explanation of the accident, and he had to climb over the bed to get to the window. Dr Semple said death resulted from internal injuries. Deceased was not addicted to drink, and it was not probable he would attempt suicide. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 1 December 1897, Issue 9485 – Gale Document No. Y3200769718
DARTMOOR CONVICT'S DEATH – An Inquest was held by Mr J. D. Prickman (County Coroner) at Dartmoor Prison on Tuesday on the body of Convict THOMAS WILLIAMS, aged 43, single, stoker. Deceased was convicted on the 7th April, 1896, at North London Sessions for stealing nine saws, &c., and sentenced to three years' penal servitude and two years' police supervision. The deceased was fatally injured by a stone falling on him. Chief warder John Hodge said he visited the deceased on the morning of the accident and the latter said to him "I'm done for now. It's no one's fault but my own. I thought the stone would have toppled over, instead of which it skidded down on me." Mr W. S. Frew, medical officer, said he found a large lacerated wound on deceased's forearm and extensive lacerations on the left groin. There had been considerable haemorrhage. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 2 December 1897, Issue 9486 – Gale Document No. Y3200769743
A BRIXHAM SUICIDE. A Young Man Shoots Himself. - JOHN GEORGE HANNAFORD, aged 25, a native of Paignton, and of good position, who has been staying for some time at the Bolton Hotel, Brixham, committed suicide by shooting himself on Tuesday. About 10.30 a.m. he got into a cab driven by Mr Tounshend, taking a double-barrelled gun with him, and gave orders to be driven to Paignton. On arriving near to the lodge of the residence of Lord Churston the cabman was alarmed at hearing the report of a rifle within the cab, and found that his fare had shot himself. He at once drove back to the Bolton yard, Brixham, where Police Sergeant St. Newbury and Sergeant Major Instructor W. Coates, took HANNAFORD out of the cab. He was quite dead. The muzzle of the rifle was lying just under his chin, whilst he had a firm grip on the trigger with his right hand. The body was conveyed to the mortuary, and upon examination it was found that the muzzle of the rifle had been placed in the mouth of deceased, as the roof was blown completely away, and the whole of the charge, which consisted of small shot, was lodged within the skull. On searching the pocket there were found three cartridges similar to the one discharged, and a piece of paper upon which the only words decipherable were, "Good-bye forever." There were also forty mourning cards relative to his mother, who is not dead. Upon the cards there was the following:-
In affectionate remembrance of Elizabeth Ann, widow of Phillip Hannaford, late of Greenway, Churston Ferrers, who died at Lower Yalberton, Paignton, 25th November, 1897, aged 60 years. To be interred at Woodleigh on Wednesday, December 1st, at 3 p.m. Thou art gone but not forgotten. Never shall your memory fade, Sweetest thoughts shall ever linger, Round the place where thou art laid."
At the Inquest held by Mr Coroner Hacker the evidence showed that deceased was under the hallucination that his mother was dead, and often cried. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Friday 3 December 1897, Issue 9487 – Gale Document No. Y3200769759
SHOCKING DEATH – Child Fatally Burnt at Exeter. - FRANCES MARTIN, a girl eight years of age, died this morning from injuries caused through her being burnt last night. Her parents live at Gatty's-court, St. Sidwell's, and about half-past eight o'clock last night the little girl was sitting beside the fire, apparently alone. Her mother, who was upstairs, suddenly heard her screaming, and came downstairs to find her daughter enveloped in flames. She succeeded in extinguishing the fire, and the girl was taken in a cab to the hospital. Every attention was given her there, but after lingering some hours she expired. The Coroner has been communicated.
INQUEST THIS AFTERNOON. – The Inquiry was held at the Hospital this afternoon by the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould). Mr W. Medland was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
FRANCES MARTIN, of Gatty's-court, St Sidwell's, mother of the deceased, deposed to going upstairs, about 9.15 last evening, leaving deceased in the kitchen in company with her other child, an infant. While upstairs she heard the deceased call "mother," and in response to her mother's asking what was the matter, she replied, "Mother, quick, quick," and she then ran down and found deceased in flames. She extinguished the fire with carpets, and by her own screams attracted a neighbour with her assistance deceased was taken to the Hospital. Witness enquired of deceased how the accident happened, but the child said she didn't know. The only way witness could account for it was that the child got on the fender to reach the mantelpiece. Deceased was quite conscious.
Wm. Ashford, assistant house surgeon t the Hospital, said deceased was admitted about 8.30 last night. The child was badly burnt about the front of the body, face and arms. The burns were dressed, and she was put to bed, but the case was considered quite hopeless. Deceased died about 7.30 this morning, and death was due to the shock caused by the burns.
The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 4 December 1897, Issue 9488 – Gale Document No. Y3200769795
A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned at an Inquest held at Start Farm, Stokenham, on the body of THOMAS HORTON, who died of shock from syncope, after having been cut by the knife of a chaffcutter.

Saturday 4 December 1897, Issue 9488 – Gale Document No. Y3200769806
NEWTON RAILWAY FATALITY - The Inquest – Today. - At the Marsh Schoolroom, Newton, this morning, Mr H. G. Michelmore, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM ROBERT NORMAN, packer, aged 58, who was accidentally knocked down and killed at Newton Station about mid-day yesterday. Mr F. Dobell was chosen Foreman of the Jury. William Kerswell, engine driver, said he was in charge of the train leaving Paignton at 121.15 a.m., and arriving at Newton at 11.43 a.m. Outside the station he was stopped by the home signal showing "danger." He felt no shock. He attributed the accident to the fact that as he was running into the station he crossed another train going out, and deceased in avoiding one train must have got in front of the other. There were no marks on the firebox or any other part of the engine. Dr W. G. Scott said deceased's head was crushed as though it had been placed between a pair of nutcrackers. The wheels of the engine had not passed over any of the limbs. Death must have been instantaneous. William Eales, 13, saw the accident from the bridge. Deceased appeared to be oiling the points at the time. George Creese Brimmacombe, shunter, found the body lying between the rails on the up-branch line from Torquay, entering the centre platform, three or four yards from the points. Evan Hughes, fireman, said he was on the engine and kept a look-out but did not see deceased. George Lugg, Foreman ganger, said deceased had been doing the work on and off for the past twenty years. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 7 December 1897, Issue 9490 – Gale Document No. Y3200769834
BURNING FATALITIES - At an Inquest held on Monday relative to the death of MARY BRIGHT SLEE, aged two years, at 102, Exeter-road, Plymouth, NANCY SLEE, the mother, said she left deceased in the kitchen for a minute last Thursday. On hearing screams she returned and found the child's clothes and hair on fire. She fire in the kitchen was nearly out. Dr T. H. Williams said the deceased was suffering from extensive burns on the upper part of the chest, right arm, and neck. He attributed death to shock, caused by the burns. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Tuesday 7 December 1897, Issue 9490 – Gale Document No. Y3200769842
THE FATAL ACCIDENT NEAR CREDITON – Inquest at Exeter. - Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this afternoon on the body of THOMAS WILLIAM PICKARD, aged 43, who died on Monday from injuries received near Crediton about a week ago, through being run over by a timber waggon, which he was driving. MARY JANE PICKARD, widow of deceased, of Bear Hill, Knowle, Copplestone, said her husband was a carter in the employ of Mr Thomas Lee, and was driving a timber waggon and three horses on Monday week. Charles James Henderson, who resides with Mr Lee, said he was at work with the deceased at Kenelly Woods and when coming down Red Hill he did not put the drag on. A piece of oak touched the shaft horse and it plunged. Deceased pulled the horse into the hedge and the shafts knocked him down, the wheels passing over his body. He was taken to Crediton on a stretcher, and then conveyed to the Hospital in a trap. Mr H. Andrew, house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was brought to the institution in a state of collapse with a fracture of the left thigh, two or three ribs broken, a fracture of the left arm, and a slight scalp wound. He died on Monday from injuries sustained. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Wednesday 15 December 1897, Issue 9497 – Gale Document No. Y3200769995
FATAL ACCIENT AT HEAVITREE – Inquest, This Afternoon. - An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this afternoon, by Mr Coroner Hooper, touching the death of JAMES GOULD, whose death took place at the Hospital yesterday. EMMA GOULD, wife of the deceased, said deceased was a labourer and resided at Heavitree. Deceased, who was aged 71, met with an injury on the 30th October. On that date he went out for a walk in the evening, but he had not been gone out more than five minutes before he was brought home by two men. He said he had fallen across the kerb. Witness sent for Dr Andrews who said he could do nothing with him, as he had a fractured thigh. He was conveyed to the Hospital. By a Juror: He had been bad in his head for some time. Mr W. Ashford, assistant surgeon, said deceased was brought into the Hospital on October 30th suffering from a fractured thigh. Deceased died on Monday night through the breaking up of the system, brought on by the fractured limb. Death was due to senile decay. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 16 December 1897, Issue 9498 – Gale Document No. Y3200770018
DEATH FROM LOCKJAW AT EXETER – JOHN KINGDON, aged 60, of Kingsnympton, who was admitted into the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the 6th instant having had two of his fingers crushed in an apple mill, and had one of his fingers amputated, died of lockjaw at that institution early this morning, and an Inquest will probably be held tomorrow.

INQUEST – A Coroner's Inquest was held last night at Cockington respecting the sudden death of a labourer named BASKEVILLE, which took place on Monday morning. The verdict was that death was due to fatty generation of the heart.

Friday 17 December 1897, Issue 9499 – Gale Document No. Y3200770045
DEATH FROM BLOOD POISONING AT EXETER – A man named WILLIAM FERRIS, bookbinder, in the employ of Messrs. Evans, Gadd and Co., wholesale chemists and stationers, of Exeter, and living at Colleton-buildings, died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday. A few weeks ago he sustained an injury to his finger, and subsequently blood poisoning set in. He was an in-patient at the Hospital, where he died as stated. The Inquest will be held tomorrow.

Friday 17 December 1897, Issue 9499 – Gale Document No. Y3200770047
BRIDGWATER FATALITY – Adjourned Inquest. - The adjourned Inquest on the bodies of SARAH BUCKINGHAM, wife of MR WILLIAM BUCKINGHAM, cattle dealer, Northmolton, and her daughter, BEATRICE MAY, who were killed by falling from an express train after passing Bridgwater on Wednesday night week, took place on Thursday. Mr Gerish (Fussell and Co., Bristol) represented the Railway Company and Mr Ffinch, of Barnstaple, the relatives. Evidence was given by Charles Parson, guard of the express, that the mother and child were the only occupants of the compartment of a corridor carriage when the train left Bristol. He locked the near door at that station, at the request of MRS BUCKINGHAM. An official proved finding the door on the off side of the carriage open when the express arrived at Taunton. Officials at Bristol were called to shew that in their opinion all the doors of the carriage in question were fastened when the train left that station, and a signalman proved that the doors on the off side were all right on the train passing Bridgwater. The Foreman and another Juryman expressed the opinion that, although the carriage in question which the Jury had inspected was new, the fastenings were rotten. Mr Cresser, manager of the locomotive department at Bridgwater station, and an official from Taunton said the fastenings were of the latest pattern and in perfect condition. After a lengthened Inquiry the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", adding as a rider the unanimous opinion that the fastenings of the door were not properly closed at Bristol.

Friday 17 December 1897, Issue 9499 – Gale Document No. Y3200770035
FATALITY AT LYMPSTONE – Mr Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Globe Inn, Lympstone, on Thursday, touching the death of a twin child, eleven months old, daughter of MR J. LITTON, a fisherman, of Lympstone. From the evidence of the mother it would appear that on Wednesday she went outside the house to hang up some clothes, but previous to doing so she placed each child on a chair facing one another. On coming into the house again she found that one of the chairs was overturned, and the child lying with its head on the fender. Mr Barton, surgeon, was sent for, but the child died from injuries it received before his arrival. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Friday 17 December 1897, Issue 9499 – Gale Document No. Y3200770036
DEATH FROM LOCKJAW AT EXETER – Inquest Today. - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquiry at the Devon and Exeter Hospital this afternoon into the circumstances attending the death of JOHN BOWDEN, aged 64, blacksmith, of Powhill, formerly of Kingsnympton. CHARLES EDWARD BOWDEN, farmer, of Powhill, identified the body as that of his father, who was a blacksmith. On the 6th December deceased was at work grinding apples for witness. The machine was worked by horse-power. Deceased's middle finger of his left hand was torn open and other fingers were injured in the machine. Deceased said he was clearing the machine free of the crushed apples when the tumblers, two rollers that reverse to crush the apples, caught his fingers. Witness then drove his father to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died on Thursday last. FRANK MORDANT BOWDEN, aged fourteen, son of the deceased, gave corroborative evidence. Mr Andrew, house surgeon t the Hospital, said deceased was admitted to that institution on the 6th December. He had the fore and middle fingers crushed, and the middle finger was at once amputated. Deceased went on very well until about midday of the 14th when symptoms of lockjaw set in, from which he died on the 16th. The first witness stated that deceased never ought to have put his hand there, there being a shovel to clear the machine. Deceased's hand was caught between the frame of the machine and tumblers. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 18 December 1897, Issue 9500 – Gale Document No. Y3200770094
DEATH FROM BLOOD POISONING – An Inquest was held by the City Coroner today on the body of EDWIN FERRIS, who died from blood poisoning at the Hospital yesterday. From the evidence of ETHEL FERRIS, deceased's daughter and William Cornish, a bookbinder at Messrs. Evans, Gadd and Co's., it appeared that on November the 29th, deceased was "knocking up" some white paper previous to placing it under the guillotine to cut it, and in some way bruised the nail of his right thumb. It caused deceased great pain, and on the Tuesday, November 30th, a doctor was summoned. He ordered linseed poultices and gave him medicine, but the wound became swollen, and on December 6th he was admitted to the Hospital, where he was treated for blood poisoning. Deceased succumbed early yesterday evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 18 December 1897, Issue 9500 – Gale Document No. Y3200770087
THE OTTERY FATALITY – At the Ottery St. Mary Cottage Hospital on Monday Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of JOHN COLLINS, aged 63, a retired farmer, who met his death in attempting to stop a runaway horse on Saturday afternoon. Bessie Prigg said she was in the trap with Mrs Digby, when the horse bolted at St. Saviour's Bridge, and Mrs Digby lost control. She saw deceased standing at the entrance to the mill and called to him to stop the horse. Just at that moment, the trap upset, and she did not remember any more. Frederick Reed, postman, and Albert cork, who saw the accident, said both Mrs Digby and MR COLLINS were rendered insensible. Dr Clayton Jones said he found the deceased suffering from five broken ribs and a severe abrasion on the face. Death was caused by a blow on the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and expressed their sympathy with the relatives.

Monday 20 December 1897, Issue 9501 – Gale Document No. Y3200770100
INQUEST – Mr Coroner H. W Hooper held an Inquest at No. 11, Summerland-street, today, on the body of EDWARD GEORGE CHURCHILL, aged four months, who was found dead in bed on Saturday morning. FRANCIS CHARLES CHURCHILL, the father, said the child was healthy and had not been under medical treatment. On Saturday morning at 8.15 his wife woke him and told him that the child was dead. She had nursed him at a quarter past six. When he found the child was dead he went for Mr A. S. Perkins who came immediately. Mr A. S. Perkins said the child died from convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes.

Wednesday 22 December 1897, Issue 9503 – Gale Document No. Y3200770147
A DEVONSHIRE WOMAN'S DEATH IN LONDON – An Inquest was held on Tuesday on the body of ELLEN DART, aged 41, of no fixed abode. The deceased, a single woman had come to London from Devonshire, and after leading an improper life, applied to the relieving officer to be admitted to the workhouse. While making her way there she fell exhausted, and was taken to the infirmary where she expired. The Jury returned a verdict of death from exhaustion, caused by disease of nearly all the organs in the body.

Friday 24 December 1897, Issue 9505 – Gale Document No. Y3200770199
FATALITY ON THE LYNTON-BARNSTAPLE RAILWAY – While ISAAC POWE, aged 62, of Lynbridge, was engaged on Wednesday on the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway, near Den Steep Quarry, pushing an empty truck along the line, three heavily-laden trucks overtook him. Before POWE could get out of the way he became jammed between the trucks. His body was lacerated and his left thigh and leg fearfully crushed. Mr Mitchell and Mr Thompson were summoned, but their services were of no avail, and the poor fellow died within a very short time of the accident. An Inquest was held today.

Saturday 1 January 1898, Issue 9510 – Gale Document No. Y3200770247
SUICIDE OF A NEWTON WOMAN – Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest in the schoolroom, Bishopsteignton, yesterday on the body of ELIZABETH EGBEER, aged 62, of Newton Abbot, whose body was picked up in the Teign, near Bishopsteignton. Mr G. Maddicott was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
WILLIAM CHARLES EGBEER of 12, Osborn-street, Newton Abbot, identified the body as that of his wife. She lived with him and his son in Osborn-street, and her health had been delicate, she having been under the doctor about three weeks ago. Witness went home last Monday night just after ten and his wife was then crying like a mad woman. Witness left home about 6 o'clock, she being then there. Deceased and her daughter had had a few words and she said she had called her an "old devil", and she would never forgive her. Witness tried to quieten her. The daughter came in and she sent her to her sister-in-law's house. Witness and the deceased had their supper and went to bed. Deceased was restless during the night, and was just as excited in the morning, and remarked that she would never see her daughter again. She continued the whole of the day about her daughter. Deceased did not say anything during the tea time, and at about twenty minutes to eight as witness was proceeding out of the house the deceased said, "I may see you again or never. My purse and money is in the cupboard." Witness said he did not want her money, and told her to be quiet. She made no reply, and witness went out. Deceased had threatened to take her life, but not recently. He did not know what made her say so, but deceased had a violent temper. Witness had proceeded some distance away from the house when he considered what deceased had said and went back again. He found deceased fully dressed, and after making some remarks as to his returning so quick she left the house. Witness went out to follow, but she was out of sight. Witness and his son went to look for her, but could not find her. Witness sat up all night, and the next day gave information to the police. Witness was going to Lustleigh when a messenger informed him that the deceased had been picked up. They had been married 37 years and there were six children, only one living home. By the Coroner: He was on friendly terms with his wife. For the past twelve months she had complained of pains in her head. BESSIE EGGBEER said she was in service and had been staying with her father and mother at Newton. Witness was going on the Monday evening to Plymouth but missed the train, and on going back witness and deceased ha just a few words. Witness left by a later train for Plymouth. The first witness was recalled, and said they had found no letters written by the deceased. MARY ANN EGBEER, daughter-in-law, of Newton, also gave evidence. James Braund, of Newton Abbot, ganger, said he was walking along the sea wall on Thursday, when he saw the body of the deceased lying on the beach by the pleasure house with the water washing over it. Witness and another ganger pulled the body out and informed the police. Mr John Wood, surgeon, of Bishopsteignton, said death was due to drowning. Mr Nesbit, surgeon, of Newton, said he had attended deceased, who had had a great deal of trouble. She was naturally weak and of a nervous disposition. A very trivial thing would upset her. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 1 January 1898, Issue 9510 – Gale Document No. Y3200770252
SUICIDE AT BIDEFORD – Man Cuts His Throat. - At Bideford on Monday WILLIAM HENRY YEO, a single man, living at Abbotsham-road, Bideford, with his parents, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. He lingered for three hours after committing the act. Dr Grose was soon in attendance and did what was possible but his services were of no avail. Deceased had been in ill-health for the past four years. He was first discovered in bed by his nephew, Charles Westcott. The Inquest was held on Tuesday at the Lamb Inn, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

BISHOPSTEIGNTON FATALITY – The Inquest on the bodies of JOHN COCKERHAM and JOHN SAMUEL ROBERTS, who, as previously reported, met their death by falling into a quarry at Bishopsteignton, was held on Tuesday afternoon by Mr Coroner Hacker.
WILLIAM COCKERHAM identified one of the bodies as that of his brother, a labourer, aged 32, residing at No. 4 Court, Wolborough-street, Newton Abbot. JOHN ROBERTS, an engine driver, of Newton Abbot, identified the other body as that of his son, a lighterman, aged 25, and residing at No. 2 Court,. Wolborough-street, Newton Abbot. Reginald Samuel Harvey, of Roadway Farm, Bishopsteignton, deposed to finding the bodies of the men in the disused quarry, which was about 40 feet deep. There was a hedge round the top of the quarry, and it would be impossible for anyone to fall over unless they walked through the fence. P.C.Martin stated that by the side of the men were two bags one containing two rabbits and the other a quantity of rabbit netting. From the pockets of each of the deceaseds' clothes were protruding a number of staves used for pegging down the nets. CHARLOTTE COCKERHAM stated that her husband left his home on Sunday night about seven o'clock. He did not say where he was going, but she thought he was only going to have a drink the same as he did on other nights. He went out empty-handed. KATE ROBERTS stated that her husband left home on Saturday night about six o'clock, saying that he was going out to have a glass of beer and that he would be back again by seven o'clock. Her husband was in the habit of staying home with her. Mr John Wood, surgeon, gave medical evidence, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 22 January 1898, Issue 9528 – Gale Document No. Y3200770377
THE TORRINGTON FATALITY – An Inquest was held at Torrington yesterday on the body of ROBERT DAVEY, in the employ of the North Devon Clay Company (Limited). Henry Holwill, manager of the clay works, said deceased had been in the employ of the Company for over sixteen years, and was an experienced miner. John Bright stated that on Wednesday he was working with deceased and they were employed in stooping to pick up a beam, which they were about to place in a bucket, when a piece of clay, nearly 1cwt. fell on deceased, driving his head against the beam. Witness moved the clay as quickly as possible, and seeing DAVEY was badly injured he sent for the manager and the doctor. All precautions were taken for the safety of the men at all times. The supply of timber for props and supports was unlimited. Dr Morse, of Torrington, said in his opinion death was due to fracture and other internal injuries to the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," adding a rider that no blame was attributable to anyone.

Saturday 29 January 1898, Issue 9534 – Gale Document No. Y3200770404
BURNING FATALITY AT EXETER – Bradninch Young Woman's Death. - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Monday afternoon into the circumstances of the death of ALICE CHAMBERLAIN, aged 20, of Bradninch, who died at the Institution on Saturday last from burns. Mr F. Voysey was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who then proceeded to view the body.
FANNY CHAMBERLAIN, widow of EDWIN CHAMBERLAIN, labourer of Bradninch, identified the body as that of her daughter, whose mind was afflicted. On the 29th December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, she visited her sister, who was ill in bed, upstairs. The room was partially dark and there was a lamp burning in the window, which was minus three or four panes of glass. The lamp was a small benzoline one, and deceased went over to look out of the window. Her night dress caught fire, and her sister having fainted her screams attracted the attention of Mrs Drew, a neighbour, who extinguished the flames. Dr Duncan attended the deceased, who was subsequently removed to the Exeter Hospital. She was ordered to be removed on the 7th January, but was not removed until the 12th.
Mr Ralling (a Juror): How was it she was not removed to the Hospital quicker? - Witness: Because we could not get a recommend.
Another Juror: How was it these panes of glass were out? Whose place was it to have had the glass put in; the landlord or the tenant? - A: The landlord. He said the landlady was in Wales and he could not do it unless he had a message from her. It was out for three months.
A Juror: I call it disgraceful to let glass stay out so long in winter.
Dinah Drew, wife of Robert Drew, of Bradninch, deposed to hearing screams and finding deceased in flames. The windows were blocked up to keep out the cold. Witness considered deceased heard a noise outside, and in looking out of a little hole caught her clothing on fire.
Mr P. H. Stirk, house surgeon of the Hospital, said when deceased was received into the Institution she was extensively burned over the neck, chest and thighs. She died on Saturday, death being due to burns.
Several questions were asked witness as to the seriousness of the delay before being brought to the Hospital and the witness said when the deceased was admitted he did not think she would recover, the burns being very extensive.
The Coroner pointed out that anyone might be admitted to the Hospital who had met with an accident, but the House Surgeon said it was against their rules to admit anyone of weak intellect.
Mrs Drew was recalled, and said Mr Glover, undertaker, of Bradninch, was the agent for the house.
A Juror: The repairs ought never to have been left in such a state.
Mr Drew: Mr Barons, Inspector of Nuisances of Tiverton, had ordered the work to be done.
A Juror: It is a gross neglect on the agent's part.
Another Juror: He calls for the rent regularly? - Mrs Drew: Yes, every fortnight. (Laughter).
Another Juror: Better keep the rent and repair the place.
The Jury severely censured Mr Glover for not having attended to the repairs and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 29 January 1898, Issue 9534 – Gale Document No. Y3200770410
TORQUAY NEWS – Sudden Death Inquiry – A Coroner's Inquest was held in Upton Parish Room on Tuesday relative to the death of JAMES BRIDGETT, who died at Higher-terrace Mews on Sunday afternoon. The evidence of Mrs Ledd, daughter of deceased, was to the effect that during the autumn and winter deceased had been ailing a little, and that in October Dr Todd was called in, and prescribed for him. Up to the 17th just no medical man had attended him, and on that day Mr Todd was twice sent for, but he being too busy could not go and asked that some other doctor be called. Dr Pollard was called in, and found BRIDGETT in a dying condition. He prescribed for him, but did not call again. On Sunday her father died. Mr Pollard, in his evidence, said deceased was suffering from acute inflammation of the lungs and pleurisy in both sides. He explained why he did not call after his first visit, his reason being that he understood Dr Todd would be calling. At the time of his visit deceased was beyond medical help. He had since learned that Dr Todd had not seen deceased since October last. The Coroner was pretty severe in his examination of Mrs Ledd on the question of her not getting medical assistance sooner, telling her that the law would not allow anyone in charge of a house to permit a person to lie and die without a doctor being called. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and added that they considered everything had been done for deceased and that he was well cared for.

Saturday 12 February 1898, Issue 9546 – Gale Document No. Y3200770492
UFFCULME SUICIDE – The Inquest on the body of the man SALTER, who was found dead in the pond at Uffculme factory on Tuesday, was held on Wednesday by Mr Deputy Coroner Cox, Mr G Babb being chosen Foreman of the Jury. Evidence was given by the deceased's father. Rhoda Marshall, Robert Venting, and Thomas Kerslake and Dr Barrow said deceased had suffered from dyspepsia and extreme debility. Mental depression following influenza had exhibited itself latterly, but his condition had not been such as to warrant any apprehension from a physical point of view. The Jury returned a verdict that SALTER drowned himself in the factory pond whilst in a state of temporary insanity. They returned their fees to the widow.

Saturday 12 February 1898, Issue 9546 – Gale Document No. Y3200770525
BARNSTAPLE SUICIDE – Another Victim of Influenza. - An Inquest was held at Pilton, Barnstaple, on Wednesday on the body of MISS ELIZABETH ROBINS, aged 21. The evidence showed that on the previous evening deceased went to her bedroom to clean, and nothing strange was observed in her manner. The mother subsequently discovered her daughter hanging to a bed post, quite dead. Four years ago deceased had an attack of influenza, and had since been under Dr Jackson, who deposed that she was subject to illusions and did strange things. A verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Saturday 26 February 1898, Issue 9558 – Gale Document No. Y3200770612
THE TOTNES SUICIDE – An Inquest was held on Monday at the Totnes Guildhall by Mr S. Hacker (Coroner) on the body of ELIZABETH CATHERINE CHOPE who committed suicide on Saturday by drowning herself in the Dart. The deceased was 15 years of age, and was in service. On Friday the girl's mistress had occasion to reprimand her and subsequently deceased disappeared from the house. She had suffered from influenza and headache, and had also threatened to drown herself. A piece of paper was found in the pocket of her jacket bearing the words, apparently perforated by a pin:- "No pencil. Drowned. CHOPE, Carrie." - A verdict of "Suicide whilst of Unsound Mind" was returned.

Saturday 5 March 1898, Issue 9564 – Gale Document No. Y3200770633
TOPSHAM TRAGEDY - The Inquest on the body of MR GEORGE BELLAMY, farmer, of Samoa-terrace, Topsham, a member of the Parish Council and representative of the town on the Rural District Council and Board of Guardians, who se death under tragic circumstances were reported on Wednesday night, was held at the Salutation Hotel on Thursday afternoon by Mr A. Burrows. Deputy Coroner for the district.
Mr George Hopewell was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Before the evidence was taken Mr Ellis, a Juryman, said he believed he was voicing the opinion of the Jury in asking why the Inquest was not held at the Nelson Inn, a much nearer public-house. The Inquest being held at the Salutation necessitated the relatives going half a mile.
The Coroner said he would take all responsibility for the holding of the Inquest there. The simple reason was that he was told that there was more accommodation at the Salutation.
Mr Ellis said he was satisfied with the explanation.
MRS BELLAMY, the first witness, said her husband was s57 years of age. She last saw him alive yesterday morning. About half-past six he went downstairs and brought her up a cup of tea. He seemed in a dazed condition, and she asked him to lie down. He replied, "I can't; I'm going in the asylum." She told him he had nothing to trouble about, and to this he replied, "My dear, it's my head; I'm mad." He had been restless for the last three nights, and had complained of pain in his head for a very long time. After giving her the cup of tea yesterday he went downstairs, and then she heard a fall, but not the report of the gun. She thought he had fainted, as he sometimes did, but when she got to the head of the stairs she smelt powder. He had suffered very greatly from his head and heart, but had no other trouble that she knew of, and had never threatened to commit suicide. He had a fear that it would be necessary for him to be put in the Asylum. the gun produced was her son's, and was kept in the house. Her husband was not in the habit of using it, and it was not kept loaded.
MISS EMMA LOUISA BELLAMY, daughter, said she heard the report of a gun in the house about a quarter to seven yesterday morning. Her mother ran in to her room, and witness went downstairs, through the kitchen and dairy, and found her father lying on the floor of the wash-house.
HENRY THOMAS BELLAMY, son, said the gun belonged to him. He last saw his father on Tuesday in Exeter, when he complained of pains in his head. Witness thought he looked queer, and asked one of his uncles then to look after him.
Mr George May, market gardener, of Topsham, testified to the frequent complaints by the deceased of weakness of the heart and pains in the head. On Tuesday witness drove home from Exeter, and he then seemed more depressed than ever before and scarcely spoke half-a-dozen words all the way from Exeter to Topsham.
Dr J. N. Frood said he had attended deceased on many occasions, for heart disease, rheumatism, and neuralgia, but not for the past twelve months. He was subject to rather severe fainting fits, and was crippled a good deal from rheumatism in one of his legs. He was called about twenty minutes to seven yesterday morning and found deceased lying on his back with the gun across his legs. The whole of the head from the level of the nostrils to the ears was completely blown away. The cause of death was shock from destruction of the brain. The charge went upwards and witness thought he probably put the muzzle in his mouth and pulled the trigger with his thumb.
This concluded the evidence, and the Deputy Coroner, in summing it up, expressed his sympathy with the relatives and thought the Jury would agree with him in that expression. The only point for consideration he thought was the state of the deceased's mind at the time he committed the act.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 12 March 1898, Issue 9570 – Gale Document No. Y3200770703
TORQUAY NEWS – Adjourned Inquest. Groundless Complaint Against a Doctor. - At the Inquest held by Mr Hacker on Saturday evening on the death of a little girl named ADA JANE CLARKE, the mother of the deceased made complaints concerning the manner in which Dr Winter had attended the child from the time it received a severe burning. The child having ultimately been removed to the Hospital, where it died, Dr Winter had not been called to the Inquest as a witness, but when MRS CLARKE made her charges the Jury considered it proper that Dr Winter should be allowed an opportunity of explaining or refuting these charges, and accordingly the Inquest was adjourned to Tuesday night, when Dr Winter and the parish nurse both attended. In giving his evidence, Dr Winter, St. Marychurch, said the child was brought to him on the 14th ult. The burns were very considerable over the abdomen, breast, and neck, and witness suggested to its mother that it would be a fit case for the hospital. The mother did not wish the child treated at the hospital, and the doctor, having dressed it, instructed the mother how to treat it, and told her to see the Parish nurse. Witness saw the child the following day, and on the 16th the father informed him that it would not sleep, and witness prescribed for it. On the next day, Thursday, witness saw it, and it appeared to be getting on all right. On the 20th, the Sunday, witness again saw it, and he considered it was better, and informed the mother that it would not be necessary for him to see the child every day. On the 24th the parents sent for some more dressing and told the doctor the child was about the same. The witness saw sit on the following day (Saturday), and was then informed that the nurse was going away for a time, and on the Sunday morning the doctor again saw the child, and dressed the wounds himself. The wounds were going on very well, and seemed quite healthy. The fact that the child had lived three weeks after the burn was evidence that it had been well attended to. Having dressed the wounds the doctor told the mother that the child must go to the hospital. The mother demurred, but ultimately the child was taken to the hospital, and the doctor heard no more of the case until Inspector Bond called upon him after the Inquest.
MRS CLARKE, mother of the child, was instructed by the Coroner to ask Dr Winter any questions. She said Dr Winter had not seen the burns for a fortnight, and in reply the witness said the child was under a trained nurse, who would at once see that he was informed if the child was not progressing favourably. When the wounds were dressed by the nurse it caused unnecessary suffering, and retarded the healing if they were opened for mere curiosity. If the burns had not been progressing favourably he would have seen that from more constitutional symptom.
Nurse Hill also gave evidence of attending the child and dressing the wounds daily. If something had not been going all right she would at once have seen that the doctor was informed.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death by Burning, as the result of an accident," adding that they were of opinion that the child had been properly cared for, and that there were no grounds for the complaint made against Dr Winter.

Saturday 19 March 1898, Issue 9576 – Gale Document No. Y3200770747
DEATH OF AN EXETER CHILD – Pneumonia or Scalds? - An Inquest was held at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday afternoon by Mr Coroner Hooper on the body of FRANK EVANS, three years old, who died in the institution on Tuesday. ANNIE EVANS, wife of a labourer, of Ewing's-lane, said deceased was her son. On Friday, whilst witness was out of her room for a minute, deceased pulled a jug of boiling pea-soup off the table, and part of it became overturned on his chest. she took him on Sunday to the Hospital, of which he was made an out-patient. Witness was told to take him again on the Sunday morning, but as he was looking all right witness did not take him until Monday, when he was detained. Mr Styrk, House Surgeon, said the child was brought to the Hospital suffering from a slight superficial scald on the chest. On Monday morning it seemed to be progressing, but on Tuesday morning it was in a dying condition, and expired during the day. Witness could not say what the child died of. – The Coroner: Don't you think the scalds would have caused death? - Witness: No, I don't think they were so serious as that. He had been told that the child was suffering from whooping-cough, and pneumonia would be the most probable cause of death. Dr Clapp, who had attended the child just before it was brought to the institution, was sent form, but was not at home, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 26 March 1898, Issue 9582 – Gale Document No. Y3200770784
BIDEFORD – An Inquest was held at the Stratton Workhouse on Wednesday on the body of EDWARD THOMAS TAPE, aged 2 years, who, with his mother, was recently brought to the Stratton Workhouse from Bideford Union, the father, THOMAS TAPE, having been convicted for neglecting them. Death was said to be due to neglect, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 26 March 1898, Issue 9582 – Gale Document No. Y3200770804
TORQUAY – Inquest. – Mr Hacker held a Coroner's Inquest yesterday afternoon at the Rawson Club, concerning the sudden death of ELIZABETH POWELL, aged 76, which we announced yesterday. There were no special circumstances attending the case, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 26 March 1898, Issue 9582 – Gale Document No. Y3200770795
SINGULAR DEATH – The City Coroner Mr H. W. Hooper, held an Enquiry into the death of GEORGE VICKERY, the infant son of ALICE and JOHN VICKERY, of 25, Stepcote-hill, at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday. The mother said the child was born on the 7th March, and Mrs Hepworth, who attended her, advised her to take the child to the Hospital immediately she could go out, as it was deformed. She took it to the hospital on Monday morning, and it died in the out-patients' room of that institution soon after she got there. Mr Ashford, assistant house surgeon to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, said the deceased was quite dead when he saw it. At the request of the Coroner he made a post mortem examination and found deceased had a cleft palate, diseased lungs, deformation of the abdomen, congested brain and diseased heart. Death in his opinion was not due to any of these causes, but to accidental suffocation caused by the child being wrapped up too much. Deceased could not possibly have lived long, and its weak state probably accelerated its death. A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 26 March 1898, Issue 9582 – Gale Document No. Y3200770802
DEATH OF A NORTHMOLTON FARMER – News reached the County Coroner (Mr J F. Bromham) at Barnstaple today that an aged farmer of Northmolton had died, and the circumstances pointed to the assumption that his death was the result of the cold weather. His name was JOHN STONEMAN, and he lived at Barnacott Farm. On Friday evening he was returning from Barnstaple Market in a trap, of which he was the sole occupant. About a mile and a half from his house a woman on the road noticed the horse and cart, but not seeing anyone in the cart she stopped the horse. MR STONEMAN was then discovered to be lying in the cart, and he was quite dead. It is supposed that he was suffering from heart complaint. His age was 70 years.

Saturday 9 April 1898, Issue 9593 – Gale Document No. Y3200770858
HELE FATALITY – An enquiry into the death of ALLAN THOMAS SAVIN, the man found on the Great Western Railway near Hele on Saturday morning, was held on Monday afternoon by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) at the Exeter Police Court.
Chief Inspector Shattock represented the Great Western Railway Company.
MR H. B. SAVIN, living at 33, Shepherd's Bush-road, London, said he was a Canadian farmer, and identified the body as that of his brother, ALLAN THOMAS. The deceased was an auctioneer's clerk and resided at Bicester, Oxfordshire. He was 29 years of age and was a single man. Witness saw him last on the Sunday after Christmas Day last. He was then at his mother's house, where witness was now staying. He was a man of fairly good health, but not temperate. Witness did not know that deceased had any business in these parts. He was in the employ of Messrs. Paxton and Halliday at Bicester, and was in the receipt of a salary of about £100 a year.
Alice Frances Holloway, sister of the deceased, said she resided at Chapel-street, Berkhampstead, Hertfordshire. She saw the deceased on Thursday last at Bicester. She visited him in reply to a telegram from him. She saw him for about a quarter-of-an-hour, and he was very agitated. He told her that he was in great trouble. He did not wish to disgrace the family, but if he stopped in Bicester he should; so that he must leave the town. Witness asked him where he was going, but he seemed quite lost, and did not seem to know where he was going. Witness stopped the night at his lodgings and expected him to come back, but he never came. She never heard of him again until she received two letters on Sunday morning. One was dated from Exeter and in it deceased stated that he "should drown himself at midnight." A letter-card written subsequently, but received at the same time, said that he was then at Hele, about seven miles from Exeter; "The express would be down in half-an-hour, and he would manage t get in front of it."
Edward Blackmore, farmer, of Halthays, Bradninch, gave evidence to the effect that he was working in his garden about 11.15 when he saw a man standing at the gate of the railway crossing and when the goods train came along he saw the man walk in front of the engine and he did not see him again. When he went to the spot he found others there.
John Jones, of 9, Cambridge-street, St. Thomas, engine driver in the employ of the G.W.R., said he was in charge of the 4.30 a.m. goods train from London on Saturday morning. When nearing Hele he saw a man standing at the gate of the crossing. When getting close, the man started to walk across the line. Witness "opened" the whistle. The man took no notice but stood in the 4ft. way. Witness shut off steam and applied the brakes and stopped the train as soon as possible. His mate and the guard of the train went back to see to the man. Witness found deceased's hat on the buffer of the engine. The deceased was put into the guard's compartment. He was alive then, and was taken on to Exeter; but on arrival life was extinct.
Mr F. A. Brash, surgeon, said he was called on Saturday morning to St. David's Station. On the top of St. David's-hill he met the body being brought up on the ambulance. Witness examined the body to see if life was extinct, and found it so. He made a post mortem and found his left thigh and leg very extensively broken, his head bruised, his right ear bleeding profusely, and his right arm broken. These injuries caused his death.
The Coroner, in summing up, remarked on the sadness of the case, and said that it was quite apparent that deceased had deliberately taken his own life. He (the Coroner) thought they were greatly indebted to the G.W.R. Company for the prompt action they had taken in bringing the case on so soon. He was sure that he always received the greatest assistance from both railway companies in cases of this kind. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporary Insane."
The brother and sister of deceased expressed their thanks to the guard and officials who picked up the body and the company for their prompt action in the matter. The Coroner and Jury also expressed their condolence with the family in their bereavement.

Saturday 9 April 1898, Issue 9593 – Gale Document No. Y3200770888
At an Inquest on Monday evening on ELIZABETH JANE FENWICK, aged eight months, daughter of WILLIAM FENWICK, of Portland-street, Exeter, the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 9 April 1898, Issue 9593 – Gale Document No. Y3200770872
SAD ACCIDENT – At no. 13A. Sidwell-street, this morning the City Coroner, (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on the body of CHARLES LE VOIR, labourer, in the employ of the L. and S.W.R. Company. Mr G. J. Tilke was chosen Foreman of the Jury. ANNA LE VOIR identified the body as that of her late husband, who was 51 years of age. He being on night duty, left home on Saturday evening to go to Exmouth Junction to his work. Between 10 and 11 o'clock the same evening he was brought home and said he had met with an accident on the coal stage. A doctor was sent for, but deceased died on Thursday morning. Thomas Dean, railway coalman, said he was at work with the deceased lifting coal into tubs to be conveyed to the engines. Deceased was lifting a piece of coal about half a hundredweight when it broke in his hands and he fell back between the trucks. Mr Carlyon, surgeon, said the fracture of three ribs was the primary cause of death. In his opinion haemorrhage was going on from some internal organ. "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned.

Saturday 9 April 1898, Issue 9593 – Gale Document No. Y3200770892
INQUESTS AT EXMOUTH – An Inquest was conducted at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, this morning by Mr C. E. Cox, the Deputy Coroner, on the body of the infant child of FRED A. PERRIAM, of Victoria-road, Exmouth. Dr Stanley Thomas attributed death to convulsions, and a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

An Inquest was held at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, this morning by the Deputy Coroner (Mr C. E. Cox) on the body of WILLIAM SNELL, who was killed on the railway near Exmouth on Thursday morning. The body was identified by ALFRED SNELL, the son of the deceased, who said his father was 66 years of age. He was deaf and partially blind.
John Clarke, engine driver, said he noticed the deceased walking on the line in front of the goods train which left Exeter at 8 o'clock in the morning. The whistle was sounded, but deceased did not take any notice and was knocked down and killed.
Cornelius Thomas, the fireman, gave corroborative evidence, as also did Frank Collins, the guard.
James Thorne, ganger, said that if the deceased had had kept to the path which was railed off from the line he would have been out of danger.
Dr Stanley Thomas said deceased had a very extensive scalp wound, and he thought death was due to concussion of the brain. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and said no blame was attached to anyone.

Saturday 23 April 1898, Issue 9605 – Gale Document No. Y3200770936
SUDDEN DEATH – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Artillery Inn, on Tuesday on the body of CAROLINE TAVENER, who died suddenly on Saturday last. Emily Steer, of 4, Collaton-row, stated that deceased lodged with her for about a week. On Saturday night she left her in her bed, but on going to her with a cup of tea on Sunday morning, she found her lying on her right side dead. On Saturday evening deceased complained of feeling unwell. George Baker, a carpenter, of 74, Holloway-street, said deceased was a spinster and was 73 years of age. Deceased told witness on Saturday week last that she would not live long and if anything happened to her witness was to bury her. Witness had not yet found the necessary funds. Mr J. Mackeith said he had attended deceased several times. Last Thursday witness was called and found deceased suffering from bronchitis and a weak heart. Witness advised her to go to the Workhouse Infirmary, but she refused to do so. Witness considered that deceased had been dead about ten hours when he was called on Sunday. Death was due to syncope, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

INQUEST – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at No. 32, Howell-road, on Wednesday, on the body of FRANCES HALLS, aged 40, who died suddenly on Tuesday morning. WILLIAM HALLS, husband of the deceased, said he went out at 8 p.m. on Monday, and on returning home just after ten he heard the deceased calling him. He went upstairs and found her lying on the floor nearly speechless and vomiting. He told his little boy to get some brandy, while he put some cold water bandages up to her head. He succeeded in getting a little brandy down her throat, but she brought it up again. He then sent his boy for Mr Brash, surgeon, who said he could not come as he was tired. MR HALLS went and told Mr Brash that his wife was rambling in her head, and then he gave him some medicine which he took home and gave a dose to the deceased. Just about three he left his wife with his little boy and went to Mr Brash, who came, but on his arrival the deceased was dead. In his opinion death was due to apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 30 April 1898, Issue 9611 – Gale Document No. Y3200770991
BRADNINCH FATALITY – A Sad Story. - The Deputy Coroner (Mr A. Burrow) for the Cullompton District, held an Inquiry at the Merry Harriers Inn, near Hele, on Thursday, into the circumstances by which WALTER HENRY VOSPER, cab proprietor of Hele, and a native of Exeter, met his death.
Mr Wm. Baker was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who proceeded to view the body, which was beyond recognition.
GEORGE VOSPER, driver, of Hele, said his brother was 25 years of age, and a driver, of Hele. Witness last saw him alive on Tuesday night about six o'clock, when he was going to Plymtree with a piano. He heard there had been a fire, and witness went to Bolealler. He did not see his brother, who was covered up on a stretcher. Deceased had several pounds with him. Witness identified a watch and knife found near where the body was picked up as that of articles which belonged to his brother.
Mr Hitt, farmer, of Bolealler Farm, said on Tuesday night his son went to stable the horses for the night, and hung the lantern up in the hay-loft. The ring of the lantern broke, and the lamp fell, catching the surrounding straw and hay. The flames spread rapidly. Witness saw deceased taking out some articles from a table in the kitchen. Deceased then went to one of the bedrooms and brought down a small table which was in flames. The bedroom from which deceased came was one mass of flames. Witness did not see VOSPER again, and hearing there was someone in one of the bedrooms he went there, but could not see anyone. Witness then came down again and fancied he heard a noise. He then heard someone shout "Where's the door." The roof had fallen in and it was impossible to get to where the shout came from. His son was burning benzoline in the lamp.
John Sharland, farmer, of Bradninch, stated that he said to the deceased "Don't go up again, that's a good fellow." Deceased, however, entered the house, which was wrapped in flames. Deceased did not return. – By a Juryman: There was part of the roof in when deceased entered the building.
Alfred Ireland, baker, of Bradninch, said he last saw deceased on the landing.
By a Juryman: I heard a noise and went up but could find no one.
The Coroner: Was there no chance of getting at him? - A: No, sir, none whatever. The whole place was one mass of flames.
P.C. Ball, of Bradninch, said he was the first to arrive at the fire. Shortly afterwards the deceased, with two or three others, arrived, and they got out the hole of the furniture in the kitchen. They then went upstairs and commenced taking some of the furniture down. Witness saw deceased with a burning table. When witness was going back again he met the last witness, who told him VOSPER was in the fire. Witness went upstairs. He heard groans and went into a room which was burning furiously, and a portion of the roof had fallen in. Witness then heard the deceased call out three times, "Lord, have mercy upon me." Witness found it necessary for him to leave the building for his own safety. He made his way downstairs and had to force a door before he could get out.
Frank Sweet, builder, of Cullompton and captain of the Fire Brigade, said he went up into the bedroom in which deceased was by means of a ladder. He saw a body and caught hold of it, but the flesh came off and he could not retain his hold. After some difficulty it was afterwards got out. Other persons might have got him out by getting in at the window. There were plenty of means for them to get at him.
A Juryman: Do you think if you had been there at the first call you would have saved his life? - A: Yes, I think I could have. The bars of the window were very thin, and could easily have been knocked in. – By a juryman: Deceased was just inside the window.
The Foreman: You could reach him from the window? - A: Yes, I could.
Do you think he was knocked down by a beam? - No, he was not; there was no beam near him.
The Coroner: No portion of the roof on him? - No, sir.
Mr G. G. Gidloy, surgeon, of Cullompton, said all the clothes and skin were burnt off. His idea was that something burning fell in front of the door cutting off his retreat, and that he could not find the door and became suffocated. The cause of death was burning.
The Coroner said he thought they would agree with him that it was a very calamitous affair for a poor fellow to have met with his death in the manner described.
After a short deliberation the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that death was due to burns accidentally inflicted.

Saturday 30 April 1898, Issue 9611 – Gale Document No. Y3200771008
EXTRAORDINARY STORY FROM NORTH DEVON – Alleged Concealment of Birth. - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Bromham at Radscott Farm, Tawstock, near Barnstaple on Tuesday, on the body of the female child of EVELYN HOBBS, domestic servant.
John Berry, who resides with her brother at Radscott Farm, said HOBBS was a servant and twenty years of age. On Sunday morning last he saw her partly dressed and carrying some clothes, enter the house by the back door. She was wet from head to foot, and in answer to a question said she had done wrong.
William Perry state that the girl told him "The child was in the well" and he sent for P.C. Cousins and Mr Ware, surgeon, of Barnstaple. Witness, with the policeman, found the child in five feet of water in a well in Stoneyland Hill.
Mr G. T. Ware stated that the child was born alive. HOBBS told him the child was in the stream, and later that it was in the well. Replying to a further question, she said, "I went to the well to drown myself. I found I could not drown, so I shouted, and the child was born." In his opinion the child was born alive, and he did not think that the girl's statement that it was born in the well could be true. He should think that it was born while the girl was sitting on the edge of the well, and that it immediately fell into the water. The body presented the appearance of having died from drowning. There were no marks of violence.
The Inquiry was adjourned to May 16th in order that the mother might attend.

Saturday 7 May 1898, Issue 9617 – Gale Document No. Y3200771026
THE DARTMOUTH FATALITY – An Inquest was held on Monday at Kingswear, before Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, on the body of CAPTAIN F. TOWES, of the schooner Letitia, which went ashore in Millbay Cove, Kingswear, under circumstances reported by us yesterday. Dr W. B. Kendall said he attributed death to failure of the heart's action owing to the shock of the vessel going ashore. A verdict to that effect was returned by the Jury.

Saturday 7 May 1898, Issue 9617 – Gale Document No. Y3200771048
NORTH DEVON FATALITY – At an Inquest held on Tuesday by Mr J. F. Bromham at Newton Tracey, near Barnstaple relative to the death of JOHN SKINNER, 37, after being struck with a piece of timber which was being cut on a circular saw. Dr Charles Cooke stated that there was no chance of saving the man's life by an operation, some of the intestines having been ruptured. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury gave their fees to the widow.

DARTMOOR CONVICT'S DEATH – "Death from Natural Causes" was the verdict returned by the Jury at an Inquest held at Dartmoor Prison on Wednesday by Mr Prickman on the body of a convict named MICHAEL CONCANNON, who died in that establishment on Sunday, aged 33 years.

Saturday 7 May 1898, Issue 9617 – Gale Document No. Y3200771063
TORQUAY NEWS – Sudden Death. – While MR GEORGE PEPPERELL, harbour master, was attending to his duties on board the yacht White Heather at Torquay yesterday afternoon, he became unconscious and fell down. Dr Thomas, who was on board, went to MR PEPPERELL'S assistance, but he died in a few minutes. The deceased, who was 59 years of age, and had been harbour master at Torquay for some years, was under the treatment of Mr Horton. At the Inquest this afternoon the Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," death being attributed to heart disease.

Saturday 7 May 1898, Issue 9617 – Gale Document No. Y3200771051
NORTH DEVON CONCEALMENT CASE – The Inquest relative to the newly born child of ANNIE MARY FREEMAN CURTIS, at Hartland, was resumed on Monday by Mr J. F. Bromham. The girl (who has been committed by the magistrates to the assizes on the charge of concealment) made a statement as to the birth, and, in answer to the Coroner, said she heard no cry, and believing the child was stillborn, paid no attention to it. The Jury found that there was no evidence to show that the child was born alive. Mr Walter Bosson (Barnstaple) represented the defendant.

Saturday 14 May 1898, Issue 9623 – Gale Document No. Y3200771075
THE DARTMOUTH SUICIDE – On Tuesday at Dartmouth Guildhall, an Inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner, Mr Philip R. Hockin, touching the death of ANN RENDLE, a widow, 58 years of age, residing at No. 1, Belvedere-terrace, Dartmouth. On Thursday afternoon Miss Trout, who resided in the same house, heard groans. She called Chief Petty-officer Launder, H.M.S. Britannia, who resides opposite, and he found the deceased kneeling on the floor with her throat cut. She was removed to the Cottage Hospital and died on Saturday. It was stated in evidence that some twenty years ago deceased went to an asylum. A verdict of "Suicide whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity" was returned by the Jury, who protested against having to view the body, and thanked Mr Launder for his kind assistance to the unfortunate woman.

AN ILFRACOMBE CHILD'S DEATH – A Sad Case. - The adjourned Inquest on the body of the infant child of ADA GRASS, a single woman, was resumed at Ilfracombe on Wednesday. Mr Richard Vicary (Relieving Officer) said ADA GRASS was a pauper chargeable to the Union from January 7th last. Previous to Christmas she had received medical relief and 10s. in consequence of sickness. From January 11th to May 4th she received 1s. 6d. per week. The shilling received by the midwife was given out of witness's own pocket. The pay was stopped on May 4th in consequence of Witness being informed that GRASS was living with a married man. He had not heard of her condition prior to the confinement. By the Jury: No application was made by GRASS for extra relief or admission to the House. He saw her on the Monday previous to the confinement, and she was not then destitute.
After consultation in private the Jury returned the following verdict: "That the death of the child was consequent on extreme weakness, caused by defective nourishment and went of attention; but the Jury do not consider that the mother was to be blamed for this, owing to her inexperience and weak condition."

Saturday 14 May 1898, Issue 9623 – Gale Document No. Y3200771073
THE FATAL FIGHT NEAR HOLSWORTHY. Verdict of Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Prickman on Monday evening at Burrows Farm, Bridgerule, near Holsworthy, to inquire into the death of GEORGE LAWRENCE STONE, a navvy employed in the construction of the Holsworthy and Bude Railway. It appeared that the deceased and some others were drinking at the Bridge Inn, Bridgerule, on Saturday, 30th April. Nicholas Uglow, a travelling scissors grinder, was among the company and deceased and him had a quarrel and fought. Henry James, the son of the landlady, witnessed the fight and after three or four rounds he saw STONE fall on the back of his head. When he reached home he complained of pains in his head and on the next day (Sunday, May 1st) became unconscious and remained so more or less till he died on May 6th. Dr Lewis was sent for as soon as he lost consciousness. He could find no injury at the back of the head, but his left ear was bruised and he had a black eye. He had since made a post mortem examination and found on entering the skull cap, immediately beneath the bone on the outside membrane of the skull, a large clot of blood, quite sufficient to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Uglow, who had been arrested the previous Saturday at Kilkhampton and conveyed to the Police Station at Holsworthy.

Saturday 14 May 1898, Issue 9623 – Gale Document No. Y3200771110
FATAL POISONING NEAR UFFCULME - Mr Coroner C. E. Cox held an Inquest last evening at Southey Farm, Uffculme, touching the death of MARY SALTER, widow, who died at Northcott Dairy from the effects of poison. From the evidence it appeared that deceased was 67 years of age and during the past two years had been suffering from melancholia. She had been very strange during the last few days. She had seen a bottle labelled "poison" in her daughter's house and made the remark, "If anyone drinks that I suppose they would die." She had also "wished herself dead" on many occasions. On Thursday deceased visited her daughter again and went upstairs and closed the door. She came down soon afterwards and said "She felt so bad." Witness found that she had been upstairs and emptied a bottle of carbolic acid which the doctor had sent for burning, as a disinfectant for the whooping cough from which her children were suffering. Dr Dale was sent for, but deceased expired in about an hour. From the post mortem the doctor said deceased had drunk fully two ounces of the poison. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from the effects of drinking carbolic acid whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Saturday 21 May 1898, Issue 9629 – Gale Document No. Y3200771128
SUDDEN DEATH – An Inquest was held on Tuesday at 27, Rack-street, by Mr Coroner Hooper, on the body of ELLEN GUSCOTT, who died suddenly on Sunday last. ALFRED JOSEPH GUSCOTT, the husband, stated that the deceased, who was 47 years of age, was lying in bed on Sunday afternoon, when she complained of feeling unwell. Witness thought it advisable to send for a doctor, but upon his arrival she was dead. Mr C. J. Vlieland, surgeon, of St. Thomas, said death was due to syncope, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 21 May 1898, Issue 9629 – Gale Document No. Y3200771145
NORTH DEVON GIRL'S REMARKABLE STORY – The adjourned Inquest on the body of the infant child of EVELYN HOBBS, single, domestic, in employment at Radstock Farm, Tawstock, took place on Monday. The mother of the child stated that on the 24th Aril she jumped into a well, but saved herself from drowning by holding to a piece of wood. While she was screaming for help the child was born and fell into the water. She became alarmed and hardly knew what she did. She could not say how she got home. The father of the child told her he was going off to America. After a long consultation the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned in a well, the child being put there through misadventure by the mother."

Saturday 21 May 1898, Issue 9629 – Gale Document No. Y3200771126
DEATH FROM IMPROPER FEEDING AT EXETER – At an Inquest at 13, Spring-place, Little Silver, St. David's, by the City Coroner on Monday on the body of ALBERT HENRY SNOOK, aged three months, found dead on Saturday night, Dr Bremner attributed death to convulsions, the result of improper feeding and acute dyspepsia, brought about by following the insufficient directions given on a bottle of patent infants' food. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Saturday 28 May 1898, Issue 9635 – Gale Document No. Y3200711187
FRIGHTFUL SUICIDE – SERGEANT MAJOR Cuts His Throat At Sidmouth - A suicide of an unusually shocking character occurred at Sidmouth on Wednesday, the victim being SQUADRON SERGEANT-MAJOR MAJOR, of the 1st Devon Yeomanry Cavalry, who are training in the town. MAJOR, who was attached to the E. Squadron and resided at Cotmaton, Sidmouth, had for some time been in a depressed state, owing to worry, presumably of a financial nature. On Tuesday night retired Sergeant-Major Thorpe visited him and found him getting out of bed, but induced him to return. Having to attend to regimental duties Mr Thorpe prepared to leave the house in the morning. As he was descending the stairs he heard MAJOR groaning. He t once ran back and found MAJOR with a terrible gash in his throat. He endeavoured to seize his arm to prevent him from doing any further damage to himself, but before he could do so the unfortunate man inflicted another shocking gash in his throat. Mr Thorpe then caught his right hand, but with maniacal ferocity he trust his left hand into the gaping wound and tore it in a terrible manner. Death ensued shortly afterwards. The deceased, who as formerly in the 11th Hussars, was much respected in Sidmouth and the neighbourhood, and the greatest sympathy is felt for the widow and two children he leaves behind. The gruesome event has cast a great gloom over the town.
Mr Coroner Cox held the Inquest on Wednesday afternoon at the Anchor Hotel, Sidmouth.
The first witness called was ANNIE MAJOR, who stated that about five o'clock that morning when she entered the deceased's bedroom he had a razor in his hand. He had just made one mark across his throat. She struggled with him and tried to take the razor away but he pushed her down, and he made another attempt again drawing the razor across his throat.
Ex-Sergt. Major Thorpe, who had been sleeping with the deceased, said he rushed up and caught hold of deceased's right hand and tried to get the razor away from the deceased. He then put his fingers in the wound and tore the wound worse. Witness called for assistance and Corporal Gerry, a member of the Ambulance Corps, did what he could but the deceased was too far gone. Dr Pullin was sent for, but when he arrived life was extinct.
Evidence was given by Lieutenant-Surgeon Goodwyn, who stated that the deceased was on sick leave yesterday, suffering from nervous debility.
Major Balfour gave the deceased an excellent character and said he was a splendid non-commissioned officer.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary insanity."

Saturday 28 May 1898, Issue 9635 – Gale Document No. Y3200711192
TORQUAY NEWS – Inquest. - Mr Kellock, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest this forenoon, touching the death of the man WILLIAM SMITH, a mason, who died suddenly in Lymington-road on Thursday night. The evidence was purely formal, and medical testimony was to the effect that a post mortem examination showed death was due to heart disease of long standing. A verdict of Natural Causes was returned.

Saturday 4 June 1898, Issue 9641 – Gale Document No. Y3200711239
BURNING FATALITY – An Inquest was held at the Hospital on Wednesday, relative to the death of EVA GARDNER, aged three years, of Thorverton. She was left in bed by her mother, who soon afterwards heard her screaming. On going upstairs MRS GARDNER found the little one standing in the middle of the room with her nightdress on fire. Some matches were left in a tray on the table, and it is supposed the girl struck one. The mother wrapped the child in a sheet and sent for a doctor, who ordered her removal to the Hospital, where she died an hour after admission. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

SUDDEN DEATH AT TEIGNMOUTH – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner S. Hacker, at Teignmouth Hospital on Thursday, on the body of SAMUEL SANDERS, painter, of Teignmouth. JOHN SANDERS, painter, identified the body as that of his father, who was 64 years of age, and had been suffering from rheumatic gout for about two months. While he was working in Bitton-street, he saw a trolley being drawn up the road with his father upon it. He was then unconscious. Alice Westaway said the deceased was walking down the street in front of her, and when he tried to cross over the road he fell down. He rose, but fell down again very heavily. George Henley, of Bishopsteignton, said that deceased was at work with him yesterday and complained of rheumatism. Dr Hasluck, House Surgeon at the Hospital, said he had attended the deceased for rheumatic gout for some time. Last evening he was brought into the Hospital and he died soon after admission. The cause of death was due to haemorrhage on the brain, caused by the rupture of a blood vessel. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 11 June 1898, Issue 9647 – Gale Document No. Y3200771286
INQUEST AT TORQUAY – Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at Torquay on Monday touching the death of THOMAS LATHRUP.
The widow said deceased was a fisherman and was 65 years of age. There were five children, and all at home. He slept out in a cart three nights last week, but she did not know for what reason. She had had no words with him. On Monday she asked him to get something to do, and he replied that there would be an alteration soon. On being discovered by some of the children in a cart he refused to come home, but on Thursday about midnight witness was called to her husband, who was taken home on a cart, he being very ill. On Saturday he complained of a pain in his side and became very weak. He refused to allow a doctor to be sent for, but on Sunday night she had one called. He was not at home, but came after her husband died. Deceased took nothing on the Sunday, but was conscious up to the last and was able to speak.
Dr Cook, who made a post mortem examination that morning, said he had come to the conclusion that death was due to pleurisy and inflammation of the lungs caused by the three nights' exposure. He was also of opinion deceased had been short of food. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" and exonerated the widow from blame.

Saturday 11 June 1898, Issue 9647 – Gale Document No. Y3200771282
SUDDEN DEATH – At the prison on Wednesday an Inquest was held on the body of F. J. LARCRY, aged 26, a convict, who died on Monday from consumption. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

INQUEST – An Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Hooper at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Thursday on the body of ANNE COMBEAR, aged 82, of Holloway-street, who died at the Hospital yesterday morning. Anna Batten, of 3, Holloway-cottages, Holloway-street, said deceased was a single woman and lodged in her house. She had been bed-ridden for the past six years and in her younger days she was a domestic servant. She was a native of Morchard Bishop, but had lived in Exeter nearly fifty years. About a month ago witness heard a noise in deceased's bedroom and on going there found her lying across the bed. Deceased stated that she had fallen and injured herself. After witness had helped her up she stated that she had broken her thigh. Mr McKeith was called in, and ordered deceased to be taken to the Hospital. Mr Stirk, house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted into the Hospital suffering from a fractured thigh. She had to stay in bed, and after that she got congestion of the lungs, and died yesterday morning. Death was due to congestion of the lungs, caused by the fractured thigh. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Saturday 11 June 1898, Issue 9647 – Gale Document No. Y3200771292
THE SAD DROWNING CASE AT TOPSHAM – The Inquest was held at the Salutation Hotel, Topsham, on Tuesday afternoon by Mr Coroner Burrow on the body of MRS ELLEN EMMA BELLAMY, whose body was found in the Exe at Topsham. Mr Richard Underhill was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
GEORGE BELLAMY, son, stated that his mother was 49 years of age. He last saw her on Sunday at home. She told witness that she was going to the cemetery first and then to Countess Weir to see her sister. As she did not return he went to Countess Weir, and found her hat on the banks. Witness then came back and informed P.C. Newberry of what he had seen. Deceased had not threatened to take her life, but had been greatly depressed at the loss of witness's father, and he had found her crying at dinner times when he arrived home.
EMMA LOUISA BELLAMY, daughter, was brought in to give evidence, but owing to her weak state, the Coroner said he could dispense with her services.
Sidney George Labbett, of Exeter, stated that when he met the deceased about a mile from Topsham on Sunday she seemed greatly depressed. William Glimpse, sailor, stated that on Sunday about three o'clock he saw the body of a woman in the water at Topsham Quay, and got a boat and helped to get it out of the water. She was quite dead. Witness did not see any person about the Quay in the afternoon.
Dr Froode, of Topsham, said he had known the deceased for some years, and had seen her twice or three times since her husband's death. She had been greatly depressed, and suffered from headache and sleeplessness. He found no marks of violence upon the body, which gave the appearance of death from drowning.
The Coroner, in commenting upon the evidence, said he was sure the Jurors' sympathy was with the family, and, coupled with the death of their father some time ago, he thought it was a great blow to the family. Death was due to drowning, but whether she got into the water herself was for the Jury to say.
The Jury, after a consultation, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned", and gave their fees to the children. The Coroner, in discharging them, said he hoped it would be a long time before they would meet again on such a sad occasion.

Saturday 18 June 1898, Issue 9653 – Gale Document No. Y3200771335
INQUESTS AT SALTERTON – Mr Cox held two Inquests on Monday at Budleigh Salterton. The first one was on the body of JOSEPH DAVIE, aged 41, a pensioner, and member of Budleigh Parish Council. He had been painting the new gas tank, and was sitting on a plank across a tub having his tea when he suddenly fell forward into a heap of coke and expired. A post mortem examination showed death was due to aneurism of the aorta. the Jury, of whom Mr Kempson was Foreman, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, and gave their fees to the widow.

The Jury were then driven to Liverton Farm, Littleham, where an Inquest was held on the body of SUSAN MARY DAVEY, aged 15, domestic servant in the employ of Mrs Ellett. The deceased on Thursday apparently had a fit, and was found lying unconscious on her right side across a large open fire. She subsequently succumbed to her injuries. Mr Semple, surgeon, said death was due to shock, caused by having fallen into the fire while suffering from an attack of epilepsy. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

FATAL ACCIDENT AT HEAVITREE - A painful accident, attended with fatal results, happened to ALICE CHANDLER, aged 15 months, the daughter of EDGAR CHANDLER, commission agent, of Cavendish-terrace, Heavitree, at Heavitree on Monday afternoon. The child was being driven in a high perambulator on the pavement by the side of the roadway at the bottom of Mont-le-Grand, Heavitree, by a sister, aged 11, who was conversing with a boy, and in passing a bill-posting station attempted to pull down some of the bills. In doing so she allowed the perambulator to slip from her grasp, and the vehicle ran over the edge of the pavement and precipitated the baby immediately under the wheel of a trap which was passing. the child's neck was dislocated, and death was instantaneous. In the trap was Mr R. Cushing, the local manager of the West of England Yeast Company, Catherine-street, and his little girl, 2 ¼ years old, besides the driver, a young man in his employ.
Mr Coroner Burrows held the Inquest on Tuesday at the residence of the deceased's parents in Cavendish-road, Heavitree.
SUSAN CHANDLER stated that she was the mother of the deceased who was fifteen months' old. She saw her last alive about 2.45 on Monday afternoon when it left the house in a perambulator with a daughter, IRENE, aged 11, driving, whom she sent on an errand. About a quarter of an hour after they left, IRENE came back and told her that the baby had been killed. Witness rushed out of the house immediately to the spot. On the way she met a gentleman, carrying her child in his arms. She was taken home and Dr Jellett sent for.
Robert Cushing, agent for the West of England Yeast Company, stated that he was in the trap when the accident occurred. He saw the children reading some placards and the perambulator by them. As they neared them the perambulator ran down the pavement and toppled into the road, throwing the baby out opposite the trap. He could not say whether the wheel went over the child or whether the child's body only knocked against the wheel.
Robert Woodley, baker of Heavitree, gave evidence to the effect that he was only about 10 yards from the spot at the time of the accident. He saw the perambulator and the baby go out. He thought the wheel of the trap passed over its head. Elias Finning, a boy, aged 14, said he was in company with the girl who had charge of the perambulator. They were reading some placards, when the girl letting go the handle of the perambulator – she only had hold with one hand – it ran off the pavement into the road just at the time when a trap was passing, and the head of the baby knocked against the trap.
Dr W. H. Jellett deposed to finding the child dead when called. It had sustained a fractured skull and he should say had only knocked against the wheel of the trap. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 25 June 1898, Issue 9659 – Gale Document No. Y3200771387
THE SHOCKING SICIDE AT BRIXHAM – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at the Temperance Hall, Brixham, last evening on the body of HENRY FOOT, aged 55, owner and proprietor of the Three Elms Hotel, who committed suicide yesterday morning under the tragic circumstances reported in our columns last evening. From the evidence it appears that about half-past five o'clock the deceased called his son, who is a baker, to get up, as usual. A few minutes before deceased committed the act his daughter, CAROLINE, saw him in bed and asked him if he would like a cup of tea, to which he replied, "No." At that time he must have had the gun in bed with him. She had no sooner returned to her bedroom, which is situated on the same floor, when she heard the report of firearms, and on proceeding to her father's room was horrified to find him lying in bed with the top part of his head above the eyes completely blown away. About three years ago a son of the deceased committed suicide with the same gun in a similar manner. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased "committed suicide while of Unsound Mind."

Saturday 25 June 1898, Issue 9659 – Gale Document No. Y3200771374
CHILD DROWNED – At the Inquest yesterday on the body of GLADYS EMILY ETTERY, aged two years and five months, daughter of a farm bailiff, who fell in a pond at Willishayes Farm, Morebath, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Saturday 2 July 1898, Issue 9665 – Gale Document No. Y3200771410
At the Inquest held at Tiverton yesterday touching the death of SAMUEL PERCY APLIN, a lad, who was drowned in the Exe on Thursday afternoon while bathing, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 2 July 1898, Issue 9665 – Gale Document No. Y3200771396
TEIGNMOUTH – At the Inquest held at the London Hotel on Wednesday by Mr S. Hacker on the body of HARRIET COX, aged 70, who died from injuries received through falling over the stairs of her house early on Sunday morning, death was attributed to fracture of the skull, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 9 July 1898, Issue 9671– Gale Document No. Y3200771477
DROWNING CASE – Mr W. H. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest at the Police Court this morning on the body of REGINALD WALTER FRENCH, aged 8, who was drowned at the Quay on Thursday evening. Mr C. E. Young was chosen Foreman of the Jury. SAMUEL SAMPSON SYMS, fish hawker, of 22 James-street, identified the body as that of his step-son, who left home about 6 o'clock on Thursday evening with his brother ALBERT to go fishing at the Quay. ALBERT FRENCH, brother of the deceased, also gave evidence. Robert Gregory, labourer, of Thomas's Court, said he heard that a boy was in the water, and went to the spot, where he saw his nephew, William Gregory, diving for the body. Witness obtained a hook and recovered the body. Mr H. B. Harrison, surgeon, said death was due to drowning, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 9 July 1898, Issue 9671 – Gale Document No. Y3200771448
THE LATE SERGEANT-MAJOR FURNEAUX - The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest touching the death of SERGEANT MAJOR GEORGE FURNEAUX, at the Mount Pleasant Inn, Exeter, on Monday.
ROSINA LOUISE FURNEAUX, daughter of the deceased, living at 23 Mansfield-road, gave evidence to the effect that her father was 63 years of age, and was a drill instructor at the time of his death. She saw him last alive on Friday evening about seven o'clock. He left home to go for a walk in the Nine-path Fields, with his dog about 7.20 and he was brought home about half-past eight on a stretcher, dead. He was in good health when he left the house. Dr Harris was summoned immediately he was brought home, and pronounced life extinct.
Albert Stevens, pointsman on the L. and S.W.R., stationed at Exmouth Junction, said about eight o'clock in the evening he saw the deceased catch hold of the railings in Nine Path Fields and appeared to struggle to catch his breath, and foam was coming out of his mouth. Witness was about 200 yards away and he rode up on an engine and proceeded to the spot, where he saw the deceased's dog. When he came to the deceased he found him on his back with his knees up. Witness then called for assistance and helped him up. Deceased gave one groan and expired. He was then removed to the company's oil stores by witness and several others, and afterwards conveyed home on a stretcher by policemen.
Mr J. D. Harris, surgeon, deposed to attending the deceased, with whom he had been well acquainted for the twenty years he had been connected with the 1st R.V. Previous to his death, the deceased had been suffering from asthma an diabetes. Witness saw him last alive on Saturday, the 25th of June. He saw him on the evening of July 1st at his residence, but life had expired. On examination witness found foam coming from his mouth, and from enquiries made he came to the conclusion that he died from a sudden attack of asthma. Witness had attended him for this complaint for about a fortnight.
The Coroner said that the case was a very sad one, for Sergeant Major FURNEAUX was as well respected as he was known. He was sure the Jury would join with him in sympathising deeply with the sudden affliction that had befallen the family. It was only last Thursday that he himself had spoken to the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 9 July 1898, Issue 9671 – Gale Document No. Y3200771480
MYSTERIOUS DEATH AT CHUDLEIGH – An Inquest was opened at Chudleigh yesterday on the body of MARY ANN LAMBEL, wife of a labourer, of Woodway-street. Deceased died on Wednesday in great pain, and the evidence of Mr H. Lloyd Patch, surgeon, was that death was due to some irritant poison. He has made a post mortem examination. The deceased was enceinte, and as he could not say what the irritant was he had sent the stomach to be analysed. The Inquest was adjourned.

Saturday 16 July 1898, Issue 9677 – Gale Document No. Y3200771512
BARNSTAPLE – At an Inquest held on Tuesday relative to the death of ERNEST MALTBY, 25, which took place on the previous day immediately after he had partaken of dinner, Dr Jackson expressed his belief that death was due to syncope. Deceased had evidently become overheated before dinner. A verdict to that effect was passed. MR MALTBY was subject to fainting fits.

Saturday 16 July 1898, Issue 9677 – Gale Document No. Y3200771526
FATALITY – WILLIAM MEDLAND, aged 50, lodging at the Courtenay Arms, Mary Arches-street, fell outside the Higher Market on Thursday night and injured his head. He was taken to the Hospital, where he expired yesterday. An Inquest will be held on Monday.

Saturday 16 July 1898, Issue 9677 – Gale Document No. Y3200771491
TAVISTOCK CRIPPLE'S DEATH – Mr Rodd, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday at Radge Farm, Tavistock, on the body of GEORGE GIDLEY, the crippled sons of MR G. GIDLEY, farmer, found drowned in the river Tavy, nor far from the farm, on Friday. Sergeant Major Bowles was foreman of the Jury.
Dr Ledman, of Tavistock, stated that twelve months ago deceased was under his care for a nervous disease. He warned the parents to keep all sharp instruments from him. He had a delusion that there were worms creeping about him underneath his skin and went so far as to make a big sore in his neck with his nails.
MR GEORGE GIDLEY, the father, said the deceased was 32 years old and had been a cripple for 30 years, only being able to get about on his hands and feet. Witness missed him on Friday and looked about in every direction, but could not find him. A gate leading to the river was left open. Deceased often went down to the river to fish and to look at the stream. He did not notice anything unusual about him on Friday. Ernest Steer of the Cottage Inn, deposed to recovering the body by means of a long crocked pole about 11.30 on Friday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 16 July 1898, Issue 9677 – Gale Document No. Y3200771501
TORQUAY – Determined Suicide. - The Coroner and a Popular Delusion. Mr Hacker held an Inquest concerning the death of the young man LAIRD, whose body was found at Hope's Nose on Thursday night. The evidence was somewhat of a remarkable nature, showing premeditation and firm determination on the part of the unfortunate suicide. Deceased, who had just finished his apprenticeship last month with Mr R. Pickhard, lived with an old spinster aunt, in Avenue-road, to whom he was much attached. He was of a shy and retiring disposition, with peculiar notions about certain things. He felt very despondent on the prospect of leaving his aunt, and going away amongst strangers, as he was about securing a situation at Newton. On Wednesday he took dinner as usual, and then went out for a walk, as he did daily. On this occasion he had in his hand a lump of lead tied in a parcel, and in reply to a question from his aunt, he said it was to strengthen his arms. She did not notice the parcel in his hand when he returned about four hours later. He had tea with his aunt, and later, about nine o'clock, had supper. A few minutes after that MISS LAIRD retired for the evening, leaving her nephew sitting reading. When she came down the next morning she found her nephew was not in the house, and that he had not been in his bed that night. On looking round she also found that he had burnt the candle for probably an hour or more after she had retired the previous evening, and that he had changed his usual wearing clothes for a suit of discarded ones, carefully placed his gold watch in the draw where it was usually kept, and had arranged all his reading books. She also found that a bag containing some rope had been disturbed, and a bit of rope cut off. The lead and rope produced she identified as taken from her house. The lead was used by deceased as dumbbells. P.S. Adams said when the body was taken to the mortuary it was found that a rope had been tied round the right thigh, then taken round the neck and tied; a loop had been made through which the left hand had been thrust, and this loop was then tied to the part of the rope at the neck and also to the piece leading from the thigh, thus tying the left hand across the breast. The body had no trousers, vest or boots on, but a jacket, and in the two side pockets and breast pocket were three pieces, weighing 22 ½ lbs. The tie, collar, trousers, and boots of deceased were picked up a short distance from where the body was found, but the cap and vest had not been found.
Dr Winter was of opinion that the cut over the eye had probably been caused by striking a rock. A blow at that part to render a person unconscious would have to be much more severe than the wound indicated in this case. Deceased had been dead from six to twelve hours, but he could not have been in the water from the morning tide. In this respect it was assumed the act had been committed in the morning tide on Thursday, which would have coincided with the time deceased left his home, but the evidence of the doctor made it plain that the deed must have been committed in daylight, sometime after mid-day on Thursday.
The finding of the body was deposed to by John Bishop, a Torquay fisherman. Bishop and his mate saw "something" on the beach, and pulling ashore, saw it was a man's body, wet and bleeding from a wound over the eye. When they saw what it was they did not land but went and told the coastguard. In answer to a question Bishop said the body was dead because there was no movement. They did not go to the body because they must not touch a body if it is on the beach.
The Coroner said there was great ignorance regarding the popular idea that a body should not be touched. Everyone's first duty as a human being was to go to the body and ascertain if any assistance was required; if that was so, then convey the body to where that assistance could be had. If the person was dead, the proper course was to communicate with the police. Witness: If the body had been floating they would have taken it in tow. Coroner: I hope you would have taken it into your boat. The Jury returned a verdict of Suicide whilst Temporary Insane.

Saturday 23 July 1898, Issue 9683 – Gale Document No. Y3200771550
EXMOUTH DROWNING CASE – Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at the Vestry Hall, Dawlish, on Monday, on the body of LUDWIG LEONARD LARSEN, aged 19, of Tromsoe, Norway, seaman on the schooner Bertha, who met with his death while bathing at Exmouth on Thursday evening. From the evidence it appears that the deceased and another man named Christoffersen went for a bathe, when those on board heard a shout for help, and the crew prepared to launch their big boat. Meanwhile, however, a boat from another ship had gone to the rescue of the men and picked up Christofferson in an exhausted condition, but LARSEN had disappeared. His body was recovered on Sunday by Mr A. P. Baker, of Exeter, who was sailing from Exmouth to Dawlish, between the Pole Sands and Langstone Sands in about 3 ft. of water. A verdict of "Accidental Death From Drowning" was returned.

Saturday 23 July 1898, Issue 9683 – Gale Document No. Y3200771557
THE DEATH OF A ST. THOMAS RESIDENT – Inquest This Afternoon. - An Inquest was held this afternoon by Mr Burrow, Deputy Coroner of Cullompton, at the Council Chamber, Cowick-street, St. Thomas, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY GOODHIND, timber haulier, of 27, Cowick-road, who died suddenly on Thursday night, as reported in our columns last evening. Mr P. Rousham was chosen Foreman of the Jury. Charles Hooper, waggoner, of Haven-road, said on Thursday night witness and deceased went to the circus performance. They were going towards St. Thomas after the performance when deceased suggested they should ride home. A cab was hailed and deceased fell back when getting in. By a Juryman: He was sober; he did not complain at all and did not speak when he fell back. WILLIAM GOODHIND, signalman on the railway at Bristol, identified the body. Deceased had a seizure about three years since, and had not been in good health since. Mr M. Farrant, junr., said when he saw the deceased he was dead. A post mortem examination was made, and death was found to be due to a large effusion of blood around the heart. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 23 July 1898, Issue 9683 – Gale Document No. Y3200771562
DEAT OF A TOWN PORTER – At the Hospital on Monday Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM MEDLAND, aged about 50 years, who was found prostrated in the Higher Market on Thursday evening. Mr Thorn was chosen Foreman of the Jury. William James Taylor, landlord f the Courtney Arms, Mary Arches-street, identified the body. Deceased was town porter, and lodged with witness. On Thursday evening he was informed that MEDLAND had fallen down in Goldsmith-street. In answer to the Coroner, witness said deceased was in the habit of getting intoxicated once or twice a week. William Robert Western, butcher, of Goldsmith-street, said he saw deceased on Thursday night in the Higher Market. He appeared to have been drinking and was sitting on one of the stalls. Witness shortly afterwards saw him lying on the ground. He appeared to have lost the use of his right arm and leg. Deceased was subsequently conveyed to the Hospital. Mr W. Ashford, assistant house-surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was received at the Hospital on Thursday evening. He was paralysed on his right side, and after admittance grew rapidly worse and died next morning. Witness examined deceased's head and found death was due to haemorrhage of the brain, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Saturday 23 July 1898, Issue 9683 – Gale Document No. Y3200771585
CHUDLEIGH MYSTERY – A Woman Poisoned. - Mr Hacker, County Coroner, at Chudleigh, last evening resumed the Inquest relative to the death of MRS MARY ANN LAMBLE. Dr Bean, borough analyst of Plymouth, showed that as the result of the examination of the stomach and the analysis of the fluid death was due to lead poisoning. Three-quarters of a grain may have been taken, probably to procure abortion. ELIZABETH HOLWILL, deceased's mother, who declared that she did not know of her daughter's condition or of her having taken drugs, was questioned relative to the death of a younger daughter under somewhat similar circumstances. Mary Ann Warren, who attended deceased, said she had no suspicions of anything wrong. In reply to the Coroner, she gave particulars of the death of the younger daughter. The Inquiry was adjourned for a week.

Saturday 30 July 1898, Issue 9689 – Gale Document No. Y3200771613
SUICIDE NEAR TAVISTOCK – An Inquest was held by Mr Rodd (County Coroner) at Hunson Villa, Whitchurch, near Tavistock, on Wednesday n the body of ROBT. TOYE, retired mine agent, aged 71. MARY TOYE, daughter, stated that deceased had suffered from a kidney complaint, and had been depressed for some time. Early on Sunday morning she saw him drop a knife. It had blood upon it, and she called her brother. WILLIAM SOPER TOYE said when he asked his father what he had done he replied that he did not know. Mr Foueca, of Tavistock, stated that deceased had a wound in his throat, though not of a very serious character, but pneumonia set in, and resulted in death. The Jury found that the deceased committed suicide while of Unsound Mind, and expressed sympathy with the widow and family.

Saturday 30 July 1898, Issue 9689 – Gale Document No. Y3200771615
BARNSTAPLE DROWNING CASE - Mr J. F. Bromham (County Coroner) held an Inquest on Tuesday on the body of EDWIN HUGH CLARKE, the lad who was drowned while bathing in the treacherous River Taw Monday afternoon. In returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," the Jury called attention to the need of proper bathing accommodation in the town, and added a rider recommending the placing of such accommodation.

Saturday 30 July 1898, Issue 9689 – Gale Document No. Y3200771617
TORQUAY MANSLAUGHTER CASE. The Inquest Adjourned. "Thirty Two Years' Drunkenness." - Mr S. Hacker (County Coroner) held an Inquest at St. Marychurch Town Hall on Wednesday into the circumstances attending the death of THIRZA MINGO, 52, wife of a marine store dealer, who was found dead, as previously reported in the "Evening Post." Mr Basil E. Greenfield appeared for Joseph Holding (son-in-law of deceased) who had been arrested on suspicion. Evidence of identification was given by the husband, JOHN MINGO, who said his wife lived with him at 4, Gray's Cottages, Babbacombe. His two sons, JOHN, 21, and SAMUEL, 18, also lived at home. On Monday evening his son-in-law and daughter JOSEPH and MARY ANN HOLDING, were with him in the wood-house at 8 o'clock when deceased came to him for money for beer, as was her practice. His wife started wrangling and he told her to "be quiet," on which she took up a piece of wood and threatened to strike witness. Deceased was intoxicated at the time, and he took away the wood from her. He had been married 32 years, and he had had nothing but daily drunkenness from her all that time. After the wood, his wife took up a large stone and then a piece of ceiling to throw at him. His daughter then picked her up and carried her outside on the green. Half-an-hour later witness found his wife lying in the road on her back. A lot of people were about, including his daughter, and witness's son and Holding picked up deceased and carried her into the house and laid her on the floor, as he had done frequently before. She did not move or speak. Laying her n the kitchen floor, the daughter placed some old coats for a pillow under her head. Holding left the wood-house before witness, but not with deceased. He heard a disturbance in the interval, but did not go out on account of her belligerent character. This was before they carried her into the house, after which she vomited. He let her lie on the floor as if she woke up she would disturb the whole neighbourhood. Witness stayed up all night in the arm chair and kept up the fire, and his son slept on the box on the other side of the kitchen. Mr and Mrs Holding left between nine and ten. Shortly after the son came up deceased made use of an expletive, according to custom. She lay still after that till 5.30 the next morning, when his son JOHN called his attention to deceased, whose face he felt and then exclaimed, "Father, mother's dead." Witness refused to believe it, but examination proved it to be true, and the police and a doctor were sent for. He never took the trouble to look at her because he got rather tired and weary of her coming home beastly drunk every night and sleeping on the floor. He was not aware of any wound till after the doctor's arrival. His wife often came home intoxicated, and he always let her lie on the floor till she recovered, when he put her to bed. His wife had been convicted of assaulting him, and had been to prison eleven times. In reply to the police, witness said he did not see any blood and did not see his wife fall down in the road.
Dr Finch deposed to being called at 5.30 on Tuesday morning to attend to deceased, whom he found had been dead some two or three hours. Blood had been running from the right ear. A post mortem examination disclosed a large bruise behind the right ear, and old injuries to the cheek and shoulder. The brain was covered with a large blood clot, with a fracture underneath the bruise, extending to the base of the skull, indicating great violence. Death was due to the fracture of the base of the skull, which was due to her falling heavily on a stone like the one produced, or receiving a severe blow from a blunt instrument. Deceased had only the use of one arm, having to carry the other in a sling. She had come to witness for treatment in a drunken state, and he certainly thought the blow was such as would be caused by a drunken person falling backwards. It was quite possible in injuries f this kind for a person even to walk home after and also to speak for hours after, and then for death to supervene. Medical aid would have been no avail if obtained, for the blow was fatal. It could not be produced without other effects by a blow from a fist.
The Inquest was then adjourned.

Saturday 30 July 1898, Issue 9689 – Gale Document No. Y3200771605
DEATH OF A MARYCHURCH WOMAN – The adjourned Inquest touching the death of THIRZA MINGO, for whose death her son-in-law, JOSEPH HOLDING, was apprehended and subsequently allowed out on bail, was opened this afternoon in the Town Hall, St. Marychurch, by Mr Coroner Hacker. Holding was represented by Mr B. Greenfield, Torquay. The evidence of four witnesses went to show that Holding used no violence in separating the deceased from her daughter. All swore that the deceased was very drunk. A verdict was returned that deceased died from fracture of the skull by accidentally falling while drunk. The verdict was received with applause.

Saturday 6 August 1898, issue 9694 – Gale Document No. Y3200771680
THE MORETON HANGING CASE - Mr Coroner S. Hacker held an Enquiry yesterday in the Smethurst Schoolroom, Moretonhampstead, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM CANN, wheelwright, who was found in his pound house on Thursday hanging by a rope to a beam. GEORGE CANN, of the Union Inn, brother of the deceased, said he believed the only trouble deceased had was about money matters. William Miller, labourer, employed by the deceased, said he went to the pound-house for cider and found the door locked. William Brooks opened the door and they found their master on his knees with a rope round his neck. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 13 August 1898, Issue 9700 – Gale Document No. Y3200771710
OTTERY ST. MARY - An Inquest was held at the Golden Lion Inn, Tipton, on Wednesday on the body of the REV. WILLIAM ONSLOW SOLE, who was drowned while fishing in the river Ottery. The deceased had for some time suffered from faintness, and had been under medical advice. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 13 August 1898, Issue 9700 – Gale Document No. Y3200771712
TORQUAY NEWS – Inquest. - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest at St. Luke's School, Torquay, on Monday on the body of MISS HESTER FENWICK, aged 77, of 10, Portland-place, who had been spending some time at Moretonhampstead. On Friday, 26th July, she went for a walk with her sister, MRS BIGGE, on the moor. She evidently took a short walk in her sister's absence and slipped on a stone, fracturing her thigh. She was removed to Torquay afterwards, and died on Friday night. The evidence of Dr Gardener was to the effect that she died from congestion of the lungs, caused by a fracture of the thigh, produced by accidentally falling on a stone, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Saturday 20 August 1898, Issue 9706 – Gale Document Nol. Y3200771758
At an Inquest at Devonport on Tuesday relative to the death of SARAH CARTER PEMBERTHY, drowned through a waterman's boat colliding with the Millbrook steamer Devonia, the Jury expressed the opinion that a more experienced look-out man should be employed and that precautions should be taken for the safety of passengers and others, strongly disapproved of the high rate of speed at which the Millbrook steamers run owing to steam-boat rivalry, and reprimanded Captain Gummer, of the Devonia, for the way in which he navigated his vessel.

Saturday 20 August 1898, Issue 9706 – Gale Document Nol. Y3200771742
FATALITY AT EXMOUTH. A Child Poisoned. Coroner and Chemist: Strong Remarks. - Mr Coroner C. E. Cox held an Enquiry on Monday at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, into the death of REGINALD ALFRED JOHN BASTIN, infant child of MR BASTIN, garden labourer, of Market-street, Exmouth. Mr J. M. Dyer was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
LILY BASTIN identified the deceased as that of her child, who was three years of age on the 4th of this month. On Saturday last, about three o'clock, she was mending clothes in her washhouse. She left the child at play in the house. She noticed the child was quiet, and she went to find him. He had gone through the house and out at the front door. He came back in about five minutes staggering, and said, "Oh! mother, take me up and kiss me; I feel very poorly. I ain't well." Witness took the child up, and it twitched convulsively, and lost the use of its legs. Witness called Mr Smith, a lodger, and he took the child up and asked it if it had been drinking anything, and the child answered "Yes," pointing to a bottle of eye-wash on the chest of drawers, which witness noticed was not so full as it was when she left it. Mr Smith took the bottle and went to Mr Bickford, chemist, of the Strand, Exmouth, who had made up a prescription of Dr Martin's for witness's eyes. He came back some time afterwards, and Dr Hodgson then arrived. He gave the child several things to try and make it sick, but without avail. The child died at 7.30 the next morning.
The Coroner then read the label on the bottle which was as follows:- "Exmouth Dispensary. The drops to be used three times a day. Lily Basin. J. T. Bickford, dispenser by appointment. Strand Pharmacy, Exmouth." Another label at the bottom said "Not to be taken."
Samuel John Smith, said he was clerk in the Exmouth Post Office, and was a lodger with the mother of the deceased. He was called in to look at the deceased by the mother on Saturday afternoon. When he went into the room the mother was putting the child on to the ground but it could hardly stand as its legs seemed to be wobbling. when he got to it the child said "Sam, take me up; I don't feel well." Witness took him up and asked him if he had been drinking anything. He said "Yes," in the bottle," pointing to the bottle (produced) on the chest of drawers. He took the bottle and ran to Dr Martin, who prescribed the drops, but he was out. He then went back and found the prescription and took it to the chemist's, where he saw Mr Cummins, the assistant, and asked him if there was anything dangerous in the prescription. He answered in the affirmative, but said he dared not give him an antidote. Witness then went for a doctor and he was out; a second he found away; and eventually Dr Hodgson was telephoned for from Mr Bickford's shop. He arrived at the deceased's parents house soon after witness. Witness stopped in the house till 8.30 when he had to go to work. The deceased died in his presence on the following morning at 7.30.
Mrs Dyer, a next door neighbour, corroborated the evidence as to the condition of the deceased previous to death.
~Dr J. W. Hodgson deposed to being called about four o'clock. He was told the child had drunk out of a bottle a liquid which was used as eye-wash. He found that there were poisons contained in the liquids, viz., atropine and cocaine. The child was apparently suffering from the influence of atropine when he saw it, and it was quite delirious. He gave the child emetics and also morphia, which sent it to sleep. When he saw it late that night its condition was favourable, and he was hopeful of recovery. Convulsions, however, set in on the Sunday morning, and the deceased died at 7.30. He had made a post mortem examination. There were no distinctive symptoms that the deceased had drunk the eyewash. It was not discernible in the contents of the stomach. The brain was congested; and of course from the evidence the cause of death was perfectly clear. The mother had pointed out to the Jury by showing them on the bottle how much the child had drunk, but she had forgotten to state that the child had poured some of the liquid into a cup, and had not swallowed all of that which was poured out. The mother herself had put some milk into the same cup, thinking that it contained water and had drunk the rest, afterwards feeling the effects in her throat.
Mr J. T. Bickford said he was a chemist on the Strand, Exmouth, and was responsible for the preparation in the bottle produced.
The Coroner: Are you aware what the ingredients are? - Yes.
Are you aware that some of them are poisons, and that they are incorporated by the Pharmacy Act in schedule A as such? - Yes.
Are you further aware it is your business to be aware that any preparation of atropine has to be labelled "Poison?" - No, I'm not aware of that, with respect to a medical practitioner's prescription. I am aware that if it is sold over the counter it is required to be labelled.
The Coroner: This bottle ought by law - and you have broken the law – to have been labelled "Poison", and it is for the protection of the public that the law was made.
Did you label it. - Yes.
Then you've broken the law, and it is a very serious matter for you. You have neglected your duty, and this child has died. The regulations laid down in this Act are made for the protection of the public, and it is my duty to see that they are carried out.
Witness: Will you read the Act, please? - Yes, most certainly. (The Act was then read.)
A good deal of discussion then took place between the Coroner and witness, the latter contending that the law did not apply to medical prescriptions, but only to retail sales.
The Coroner (addressing witness): I don't know what view the Jury will take of this case, but you lay yourself open to a charge of Manslaughter, and I leave it with them as to the verdict – they can return a verdict of Manslaughter if they think it a case of sufficient neglect. Several Jurymen were of the opinion that the Coroner had seemed to overlook the fact that the bottle was labelled "Not to be taken." The Coroner: "Not to be taken" is one thing and "Poison" is another. the latter is a much more forcible warning.
The witness stated that he did not understand that part of the law which had been read by the Coroner to refer to medical prescriptions.
The Coroner: It is my duty to point out what the law is. I lay down that you have broken the law. Do you wish to make any further statement?
A Juryman: Perhaps Dr Hodgson could give us some information.
Dr Hodgson: I think it only right to Mr Bickford to state that a doctor would consider a red label "Not to be taken" equivalent to "Poison."
The Coroner: No one has a right to break the law.
Dr Hodgson: The spirit of the law is carried out, but the letter is not.
The Coroner: Excuse me, the spirit of the law is not carried out. the one label is not so much a warning as the other. I consider it most important in the interests of the public safety that this Act should be adhered to.
A Juryman: A person would be very ignorant to take what was in the bottle in face of the label.
The Coroner: There is blame, and great blame, attachable to the chemist for not labelling the bottle in accordance with the law.
Dr Hodgson: Of course, I'm only speaking from experience. In the case of prescriptions the law is different. What the Coroner has read applies to sales over the counter. This is neither sold wholesale nor retail. It was not sold at all.
The Coroner: Well, I consider it was.
Dr Hodgson: That is only just what is usual. There is nothing unusual in the way in which it has been sold.
The Coroner: It may be usual, but it is time it was unusual, because it is a great breach of the law.
Dr Hodgson: I am only telling you what is my experience.
The Coroner then commenced to sum up. He said it was a case in which the deceased child had partaken of the contents of a bottle containing a preparation of various poisons, amongst them the poison atropine. The bottle in which this poison was contained was supplied by Mr Bickford, a well-known chemist and druggist of the town. As he read the Act of 1868 – the Pharmacy Act – it was distinctly against the law to sell such a poison – such a preparation of atropine – without attaching to the bottle a "Poison" label. A label "Not to be Taken" did not answer the same purpose, and did not give the requisite warning. The mother had stated that she did not know that this was dangerous. He did not know that he could blame her altogether, because, in his opinion, she did not have sufficient warning. He considered the chemist who supplied the eyewash had broken the law; whether or not there was any other neglect that helped on the death of the child he left it for the Jury to consider. But he thought that if the law had been properly complied with, deaths f that sort would have been less frequent, and he could not help the conviction that if the bottle had been labelled "Poison" the mother would have put it away out of the reach of the child. It was quite clear that the child died from the effects of the atropine. He was very far from saying that it would be the duty of the Jury to return a verdict of Manslaughter – of course there were degrees of neglect and he left it with them as to how far the chemist had failed in his duty – but he did urge them to point out strongly that the law should be strictly complied with in this matter He hoped he should never have to investigate a death of this sort again in Exmouth. If he did he should deal with it very seriously.
The Jury after a short deliberation returned a verdict of "Accidental Death", adding a rider that the cause of death was due to the child drinking part of the poisonous contents of a bottle of eyewash. The Foreman also said it was the unanimous wish of the Jury that he should say that all chemists in Exmouth, when supplying any of the poisons, or preparations in which they were contained, mentioned in the Act, should label the bottle "Poison."
The Coroner (turning to Mr Bickford): You have heard the expression of the Jury. I entirely agree with it and I hope you will adhere strictly to what has been said and that you will label all dangerous bottles "Poison." A Juryman: I don't think that it is the opinion of the whole Jury. It is not mine. I think it's only the Foreman's.
The Coroner: Well, I quite agree with it.
Dr Hodgson: I can certainly testify as to – The Coroner: Dr Hodgson, I must ask you -----, You have expressed your opinion already at the Inquest. The Coroner then formally entered the verdict, and the Inquest closed.

INQUEST AT NEWTON ABBOT - Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest at the Town Hall, Newton Abbot, on Monday, into the circumstances attending the death of MRS ANNIE PENNY, aged 35, wife of Chief Petty Officer GEORGE PENNY, of H.M.S. Collingwood, now lying off Ireland. FREDERICK TOWELL, fitter at the station, stated that deceased was his daughter. On Sunday morning she rose apparently in good health and had breakfast, and dressed her nine-month old daughter. About 9.30 she was seized with violent pains in the chest and shoulders. At her request witness rubbed her and assuaged the pain somewhat, but a few minutes later it came on again as badly as ever. As witness was lifting her she expired in his arms. Dr Margrave deposed that he had made a post mortem examination, and found that death was due to failure of the heart's action following acute indigestion. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned by the Jury, of which Mr W. H. Lauder was Foreman.

Saturday 20 August 1898, Issue 9706 – Gale Document No. Y3200771769
At an Inquest at Plymouth on Monday relative to the death of GEORGE THOMAS DERRY, professor of music, who died through injuries received through being knocked down by a bicycle on August 4th, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and added that they were convinced that deceased was not under the influence of drink and recommended that every cyclist should carry a brake.

Saturday 20 August 1898, Issue 9706 – Gale Document No. Y3200771751
FATAL ACCIDENT NEAR NEWTON – Yesterday afternoon about four o'clock GEORGE HOLMES, quarryman, aged 40, died from the effects of the injuries he received by a quantity of stones and earth loosened by the heavy rain falling upon his head on Thursday. When picked up Dr Stephens was sent for and attended to his injuries. The poor fellow was afterwards removed to his home at Ipplepen, where he died in great agony. The Inquest was held this afternoon at Ipplepen schoolroom and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 27 August 1898, Issue 9712 – Gale Document No. Y3200771782
INQUEST – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on Tuesday on the body of HARRIET BALSOM, wife of ELIAS BALSOM, of 3, Ebenezer-place, Paris-street, who was found dead in bed on Sunday. Mr Russell Coombe, surgeon, said the death was a natural one, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Saturday 27 August 1898, Issue 9712 – Gale Document No. Y3200771790
SIDMOUTH FATALITY – St. Thomas Boy Drowned. Plucky Attempt at Rescue. - About seven o'clock on Tuesday a boy named ERNEST MADGE, about 14 years of age, employed at Smith and Son's bookstall, and whose parents reside at St. Thomas, Exeter, went down to the sea in company with some other boys to bathe. He had not been long in the water when he was seen to be sinking. He made no call for help, but a boy named Abbot attempted to pull him out. Being unable to succeed he ran to the coastguard house for assistance. The alarm was immediately given, and a fisherman named Smith ran to the spot, dived into the water, and rescued the lad. In the meantime medical help had been summoned. Mr Goodyn and Mr Bingley Pullin arrived, and every effort was made to restore life, but without avail.
Our correspondent says the coastguards speedily launched a boat on receiving the alarm, but owing to the dirty condition of the water they were unable to see the bottom and it was some few minutes before the body was recovered. On MADGE being brought ashore, it was found that life was not quite extinct, but owing to the length of time which had elapsed between his sinking and recovery it was feared impossible to resuscitate him. The sincerest sympathy is expressed for his relatives.
The Inquest was held by Mr Coroner Cox on Wednesday, and after hearing the evidence of the witnesses the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury also recommended that the District Council should be asked to place a life-buoy and a danger post near the spot where the deceased was drowned, and the Coroner promised to forward the recommendation to the authority. The boy Abbot was commended for his gallant efforts in endeavouring to rescue the deceased.

Saturday 27 August 1898, Issue 9712 – Gale Document No. Y3200771792
TEIGNMOUTH FATALITY – The Inquest. - Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquiry at Teignmouth Infirmary on Monday into the death of THOMAS CHAFFE, widower, of the town, who died after meeting with an accident on Lifeboat-day. Mr William H. Haynes was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and Mr Burden, the hon. local secretary, represented the National Lifeboat Institution. EMILY CHAFFE, of Fore-street, Buckfastleigh, identified the body as that of her brother, aged 46. She had a letter yesterday stating that her brother was dead; she did not know till then that he had met with an accident.
John G. Bartlett, contractor and haulier, of Teignmouth, said deceased, with others, was engaged as guard to keep the people from the wheels of the lifeboat carriage. After the launching of the lifeboat the carriage was left on the beach for a short time, a man being in charge of each of the four horses. Someone shouted "Right away," and the carriage was moved, knocking deceased down, one of the hind wheels going over him.
By the Coroner: The word to start was audible to everybody around. He could not say who gave the word. He was quite sure deceased was sober, and considered he misjudged the distance. There was no disturbance of any kind.
Mr Burden asked if the drag ropes were in position, witness replying that he was not certain. Sergeant Richards, however, said they were.
Mr Burden said his reason for asking was that deceased's position was outside the rope if he had been in his place he could not have got under the wheels.
Arthur Wilfrid Brain, of Teignmouth, said he saw deceased with his back to the wheel, apparently screwing up something which had got loose, and walking along at the same time. He was conscious when picked up.
Mr Burden here informed the Coroner that he had received a telegram from the Lifeboat Institution expressing deep regret at the accident and offering to defray the funeral expenses. Deceased had been a helper on many occasions.
Mr Hasluck, house surgeon at the Infirmary, said deceased was admitted on Tuesday and attended by Dr Johnson. Witness saw deceased next day and he appeared well. He had a sprained ankle.
The Coroner: Only a sprained ankle not suffering from shock or concussion.
Witness: Apparently not. Continuing, witness said on Friday symptoms of delirium tremens set in and deceased had to be constantly watched. He became very exhausted in consequence of his attempts to get out of bed, and died of delirium tremens.
By the Coroner: In certain cases shock would hasten delirium tremens. He believed deceased was a heavy drinker.
A verdict of "Accidental Death" and attached no blame to anyone was returned.

Saturday 3 September 1898, Issue 9718 – Gale Document No. Y3200771875
An Inquest was held at Plymouth yesterday on the body of AARON PARKES, killed by an explosion in connection with the water-gas apparatus at the gasworks.

Saturday 10 September 1898, Issue 9724 – Gale Document No. Y3200771905
DARTMOUTH – At the Inquest held at Slapton on Wednesday on the body of GEORGE MCKEON, who was drowned through slipping off the yacht Ailsa when she was racing at Dartmouth, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TIVERTON – Mr Foster Barham held an Inquest at Tiverton on Wednesday relative to the death of THOMAS KELLOW, a quarryman, of Langley Marsh, near Wiveliscombe, where a windlass struck him on the head. He took no heed of the wound at the time, but subsequently went to Dr Norris, of Wiveliscombe, to be treated. He was ordered to hospital, where it was soon found that an abscess had formed on the brain; from this he died.

Saturday 10 September 1898, Issue 9724 – Gale Document No. Y3200771907
INQUEST – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at No. 9, Grant's Cottages, St. Sidwells, on Tuesday, on the body of MARY CLEAVE, the infant daughter of WILLIAM HENRY CLEAVE, coal merchant. Emma Smith, residing at Exmouth, said the child was born on Saturday morning and died on Sunday morning. Witness saw it on Saturday afternoon, when it seemed to be all right. The mother of the child was attended by Mrs Whitfield. Dr Gordon said he was fetched on Sunday morning, and when he arrived he found that the child had been dead for four or five hours. In his opinion death was due to debility, brought on by being prematurely born. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Saturday 24 September 1898, Issue 9736 – Gale Document No. Y3200772008
SHOOTING FATALITY NEAR HONITON – A shocking affair took place yesterday morning at Fenton, near Honiton. MR WILLIAM HORSFORD, an extensive and well-known farmer, being found shot. It appears that the deceased rose shortly before six o'clock, and not long afterwards the inmates o the house heard the report of a gun. MR HORSFORD was found lying in the sitting room in a pool of blood with his head completely shattered, and a gun at his side discharged. Dr Shortridge, of Honiton, was immediately summoned, and within a short time his assistant (Dr Alleyne) arrived, but their efforts were, of course, of no avail as death had been instantaneous. At the Inquest held by Mr Coroner Cox, Mr Chown, carpenter, spoke as to the dangerous condition of the gun, which he had known to frequently go off without any warning, and without the triggers apparently being touched. The Jury returned an open verdict "that death was caused by a gunshot wound, but as to how the weapon exploded there was no evidence to show." Deceased was 40 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children.

Saturday 24 September 1898, Issue 9736 – Gale Document No. Y3200771983
INQUEST – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest this morning at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of MRS MARGARET HAYDON, the landlady. Mr Edward Comer was chosen Foreman of the Jury. MR ARTHUR HAYDON, mineral water manufacturer, of St Leonard's-terrace, identified the body as that of his mother, who was 56 years of age. She had been in very good health for the past eighteen months. As was her custom deceased went to lay down about four o'clock on Thursday. She was called for tea about five, but there was no answer, and witness's sister on going to her bedroom found her mother dead. Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said death was due to syncope, and a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned. The Coroner and the Jury expressed their sympathy with the family in their sad bereavement.

Saturday 24 September 1898, Issue 9736 – Gale Document No. Y3200771991
ILFRACOMBE MYSTERY - The adjourned Inquest on the body of JOHN HAM was resumed at the Tyrrell Cottage Hospital, Ilfracombe, before Dr Slade-King. Dr Payne stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body he was of opinion that deceased died from the effects of toxic poisoning. there was not sufficient evidence of lead poisoning, but he thought it must be ptomaine poisoning in consequence of an inadequate liver. The Coroner regretted to say that it pointed to the fact that the liver had been destroyed by alcoholic excess. s The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 1 October 1898, Issue 9742 – Gale Document No. Y3200772044
EXMOUTH FATALITY – The Coroner and Mr Bickford. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday by Mr Coroner Cox at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on the body of RICHARD CAMERON, of Greenock, who lost his life by falling overboard while boarding the S.S. Elk, which was lying in the Exmouth Bight unloading sleepers for the London and South Western Railway.
Before swearing the Jury the Coroner said he should first of all like to say a few words with respect to the last Inquest he held there. At that Enquiry he had expressed the opinion that a certain chemist in the town, Mr J. T. Bickford was legally to blame for not having labelled a bottle "poison" which contained a preparation of atropine. He wished now to say that he was not now of the same opinion, but thought to the contrary that he was not legally to blame. In making his remarks he was under a misapprehension, as he had overlooked an Act of Parliament of 1869, which amended the one of 1868, which he had been looking at. Although in his private opinion the law on the labelling of poisons ought to be much more stringent, he wished to unreservedly withdraw every word he had said imputing any legal blame on the chemist. He was quite satisfied that there was no blame, and as he always wished to do justice in the office which he held he wished to express his sorrow that he should ever have made such remarks under a misapprehension.
GEORGE CAMERON, brother of the deceased, and living at 7, Mont Pleasant, Greenock, said deceased was 28 years of age and was a marine engineer on the S.S. Elk. He saw the deceased on the Sunday night previous to his joining the vessel on the 16th May last.
Francis Thomas Dyer, landlord of the Criterion Inn, Exmouth, said deceased came to his house on Monday evening, the 19th inst., about ten o'clock, and he left at eleven. He had with him the second engineer of the S.S. Elk. He had no intoxicating liquor there that night. He asked for soda water. He did not appear to have been drinking at all. When he left, witness went with him and Mr Smith out to the vessel. He saw him get on to the lighter, and there he stood talking for some time. Later on he was missed from the lighter, and a diligent search was made, but all to no purpose.
William Frank Bamsey said he met the deceased about ten o'clock, and they went to Mr Dyer's. He had a soda, and witness had a soda. He had nothing else to his knowledge. By the Coroner: We met outside the Station, and then he was not what he should call the worse for liquor. Witness, continuing, said he left the Criterion and went with the deceased and five others out to the S.S. Elk. Three got on to the lighter – the second engineer, the second mate, and the mess-room steward. The deceased was the second to try and board the steamer from the lighter. It was then they heard a splash. They searched for the deceased, but it was fruitless. – By the Foreman: Witness saw him at the "York," and he was refused drink there by the barmaid. Witness intended taking deceased with him to the "Criterion," but deceased stopped to speak to someone, and witness went on. – By Mr Hine: He was not aware that he went from the "York" to the South Western Hotel.
John Smith, mariner, of Exmouth, said he met the deceased at the Criterion. When he left the house he went home, and told his daughter that he was going to row the men out to the steamer. There was not an intoxicated man in the boat when he took them to the steamer. The barges were about three feet from the vessel.
Arthur Smith, son of the last witness, gave corroborative evidence. Edwin Richards deposed to finding the body. P.S. Dymond said 15s. 9d., a purse, watch, chain, &c., were found on the body. The Jury came to the conclusion that death was accidental, and passed a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 1 October 1898, Issue 9742 – Gale Document No. Y3200772037
FOUND DEAD - Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Police Station on Thursday on the body of MARY ANN DARBY, aged 71, of Darby's-buildings, Pancras-lane. WILLIAM MITCHELL, labourer, living at Darby's Buildings identified the body as that of his mother. She was the widow of ROBERT DARBY, paperhanger. She was found dead on Wednesday morning. Mary Ann Ellacott, a neighbour, said she was fetched in the morning by the last witness, and when she went in the house she found deceased dead. Mr E. A. Brash, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased, whom he had attended for years on and off, in the morning, and when he arrived he found the deceased dead. In his opinion death was a natural one, probably due to the failure of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 1 October 1898, Issue 9742 – Gale Document No. Y3200772029
LYMPSTONE – Mr C. E. Cox, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Railway Hotel this afternoon on the body of MARY ANN VINNICOMBE, aged 65, wife of RICHARD VINNICOMBE, fisherman, of Lympstone It appeared that MR VINNICOMBE went to bed in the early hours of Friday morning and left his wife asleep on a coach in a room downstairs. On coming downstairs about 5.30 in the morning he found his wife dead.

Saturday 1 October 1898, Issue 9742 – Gale Document No. Y3200772021
DEATH OF AN EXONIAN - At Turf House on Tuesday Mr A. Burrow (Deputy Coroner, of Cullompton) held an Inquest touching the death of GEORGE SMART, compositor, of Exeter, whose body was found at Turf Locks on Sunday morning. Mr William Hannaford was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who then proceeded to view the body.
The first witness was Mr Henry Burridge, who identified the body as that of GEORGE SMART, who had been in his service for about twelve months as a compositor. He had previously served his apprenticeship under witness. He last saw him alive on Thursday morning when between 11 o'clock and 122.30 he asked to go out for a little while. Deceased hardly made it clear what he was going to do.
The Coroner: To get away from Exeter? Witness: Oh! no, he asked to go for a short time from his work, which was no uncommon thing. I let him go. Witness, continuing, said he knew he had the care and trouble of the removal of his mother, and witness thought he was going out to make some arrangements.
The Coroner: Did he appear to be depressed? Witness: Nothing struck me particular; he was anxious about his mother.
Witness saw no more of him until that morning.
The Coroner: Did he threaten to destroy himself?
Witness: Never made the slightest intimation whatever. Witness observed that he should think it was either a fit or an accident. He was too high minded a young man, he should think, to throw himself into the river. Deceased had an exemplary character, and was most abstemious in his habits.
Mr T. E. D. Dixon, lock-keeper at Turf, said he saw several persons fishing at the Basin Head on Thursday morning. He did not know deceased. He was in the habit of going up around there of an evening and on Thursday evening he found two fishing rods and a basket. Witness took it back, and said someone was in an awful hurry to catch their train, as they had left their tackle behind. On Saturday a Mr Mills telephoned to them, and asked if they had seen anything of MR SMART. Miss Ball informed him that rods and a basket had been found. They dragged and found the body on Sunday morning about nine o'clock. Deceased was quite dead. The water where they found the body was about fifteen feet deep. There was a mark over the right eye, which he should think was caused by his falling against a stone.
Mrs Ellen Dixon, wife of the last witness, said she knew deceased through his coming there fishing. She last saw him alive on Thursday evening when she was going up the banks. He appeared in his usual state of health.
The Coroner: He didn't appear to be likely to commit suicide?
Witness: Oh, no. Witness further said when she had gone further she heard a splash, with which she was impressed. She thought a sheep had fallen in the dyke. Witness went back, but could see nothing.
P.C. Beer: If he had shouted should you have heard it?
Witness: Oh, yes.
By the Coroner: She did not see a fishing basket.
The Coroner: Did you find any letter at all?
Witness: No; I have had every piece of paper that has been seen floating down brought in and examined to throw, if possible, some light on the subject.
Miss Alice Ball said she was an assistant at Turf Hotel. She saw deceased on Thursday and he spoke to her several times. When asked what train he was going to catch he seemed to treat the matter with indifference.
Coroner: He was sober at the time, I suppose?
Witness: Yes, quite.
Samuel Hutchings, mariner, of Coombe-street, Exeter, gave evidence s to finding the body, and P.C. Beer as to searching it. He had no money.
Dr Frood, of Topsham, said he examined the body, and considered death was due to drowning. There was a slight abrasion over the right eye, which was apparently caused before death.
Foreman of the Jury: It was quite possible that deceased might have hitched his foot in anything?
Witness: It is possible; there have been several cases where death has been caused by tripping.
The Coroner said it was difficult for the Jury to bring in a verdict, as it was for them to decide how deceased came into the water. Deceased's employer had given him an excellent character, and did not think he would have taken his life. There was the fact that his basket and rods were some distance from the path which persons would take for Exeter or the Station.
The Jury after a little consultation, returned an open verdict – that of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 8 October 1898, Issue 9748 – Gale Document No. Y3200772059
THE FATALITY TO A NEWTON MAN – Inquest at Coombe Cellars. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday by Mr G. Kellock, Deputy Coroner, at Coombe Cellars, touching the death of WILLIAM GEORGE ELLIS, a bargeman of Newton Abbot, who was drowned the previous day in the River Teign. The body was identified by WILLIAM CANE, the deceased's grandfather.
William Steer, another bargeman, said he and deceased were mates. They left Buckland Point about ten minutes to nine the previous morning to take a barge load of clay to Teignmouth. William Truss was then accompanying them. They arrived at Coombe Cellars just before ten o'clock, when all three put off in the barge boat to get a drink, remaining about ten minutes. They then sculled back to the barge, the head of which they found had veered round with the wind. Witness and the deceased were in the bow, and Truss was in the stern. Witness heard a splash, and saw Deceased drowning. He immediately put off in the [?] to reach him, but a strong north-easterly was blowing and a strong ebb tide kept him from reaching the deceased. Mr James was on the beach, and they shouted to him. He [?] put off in a boat to the deceased and reached the spot, but deceased had gone down. They waited about the spot for about ten minutes, and then went on to Teignmouth.
Similar evidence was given by William Truss and Mr H. James, the landlord of the Ferryboat Inn. P.C. Stacey recovered the body about two o'clock in the afternoon. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" and added a rider that on account of the great risk men run upon barges that some better provision should e made for preserving the lives of anyone who might fall overboard. They also considered that in this case greater time should have been spent to try to recover the deceased.

FATALITY IN SOUTH DEVON - JOHN WARREN, aged 63, died at North Huish on Sunday from injuries received in June last by falling from a hayrick. At the Inquest held by Mr G. F. Kellock, Deputy County Coroner, on Tuesday, Dr F. W. Stoyle, of Brent, said deceased fractured his spine, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 8 October 1898, Issue 9748 – Gale Document No. Y3200772060
INQUEST AT EXETER PRISON – Mr Deputy Coroner A. Burrow held an Inquiry on Monday at the County Gaol into the death of JAMES SETTER, a prisoner of no fixed address, who died suddenly on Saturday last.
Major D. Matheson, Governor of H.M. Prison, said the deceased was received on the 27th ult. from Dawlish. He was sentenced by the magistrates to seven days without hard labour. He was said to be 70 years of age, and had been to prison on thirty-one previous occasions. A note was sent for the Magistrates' Clerk at Dawlish, saying that the prisoner was apparently in a bad state and in consequence Dr Mortimer saw him within half-an-hour of admittance. He was placed in a matted cell, but died about two o'clock on the Saturday in the Infirmary.
James Piper, day nurse at the prison, said deceased was brought to him on the 28th September and he was then put in the hospital ward. Deceased never spoke or opened his eyes up to the time of his death on the Saturday. He was fed with a spoon with hot milk, arrowroot, beef tea and eggs and milk. Witness did not think he suffered any pain. He seemed unconscious. Charles Madden, warder, deposed to seeing deceased just after his admission. He was very feeble and drowsy. He made no remark to him.
Dr J. Mortimer, medical attendant at the prison, said he examined deceased on admission. He was suffering from chronic alcoholism and was drowsy and stupid. Kidney disease set in on the next day, and he was at once sent to the infirmary, where he died on Saturday from Bright's disease or urenia. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

LYMPSTONE FATALITY – A Woman Killed. - A fatal accident occurred between Exmouth and Woodbury on Saturday evening. MARTHA HARRIS, aged about 60, the wife of a market gardener of Woodbury, was returning from Exmouth in a trap, accompanied by her daughter, who is about 15 years of age. MRS HARRIS was driving, and the trap collided with a waggon belonging to Messrs. Northcott and Bolt, carriers, of Exmouth, which was being driven by Mr Northcote, who was accompanied by Mr D. Pengilley. The trap struck an axle box of the waggon, and the smaller vehicle capsized. MRS HARRIS was thrown against a wall and her neck was broken. Her daughter was also thrown out, but was only slightly injured. The body of MRS HARRIS was taken to Woodbury, and her daughter received attention at the hands of Mr Burton, medical practitioner, of Lympstone. Mr Northcott states that the accident occurred at about eight o'clock. He left Exeter with a waggon load, accompanied by a man named Pengilley in his employ. After they had descended the hill near Gulliford Farm occupied by Mr Hallett, they stopped to take off the drag. The two horses had barely started again before they saw a horse and trap approaching at a rate estimated by Mr Northcott at ten miles an hour. It was a moonlight night and Pengilley shouted and whistled to the occupants three times. The wheel of the trap struck the waggon, and after it had gone a dozen or more yards the trap over-turned. Mr Northcott and Pengilley ran back to render assistance. MRS HARRIS'S daughter, SARAH, about 16 years of age, had been thrown up against the wall and escaped without injury, but MRS HARRIS was under the trap. The men tried to lift the trap to get her out, but the weight was too much for their strength. After waiting a little while an Exeter conveyance came alone with four men in it, and those lending a hand the trap was lifted up and MRS HARRIS extricated. It was seen that she was dead. Pengilley rode back to Lympstone and informed the police and fetched a doctor. P.C. redwood was soon on the spot and Dr Barton followed not long after. MRS HARRIS was conveyed to her home. Her husband is a confirmed invalid.
THE INQUEST - Mr C. E. Cox, coroner for the district, held the Inquest at the George and Dragon Inn, St. George's Clyst on Monday. Mr Brownson was appointed Foreman of the Jury.
The husband stated that he last saw the deceased on Saturday morning about nine o'clock when she was going to Exmouth market. She was driving a young horse about three years old, which was very quiet.
Mrs Perry stated that she saw the trap pass her window, which was about 150 yards from the place where the accident occurred. The horse was then going at a moderate rate.
SARAH HARRIS, daughter of the deceased, stated that she was driving with her mother on Saturday. They left Exmouth at 7.30 p.m. The horse was going at a slow trot. She did not remember the horse shying. It was about ten minutes past eight when the accident happened. They met the waggon below Mr Hallett's Farm. The waggon was in the middle of the road. Her mother called to the driver. She could not say who was driving. They pulled in before the accident happened. She was thrown out on the left side, by the side of her mother. She did not hear the driver call to her.
By the Foreman: They were coming down the hill, and the carrier was going up.
William Henry Northcote, carrier, Exmouth, said that the deceased was driving at the rate of 10 miles an hour. He did not hear anyone call, but he called to the deceased. He was on the right side of the road and his horses were walking. The trap struck the axle box of his waggon and turned the trap on one wheel When he went to the deceased he found her head against the wall and the hinder part f the horse was on the deceased.
Robert Pengelly, in the employ of the last witness, corroborated.
Joseph Gater, of Gulliford, stated that he was working in the garden when he heard someone call, and he went to see what was the matter. He found the deceased's head against the wall. There were no signs of life. Sarah Potter, living at Mr Hallett's, said that she was waiting for the carrier, who was near his proper side. The deceased was driving about eight or ten miles an hour, and was in the middle of the road. There was plenty of room if she had pulled in. She heard the driver of the waggon call, but did not hear the deceased call.
P.S. John Flew, stationed at Woodbury, gave the measurements of the road showing that the waggon was 5 ft. from the hedge on its proper side. The road was 23ft. wide. The waggon was more on the right side than the trap.
Mr Barton, medical practitioner, of Lympstone, stated that he was called at five minutes to nine. He arrived at the place about 9.15. The deceased was quite dead, having broken her neck. Death was instantaneous. The Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and stated that the driver of the waggon was not to blame.

Saturday 15 October 1898, Issue 9754 – Gale Document No. Y3200772120
SUDDEN DEATH AT CULLOMPTON - Torquay Lady's Enormous Heart. - Mr A. Burrows, District Coroner, held an Inquest at Cullompton on Wednesday touching the death of MARY JANE BAILEY, aged 50 wife of JOHN BAILEY, a resident of Ellacombe, Torquay. She had intimated that she should take a week's holiday, and left rather abruptly on Saturday. She left the following note for her husband:- Dear JOHN, - Goodbye. I cannot bear this any longer. Sell everything, and think no more of me. I have only been a curse to you. I have taken some money, - MARY." She appears to have made her way to Cullompton and there took lodgings at the house of Mrs M. Shepherd. On Tuesday morning deceased was found on the floor by the side of her bed, quite dead; £2 5s., three gold rings, and two pawn tickets were found in her purse. A post mortem examination by Mr Potter showed that deceased's heart was of enormous size, being 16ozs. instead of 8 ozs., and that death was due to heart disease. A verdict was returned accordingly.

Saturday 15 October 1898, Issue 9754 – Gale Document No. Y3200772109
BARNSTAPLE TRAGEDY – Suicide of a Volunteer. - A tragic death occurred at Barnstaple on Monday about eight o'clock, when Private GEORGE HARPER, of the 4th V.B.D.R., was found shot. Deceased was a blacksmith, his smithy being in the North Walk, where he was generally hard at work. He owned a Martini-Henri rifle, which was kept at the Volunteer Armoury. On Saturday night he asked Sergeant-Major Hellings for the rifle, saying he wished to lend it to a friend. It was then too late to open the Armoury, and Sergeant-Major Hellings told him he could have it on Monday. He accordingly called at the headquarters just before eight o'clock and Mrs Hellings permitted him to take the rifle. He appeared in his usual spirits and health, and after chatting a few moments he left. He must have gone direct back to his smithy as his dead body was found lying on the floor at a quarter-past eight. The muzzle of the rifle was near his mouth, and the trigger had apparently been pulled by a piece of thin iron which was found in his hand. Dr Jackson was called in, and the body was removed to the house of the deceased's mother. He has just completed twenty years' service as a Volunteer.
It is stated that the deceased took the cartridge from a bandolier presented to him by one of Jameson's troopers. Deceased had twice won a St. George's badge at Wimbledon, and was also well-known locally as a singer.
THE INQUEST. – Mr Incledon Bencraft held the Inquest at the Mermaid Inn in the afternoon. The evidence given was similar to the above facts, except that deceased called at the Armoury for a rifle on Sunday night and fetched it next morning, as stated. He had of late complained of pains in the head, the effects of influenza. A verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 15 October 1898, Issue 9754 – Gale Document No. Y3200772136
While driving to the station from Clayhanger, near Bampton, JOHN GREENSLADE, 65, fell and was run over by the waggon, receiving fatal injuries. At the Inquest a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 29 October 1898, Issue 9766 – Gale Document No. Y3200772220
SUDDEN DEATH AT BARNSTAPLE – An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the Horse and Groom Inn, Barnstaple, before the Borough Coroner (Mr Incledon Bencraft), on MRS ESSERY, of Garden Court. The deceased was subject to fits and had a fit on Monday evening while stooping over a box containing clean clothes. She became unconscious and her head dropping on to the clothes, was pressed down by the weight of the body. In this way she became suffocated, and died before help was at hand. She was first found by her daughter, 11 years of age, and afterwards her husband was fetched. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 29 October 1898, Issue 9766 – Gale Document No. Y3200772186
COUNTESS WEIR FATALITY – Mr A. Burrow held an Inquest at Tollaro Farm, Topsham-road, on Wednesday, relative to the death of JOHN FORD, 53, a farm labourer, in the employ of Mr Tuckett. It appeared that deceased was going to the loft at the farm on Monday, and when he reached the top of the ladder it is supposed that he had a seizure and fell to the ground. Death was apparently instantaneous. Dr Frood stated that death was due to a fracture of the base of the skull, and a verdict to that effect was returned. The Jury gave their fees to the widow. Deceased had been in Mr Tuckett's employ for over twenty years, and leaves a widow and long family. Mr Tuckett was represented by Mr M. B. Ford (Ford, Harris, and Ford).

Saturday 5 November 1898, Issue 9772 – Gale Document No. Y3200772263
TIVERTON – At an Inquest held relative to the death of HENRY REED, of Westexe South, on Tuesday night, a verdict of Death due to Dilation of the Heart, owing to fatty disease, was returned.

Saturday 19 November 1898, Issue 9784 – Gale Document No. Y3200772363
TORQUAY NEWS – "Accidental Death from convulsions due to Improper Feeding" was the result of a Coroner's Jury on Monday in the case of the five weeks' old child of a rag and bone collector called WALSH, of Pimlico. The child died suddenly on Saturday, and medical testimony showed that the feeding was by ginger biscuits, which caused convulsions. The mother was cautioned.

Saturday 19 November 1898, Issue 9784 – Gale Document No. Y3200772341
TAVISTOCK – An Inquest was held on Monday at Tavistock Cottage Hospital on the body of HENRY STOKES, who died through breaking his back and arm in falling across a crane as previously reported. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TAVISTOCK – An Inquest was held on Wednesday by Mr R. R. Rodd on the body of WILLIAM THOMAS BISHOP WINTER, a draper, aged 58 years, who died suddenly on Tuesday. Evidence was given by his niece, Miss Mant, to the effect that deceased groaned and complained of great internal pain. She gave him milk and water, and he went upstairs, and died in a few minutes. Mr Snowden Smith attributed death to angina pectoris, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

INQUEST AT EXMOUTH – Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest on Thursday at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, into the death of JOHN WILLIAM POMEROY, gardener, in the employ of Major Wetherall, who was found dead at Bicton-street on Tuesday night. From the evidence it appears that the deceased had been looking after Major Weatherall's house while it was unoccupied. The deceased went home to his lodgings at Mr Gigg's, Pound-street, about nine o'clock. For some time past the deceased had been suffering from attacks of spitting blood. During Tuesday he was seized with an attack. Mrs Gigg gave him some cocoa and deceased got better and smoked his pipe. Mrs Gigg tried to persuade him to stop the night, but he left the house about two o'clock in the morning. He looked very bad when he started to go home and Mr Gigg went out after him to watch him home. When he was almost opposite Dr Hodgson's the deceased was seized with a coughing fit and he fell on his face. Mr Gigg ran to him and helped him up, and he said, "Oh, I'm all right." Mr Gigg turned him on his back and ran for Mrs Gigg. Dr Hodgson then came, but life was extinct. A post mortem examination showed that the deceased died through a rupture of one of the largest blood vessels leading to the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 26 November 1898, Issue 9790 – Gale Document No. Y3200772387
ST. THOMAS FATALITY – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an inquest at the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Tuesday touching the death of ROBERT SELLEY, builder, of St. Thomas, who died from injuries received through falling from a scaffold at St. Thomas on Saturday. Mr G. Elston was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
MR H. L. SELLEY, of the Royal Engineer Band, Chatham, identified the body as that of his father, who was a builder, of 28, Church-road, St. Thomas.
William Richards, labour, of 59, Preston-street, said he was in the employ of deceased, and on Saturday was at work with MR SELLEY at Sidney Lodge, Alphington-road. They were repairing the roof, and while deceased was placing some mortar under the slates the rope fastening the ladder, upon which deceased was, to the ladder upon which witness was standing, broke, and deceased fell a distance of between forty and fifty feet. In answer to the Coroner, witness said the rope (produced) was not an old one. Witness, continuing, said he immediately went to where deceased was lying, and afterwards obtained assistance. Deceased was then unconscious.
By a Juryman: MR SELLEY tied the rope himself.
Mr William Ashford, deputy house surgeon at the Hospital said the deceased was received at the Institution on Saturday last, and it was apparent there was no hope for his recovery. There were no noticeable injuries externally. The patient died on Sunday at noon. Witness made a post mortem examination, and found the deceased had five ribs broken on his right side, and his neck was also broken. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, the Jury attaching no blame to anyone.

Saturday 26 November 1898, Issue 9790 – Gale Document No. Y3200772414
INQUEST – Mr Hooper held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Summerland Inn, on the body of HARRIET BESSENT, aged 66. EDWIN BESSENT, a constable in the City Police Force, identified the body as that of his mother. He last saw her alive about one o'clock on Sunday at her house, No. 10, Parr-street, when she was in the best of spirits. He was informed of her death by another constable about 11.30 on Monday morning. Alice Facey, living at No. 10, Parr-street, said deceased had lived in the same house for many years. On Monday morning she was in the passage when deceased called her in and complained of feeling ill. She went and laid the deceased on the bed. She became worse, and witness fetched a neighbour, who sent for a doctor. Mr E. S. Perkins, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Monday morning, but when he arrived she was dead. In his opinion death was a natural one brought on by cardiac syncope. the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 26 November 1898, Issue 9790 – Gale Document No. Y3200772408
TORQUAY WOMAN'S DEATH – Shocking Evidenced at the Inquest. – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest at Torquay on Thursday on the body of SARAH DREW, a licensed hawker, who died on Tuesday afternoon.
The evidence of identification was given by her daughter, and William Mahoney said on Monday night the deceased, along with a number of other women, started drinking in the kitchen of the common lodging-house, and continued until half-past twelve. Witness at that time went to bed, deceased being very drunk. Next forenoon, on entering deceased's bedroom, he found her lying with her head on her arm, and froth coming from her mouth and nose. the doctor was called and deceased attended to. Dr Crook, who has made a post mortem examination, said her liver was very much diseased, but the other organs were normal; about the head were serious symptoms. The brain was full of clots of blood indicating serious complications. The blood was due to a number of blood-vessels having burst, and there were some marks of violence about the head, but he did not think these had any connection with death. He was of opinion that death was a natural one, due to apoplexy. The Coroner said the doctor's evidence was quite clear, and he saw no reason for calling other witnesses, although there were a number if Court, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 17 December 1898, Issue 9808 – Gale Document No. Y3200772555
HEAVITREE SUICIDE – Inquest – This Evening. - Mr Burrow (Deputy District Coroner of Cullompton) held an Inquest at 1, Albion-place, Heavitree, this evening relative to the death of MR GEORGE O. ROBERTS, aged 48, clerk to a firm of auctioneers in the city, who committed suicide by taking a quantity of spirits of salts, as reported in last evening's "Post."
Mr W. J. Lamacraft was chosen Foreman of the Jury. MRS ROBERTS, the widow, said her husband had been rather strange and depressed for the past week. On returning home on Thursday evening he went upstairs, and shortly after she heard groaning. Her daughter went up and found her father ill.
LILY ROBERTS, daughter of the deceased, said he had complained of pains in the head. When she went upstairs on Thursday night her father walked towards her, put his arms round her neck, and said, "I have done it," or "took it."
William Edward Peacock deposed to going to the house and finding deceased suffering from poisoning by spirits of salts, and giving him an emetic. He was in dreadful agony. Mr Thomas, manager of Messrs. Holman, Ham, and Company's branch at St. Sidwell's deposed to serving a man whom he believed to be deceased with a quantity of spirits of salts. The bottle was labelled "Poison" which was more than he was required to do by the Act. A member of the firm in whose employ deceased had been said deceased was discharged about a fortnight ago. It was afterwards found that discrepancies had crept into his accounts, and a process was applied for a matter of a few pounds, and in the meantime deceased answered a number of questions which had been put to him, but his reply was received after the process had been applied for. His reply was satisfactory. Dr Andrews gave evidence and a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned.

Saturday 17 December 1898, Issue 9808 – Gale Document No. Y3200772547
INQUESTS – Mr Coroner H, W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Police Court on Tuesday on the body of ELIZABETH FOSTER, 42, of 30, King's-street. ROBERT FOSTER, gas stoker, identified the body as that of his wife. Deceased had been complaining of pains in her head lately. She went out about eight o'clock on Sunday evening when she seemed all right, and she returned about 9.30, but next morning about 5.30 she was found dead. A policeman and a doctor were sent for. Deceased was addicted to drink and had been in trouble about her son, who enlisted for a soldier on Thursday last Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said he was called at quarter to six yesterday morning, and he went and saw the deceased. In his opinion death was due to cardiac syncope associated with pregnancy and chronic alcoholism.

An Inquest was also held at No. 10, Little Silver, St. David's, on Wednesday morning, on the body of FANNY COULMAN, aged 64, who died suddenly early on Tuesday morning. Dr Bremner said death was due to cardiac syncope. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 24 December 1898, Issue 9814 – Gale Document No. Y3200772586
DARTMOUTH – An Inquest was held on Tuesday at the Royal Dart Hotel, Kingswear, by Mr Coroner Hacker, on the body of EDWARD COLE, 72. the deceased was assisting another man to put some fencing poles into the ground when one of the poles slipped and struck him a slight blow in the forehead and he died in a few minutes. The medical evidence showed that the deceased died from shock owing to his great age and weak state. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

NEWTON ABBOT – An Inquest was held in the Girls' Schoolroom, Highweek, Newton Abbot, on Monday, by Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, touching the death of the ten weeks old child of ALBERT BOWDEN, of Mill-lane, Highweek. The child was found dead in bed on Saturday morning A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 7 January 1899, Issue 9825 – Gale Document No. Y3200772635
THE SUICIDE OF A TEIGNMOUTH YOUNG LADY – The inquest on MISS WINIFRED LIND was held on Monday by Mr Coroner Hacker and considerable interest was taken in the proceedings.
The first witness was MISS ROSAMOND LIND, sister of the deceased. She said on Saturday she and her sister started about half-past two to walk to Dawlish, reaching there about half-past three. They took tea with their aunt, Mrs Lippincott, and talked about their mother who was mentally afflicted. They then went up to the Strand, and deceased went into Mr Harris's, chemist, and bought two ounces of salts of lemon. Witness was outside, and when she asked deceased what she had bought she said some lozenges for her voice, and laughed. They then went towards Teignmouth, and when near the lane leading to the Barton's deceased ran away. Witness waited about ten minutes and then went to her mother's house. When the witness got there she found that the deceased had not arrived. She then walked back to Dawlish and made enquiries at the railway station as to whether the deceased had been seen there, and receiving a reply in the negative went to the chemist's, but the deceased had not been there since her visit in the afternoon.
The finding of the body by the side of a rick in Mr Bayldon's field was proved, and further evidence showed that death was due to poisoning by salts of lemon and that the deceased had previously threatened to commit suicide. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide while temporarily insane, and a vote of condolence with the relatives of the deceased was passed.

THE EXETER MYSTERY – Inquest On An Exmouth Man, Open Verdict. - At the Parade Room of the Exeter Police Court on Wednesday, Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Enquiry into the circumstances of the death of THOMAS PYNE, aged 45, widower, of Exmouth, whose body was found in the leat at the West Quarter. Mr C. H. Young was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
THOMAS RICHARD PYNE, labourer, of Fore-street, Exmouth, identified the body as that of his father, who was a fisherman, and resided at Staples-buildings. Witness last saw him alive about three o'clock in the afternoon of Friday last in Chapel-street. As far as witness knew deceased's health was good. He appeared to be sober. Witness heard no more of him until Monday morning, when a messenger came to the Exmouth Battery, where he was drilling, and informed him that his father was drowned at Exeter. Witness proceeded to the city, and found his father lying dead at the mortuary. Witness had not heard of anything to trouble him.
By the Foreman: Deceased was not living with him, but with his mother He never heard him threaten to destroy himself.
By a Juryman: (Mr Ham) He knew he was missing from home, but did not think he was out of Exmouth.
Mr Turner (a Juryman): Was he a temperate man? - Witness: No, sir.
Edward Weeks, engineer and stoker at the City Killer Mills, West Quarter, said about 7.30 a.m. on Monday morning he went to clear the grating in front of the water wheel when he saw a man's hand. The matter was reported to the foreman, and the mill stopped. The body was then taken out, and life found to be extinct.
Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he was called to the mortuary, just before 9 a.m. on Monday. He examined the body, and found no marks of violence, death being due to drowning. The body had not been in the water long. The Jury returned an open verdict, viz., "Found Drowned."

Saturday 7 January 1899, Issue 9825 – Gale Document No. Y3200772608
NORTHTAWTON'S CHILD'S DEATH - Reported Burial in a Garden. - Mr J. D. Prickman held an Inquest at Northtawton, Wednesday, relative to the death of the illegitimate child of ELLEN WARDEN, a servant in the employ of Mr L. W. Day, aerated water manufacturer. Mrs Day stated that WARDEN had been in her employ for over seven months. On Christmas Day WARDEN was ill, and she told her she must see a doctor. On the 28th she went to Dr Cutcliffe with her. WARDEN admitted to having had a child,, which she had buried in the garden. Two or three days later she said the body was in a wash house wrapped in brown paper. She said she was confined on Christmas Eve. WARDEN was about 19 years old. She had previously had an illegitimate child, now in Okehampton Workhouse. It is about one year and seven months old. Dr Cutcliffe stated that WARDEN consulted him on December 25th and in answer to him she said that there was not any chance of her being confined. He ordered her to bed. On January 2nd he found she had recently been delivered of a child. Mrs Day found the child. He made a post mortem examination of the body, and considered the child not fully developed and possibly had been born seven or eight days. It was so decomposed that he could not say positively whether the child was born alive or not. There were no marks of violence, and no evidence of any drugs or instrument having been used. The mother was not well enough to attend the Inquest. The Jury found that the child was still-born.

Saturday 14 January 1899, Issue 9831 – Gale Document No. Y3200772663
FATALITY AT BARNSTAPLE WORKHOUSE – Mr Incledon Bencraft held an Inquest on Tuesday at the Barnstaple Workhouse concerning the death of a woman, aged 87, named MARY LOCK, an inmate of the House, who fell out of bed on Saturday last. Evidence was given by the nurse and Mr J. Cooke, surgeon, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 14 January 1899, Issue 9831 – Gale Document No. Y3200772653
TOPSHAM FATALITY – Woman Burned To Death. - A shocking fatality occurred at Topsham on Tuesday morning, when an old woman was burned to death and her husband received such serious injuries that it was found necessary to at once remove him to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. It seems that the unfortunate parties, WILLIAM BURGESS, aged 71, mason, and his wife SARAH, two years younger, lived together at Monmouth-street, Topsham. The husband, though advanced in years, was an active man and enjoyed good health, though his wife had for some time past suffered from bronchitis, for which she had been attended by Dr McArthur. About one o'clock in the morning the husband partly dressed and went downstairs into the back yard, and it would appear that during his absence his wife got out of bed, it is thought, for the purpose of taking some medicine. While doing so she must have over-turned a paraffin lamp which was standing on a shelf, and which she usually kept burning. In the fall the china container of the lamp broke and the burning oil set fire to the woman's night-dress. When the husband returned to the room he found his wife in flames. He did his best to extinguish the flames, but in doing so his own clothes became ignited. Finding that he was unable to cope with the flames he shouted for help to his neighbour, Frederick Hooper. The latter at once went to his assistance, and discovered that both the husband and his wife were enveloped in flames. He, howe3ver, succeeded in subduing them, but not before both victims had sustained terrible burns. He carried the woman into his own house and called in Dr McArthur, whose examination revealed the fact that the woman had been shockingly burned, and was in a state of complete collapse. He did all that was possible to allay the unfortunate woman's sufferings, but there was no hope of saving her life, and she succumbed about seven o'clock the same morning. The husband, it was also discovered, had been very severely injured, chiefly on the right side, shoulder, and face, which was considerably disfigured. he was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he remains as an in-patient.
THE INQUEST - The Deputy Coroner (Mr A. Burrow, of Cullompton) opened an Inquest at Topsham on Wednesday evening upon the body of MRS SUSAN BURGES, wife of MR WILLIAM BURGESS, mason, of Monmouth-street, who died from the effects of burning caused by the upsetting and explosion of a paraffin lamp, as reported. The Coroner remarked that, inasmuch as the husband, the principal witness, was in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, he proposed simply to call evidence of identification, issue the necessary order of burial, and adjourn the Inquest until such time as it was thought the husband would be well enough to attend. John Lyddon, mason, then identified the body as that of his aunt, whom he last saw alive on Tuesday morning immediately after the accident. She was removed to the next door neighbour's house and died shortly after. Deceased made no statement, but at intervals called "Jack." The Inquest was then adjourned until February 8th.

Saturday 14 January 1899, Issue 9831 – Gale Document No. Y3200772685
INQUEST – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper, held an Inquest at No. 6, Eaton-place, Paris-street, on Tuesday, on the body of CHARLOTTE ROWE, aged 81. Eliza Cohern, wife of John Cohern, gardener, said the deceased was a widow. She came every morning to dress an old lady, and had done so for the past two years. She came in on Saturday as usual, and about 2.30 went and saw deceased lying on the floor dead. She lifted her up and sent for medical aid. Dr Mackeith said he was called on Saturday afternoon. He went and saw the deceased who was dead. In his opinion death was a natural one, due to cardiac syncope. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 14 January 1899, Issue 9831 – Gale Document No. Y3200772686
SAD DEATH NEAR EXETER – On Wednesday Mr C. E. Cox (Coroner) held an Inquest at Marianne Pool Farm, Clyst St. George, on the body of EMILY COWD STEER, aged 40, wife of MR JOHN LEWIS STEER. Major Tracey was the Foreman of the Jury. The evidence of the husband went to show that his wife had not been well of late, and was much worse on Sunday. As she was nearing her confinement he fetched Mr Frood, surgeon, of Topsham, who attended. After consultation it was decided that chloroform should be administered, an operation being found necessary. While under the effect of the anaesthetic, MRS STEER died. Evidence having been given by Mrs Glass and Mrs Henry Steer as to being present when the chloroform was administered with MR STEER'S consent. Mr Frood said on his arrival at the house he found the deceased in a very weak condition. After giving his opinion to MR STEER it was decided that an operation should be performed. During the time MRS STEER was under the influence of chloroform she expired. The cause of death was sudden failure of the heart's action caused by shock and haemorrhage while under the partial influence of the anaesthetic. The Coroner characterised the case as a sad one. When emergencies arose medical men had to do the best they could. He considered there was no blame attachable to anyone in this instance. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sympathy with MR STEER and his family in their bereavement.

REMARKABLE ACCIDENT NEAR TIVERTON – Poughill Woman Killed. - At Poughill, near Crediton, on Wednesday, an Inquest was held by Mr Burrow, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MRS CHARLOTTE BURRIDGE, 44, wife of F. BURRIDGE, a labourer, of Poughill. The husband of the deceased stated that on Saturday last his wife went to Tiverton to do some errands. Thomas Greenslade, landlord of the Rose and Crown Inn, Poughill, said deceased went with him to Tiverton in a trap. They had some drink, but neither were drunk. After leaving Tiverton the deceased fell out of the trap, and got hung up to the near step with her head under the horse's heels and her legs under the wheels. The horse got frightened and in pulling up witness fell out and was marked very badly about the face. Frederick Woodgates, of Woodley, Tiverton, said he was riding his bicycle and saw deceased hung up to the step of the trap. Seeing Greenslade was not in a fit state, he took charge of deceased until assistance arrived. Both Greenslade and deceased were drunk. Mr Reynolds, surgeon, of Cheriton Fitzpaine, said deceased died from the injuries received. P.C. Kitt said deceased told him she could not say how the accident happened, but no blame was attached to anyone. Greenslade informed him that the horse bolted and threw them out. The Jury returned a verdict that death was caused from injuries received from falling from a trap, but there was not sufficient evidence to show how the accident occurred.

Saturday 21 January 1899, Issue 9837 – Gale Document No. Y3200772720
DOUBLE FATALITY AT CULLOMPTON – Exonian's Two Children Drowned. - A sad double fatality occurred on Tuesday at Cullompton near the Town Mills, when two children, a sister and brother, aged six and four years respectively, were drowned. Mr Rowe, miller, by chance discovered the body of the female child in the water and hastened quickly and took it out, when to his great surprise the body of the younger child rose to the surface. He called his wife and son to his assistance. Mrs Rowe did what she could to restore animation, whilst the son fetched Dr Alleyne, who speedily arrived and tried every means to save their lives but to no avail. The father is named OSMOND, and is in the employ of Mr Shore, timber merchant, and his wife and family have only been in the town living about a week, formerly residing at Exeter. How the children got to the mill stream is not known. Great sympathy is felt for the parents.
INQUEST ON THE TWO VICTIMS. - Mr Alfred Burrow (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Town Hall, Cullompton, on Wednesday, touching the death of WILLIAM OSBORN, aged 6, and ESTHER OSBORN, aged 4. WILLIAM HENRY OSBORN, father, said he was a labourer. He last saw the children alive on Monday. The girl started for school on that day. The deceased previously attended school at Exeter, as witness only came to reside at Cullompton on Tuesday last. FRANCIS JANE HAYDON OSBORN said the children were out in the garden at one p.m., and she never saw them alive after. She heard of what had happened and went to the bank of the river, but could not go to where the children were. James Rowe said he was a miller. He came out from dinner at 1.30 and looked out of the window and saw the little girl in the water. He went out and took the girl up, and immediately the body of the little boy rose to the surface. He also took this out and sent for a doctor and the police, who soon arrived. Mr E. F. M. Alleyne said he was called about 1.50 p.m. He went at once to see the children, and found them quite dead. He should think they died from drowning. A verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. The Coroner said he was quite sure the Jury had sympathy for the parents as he himself had, as well as the whole parish. The Jury spoke strongly, recommending the owner of the property to see that some protection should be placed at once, especially at the bridge across the water.

Saturday 21 January 1899, Issue 9837 – Gale Document No. Y3200772722
TORQUAY – Mr Coroner Hacker on Monday, in the Upton Parish Rooms, held an Inquest on the body of MRS WILLMOTT LAWSON, who died suddenly on Saturday night. Deceased was 90 on her last birthday, and had been a widow for 38 years. Until a fortnight ago she had been living at Higher-terrace Mews, but as the authorities desired to take her to the Workhouse, her daughter, MRS EDGCUMBE, was averse to that, and took her to live with her at 23 Victoria Parade. On Saturday deceased was in her usual health, took her dinner and tea as usual, and was put to bed about nine o'clock in the ordinary manner. About ten o'clock her daughter looked at her, and found she was dead. Dr Pollard said he was called on Sunday morning to see the deceased; she was then dead. He had since made a post mortem examination and found death was due to natural causes – failure of the heart's action. The body was well nourished; there were no external marks. There was a slight congestion of the lungs, and senile degeneration of the heart, such as would be expected at the deceased's age. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence.

Saturday 4 February 1899, Issue 9849 – Gale Document No. Y3200772792
EXETER CHILD'S DEATH – Sad Story: Mother Censured. - An Inquest was held at the City Police Court on Monday by the Deputy Coroner (Mr H. W. Gould) on the body of JOSEPH GEORGE HANNAFORD, the twelve-months old child of SUSAN HANNAFORD, single woman, of Smythen-street, who died on Saturday morning.
The mother said she was out at work from eight in the morning to eight at night and paid a neighbour 4d a day for looking after the child, which was fed on new milk and boiled bread. Witness earned 7s for four days' work per week, and had to pay 12s 6d for rent, 1s 4d or 1s 6d to the neighbour, and 2d a day for milk. Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said the mother came to him at the Dispensary and about five hours after its decease. He went to Smythen-street and found the infant laid out on a box. The body was much emaciated. He made a post mortem on Sunday and on weighing the body found it to be barely 7 ½ lbs. The average weight for a healthy child of that age was 18 lbs. He found no evidence of disease except in the covering of the brain, which showed signs of having been inflamed at some distant date. The brain itself was healthy. He was forced, from the evidence of wasting grievance of disease, at the conclusion that the child had not had sufficient food to maintain life, in other words that it was starved. If the child had had the quantity of food described by the mother it would not have been so emaciated. Mrs Harriett Squire, the neighbour referred to, was next called. The Deputy Coroner, addressing her, said it was only fair, after the evidence that had been given, that anything she might say could, if the Jury returned an adverse verdict, be given in evidence against her. If she wished to obtain the advice of a solicitor he would adjourn the Inquiry.
She, however, elected to give evidence, and said she was 25 years of age, the wife of a fish hawker, of 19, Smythen-street. She took care of the child four days in the week, receiving 4d. a day. Before going to work the mother would leave a cupful of brad and a cupful of milk, and when she came home at dinner-time would leave food to last for the rest of the day. In her opinion the food was quite sufficient, and she always gave the child all the food. She had nothing to do but to look after the baby. By the Jury: The deceased was very hearty; it had always been small and sickly looking. She fed it twice a day with boiled bread, with milk in between. The child was taken with convulsions at two o'clock in the morning and died at five. She did not suggest that a doctor should be sent for, because she did not think he would come.
The Deputy Coroner, in summing up, said the evidence disclosed a rather shocking state of things, and the Jury would have to consider the relation of Mrs Squire to the child. If they considered the death due to highly blameable conduct on her part then she would undoubtedly be liable to a charge of manslaughter, but if they considered that death was only accelerated by the treatment they might return another verdict and add a rider expressing their opinion.
The Jury had the Court cleared, and after ten minutes' deliberation in private they returned a verdict to the effect that death was due to Natural Causes, accelerated by the neglect of both the mother and Mrs Squires, and asked the Coroner to censure them.
The Deputy Coroner, addressing the mother and Mrs Squires, said the latter, having had children of her own, should have advised the mother as to what she should have done. The Jury had taken a very lenient view of the evidence, and had they brought in a verdict of manslaughter against one or both, no one could have found any fault with the verdict.

Saturday 4 February 1899, Issue 9849 – Gale Document No. Y3200772809
AN EXONIAN'S DEATH – An Inquest was held at the London Hotel, Teignmouth, on Wednesday, touching the death of RICHARD WARREN, a stone sawyer, found dead in bed at his lodgings. Deceased's wife stated that he was 57 years of age, and a native of Exeter. He had complained of pains over his heart, but they did not interfere with his work. Dr Piggott, who had made a post mortem, stated that deceased suffered from valvular disease of the heart, and death was due to syncope. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned. A Juror remarked that the condition of the building kept as a mortuary was worse than ever, and its appearance was not as clean as a respectable slaughter-house. Dr Piggott said that plans were passed three years since for a mortuary to be built on Gale's Hill lawn, but the wheels of public bodies moved tardily. He had to use his own soap and towel and fetch water when making the examination. It was considered that the place was a disgrace to the town, and with that the Coroner (Mr Hacker) agreed.

Saturday 4 February 1899, Issue 9849 – Gale Document No. Y3200772815
STRANGE DEATH AT KINGSWEAR – At Kingswear on Tuesday an Inquest was held by Mr S. Hacker, touching the death of ERNEST PEPPERELL, aged 15. Deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Bulley, a farmer, of Brownstone Farm, came home on January 19th, and complained of having a bad leg. He would not tell his father how he got it, but he told his grandmother it was caused by a turnip-cutter. Dr Davson, Dartmouth, said there was a suppurating wound on the leg which induced meningitis on the brain, from which the deceased died. There was no mark of violence on the body, except the wound on the leg. Thomas Bulley, deceased's employer, said so far as he was aware, deceased had not been working at the turnip-cutters. He saw the deceased limping the day he went home, and deceased told him he had a chilblain on his foot. The Coroner: Evidently, from the doctor's evidence, that was a lie. The Coroner said in the absence of anything to the contrary, the Jury would be justified in presuming that the occurrence was accidental. A verdict to this effect was returned.

TAVISTOCK MYSTERY – The Inquest. - An Inquest was held in the Tavistock Guildhall-room on Tuesday on the body of WILLIAM BACKWELL. JOHN BACKWELL, coach proprietor, said deceased was his brother. He left home on Saturday to go to Exeter, and was returning to Tavistock in the London and South Western late express the previous night. Witness saw him at the Hospital, when he said, "Oh, JOHN, I got into the train at Exeter, and went to sleep, and did not know anything more until I found myself on the line." Witness said about three months ago his mother found deceased in his bedroom walking in his sleep and just coming out at the door. John Kingdon, signalman, said at Okehampton he saw a gentleman in a second-class compartment covered with a rug. There was no one else in the compartment when the train left Okehampton. George Hill, signalman, of Tavistock, said that on the arrival of the 11.20 p.m express he noticed the carriage door referred to by the last witness open and swinging. He saw in the compartment a rug, folded up on the seat, a silk hat, and a stick. The lock of the door was all right. John Milford, a ganger, deposed to finding the deceased about 200 yards from the Wallabrook viaduct in the six-foot way between the up and down lines. Deceased was bleeding from the left leg, and witness tied up the limb as well as he could with flags. Deceased said he did not know how he got on the line. Mr. Smyth stated that he found deceased had a compound comminated complicated fracture of the left leg just below the knee, extending to four inches above the ankle. He suffered much from shock and loss of blood. Milford had tied up the leg admirably. Deceased said something about walking in his sleep. The Jury found that deceased died from injuries received by falling out of a railway carriage, but did not consider there was sufficient evidence to show how he fell on the railway. They sympathised with deceased's friends, and commended Milford for the able way in which he had bound up the wound.

Saturday 4 February 1899, Issue 9849 – Gale Document No. Y3200772800
SUDDEN DEATH – The infant son, aged ten weeks, of MR J. GOSS, of the firm of Reed and Goss, auctioneers, was found dead in bed by its parents early this morning. An Inquest will be held.

The infant son of MR H. PATTEN, of the Criterion Inn, died suddenly this morning. The Inquest is to be held on Monday afternoon.

Saturday 4 February 1899, Issue 9849 – Gale Document No. Y3200772804
ASHBURTON POSTMAN'S SUICIDE – Mr S. Hacker, Coroner, held an Inquiry at Ashburton yesterday into the circumstances attending the death of SAMUEL BUTLAND, 40, journeyman tailor and rural postman, whose body was found in the Dart, near Holne Bridge. Dr Digby-White said deceased's neck was broken, and the body must have been in the water several days. Ernest Rowland deposed to seeing deceased going in the direction of Lover's Leap on Saturday, and J. H. Mitchelmore, who employed deceased, said he had often heard him enquire if it would kill anyone to fall over the Lover's Leap, but had never heard him intimate anything about destroying himself. A verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane" was returned, ad a recommendation was made by the Jury that the Urban Council should provide a mortuary.

Saturday 4 February 1899, Issue 9849 – Gale Document No. Y3200772813
BRADNINCH WOMAN'S SHOCKING DEATH – "Heaps of Vermin": Alleged Neglect. – An Inquest was held at Tiverton Workhouse on Monday night touching the death of SUSAN DREW, aged 74, Bradninch, in receipt of out relief. On December 28th she was crossing the street at Bradninch, and was knocked down by some cows. The drover picked her up and conveyed her home, where she was attended by her daughter. Neither the drover nor the daughter called in medical assistance until January 6th, when Dr Duncan found the old woman suffering from a broken thigh. The daughter said they had been trying to make her stand, but failed. Dr Duncan stated that before he could make his examination he had to get heaps of vermin swept out of the bed. Difficulty was experienced in obtaining a trap, and deceased was not conveyed to Tiverton Workhouse until January 9th, when her case in the infirmary ward was found hopeless from the first. When admitted to the House deceased was still covered with vermin. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death", and added a rider that there had been culpable neglect by somebody.

INQUEST AT EXMOUTH – An Inquest was held at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Monday by Mr Deputy Coroner Gould on the body of THOMAS NEWBERRY, a labourer, in the employ of Mr J. James, corn dealer. Deceased died whilst at work at the stores, the Dock, on Saturday morning, after a fainting fit, and the body was removed to the Maud Hospital. MARIA TRIM, wife of Stephen Trim, identified the body as that of her father, who was 68 years of age. She last saw him alive on Thursday. He had never complained to her and lived alone. Evidence was given by George Hocking, miller, who said deceased was at work on Saturday. At about twenty minutes after five he asked deceased to turn the gas off at the gas-house. He went into the gas-house but did not turn off the gas. About five minutes after this witness heard the steam escaping and, going to the gas-house, saw deceased lying on his right side near the gas-holder. He was unconscious, but not dead. A doctor was sent for, but within two or three minutes the man was dead. In the morning deceased complained of a pin in his head and stopped work for a time. Dr J. Cook said he saw the deceased on Saturday evening but he was then dead. He made a post mortem examination and found that the heart was thickened and enlarged and deceased had been suffering from lung disease. He attributed death to syncope and thought the heat of the engine-room was hardly he thing for a man in deceased's state of health. A verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" was returned.

Saturday 11 February 1899, Issue 9855 – Gale Document No. Y3200772833
EXETER – Inquest. – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on Monday at the Criterion Inn, Waterbeer-street, on the body of WILLIAM THOMAS PATTEN, the infant son of the landlord. EMMA PATTEN, the mother, said the child was born in November last and had been brought up on condensed milk. The deceased was all right when she went to bed on Friday, but when she woke up early on Saturday morning the child was ill, and died before the arrival of a doctor. Mr E. Steele-Perkins, surgeon, said he had examined the child, and in his opinion death was a natural one, brought on by convulsions. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Saturday 11 February 1899, Issue 9855 – Gale Document No. Y3200772838
SALTERTON MAN'S TERRIBLE DEATH – At the Inquest on Monday at Salterton on the body of ABRAHAM TURNER, a gardener, aged 58, the evidence showed that on Saturday night Elizabeth Voysey, a neighbour, saw smoke issuing from the deceased's bedroom window. Mr Birch, the landlord, burst the door open. The room was full of smoke, and the heat intense. He attempted to go upstairs, but had to return. Robert Cooper, Captain of the Fire Brigade, entered the bedroom by the window and discovered the deceased lying on his back across the bed. He was black and charred, and the body was removed to the kitchen. He saw nothing in the room to indicate the cause or origin of the fire. Amongst some plastering in the room a lamp (produced) was found. Mr Evans, surgeon, said the body was extensively charred and the deceased was undoubtedly burnt to death. The verdict was in accordance with the medical testimony.

DYING IN FILTH – A Shocking Case At Tavistock. – An Inquest was held on Monday at the Tavistock Workhouse on the body of ANN PERKINS, widow of DAVID PERKINS, aged 80 years. The evidence showed that the deceased was admitted to the Workhouse on Saturday morning in a dying condition. Her body was in a dirty state and her clothing was filthy. She had apparently not been washed for weeks. She was not conscious from the time she was admitted till the time she died, about 6.30 p.m. Her house was filthy, and deceased used to lie and sleep on the floor. She was always in want, although it was believed that she had money. When the police searched her room £7 2s 11d was found, including five sovereigns. The doctor stated that deceased could not have had food for at least forty-eight hours before admission to the infirmary at the Workhouse. MRS ALFORD, daughter of the deceased, was censured for not seeing that her mother was better cared for. the woman did not attend the Inquest when asked to do so, and the Coroner considered that this was a confirmation of her indifferent treatment of her mother. The Jury found that death was due to senile decay, accelerated by neglect, and added that grave reflection rested on Mrs Alford, the daughter.

Saturday 11 February 1899, Issue 9855 – Gale Document No. Y3200772862
TOPSHAM BURNING FATALITY – The adjourned Inquest on MRS BURGESS, aged 69, of Topsham, who died through extensive burns received by the breaking of an oil lamp on January 10th, was held on Tuesday by Deputy Coroner Burrow. Maria Hooper, a neighbour, stated that she saw the deceased on the night previous to the accident. She was then in bed suffering from bronchitis. The witness heard nothing until the late MR BURGESS called her husband to "come at once or it would be too late," and by the time she arrived downstairs her husband was bringing the deceased into their house where she expired, the burns being very bad. Dr McArthur said on examining the deceased he found her to be hopelessly burnt, and death was caused through shock. He fancied that the deceased must have got out of bed to obtain some lemonade which he had advised her to drink, and in some way or other capsized the lamp. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Saturday 11 February 1899, Issue 9855 – Gale Document No. Y3200772865
THE FATALITY TO A SAILOR AT EXETER – Insufficient Lighting: Need of a Mortuary. - Mr Coroner Burrows held an Inquest today at the Mission Hall, Alphington-street, St. Thomas, touching the death of GEORGE CARMEN, 49, a seaman, whose body was found in the basin on Thursday night. RICHARD CARMEN, master mariner, of Rye, Sussex, said the deceased was his brother and was 49 years of age. They were both on the ketch Arrival – GEORGE CARMEN, son of the deceased said he last saw father alive in the afternoon. He told witness he was going ashore to go to the Mission Hall. He was in his usual state of health and spirits. Witness later on heard a cry of "Help." He went to see what the matter was, but could discern nothing. After waiting some time he saw a hat rise to the top of the water. Assistance was secured and the body was found lifeless and taken to the Plymouth Inn. By the Coroner: Deceased had to go down a ladder to get ashore. Witness could not account for the accident. Mr Mortimer, news agent of St. Thomas, said he knew the deceased as a visitor to the Seamen's Mission. Witness was at the Mission Hall on Thursday night with others, when they heard a cry. They did not go out at once because they thought perhaps someone was playing a game, but they subsequently went out and saw something moving on the opposite side of the water. It was very dark and when they got across they could see nothing. They got a light and a boat-hook and after three-quarters of an hour's searching found the dead body of the deceased. Witness added that he should like to make a suggestion that the Jury should pass a resolution calling the City Council's attention to the bad lighting of the locality. A man fell into the water at the same place a short time ago, being rescued with extreme difficulty owing to insufficient light. Another matter was the provision of wall chains at the sides of the Basin. The man who was referred to complained bitterly that although he could manage to reach the side there was nothing to grasp to keep him from sinking. The Coroner suggested that the St. Thomas Urban Council should make representations of the state of affairs to the City Council and they would probably immediately attend to the matter. Mr Mark Farrant, junr., gave it as his opinion that death was due to suffocation from drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Saturday 18 February 1899, Issue 9861 – Gale Document No. Y3200772911
EXMOUTH – Mr Coroner Gould held an Inquest yesterday at the Rolle Hotel on the body of GEORGE HENRY EASTWOOD, aged three months, who had been found dead in bed that morning. On Thursday night the father went to bed the worse for liquor and in the morning the mother awoke and found the child dead with her husband's arm over it. There was also a broken bottle in the bed. Dr Hodgson considered death to be due to suffocation, from the father over-lying it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from Overlying," and added "We consider, having regard to the father's condition, both father and mother deserve of severe censure for allowing the child to sleep in the position it was."

Saturday 18 February 1899, Issue 9861 – Gale Document No. Y3200772902
EXETER – Inquest. – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest on Tuesday on the body of THOMAS HENRY NORTH, of Hardwick, Devonshire-place. MRS NORTH, widow, said deceased was manager of Messrs. Stone and Sons', Fore-street, and was 51 years of age. Deceased was in his usual health, but while smoking his pipe on Sunday suddenly expired. Mr E. Steele Perkins said death was due to syncope, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

EXETER – Inquest. – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Enquiry at the Parade Room of the Police Station on Thursday into the circumstances of the death of DOROTHY ELIZABETH MAY SMITH, aged twelve months, daughter of SAMUEL SMITH, compositor, of 49, Preston-street, who said the deceased was suddenly taken ill early on Tuesday morning, and died before the arrival of a medical man. Mr T. Smith, surgeon, said death was due to heart failure, resulting from dentrition, and a verdict was returned accordingly by the Jury, of which Mr white was Foreman.

INQUEST – The City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper) held an Inquest at the King's Arms Inn, Coombe-street, on Wednesday, on the body of SUSAN WESTCOTT, aged 65. CHARLES WESTCOTT, dyer, and husband of the deceased, of 34, Coombe-street, said that on Monday morning, about quarter-past five, he went to get a bit of tobacco to put in his pipe when he heard deceased call out "CHARLEY, catch me." He caught her and put her on the bed, when blood issued from her mouth. He called in a couple of neighbours, but deceased soon died. Mr Brash said he was called on Monday morning to see the deceased, who was dead when he arrived. In his opinion death was a natural one, due to the rupture of a blood vessel, most probably in the lungs, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 18 February 1899, Issue 9861 – Gale Document No. Y3200772889
DARTMOUTH – At the Inquest yesterday on the body of GEORGE PERROW, labourer, employed on the Naval College Works, the Jury found that death was due to heart disease, and it was decided to draw the attention of the Town Council to the state of the mortuary, which was described as disgraceful and indecent.

Saturday 25 February 1899, Issue 9867 – Gale Document No. Y3200772949
THE EXETER MYTERY – Inquest at Topsham. An Open Verdict. - The Inquest on the body of the young man SHIPCOTT, whose strange disappearance from his residence at Coombe-street, Exeter, a month ago, has formed the topic of much speculation in the city, was opened at the Salutation Hotel, Topsham, on Tuesday by Mr Deputy Coroner F. Burrow, of Cullompton. Mr G. Hopewell was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
Before the Jury viewed the body the Foreman said he should like to know whether, in a case like the present, where a body had been in the water several weeks, a constable could purchase disinfectants and charge the cost to that or some other Court. Last time several of the Jury were ill after viewing the body, and this time he had had disinfectants purchased and used on his own responsibility.
The Deputy Coroner said he thought if the body was in a bad state the constable should ask the overseers of the poor to take steps to have it disinfected, and if they neglected to do so, to disinfect it on his own responsibility.
The first witness was MR FRANK SHIPCOTT, of Helmore's-court, Coombe-street, who said he recognised the body as that of his son by the clothes, and was 21 years of age, and worked at Mr Hearn's. Witness last saw him on the 22nd of last month, when he appeared in his usual health. Finding he did not come home he communicated with the city and county police. Deceased had never threatened to destroy himself, and was of a bright disposition. The watch and pipe produced were his son's.
MRS EMMA SHIPCOTT, mother of the deceased, said she last saw him just after two on Sunday, the 22nd January, at dinner. He was then quite cheerful, and left home about half-past two to go to his brother-in-law's, in St. Sidwell's. She believed his watch was going.
Elias Alford, fisherman, of Topsham, said he found the body between eight and half-past on Monday morning about a mile and a half below Turf House, in the channel. Witness stopped fishing and brought the body, which was floating, to Topsham. The trousers were torn near the knee.
Mary Jane Westaway, laundrymaid at Wonford, said she had known the deceased three years, and had kept company with him for seven months. She last saw him on the 22nd of January. She met him in the evening at the top of Paris-street, and after going to church they went home by way of Polsloe-road. They reached home at a quarter to nine, and he left at ten. When he left he arranged to come again on the Tuesday night. they had never had any disagreement, and parted on the best of terms. He never mentioned other men's names to her, and was not jealous of her. At Christmas she went to Cornwall with him, and since then his manner towards her had not changed. When she saw him last she did not tell him anything he did not know before. She could not account in any way for his disappearance. Deceased knew a man called Hurley, but Hurley had never kept company with her, and deceased never said anything to her about him.
By the Jury: She had never known deceased threatened. He had told her he had been to the Theatre, but never told her about a fight. She had never given him cause for jealousy, and had never been in Hurley's company.
EMILY VINNICOMBE, sister of deceased, said he left her house, St. Sidwell's, in the evening of the 22nd January. She went to the Theatre with him on the previous Thursday. Hurley was in front, and as he would not sit down people behind threw orange peel at him. Deceased said, "I should sit down if I were you," and Hurley tried to jump over the seat, offering to fight him. Witness's husband then came in and Hurley left the Theatre. She had never heard her brother say anything about Hurley and Miss Westlake.
Mr MacArthur, surgeon, said he had examined the body, but could find no marks of violence, and his opinion was that death was due to drowning. He should say the body had been in the water three weeks or so. Miss Westcott, recalled, said deceased looked at his watch when he last left her, and it then pointed to ten o'clock. It had stopped at 25 minutes to eleven. The Deputy Coroner, in summing up, said the case was a complete mystery, and he saw absolutely no reason to suppose that deceased drowned himself. If so, he must have gone straight from his sweetheart to the river and nothing had been said to show that he did that. they could only say that the cause of death was drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The Foreman said he thought all persons who were opposed to a mortuary should be compelled to act as Jurors.

Saturday 4 March 1899, Issue 9873 – Gale Document No. Y3200772983
SUICIDE NEAR BARNSTAPLE – HENRY HOLLAND, retired labourer, aged 73, found drowned in a stream at Swymbridge, Newland, near Barnstaple, had been in ill health for some time. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 4 March 1899, Issue 9873 – Gale Document No. Y3200772984
EXETER – Sad Death. – Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Police Court touching the death of ANN WILLIS, a married woman, who died on Monday last after confinement. JOHN SETTER, bootmaker, of Queen's-court, Exe Island, identified the body as that of ANN WILLIS, the wife of JAMES WILLIS, basket maker. She was witness's sister, and was 23 years of age. Her husband was at Swansea. The deceased lived with witness and was confined on Monday last of a boy. She died on the same day. Mrs Hepworth, certificated midwife, said she was called to attend the deceased about three o'clock on Monday morning. The child was born at ten o'clock, just before she was again called, and was still living. The woman was in pain and would not keep quiet, so witness sent for the doctor. He came about eleven, but the deceased had expired a few minutes before he arrived. Dr Selly said he was one of the surgeons to the Lying-in-Charity, of which deceased was a member. He was called about 11 o'clock on Monday morning to go to Queen's-court. MRS WILLIS was dead when he arrived. He made a post mortem examination. There were no marks of violence. He found she had been recently confined. The brain was healthy, but the heart was small and light in weight. There was no clot in the heart or in the pulmonary artery. The lungs were healthy and not engorged; the kidneys were small, but not diseased; and the other organs were healthy. The stomach contained no poison or irritant. He considered death was natural and due to syncope. What Mrs Hepworth had done was right and proper. By the Jury: All was done that could have been done under the circumstances. The deceased seemed to have died from the strain consequent upon a confinement and weak heart. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Causes."

INQUEST AT EXETER – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Workhouse on Tuesday on the body of WILLIAM PICKARD, aged 64, an inmate of the House, who died suddenly on Saturday evening. Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said he was called to see the deceased on Saturday, but when he arrived he found PICKARD to be dead. In his opinion death was a natural one brought on by syncope. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 4 March 1899, Issue 9873 – Gale Document No. Y3200772997
TORQUAY – Yesterday a middle-aged woman named ELIZABETH GREGORY was found dead in bed at her house in Barton. An Inquest will be held and a post mortem examination has been ordered.

Saturday 11 March 1899, Issue 9879 – Gale Document No. Y3200773008
BUDLEIGH SUICIDE – Inquest and Verdict. - Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest on Wednesday at the Rolle Arms Inn, East Budleigh, touching the death of ROBERT DYER, aged 55, a carpenter, employed on the Rolle Estate, who committed suicide by hanging himself on Monday. Mr John Palmer was chosen Foreman.
ELIZABETH DYER, the widow, said her husband had been rather depressed lately, but she knew of no cause for it and she had never heard him express any intention of taking his life. He suffered a good deal from insomnia, but he was cheerful. On Monday he got up at 5 a.m. and brought her a cup of tea. He complained of a pain in his back. He then left the house for the purpose, as she supposed, of going to his work as usual, and she heard no more of him until her son told her he had been found dead. WILLIAM HENRY DYER, son, deposed to finding his father dead in the linhay as already reported. There was a rope (produced) hanging from a beam across the linhay. The rope had broken, and part of it was lying loosely round the neck of the deceased. JOHN DYER, brother, and Mrs Kingdon, also gave evidence.
Dr Evans said he had always looked upon the deceased as a most cheerful man, and had never noticed anything strange in him. In his opinion death was caused by strangulation. P.C. Fred Richard Brown, stationed at Otterton, said the beam was 6ft 6 in from the ground. An open knife was found at the feet of the body. Edward L. Copleston said he was an agent on the Rolle Estate. The deceased rented a cottage belonging to the estate. A year's rent - £10 – was due at Christmas last, and a week or so since the deceased was written to requesting payment. Two notices had been sent him during the past six months. Robert F. Kingdon, clerk of the works Rolle Estate, deposed that he was of opinion that the deceased was in total ignorance of the notices alluded to asking for payment of rent. The Jury returned a verdict "That deceased hung himself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity," and expressed their deep sympathy with the widow.

Saturday 11 March 1899, Issue 9879 – Gale Document No. Y3200773009
EXMOUTH CHILD'S DEATH – Alleged Negligence By a Midwife. – At the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Thursday Mr Coroner Cox held an Inquest on the body of EDWARD RIDGE, infant son of MR HUBERT RIDGE, plumber, of Montpellier-street. Mr H. Tozer was chosen Foreman of the Jury. The father of the child said the child died three days after its birth. The Coroner questioned witness as to whether he called in a doctor, and he replied in the negative. Witness said it would have been throwing away money, as it was impossible for the child to live.
The Coroner: You don't call it throwing away money to have a doctor to try and save the child's life. Up to the time of its death you did not call in a doctor? - No, sir. You certainly ought to have. What did the child take? - Nothing; it could not. And yet you didn't call in a doctor. It is very unsatisfactory indeed.
A Juryman: Was the child sick from the first? - The midwife said it was impossible for it to live. Elizabeth Treyburn, certificated midwife, said she attended the child, which was prematurely born. The Coroner: Did you think it advisable to send for a doctor? - No, I did not think so. Then you ought to have. You ought to have done your duty better. The witness explained what her duties were. The Coroner: When a child is in such a dangerous state I consider it is your duty to send for medical assistance. Witness: It could not live. In answer to a Juryman, witness said a nurse was in attendance.
The Coroner: I hope you will be more particular in the future. When a child cannot take any nourishment and is dangerously ill you must call in a doctor. Mrs Ridler, a neighbour, stated that Mrs Treyburn said that if the child was privately baptised there was no need to call in a doctor. The Coroner: (to Mrs Treyburn) Did you really make use of such an expression? Mrs Treyburn: I did not think a medical man was required.
The Coroner: You really must be more careful if you act as midwife. You really advised them not to send for a doctor. I do hope you will be more careful. The father of deceased was re-called, and said his wife was delicate.
Dr Hodgson said he had made a post mortem examination and found the child had a malformation of the heart. It was a perfectly hopeless case. Medical treatment could not have saved it. The Coroner: That doesn't alter what I have already said. There was great remiss on the part of the parents. Sarah Parsons, nurse, also gave evidence. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony, and added that they considered there was negligence on the part of the midwife in not calling in a medical man. The Coroner having warned Mrs Treyburn the proceedings terminated.

Saturday 11 March 1899, Issue 9879 – Gale Document No. Y3200773007
EXETER – Inquest. – Mr Hooper held an Inquest at the Custom House Inn on Tuesday, touching the death of ELIZABETH FORRESTER, aged 74, widow of THOMAS FORRESTER, a sailor in the merchant service. Elizabeth Baker, wife of William Baker, blacksmith, and residing at 41, Commercial-road, in whose house deceased lived, said when the deceased went to bed on Sunday night she seemed in her usual health, but on Monday morning, about seven o'clock, she heard deceased call. Witness went to her and she said her back was very sore. Witness then sent for a doctor. Mr G. T. Clapp, surgeon, said he had attended deceased for a long time, on and off, and, in his opinion, death was brought on by syncope. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 18 March 1899, Issue 9885 – Gale Document No. Y3200773081
SOUTH DEVON TRAGEDY – Doctor Poisons Himself. – Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest on Wednesday touching the death of DR. W. W. QUINTON, of Kingsteignton, which we have previously reported. Mr W. Snow was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
MR RICHARD FRITH QUINTON, Medical Officer of her Majesty's prison, Parkhurst, gave evidence as to a previous attempt made by deceased to take his life in 1884 when he succeeded in cutting his throat. Since then he had been depressed, but seemed brighter lately. Elizabeth Heywood and John Smith, a lad, gave evidence as to finding the body. Bertha Clarke, a domestic servant at the deceased's, gave evidence as to her master leaving the house at about 10.30 and the attendant nurse swore to finding a bottle of crystal carbolic acid, usually supplied as samples to the medical profession, in deceased's study. P.C. Sharland stated that the deceased apparently walked straight from his house to the spot where he was found, getting over two hedges on the way. Dr Malcolm Margrave assisted by Dr Malcroyd made the post mortem examination and the former stated that death was due to poisoning by carbolic acid, and a strong dose would produce death in four minutes.. The Rev. P. Jackson and Major Bearne also gave evidence as to the recent condition of deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane," and Mr W. F. Snow, the Foreman, desired on behalf of the Jury to express their deep sympathy with the relatives, as they had found deceased a good man in every respect.

An Inquest was held at Plymouth on Tuesday on the body of a Corporation employee named JOHN SHUMAN, who committed suicide by hanging himself in a sewer, a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporary Insane" being returned.

Saturday 18 March 1899, Issue 9885 – Gale Document No. Y3200773094
LOCAL PREACHER'S SUICIDE – Inquest at Newton. – Mr S. Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday on the body of MR JOSEPH MARDON GRIBBLE, builder, and local preacher, who was found hanging from a beam in a hay loft at his residence in Queen-street on Monday morning.
The widow identified the body, and stated that her husband, who was between 50 and 60 years of age, had seemed depressed of late owing to want of sleep. He returned from Chudleigh on Sunday evening about nine o'clock. When witness retired to bed she left deceased reading "The Methodist Recorder." On awakening that morning she found the gas on the landing alight. She rang the bell, and not receiving an answer, went to the deceased's bedroom. The bed was empty, but had been slept in. Witness looked behind the door and saw her husband's coat and boots there. She called to Mr G. Perris, who rents a portion of the adjoining stables, and asked him if he had seen her husband. He replied "Yes; he has hanged himself in the loft". The deceased was not in financial difficulties, and seemed quite bright in spirits the previous evening. A note, reading as follow3s, was found in a drawer in his room:-
I don't know how I was such a fool to let the man leave his work. Don't think too hard of me." The deceased had engaged a man, taking him away from some other employment, and seemed to be afraid that he had not enough work to keep him on. This preyed on his mind.
Mr G. Perris, cab proprietor, said he went into the loft over the stables in the morning, about seven o'clock, and there saw the deceased hanging from a beam, with his feet about two feet above the ground. Witness fetched a police constable and a doctor. He did not himself cut the deceased down. P.C. Hatherley stated that he was called to the loft by the last witness and cut the body down. Deceased had on his shirt, trousers, socks, and slippers. The body was warm. Witness tried artificial respiration without success.
Mr E. Hunt, the medical man called in, said he was of opinion that the deceased had been dead about an hour before he arrived. FREDERICK GRIBBLE, nephew of the deceased, said that, as far as he knew, his uncle had no reason to trouble, and he did not know of any summonses or writs hanging over him. The widow, however, said the deceased had been summoned for non-payment of rates amounting to 14s. and the summons was returnable for this (Tuesday) morning. This did not seem to trouble him, however, as he had the money with which to pay. He intended to have settled up on Saturday, but for some reason did not do so. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 25 March 1899, Issue 9891 – Gale Document No. Y3200773127
EXETER – Burning Fatality. – An Enquiry into the death of LENA DENLEY, 31, of West-street, who has been in the Hospital for some time suffering from burns caused through falling on the kitchen fire, was held at the Hospital this morning by the City Coroner (Mr H. W. Hooper). The husband of deceased, JAMES DENLEY, a mason's labourer, said one of his children told him that deceased was standing in front of the fire and burnt herself. Witness left the children in charge of Mrs Lear and went again to his work. By a Juror: There was nothing else burnt in the house except the apron of the little child, which had just caught a little. George Reeves, gardener, of West-street, deposed to hearing screams and finding MRS DENLEY on fire. Before he could pull a sheet off the bed to extinguish the flames she ran into the street. She did not say anything as to how the accident happened. A little boy, son of the deceased, who was too young to be sworn, said that he remembered seeing his mother catch alight. She was standing with her back to the fire. Mr Percy Stirk, house surgeon at the Hospital, said deceased was admitted suffering from shock and was deeply burnt about the legs and back. There was no hope for her from the first. The Jury unanimously returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 25 March 1899, Issue 9891 – Gale Document No. Y3200773142
THE SOUTH DEVON SUICIDE – Mr R. R. Rodd held an Inquest at Lutton, near Cornwood, on Monday relative to the death of MATTHEW F. N. HORTON, aged 36 years, a mason. MARY JANE HORTON, the widow, said deceased got up on Saturday morning to light the fire. Not hearing him stirring for a short time she went down and found him hanging by a rope attached to above the back door. James Barkwell said he heard the last witness shouting for help and went and cut the deceased down. Deceased had been depressed of late. Dr Rendle said he had been attending deceased for some time for heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 25 March 1899, Issue 9891 – Gale Document No. Y3200773138
THE NORTH DEVON SUICIDE. Singular Evidence. – Evidence given at the Inquest relative to the death at Dolton of HARRY TRIGGER, aged 30, was of a remarkable character. RICHARD TRIGGER said the deceased, his son, had lived with him rather over twelve months When he went to bed his son was in bed apparently asleep. Deceased got up once and went downstairs, and after staying about ten minutes came up again and got into bed. Just after that they heard one of the horses neigh several times. Deceased said "The horse is out," dressed and went downstairs. Hs other son, who slept in the next room, also went down. Very shortly afterwards his son JAMES shouted up "Come down at once." He rushed down, and JAMES said "HARRY has cut his throat." When asked what he had done, HARRY made no reply. Dr Trouson came within ten minutes. Deceased was not quite right in his mind, and had been away nine or ten years, and witness had never known where he had been. By the Foreman: (Mr J. S. Friend) Deceased, he believed, had been in a lunatic asylum.
JAMES TRIGGER, brother of deceased, said when he went downstairs HARRY said, "Jimmy, there's somebody in the yard." Harry went out. witness stopped to put on his boots, and then went into the yard, but no one was there. He returned indoors, and on going out again to make sure all was right he heard HARRY shout "Jim." Witness replied "Where are you?" HARRY said, "Good bye Jim." Witness went into the garden and found his brother in a stooping position, blood flowing from the neck. Deceased died in about fifteen minutes. By the Coroner: His brother was often funny, probably owning to drinking.
Dr Trouson said deceased had two cuts, extending two-thirds round his neck. While tying up the artery he noticed that the man died. The Jury expressed sympathy with deceased's family, and returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 25 March 1899, Issue 9891 – Gale Document No. Y3200773137
UPTON PYNE FATALITY – The Inquest. – Mr A. Burrow (Deputy Coroner, Cullompton) held an Inquest on Monday at the Schoolroom, Upton Pyne, into the circumstances attending the death of WILLIAM HENRY GIBBONS, Rector of Upton Pyne. Mr Henry Osmond was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who proceeded to view the body at the Rectory. JOHN GIBBONS identified the body as that of his brother, who was 43 years of age. He was Rector of Upton Pyne. Witness had not seen him lately. Deceased had always been near-sighted.
Emma Oliver, wife of Edwin Oliver, of Pynes Lodge, said she had known deceased for some time, and last saw him alive on Friday evening. She was at Cowley Bridge when he passed her, between five and six o'clock, on his way towards Stoke, and said "Good evening."
John Floyde, blacksmith, of Upton Pyne, said he had known deceased for some years, and last saw him alive on Thursday last, when deceased spoke to him. On Saturday morning he heard he was missing, and went down by the Exe. By the fender on Mr J. Osmond's property was a hat (produced), which he recognised as the deceased's. Word was sent to the Earl of Iddesleigh that the Rev. GIBBONS was missing. They made a search and found the body further up the river. Mr Vicary and P.C. Johns came to his assistance, and the body was got out and taken to the Rectory in Mr Osmond's trap. He did not see anything of the bicycle.
By a Juror: His reason for searching the river was that he knew deceased was going to the Reformatory the previous evening.
By the Foreman: MR GIBBONS had always very peculiar sight.
P.C. Johns, stationed at Heavitree, said on Saturday he received orders to go to Upton Pyne, as deceased was reported missing. They made a search, and about 7 a.m., when crossing Stafford Bridge and there saw a bicycle in the water. They then searched the river, and eventually the last witness called him, and they got the body out from the water, which was four feet deep. Deceased was dead. Witness found all his clothing on him with the exception of the hat. The watch had stopped at quarter to seven. The glass was cracked. His ring was still on his finger. Witness traced the marks of the wheels over the bank and into the river. By the Foreman: It appeared as if the deceased made a sudden turn. The bicycle was resting in the river on some rock.
Mr E. J. Domville said he had known the deceased for some years. His sight was near, and he had to use two varieties of spectacles. Witness last saw him alive on Wednesday last, when he was arranging for some Good Friday services. Witness was called to the Rectory on Saturday, when he saw deceased dead. He examined the body and came to the conclusion that death was due to drowning.
The Coroner, in summing up, said it was a sad thing for those who lived in that parish to be called there that day upon this Inquest on the body of their Rector. He was quite sure their sympathy would be extended to his widow and family in their sad bereavement. The facts, it seemed, were that the deceased was going to the Reformatory on his bicycle, and by some means got into the river. He did not think they would return any verdict other than "Found Drowned," unless they thought he got into the river accidentally. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed their sympathy with the family. The Coroner concurred, and the brother of the deceased promised to convey the message to the widow. The Jury gave their fees to the Nursing Fund of the Parish, in which deceased took a great interest.

Saturday 1 April 1899, Issue 9896 – Gale Document No. Y3200773190
THE TEIGNMOUTH FATALITY – An Inquest was held at the London Hotel, Teignmouth, by Mr S. Hacker on Tuesday evening on the body of WILLIA HULL, a sea man, who before his death was serving on board the John schooner, lying in the river. Deceased was 22 years of age, and son of the Sub-Postmaster of Herford Heath. He had spent Sunday afternoon and evening at Frances Trout's house at Shaldon, and at 11 o'clock Trout saw his shipmate Hull scull away in the ship's boat towards the Teignmouth side of the river. A few minutes afterwards Trout saw the boat drifting with the tide with no one in it. He then noticed that HULL was making for the shore, swimming and blowing. Trout called to him "Keep up Bill, I'm coming," but the boat he got into had no paddles. Before he could get to the young man he had been sucked down in the eddies and disappeared. The body was found yesterday morning. the conclusion drawn was that he stood on the after seat and was sculling. the oar slipped from the notch and he fell overboard. Captain Johnston stated that it was a general practice with sailors, though dangerous. He had been overboard three times in a like manner. Sailors would scull like that to get more power on the oar, and there were no means to stop it except by the men's own discretion. A verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning" was returned.
The funeral of the deceased took place at the Teignmouth Cemetery this afternoon.

Saturday 1 April 1899, Issue 9896 – Gale Document No. Y3200773175
SENSATIONAL SUICIDE – Woman "Bewitched" at Paignton. – At Paignton on Good Friday Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquiry relative to the death of MRS SARAH HURMAN, wife of a gentleman of independent means, residing at Albana-villa, Dartmouth-road, who committed suicide on Thursday evening.
THOMAS SMERDON HURMAN, the husband, who was greatly distressed, said deceased had lately complained of biliousness, and had been unable to sleep well. In the ordinary way she enjoyed good health, but suffered at intervals from neuralgia. On Thursday morning she complained of headache, and she was in bed when he left for Torquay at nine o'clock in the morning. He returned about 5.35. As he was coming up Dartmouth-road someone told him a murder had been committed in his house, and he ran indoors. On going upstairs he found his wife in a pool of blood. No one else was in the house. Deceased was only partially dressed. On the dressing-table he found a note addressed to him. It was in deceased's handwriting, and was as follows:-
Private. My dear husband Tom, - Forgive me for everything, I am most unhappy. My poor brain is dreadful. Let Susie (her sister) come and look after Nena (her daughter). Do not blame me for anything. A wicked woman has done all this. She said she would bewitch my poor brain, but do not say her name. I am so miserable. Look after your dear mother all her life and may Nena and you forgive your poor, miserable, unhappy wife. You have been a good husband in many ways. Your loving wife, Annie. P.S. – Your going to work at Torquay has been such a worry to me."
The Coroner: Can you give any explanation of this? - Witness: None. I know nothing about it. She has made no complaint to me. All she has complained of has been neuralgia. We always lived happily together.
What is the meaning of the statement that her brain was bewitched? Was she at all superstitious? - Perhaps she was rather, but she never said anything about being bewitched. It must have been a delusion. One of her brothers shot himself eight or nine years ago. – Has she ever complained about your working at Torquay? - No.
Louie Meyer, general servant, said deceased came downstairs about ten o'clock on Thursday morning. All she had to eat all day was a crust of dry bread. Deceased said she could not do anything because of the pains in her head. She was up on the bed most of the day. Several times she came down, and once owning to her groans, witness went up to her. About 5.30 she came down her dressing gown, and seemed strange. About five minutes after she had gone upstairs her little girl came in with some sponge cakes for tea, and ran upstairs to show them to her mother. From the top of the stairs the child called out that her mother was lying in a pool of blood. Witness ran up and saw deceased as described by MR HURMAN. Did not know deceased had any troubles.
Mrs Rodway, wife of the Rev. Mr Rodway, a neighbour, stated that some weeks ago deceased told her she was certainly bewitched. She said she knew witness would think it very silly, but a woman, whose daughter she had refused to take as servant, had bewitched her.
The Coroner: Had bewitched her with an evil eye? - Witness: Yes, she said she would never keep a servant because the woman told her so. She was quite serious about it, but witness did not think much of it. Deceased said she had so much worry with the change of servants, &c.
The Rev. Mr Rodway said he was present when the conversation about the "witching" took place, and he did his best to disabuse her mind of such folly.
Dr C. H. Cozens said deceased's throat was cut from ear to ear. It would require an enormous amount of determination to inflict such a wound. Death must have been instantaneous. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily of Unsound Mind," and expressed sympathy with MR HURMAN and his little child.

Saturday 1 April 1899, Issue 9896 – Gale Document No. Y3200773177
EXETER MYSTERY. Woman Poisoned. Burning Of A Will Strange Letter Magistrate Action Condemned. - An Inquest was held at the Exeter Police Court this morning by Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper on the body of MISS SUSAN MARY HEAD. MR JOHN CARPENTER, farmer, of Exminster, identified the body as that of his cousin. She was 46 years of age, and had died at 22, Church-lane, St. Sidwell's. Witness last saw deceased alive in February, and she was all right then.
Mr Alfred Waller, baker, said the deceased lodged at his house and rented two rooms. She had lived with witness for four years. She had seemed depressed and melancholy for the last eighteen months. She had no regular medical attendant, but Mr Domville attended her about a year ago. Witness had complained of deceased's untidy habits, and he and his wife were going to take steps to have her removed. She had not been outside the house since last Christmas. On Wednesday night Mrs Baker came home from church and found that the deceased had not been down for her milk, which she fetched every night. Witness went across the road and looked up to deceased's window and saw the room was in darkness. He went up to her room and called the deceased, but received no answer, and he went and fetched a policeman and Dr Perkins. The other day deceased sent a neighbour for some laudanum, but Mr Stocker, chemist, would not serve her. She had had no fire in her room for the past twelve months; only an oil stove.
In reply to a Juror witness said that deceased had made a will in favour of witness's niece, but that had been burnt. the last food she bought was on Wednesday week, when she had a loaf of bread and a 4d cake. She had ample means.
Dr Mackeith said he visited the deceased on the 18th February last, in consequence of an order made by the magistrates as to deceased's mental condition, and after taking into consideration the fact that she had been an inmate of an asylum, he had no hesitation in certifying her as being of unsound mind. He understood that a magistrate (Mr Jones) had subsequently visited her and was unable to confirm his opinion, and subsequently MISS HEAD was not ordered to be removed to the asylum. The room was in an unsatisfactory condition for living in at that season of the year. There was a large grate in direct communication with the air outside through a disused chimney. He enquired as to her food, and she said she was in the habit of cooking herself. She was very despondent, and was under the impression that people were trying to do her harm. While witness was there she sobbed bitterly on several occasions. Witness thought it a very serious thing for a Magistrate to take upon himself the responsibility of refusing to take medical opinion in preference to his own.
The Coroner: One is skilled and the other is not.
Dr A. Perkins stated that he found the deceased lying on her back in bed. Both thumbs were clenched. Beside the bed was a small book and a piece of paper (produced) upon which was written:-
"To the Bakers – All you have to do now (your cruelty has done its work) is send for Dr Domville at once and all of you keep yourselves clear of my rooms and effects till my cousin arrives, who I've asked the doctor to telegraph for and who knows most about my affairs, and how to act now and with all my belongings, and that I wish to be buried with my mother in her grave by Mr Popman (Paris-street) just as they did for her, for which I leave money in full and ample payment, and for any fees demanded for same. You have refused to do common acts of needful service that would have cost you no extra labour, for many months, and the less you interfere now the better for you. My few friends will do what is now necessary, and as Dr Domville is on the Sanitary Committee, he will be inspector enough, and as magistrate eject my body from the wretched shelter it has had since Christmas, 1897. – (Signed)( S. M. HEAD."
The body was very poorly and thinly clad, and on examination he found it was fairly well nourished. The heart was slightly fatty externally, and one lung showed signs of old pleurisy. Several of the organs were congested. There was no charring or burning of the tongue. He did not see anything in the shape of poison in the room. There was a chocolate-like fluid in the stairs, and he was quite sure that it was an irritant poison, but he could not see what it was. He was quite sure that the irritant in the stomach was not due to food.
The Coroner said that it appeared that the deceased was a fit object for a lunatic asylum, and he thought it very unwise of the magistrate to act as he had done. Mr Morton (Foreman of the Jury) said the Jury desired to know the name of the poison, and who supplied it. The Coroner said he had been trying to find that out, but he had been unable to. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased was found poisoned, but that there was no evidence as to how she obtained the poison They also condemned the action of the Magistrate in refusing to grant the order for the deceased's removal to the Asylum.

Saturday 1 April 1899, Issue 9896 – Gale Document No. Y3200773166
THE PAIGNTON FATALITY – At Paignton on Monday evening, Mr Hacker, County Coroner, held an Inquest concerning the death of MR THOMAS KING TOZER, aged 75, retired auctioneer. He was a widower and lived alone, his family having left Paignton for some time. He did all his own cooking, &c., and had no one to assist him, and for some years had been nearly blind. He was last seen alive on Friday evening. On Saturday a daughter arrived from Dublin, and could make no one hear at his house, which was shut up. Mr Richard Wans, a next door neighbour, and his man forced one of the windows about five o'clock on Saturday afternoon, and on entering the house found MR TOZER lying dead at the bottom of the stairs and doubled up. The front door was barred. Deceased was dressed and in his overcoat. His hat was at the top of the stairs and his stick at the bottom, and it was evident he had fallen down the stairs.
Mr Atkins, surgeon, said the neck was broken, and there was a wound at the top of the head from which blood had flowed, so that the skull was probably fractured. He probably died on Friday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 1 April 1899, Issue 9896 – Gale Document No. Y3200773174
TORQUAY – Inquest. – On Thursday evening Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest on the body of the woman MRS MOULD, whose death was reported in Thursday's "Post." The evidence at the Inquest showed that deceased, who was 73 years of age, was seen by MRS MOULD'S nurse to proceed downstairs, but shortly afterwards the nurse heard a crash. On going to ascertain the cause she found MRS MOULD lying dead at the foot of the stairs. Dr Hudley was of opinion that death was due to shock caused by the fall, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Saturday 8 April 1899, Issue 9902 – Gale Document No. Y3200773226
INQUEST AT TEIGNMOUTH – Mr S. Hacker held an Inquest at the London Hotel, Teignmouth, this afternoon relative t the death of MISS BERTHA BREWER, who was found dead in bed at the house of her sister, MRS BRUCE CARLISLE, of 40, Teign-street, on Thursday morning. Deceased had suffered from fits, and the evidence of Dr Stevenson was that she died from suffocation as a result of a fit. Deceased had slept with Miss Maria Tootell, of Bartholomew-street, Exeter, who had spoken to her not long before she was discovered to be dead. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Saturday 8 April 1899, Issue 9902 – Gale Document No. Y3200773233
STRANGE DEATH IN EXETER – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the King's Head Inn, St. Sidwell's, Exeter, on Thursday, on the body of GEORGE HOLDEN PATE, aged 24, porter. JOHN HOLDEN PATE, painter, of 8, Summerland-square, identified the body as that of his son. Witness last saw him alive on Tuesday night, when he was having his supper. He had been to work during the day and went to bed just before eleven. He had some mussels during the day. Witness went and called him at 6.30 on Wednesday morning, and deceased answered, "Yes, father." About eleven o'clock another son came to him at St. Thomas and said, "Brother George is dead." He returned at once and found him dead. He believed he had been in the swingboats at the Fair. Deceased sent out for some gingerbreads after his supper on Tuesday. WILLIAM HENRY HOLDEN PATE, porter, and son of the last witness, stated that on Tuesday night he slept with deceased. He was perfectly sober, and witness had his supper with him. On the following morning deceased called to witness to get up. He could see nothing the matter with him then. Witness came home after breakfast, and his mother told him to call the deceased but when he went up to his room he found him dead. His mother said she went up and called him, but could get no answer. Dr Duncan said when he was called on Wednesday morning the deceased appeared to have been dead about a hour and a half. He examined the body and found no marks of violence. He enquired as to his previous health, and found that he had complained of feeling unwell on Tuesday. He was told that he had been to the Fair on Monday and went on the swing boats, and that he had had some drink, some mussels, and gingerbreads. In his opinion deceased died from failure of the heart's action, brought on by an excessive indulgence in indigestible articles of food. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 8 April 1899, Issue 9902 – Gale Document No. Y3200773240
THE TOPSHAM FATALITY – An Inquest was held on Thursday at the Salutation Hotel, Topsham, by Mr Coroner Burrows, touching the death of RICHARD SWAIN, shoemaker, of High-street. Mr Grantham was appointed Foreman.
ANN SWAIN identified the body as that of her husband, who was 67 years of age. He had been suffering for some time with racking pains in his head. He had never threatened to destroy himself. She last saw him alive in bed at 8.30 on Wednesday morning. He usually got up about twelve o'clock. She did not hear any noise. Mr Potter came to the door and told her that there was a man lying on the pavement outside her house. He was dead, and she thought he had fallen from the top window. He was not worse yesterday morning.
James Potter, of Woodbury, said he was returning from Exeter with fish and had stopped just above the house talking with Mr Vonden, when he saw the deceased fall out of the window, pitching on his head. He thought it was out of the middle windows. He went down to him, but he could not say if he was there before deceased's brother. He helped to carry him indoors.
JOHNS SWAIN, brother of the deceased, said he saw the deceased twice the day before. He was depressed and suffering in his head. He last saw him alive at 7.30 on Tuesday night. Deceased had never threatened to destroy himself in his presence. Witness looked out of the window and saw the deceased on the footpath, but he did not see him fall. The top window was a very pleasant one to look out of, and deceased was often looking out.
Mr J. N. Frood, surgeon, of Topsham, stated that he saw deceased the day before. Two months ago he had a very severe attack of influenza which left a general depression. He was very dull, and witness could not get him to take any interest in his occupation. Witness was called in the morning and found deceased dead. There was an extensive fracture of the skull, which must have been caused by his falling from the top window. Death was caused by shock and fracture of the skull. The Jury found that the deceased met his death by falling out of the window of his house, but there was no evidence to show how.

Saturday 8 April 1899, Issue 9902 – Gale Document No. Y3200773246
TORQUAY – "Accidental Death" was the verdict returned last night at the Inquest on MARY JANE POTTER, aged 58, a laundress, who fell downstairs on Wednesday night and broke her neck.

Saturday 29 April 1899, Issue 9920 – Gale Document No. Y3200773385
INQUEST AT BARNSTAPLE – Mr I. Bencraft held an Inquest at the Workhouse yesterday on the body of the illegitimate child of LUCY LUSCOMBE, who five weeks since was sent to prison for neglecting her children. Mr Cooke said the child was admitted in a very miserable state, and although it improved slightly, it died on Thursday night from convulsions. A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned.

Saturday 29 April 1899, Issue 9920 – Gale Document No. Y3200773353
THE DAWLISH MYSTERY – Inquest and Verdict. – At the Dawlish Vestry Hall on Monday evening Mr Coroner Hacker held an Inquest on the body of EDWIN COLE, a draper, of the Strand, Dawlish, who was found dead in a cave under Langstone Cliff on Saturday.
GEORGE C. R. COLE, said his father was 53 years of age. As far as witness knew, the deceased had been in his usual health of late. He did not know of anything which would have taken him to Langstone Cliff on Friday evening. He did not know of his father being troubled over any matter, and when he last saw him alive on Friday at midday he seemed in his usual health. His father had not left anything which would throw any light on the circumstances surrounding his death.
The widow stated that her husband came home to tea at 5.30 on Friday evening, and afterwards went back to the shop. She did not seem him alive again. She was not aware that he had had anything weighing on his mind of late, and his health had been fairly good. She fancied that he was a little quieter than usual at tea time, but this fact did not strike her until afterwards. She had never heard him threaten to do himself any harm. She did not know of his having any difficulties in regard to monetary matters. When she found that he did not come home at his usual time on Friday evening she became alarmed, but at the same time thought he might have gone away and missed the last train home He was fond of a walk.
George Lambshead, caretaker at the Dawlish Constitutional Club, said the deceased was a member of the Club, and used to go there every evening except Saturdays. He arrived at the Club about seven o'clock on Friday evening, and remained there until ten. While there he was playing cards. He left in company with two other members – Messrs. Cotton and Scott. He did not appear excited.
Philip J. Scott said he was at the Club with the deceased on Friday evening. Nothing happened to upset him. Deceased left the Club with witness, as he had done on many previous occasions, and they parted near their respective homes. Deceased seemed to be in his usual good spirits. He said nothing about going to Langstone for a walk, nor anything to indicate that he had anything preying on his mind.
Ernest Northcote, 21, High-street, Dawlish, said he was walking back from Starcross to Dawlish on Friday night in company with a friend. About 10.30, when within a quarter of a mile of Dawlish, he met the deceased walking along the Exeter-road in the direction of Langstone. Witness wishes him good night, but he did not reply. Witness did not know whether he heard him. Deceased (who, it was explained, was somewhat deaf) was walking at an ordinary pace, and alone.
William Henry Jones, Coastguardsman, stated that he was on duty at Langstone Cliff at 11.30 on Saturday morning. He went down to the beach, and on glancing into a cave on the Exmouth side of the groyne saw the body of the deceased. It was lying face downwards, and had evidently been washed into the cave by the tide.
P.C. Rounsfell deposed to searching the body. He found a watch, which had stopped at 10.40, 7s. 1d in money, and various small articles. The path on the wall was open at the side, and it was quite possible that the deceased might have fallen over. There would have been no water near the wall at the time the watch stopped. The deceased's hat was found on the beach close by the cliff.
Mr G. F. Webb, surgeon said the face was scratched as if the body had been washed about on the sand. there was no fracture, but a small swelling on the right shoulder, like that which would be caused by an ordinary blow. It might have been caused after death by the body being washed against the rocks. It was not a blow such as would have been caused by the deceased falling from the wall. The appearance of the body was consistent with death from drowning. There was nothing to point to anything else. He was convinced that there had not been foul play. The deceased was of an irritable nature, but there was nothing to indicate that he had any suicidal mania or anything of the kind. After a short deliberation the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was found drowned, washed up by the sea, but that there was no evidence to show how he got into the water.

Saturday 29 April 1899, Issue 9920 – Gale Document No. Y3200773346
EXMOUTH FATALITY. The Authorities and Pauper Lunatics. Their Action Criticised. - A shocking story was told at the Inquest held at the Rolle Hotel, Exmouth, on Thursday by Mr Coroner Cox on the body of GEORGINA ELLEN ANN HORN, who was burnt to death on Wednesday. Mr Winter was Foreman of the Jury.
The evidence of FRANCIS CHARLES HORN, innkeeper, went to show that his wife, who was 33 years of age, had recently been made a pauper lunatic. A woman who was engaged to look after her left the house at midnight on Tuesday, and witness watched her until ten minutes past three when he retired to rest in an adjoining room from which he could see into the deceased's room. In the meantime the deceased arose and went downstairs, thinking it was time to get up, and he brought her back. Witness subsequently awoke and found the deceased's room full of smoke. After considerable trouble he found his wife, who was terribly burnt. The flames were subdued by his brother. Several things in the room were burned. A tin oil lamp, which was left burning on a washstand was found in the middle of the deceased's bed. The lamp was unscrewed. The authorities were going to take the deceased away, first on the Monday and then on the Tuesday. The relieving officer said he was to get a woman to look after the deceased, but of course they could not expect one woman to look after her night and day.
The Coroner: He did not get a woman himself? - No.
A Juryman: I think it is his place to do so. Another Juryman: So do I; I don't think MR HORN ought to do it.
Witness said it was suggested in a letter he received from the relieving officer at Topsham (Mr Mark Baker) on Sunday that witness should get a woman to look after deceased. Witness was told personally on Tuesday to get a female attendant. Witness handed in a communication which he had received from Mr Mark Baker stating that there was no room for deceased at the Exminster Asylum, but perhaps a vacancy could be found either at Salisbury or Ivybridge; they would endeavour to send her away by Tuesday.
A Juryman: You don't know that a telegram was received saying there was no accommodation at the Asylum or Union, and that you would have to get someone to look after her night and day? - I was told that. A Juror: Did you get the telegram yourself? - No. The Coroner: It was an unfortunate thing that the asylums were all full.
WILLIAM RENDLE, brother of the deceased, said he discovered deceased burned on the floor. Witness extinguished the flames in the room. The clothing on the body was burnt off. Evidence was also given by Alice Hoskins, married woman, who had watched the deceased, and who denied that her husband was the first in the room after the discovery. A Juror: Well, he must tell lies then. Another Juror thought the man should be called, but Sergeant Dymond said Hoskins was not present until three or four other witnesses had been in the room. A Juror: He told me he was the first in the room. The Coroner: Do you wish him to be sent for? - Voices: Yes.
A scene of disorder followed, and it was some time before order was restored, when the Coroner intimated that he would excuse Mr Mark Baker (relieving officer) who had been summoned to attend, but was absent through influenza.
Ex-Sergeant Brownson, of Topsham, acting relieving officer, deposed to asking the deceased's husband to obtain a female attendant for his wife night and day, in consequence of there being no room in the Asylums at the expense of the authorities. Thomas William Hoskins, husband of a previous witness, appeared, and was sworn.
A Juryman: Did you tell me you were the first man in the room? - Witness: After her brother had been there. Henry Baker, overseer for the parish of Littleham, deposed to advising deceased's father to apply to the relieving officer (Mr M. Baker) for an order. Witness afterwards received a letter from Mr Baker stating that the asylums at Exminster, Plymouth, Salisbury and Digby were all full. The Coroner: (to deceased's husband): MR HORN, you have heard what has been said. It is said you were asked to put a nurse in charge of your wife night and day, and that the authorities would pay for it? - HORN: I didn't understand I was to get a woman to look after her night and day. Mr Brownson remarked that HORN was very much upset at the time. Mr Shapland, Union Medical Officer, deposed to the mental condition of the deceased and to his issuing of certificates. He communicated with the authorities with a view to arrangements being made for sending the deceased away. Witness had no idea she was still at her own house. When witness was called after the discovery he found life extinct. The Coroner, in summing up, said the case certainly pointed to the fact that more accommodation for pauper lunatics was urgently required. A Juryman: From the evidence the Guardians are not liable. MR HORN was told to appoint someone to look after her. Another Juryman: I think the Guardians should have appointed someone to look after her; not leave it to one man. The Jury proceeded to consider their verdict amidst a scene of [?], and afterwards held a private consultation. The Jury eventually found "That the deceased was accidentally burnt by taking a paraffin lamp and setting fire to the bed clothes whilst insane," and the Jury added a rider calling the attention of the County Council respecting the lack of accommodation for lunatics. The Foreman was asked to forward the rider to the authorities.

Saturday 29 April 1899, Issue 9920 – Gale Document No. Y3200773350
MOTOR FATALITY – Exonian's Sad Death. - Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest on Tuesday at the Exeter Police Court touching the death of GEORGE MORGAN, clerk, who died as the result of an accident on Sunday last. Robert Henry Darby, clerk, of 2, Southernhay-gardens, identified the body. Deceased was a single man, 37 years of age, and had lodged at his house for the last sixteen or seventeen years. He had been employed as a clerk to the St. Thomas Urban Council for the past twelve months and prior to that, served fifteen or sixteen years with Mr Champion, clerk to the St. Thomas Guardians. He was a cripple in his left leg, and had purchased a motor cycle, but he very rarely used it. Henry John James, electrical engineer, of 135, Cowick-street, St. Thomas, said he knew the deceased. On the 11th February witness saw him start from just outside the Fire Station,. St. Thomas, on his machine. He was going in the direction of Dunsford-road. The machine was a motor-tricycle, and he continued to steer all right until he got opposite St. Thomas Vicarage when the machine swerved suddenly to the left and turned over. Witness immediately went to his assistance. He was picked up and removed to his house.
The Coroner: Could he mount this machine without assistance. Did he usually do so? - This is the only time I ever saw him on it, and then I was one of those who helped him. What did he pay for it? - I hear he paid £42 for it. Witness, continuing his evidence, said the deceased was subsequently seen by Dr Andrews and Mr Mark Farrant, jun. When the machine overturned the oil came out of the container and ignited. By the Jury: He had had no tuition in the riding of the machine except a letter with instructions from the firm he had bought it of. He had never ridden the machine before. Witness thought that the deceased understood how to work the machine as he asked witness to try it, and gave him instructions how to use the levers. Witness had been two or three journeys, and had found the machine all right. Dr Woodman said he had known the deceased for the last twenty-five or thirty years. He had been his constant medical attendant, and he had operated on him for hip disease with great shortening of the left leg, which he had suffered from since youth. Witness saw him on Sunday morning, February 26th, when he found that he was suffering from alarming haemorrhage from the wound on the hip and a swelling of his jaw on the same side, which caused great difficulty in eating. He stopped the haemorrhage and the deceased rallied for some time, but the old hip mischief set in again. Witness removed one piece of old bone and there was still more there but the patient was too weak to allow of it being taken away. His death, which occurred on Sunday, the 23rd inst., was due to exhaustion, owing to the discharge from the hip, which had been reopened by the fall. The deceased had been very anxious to go to and fro from business on a motor cycle, and he had been saving up for years for the purpose. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Saturday 6 May 1899, Issue 9926 – Gale Document No. Y3200773427
THE YEOFORD FATALITY – An Inquest was held at Yeoford on Monday relative to the death of FLANNIGAN, known as RICHARD COLLINS, who was found dead on the line on Sunday morning between Yeoford and Coleford Junction. BEATRICE FLANNIGAN, the widow said deceased lived at Rack-street, Exeter, and he went to his work on Saturday night for Sunday morning. He was a sober man, 26 years old, and left two children. Adam Abbott, of Crewkerne, belonging to the relaying gang, said deceased came to Yeoford from Exeter by the last train on Saturday night. He was an Army Reserve man. C. Pike, a labourer, said deceased was a steady man. He last saw him alive on Yeoford Station, and he was then perfectly sober. In reply to Superintendent Ellacott, witness said they went into the Railway Hotel and had a pint of beer each. Alfred Pring, a ganger, said he found deceased at 4.15 on Sunday morning lying in the 4-foot way dead below Yeoford Junction, apparently having been run over. He did not know why deceased was on the railway. Henry Woodford, an engine driver, said he drove a goods train from Plymouth, leaving Friary at 9.20 p.m. for Exeter on Saturday night. Just after leaving Coleford Junction he felt a slight jerk. Mr Samuel Melhuish, district inspector, stated that he examined the engine at Exmouth Junction, and he found under the bogie wheels a portion of flesh and human hair. It was very slight however. He thought deceased must have been lying down on the rails, for if a man had been standing up the appearance of injuries would have been more prominent. Dr L. Powne, of Crediton, said he found a deep wound on deceased's forehead, and the left leg was cut off. There was a deep wound on the body, and several ribs were broken. He considered the deceased was knocked down by the train. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead, being run over by a goods train," and gave their fees to the widow.

Saturday 6 May 1899, Issue 9926 – Gale Document No. Y3200773420
EXETER WOMAN'S DEATH – Excessive Drinking. Severe Censure. – At 56, Bath-road, Exeter, on Wednesday, Mr H. W. Hooper, City Coroner, resumed the adjourned Inquest on the body of SUSAN BANNISTER, widow, who for a number of years carried on business in South-street. It will be remembered that at the opening of the Inquiry Dr Mortimer gave it as his opinion that death was due to excessive drinking, and a post mortem examination was ordered. At that day's proceedings Mr S. Andrew (Messrs. Roberts and Andrew) represented certain of the relatives, and Mr Thomas (Messrs Jerman and Thomas) appeared for other relatives. The Coroner said the facts of the case were before the Jury at the last hearing, and the only evidence he proposed calling was that of the doctor.
Mr Mortimer, surgeon, said in accordance with the order of the Coroner and Jury he, in company with Mr Thompson, one of the house surgeons at the Hospital, made a post mortem examination of the body on Saturday morning. He found the stomach quite empty and the blood vessels of its walls highly congested. The haemorrhage which had occurred during life had evidently resulted in slow, chronic, oozing of blood, which was deposited in a thin layer over the walls of the abdomen. The liver was enlarged and very fatty, the kidneys being in the same condition.
You detected no poison of any kind? - No poison or sign of poison. At the last meeting you said you considered death to be due to haemorrhage from the wall of the stomach caused by excessive drink. All the present appearances show you that it was the result of excessive drink? - I think so, absolutely. There were no marks of violence? - None whatever.
The Coroner, in summing up, said he thought the Jury were quite right in requiring a post mortem because he thought it was a case in which it was necessary. They might have heard that the deceased's daughter would at some not distant period become entitled to some considerable means, and therefore on that account it was the more necessary that the enquiry should be held. No doubt the man, whom they had heard on the last occasion, Samuel Dymond, became somehow introduced into the house, and practically had the management of it for a time, the deceased furnishing him with what was required for the keeping of the house, which, to him, seemed a somewhat extraordinary proceeding. He thought the Jury would agree with him upon that point, especially considering Dymond's antecedents, which no doubt were well-known to them, and he became the instrument of procuring alcoholic liquor for her to a considerable extent. Again, this continued inebriety was a sad example to the daughter, aged about 15 or 16, and living in the same house. That daughter would, as he had said, become entitled to considerable means. These, he was glad to know, would be protected by proceedings which, he was informed, were being taken for preserving it in a proper way. Taking all the facts into consideration he felt, as the Jury did, that there existed a most lamentable state of affairs. To him the case was a very painful one because he happened to have known the family for a vast number of years. Mr Jeffries (a Juryman) asked whether the man Dymond was justified in procuring and giving to deceased such a quantity of spirit. the Coroner said it might have been at deceased's request; that he did not know. Doubtless he ought not to have done it. Mr Jeffries: It seems remarkable that a man giving his description as a cab proprietor should be on the premises to do such things as that. The Coroner said if any proceedings were being taken that had nothing to do with him. She furnished the man with money evidently, and no doubt gave him instructions. Mr Jeffries: There was no evidence at the former Enquiry to show whether he paid for the spirit or whether he was trusted with the cash to pay for what he had. The Coroner: I have no doubt there was plenty of money to do that. Mr Andrew asked the Coroner whether he would instruct the Jury that it was not necessary to go beyond the immediate cause of death. The Coroner said that was so, but they could add that it was a very reprehensible state of things. Mr Jeffries said as far as he was concerned he should wish a vote of censure on the man Dymond. The Jury returned a verdict that death was due to Natural Causes, accelerated by excessive drinking, and added that they considered the man Dymond should be severely censured. The Coroner said he quite agreed, and addressing Mr Dymond he said: I am requested to express to you very severe censure upon what you have been in the habit of doing; you have been in the habit of getting spirit from time to time in large quantities, and the Jury think it is very reprehensible of you to have done it, seeing what was done with it, because in your evidence on the last occasion you stated that you had fetched her a pint of brandy a day. She was in the habit of drinking brandy, beer, and gin, and the Jury have requested me to say that you are deeply censurable for the death of this poor woman, which I hope will be a warning to you. I presume she furnished you with money and requested you to fetch the liquor.
Dymond: That's right, and it is not only one who fetched it. If I hadn't done it others did. I've refused to go and then she drove her own daughter to go.
The Coroner: Possibly that may be so, but I think you might have stopped it. Dymond: I tried all I could, Mr Hooper, and begged her to send for her legal adviser as she was in a bad way. Her own daughter will tell you IK begged her not to take so much spirit, and then she said she would have a glass of ale with her dinner instead. The Coroner: All I can say is I am very sorry that anyone of the name of BANNISTER should have come to such a death. Dymond: There is nobody more sorry than I am myself. The proceedings then terminated.

Saturday 6 May 1899, Issue 9926 – Gale Document No. Y3200773404
EXONIAN'S SUDDEN DEATH – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at No. 9, Belmont-road, Exeter, on Tuesday on the body of MR GEORGE MADGE, wine and spirit merchant, of High-street.
MRS CATHERINE MADGE, the widow, said her husband was 27 years of age. He had been under medical treatment very recently, and for the past few days had hardly been outside the house. He was last out on Saturday afternoon, coming in about six o'clock apparently quite well, and had tea. He said he should go down to business again, and witness went out to the post. When she returned he was in bed very faint, as he had often been lately. Medical assistance was called in, and Dr Faulkner came. Mr Herbert Faulkner, surgeon, said he had been MR MADGE'S medical attendant for six years. For the last month or six weeks he had attended him for giddiness, the last time being on April 21st. Deceased used to fall asleep at all hours of the day On Saturday witness was fetched to see him, and found him in bed breathing stertorously, and quite unconscious. Witness had no doubt whatever that death was due to apoplexy caused by the rupture of a vessel on the brain. The Coroner said he was sure the Jury would sympathise with MRS MADGE in her loss. He had known both MR MADGE and his father for a number of years as highly respected people, and could only express his deep regret at the death which had come upon him so unexpectedly. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 13 May 1899, Issue 9932 – Gale Document No. Y3200773443
CHILD SUFFOCATED – On Monday Mr Sidney Hacker held an Inquest at Moreton as to the death of the infant daughter of ALICE MAUD NORRISH, who said that she lived at Bartholomew-street, Exeter, but had been staying at Moreton with her sister previous to and since the birth of the child on April 8th. The child had not been registered or named. The child was found dead in bed by the mother's side. Mr L. V. Laurie, surgeon, said he had made an examination of the body, and found that death was due to asphyxia. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Accidental Suffocation."

Saturday 13 May 1899, Issue 9932 – Gale Document No. Y3200773462
THE TOTNES FATALITY – At Totnes yesterday the Inquest was resumed by Mr Coroner Hacker on the body of ERNEST WEST, single, 21, who was killed by the fall of a tunnel he was driving at the sewage works near Totnes, and by which he was buried. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, and the Jury passed a vote of sympathy with the relatives and signified their appreciation of the prompt measures taken by the rescue party.

Saturday 13 May 1899, Issue 9932 – Gale Document No. Y3200773471
THE SAD DEATH AT EXETER – The Coroner and His Officer. – The Exeter City Coroner, Mr H. W. Hooper, held an Inquest at the Black Horse Hotel, Longbrook-street, on Tuesday, touching the death of FRANK BANKS WAKEFIELD, stock-keeper to Messrs Milton and Son, chemists, of High-street. The proceedings commenced with a passage-of-arms between the Coroner and Mace-Sergeant Wicks, the officer in charge of the Inquiry, in consequence of a misunderstanding as to the place at which the Inquest would be held. The Jurymen were summoned to meet at No. 9, Park-road, where deceased lodged, while the Coroner, having been informed that the Black Horse was the place of meeting, sat there for twenty minutes until the Jury had been fetched. The Sergeant said the Jury had been waiting and a room was ready at No. 9. The Coroner: You ought not to fix time and place as you have done here; don't do it again.
Wicks: There's a lot of the Jury there now. The Coroner: Well, I'm not going there. You tell them to come here to be sworn.
Wicks: When I summoned the Jury to be at Park-road the Inquest ought to be held there. I was trapesing about two or three hours after you.
The Coroner: Don't talk to me like that; I won't be talked to like that.
The Jury elected Mr F. G. Towill as Foreman, and proceeded to Park-road to inspect the body, returning to the Black Horse to hear the evidence.
William Henry Odgers, assistant at Messrs. Milton's, said deceased was 22 last week. Witness was with him on Saturday night; he said he had toothache "jumping mad." In the morning he took one drachm of morphia, remarking to witness, "It's all right, old man; it's only the maximum half-grain dose." That was at ten o'clock in the morning later in the day he appeared easier, and at nine o'clock in the evening joined witness at the Theatre. They went home together; and as witness was standing in the passage the landlady's daughter said "Mr Odgers, MR WAKEFIELD has a bottle in his hand." Witness went to the room where deceased was and found two bottles on the mantelpiece, one containing toothache tincture, while the other contained the morphine mixture. He told witness that he had taken a dose of the same quantity as in the morning. he then went to bed, and after about half an hour had elapsed he repeated, in conversation with witness that he had taken the same dose as morning. On Sunday, at dinner time, he was not so well, and witness fetched Dr Mortimer, later going for Dr Harris, but he died, at ten minutes to nine on Sunday night. Latterly he had been in the habit of taking morphia and chlorodyne. He had been with Mr Milton five months and fortnight. He never showed any suicidal tendencies.
Mr Mortimer, surgeon, said he saw deceased on Sunday afternoon and found him suffering from marked symptoms of morphia poisoning. Witness applied all the appropriate remedies with apparently considerable success for three hours. Then the heart began to fail, and the remedies failing to react deceased died between eight and nine. Death was undoubtedly due to morphia poisoning, and deceased must have taken a good deal more than the half-grain which he told the last witness about.
Mr Milton, deceased's employer, said he should like to mention that he had no previous knowledge that deceased took drugs from the store, nor that he was in the habit of taking morphia. Deceased was stock-keeper, and as such it would be impossible to keep these things from him. Deceased had been in the office of his brother, a surgeon in London, and had a greater knowledge of drugs than most assistants. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Misadventure."

INQUEST AT TAVISTOCK – Mr Rodd held an Inquest at Tavistock Workhouse on Monday relative to the death of the illegitimate infant of ELIZABETH BALL, an inmate, who at seven o'clock on Saturday morning called attention to the state of the child, which Nurse Pascoe found to be dead. It was born on the 2nd inst. Nurse Coaker stated that the child appeared well at 6.30. It had always been the custom in that Workhouse for young infants to sleep with their mothers, but she had received instructions not to permit it in future. Dr Snowden Smith attributed death to suffocation, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. Sergeant-Major Bowles was Foreman.

Saturday 13 May 1899, Issue 9932 – Gale Document No. Y3200773461
INQUEST AT DARTMOOR PRISON Mr J. D. Prickman (County Coroner) held an Inquest at the Prison, Princetown, yesterday, on the body of a convict named THOMAS CORDERY, who died on Wednesday last, aged sixty-eight years. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Saturday 20 May 1899, Issue 9938 – Gale Document No. Y3200773515
THE RAILWAY SUICIDE – Inquest At Cullompton. – An Inquest was held on Wednesday by Mr Coroner A. Burrow at the Railway Hotel, Cullompton, touching the death of the unfortunate man LEONARD POTTS, who was found shot in a railway compartment on the Great Western Railway on Monday night at Cullompton Station. HAROLD JAMES POTTS, a retired engineer, identified the body as that of his son who was 21 years of age and had been a clerk in the dockyard at Pembroke. He saw him last on March 29th. He left next day and he understood that he booked for Cardiff. He was on leave from the dockyard. He knew he was going to have leave, but he did not know he was going away. He did not hear of him again till he heard of his death. Deceased had never threatened to destroy himself and he could not account for it in any way He had been a good son and witness had had nothing to complain of. The writing on the note (produced) that was found on the deceased was his son's, but he had no idea what he meant by saying he had "wronged" aim (witness).
In answer to the Coroner, witness said that deceased might have gone to Plymouth to see some friends that he had there. He used to have a revolver as a boy and was very careless. He had to reprimand him more than once.
John Denham, guard on the Great Western Railway at Taunton, said he was on the train which left Exeter at 8.25 on Monday. He noticed the blinds drawn on both sides at Silverton, but he did not attach any importance to the fact, and did not look into the carriage till he reached Cullompton. He heard no report of a pistol on the journey. He opened the door at Cullompton and saw a man lying on the seat, which his feet on the floor. He was still alive, and witness first thought he had cut his throat, but on investigation saw the revolver produced on the floor. Witness called Mr Luxton, cabman, and sent him for the doctor, and waited till the doctor arrived. He was not bleeding much then. When the doctor came he ordered that the man be removed to the waiting-room, which was done.
A Juror: Did not a Mr Disnay look in between the blinds at Hele and call your attention to a man on the seat? Witness: A man did look in through the window, but he told him it was all right; it was a passenger to Cullompton. A man did get in at Exeter and asked if it was the train for Cullompton, and he thought he got into that carriage.
Dr Gidley deposed to being called and finding deceased half-sitting and lying on the seat. There was a good deal of blood about, but the man was still breathing. On the right temple was a revolver shot wound which, however, was not bleeding very much at the time. The skin was singed and blackened as if the barrel had been put very close. There was no other wound on the head. He was removed to the waiting-room and thence to the Railway Hotel. Witness was with him about an hour and a half. The wounding of the brain had caused death.
P.C. Cridland said he was called to the railway station about 9.5. He accompanied the doctor down to the station, and found the deceased in the position already stated. He found the revolver, which was a five-chambered weapon, under the seat. Four chambers were loaded and one discharged. A ticket from Exeter to Hele and Bradninch was on the window-sill. In his hat was a letter to his father addressed and stamped and a small piece of paper with his own address on it in the lining. The letter was as follows:- "Dear Father, - Forgive me please. I have wronged you; but shall worry you no more. Pray for my soul. Your wandering son, LEO." In his pockets were there more cartridges, a pipe, handkerchief and memoranda relating to the times, &c. of trains. Witness helped t remove him from the compartment to the waiting room, and from there to the Hotel where he undressed him and remained with him till 12.30. P.C. Brown said he came to the Railway Hotel about 10.30. He stopped with deceased until 1.45 when he died. He never said anything, and was unconscious the whole time.
The Coroner briefly summed up, expressing sympathy with the parents. He said there was absolutely no evidence to show that deceased was out of his mind, and they could not return a verdict to that effect. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the Coroner's suggestions, that deceased committed suicide, but that there was not sufficient evidence to show the state of his mind. Inspector Shattock and Mr Abrahams (Stationmaster of Cullompton) were present on behalf of the railway authorities.

Saturday 27 May 1899, Issue 9944 – Gale Document No. Y3200773578
EXETER FATALITIES – Boy Killed: Child Drowned: - At the Exeter Police Court this morning Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of WALTER ALFRED GEORGE SPRAGUE, the particulars of which were published in our last evening's issue. Mr C. Spicer was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who proceeded to view the body in the mortuary. WALTER SPRAGUE, labourer, No. 9 Tremlett's-cottages, Exe-street, father, said his son resided with him and was 12 years of age. Between eight and nine o'clock on Thursday evening witness was called to the houses in course of demolition at the bottom of Lower North-street, it being stated that his son was buried. A number of men were clearing away the rubbish, and eventually the boy's body was recovered. Henry John Cox, aged 13, residing in Exe-street, said he knew the deceased. Witness, with others, were on the old buildings shifting a ladder. They had no business there. Deceased had a pickaxe, which he obtained from a shed close by, and was digging away at some of the foundations of the building. They were really trespassers. There were no men at work on the building. Witness and the others heard a noise and warned SPRAGUE, but he refused to come away and said he would have it all down. Suddenly a part of the building collapsed on SPRAGUE. There were about sixteen boys present. By the Coroner: The place was open for anyone to go in. Witness heard deceased groaning, and then ran and told deceased's father. Messrs. Ham and Passmore were engaged to pull the buildings down. Mr Austin, of the firm of Messrs. Westcott, Austin, and White, builders, said he was on the firm's premises adjoining the houses which are being pulled down, and while standing at a window overlooking the property, saw some boys with a ladder, which they threw on the ground. They raised it perpendicularly two or three times and let it fall to the ground. He should think the ladder was about twenty feet long. the window was not open, and he was proceeding to a place where he might speak to the boys when he heard a crash. He saw that a part of the building had fallen down, and, hearing that a boy was under it, he assisted in getting the body out. Witness thought he was dead, but ran for medical assistance. By the Coroner: The boys had no business there whatever. The property had been closely boarded up, but the boys had deliberately pulled the boarding down to get in. He could not say whether that was so on the evening in question. Mr Sercombe (a Juryman): I think on this night the place was quite open. During the last four or five nights it has been a perfect nuisance with the boys. Every night it had been barricaded except this night. Unfortunately, on that occasion nothing was put up. Mr Sercombe said the place had been a source of very great danger. There were two shafts dug out to a depth of nineteen or twenty feet, and there was nothing to guard it whatever. He thought something should have been done to prevent the boys from going there. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said death must have been instantaneous, the neck being broken. The Coroner said he was very sorry to see the liberties which boys took in going over other people's premises. If one said anything to them they only received an impertinent answer. It was a very unfortunate case, and seemed to be perfectly accidental. Deceased was undoubtedly trespassing. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and the Foreman said there was a strong feeling that such a state of unsecurity should have existed. The Foreman criticised the action of the men employed in leaving masonry unsupported.

A second fatality was reported yesterday in Exeter. It appears some little children were playing on the Canal banks last evening, and one of them, venturing too near the edge, fell into the water. A woman raised an alarm and Mr Charles Willey, who resides on the Banks, and who was passing at the time, entered the water and succeeded in bringing the child out. The child, the 3 ½ year old son of a man named ALBERT HALLEY, in the employ of the City Council, and residing on the Haven Banks, was taken to the Welcome Inn, where every assistance was rendered, but life was found to be extinct. An Inquest will be held by Mr Burrow, probably on Monday.

Saturday 27 May 1899, Issue9944 – Gale Document No. Y3200773550
SUDDEN DEATH IN EXETER – Mr H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Black Horse Hotel, Longbrook-street, Exeter, on Tuesday, on the body of OSMOND HENRY DICKER, aged 30, who carried on business as a tobacconist and newsagent at No. 15, Longbrook-street. Mr William Henry Sharland, compositor, and brother-in-law of the deceased, said he resided at No. 15, Longbrook-street, and the last time he saw the deceased alive was on Monday morning about 10.30 when his attention was drawn to him by his coughing. He went to him and found blood issuing from the mouth He at once sent for a doctor, but on his arrival life was extinct. The deceased had had a very bad cough for the last ten years. Mr C. E. Bell, surgeon, said he was in the neighbourhood on Monday when he was called to see the deceased. He found him lying on the table quite dead. He considered death a natural one, brought on by the rupture of a blood vessel in the lungs, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. The Coroner and Jury expressed their sympathy with the relatives of the deceased.

Saturday 3 June 1899, Issue 9950 – Gale Document No. Y3200773584
EXETER CHILD'S DEATH. Another Case of Over-Lying. - Mr H. W. Gould (Deputy Coroner) held an Inquest at the Exeter Police Court on Thursday on the body of GERTRUDE DOROTHY PIM, the infant daughter of ASECATH PIM, wife of JAMES PIM, cabdriver, of Clark's-place, Paris-street, who said the child was very thin. It, however, seemed to thrive, and had apparently never been ill. The child was sleeping between witness and her husband that morning, and, after giving it nourishment, she laid it down to sleep. Witness woke up about 1.30 and found the child dead in her arms. Mr Henry Andrew, surgeon, said when he arrived the child had probably been dead some hours. The child was badly nourished. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Over-Lying."

Saturday 3 June 1899, Issue 9950 – Gale Document No. Y3200773623
EXETER – Inquest. – Mr A. Burrows, Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at the Welcome Inn on Tuesday on the body of the three-year old son of ALBERT HALLEY, who is in the employ of the City Council. It will be remembered that the child fell into the water while playing on the Haven Banks on Saturday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Drowning."

Saturday 3 June 1899, Issue 9950 – Gale Document No. Y3200773619
TORQUAY FATALITY. Sad Death of a Tradesman's Wife. – Mr Coroner S. Hacker held an Inquest in the Upton Parish Room on Wednesday on MRS MARTHA MARY ROWELL, 58, the wife of MR G. A. ROWELL, draper, of 98, Union-street, who died suddenly in Union-street on Monday. Mr J. Jones was elected Foreman of the Jury.
SIDNEY GEORGE ROWELL identified the deceased as his mother. She had been poorly for some time, but had been able to go out. She had complained of her head. On Monday, about twelve, she went for a walk to Torre. Soon afterwards a message arrived that she had fallen, and his father went up, as he had been summoned to attend an Inquest at two on that afternoon. Mary Hill, 238 Union-street, stated that deceased called about twelve on Monday and asked her to go to the Baptist School treat. She told witness she was not very well. She would not go inside and on moving backward saying "Good-bye" she fell backward, her head striking the kerbstone. There was nothing for her to trip over, but she seemed to be suddenly seized with a fit. Deceased was taken into al shop by gentlemen and a doctor was fetched, but she did not regain consciousness, dying about 2.30. Dr Horton said on seeing deceased in Mrs Hill's shop he found a wound on the back of her head bleeding freely. She was unconscious, and died at 2.30. the post mortem examination shewed that the skull was fractured, and an effusion of blood on the brain had caused death. There was also a recent rupture of a small blood vessel on the bridge of the brain, which led him to believe that an apoplectic fit had caused deceased to fall, and would have doubtlessly caused death eventually, although not so quickly. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased met with her death by accidentally falling and fracturing her skull whilst in an apoplectic fit.

Saturday 10 June 1899, Issue 9956 – Gale Document No. Y3200773660
ST MARYCHURCH UNDERTAKER POISONED BY SAUSAGES – An Inquest was held at St. Marychurch on Monday touching the death of an undertaker named JOHN HOSKINGS CLEAR, 71, who died on Sunday. The evidence given showed that on account of deceased eating some sausages he had purchased he became ill, and after buying medicine and seeing a doctor on Friday death ensued on Sunday. MRS CLEAR, daughter-in-law, said that deceased's death was a surprise to her as she thought deceased was only suffering from weakness. The sausages, she said, were brought on Tuesday.
Dr Steele said that when he first visited the case deceased stated that the illness was caused through eating sausages. Deceased was very ill, but witness hoped that recovery would take place. Death ensued as stated. Witness made an examination of the body and found the stomach and intestines very much inflamed. Death occurred as the result of unwholesome sausages being eaten. There was evidence of ptomaine poisoning, generated by the putrefaction of meat in the stomach. The poisoning was of a serious nature. MRS CLEAR, recalled, said that she destroyed the sausages that were left as they were so bad. P.C. Chudley on making enquiries failed to find out where the sausages were purchased. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased died as stated by the medical gentleman, but that there was no means of ascertaining from whom the sausages were purchased.

Saturday 10 June 1899, Issue 9956 – Gale Document No. Y3200773659
An Inquest was held at Plymouth on Monday relative to the death of HENRY MOUNTJOY, aged 41, carpenter, Plymouth, who was found by his little boy hanging by a rope suspending from a gas jet in the kitchen. Dr Thomson said he had been attending deceased for some months for pains in the head. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 10 June 1899, Issue 9956 – Gale Document No. Y3200773646
THE NORTHAM SUICIDE – Mr J. F. Bromham held an Inquest on Tuesday at the Golden Lion Hotel, Northam, on the body of EDWARD COOK, landlord of the hotel. Mr William Ashplant was foreman of the Jury, who, having been sworn, proceeded to view the body. The first witness called was the son of the deceased, CHARLES EDWARD COOK, who stated that he last saw his father alive on Saturday night about 12 o'clock. At 6.30 a.m. on Sunday witness was awakened by a knock at his door and, on hearing that his father could not be found, he went to the w.c., but could not force the door open. He went for P.C. Carpenter, and together they opened the door. His father was quite dead with a rope round his neck. The other end of the rope was around the stay of the shelf. He had often heard his father complain of pains in the head. P.C. Carpenter, stationed at Northam, corroborated. Dr W. A. Valentine, of Appledore, stated that he was sent for on Sunday morning, but found the deceased dead. In his opinion deceased died from strangulation. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during Temporary Insanity." s The Jury also sympathised with the widow and family of the deceased.

Saturday 17 June 1899, Issue 9962 – Gale Document No. Y3200773707
DEATH OF A PRISONER – SAMUEL ESCOTT, clerk, of Exeter, was yesterday brought up at the Police Court charged with wandering abroad with no visible means of subsistence. He was in a dreadful condition, and stated to be suffering from "D.T's". His parents lived in Exeter, but would have nothing to do with him. The Bench remanded him till today, in order that prisoner might be medically examined. This morning at the Police Court, the Chief Constable stated that prisoner had died that morning. On enquiry it was ascertained that prisoner was removed to Digby's Asylum yesterday, where he died this morning. Dr Bell thought it was a hopeless case. An Inquest will probably be held.

Saturday 17 June 1899, Issue 9962 – Gale Document No. Y3200773726
FATALITY – Mr Deputy Coroner Burrow on Wednesday held an Inquest at Teign House on the body of C. DIMMICK, who was crushed to death on Monday between the buffers of a truck and an engine on the Exeter Railway. Deceased was thirty-five years of age and a first-class army reserve man. The Jury attached no blame to anyone and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Mr Harry Dickson (Messrs. Dickson, contractors) stated that the firm would be responsible for all the funeral expenses.

INQUEST – Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest at the Duke of York Inn, Coombe-street, on Wednesday, on the body of EDMUND STEVENS, aged 65, labourer. ROBERT STEVENS, fish dealer, and son of the deceased, said a few days before his death he complained of feeling bad in the head. Dr Clapp was sent for, and the deceased fetched a bottle f medicine from the doctor. Witness asked the doctor what he was suffering from, and he said it was bronchitis and a severe cold. Deceased was out on Monday, and witness'[s wife went in and found him dead in bed yesterday morning. Mr Harrison, surgeon, deposed to being called about a quarter to seven on Tuesday morning. Death must have taken place very suddenly. In his opinion death was a natural one, due to cardiac syncope. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

Saturday 17 June 1899, Issue 9962 – Gale Document No. Y3200773689
FOUND DROWNED AT WESTWARD HO! – Inquest at Northam. - Mr J. F. Bromham held an Inquest on Thursday at the King's Head Hotel on the body of CAPTAIN SHAZELL, of Bude, whose body was picked up at Westward Ho! the previous day. The unfortunate man, it will be remembered was washed overboard the ketch Joseph and Thomas, which went ashore eleven weeks ago at Westward Ho! Deceased, who was 54 years of age, had been a sea-faring man for forty years. Although the body was beyond recognition, the deceased was identified by his brother-in-law by the clothes he had on and his belt, pocket knife, and purse. The Jury, of which Mr T. Braund was Foreman, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." Deceased's body was removed to Bude on Thursday.

BLIND BOY'S SAD DEATH - An Inquest was on Thursday held at the West of England Institution for the Blind by Mr H. W. Hooper (City Coroner) on the body of WALTER HOAR, an inmate of the institution, who died suddenly on Tuesday. Mr William Letheren was chosen Foreman of the Jury.
WILLIAM HOAR, railway porter on the G.W.R., stationed at St. David's Station, gave evidence of identification, and said deceased was 15 years of age. Previous to last August witness noticed that his eyesight was failing. The boy was treated at the Eye Infirmary and the Hospital. From the latter institution he was discharged as incurable.
Mr Charles M. Collingwood, superintendent of the Blind Institution, said deceased was admitted to the institution totally blind on the 8th October last, being then in good bodily health. In May he was taken ill and attended by Dr Solly. Deceased's condition improved, but on Thursday last he was again taken ill, but was afterwards allowed to get about on Saturday, apparently being better. He got up on Sunday and Monday, but just after having breakfast on the latter day he complained of being ill, and in the afternoon Dr Solly attended him. The boy seemed to be wandering in his mind, and was placed in a separate room. About one o'clock on Tuesday morning witness was called, and finding deceased was dying, sent for medical assistance. Dr R. V. Solly said he made an examination after death and found a cerebral tumour under the skull, which showed no sign of fracture.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes," and referred to the kindness shown the patient by Mr Collingwood.

Saturday 24 June 1899, Issue 9968 – Gale Document No. Y3200773740
THE SUICIDE OF AN EXETER MAN – The Inquest on the body of ALFRED SPEARE, tailor, of 2, Exon-court, Sidwell-street, was on Tuesday held at the Schoolroom, Upton Pyne, by Mr A. Burrow. JAMES SPEARE said as far as he knew his father had nothing to trouble him lately. He could not say whether it was his father's handwriting on a card which the Coroner handed him, and which read:- "I cannot stand it any longer; my head is in a dreadful state. I shall be better out of the way." - The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while in an Unsound State of Mind."

Saturday 1 July 1899, Issue 9974 – Gale Document No. Y3200773794
FALL OVER THE EXMOUTH CLIFFS. Inquest and Verdict. – On Saturday Mr Dart, cabinetmaker, of Exmouth, when out shrimping, discovered under the cliff between Orcombe Point and Straight Point the body of MISS CUMMING, daughter of MR A. J. CUMMING, a well-known surgeon of Exeter, who now resides at Exmouth. The lady, who was about 40 years of age, was missed from home on Friday. The body was much cut about the head and bruised, and had also been washed by the tide. She had fallen over the cliff, which is protected above by wire-fencing. It is supposed that, being frightened at some bullocks in the field, she got over the fence and then fell over the cliff.
THE INQUEST – The Inquest was held at the Rolle Hotel on Monday by Mr Coroner Cox. Mr E. W. Tupman was chosen Foreman of the Jury, who proceeded to view the body at the Maud Hospital, to which institution it was taken.
DR ARTHUR JAMES CUMMING identified the body as that of his daughter, who was 43 years of age. She had not been in the best of health. Occasionally she had hours of depressed and was totally deaf. His daughter had resided with him since childhood. Witness last saw her alive on Friday morning about 11.30. She was dressed as usual to go out, but witness knew she was coming back shortly as she did not say good-bye to him. She was of a very cheerful disposition. She did not return, and they became anxious. When the night came on enquiries were made. DR CUMMING expressed a wish that a letter sent by the deceased to her sister should be read.
The Coroner read an extract of the letter in which she said her father was getting better, and she hoped to look after him as she would see him every day. It was very comfortable at Exmouth.
Mr Richard Ley, J.P., brother-in-law of the deceased, said he had been in the habit of seeing her almost daily. She was one of the brightest women he had ever met. Witness last saw her alive at 11.30 on Friday morning. In answer to witness deceased said her father was better. She further said that when she returned to her house, her sister would go out as they had not to leave their father. Witness had remarked to her about going on the cliffs by herself, but she said "It's such a delightful walk; it's the life of me." Deceased was a constant visitor to the cliffs. Witness had viewed the spot and came to the conclusion that deceased got under the railings out of the way of some cattle that were in the field. She was near sighted, and he thought she must have slipped over the cliff. Her jacket was torn as if she had got under the railings suddenly.
Mr Henry Dart, cabinet maker, of Beacon-place, said he was prawning between Orcombe Point and Highlands on Saturday morning when the Rev. J. Thomas told him there was something on the beach. Witness went under the cliffs and found deceased on the beach. He immediately sent his boy to the coastguard station, asking them to send on an ambulance, and then sent information to the police station. The Rev. J. Thomas told him that the body was under the cliff, but did not assist witness, neither did he show him the spot where the body was. Witness had to find the body himself, and remained there until the coastguards arrived with a stretcher.
Charles Salter, schoolmaster, of Elmgrove, Exmouth, said he was prawning in close proximity to the scene of the accident on Saturday when the Rev. J. Thomas informed him there was a body on the beach. Witness went to the spot and saw the body. The face was familiar to him, but he could not say who it was. Apparently she had not moved after the fall. Witness viewed the spot, and could not notice any signs of a struggle. The cliff was about 200 ft. high. When once anyone was outside the railings it was no trouble to fall over. He could understand anyone at all giddy falling over. Just above where deceased fell over there was an open place which was extremely dangerous. Mr Salter commented on the bad state of the path, and thought the local authority should keep it in a better state of repair. There was another dangerous place on the cliffs.
By the Coroner: The pathway was used very much. It would be used very much more if it was in better order. Witness said when he went into the field over the edge of which deceased fell the cattle there followed him, and he was sure it would frighten any lady.
Mr Thomas, surgeon, said he saw the body at the Battery. There were extensive injuries on one side of the head showing that she had probably fractured her skull. He had been to the spot, and came to the conclusion that death must have been instantaneous.
By the Foreman: She had been dead about twenty-four hours when witness saw her.
The Coroner, in summing up, expressed his sympathy with DR CUMMING and deceased's other relatives. After a short deliberation the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."
The remains of MISS CUMMING were buried at Littleham on Tuesday morning. The Rev. Freeman officiated, and many friends were present to pay a last tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased lady. Mr Blackmore supplied the coffin, which was of polished oak with brass mountings, the inscription being:- "LUCY CUMMING, died 23rd June, 1899."

Saturday 15 July 1899, Issue 9986 – Gale Document No. Y3200773920
STRANGE SUICIDE AT EXMINSTER. Lunatic Breaks His Neck And Lives Three Days. – Mr Deputy Coroner A. Burrow held an Inquest yesterday at the Devon County Asylum, Exminster, investigating the circumstances attending the death of ELIJAH GILLARD, an inmate. The man was s48 years of age, and belonged to Devonport. He was said to be a naval pensioner, and was admitted to the Asylum in July, 1897. In April of this year he made an attempt to dash his brains out against a brick wall. After this he was watched carefully, but, in spite of this, he frequently tried to fall from his seat and get his head on the floor. He was very quiet, hardly ever entering into conversation with anyo0ne. One Sunday last Sidney Francis, one of the attendants, was in the airing yard when he saw the deceased "smash" his head against a tree. The man fell down unconscious. Dr Stevens, in his evidence, said the deceased had been on the "suicidal card" ever since is first attempts to commit suicide in April last, and that meant that he was continually under strict supervision. He saw GILLARD on Monday and found he had a superficial wound on the back of his head, the skin having been just taken off. The injuries were not severe, but at the same time it could not be seen what was the matter with him. On Tuesday it appeared from certain symptoms that he was suffering from injuries to the spinal cord and later on in the day the man succumbed. Witness had made a post mortem examination and found that deceased had broken his neck and that three of the vertebrae were broken. These injuries could have been sustained by the fall against the tree. He was remarkable, however, that the man should have lived so long with such injuries, as a rule a man, under such circumstances would expire in twenty four hours. Deceased was undoubtedly of unsound mind. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased committed suicide whilst of Unsound Mind.

Saturday 15 July 1899, Issue 9986 – Gale Document No. Y3200773889
FATALITY AT HONITON – Exeter Visitor Drowned. – A sad fatality happened at Honiton this morning, the victim being MR GEORGE WESTERN, a visitor from London, who was found drowned at the public bathing place, where he had been bathing. Two men, named Harris and Gollop, discovered the body, their attention being first attracted by the deceased's clothes on the bank. Assistance was at once obtained, and the body taken out. It is supposed that the deceased was seized with cramp. MR WESTERN, who is a native of Honiton, was to have returned to London on Monday.
Later. MR WESTERN, a licensed victualler of London, had been on his annual visit to his native county and had been staying at Eagle House, 7, Park View, Exeter, with his cousin, MR HENRY DALGLEISH. He visited Honiton on Thursday to pay a visit to his sister. Rising shortly after seven o'clock he proceeded to the bathing ground to have a morning dip. His body was discovered floating on the water shortly after 8.30. Deceased, who by his geniality had a large circle of friends, was well known in Exeter and Honiton. He was 46 years of age, and not married.
INQUEST, This Afternoon. An Inquest was held at the Police Station, Honiton, this afternoon before Mr Coroner E. C. Cox. The Jury, having viewed the body, MRS W. SYDENHAM identified the body as that of her brother. Mr J. T. Holway, surgeon dentist, New-street, Honiton, a cousin, at whose house he slept the previous night, stated that he called deceased, as requested, at 7 a.m., and he left the house at 7.20 to proceed to the public bathing place at Head Weir. He passed on the way thither Mr A. Campion, with whom he exchanged the time of day. A labourer named Harris proved finding the body and giving information to the police. Dr Shortridge, medical officer of health, who was called shortly after the body was found, said deceased died from syncope in consequence of drowning. P.S. Cridland stated that at the spot where the deceased was drowned there was no life-saving appliances. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidentally Drowned Whilst Bathing."

SHOCKING EXETER SUICIDE - Mail-Porter Cuts His Throat From Ear To Ear. - A most determined case of suicide came under the notice of the Exeter police last evening, the victim being a man named JOHN ROWDEN, employed as mail-porter at the General Post Office, and residing at No. 111, Sandford-street. The first to discover the act was ROWDEN'S wife, who was horrified to find her husband lying in a pool of blood in the doorway, be3tween the kitchen and the wash-house, with a terrible gash in his throat. P.C. White, who lives opposite, was immediately summoned, and sent for Mr Mackeith and the police ambulance. The medical gentleman was soon in attendance, but life was extinct, deceased having almost severed his head from his body. A blood-stained razor was found on the wash-house table, and it is supposed that ROWDEN committed the act about 8.15 in the wash-house with the razor, afterwards staggering to the door, and falling on the floor, where he was found. Deceased was a most genial fellow, of about 35 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children, with whom much sympathy is felt. No reason can be assigned for the deed, although ROWDEN had been lately depressed. The body is now at the mortuary, awaiting an Inquest which will be held on Monday.

Saturday 22 July 1899, Issue 9992 – Gale Document No. Y3200773951
EXETER POISONING CASE - Suicide of a Coal Merchant. – Considerable consternation prevailed in the vicinity of St. David's, Exeter, on Wednesday, when it became known that a well-known coal merchant and resident of Richmond-road had met with a tragic death by taking poison. The gentleman is MR EDWARD JOHN HYETT, who carried on business as a coal merchant with Mr Taylor, trading as Messrs. Taylor and Hyett, in the Queen-street yard. MR HYETT'S private residence was 4, Richmond-road, and, finding he had not returned on Monday night, enquiries were made by his family as to his whereabouts. Mrs Taylor, wife of the other partner in the firm, about six o'clock in the morning informed Mr John Hoare, foreman, that MR HYETT had not been home for the night. Hoare immediately went to the office used by the principals of the firm, but found the door locked on the inside. Mr James Galling, of 2, Park-street, Heavitree, appeared on the scene, and with his assistance Hoare forced the door. To their horror MY HYETT was lying on the floor of the office, apparently dead. The police were immediately communicated with, and Sergeant Wheeler, on arriving at the spot, found MR HYETT lying on the floor, face downwards, with blood issuing from his mouth. Dr Bremner, whose residence is in close proximity, was soon in attendance, but discovered life to be extinct. Close by the body Sergeant Wheeler found a small blue bottle labelled "Carbolic Acid (Pure)," with the name of Mr Eric Lemmon, High-street. The bottle was also labelled "Poison," which it may be stated, is not required to be done by law, carbolic acid being an unscheduled poison. The bottle was empty. Mr Lemmon, chemist, of High-street, states that a man was supplied with an ounce of carbolic acid at his shop on Monday morning.
THE INQUEST – At the Parade Room of the Exeter Police Court, on Wednesday, Mr Coroner H. W. Hooper held an Inquest on the body of MR EDWIN JOHN HYETT, coal merchant, of 4 Richmond-road. Mr S. Limpenny was chosen Foreman of the Jury, and Mr J. Beal was present on behalf of the family.
Mr William C. Taylor, partner with deceased, of 40, Culverland-road, said MR HYETT was 46 years of age. Witness saw him at five o'clock on Monday evening in the office making out accounts. He was unusually lively, though latterly he had been very depressed, and would ramble in his talk, frequently contradicting himself. His only trouble was in regard to the business. The affection of his mind had been coming on for the past three years. He was in the habit of carrying a small flat bottle, containing about sixpennyworth of whiskey, and before leaving the office he would lock himself in and drink the contents; he had done that for the last ten years. On Monday morning, at witness's suggestion, deceased sent to the chemist's for a small bottle of carbolic acid for sprinkling in the office. It was witness's opinion that deceased never intended to commit suicide, but made a mistake in the bottles.
Sergeant Wheeler produced the bottle which had contained the carbolic acid, and which was of hexagonal shape and of the usual blue tinge.
John Hoare, waggoner, said he went to eh yard as usual on Tuesday, and Mrs Taylor (deceased's sister) asked him if he had seen Mr Taylor. He replied that he had not, and got one of the workmen to burst open the office door. They found MR HYETT lying face downwards, dead. Witness had seen him on the previous evening at half-past six, when he appeared as usual. He had been rather strange in his manner of late.
Wallace Frederick Beeny, qualified chemist, in the employ of Mr E. Lemmon, of 47, High-street, said that about half-past five on Monday a man, whom he recognised as the last witness, came to the shop and asked for a small bottle of carbolic acid, at the same time handing to witness an order signed by MR HYETT. Asked what it was for, the man said he did not know. Witness asked him whether he knew what kind he wanted – the pure or the proprietary – and to this he also replied negatively. Witness therefore gave him a small quantity of the pure acid, which could be used for any purpose, which he put in a poison bottle and also labelled "Poison." The law placed no restriction on the sale of carbolic acid. The bottle contained once ounce.
Sergeant Wheeler said he was called on Tuesday morning about half-past six to go to Queen street Yard, and found deceased on the floor, dead and cold. Just outside the office door was a piece of blue paper, and a few yards from it was the bottle, having apparently been thrown out of the door. He had the body removed to the mortuary, and found on it a gold watch and chain, £1 2s 7 ½ d. and other articles.
Dr Bremner said when he saw deceased about seven o'clock on Tuesday morning, he appeared to have been dead some hours. There were some bruises, but not of a violent nature. At the Coroner's request he had made a post mortem examination. The lips, tongue, and gullet were marked with the characteristic marks of carbolic acid. The mucous membrane was charred, and shreds of it were in the stomach. The larynx was tightly closed, conducing to suffocation, the usual result of carbolic acid poisoning, and there was no doubt that death was so caused. He was probably an hour or an hour and a half dying, and most likely must have taken the poison about nine or ten on Monday night. The Jury found that deceased committed suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity, and both they and the Coroner expressed their sympathy with the relatives.

Saturday 22 July 1899, Issue 9992 – Gale Document No. Y3200773932
TIVERTON WOMAN'S SUICIDE - Mr R. Mackenzie held an Inquest on Monday at Tiverton on the body of ELLEN LOUISA ARTHURS, aged 49, wife of MR PETER ARTHURS, coachbuilder, who was found strangled in her bedroom on Sunday morning, with a tie round her neck. The husband said that two years ago deceased had an attack of typhoid fever, and had since suffered from deep melancholia and insomnia, and complained of pains in her head. Deceased had tied things round her neck before, but only loosely, and once she took some Scrubb's Ammonia, but did not swallow it. Witness was at Exeter when he heard of the occurrence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide whilst Temporarily Insane."

Saturday 22 July 1899, Issue 9992 – Gale Document No. Y3200773962
SUICIDE NEAR OTTERY. "Suffered Enough To Kill A Horse." – An Inquest was held yester