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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1836-1844

Articles taken from North Devon Journal

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs]

Names Included: - Acland; Adams(3); Addicott; Adnell; Aggett; Alford; Allen(3); Allin; Andrew; Anning; Apsey; Ashelford; Ashley; Ashplant; Austwick; Avent; Avery; Axhom; Badcock; Bagelhole; Bailey; Baird; Baker(5); Baldwin; Bale(2); Ball(2); Baller; Bament; Barnes(2); Barret; Bartlett(3); Bassett; Bastow; Bate; Bater; Batten; Bawden(2); Bayley; Beauchamp; Beavis; Beer(2); Bellows; Bendle; Bennett(3); Berry; Bickford; Bidgood; Bignell; Blackford; Blackmore(3); Blackwell; Bligh; Blumendale; Boden; Body; Bossen; Boucher; Boult(2); Bowden; Bowditch; Brace; Bradford; Bradley; Bragg; Brailey(2); Brailsford; Braund(2); Bray(2); Brealey; Brewer(2); Britton(3); Brock; Brook; Brooks(2); Brown(2); Browne; Buckingham(2); Bulleid; Bunsall; Burch; Burge; Burgess(2); Burgoyne; Burnell; Burrough; Bussell; Cutson; Cann; Carpenter(2); Carter; Challice; Champion; Channon; Chanter; Chappell(2); Chave; Chichester; Churchward; Clarke(2); Clerk; Cleverley; Clifford; Coaker; Cock; Cole; Collacott; Collard; Collins; Colwill(2); Commins; Connet; Connor; Cook(3); Coombe; Cooper; Copp; Coram; Cork; Cornish(2); Cose; Cottey; Cottle; Cottrell; Courtenay(3); Cousens; Cowel; Crabb; Cranch; Crang; Creedy; Crewys; Cridge; Crocker(3); Cross; Crosscombe; Crossman(2); Cumming; Cutcliffe; Dalling; Dally; Daniel; Darch; Darke; Dart(3); Davey(3); Davie(2); Davy; Dawton; Deane; Dee; Delbridge; Demellwick; Dendle; Dobb; Dobson; Dodge; Dowdle; Down; Downing; Draper; Dummett; Dunn; Dunsford; Dustin; Dyer; Dymond; Earle; Eastaway; Ellacott; Elliot; Elliott(2); Elston; Endicott; Evans(2); Evens; Ferris; Fey; Finley; Fisher(2); Ford(3); Fowles; Fox; Franklyn; Freeman; French; Friend; Friendship; Frost(2); Fry(2); Furgusson; Furze; Furzey; Gammon; Gardiner; Garrett; Gayton; Geen; Gent; George; Gerry; Gibbs; Gilbert; Gill(2); Gillard; Ginn; Glass; Gliddon; Good; Gooding; Gordon; Goss; Goswell; Gray; Greaves; Greenwood; Gregory; Gribble(2); Grigg; Guard(2); Gubb(2); Guy(2); Hadley; Hake; Hall; Ham; Hancock; Harding; Harman; Harper; Harris(2); Harriss; Haynes; Hayward; Headon; Heal; Heanes; Hearder; Hearn; Hele; Helmore; Hemmett; Hicks(4); Higgings; Hill(3); Hillman; Hobbs; Hodge; Hodgkin; Hole; Holland; Holloway; Holly; Holman; Hooper(2); Horlington; Horne; Horswill; Horton(2); Houghton; How; Howe(2); Hoyles; Hoyten; Huet; Humphries; Hundrey; Hurard; Huxtable(2); Incledon; Ireland(2); Isaac; Jackman; Jackson; James; Jarvis; Jefford; Jeffry; Jenkins; Jenn; Jeve; Jewell(2); Johnston; Jones(3); Jordan; Judd; Kelly(5); Kelt; Kerslake; Knight(2); Knill; Lamprey; Lancey(2); Lane; Lang; Langdon; Laramy; Latham(2); Lauder; Lavering; Lazarus; Leaman; Leat; Lee; Lemon; Lethbridge(2); Lewis(3); Leworthy(5); Ley(3); Lidstone(2); List; Little; Littlejohn; Loaring; Lock(4); Locke; Long; Lovering; Luscombe; Marquis; Martin; Major; Mallet; Mallett; Mare; Marrack; Marshall; Martin(3); Masey; Matthews(3); May; Maye; McLacklan; Medland; Meldon; Metters; Middleton(2); Mills(2); Milton; Mitchell; Mitchelmore; Mock; Molland; Monk; Moon; Moore; Morice; Mortimer; Mountjoy(2); Moxey; Mulland; Nancekivel; Needs; Newcombe; Newman; Nicholls; Nixon; Norman(3); Norris; Northam; Northcote; Nosworthy(2); Nott; Nutt; Oddey; Oliver(3); Osborne; Page(2); Palk; Palmer(2); Parfit; Parish; Parker; Parkhouse; Parkin; Parminter; Parr(2); Parsley; Parsons(4); Partridge; Passmore; Paton; Pawle; Pawley; Payne; Peake; Pearce(4); Pearcy(2); Pengelly; Perkins; Perriam; Perry; Philips; Phillips; Pickard(2); Pike; Piller; Pine; Pitts; Place; Pleydell; Pinkham; Pinson; Ponsford; Poole; Pooley; Pope; Potter; Power; Price; Prideaux; Pring; Priscott; Pugsley; Pyle; Pyne; Quick; Quicke; Radford; Ratcliffe; Rattenbury; Redicleave; Redmore; Reed(3); Rennels; Rice(3); Richards(6); Ridd; Roberts; Robins(2); Robinson; Rogers; Rook(2); Rooks; Rowcliffe; Rowden; Rowe(2); Ryers; Salter; Sanders(3); Saunders; Scamp; Sclater; Searle(2); Secombe; Seldon(2); Shapcott(4); Shapland(2); Sharland(2); Sheppard; Shersel(2); Shields; Shirley; Short; Simmons; Skinner(4); Slader; Slocombe; Sloeman; Slooman(2); Smalridge; Smith(5); Snow(2); Southard; Southcote; Southwood; Sparkes(2); Spearman; Spilsbury; Squire(2); Staddon; Stanbury; Stevens(2); Stiles; Stone; Stoneman(3); Stradling; Stranger; Summerwill; Sweete; Sweetland; Symons; Taggarth(2); Tall; Tamlyn; Tanton; Tapp; Tapscott; Tatchell; Taylor(2); Thomas(3); Thompson; Thorne(8); Tidboald; Tiller; Tippett; Tont; Tooley; Tout; Townsend; Trace; Tree; Trenhick; Trick; Trickey; Trump; Tucker(3); Tuckett(2); Tuckfield; Tuite; Tupman; Turner; Underhill; Vangner; Vanstone; Veale; Vellacott; Venton; Vernon; Vicary; Vickery; Viney; Wakeley; Wall; Walter; Ward; Ware(2); Warn; Warren; Watts(2); Way; Webb; Webber(3); Webster; Were; Westacott(2); White; Whitefield; Whitfield; Widdon; Widlake; Wilkins; Willey(2); Williams(6)Williamson; Willing; Willis(2); Wills(2); Winyard; Witheridge; Withyridge; Wivell; Wonnacott; Woodley; Woollacott; Wotton; Wrentmore; Wright; Wyer; Yelland(3); Yendell

Thursday 21 January 1836
KENTON - An Inquest was held last week, at Kenton before Joseph Gribble, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of WM. SHEPPARD, jun. of that place, who met his death under the following circumstances:- About twelve months since, John Monk, of Powderham, and the deceased had a pugilistic encounter, which terminated without its being enabled to be said that victory had declared for either side, although the honour was claimed by both. About 6 in the evening of the 10th ult., Monk, entered the Exeter Inn, at Kenton, where SHEPPARD was, and some expressions used by the former giving offence to him, SHEPPARD challenged his old antagonist to another fight. This he offered to do for money, but Monk being out of cash, the other was at length content that it should be, according to the common phrase, "for a belly full." They accordingly repaired to a piece of ground in rear of the house, where they set to, but Monk proving the stronger man, yet desiring to have done with it, offered SHEPPARD that if he would put on his clothes, and got into the house, he (Monk) would treat him. This friendly offer, however, was refused by SHEPPARD, and the fight being resumed, SHEPPARD received a blow which brought him to the ground, his head coming with violence in contact with it, and persons going to his assistance, it was found he was dead. The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter, and Monk is committed for trial. The deceased has left a wife and several young children, and is said to have been a very quarrelsome man.

Thursday 18 February 1836
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Sunday last, an Inquest was held before T. Copner, Esq. Coroner, on board the 'Betsey,' Huxtable master, then lying at Strand Houses, in our river, on the body of a boy about fifteen years of age, called JOHN FRANKLYN. It appeared that the deceased was the cabin boy of the said vessel, and that he was left in charge of her, the master and mate being on shore, and on his retiring for the night on Friday evening, he let down the scuttle, thereby excluding from the forecastle where he slept all circulation of air, and consequently preventing the emission of the effluvia which proceeded from the stove; and on his not answering on the following morning when the ship was hailed, a person went on board, and discovered the poor boy lying in his hammock a corpse. From the evidence adduced the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Suffocation."

Thursday 3 March 1836
EXETER - On Monday an Inquest was taken before S. Walkey, Esq. Coroner, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen-street, in this city, on the body of ANN NORMAN, in the twenty second year of her age, of the parish of Rewe, who having on the preceding Friday morning been dreadfully burnt, from her clothes catching fire, as leaning over the grate, was brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she expired on the night of Saturday. Verdict: Accidental Death.

Thursday 17 March 1836
EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - Monday last, an Inquest was taken before Samuel Walkey, Esq., Coroner, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen Street, in this city, on the body of ELIZABETH COMMINS, about 80 years of age, of the parish of Whitstone, who being troubled with fits, on the preceding Thursday, while labouring under an attack of this kind, fell into the fire. On being extricated she was immediately removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, but expired on Saturday. Verdict - Accidental Death.

EXMINSTER - Case of Suicide. - On the morning of Friday last, immediately after taking his breakfast, HENRY HUMPHREYS, about 30 years of age, a farm servant of Mr R. Gibbings, Higher Brenton, Exminster, repaired to a hay-loft and hung himself. The deceased had always preserved a good character, and it was understood, at Lady-day, was about to be married to a female servant in his master's house, with whom, at a relative's and by permission of his master, the preceding evening had been spent. No cause is known for the commission of this rash act, and immediately on its being discovered, Mr Calder, surgeon, Alphington, was called in, but whose efforts for his restoration were ineffectual, life being extinct. An Inquest was taken on the body on Saturday, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, when the Jury returned a verdict of Insanity. The deceased had lived with Mr Gibbings about 3 years, and was a man of very steady and sober habits.

BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on Monday last, on the body of a boy about 8 years of age, called JOHN ALEXANDER FINLEY, who was so dreadfully burnt on Saturday, by his clothes accidently taking fire, that he survived only a few hours. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Thursday 31 March 1836
ST. GILES IN THE HEATH - Inquests held by H. A. Vallack, Esq. - On Monday last, at St. Giles in the Heath, near Torrington, on the body of LEONARD GERRY, a workman of Mr Miles's, who, whilst employed in pitching to a thrashing machine, fell and instantly expired. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

WINKLEIGH - And on Tuesday at Winkleigh, on the body of JOHN PARR, who was killed on the spot, by the kick of a horse which he received on the head. - Accidental Death.

CHITTLEHAMPTON - An Inquest was held this morning by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN ROWDEN, of Chittlehampton, aged four years, who in the temporary absence of his mother, who had not left the room in which he was five minutes, caught his clothes on fire, and was so dreadfully burnt as to occasion his death within the short space of twenty minutes. - Verdict Accidental Death.

Thursday 7 April 1836
KENTON - Inquest by J. Gribble, Esq. - March 29th. At Mount Pleasant, in the parish of Kenton, on the body of JOHN WILLIAMS, a Seaman belonging to a vessel bound from Newcastle, to Starcross, called the Cheviot, laden with Coals. It appears by the master that he took on board a pilot off Exmouth, on Sunday last, but there was not water enough to take the Vessel into harbor, and the Vessel beat up and down for many hours, when a very heavy gale of wind and rain came on and continued till early Monday morning; being very dark the vessel drove ashore at Dawlish in the parish of Kenton and went to pieces. The Captain and two Seamen saved themselves on the mainmast, the Pilot and 7 others are supposed to be under the Wreck, which is now breaking up, as none of the bodies have been seen except WILLIAMS. Verdict - Accidentally Drowned.

TAWSTOCK - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held by T. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MIRIAM, the wife of MR WM. THORNE, of Tawstock, aged 69, who whilst sitting alone in her own house the preceding evening, accidentally caught her clothes on fire; a neighbour passing by and perceiving the room filled with smoke, went in and found the deceased sunk from off her chair on the floor, her clothes on fire, and life extinct. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Thursday 5 May 1836
HIGH BICKINGTON - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, by A. Vallack, Esq., At Highbickington, on the body of THOMAS GOODING, who in the temporary absence of his mother caught himself on fire, and shortly afterwards expired. Verdict - Accidental Death.

OKEHAMPTON - And on Monday, at Inwardleigh, near Oakhampton, on the body of WILLIAM BUCKINGHAM, who was overturned in a cart, and killed on the spot. Accidental Death.

SOUTHMOLTON - On Saturday last, a little boy, aged two years, son of a labouring man named GEORGE TAPSCOTT, accidentally caught his clothes on fire during the temporary absence of its mother, and was burnt so dreadfully that it died of its injury. An Inquest was held on Tuesday by Thomas Copner, Esq. Coroner, in the Guildhall, when a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned.

Thursday 19 May 1836
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - On Monday last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, JAMES LAMPREY, a superannuated officer of the Customs, nearly 70 years of age, residing in Back lane, in this town, put an end to his existence by hanging himself to a beam, in an apartment adjoining his bed room. The unfortunate deceased had indulged in habits of intemperance, which, together with some family circumstances of a painful nature, appear to have produced a degree of insanity, under the influence of which he is supposed to have perpetrated the fatal and irretrievable act. On the Inquest held before Thomas Copner, Esq., the newly appointed Coroner for the Borough, the Jury thought so, and returned their verdict accordingly.

Thursday 26 May 1836
BISHOPS NYMPTON - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS WATTS, aged 17, servant to farmer Rice, of Bishopsnympton, whose death was occasioned by the upsetting of a cart which he was driving, and incautiously turning a corner too sharply, the wheel went on the hedge, and overthrew the vehicle upon him, which killed him on the spot. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 9 June 1836
UFFCULM - An Inquest has been taken by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN WILLEY, a labourer at Uffculm, who had hung himself by means of a cord which he had attached to a withy stem in the hedge of a field. The deceased had belonged to the Plymouth Division of Marines, from which he was, after having been repeatedly punished, discharged in disgrace a few weeks since; and the verdict was, Hung himself being a Lunatic.

Thursday 30 June 1836
BRATTON FLEMING - An Inquest was held this morning, before T. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man called JOHN HUXTABLE, 24 years of age, servant to Mr Isaac, of Chelfham Barton, in the parish of Bratton Fleming; who was yesterday returning from this town with his master's cart and horses, and between nine and ten o'clock at night was discovered lying senseless in the road near Yeotown Lodge, by two respectable individuals who happened to be passing by, and who immediately procured a shutter and conveyed him to the new public house at Crockman's Corner; he sighed once after he was in the house, and then expired. There was no evidence to show the cause of his death, and there being no external marks on the body, the medical attendant who was called in gave it as his opinion that it was occasioned by apoplexy. Verdict, "Found Dead."

Thursday 7 July 1836
BISHOP'S TAWTON - Inquests held by T. Copner, Esq., Coroner. - On Saturday last, at Rumsam, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, on the body of GEORGE IRELAND, labourer, aged about 55, who, after a hard day's work at mowing, retired to rest the preceding evening, as usual; but about the middle f the night, his wife heard him breathing with difficulty, and finding him ill, she got a little spirit for him, which he took, and almost immediately died. - Verdict, 'Visitation of God.'

BISHOP'S TAWTON - Also on the body of a child called MARY ANN SNOW, between six and seven years of age, who was in a hayfield at Rumsam, at play with other children, where she was accidentally struck down by the hay cart, the wheel f which passing over her, caused her death within a few hours. - Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

WINKLEIGH - An Inquest was held lately by H. A. Vallack, Esq., At Winkleigh, on the body of a man called MOLLAND, who was killed on the spot by the upsetting of a cart. The deceased was a servant of the Rev. P. Johnson, of Wembworthy. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Thursday 28 July 1836
TORRINGTON - Melancholy Accident. - On Monday afternoon, a man of the name of SANDERS, one of the mason's labourers employed in erecting the Gas Works in this town, was fixing the scaffolding, when his foot slipped, and one of the planks above him gave way, and coming in contact with the poor fellow's head broke his neck and killed and a large family of little children to lament his untimely end. An Inquest was held by the mayor, John Sloley, Esq., and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned.

Thursday 4 August 1836
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Thursday morning last, before T. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM LOCK, a shoemaker, in Elephant lane in this town. The deceased who was between 60 and 70 years of age, had gone to bed the night before in his usual health, and was found dead in his bed the following morning. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

LINTON - A very melancholy and deeply afflictive accident occurred at this fashionable watering place, on Thursday evening last. MISS MARY ANN WEBSTER, of Birmingham, a maiden lady, between forty and fifty years of age, most respectable connected, arrived here on Monday se'nnight, and was followed a day or two afterwards by a gentleman and his lady whom he had just married, and who was niece to the unfortunate deceased, and a younger sister, all of whom had come for the purpose of spending a short time with their aunt, in the enjoyment of the romantic and peculiar beauties for which Linton is so justly celebrated. Pursing their interesting object, the party left their hotel on Thursday early in the afternoon, intending to visit Watersmeet, an attractive spot, about two miles from Linton: MISS WEBSTER was mounted on a donkey led by a little boy eight years of age; the younger ladies and the gentleman were on foot. The road to Watersmeet, beyond Lynmouth, is a narrow path which winds round a ill, and in some parts of it rather precipitously overhangs the river Lyn, which flows at the foot; they had proceeded a long way safely, and were all exceedingly charmed by the scenery; MISS WEBSTER led the way, the rest of the party came on slowly, and were a considerable distance behind her. In turning rather a sharp corner the donkey, unaccustomed to the path, took too wide a sweep, and got its leg over the edge of it, throwing the lady from her seat; with great presence of mind she caught hold of the bow of the saddle, and hung suspended, while the boy held on to the bridle with all his might, and called for help, but the party were out of view and haring; having kept her perilous place as long as her strength would allow her, the unfortunate lady was compelled to loose her hold, and fell in a green plat beneath, and from thence rolled down a precipice, about 60 feet, into the water, which is there about 5 feet deep: had the ill fated lady fallen on the solid rock she would doubtless have been dashed to pieces; as it was she floated down the stream to a pool, a few feet below the spot at which she fell. It was not until the lapse of two or three minutes, that her companions came up to the boy, and were agonized to hear of the awful calamity which had befallen their relative; one of the ladies was excited almost to frenzy, and at the impulse of the moment rushed down the precipice at the imminent risk of her life; the gentleman immediately descended the cliff by the nearest possible route, and, arriving at the edge of the river, he said he saw the deceased still floating, but from the depth of the pond, and the absence of any means to get at the body, some minutes elapsed before it was drawn out; Mr Clarke, surgeon of Linton, who happened to be near the place, presently came up, and with his assistance the body was rescued from the water: signs of animation were observed, and the lady was promptly conveyed to the hotel; she survived about two hours after the occurrence of the accident, but was speechless. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner and a respectable Jury, which returned a verdict of Accidental Death. From its great height, and the craggy and protuberant nature of the rock over which the lady fell, it was expected that the body would have been dreadfully mangled: this, however, was not the case, merely a few bruises were discernible: and Dr Slade, Mr Clarke, and Mr Cutcliffe, concurred in the opinion that death was occasioned by a concussion of the brain. The body was removed on Monday in a hearse for interment at Birmingham. The boy let go the bridle immediately on the fall of the lady, and the donkey followed her down the precipice, into the water, and swan to shore almost unhurt.

Thursday 11 August 1836
GEORGEHAM - A fatal accident occurred on Friday night last to a young man called GEORGE HURARD, a small farmer, aged about 23, of the parish of Georgeham. It appeared that the deceased, having been to Barnstaple market, had left town early in the evening rather intoxicated, stayed at an inn in Braunton and drank to still further excess; proceeded on his way home between 8 and 9 o'clock and was found by two gentlemen at half past nine, between Braunton and Georgeham lying in the hedge, with a dreadful wound in the back of his head. He was insensible and speechless, and was immediately conveyed home, where he lay in the same state until Sunday morning when he died. From the nature of the wound, it is supposed that he was riding furiously and by some means was thrown from his horse, and that his head came in contact with a sharp stone. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body on Monday and returned a verdict of 'Accidental death.' It is said that the deceased exhibited money to the amount of 10l. when he was in the inn at Braunton, and that but 2l. was found upon his person when he was picked up; from this circumstances some have imagined that he was robbed and murdered, but there is no sufficient evidence to bear out the conjecture. The deceased has left an afflicted wife and three very young children to mourn his untimely end.

TEMPLETON - Inquest by Mr Partridge. - An unusual circumstance occurred on Wednesday, the 27th July last, at Higher South Comb, in the parish of Templeton, near Tiverton, occupied by Mr George Besley, under Mr Chichester. RICHARD SOUTHCOTE, a stout grown boy, about thirteen years and a half old, was found suspended to an apple tree, in an orchard adjoining the courtlage of Lower South Comb farm, also farmed by Mr Besley: on the following day, Thursday, an Inquest was holden at Higher South comb, before a respectable Jury; the Coroner examined all the members of Mr Besley's family, and all his labourers, who were known to be on the farm the preceding day, and others; the evidence was as follows:-
George Besley, of Higher South Comb, yeoman, sworn. - The deceased has lived with me since Ladyday, 1835, as a servant; I do not know his age, I suppose 14 years; he was a very good boy; I last saw him alive yesterday morning, between 7 and 8 o'clock, outside my court gate; he had put the cows to field and was coming back; he asked me what he was to go about, I told him to go to the lower court and finish the dung he was about the day before; nothing else passed between us, he went towards his work; I had no quarrel with him; I have not struck him for a year past.
George Mogford. - I am about 14 years old, servant to Mr George Besley, have lived here since Ladyday, 1835; soon after breakfast I went to lower court for a shovel. No person there, I took up the shovel and was coming away with it; I saw RICHARD SOUTHCOTE coming from the road into the lower court at the gate; I heard the voice of children outside; I said to him "If you be not using the shovel, I want to use it directly." He said "D-nation seize your eyes in hell flames of fire, if you do not put down the shovel I'll tell master of it!" He used such language very often, he did not come after me; he then went to work turning dung with a fork. I said I have no shovel to use, I want to use it directly; I came back to the higher court; about half an hour afterwards he came to the higher court where I was, and took his jacket and another shovel with him; he did not speak to me nor I to him. I saw no more of him. I never heard him say a word about destroying himself.
Richard Cobley, 19 years old, apprentice to Mr Geo. Besley. About half past six yesterday morning, I saw the deceased RICHARD SOUTHCOTE, in the higher court, he was turning the cows into the court: I told him to fetch the scythe from the orchard, he did it, and then we took breakfast together. I have not seen him since; he was a willing boy to work - no quarrel happened.
James Maunder, about 17 years old, lived here a servant since Ladyday. - I did not see RICHARD SOUTHCOTE after he took his breakfast; He went out of this court as I stood at the stable door; had no quarrel with him - not seen him alive since.
Thomas Wilcocks, a servant, 17 years old last New Year's day. Deceased and I breakfasted together yesterday morning; I came on Monday last only; I and James Maunder and deceased slept in the same bed; I have not heard of any person ill-using him. I did not see RICHARD SOUTHCOTE after breakfast yesterday.
Harriet Mogford, 17 and Ann Row, about 12 years old, servants. We heard no quarrelling among the boys; deceased said he did not know what to do after breakfast, Mogford told him he might scrape up the dung about this court, he went about it. This was not later than 7 o'clock yesterday morning; we did not see him after that.
James Cottrell, of Lower South Court, labourer. I did not see the deceased alive after 7 o'clock yesterday morning - he was then employed in this court about the dung.
James Besley, of Temple Hill, labourer. I don't remember that I saw the deceased yesterday morning; I came here at 7 o'clock and went into the room adjoining to work; if there had been any quarrel among the boys, I must have heard it; I heard no quarrel. I have known the deceased 12 months, know no reason why he should have destroyed himself.
John Turner, near Templeton bridge, labourer. I was at work in the barn between 7 and 8 o'clock yesterday morning, I saw the deceased at work, putting the dung together in this court. I did not speak to him nor he to me; I know nothing about his death, nor how it was caused.
George Wood, of Great Esseworthy, Templeton, labourer. - I came here about 7 o'clock yesterday morning, and went away soon after with a cart to fetch some sheep; I did not return till about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, the deceased brought me some ropes to take with me to secure the sheep; no other conversation passed, saw nothing more of him; no anger or quarrel with him.
Mary Ann Jackson, wife of George Jackson, of Lower South Comb, gamekeeper. - About 8 o'clock yesterday morning I was in my house at Lower South Comb. I saw the deceased come into the court at the gate, I did not go out, nor see him afterwards. I went to Mrs Mallet's; I was absent an hour, came back to my house, I saw nothing of the deceased during this time, but Mr Besley inquired of me for him; half an hour after I came home I heard some person talking to Thomas Mills, a carpenter, who was at work at our back door, I went out to see who it was, Mary Cottrel and Thomas Mills were talking about the boy SOUTHCOTE, said it was very odd where he could be; then Mr Besley came and inquired for him, we all laughed and said we thought he was gone to sleep in the tallet, I went indoors, took my boy to the back door, where Mills was at work, then Mary Cottrel came again and asked Thomas Mills to look about the tallets for the deceased; Mills searched among the straw, did not find him; I thought it was very odd the boy was not to be found, I asked Mills to look about the orchard adjoining for him; Mary Cottrel said he might have dropt away - Thomas Mills went into the orchard, I went into the meadow where my birds are; Mills found deceased hanging to an apple tree. I saw no other person besides those I have mentioned; I cannot say how the boy came in that situation - my opinion is, that the boy hung himself; he was a very pretty behaved boy; I do not know that he has been unwell or ill, or subject to fits.
Thomas Mills, of Lake Templeton, carpenter, sworn. - I came to my work at Lower South Comb about 8 o'clock yesterday morning. I then saw deceased throwing dung to the heap there; I spoke to him, he said he was clearing the dung; Joseph Mogford, carpenter, came with me, he said the same to the boy, Joseph Mogford and I left that court, I came this side the shippen to make a door; Mogford went into Mr Jackson's, remained there about half an hour, he went then to Mr Bray's at Looseland, I saw him go, I did not see RICHARD SOUTHCOTE after I had begun my work; about 9 o'clock Mr George Besley came to me and enquired whether I had seen deceased lately, he wanted him to go to make hay; near 11 o'clock master came again and enquired for the deceased, then Master and I went in the lower court, we found deceased's jacket in the linhay, his hat was put in a hole in a door near his work, his shovel was standing in the dung where I saw him in the morning at his work; Master went away, Mrs Jackson and Mary Cottrell came out of their house to me, at their request I searched the tallet for the deceased, supposing he was asleep there; I came down from the tallet, then Mrs Jackson and Mary Cottrell asked me to go round the orchard to look for him, as master wanted him; they said they were afraid to go; Mrs Jackson said the boy might be dropped down and she did not like to go; Mary Cottrell said she did not like to go and asked me to go into the orchard to seek for the boy, I did not know that the boy had gone into their house, nor that they had lent him any tool, nor what conversation they had had with him in the morning; at their request I went into the orchard behind the buildings, and went round it alone, went down by the left hedge to the lower side, then went up a few paces; I saw him hanging to the third tree from the corner; Mrs Jackson was then outside the hedge in the meadow, and asked me to cut the rope; I had no knife, and Mrs Jackson ran to get one. Mary Cottrell came with a knife part way and fell, I got the knife and cut the rope; RICHARD SOUTHCOTE was quite dead, his feet were about 13 inches above the ground - I know nothing about his getting into that situation.
Mary Cottrel, wife of James Cottrel, of Lower South Comb, labourer, works for Mr Besley, gives same account as Mary Ann Jackson. I live in the same house with her. RICHARD SOUTHCOTE came to me and borrowed a pitchfork in the morning of yesterday; never made any complaint to me, he was well as usual; master wanted him, I advised the tallet to be searched, thought he was asleep there or some where; I said he might have fallen down asleep. I have three small children, I keep myself with them; I did not go into the orchard, I thought he might have gone there for apples; he was not displeased because master had hired another boy a little older than himself, on Monday morning; he laughed and said master had put the new boy to the bottom of the table, every boy kept his place.
JANE SOUTHCOTE, of Witheridge, wife of THOMAS SOUTHCOTE, labourer, said, My son is 13 years and some months old. I have nothing to ask the witnesses. My boy was home 3 days at Midsummer fair; went back again to Mr Besley freely, and made no complaint.
Verdict - That the deceased hung himself.

Thursday 25 August 1836
BARNSTAPLE - A fatal accident occurred at Heanton, near this town, this morning (Wednesday). WILLIAM INCLEDON, a mason employed in making some alterations at the parsonage house, was unfortunately standing near an old and dangerous piece of cob wall, when it fell and buried him beneath it. Scarcely two minutes transpired before the poor fellow was got out, but he was quite dead and his body shockingly mangled. A Coroner's Inquest sat upon the body, and returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 8 September 1836
COMBMARTIN - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last, a Jury sat before Thos. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the bodies of two men, GEORGE BROOKS and HENRY GUBB, aged respectively 46 and 48, labourers, of the parish of Combmartin, who were at work together in Mr Dovell's lime quarry, on the preceding day, when an over-hanging mass of rubble gave way and buried them; the rushing noise occasioned by the falling earth and stones was heard by some other labourers who were working hard by, and who instantly ran to the relief of their unfortunate comrades, but the quantity of matter to be removed was so great that an hour and half had elapsed before the bodies were got out, when they were both dead, and shockingly mangled. They had been companions in their labour for several years, and each has left a widow and family to lament their untimely bereavement. Verdict - 'Accidental Death'.

Thursday 22 September 1836
TIVERTON - The New Poor Law. - An Inquest was held at Tiverton, on Tuesday, which excited a considerable sensation. The facts are as follow:- The child of a labourer named JOHN SEARLE, was taken ill of scarlet fever, and the wife applied to Mr Macdonald, one of the parish surgeons, to attend it; he referred her to Mr Beck, the overseer, for an order for medical attendance. This Mr Beck told her he could not give, as the wages of her husband and children amounted to 17s. 6d. per week. This was on the Thursday. On the Friday the child appeared rather better; but on Saturday it became worse, when she applied to the Coroner, Mr Gervis, who is a medical man. He pronounced the child to be dangerously ill, and gave the mother a note to take to Mr Mills, another of the overseers, stating the fact, who immediately gave her an order to the parish surgeon, Mr Macdonald, who attended and gave the mother some medicine. the child died at three o'clock on the Sunday morning. The surgeon, Mr Macdonald, corroborated this statement of the mother. The overseer, Mr Beck, stated that he refused to give the order in consequence of having received a letter from the Clerk of the Guardians, requesting him to be careful what orders he gave for medical relief. The coroner having summed up, the Jury remained some time in deliberation, and then returned a verdict - "That HARRIET SEARLE died of the scarlet fever, and that it appears to the Jury that her death was hastened by want of timely medical aid," and they requested the Coroner to transmit their verdict, with the depositions on which it was founded, to the Poor Law Commissioners.

Thursday 29 September 1836
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held in this town on Saturday morning last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY BRAILEY, aged 59. The deceased (who occupied apartments in the house of Mr Vickery, shoemaker, in High-street) was sitting on the preceding evening in conversation with her husband and son, when she suddenly fell from her chair and expired in an instant. She had been to the market in the course of the day, and was altogether as well as usual until the moment of her seizure. - Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 6 October 1836
EXMOUTH - On Thursday week, an Inquest was taken at Exmouth, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., a Coroner for Devon, on the body of JOS. WIDDON, aged 56, a person who got his livelihood by retailing fish; his body was found about a quarter of a mile from this place, on the road to Budleigh Salterton, about five o'clock in the morning. It appeared after a minute and careful investigation, assisted by the attendance of Mr Land, surgeon, of Exmouth, that most probably his death was caused by apoplexy; that he had fallen from his cart on his horse, as his waistcoat was much covered with horse hair, and the horse being blind, had run against the bank and overset the cart, which fell on the poor man's breast, in which situation he was found. A considerable quantity of blood had flown from his mouth. No marks of violence beside appeared. Verdict - Accidental Death. The deceased had called at a public house about 9 o'clock the preceding evening, and took a pint of beer, and was perfectly sober when he left it: it appears singular, as the public house was not more than 2 miles from the spot, that the accident was not, in so public a road, discovered before. He has left a widow and six children, to whom his loss will be a great misfortune.

TAVISTOCK - Suicide - On the 20th inst. an Inquest was taken before A. B. Bone, Esq. a Coroner for Devon, on the body of a young woman named MARY SYMONS, about 23 years of age, who was found dead in the Tavistock Canal, by a man named Richard Jennings, on the previous day. The deceased when discovered was found floating on her face, had no bonnet or shoes on, but was otherwise perfectly clothed; a pocket was attached to her side in which was found two stones, but there were no marks of violence on her body. It appeared from the evidence of Mary Gill, wife of John Gill, a butcher, that the deceased had come from the parish of Coryton to Tavistock, for the purpose of learning the dress-making business, and had lodged with her and her husband. On Sunday morning deceased told witness that she was pregnant by one George Brendon, who she complained had ill-treated and ruined her. She soon after asked witness for a pen and ink, and commenced writing a letter. The deceased was frequently low spirited, but on this occasion she appeared collected. Witness observed her writing several times in the course of the day, and in the evening again spoke to witness about Mr Brendon's bad conduct. About 10 o'clock she went to bed, she said she was four months gone with child. She never said any thing to witness to induce her to suppose that she would do any injury to herself. On the following morning (Monday) on getting up witness looked into deceased's room and found she was not there; she observed that her bed was made up, the clothes she had worn on Sunday folded, and everything in order about the room. About an hour after witness saw her box opened, in which was found a letter to her brother and sisters, stating that she had been seduced and led away from the paths of virtue under the promise of marriage. Mr Frederick Hillman Hornbrook, surgeon, deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased, and there were no marks of violence thereon: the deceased was pregnant at the time of her death. Mr John Physic, clerk to Mr Bridgman, solicitor, Tavistock, deposed that the deceased came to Mr Bridgman's office about two months since, and complained that Mr Brendon had seduced her under a promise of marriage; she appeared to be in a state of mind bordering on distraction. The Jury returned a verdict, that the deceased drowned herself in the Tavistock Canal, but whether she was at the time insane or not, they could not determine.

Thursday 20 October 1836
WEST TEIGNMOUTH - Inquests Held By J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner. - Oct. 8th. - At West Teignmouth, on the body of MR THOMAS CUMMING, aged 52, a mariner, who, on the 3rd instant, with another man, was in a sailing boat for the purpose of fishing off Teignmouth bar, when a sudden squall of wind came, upset the boat, filled with water, and went to the bottom; the other man could swim, and was picked up presently by another boat, but the deceased was drowned, and not picked up until the 6th inst. - Verdict, Accidentally Drowned.

ILSINGTON - Oct. 9th. - At Haytor Vale, in the parish of Ilsington, on the body of WM. ADNELL, aged about 80, who, on the 7th instant, in the evening, was returning from his work to his house, and another workman coming over the field soon after heard a person groan twice; he went to the spot and found the deceased lying on the ground nearly speechless, having lost his path, and by the time assistance was got he was quite dead; was a healthy man before, and had no marks of violence appearing on him. - Verdict, Visitation of God.

COCKINGTON - Oct. 10th. - At Cockington, on the body of JN. COAKER, aged 63, who, on the 8th instant, was in good health sitting at his kitchen table, writing; was suddenly seized with some internal complaint and died in a few minutes after. He was a servant of the Rev. M. Mallocks. - Verdict, Visitation of God.

OTTERY ST. MARY - An Inquest was held on Friday the 14th inst. by R. H. Aberdein, Esq. at the Greyhound Inn, Fennybridges, Honiton Road, on the body of MR EDWARD SMITH, who had drowned himself in the river Otter the preceding day. It appears from the evidence, that the deceased reached the Greyhound Inn on foot, about 11 o'clock on Thursday, and called for a glass of gin, which he drank and left the house; he had not been gone more than a quarter of an hour before an alarm was given, that a "man had jumped into the river." Two labourers, who were near, ran to the spot, succeeded in dragging him out and conveyed him back to the Inn, where every means were resorted to to restore animation, but the vital spark had fled. Mr Wreford, surgeon of Ottery, was in attendance within half an hour of the melancholy affair, but too late to render any assistance. On searching the deceased's pockets, a 10l. Bank of England note was found, some silver and half-pence, a gold watch, &c., &c., and a receipt dated Falmouth, 10th Oct. 1836, signed Wm. Gay, Agent, purporting to be a receipt from EDWARD SMITH, of a bag of despatches addressed to the Right Honourable Lord Howard de Walden, Lisbon. From this, as well as from the evidence given by Mr Blake, of the Dolphin Inn, Honiton, it appears the deceased was a King's Messenger. He had passed through Honiton on Sunday, the 9th of October, changing horses at the Dolphin, on his way to Falmouth with despatches, and from the statement given by Mr Blake of his conduct then, and that given by other witnesses as to his manner at the Greyhound Inn, it was evident he was labouring under strong mental excitement and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

MILTON DAMAREL - An Inquest was held last week by H. A. Vallack, Esq., at Milton Damarel, on the body of a child named THERESA HARRISS, who in the temporary absence of her mother, being at play with other children, caught her clothes on fire, and was so dreadfully burnt as to cause almost instant death. - Verdict, Accidental.

Thursday 3 November 1836
EXETER - We regret to state that MR EDWARD REGINALD WILLIAMSON, a respectable Commercial traveller for a Manchester House in the drapery line, died about 6 o'clock on Friday morning, from the effects of taking a large quantity of laudanum. He had for some time past been observed to labour under lowness of spirits and despondency. An Inquest has been held on the body before J. Warren, Esq.; after hearing the evidence the Jury returned a verdict "That the deceased destroyed himself by taking laudanum, he being at the time in an unsound state of mind."

EXETER - Another Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, at the George Commercial Inn, in this city, on the body of a man called RICE, a journeyman carpenter in the employ of Mr Horrell, builder. The poor fellow was at work in the morning on the building now erecting for the Devon and Exeter Savings' Bank, and was screwing up a bolt, when his purchase gave way and he fell from the scaffold into the street and was literally dashed to pieces. He died instantly. Verdict - Accidental Death. The unfortunate man has left a wife and four children.

Thursday 10 November 1836
TORMOHAM - Inquests By J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner. - October 22nd, 1836. - At Tormoham, on the body of a seaman named JOHN VANGNER, one of the crew of the late vessel Duke of Marlborough, which was wrecked in Torbay on the 11th inst. in a gale of wind. Verdict - "Accidentally Drowned."

TORMOHAM - Same day. - At Tormoham, on the body of JOHN HANCOCK, also a seaman on board the Duke of Marlborough; the deceased had clung to the rocks to save himself, when the vessel drove against him and killed him. Verdict - "Accidentally killed by the wrecked vessel."

HIGHWICK - Same day. - At Greenhill, in the parish of Highwick, on the body of MRS JANE WILLS, aged 80, who, on the 19th of October last, early in the morning, while coming down stairs, was suddenly seized, fell down, and soon after expired. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

CHURSTON FERRERS - Oct. 26th. - At Churston Ferrers, on the body of EDWARD DOBSON, another of the crew of the wrecked vessel Duke of Marlborough, who was found driven on shore near Elbury Cove, in the above parish, on the 24th Oct. Verdict - "Accidentally Drowned."

HIGHWICK - Oct. 27th. - At Little Bradley, in the parish of Highwick, near Newton, on the body of MR JOHN SMALRIDGE, aged 78, late a miller of Bridford Mills, having retired from business. It appeared that the deceased had been to Newton market on the 26th Oct. and returned in his usual health, when, on going to dinner, he was suddenly seized, (having had water on his chest) dropped down, and immediately expired. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

MARLBOROUGH - Oct. 28th. - At Salcombe, in the parish of Marlborough, on the body of JOHN TUITE, aged 78, who, on the 26th of Oct., was found dead in the road near his house: he had been to Kingsbridge, and having drank rather freely, brought on a fit of apoplexy, of which he died, no violence having been committed. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

ALPHINGTON - Oct. 31st. - At Alphington, on the body of THOMAS CARTER, aged 19, son of a farmer of that place, who was found dead in Buckingham House Lane, on the 29th of October, between 8 and 9 o'clock, having just returned from Teignmouth market. It appeared the deceased had been afflicted for several years with a disease and Enlargement of the Heart, which, through exertion, occasioned a vessel to burst, and caused instant death. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

ASHBURTON - Nov. 2nd. - At Ashburton, on the body of EDWARD MAJOR, aged about 5 years, who, on the 31st of October, in attempting to hang a kettle over the fire, accidentally caught his clothes on fire, of which the next day he died. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Thursday 17 November 1836
EXMOUTH - On Friday, an Inquest was held here by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HY. TILLER, shipwright, aged 40, who, for the last eight years, had been unable to work from the effects of severe asthma; he was in the habit of taking laudanum to procure sleep. On Wednesday night he took three pills, and being uneasy and not able to sleep, he desired his wife to send for some laudanum, which she did, and gave him; the next morning he was found dead in his bed. After a careful investigation before a respectable Jury, assisted by Mr Land, surgeon, of Exmouth, the Jury returned a verdict of - Died from the effects of poison administered by his wife. It appeared that the person who sold the laudanum is not a chemist or druggist, but keeps a shop for the sale of various articles, and was in the habit of supplying them with a similar quantity, and therefore gave no particular direction; but surely when poisonous articles are sold a caution and direction should invariably be given.

Thursday 24 November 1836
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at Cann's Golden Fleece, in the Butcher Row, on a woman named ENDICOTT, who died suddenly from the bursting of a blood vessel in the night. Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 15 December 1836
SAMPFORD COURTNAY - Inquests held by T. Copner, Esq., Coroner. - On Tuesday last, at Sampford Courtnay, near Oakhampton, on the body of MR W. ASHLEY, of that parish, who on the Wednesday preceding in the middle of the night, left his bed room, in which his son was sleeping, and descending into the back kitchen, put an end to his existence by hanging himself. The unfortunate man had previously been afflicted with an aberration of mind, for which he had been in an asylum and had since manifested evident symptoms of a return of the malady. Verdict - Insanity.

SOUTH MOLTON - On Thursday last at Southmolton, on the body of MR TONT, aged 70, who on his return from church the preceding day fell down and instantly expired. Verdict - Visitation of God.

Thursday 5 January 1837
SOUTH MOLTON - Inquests held by T. Copner, Esq., Coroner. - On Sunday last, at Southmolton, on the body of FARMER BRAILEY, of Highdown, aged 40, who was riding homewards from Southmolton market, on the preceding evening, about seven o'clock, in a cart drawn by one horse, when, very near the first milestone, the North Devon coach drove up, and, in consequence of the darkness of the night, the coachman did not perceive the cart in the road till the leaders ran full against it, and overturned it; MR BRAILEY was unfortunately thrown with violence to the ground, whereby he received a dreadful concussion of the brain, which occasioned his death within a few minutes. A very searching investigation of the circumstances connected with the fatal catastrophe took place before the Jury, which fully exonerated the driver of the coach, and all other parties, and satisfied them that it was purely an accident, and they returned a verdict accordingly.

NORTH MOLTON - On Sunday last, at Daddery, in the parish of Northmolton, on the body of MR THOMAS STRANGER, aged 45, who was returning from Southmolton market the preceding evening, about seven o'clock, when, overtaking an acquaintance who was on foot, he kindly took him on his horse behind him, upon which the animal bolted and ran away, and, on turning a corner of the road covered with ice, it fell, and MR STRANGER received so severe a fracture of the skull, as occasioned his death almost instantly. - Verdict 'Accidental'.

BISHOPS NYMPTON - On Monday last, at Bishopsnympton, on the body of JAMES DOWN, labourer, aged 40, who when in the act of undressing himself on the Saturday preceding, fell down and died immediately. The cause of his death was clearly apoplexy, and the Jury returned a verdict of 'Divine Visitation.'

Thursday 12 January 1837
COMBMARTIN - Inquest by T. Copner, Esq., Coroner. - On Monday last, at Combmartin, on the body of MARY WITHYRIDGE, aged 69, who, on coming down stairs the preceding day, was seized with a fit of apoplexy, and suddenly expired. - Verdict, 'Apoplexy.'

Thursday 26 January 1837
HIGH BICKINGTON - An Inquest was held on the 20th instant, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of MARGARET LOCKE, at Highbickington, who died suddenly. And on the 21st instant, at West Putford, on the body of HUGH OXENHAM WALTER, a most respectable farmer of that parish, who was found dead in his bed. Verdict in both cases, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 9 February 1837
ATHERINGTON - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, at Umberleigh Bridge, in the parish of Atherington, on the body of a boy called BARTHOLOMEW CHAMPION, who while playing with another boy by the river side, in stooping down, accidentally fell into the river. Assistance was furnished almost immediately by a neighbouring miller, who plunged in and succeeded in bringing the body to shore; and it is probable, had there been a surgeon on the spot, who could instantly have applied remedial measure, animation might have been restored, but having to send some miles for a medical man, so long an interval necessarily elapsed, that before his arrival the vital spark had fled. - Verdict "Accidental Death."

PILTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last, at noon, an Inquisition was taken before Thos. Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr George Gould Carpenter was the foreman, on view of the body of ANN LOCK, who had died on the preceding day. Reports were prevalent that the deceased had died from starvation, through the neglect of the parish officers; the Inquest therefore excited a great deal of interest among the inhabitants of Pilton. It appeared that the deceased was a married woman, and belonged to the parish of Northmolton; her husband and she, however, had separated, and for some time past she had been living in a state of concubinage. About seven months ago she applied for relief to the Southmolton guardians, who gave her 5s. to pay her expenses home, and ordered her into the workhouse: but she took the money, and returned to Pilton, where she has been residing ever since lodging n the house of a woman named MARY HILL. Deceased had lately been suffering from a disease of the lungs, and on Saturday se'nnight she sent Mrs Hill to the Barnstaple workhouse to represent her case and to ask for relief and medical assistance; the relieving officer told her he could do nothing for the deceased, both because she did not belong to the union, and because she had neglected to obey the order of the Southmolton board. On the Tuesday following, though in a state of extreme weakness, she managed to reach the infirmary, to which Mr Bencraft had recommended her as an out-patient. Dr Britton saw her and gave her a prescription; she appeared to be suffering from the influenza. On her return to Pilton, by the charity of some of the humane inhabitants, she procured the medicine which the doctor had ordered, and was a little relieved. Mrs Hill mentioned the distress of the deceased to several resident families, by whom, it seems, she was amply supplied with food suited to her debilitated state. On Thursday Mrs Hill, observing the relieving officer, Mr Joce, to pass the door, called him in, and told him the deceased was in a very afflicted condition: he at once directed her to come to the board the following day, and represent her distress to the guardians. She went accordingly; and, after the case had been considered, the relieving officer was directed to give the deceased a medical order. Joce immediately communicated to Mary Hill the decision of the board, adding, "I have not my order book with me, but I will call at your house on my way home, and leave it." This, unfortunately, the relieving officer forgot to do, and late at night, Mary Hill sent a man to Joce's house for the order; Joce was in bed, but told the man to go to Mr Parker, the surgeon, and say that he had sent him, - that he should attend the patient at once, and that he (Joce) would give him the order tomorrow. The next morning Joce called on the woman, but found that the man had not gone to the surgeon as he had directed; he then immediately left a medical order and an order for groats and some other necessaries. Before this, however, Dr Bignell, who was passing through Pilton, was called in, and saw the deceased; the doctor found her evidently sinking and applied a blister to her chest, and gave her some pills: on that account Mary Hill did not use the medical order which Joce afterwards left. She became worse and worse until five o'clock on Sunday morning, when she died. Several witnesses were examined on the Inquest, and the Jury, after a patient investigation, returned a verdict to this effect:- "That the deceased's death was occasioned by inflammation of the lungs; but the Jury wished to record their opinion that there appeared to have been neglect on the part of the relieving officer, and the poor warden, in their not having attended to the application of the deceased."

Thursday 16 February 1837
TAWSTOCK - An Inquest was held this afternoon before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little girl, four years old, daughter of a labouring man of the parish of Tawstock, named THOMAS BRACE, whose death was occasioned by her clothes taking fire yesterday in the absence of her parents. - Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 2 March 1837
PILTON - An Inquest has been held this day by T. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ANN, the infant daughter of WM. TUCKER, of Pilton, who died suddenly in the arms of her mother, the preceding morning. Her death was occasioned, in the opinion of Mr Radd, the medical attendant, by the rupture of a blood vessel in the head. - Verdict, 'Divine Visitation.'

Thursday 16 March 1837
EXMOUTH - The body of young PINE, one of the unfortunate persons who were drowned about five weeks ago, was picked up on Wednesday last, in a dreadfully mutilated state, without the head, arms or legs; An Inquest was held on the remains before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., and the verdict returned "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 23 March 1837
HITTESLEIGH - MANSLAUGHTER - On Monday evening a melancholy incident occurred at the New Inn, Dennis Down, in the parish of Hittesleigh, in this county. A party of Flax-men were assembled at the above Inn, and there was also present another man named Clark, alias Brimblecombe, a butcher of Cheriton Bishop. Some disagreeable circumstance arose among them, at which Clark took offence, and went away to call others to his assistance; upon his return with his friends, he struck one of the party named WM. BRAGG, a blow in the face, who fell to the ground; a general row was the consequence, but upon the brother of the deceased lifting him from the ground, he was found quite senseless. Mr Battishall, surgeon, was called, but too late, life was extinct: upon a post mortem examination it was found that the vestra of the neck was dislocated. An Inquest was held before J. Gribble, Esq., and a verdict of manslaughter being returned, John Clark was committed to take his trial for the offence at these assizes.

BARNSTAPLE - Horrid Murder. - It is our painful duty to report a brutal murder, which was perpetrated in this neighbourhood on Monday last. The victim is a MR KNIGHT, a middle aged man, an itinerant quack doctor, and the murderer is generally supposed to be Robert Alford, a man aged about 28, of profligate habits, son of a very respectable farmer of that name in the parish of Highbickington, about nine miles from this town on the old Exeter road. It appears that on Monday evening the parties were drinking at the Ebberly Arms, a public-house in the parish, and within a mile and half of the village of Highbickington: KNIGHT wished to go to the village but did not know the way, and it was said that Alford would have to pass through it, and would probably accompany him, which he consented to do: KNIGHT then treated him to a pint of two or beer, and they left the house together at half past eight o'clock, Alford carrying in his hand a reap-hook. From this time nothing was seen or heard of the deceased until the following morning, at about half past seven, when his body was discovered by a labouring man lying in the road about half a mile from the Ebberly Arms, and quite dead. His face presented a shocking appearance; he had received a wound, (apparently from a hook) which extended from his chin around by his ear, terminating in a deep incision at the back of his head, his upper lip also was very severely cut and bruised; but there were no marks of violence on the body. It is supposed that after he had received these injuries the deceased endeavoured to make his way back to the Ebberly Arms; blood was traced along the road from a considerable distance, and a quantity of blood was also found by a gate on the road side, which the deceased is thought to have leaned upon; but, doubtless, overcome by increasing weakness, from the very great effusion of blood, he was unable to proceed further, and sank down in the road where the body was discovered, as we have already stated, stiff and cold. His death was probably hastened by the extreme severity of the night. The body was removed to the Ebberly Arms, and messengers were dispatched for the surgeon and coroner, while the constables went in quest of Alford, whom they found at his father's, at work in the garden. He strongly denied all knowledge of the bloody transaction, and said that he came home the preceding evening by another road, but his statement is contradicted by the testimony of three females who met him late at night not far from the spot where the deceased was found. An Inquest was held on the body in the afternoon, before H. A. Vallack, Esq. Coroner, but, after prolonged deliberation it was adjourned to the following day (Wednesday). Alford remains in custody awaiting the verdict of the Jury. It is said that neither of the parties were intoxicated when they left the public house, nor had they quarrelled.
Thursday Noon.- We have just learnt that the Inquest was adjourned again last evening, and will be resumed today.

Thursday 30 March 1837
HIGH BICKINGTON - Murder at Highbickington. - The Coroner's Inquest terminated on Thursday last. After a patient and anxious investigation, which was protracted during three following days, the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against Robert Alford, who was fully committed to Exeter Jail, on the following day, to take his trial at the autumn assizes.

COMBMARTIN - On Monday last, at Combmartin, an Inquest was held before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little child, named WITHERIDGE, son of a labourer of that parish. The deceased was sitting with his two brothers before the fire, when the flames caught his clothes and burnt him so dreadfully that he did soon after. Verdict - 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 6 April 1837
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - An Inquisition was taken on Monday evening last, at Rumsam, near this town, before Thomas Copner, Esq. and a most respectable Jury, (of which Anthony Huxtable, Esq., was foreman) on view of the body of MR WILLIAM CHURCHWARD (only son of the late REV. MR CHURCHWARD, rector of Goodleigh) aged 35, who had destroyed himself at about half past eleven o'clock in the morning, by blowing out his brains with a fowling piece.
The body lay on a bed, in his lodging room, and presented a shocking spectacle. Deceased appeared to have sat on the bed side, the stock of the gun resting on the floor, and it is imagined he forced the trigger with his foot, holding the muzzle to his mouth with his right hand: the left part of his skull was blown completely out, and the brains were scattered about the room, while the ceiling and the walls, were marked with blood and shot holes in every direction: the bed was also saturated with blood.
Having returned from a view of the body, the Jury proceeded to hear the evidence. The first witness was
Catherine Hill, who deposed that she was a maid servant to the deceased's mother, MRS CHURCHWARD; had lived with her 18 years; the deceased lived with his mother since his father's decease, six years ago; saw him alive for the last time on Sunday morning, at eight o'clock; he had not been out of his room today; was gone to bed before deceased came home last night; he was not home all day yesterday; did not know at what time he came home; he was in the habit of admitting himself by his own latch-key: this morning between 11 and 12 o'clock, her mistress heard a noise upstairs like the falling of a door; MRS C. went up and knocked at the door of the deceased's bed room, but could get no answer; she then called witness, who went also and knocked, but in vain, then burst open the door, and on entering the room, saw the deceased lying on his bed, with the blood streaming from his head; he appeared not to be quite dead; saw him breathe, but he never spoke nor moved: witness was not in the house, but in an outhouse, and therefore did not hear the report of the gun: had observed very eccentric conduct on the part of the deceased, especially of late; thought him in a very odd way; witness had said many times to deceased's sister that she did not think he was quite right; deceased was an early riser, was generally out before seven o'clock; he always had a gun in his bed room. In answer to a question from the Coroner, the witness said she did not know, nor had she heard that the deceased was to have been married that morning.
James Salter deposed that he was an organist residing at Newport; knew the deceased well; had noticed a strangeness in his conduct for a considerable time, not constantly, but at intervals; the impression on his mind was, that the deceased was subject to fits of temporary derangement; there was much incoherency in his conversation; deceased was in the habit of calling at witness's house twice or thrice in a day: saw him yesterday morning at eleven o'clock, before service; deceased played the organ at the Chapel of Ease: he appeared very tremulous and fidgety throughout the service; there was a hesitancy in his performance which was quite unusual to him; saw him again last night between seven and eight o'clock; deceased remained at his house nearly an hour; there was much restlessness and agitation about him; and while he was in the midst of conversation, he suddenly ran out of the house without finishing his sentence.
The Jury did not think it necessary to hear any further evidence, and without retiring, they unhesitatingly returned a verdict of 'Temporary Insanity'.
The deceased had been educated for the church, and was possessed of considerable abilities; he was a first rate proficient in the classics, and in music.

SOUTH MOLTON - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at Southmolton, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named JOHN VERNON, who died suddenly on the preceding Sunday. Verdict - 'Died by the Visitation of God.'

Thursday 20 April 1837
EXETER - Coroner's Inquests. - On Wednesday last, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, for this city, on the body of a little boy, the son of a printer named HORTON, who had been drowned on the preceding day, in one of the leats near the Island, when a verdict was returned accordingly.

EXETER - On Saturday last, before the same gentleman, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalene street on the body of ANNE CHAVE, 19 years of age, who, on the Friday week preceding, at Heavitree, was so dreadfully burnt, that on the day previous to the Inquest, she expired in the Devon and Exeter Hospital - Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 20 April 1837
FILLEIGH - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before Thomas Copner Esq. Coroner, on the body of JOHN ADAMS, a labourer employed in the lime quarry of Mr Cridge, at Rock, in the parish of Filleigh, near Southmolton. While the deceased was at work the day before, a heap of rubbish slid down from an opposite side of the quarry and buried him; he was got out in about a quarter of an hour, but was quite dead; his thigh and one of his ribs were broken, and he was otherwise severely bruised. Verdict - Accidental Death. Providentially three men who were working near the deceased, hearing the noise of the fall started on one side, and by that means avoided a similar fate.

EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for this city, on the body of a little boy, the son of a printer named HORTON, who had been drowned on the preceding day, in one of the leats near the Island, when a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 27 April 1837
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JAMES PAYNE, landlord and proprietor of the 'Bell Inn,' in this town. The deceased had been in a declining state of health for some time, occasioned, as there is too much reason to fear, by his unfortunate propensity to excessive drinking: on the preceding day, Friday, he had retired to bed in the afternoon, and soon after became alarmingly worse; medical aid was instantly sent for, but before the surgeon could arrive, the deceased expired. Verdict - Visitation of God.

Thursday 4 May 1837
KINGSBRIDGE - Horrid Depravity. - The inhabitants of Kingsbridge and its neighbourhood have been much excited during the past week. A report having spread that the body of a new-born infant had been found in a barn, in the village of Buckland, with one of its arms and face nearly devoured by rats, an Inquiry was immediately instituted. Suspicion fell on a young woman named AGNES MITCHELMORE, who was supposed to have given birth to the helpless innocent, and then barbarously murdered it. An Inquest was, therefore, held on the body, and from the examination of the young woman herself, the following facts are elicited:- She had been delivered of a child, which she said was still-born: she then wrapped the child up in a piece of flannel, and hid it under a bed in an adjoining room, where it remained for a week or ten days; she afterwards hid it under some litter in the barn, where it was ultimately found. When viewed by the Jury, it presented a horrifying spectacle - one arm and a great part of the face being completely devoured by the rats, the marks of the animals' teeth remaining distinctly visible. There were no marks of any other violence on the body, and the Jury, after a patient investigation returned a verdict of Manslaughter. The girl is fully committed for trial at the next Assizes.

Thursday 11 May 1837
BARNSTAPLE - Forgery and Suicide of the Forger. - On Friday last a mason named THOMAS KELLY, residing at Newport in this borough, called at the shop of Mr Alexander, in High-street, to purchase a watch, and having selected one at about 3', tendered in payment a check for 18l. 6s. drawn on the West of England and South Wales District Bank, bearing the signature of Francis Squire, and made payable to William Laramy. Mr Alexander, before he gave him the change, wishing to ascertain if the check was good, went to the Bank, and in his way met Mr Thorne, the manager, and shewed it him; Mr Thorne saw that the writing was not Francis Squire's, and taking with him Mr Rowe, the constable, accompanied Mr Alexander back to his shop, where KELLY was waiting. After Mr Thorne had asked him a few questions, KELLY said he wanted to go out, and the constable and he went through the butchers' row to Boutport-street and returned to Mr Alexander's again. In answer to Mr Thorne's enquiries, KELLY then said he received the check from Mr Jones of Babley, in payment for work he had done, and that Mr Jones had it from Squire for lime. Mr Thorne said to him the check was not in Squire's handwriting, but he answered it was, and added "if you don't like it I'll take it again." Mr Thorne said he did not wish to injure Mr Squire's credit and if he would go to him and ascertain either that he had written the check himself or had authorised any other person to draw it for him, he would pay it immediately: he therefore proposed that KELLY should accompany the constable to Squire's and shew it him: KELLY objected, remarking that he lived at Pilton and Squire at Newport. It was ultimately arranged that Mr Alexander and the constable should see Squire in the evening, and that KELLY should call again the next morning, to this he consented, with the understanding that one of them should be responsible to him for the value of the check, and having endorsed it he left the shop. Some time afterwards, Mr Rowe and Mr Alexander went to Mr Squire at Newport, and shewed him the check; upon which he immediately declared it to be a forgery, and told the constable he had seen KELLY pass up Newport but a little before, Rowe instantly turned and went in pursuit of him and calling at the Molton Inn, met KELLY coming out of the door, took him in custody, and lodged him in the station house from which he was taken to the Town Clerk's office and examined before the Magistrates. On his apprehension Mr Kenward, of this town, draper, having heard of the circumstance, went to the office and recognised the prisoner as the man who had passed a forged check at his establishment some time before. The facts as he gave them in evidence were these: on the 17th of April last, in the evening, the prisoner called at his shop to look at some goods, Mr Robert Cummings, one of his young men, served him, and he selected a suit of clothes and a hat, amounting in all to between 2l. and 3l. and tendering in payment a check on the West of England Bank for 14l. 8s. purporting to be drawn by Mr Philip Rock, and payable to Mr Richard Gilbert. As the prisoner looked like a labouring man, Mr Cummings asked him where he obtained it? and he said he was a servant of Farmer Laramy's of Marwood, that he had worked with him for 14 or 15 years, and that he had paid him this check as part of his wages: Mr Cummings having consulted with Mr Kenward, and knowing both Mr Rock and Mr Laramy to be respectable men, gave him the balance in cash, about 12l., first however taking the precaution to write his name and the date at the back of the check: the prisoner gave his name THOMAS BARNES: this check Mr Kenward paid with other cash into the National Provincial Bank, and having remained there some days it did not reach the West of England Bank until that same morning (viz. Friday last) when it was immediately refused and returned to the National Provincial Bank, and from it to Mr Kenward and Mr Cummings had just gone to Marwood in quest of the man from whom he received it, when the occurrence at Mr Alexander's transpired. Mr Kenward positively identified the prisoner, and on his evidence he was remanded to our borough prison, for further examination at the Guildhall the next morning at 11 o'clock. It might be observed that Mr Jones, of Babley was at the Town Clerk's office during the prisoner's examination, and denied that he had paid him the check; the prisoner then said he found it in Mr Jones's yard. It was between 7 and 8 o'clock, when he was committed, and at half past 8, Mr Cummings, having returned from Marwood, went down to the prison and immediately identified the prisoner: he said to him he was quite satisfied he was the person who paid him the forged check, and he replied, "Oh you are, are you?" Mr Cummings re-asserted that he was, and the prisoner rejoined "very well." The gaoler, Frederic Blackwill saw the prisoner at about 9 o'clock, and at his request bought him a piece of cheese and brought him: he then locked him up for the night. The next morning at a quarter past 8, when he was going round to the cells as usual, he found the prisoner in his cell suspended by the neck with his pocket handkerchief, from one of the cross bars of his cell's window. He immediately called for help, and Churchill and Tallyn, two other prisoners, came in and cut him down. The surgeon was promptly on the spot but he found the deceased quite dead. It is probable he had been hanging for several hours. The suicide was most determined, for the height from which he was suspended did not allow his feet to clear the ground. He must have sat on the sill of the window while he tied the handkerchief to the bar and adjusted it round his neck, and from thence must have swung himself off. An Inquest was held on the body at 12 o'clock, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, when after a patient investigation of the circumstances connected with the deceased's apprehension and commitment, the Jury returned a verdict of Felo-de-se, and the Coroner issued his order for the interment of the body at midnight. We hear that since his burial in consequence of a rumour that the body had been stolen, the friends of the deceased have had the coffin exhumed and opened; the corpse however was found undisturbed. It is said that the deceased had forged the name of Francis Squire, to another check which passed through the bank undetected; but the amount was small. The deceased was the principal evidence at the late assizes in the prosecution of Bussell, for a burglary at Pilton, and while at Exeter he formed an acquaintance with a female to whom he was to have been married some day this week. His baggage had been forwarded to Exeter by the waggon the day prior to his untimely end.

MARIANSLEIGH - On Tuesday an Inquest was held before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, at Mariansleigh, on the body of Farmer WILLIAM CHAPPELL, aged 30, whose death was occasioned by a kick which he received in the lower part of his abdomen, from one of his horses, while he was tackling him in the field, on the day before; he lingered in much suffering until the following morning when he died. Verdict - 'Accidental Death.' The deceased bore an excellent character in the neighbourhood in which he resided.

Thursday 25 May 1837
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at East Ashford, near this town, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little child, a year and three quarters old, son of MICHAEL HEWITT, a labourer, who in the absence of his mother who had gone to a neighbour's house for a little milk, unfortunately set his clothes on fire, and was burnt in so shocking a manner that he died about four hours afterwards. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 1 June 1837
EXETER - Melancholy Accident. - On Saturday last, as a little girl, between 7 and 8 years of age, the daughter of a tradesman named BROWN, who keeps a hucksters shop in St. Sidwell's-street, was playing with a younger sister in that neighbourhood, a cart belonging to Mr Manly, butcher, was seen advancing at a brisk pace towards them, and the poor child being anxious for the safety of her little charge, ran heedlessly into the road to rescue it. Unfortunately in her haste, the child while passing in front of the horse, (as we understood,) fell, and before the person driving the cart could pull up, the wheel passed over the poor sufferer's neck, who was killed on the spot. An Inquest was held the same evening on the body, and a verdict returned of "Accidental death." The other child escaped unhurt. No blame whatever is attributable to the driver.

EXETER - On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before S. Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner for this city, at Taylor's Barnstaple Inn, Hart's Row, on the body of MRS AGNES GRIGG, who died suddenly the preceding afternoon, at her lodgings on David's Hill. The deceased was unmarried, about 45 years of age: and of very retired and eccentric habits, and had lived as housekeeper in several highly respectable families. And having heard the evidence in the case, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 8 June 1837
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Saturday, at Farrant's, Red Cow Inn, David's Hill, by J. Warren, Esq., on the body of a servant man named HENRY OLIVER, aged 25 years, in the employ of the Messrs. Bastard, merchants, of this city, who was found drowned at the Head Weir, after being missed for about a week. It appeared that the deceased was in the garden on the morning of his leaving with his master, when he complained of a violent pain in the head, a complaint which he had been subject to, and his master very kindly wished him to go to the house, and get what he considered would afford relief from any of the servants; in the course of the day however he was found missing, and no trace of him had been discovered until Friday night, when he was found at the above named place - in the pockets of his trowsers was some silver. The deceased bore an excellent character and was much respected. The Jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

TAWSTOCK - An Inquest was held this morning (Thursday) at Uppacott, in the parish of Tawstock, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little child, son of -- SYMONS, of that place, whose death was occasioned on the day before by a pan of boiling milk falling from the fire upon him; his person was dreadfully scalded and he lingered but a few hours after the occurrence. Verdict - 'Accidental Death.'

BARNSTAPLE - MR DART, formerly of the Custom House, in this town, died suddenly on Sunday last. He had been out walking in the new road but a short time before; - coming in, and feeling himself poorly, asked for something to take; he then went up stairs, when he almost instantly expired. An Inquest was held on the following morning, when a verdict was returned, - "Died by Apoplexy.

Thursday 15 June 1837
TIVERTON - Melancholy Death by Drowning. - An Inquest was held on the 7th instant, at the New Inn, Bickleigh, before F. S. Groves, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the bodies of WILLIAM ADDICOTT and WILLIAM BARNES, two agricultural labourers in the employ of Mr William Jarman. It appeared that the deceased had been assisting to wash some sheep in a small river called the Dart, which runs into the Exe at Bickleigh and were perfectly sober when they left off. After the washing was finished they went further up the river, and coming to a deep pool, Barnes said he would try to swim, and went into the water without taking off any part of his clothes. After he had been in the water about five minutes, and was only a short distance from the bank, he sunk, but presently rose again to the surface of the water; he did not struggle or call out for assistance. ADDICOTT, who was also in the water, about twenty feet above the spot, seeing his companion sink, immediately went to his assistance. He attempted to catch him by the jacket, and both went down together, and never rose again. The body of BARNES was got out about a quarter of an hour afterwards, that of ADDICOTT about ten minutes later. Mr Coward, a surgeon of Tiverton, was in immediate attendance, and used all necessary means to restore them, but without effect - the vital spark was fled for ever. The verdict was "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Coroner's Inquest - Distressing Instance of Sudden Death. - Tuesday an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for this city, at Crabb's Spread Eagle Inn, Barrack Road, St. David's, on the body of MR THOS. BOULT, boot and shoemaker, Maddock's Row, who expired suddenly on the preceding afternoon. Richard Dean, clerk of the parish of the Holy Trinity, in this city, being sworn, said, I have known the deceased from a child; he is about 32 years of age, and was clerk of the parish of St. Paul, in Exeter. Yesterday about four o'clock in the afternoon, I called on him by appointment, for the purpose of going to Hoopern Farm to take tea. I and the deceased and his wife walked towards Hoopern. In front of the Devon County Gaol we stopped, and were there joined by Miss Gardener. The women went on, and the deceased and I followed in about five minutes. We had been looking at the men at work in the Gaol Field. When we got into the Barrack Road, the deceased's wife and Miss Gardener were about a gun shot before us towards Hoopern. As we walked the deceased took my arm: I remarked that it was too warm to walk arm in arm, upon which he let go my arm. We had walked a few paces only, when the deceased being near me, I heard him trip, and upon looking round I saw the deceased fall on his face in the road. He was about a gun shot from the gate which leads from the Gaol field into the Barrack Road. I endeavoured to lift him up, a little blood flowed from his mouth, but he never spoke. As he fell I heard a slight groan. Mr Luscombe, surgeon, came in about five minutes after the deceased fell, and pronounced him dead as soon as he saw him. He was borne to this (the Eagle) Inn. The deceased had previously told me that four months ago he had fallen down in a fit, and been attended by a medical gentleman. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." MR BOULT was much respected, and this sudden bereavement is matter of great grief to his family and friends.

Thursday 22 June 1837
Inquests Held By J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner. - OKEHAMPTON - May 29, 1837. - At Okehampton on the body of ELIZABETH CORAM, aged 57, who on the 27th of May hung herself to the curtain rod of her bed. It appeared that she had been quite blind for some months, and in a very desponding way on account of this and other misfortunes. Verdict, Hung herself in a fit of Insanity.

BERRY POMEROY - June 3. - At Longcoombe, in the parish of Berry Pomeroy, on the body of MARY COSE, aged 66. It appeared that on the 1st of June she went from her own house in perfect health to visit Mr Dugdale, at Longcoombe, and in the evening she was seized with an epileptic fit, never spoke after, and in a few hours died. - Verdict, Visitation of God.

OKEHAMPTON - June 6. - At Okehampton, on the body of MR RICHARD HEANES, aged 68, who was a respectable tradesman retired from business, living at Okehampton; that on the 3rd of June he was found in the West Ockment River, drowned. He had been seen about two hours before go to his garden, which is nearly adjoining the river, which he was in the habit of doing. It is supposed being subject to giddiness in the head, and while walking by the side of the river, that he fell in and was drowned. Verdict, - Found Drowned, but how or by what means no sufficient evidence appeared.

OKEHAMPTON - Same day, at Okehampton, on the body of JOHN KNIGHT, a labourer, aged 68, who went to bed perfectly well on the evening of the 4th of June, and was found dead next morning; another man was sleeping with him, but never discovered till the next morning; no marks of violence appeared on the body, and as no suspicion of anything improper, the Jury's verdict was, Visitation of God.

TORBRYAN - June 12 - At the parish of Torbryan, on the body of WM. AVERY, aged 77, who on the 10th of June went to the house of a neighbour in perfect health, was suddenly seized with a fit of apoplexy and immediately died without speaking a word. Verdict, Visitation of God.

COMBEINTEIGNHEAD - Same day, at the parish of Coombeintinhead, on the body of SAMUEL GILL, aged 42, who was clerk of Haccombe Chapel, and on the 11th instant had been there to perform his usual duties, and in his way home to his house at Coombe with some other persons, he was suddenly seized in the road with a fit, never spoke after and died in a few minutes. It appeared that he was not a very strong healthy man but asthmatical. Verdict, Visitation of God.

BARNSTAPLE - On Saturday last, a little girl at Rawleigh, three years and half old, daughter of one of the operatives in the factory, of the name of THORNE, fell into the mill leat and was drowned; her body was discovered about half an hour after by a neighbouring cottager floating down the stream, whilst the agonised parents, who had not long missed her, were in anxious search of her. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body on Monday, when a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned.

Thursday 29 June 1837
EXETER - An Inquest was held in the parish of St. Sidwell, on Wednesday, on the body of JOHN UNDERHILL, who dropped down suddenly and died, near his residence, in the upper part of the parish. The deceased had suffered for some time from an affection of the heart, and the verdict of died by the Visitation of God was returned.

Thursday 6 July 1837
PYEWORTHY - Inquests held by H. A. Vallack, Esq. - On the 26th ult., at Pyeworthy, on the body of MARGARET TURNER, aged 9, daughter of a farmer, who was accidentally burnt a short time before, and died in consequence. Verdict, ''Accidental Death.'

HOLDSWORTHY - On the 27th ultimo, at Holdsworthy, on the body of ISAAC KELT, a little boy six years old, who received a kick in his abdomen from a horse on the 26th, which occasioned almost instant death. Verdict accordingly.

CLOVELLY - On the 29th ultimo, at Clovelly, on the body of ANN BRADLEY, aged 33, who had committed suicide by throwing herself into the sea over Clovelly pier. The body was recovered soon after the occurrence, but life was extinct. Evidence was produced to shew that the deceased, as well as her mother, had been subject to fits of insanity. Verdict, 'Temporary Derangement.'

BOW - On the 1st instant, at Bow, on the body of JOHN DAVEY, a bastard child, which was found dead in bed, without any marks of violence on the body. Verdict, 'Found Dead.'

Thursday 13 July 1837
TIVERTON - fatal Effects of Intoxication. - An Inquest was held on Friday week, before E. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner for the borough, upon the body of RICHARD PHILLIPS. It appeared that the deceased was a farmer, residing at Cruwys Morchard, that on the previous Tuesday night, he left the Dolphin Inn about twelve o'clock, and was then so much intoxicated that the landlord endeavoured to induce him to go to bed there, but in vain. He did not get on his horse before he left the Inn, but must have done so shortly afterwards, for a woman who passed on the road, deposed that when she met him, he was on horseback, and that shortly afterwards, she heard the horse stop. Soon after four o'clock the next morning, Mr T. Payne the keeper of the turnpike gate, saw the horse grazing by the road side, and a man laying on the ground insensible. whilst blood flowed from his nostrils and mouth, he was immediately taken to the Race Horse Inn, and Mr Coward was sent for, who found an exterior fracture of the skull. The deceased never spoke afterward, and soon died. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death by Falling from his Horse whilst in a state of Intoxication.

BARNSTAPLE - On Tuesday evening last, a fatal accident happened to a boy 10 years of age, called WILLIAM WAY, who was in the employ of John Budd, Esq., of Willesly; he was riding in an empty cart returning from carrying in a load of hay, when the horse taking fright, ran violently away, and in his alarm the poor boy jumped out of the cart, and falling down the wheel went over his back, causing such extensive injury as to occasion his death within a few hours. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the next morning, which returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.'

SHEBBEAR - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, as two men were working in a quarry, at Shebbear, in this county, raising stones, one side of the quarry fell in upon them: one man was much injured and the other named RICHARD TRACE, was killed. It was three hours before the unfortunate deceased could be dug out; he was then quite dead. An Inquest was held on the body by H. A. Vallack, Esq., and a verdict returned of 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 20 July 1837
CHAWLEIGH - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Chawleigh, before Mr Vallack, Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of JAMES SIMMONS, (Earl Fortescue's Groom.) The deceased on the 1st inst. went to the seat of the Honourable Newton Fellowes, M.P., Eggesford, for a mare and colt, to take back to Castle Hill. It appeared from the testimony of Mr Fellowes's groom, that SIMMONS had started about seven o'clock in the evening, leading the mare and colt, and riding his own horse; the deceased appeared dull when he left, but not tipsy, and that he took a road which witness and other strongly advised him not to go, and recommending a better road to take a mare and colt, deceased appeared obstinate. About a quarter of an hour after deceased had parted with Mr Fellowes's groom, he was found by one of the Eggesford workmen, lying on his face and hands, in the road, (a few gun shots only from the spot where he started with the horses,) in an almost insensible state, from the effect of a blow which he had received on the temple. Mr Davy, surgeon of Chulmleigh, was immediately sent for, and every possible care and attention was given deceased, until his death, which took place on the 5th inst., from that fatal blow. When the deceased was first found in the road, he enquired where he was, and said that he was glad somebody was come to put him in the right way, and that he had received the blow from a man by whom he was knocked off his horse. The deceased, however, was in a very stupid and almost senseless state, and from the evidence it appeared unlikely that any man had passed at the time, except a gentleman on horseback, (supposed to be the Rev. Mr Kempe, of Morchard,) and that gentleman was observed to pass and speak to deceased. The Honourable Newton Fellowes had taken much trouble in investigating this mysterious case, previously to the arrival of the Coroner and in course of the Inquiry expressed his great surprise that Mr Kempe (to whom he had written the day before,) was not in attendance, and very properly remarked that it was a duty to the public that all persons who could give, if but the slightest intelligence, should voluntarily attend the Coroner's Inquiry. A special messenger was at once dispatched to Mr Kempe, with another letter from Mr Fellowes, to learn if he were the gentleman seen in conversation with deceased, but up to half past eleven o'clock at night, the messenger had not returned, and as it was uncertain whether or not Mr Kempe was the gentleman in question, the Coroner (at the request the Jury,) summed up the evidence, and a verdict was returned in accordance with the testimony before him

Thursday 17 August 1837
EXETER - On Monday last an Inquest was taken on the body of EDWIN BASTOW, son of MR WILLIAM BASTOW, Whitesmith, Waterbeer-street, in this city. The deceased was 32 years of age, of a remarkably bovish appearance and an idiot from his birth. He was led home by the oastler of the Black-dog Inn, in North street, about 5 o'clock on Saturday evening, and after vomiting very considerably, he was put to bed: he became worse about ten o'clock, and a medical man was sent for; but on the arrival of Mr Webb, surgeon, about twelve o'clock he found him dead: he stated in his evidence that he might have been dead about half an hour, and that the effects of liquor had produced Apoplexy, which occasioned his death. The Jury unanimously returned a Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God in a fit of Apoplexy. Insinuations had been afloat that the deceased had been tampered with, and improperly induced to drink at the Black-dog; but after the most careful examination, nothing of the kind was proved, on the contrary, Mr Turner the landlord, had acted with the greatest propriety and humanity.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday evening last, in the Bull court, in this town, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY PARSLEY, wife of JOHN PARSLEY, labourer, aged 56. The deceased had complained of indisposition the day before, but on the Monday about mid-day, she suddenly became alarmingly ill, and her husband ran into a neighbour's house to procure assistance, but, on his return, after an absence of not more than two minutes, he found her stretched on the floor and quite dead. Dr Bignell, who had attended the deceased, attributed her death to a disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict - 'Died by the Visitation of God.'

Thursday 31 August 1837
BARNSTAPLE - Shocking Occurrence. - An accident, which was awfully fatal to an industrious man, transpired in this town on Friday morning last. The unfortunate deceased was CHARLES HORNE; and was in the employ of Mr Marsh, of the Golden Lion Hotel, as one of his horse keepers. It appears that he was taking the North Devon Coach round from the yard to the front of the house, having as usual one horse in it, when just at the corner of Well Street, the animal became sulky and refused to proceed: HORNE was standing at his head, endeavouring to lead him on, and at his request a man who was by gave the horse a stroke with a stick, upon which he suddenly bolted round, and the deceased was forced by the pole of the coach with tremendous violence against another coach which was waiting in the street. Assistance was immediately rendered him, and as it was discovered that he had received serious injuries, he was promptly conveyed to the Infirmary, but expired on the steps of the building, having survived the accident about ten minutes. It was found that so great was the concussion that his chest was completely forced in. The deceased has left a sick wife and two young children, and their destitution point them out as objects peculiarly deserving the charity of the humane. We are happy to hear that our respected representative, Mr Chichester, who was in town soon after the occurrence, sent a handsome donation for the relief of the family, and that other individuals have since imitated his example. An Inquest was held on the body and the Jury returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.'

EXETER - Coroner's Inquest.- On Friday last an Inquest was taken at Roach's Bull Inn, Goldsmith-street, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for this city, on the body of MARY EASTAWAY, a widow, between 60 and 70 years of age who resided in a room in Gandy-street. The deceased bore an excellent character, and had been noticed on that account by those who were superior in life to herself. She had been seen on the preceding Thursday afternoon, but a lady going to the room to visit her on Friday morning, found the door latched only, and on entering discovered the bed to be empty. On the floor, in her ordinary daily attire, lay the deceased, dead, having apparently been so many hours. A verdict was returned accordingly.

SHEBBEAR - An Inquest was held by H. A. Vallack, Esq., on Saturday last, on the body of MR WILLIAM TANTON, of Shebbear, who hung himself on the preceding evening to an oak twig in the hedge, whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, occasioned by disappointment, in consequence of the failure of his crops and other farming misfortunes. Verdict - 'Killed himself whilst in a State of Temporary Insanity.'

Thursday 7 September 1837
TEIGNMOUTH - Sudden Death. - The uncertainty of life and of all earthly enjoyments was perhaps never more exemplified than in the death of MR BENJ. GREGORY, late draper at Teignmouth. This gentleman has latterly retired from business, having had considerable property fall to him from the death of a relation; he had about ten days since been to London in order to have the property, (which was in Chancery, the deceased relative being a lunatic,) transferred in his own name, and having settled every thing, and got possession, he hastened again to Teignmouth, to collect in his debts, and was stopping a few days with Mr R. Shimell: on Tuesday last, about half past four, he came down stairs from where he was writing on his accounts, to inquire if tea was ready, but not being quite ready he returned again; in a few minutes Mr S. went through his room with something, and perceived him sitting upright in his chair; he spoke to him but got no answer; being alarmed he went over to him, and to his great consternation found him quite dead; he must have died without a struggle, as he sat quite upright, and his spectacles were on. An Inquest was held next day, when a verdict was returned - "Died by the Visitation of God."

TIVERTON - Awful Death. - On Saturday morning, between 9 and 10 o'clock, this town was visited with the most severe thunder storm we every remember. The vividness of the lightening instantaneously succeeded by the most terrific peals of thunder was enough to cause alarm in the stoutest hearts. A poor man named WILLIAM AXHOM, belonging to this town, whilst passing through a narrow lane called WILCOMBE LANE, about half a mile from this town, was struck with the electric fluid, and it is supposed died instantly. He was a most frightful spectacle, and some part of his clothes was burnt to a cinder. An Inquest was held on the body the same day before J. S. Gervis, Esq., and a verdict returned, Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 14 September 1837
EXETER - Melancholy Accident.- On Saturday last, an elderly female, named ALICE GORDON, met with her death in Paris-street, in this city, under the following dreadful circumstances. The deceased who was a dealer in shrimps and shell-fish, living at Charmouth in Dorset, was standing in the street, waiting for the arrival of a parcel of shrimps by one of the coaches, when, having received her package from the coachman just at the moment that the London mail was passing down, she caught hold of the reins of the leaders of the coach to assist her in getting out of the way, but was knocked down by the horses, and not being able to raise herself from the ground in sufficient time, was run over by the mail, the wheels of which broke her neck. The coachman of the mail, to whom no blame as we hear can be attributed, pulled up the moment the accident happened, but too late, for the deceased was only seen to move her hand, and was found quite dead. She was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and an Inquest will be held upon her body. The deceased was in the habit of receiving packages in the same way; and the accident is supposed to have arisen from her want of nerve on seeing the mail approaching.

Thursday 28 September 1837
ATHERINGTON - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRY BAKER, servant to Farmer Thomas Hunt, of Atherington, who had committed suicide the day before. We gave the particulars of this melancholy case in our last; the deceased having been induced by two sharpers in our fair, on Wednesday, to exchange his master's horse, worth 22l., for a wretched animal scarcely worth 4l., was so mortified on his return to his master's in the evening, that he went to an outhouse and hanged himself. It came out in evidence that his master had scarcely upbraided him for his folly, but that the circumstance preyed deeply on his own mind; the last person who saw him alive was a fellow workman to whom he expressed his sad mortification, remarking that he had brought his master a horse that was not worth having. After a full investigation, the Jury returned a verdict of 'Felo de Se;' and the Coroner issued his warrant for the interment of the body in the churchyard, between the hours of nine and twelve. The master gave the deceased a good character as a sober and industrious man.

Thursday 5 October 1837
EXETER - Coroner's Inquests.- On Thursday last, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for this city, at Palmer's King's Arms Inn, West Street, on the body of JOHN KEMBLE, a labourer and one of the night police, 49 years of age, and had resided on Stepcote hill, who being engaged to collect the pears on a tree in the garden of Capt. Foote, Bartholemew Terrace, fell from it, and a concussion of the brain being the consequence, was followed by death in a few hours. And the facts having been given in evidence, a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was a sober and industrious man, and had been in the service of his employers many years. By his death a widow and a family of children are left quite destitute, and a subscription has been commenced in order to their assistance.

EXETER - On Monday an Inquest was taken before the same gentleman, at Wilcock's Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen Street, on the body of PHILIP BRAUND, a waggoner who met his death under the following circumstance. He was in the employ of Mr Vicary, of Northtawton, and about two o'clock in the afternoon of the preceding Saturday, was returning from this city with his master's waggon laden with hides, being himself riding on the fore part of it. The deceased was descending the hill near Newton St. Cyres at a quick pace, and had omitted to use the drag. At this instant a gentleman appeared in a gig on the opposite direction; the deceased jumped off, caught the shaft horse by the head for the purpose of stopping them, when he was immediately thrown down and both near wheels passed over his head, and the unfortunate man had also 5 ribs broken. Every attention was immediately paid him, and he was placed in a cart in order to being brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital; when the vehicle, however, reached that Institution, it was found he had expired on the road; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was supposed to be from 33 to 34 years of age, and in this case also it is understood there is left a widow and family.

Thursday 19 October 1837
NORTH BOVEY - Fatal Accident. - On the 2nd inst. an accident fatal in its nature and melancholy in its attendant consequences occurred at East Coombe in North Bovey the residence of MR WILLIAM NOSWORTHY. His son and only child, about 4 ½ years old, while playing about the house and moving backwards, accidentally fell into a tub of boiling water, and although the father was present and instantly caught him up, and his clothes were stripped from him with all the expedition possible the poor little fellow was so dreadfully scalded, that he died the following day. He was an interesting child, and the feelings of the parents may be conceived, but cannot be described. On the 4th inst. an Inquest was taken on the body before Joseph Gribble, Esq. one of the Coroners for Devon, and a verdict returned accordingly.

Thursday 9 November 1837
EXETER - The parish of Shillingford St. George, near this city, has been thrown into a great state of excitement by the disclosure of a scene of inhumanity and barbarity such as happily for human nature does not often present itself. In this parish lived an aged couple named JJOHN and SUSAN BOULT, the former 64 and the latter 60 years of age. BOULT has been in the habit of ill treating his wife, by kicking her and using other violence, and on Saturday the 21st ult. she died under circumstances of great suspicion, the consequence of which was his apprehension and examination before a Magistrate, but without a sufficiency of proof to warrant his committal. He was, however, detained in custody, in order to await the result of a Coroner's Inquest, which took place on the following Monday, at the King's Arms public house, Shillingford. Here Short, a constable, stated that having on several occasions been called to the assistance of the deceased, when BOULT had been beating and otherwise ill treating her. A daughter of the prisoner corroborated this testimony, and added, that on some occasions her father said he would murder the deceased. Mary Hanley, a neighbour, was called on the preceding Thursday, the deceased being in a fit. On recollection returning, the deceased took witness by the hand, and on the husband coming towards her, she made a motion with her hand indicating a desire to keep him off, and then struck her breast several times. None of the witnesses, however, saw BOULT strike or kick the deceased on that day, nor heard any cries from her; but the daughter stated that her mother was well in the morning when she left the house. Mr S. C. Brown, a surgeon, was requested by BOULT to visit his wife, who he said was ill, and going to the house accordingly, he found her labouring under a fit. He directed such means as he deemed necessary, and the next day visited the deceased again, when a woman who had been attending her mentioned to him an injury, the deceased was suffering under in her leg, which led to an examination and discovery of a severe fracture in the left leg. Immediate attention was paid to this, but the unfortunate woman sunk under it, and died about noon on Saturday. In the post mortem examination Mr Brown was assisted by Mr Land, surgeon, St. Thomas, and their attention was first directed to the injured leg, on laying open which a most extensive comminuted fracture was found in the centre of the tibia, and the fibula was fractured high up. The throat was inspected, but no marks indicating violence were found there. On opening the head and examining the brain, about four ounces of extravased blood was found, particularly in the right ventricle, but extending into the left, and thus inducing apoplexy, was pronounced to be the immediate cause of death. The medical gentlemen were both of opinion that the fracture of the leg could not have been caused by a fall, but that it was produced by a blow or blows from some blunt instrument: a nailed shoe might have occasioned it. They also stated that a fit of apoplexy might be brought on either by excessive joy, or fear and terror. The Jury deliberated some time, and returned a verdict:- "Died of Apoplexy." - JOHN BOULT was then called in, and the result of the Inquiry communicated to him. He was also severely reprimanded for his barbarity to his wife, the Jury expressing themselves very strongly on the suspicious nature of the case, observing to him that he had narrowly escaped being sent before another tribunal. BOULT is the father of the unfortunate young man of that name, some years since executed at the Devon County Gaol, for shooting and dreadfully wounding a young woman, through jealousy.

Thursday 23 November 1837
HEANTON PUNCHARDON - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Heanton Punchardon, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARIA GAMMON, aged 6 years, whose clothes accidentally took fire about four o'clock on the preceding afternoon, by which she was so dreadfully burnt that she died the same night. Verdict - 'Accidental Death.'

BIDEFORD - On Thursday last, SAMUEL ELLIOT, of this town, mason, committed suicide by cutting his throat. He was first discovered by a young man of Westleigh, named Puddicome, at Mount Pleasant, a wood near this town, running towards the turnpike road, and crying for assistance, having it appears committed the act in a retired part of the wood. He was immediately taken to his house, where he was attended by three medical men, Messrs. Pridham, Caddy, and Owen Cooke, who found the wind pipe was completely severed, but they could not proceed to examine the wound (on account of the violence of the infatuated man's spasms) until nine o'clock, when it was immediately pronounced a hopeless case, as not only was the wind pipe severed, but dreadfully town by the blunt instrument which he had used. He lingered until Monday, when he died at about 2 o'clock in the morning. An Inquest was held on the body the same day, at Browne's Commercial Inn, before Lawrence Pridham, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned of 'Temporary Insanity.' It appears that the deceased had been in great uneasiness of mind for some time past, on account of over speculation in building: he has left a wife and eleven children.

Thursday 30 November 1837
KINGSBRIDGE - Awfully Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at Kingsbridge, on Saturday last, by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN CRANCH, late Governor of the Workhouse. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased went to bed as usual, on Friday night, apparently in good health, and on the next morning he was found dead in his bed. J. D. Pearce, Esq. Surgeon, deposed that the deceased was afflicted with asthma, but he considered that death was caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in the lungs. The Jury returned a verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

Thursday 14 December 1837
LITTLE TORRINGTON - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at Little Torrington, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the bodies of three children of a poor man named BURCH, all of whom were taken alarmingly ill on Sunday se'nnight and one died on the following Monday, and the other two on the Tuesday. There was no evidence to shew that the extraordinary fatality was occasioned by other than natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." The little innocents were all interred in the same coffin; their ages were from 2 to 5 years.

Thursday 21 December 1837
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday, at the North Devon Infirmary, on the body of JANE SLOCOMBE, aged 84. The deceased was a pauper, and an inmate of the workhouse at Instow; on Saturday last while standing before the fire in the kitchen, her clothes became ignited, and before assistance could be rendered her, the lower arts of her person were burnt in a very dreadful manner. She was immediately removed to this benevolent institution where all that surgical skill and care cold do was done for her, but without any avail; she died on the following Tuesday. - Verdict - 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 25 January 1838
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday the 9th instant as the Defiance Coach was proceeding from this city to Bideford, when about 1 ½ miles beyond Coplestone Cross, one of the horses shied, it is supposed at a donkey, causing the off wheel to strike against some heaps of dirt which had been left in the road, and the driver, MR JOHN BAKER, was thrown off. He was taken up by Handford, the Bideford Carrier, who was passing at the time, and it was ascertained that his arm was broken together with other internal injuries. The coach did not upset and was driven by Handford on to the Union Inn, BAKER being also conveyed thither, and every attention paid him, but we regret to state in vain, - he lingered till Friday night last, when he died. An Inquest was held on the body by J. Partridge, Esq., Tiverton, on Monday last, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned, together with a deodand of one shilling on the coach and 6d. on each of the horses. BAKER was much respected, a careful, steady driver, and has left a wife and four children to deplore their loss. The great impropriety of heaps of dirt being thus allowed to remain on the public road has often been pointed out, and this sad event shows it is justly deserving of severe reprehension, and a practice which should be discontinued.

EXETER - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at the Valiant Soldier Inn, by John Warren, Esq., on the body of GEORGE MONK. From the evidence of John Sobey, who lived as servant with Mr James Turner, of Whelmstone, Colebrooke, it appeared that Monk was about 17 or 18 years of age, and an apprentice of Mr Turner's. On the 10th instant the deceased and witness came to this city with barley, the latter with a waggon and three horses, and MONK with a cart and one horse. About 2 P.M. they were returning, the witness with the empty waggon, and the deceased followed with the cart at about a distance of ten land-yards. When they had got about four or five yards beyond the Red Cow turnpike-gate, witness hard the report of two guns close together, and upon this the horse which the deceased was driving took fright and ran away. Witness then endeavoured to stop the horse on its coming up to him, but could not, as it passed on galloping. The deceased had no reins - was provided with reins, but had left them home, and it was his own fault he had not the reins with him. When about ten yards from witness's waggon, the deceased was seen to jump off the fore part of the cart where he was sitting, the horse still galloping - the cart caught his smock-frock and he fell, the near wheel going right over his head. Witness ran up to him and found John Philips assisting him - he was quite insensible, and was bleeding very much from his mouth and ears, and was at once taken to the Hospital. The horse and cart proceeded about 40 yards from the spot where the accident occurred before they were stopped. When witness heard the report of the guns he did not see the persons discharging them, but the reports appeared to come from the ground on the river side of the road. John Philips, of St. David, labourer, in his evidence, corroborated the statement of Sobey. Mr S. G. Sloman, jun., a pupil of Mr S. Barnes, stated that the deceased was brought to the Hospital in an insensible state, with much bleeding from both ears and also his nose. The deceased died on Monday, the preceding day, at 1 P.M. There had not been any post mortem examination, but there was every reason to suppose that there was a fracture at the base of the skull, and evidently a concussion of the brain; he did not regain his senses, and there was never any chance of his recovery. A verdict of Accidental Death was accordingly returned.

BRATTON FLEMING - Death by Burning. - On Wednesday last, at Bratton Fleming, ANN DANIEL, a little girl six years old, daughter of GEORGE DANIEL, a labouring man of Countisbury, in the temporary absence of the woman in whose house she lived, caught fire to her clothes, and was so seriously injured that she survived but until the following Monday. An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' returned.

Thursday 1 February 1838
BEER AND SEATON - SUICIDES - On the 9th inst. a young woman named SUSAN LOARING, residing at Bovey Farm, in the parish of Beer and Seaton, was found lying dead in the apple chamber, with a cotton shawl drawn tightly in a knot round her neck. Under her shoulder was a prayer book opened to the 69th psalm. No cause cold be assigned for the rash act, except the disappointment of a young man who was paying his addresses to her, not visiting her as she had expected, on the preceding Sunday. And on the Inquest, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, a verdict of Felo de Se was returned and the corpse was privately interred at Seaton, at 10 o'clock at night.

OTTERY ST. MARY - On the morning of Saturday the 13th instant; JAS WILLEY, 23 years of age, servant to Mr John Crown, of Burrough Hill Farm, Ottery St. Mary, hung himself in a hay loft, over the stable. On the Inquest, before Mr Aberdein, no evidence of insanity was produced, and the Jury, in this case also, returned a verdict of Felo de Se.

Thursday 15 February 1838
STOKEINTEIGNHEAD - Fatal Accident. - We have this week t record a most melancholy accident which occurred on Thursday week. A poor woman of the name of BOWDEN, residing at a place called "One o'clock," in the parish of Stokeinteignhead, had occasion to go from home for a short time leaving her two children, of the ages of four and two years, sitting by the fire; on her return, after the absence of about 20 minutes, she found her eldest child lying on the hearth, and presenting a most shocking spectacle, all her clothes destroyed, and the poor girl literally roasted. The younger child was also severely burnt, and still les in a very dangerous state. As soon as the accident was known in the village, the Rev. Dr. Collyns, the vicar of the parish, drove into Shaldon a distance of nearly four miles, to fetch the district Surgeon, but not finding Mr Scarborough at home, he drove on to the residence of Mr Harvey, Surgeon to the Teignmouth district, at whose house he was fortunate enough to find Mr Scarborough and both gentlemen immediately started for Stoke, and found the children as above described. By the kindness of Dr Collyns, some remedies were promptly applied to the surviving sufferer, who, but for this timely assistance in all probability would have met with speedy death from the effects of the intensely cold weather upon his system. An Inquest was held on Saturday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The Coroner stated that he had that day returned from holding an Inquest upon a child who was burnt to death at Kenton, which was the third child who had been destroyed by fire within the week; and Mr Harvey said that he had then three very severe cases of burns under his care, in the Teignmouth district. The frequency of these alarming accidents should teach a severe lesson to mothers, who ought to be extremely cautious in leaving young children by themselves, in a room in which a fire is burning.

BERRYNARBOR - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, Farmer JAMES ROBINS, of Berrynarbor, in company with some of his neighbours, went out for the purpose of shooting a fox. In the pursuit, they saw the fox, and MR ROBINS fired, but missed; they proceeded further and he adventurously mounted the top of a cliff to look around him, and while standing there his foot slipped from under him, and he fell over the cliff upon the beach, to a depth of about sixty feet. He was instantly picked up but the vital spark had fled; his arm was broken, and the blood was streaming in profusion from his mouth and ears. An Inquest was held on the body on the day following, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 March 1838
Coroner's Inquests: EXETER - On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., coroner for Exeter, at Wilcocks' Valiant Soldier Inn, Magdalen Street, on the body of MR NOSWORTHY, for several years lessee of the fishery at Salmon Pool on the river Exe. During the frost he had gone out for the purpose of shooting, when the gun bursting, his hand was so shattered as rendered it necessary he should become an inmate of the Devon and Exeter Hospital. Here amputation of the arm was thought requisite, but the constitution had sustained so severe a shock that he sunk under it, and died in the course of the preceding night. Verdict - Accidental Death.

CREDITON - On the 13th inst., before Jas. partridge, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Williams's Ship Inn, Crediton, on the body f MRS MARY STONE, found dead, the previous day, in her house. She was 84 years of age, and possessed of good property, but from early habits of activity and industry preferred living alone. it is supposed, therefore, that finding herself ill in the night, she had got out of bed, and falling, was unable to raise herself, and that her death was a consequence of exhaustion and cold: and accordingly, a verdict of Died by the Visitation of God, was returned. The deceased was much esteemed by those who knew her, for great kindness of feeling, benevolence and charity, and will long be regretted by them.

Thursday 8 March 1838
ATHERINGTON - Caution to Parish Authorities. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Atherington, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM PARKIN, a labouring man in the employ of Mr Down, of Umberleigh Barton. The deceased was at work in a field upon the farm, with a horse and cart, about three weeks since, and standing near the hedge, the horse suddenly turned round, and the cart came in contact with the deceased and crushed him against a tree, by which several of his ribs were fractured and he was otherwise severely injured. He lingered in great suffering a few days when he died, and was interred on Saturday se'nnight without an Inquest. These facts coming to the knowledge of the Coroner, justly considering that the death of a person under such circumstances ought to form a subject for the Enquiry of a Jury, caused the body to be disinterred on Monday last; and after the evidence was gone into, the Jury returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death,' with a deodand on the horse and cart of 2s.

Thursday 15 March 1838
BARNSTAPLE - Awful Death.- An Inquest was held on Tuesday morning last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM COPP, labourer, aged 37. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Nickolls, yeoman, of Pill, near this town, and had left his work the preceding evening at about half past seven o'clock; he was met soon after that hour coming towards Barnstaple, and nothing more was seen of him until the Tuesday morning, when he was found, by a sailor, at about three o'clock, on the lime kiln in Litchdon, quite dead. It is presumed that he was very much under the influence of liquor, and went to the lime kiln to remain the night, and immediately fell forward into it. Verdict, "Died from Suffocation."

GOODLEIGH - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, on the body of WILLIAM RICHARDS, of Goodleigh, shoe maker, aged 78, who had retired to rest the preceding night in his usual health, and was found dead in his bed the same morning. - Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 5 April 1838
EXETER - Inquest at St. Thomas's Union Workhouse.- An Inquest was held at the New Union Workhouse, in St. Thomas, on Tuesday last, before J. Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners of the County, on the body of THOMAS PYLE, who terminated his existence by hanging himself to a beam, in the work-room of that establishment, on Sunday morning. It appeared that the deceased was 75 years of age, and an inhabitant of Lympstone. He got up on Sunday morning at the usual hour, and went into the work room, and committed the fatal act; the body was discovered about three quarters of an hour after, it was warm. A surgeon was immediately sent for, but the vital spark had fled; The deceased had been admitted into the Old Workhouse about twelve months since and was transferred to the New on its completion. He had no friends, but one of the Guardians, Capt. Williams, of Lympstone, who used to give him a trifle of money occasionally and look to his little comforts. This gentleman on hearing of the tidings of his death proceeded to the Workhouse and was much affected on learning the particulars of the case. The deceased had been a man of property, but had lived fast. He had distant relatives it was stated at the Inquest, but no friends. From the evidence of Mr Woodman, surgeon, who was examined on the Inquest, it appeared that deceased was very infirm, his muscular system was completely impaired, and there could be little doubt that his mind was also much impaired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 12 April 1838
TIVERTON - On the 26th ult., an Inquest was taken before F. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner of Tiverton, on the body of SARAH ANN BROOKS, 7 years of age, daughter of a carpenter, employed in the lace manufactory of Messrs. J. Heathcoat and Co., who in endeavouring to lift the blow-coal off the fire, in the work-shop, in the temporary absence of the father, caught her clothes on fire, and was so burnt that she expired on the following evening. Verdict - Accidental Death.

EXETER - On the 27th ult., a person of the name of BIDGOOD, a butcher, of Tiverton, who had been staying a few days with his nephew, Mr Upton, at Teignmouth, terminated his existence by cutting his throat with a razor. He had intended to leave for this city that morning, and solicited Mr Upton to accompany him a short distance, who in entering his room, found him partly dressed in the state described, quite dead. Verdict on the Inquest on the following day - Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 19 April 1838
EAST BUDLEIGH - An Inquest was held on the 6th inst. by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, at East Budleigh, on the body of PETER CLERK, Esq., aged 88, formerly a surgeon of that place, who came by his death in consequence of an injury received in falling from his horse, by which he fractured three of his ribs on the left side, and a concussion of the brain was produced. - Accidental Death. It was with much regret that in this instance the Coroner felt himself called upon to issue his warrant to disinter the body no information having been sent to him of the accident until after the burial, under the misunderstanding that in consequence of the death not being immediate, no inquiry was necessary.

OTTERY ST. MARY - An Inquest was also held the same day at Ottery St. Mary, on the body of SARAH TRICKEY, an infant about two years and half old. The mother had left it for about five minutes and on her return found the deceased had fallen into an earthen pan about a foot in height, with about three inches of water in it, her hands and face were in the water and her feet upwards - a piece of stick which she had been playing with was found in the pan, and it is supposed that she let the stick fall into the pan, and in trying to recover it fell in head foremost, and being very weak in her legs was unable to recover herself. She moved once after being taken out, but died before medical assistance arrived. Verdict- Accidentally Suffocated.

Thursday 26 April 1838
PARACOMBE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, in the parish of Paracombe, on the body of a little boy about 5 years old, named WALTER DART, son of MR MICHAEL DART, yeoman. The deceased accidentally caught his clothes on fire on the Friday previous, and was burnt so severely that he died on the following day. Verdict, "Accidental Death.

At Chulmleigh, a Coroner's Inquest was held by T. Copner, Esq., on the body of THOMAS HEADON, who was killed by a fall from his horse.

Thursday 10 May 1838
BOW - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at Bow, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS MORTIMER, aged 46, a waggoner in the employ of Mr Durant, of Northtawton. The deceased was riding on the shaft of his master's waggon through Bow, and having as it is supposed fallen asleep through fatigue, fell off and the wheel went over his chest. He was instantly taken up and conveyed to a neighbouring inn, where after lingering a day or two in much agony, he expired.

Thursday 17 May 1838
PLYMOUTH - Supposed Murder.- An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before A. Bone, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a man, named THOMAS THOMPSON, which was found dead on Mount Batten, on Saturday morning. The unfortunate man was 69 years of age, and had formerly been a master of a vessel, but for some time past resided in the country. On Wednesday last, he came, with Shears the carrier, from Brixham to Plymouth to see his son. He arrived here on Wednesday evening, and on Thursday went on board H.M.S. Hercules, where his son was. After he had accomplished the object for which he came, he left Plymouth on Friday morning with Shears, for the purpose of returning home. He proceeded with him as far as Ridgway hill, at which place he got out of the cart, saying that he would follow it in a few minutes; but, being rather tipsey at the time, he mistook the road and walked back towards Plymouth. When he reached the "Rising Sun" public house, at Crabtree, he fell in with two soldiers, and wished to obtain more rink, but the people belonging to the house, seeing his condition, refused to let him have any. He ultimately rode back to Plymouth, accompanied by the soldiers' in the coach, No. 2, the driver of which set him down at the Pack Horse Inn, in Buckwell street, and observing that he was tipsey, he made him show his watch and money to the landlord, the latter consisting of some half-crowns, shillings, and other coins. He remained at the Pack Horse from 12 o'clock at noon, until about 8 in the evening. Whilst he was there, two men, named Fewings and Robinson, came into the same room, and staid there for some time, the former having persuaded the old man to treat him with some ale. they both left the house before he did. About 8 o'clock on Friday evening, THOMPSON went away from the Pack Horse, and was never seen alive afterwards, and though the most diligent and careful enquiries have been made by that active and intelligent peace officer, Leverton, no trace of his subsequent movements has been obtained. At about half-past 12 at noon, the body of an old man was found lying up on a prominent rock, on the shore at Mount Batten, about half tide high. The body lay with the back upwards, and the snow white hairs of the old man contrasted mournfully with the black sea weed upon which he was stretched. Upon examining the body, several bruises were observed upon the forehead, as if he had been struck there several times. One of his eyes were swelled, and the neighbouring parts were much bruised. He also appeared to have received a heavy blow under one of the ears, and another by the side of his nose. One sleeve of his jacket was ripped upwards from the cuff, and the jacket itself was torn on the other side near the waist. The watch had been taken away, and also the purse and money which he had in his possession on the previous day; but on a careful examination of his clothing it was perceived that another purse which was concealed in his drawers, had escaped the notice of the plunderer. A post mortem examination of the body took place, and the medical gentleman who performed it stated that the marks of violence which appeared upon the body were, in his opinion, more likely to have been produced by a fall upon some rough substance, than by manual force; the heart was so much diseased as to warrant a supposition that he might have died suddenly. He was unable to say whether the man had met with his death from drowning or disease of the heart. A highly respectable medical man of Plymouth, to whom the bruises upon the body were described by the peace officer, gave as his opinion, that the injuries causing them had taken place while the man was alive. Persons who are well acquainted with the harbour have stated that the body could not have been carried by the tide or currents from any part of Plymouth to the spot where he was found. Suspicion rests upon two persons for having - at least - unlawfully possessed themselves of the old man's watch and money. Many circumstances have transpired tending to strengthen this suspicion which we refrain from publishing, lest thereby the ends of justice might be frustrated. Leverton is still engaged in sifting the matter, and it is probable that further light may be thrown on this mysterious affair at the adjourned Inquest.

PYEWORTHY - A fatal accident occurred on Thursday the 3rd instant, in the parish of Pyeworthy. A young man named SAMUEL PAWLEY, about 18 years of age, a servant to Mr Axford, was pitching wood to a cart, when one of the fagot sticks fell on his head end-ways; he seemed to take but little notice of the blow until supper time - he however eat his supper, but soon after complained of much pain in his head. A surgeon was immediately sent for, but all to no purpose - he died about 11 o'clock next day. Mr Vallack, of Great Torrington, Coroner, being previously engaged, could not attend until Saturday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 12 July 1838
TIVERTON - The New Poor Law.- An Inquest was held by F. S. Gervis, Esq., July 2nd, on the body of GRACE BAKER, a poor woman, who had been found dead in her bed, the preceding morning. It appeared that she and her daughter lived together, the daughter (about 16) earns from 2s. to 2s. 4d. per week, the deceased was allowed 1s. 6d. per week only, by the parish of Burlescombe, to which she belongs, and this was all the poor woman had to support her. After paying for her lodging and 1d. for bringing her money, she had just one penny per day to live on. The parish refused to give her more, wishing her to come into the workhouse, but the poor woman staid with her daughter. The deceased had long been ill of water on the chest, and general debility - she had for some days before been hardly able to lie down, on account of her cough - she had eaten some ham for her supper, the night preceding her death, and drank some cider. Mr Macdonald, the parish surgeon, considered that much of her suffering and symptoms arose from her impoverished diet, and that it was not sufficient to keep her in a state of health - he had no doubt that her mode of living hastened her death, and that she might have lived for years if she had been provided more liberally with food. The digestive organs were so much impaired, as to be unable to perform their functions. The immediate cause of death was the distended stomach pressing against the lungs, by which breathing was stopped. The Coroner having summed up at some length, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God, but hastened by the want of a proper supply of food," which they requested the Coroner to communicate, with the evidence, to the Poor law commissioners.

BARNSTAPLE - Accident.- On Tuesday evening last, a fatal accident happened to ELIZABETH BLACKMORE, a little girl between two and three years of age, daughter of GEORGE BLACKMORE, an operative of the Derby lace factory. the deceased, in company with two or three other children, was at play in the brick field, near the edge of the river Yeo, and stooping to the water to wash her hands, unfortunately fell in: her playmates were not old enough to be aware of the child's danger, and did not therefore give instant alarm; but some little time after, the child's brother said to a woman "ELIZABETH is fallen into the river:" The woman immediately called a man in the factory and he observed the body floating down the stream and went in and brought it out, but life was quite extinct. An Inquest was held on the body the following day before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned "Accidental Death." The distress of the parents (who are very respectable people,) on seeing their child brought home a corpse, may better be imagined than described.

Thursday 19 July 1838
PLYMOUTH - JOHN POPE, nearly 70 years of age, by trade a shoemaker, residing in Looe Street, Plymouth, fell down on Sunday last, in a fit of apoplexy, which terminated his existence. An Inquest was held on the body before Mr R. J. Squire, and a verdict returned, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 2 August 1838
HEAVITREE - A Coroner's Inquest (Mr John Clarke, foreman,) was held at the Horse and Groom Inn, Heavitree, on Saturday morning, by J. Partridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM CHANNON, of Budleigh Salterton, labourer, who was found very ill, near Sandy Gate, under a hayrick of Mr T. Pidsley of Sowton, last Thursday, and died on being removed to the Royal Oak public house, in Heavitree, next morning. Webber, a labourer, deposed to finding the deceased in a great state of destitution in the place described, which was corroborated by Mr Pidsley, who behaved with the utmost humanity to the deceased and tried every means to renovate nature, though in vain. He was a drover, when employment was to be had, and had seen better days. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of Providence, but accelerated by his exposure to the wet and damp."

THORVERTON - A distressing accident occurred in this village on Saturday, by which a respectable young man named HEARDER, was prematurely snatched from this world. The unfortunate deceased was in a loft taking down hurdles for the purpose of making the sheep pens for the fair, when his foot slipped, and dropping one hurdle he fell upon another beneath, by which he was so severely injured in the abdomen, that he lingered in much suffering till Sunday forenoon, when he expired. An Inquest was held on the body; and after due investigation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was much respected as an honest and industrious character; he has left a wife and two children to lament their loss.

Thursday 9 August 1838
GEORGE NYMPTON - An Inquisition was held before Thomas Copner, Coroner, on Friday last, at Georgenympton, on GEORGE AGGETT, miller, who in attempting to [?] horse, fell from the cart in which he was riding to the ground, and the wheel passed over his body [?] his death two or three days afterwards. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

BUDLEIGH SALTERTON - The following melancholy case of suicide occurred at Budleigh Salterton, on the night of Sunday the 29thth ult., in the person of MR JOSEPH AUSTWICK, of that place, and on whole body an Inquest was held by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on Monday last. The deceased had retired to bed with MRS AUSTWICK, about half-past ten o'clock; soon after getting into bed, he got out again, and MRS A. heard a noise, as if he was opening the door of the receptacle, and immediately she heard something flowing, which she thought must be water, as he was in the habit of washing his head in the night; she spoke, but receiving no answer, got out of bed, and discovered something was the matter, and gave an immediate alarm. Medical assistance was procured and MR JOSEPH AUSTWICK was found standing with his hands resting against the wall of the bedroom, between the dressing table and the door; a deluge of blood was on the floor, and his shirt quite saturated with it: he was then alive, but on being laid on the bed, gave one of two convulsive gasps and expired. When a light was first brought into the room a razor was seen in the hands of the deceased, which was taken from him. the deceased gentleman, who is about 53 years of age, had been in an excited state of mind for upwards of two months past, which had operated most prejudicially on his bodily health, producing great depression of spirits; the more immediate cause of excitement which appeared to have occasioned this distressing event, is supposed to be some past proceedings, which were agitating in a Chancery Suit, in which he had been involved for nearly 17 years. After a careful investigation, the Jury returned a verdict of "Cut his throat being Lunatic."

OTTERY ST. MARY - An Inquest was held by Mr Aberdein, at Ottery St. Mary, the 29th July, on the body of JULIA SHARLAND, aged 16 months, the infant daughter of MR JOHN SHARLAND, of Sidmouth, brickmaker, who came to her death from injury sustained in consequence of being thrown from a donkey. The deceased child with its mother were on their way from Sidmouth to Ottery riding on a donkey, the child in the mother's lap, when within about a quarter of a mile from Ottery, the donkey suddenly became restive, and MRS SHARLAND and the child were thrown off, and both fell to the ground. MRS SHARLAND did not appear to be hurt, but got up and carried the child into Ottery to the house of MR G. SHARLAND, where she became very sick, but no external injury could be discovered. A medical gentleman was sent for, who on his arrival found the child in a calm sleep, and being informed the particulars of the accident, and that she had played since, did not feel inclined to believe it had sustained serious injury. At midnight, however, convulsions with rigid spasms ensued, which gave way for a short time to medical treatment, but returned again on the Friday morning, and the child gradually declined till her death, which took place on Saturday the 28th. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - We noticed last week the melancholy death of MR EDWARD DAVIE, of this borough, local agent to the Devon and Exeter Savings' Bank and Secretary to the North Devon Friendly Institution, and the North Devon Infirmary. The evidence which was elicited at the Inquest on Thursday evening, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a very respectable Jury, shewed that the unfortunate gentleman had long been subject to sudden and violent paroxysms in his head, and several of the Jurymen, to whom he was personally well known, had lately noticed a strangeness and peculiarity in his manner, which but too clearly indicated a disordered state of mind. From a letter which he appears to have written immediately prior to the commission of the rash act that terminated his existence, and which he had left open on the counter in his office, it appeared that although usually most precise and particular in all his transactions he had suffered the accounts of the North Devon Friendly Institution to fall into a state of partial derangement, and they being of a very complex and intricate character, he had found it difficult, suffering under a painful mental affection, to make them up to his own satisfaction; in the words of his letter, he was "unable to do it;" "my brain," he added, "will not let me." This circumstance preyed on his mind, and the dread he felt at the anticipation of meeting the auditors with his balance sheet not perfectly ready, was too much for his mind to sustain, and induced a paroxysm of frenzy, in which he was impelled to his melancholy end. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, unhesitatingly and unanimously returned a verdict of "Temporary Derangement." It will be satisfactory to the depositors of the Savings' Bank to know, that his account with that establishment are scrupulously correct: he had made up his weekly statement to the 27th ultimo, and remitted the balance; and on the evening (Wednesday) before his decease, he made up what unhappily proved to be his last account, and left the exact sum which he had received packed up and marked "Savings Bank;" this sum with his account, was handed over on Saturday morning, to the Actuary, William Lee, Esq. And we have it from the best authority that among all the agents of the Savings' Bank there was not one more regular or correct than MR DAVIE; indeed any one who had ever been accustomed to transact business with him needs not to be told that a more upright or honourable man in the every day concerns of life, there cannot exist. The accounts of the Friendly Institution are now making up, and will be completed in a few days, and business be resumed as usual. This melancholy event (which has deprived the community of a useful member), certainly is one of an extraordinary character, for so far from any defalcation in his accounts or embarrassment in his pecuniary circumstances (which have been reported) independently of the emoluments he derived from his public offices, MR DAVIE enjoyed a handsome private income.

Thursday 16 August 1838
DEVONPORT - INQUEST - An Inquest was held on Friday on the body of an idiot girl, named JANE PARR, who resided with her father in Mount Street, Devonport. On Thursday she had been locked up in a room of the house, when she procured a light and set the bed on fire. She was dreadfully burned, and taken to the workhouse, and medical assistance rendered her, but the injuries were so severe that she died on the following day. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Thursday 23 August 1838
HIGH BICKINGTON - Inquest held before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner. - On Friday last, at Highbickington, on the body of JOHN DAVIE, cordwainer, aged 67. He was at work with his son in the morning, and complained that he was ill; in about half an hour afterwards he was taken up to his bed room, but before the surgeon arrived he had expired. Verdict, 'Visitation of God.'

LITTLE TORRINGTON - Inquests held by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner. - Careless end Dangerous Driving. - On Tuesday the 21st, at Little Torrington, on the body of WM. MARTIN, servant to Mr Tucker, yeoman, of Totely, in Black Torrington. The deceased was driving a waggon drawn by three horses, without reins, a fast trot down a steep hill at Churchford, when, in order to avoid running foul of two carts which were going on quietly just a head, he alighted from his waggon to endeavour to stop his horses, but unfortunately in the attempt he was thrown down by the near fore wheel of the waggon, which passed over his head, and fractured his skull, causing instant death. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

NORTH LEW - On the same day at North Lew, on the body of MARY JANE BULLEID, aged 10 years, daughter of MR BULLEID, of Hatherleigh. The deceased had been incautiously and ignorantly placed by a servant man on a horse with her foot in the stirrup leather; the result was, she fell from the horse, and being entangled in the leather, the animal became frightened, and ran off furiously for nearly a mile to the house of his owner, by which time the head of the poor child was fractured, and the scalp entirely gone. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

BIDEFORD - On Monday last, an Inquest was held on the body of PHILIP STEVENS, of Silver street, in this town, joiner. Deceased a fortnight since was forced against the wall in the street, by a cart which was passing, the wheel of which came in contact with his head, and, crushing it against the wall, inflicted a severe wound upon it; he lingered in much pain, and lock-jaw ensued, and caused his death. It did not appear that any blame attacked to the driver. Verdict, 'Accidental Death,' with a deodand of 6d. on the cart.

Thursday 6 September 1838
BIDEFORD - We stated last week that exertions were making to recover a body which was suspected to be in the river: we have now to report that these exertions succeeded; a body was picked up, and proved to be that of a man named TAYLOR, employed in Mr Brook's ship-building yard. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body before Thomas Pridham, Esq., Coroner; but no evidence was adduced to prove how it came into the river, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 13 September 1838
PLYMOUTH - Inquests: - On Friday last, an Inquest was held on the body of CAPT. HENRY PYNE, R.N., who died suddenly at 17, Coburgh-street, Plymouth, on that morning. - [see entry for 20 September 1838]

PLYMOUTH - The same day a poor man, who obtained a livelihood by making and selling children's caps, was found lying dead in the court yard of a house in Stonehouse-lane, where he had resided. An Inquest was held on the body on the following day, before Mr Squire, and a verdict returned, "Died of Asthma."

PLYMOUTH - A fine little boy, aged 3 years, the son of MR E. BEER, butcher, was accidentally drowned on Saturday last, by falling into al tub of water, in the court yard of his uncle's house, MR WYATT, (Provision-warehouse,) Bedford-street, Plymouth. It appears that the child had been for some time employed in placing chips in the tub to swim, and while so occupied he lost his balance, and fell in: when discovered life was totally extinct. An Inquest was held on his body the same day, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 September 1838
EXMOUTH - Inquests by R. H. Aberdein, Esq. - On the 11th instant, at Exmouth, on the body of ANNA CATHERINE TUPMAN, an infant aged 7 months, who died from injuries received by accidentally upsetting a tea pot full of boiling water, the contents of which fell over the deceased child, severely scalding the chest and bowels, with the upper part of the arm; the child lingered till the following day and then expired.

LITTLEHAM - On the same day at Littleham, on the body of HENRY BARRET, aged 13. The deceased had been sent by his father to turn a mare out in a field about a quarter of a mile from his residence, about 9 o'clock in the morning of the 10th instant, and not returning to dinner, his father about 1 o'clock went to look for him. As he was going down the lane a few yards only from the field where the mare was to have been put, he saw the mare lying on her back in the ditch on the left side of the lane, with her legs in the air, and underneath the mare he saw the legs of the deceased; he returned for assistance, and on extricating the mare from the ditch, the deceased lad was taken out quite dead. There was some water in the bottom of the ditch in which deceased was lying, and it is supposed that the mare stumbled with and fell into the ditch upon him, and her weight pressing him with force downwards, suffocation was produced.

TIVERTON - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, before F. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of ALFRED ROOKS, aged 18, a youth in the employ of Mr W. Chapple, of Gornhay. It appeared that as deceased about 8 o'clock on Tuesday morning was driving a waggon belonging to his master along the road near his house, he tried to get upon the shafts of the waggon, but slipped and fell, and the wheels passed over his body. He was immediately taken home, and Mr J. F. Quick, surgeon, was sent for, but the poor fellow lingered till the afternoon, and then died. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, with a deodand of 5s. on the waggon.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - We noticed in our last that an Inquest was held on the body of COMMANDER PYNE, R.N., who died suddenly in Coburg street, Plymouth. The following are the particulars adduced at the Inquest. The deceased, who lately arrived from Jersey, had been sojourning here for a few weeks, and was about to quite the town for the north of Devon, on Friday, 7th inst., previous to which, on Thursday evening, between the hours of 9 and 10, he called on an old shipmate, Lieutenant Coates, R.N., 17, Oxford street, and having stated it was his intention to rise at an early hour and accompany the waggon on foot to Tavistock, he was then about to take his leave, and in the very act of expressing his regret to Mrs Coates, that he must leave Plymouth without being enabled to introduce his daughter to Miss C., he was seized with a sudden tremor, fell back in his chair without uttering another word, and expired without a groan. A medical gentleman was promptly called in, but found the vital spark had fled. On the post mortem examination, it was found that the deceased had died in consequence of the bursting of an abscess in the lungs. COMMANDER PYNE was an old meritorious officer; he entered the naval service in 1798, was made Lieutenant in 1806 and promoted to the rank of Commander, for his heroic conduct in assisting to capture and destroy number of armed vessels on the coast of America, in the year 1814, since which period he has not been employed, but, when afloat, was beloved and respected by all who knew him. He has left a wife and daughter to lament their loss.

PLYMOUTH - We regret to state that on Saturday last a fatal accident happened in the Dock Yard, to a man named CHARLES BUNSALL. The deceased was painting the mast head of the Camel lighter, lying in the Camber, and it being low water the guy by which she was secured gave way, she heeled over, and by the jerk the deceased was precipitated into the Camber, and killed instantaneously. A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict returned of 'Accidental Death.' The deceased has left a wife and a family of five children, who are all under the age of twelve years.

Thursday 27 September 1838
TORRINGTON - On Monday last an Inquest was held by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MRS MARY FRIENDSHIP, wife of MR FRIENDSHIP, roper of this place, who was discovered on the preceding day (Sunday) about seven in the morning, in the Rolle canal, near Taddiport. The deceased when taken out of the water had only her night clothes on, and was quite dead. It appeared the unfortunate woman had been addicted to habits of intemperance, and for some time past had been in a depressed state of mind. But as no evidence could be adduced to prove that she had committed suicide, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

DAWLISH - This place was thrown into a state of alarm early on Monday morning last, by a report being spread that a woman by the name of LUSCOMBE had drowned herself in the Mill pond. She left the house of her husband on Sunday evening between eight and nine o'clock, and on not returning search was made for her, which did not prove successful until half past five o'clock in the morning, when life was quite extinct. The deceased had for some time been labouring under depression of spirits, she was about 22 years of age, and has left a husband and one child to deplore her loss. An Inquest was held on the body the same evening, before J. Gribble, Esq., and a respectable Jury, when they returned a verdict of Insanity.

TIVERTON - An Inquest was held at Tiverton on Wednesday, before F. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of SARAH FEY, a little girl, ten years of age, who met her death under the following circumstances. The parents of the deceased live in the neighbourhood of Hensley House, about a mile and half from the town. They had sent her with her brother's dinner, who was labouring in the field. As she was returning, and coming down the hill above Hensley, an empty waggon, drawn by two horses, and driven by John Bryant, a parish apprentice of Mr Carpenter, of Witheleigh Farm, Tiverton, approached her - the driver riding on the shafts without reins. He called to her to get to the side of the road, which she did. The horses then set off in a hard trot, and the driver could not restrain them. The little girl, frightened, tried again to cross the road, but was knocked down by the horses, and the waggon passed over her body. Bryant then jumped off, and stopped the horses. The poor little girl died almost immediately. The learned Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of 'Manslaughter' against John Bryant, with a deodand of five pounds upon the waggon and horses. The Coroner issued his warrant of committal, and bound over the overseers of the parish to prosecute at the next assizes.

Thursday 4 October 1838
EXETER - A Woman Drowned. - Coroner's Inquest. On Friday morning last, the body of a female was discovered floating on the mill leat in the Bonhay, in the city of Exeter; and on being brought to the shore, was identified as that of a poor woman, named ANNE BREWER. She was about 27 years of age. No marks of violence were found on her person, but there were various rumours in the neighbourhood, as to the cause of her death, and it was even said that she had come to her death by unfair means. An Inquest was held the next day on the body, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner for this city. A man named John Isaac, with whom it appeared the deceased cohabited, attended to watch the proceedings. The following evidence was adduced:-
Betty Fisher: I am the wife of John Fisher of Allhallows on the Walls, labourer, and work for Jane Winter a washerwoman, who lives in the parish of St. Edmund on the Bridge. Yesterday morning soon after six o'clock my attention was called by Jane Winter to something in the mill leat adjoining her premises. It appeared to me at first like a shirt or shift, but on nearer approach, I discovered the body of a woman; it is the same body as the Jury have now seen. I know nothing more of the deceased.
CHARITY BREWER: I am the wife of WILLIAM BREWER of Broadclist, labourer, the deceased was the daughter of my husband by his former wife; she was about 27 years old; I last saw her alive at my husband's house a little after last Christmas; she then came in company with a person who is now present, and calls himself John Isaac; they both said they were married; I and my husband doubted it, but we never took any means to ascertain whether they were married or not; I have never seen the deceased since alive.
Ann Taylor: The deceased ANN BREWER was my first cousin; on Wednesday last, I was at work at Mr Sanders's at Pinhoe; about half past three o'clock the deceased came to me there, and asked whether I would let her stay with me a few days and look after my children whilst I was at work; I told her I had no more work for the week; she then asked me to let her stay the night, to which I consented; she then left me and at seven o'clock I found her at Fanny Westcott's, where I told her to go and wait till I had left work; she then went with me to my house: I had heard that a young man had come from Exeter with her, and I asked her and she told me that he had, and that he was gone back; never saw any man with her: she slept at my house and lay in bed till two o'clock the following day; she then got up and had some gruel and went to bed again, and staid there till half-past four, when she got up again and went away, saying she would go to her aunt, and I never saw her alive afterwards; whilst she was with me she complained of pain in her head; she appeared ill; her spirits were generally not good; she complained of distress and said she had no money, that she had sold her shoes off her feet that morning to get something to eat for herself and the young man; I had not seen her for nine months; I had heard that she was lying about in a bad way with this young man, but I did not ask her anything about him.
Ann Limebeare: I live in St. Mary Steps, in this city; the deceased had lodged with me a fortnight about two or three months since; John Isaac lived at Mrs Ballman's, next door to me, and used to keep company with the deceased. I have seen her but once to speak to her since she left my house. On Thursday night, about half-past ten or rather later, I heard a female crying, I heard exclamations such as "Oh, where shall I go? What shall I do? What will become of me?" I opened my door and saw a female; she was near my door, but as I opened it she moved off; I asked what was the matter, but got no answer; she continued moving off, and I followed her a distance of three doors; I five or six times asked what was the matter, but never got an answer, and she went away towards the Quay. I supposed that it might be a woman of bad character, who had been beaten and I returned to my house. I believe this female was ANN BREWER, the deceased, judging from her size and general appearance, but at the time I had no suspicion that it was the deceased, and I had heard in the day that she was gone to Broadclist; I saw the body of the deceased yesterday morning by the water side, and I thought then and think now that it was the body of the female whom I had seen in the street on the preceding night.
This witness was further examined at the request of John Isaac, and deposed as follows: - On Thursday night I was at a meeting of the Temperance Society in Paul-street; I saw John Isaac there about half-past eight, to the best of my belief; he stayed there till ten or rather later; I went down the street with him and Charles Ballman, and saw them go into Ballman's house before I went into my house; all this was before I heard the cries of distress.
Charles Ballman: I am a hair-dresser, and reside in St. Mary Steps; on Thursday night about eight o'clock, I went in company with John Isaac to the meeting of the Temperance Society; we left the meeting about ten o'clock, and went right home; we went to bed in a quarter of an hour; John Isaac slept in the same room with me, and I am sure he was not out of the house after a quarter past ten till the following morning at eight.
The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

The following melancholy particulars are connected with the death of the late CAPTAIN GEORGE QUICKE, King's Dragoon Guards, youngest son of the late JOHN QUICKE, Esqr., Newton House, near Exeter, which we noticed in our last week's obituary:- "The Captain feeling rather unwell, proceeded to the Bush Hotel, Southsea, for the purpose of taking a warm bath. He refused the request of his servant to be allowed to attend him, and, a length of time having elapsed, the door was opened, when the Captain was found dead in the bath, with his head hanging over the side. At the Coroner's Inquest, a verdict was found - 'Died by the Visitation of God.' The Captain was to have been married, on the following day, to a lady of fortune residing in that neighbourhood and great preparations had been made for the wedding."

BARNSTAPLE - Melancholy and Fatal Occurrence. - The inhabitants of this town and its immediate vicinity were thrown into a state of indescribable consternation on Sunday evening last, by the appalling rumour that a murder had just been perpetrated at or near New Bridge, about 3 miles hence on the Exeter road. The report spread with the greatest rapidity, and met the congregations as they were leaving their respective places of worship after the religious services of the evening, and served but too successfully to interrupt or dispel the more sacred impressions which their devotional engagements had tended to produce - Crowds thronged the streets, and especially surrounded the Station House, and every here and there groups of anxious enquirers assembled, each increasing the apprehensions of the rest. We learnt that Arthur Bassett, Esq., of Umberleigh House, was on his return from Watermouth at about a quarter to seven o'clock, and met a woman of suspicious appearance about half or three-quarters of a mile beyond Bishop's Tawton, and at some little distance further he saw the body of a man lying in the road; on examination he found him to be on the point of death, and he breathed but twice or thrice after he had lifted him up; as the body exhibited marks of severe injury on the head, Mr B. inferred that the unfortunate man had come to his end by unfair means, and he immediately conjectured that the woman he had met was the murderer; acting on this impression, he turned and followed in the direction she had taken, but did not meet with her: he then went to Barnstaple, gave information to the police, and called a surgeon, Mr Parker, who hurried to the spot, but found the poor man beyond the reach of human aid. The body was removed to Bishop's Tawton, and was recognized as -- SLOOMAN, a servant with Mr S. Ford, yeoman, of that parish. From Mr Bassett's description of the woman's appearance and dress, it was supposed that she was the wife of the deceased who had been separated from him for several years, and was living in service at Ilfracombe: thither the police were instantly dispatched, but we are happy to add the result of their journey fully exonerated the poor woman from the horrible suspicion which attached to her; the gentleman (Mr Vye) with whom she lived as a cook, wrote a note by the police to the Coroner stating that she had scarcely been out of his house for the day. Suspicion, being averted from this quarter, sought other objects to gratify the imagination of the public, and various and exaggerated were the reports which were circulated on Monday morning, of gangs of murderers infesting the neighbourhood, of threats they had been hard to utter, and confessions they had made; but it gives us much pleasure to add that the excitement of the public mind was allayed, and the strain which the imputation of the offence inflicted on the neighbourhood, removed, by the investigations of the Coroner's Jury, which ascertained that the death of the deceased was not occasioned by the act of a murderer, but by the carelessness of a boy who rode over him. As the case has excited so much painful interest, we shall but meet the wishes of our readers by giving the proceedings f the Inquest at length.
At twelve o'clock at noon on Monday, the Coroner, Thomas Copner, Esq., and a Jury, composed of respectable men of the parish, assembled at the "Three Pigeon's Inn," in Bishop's Tawton, to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of -- SLOOMAN, aged 61. Sir Bourchier Palk Wrey, Bart., James Shuttleworth, Esq., Arthur Bassett, Esq., Rev. D. Baker, (vicar of Bishop's Tawton,) and many other respectable persons were present; and Thomas Wrey Harding and John Law, Esquires, arrived during the investigation. The body was lying in a malthouse adjoining the premises, whither the Coroner and the Jury, after they were impannelled, repaired to view it. On their return the following witnesses were examined:-
Mr Arthur Bassett:- Last evening, at a quarter to seven, as I was going to Umberleigh from Watermouth, after dinner, when I came to a spot between Bishop's Tawton and New Bridge, below New-bridge Cottage garden, I saw the body of a man lying on the right hand side of the road, and his hat on the left; I supposed him to be drunk, but on looking at him more minutely, I thought he was not in an attitude which a drunken man would assume; he was lying on his belly, with his face downwards, and his arms stretched out; I then called to him, "Holloa, what are you about?" I repeated the call two or three times, and received no answer; I suspected that something was wrong, and looked about for assistance; I soon observed a young gentleman in a garden above me, and desired him to bring a candle that I might see what was the matter with the man: I then heard some persons talking, and a gentleman who lives in the adjoining cottage brought a lanthorn and candle, and we proceeded to examine the body, said I feared he was much hurt, and felt his wrist but could discover no pulsation, but after we had turned him up he breathed; the body was warm; should not think that he had received the blow above a quarter of an hour, but he did not speak; then I remembered that I had seen a suspicious-looking woman near the place, about a quarter of a mile from it; I volunteered to go to Barnstaple for the constables and a surgeon: the woman looked like a tramper, had a cotton gown and dark bonnet on; came to Bishop's Tawton and gave information to many of the villagers, but they had not seen her pass, nor did I meet with her; I then proceeded to Barnstaple; called at Dr Budd's, and Mr Drake procured Mr Parker and the constables to go to the spot; I remained in Barnstaple the night to render any assistance I might be able to give. When I was going towards Tawton, I saw two young gentlemen mount their horses near Mrs Chichester's gate, at Pill: at first they rode slowly and I kept up with them, but they afterwards went faster than I chose, and they passed me; I heard that they rode very fast, and they must have passed the spot where I found the body ten minutes or a quarter f an hour before I did.
Mr James Greenough, gentleman, of New-bridge Cottage, Bishop's Tawton:- My son came in from the garden last evening about five minutes before seven, and said that a gentleman was in the road calling out "holloa" and that he wished me to come down and bring a lighted candle to look at a man who was lying there; I instantly ran down and my son came after with a lanthorn and candle; when I got to the bottom of the hill, I saw a man lying flat on his face, his face in the gutter in which the water runs; his feet were out towards the road, his right arm lying by his side, and his left arm under him; my children had been in the garden about ten minutes; they are noisy at play, and they might not have heard a man's voice; one of them heard a horse go past New Bridge about five minutes before Mr Bassett called; I turned the man over on his back, and he breathed twice or three times.
Mr Greenough's son, who was in court, corroborated his father's statement; and his little daughter, who was with her brother and sister in the garden, said she heard a horse galloping very fast near New Bridge, a few minutes before Mr Bassett called.
Joseph Coles, servant to Mr Owen, surgeon of Barnstaple, here volunteered his evidence; yesterday, at ten minutes before seven in the evening, I was coming into Barnstaple; passed by a man a little this side of New Bridge, by the rail; he was walking towards Bishop's Tawton; he was a labouring man, with a fustian jacket and seemed steady and sober; when I saw him he was about 40 or 50 yards from the spot where the body was found; about a quarter f a mile further on, or about 10 yards this side the three-mile stone, I met two boys riding steadily; I afterwards met a gentleman riding a white horse, but I do not exactly remember where; I was riding at the rate of about 7 miles an hour.
It had been ascertained that the two boys who were riding, were the son and nephew of Mr Moore, a respectable farmer of the parish of Tawstock; they do not seem to have said an thing of the subject the same evening, but the next morning, the son said to his father that he saw the body lying in the road as he passed, and the nephew said that he also saw a man's hat. The Coroner, supposing that their evidence might aid the inquiry, issued his summons for the boys; and at this stage of the business it was announced that they had arrived. At the suggestion of Sir Bourchier Wrey the one left the court while the other was under examination.
Edward Tyte, aged 13, after the Coroner had questioned him on the nature of an oath, was sworn; I am the son of Mr Tyte, of Plymouth; yesterday afternoon, was riding with my cousin, Henry Moore; we went from Tawstock to a green gate [Mrs Chichester's gate] beyond Tawton: between Tawton and New Bridge, saw a man's hat lying in the road; did not look to find a body, but went right on; my cousin was before; when I came up to him he asked me if I had seen a man lying by the hedge; I said I had not; he said he had seen a man lying, and he rode by him, for he was afraid of him, he did not know if he was dead or drunk; do not remember that I met any one between Bishop's Tawton and the spot where I saw the hat.
Henry Moore was then brought up, and was impressively and suitably admonished by Sir Bourchier Wrey to allow no earthly consideration to induce him to say any thing but the truth, or to conceal any part of the truth: the boy seemed affected, and proceeded to make his statement, but the Coroner did not administer the oath in consequence of his tender age (13):- he said, I was returning home last evening with my cousin; turning the corner to go down to New Bridge, my horse knocked a man down and ran over him. - [A great sensation was manifested in the court, for this intelligence was altogether unexpected. The Coroner conferred with Sir Bourchier Wrey on the propriety of his proceeding to question the boy further; and after due consideration he resolved to take his voluntary declaration, cautioning him that any thing he chose to say might be used to his prejudice, if the verdict of the Jury should give rise to any ulterior proceedings.] - The boy then said - I was riding very fast; the horse was on full gallop; I did not see the man until I came upon him, and knocked him down; he was close by the hedge; it was dark; the man was standing erect when the horse came against him; I did not stay to speak to him, but went on; I did not say any thing about it to any one.
Mr Parker, surgeon, deposed, that he had examined the body; there was a large wound on the scalp, four inches long, and half circular like a horse's shoe; and a contusion, without any laceration; there are several small wounds about the nose, and a fusion of blood under one eye; these wounds, I conceive, are not sufficient to cause death; he is subject to hernia; there is no fracture nor any external appearance which would indicate an injury sufficient to occasion death; he might have had a seizure; I have not opened the head; death by apoplexy can only be ascertained by opening the head; I cannot positively state the immediate cause of death.
It was said that the deceased had been subject to fits, and it was insinuated that it was possible that the fright might have brought on an apoplectic attack; but certainly there was nothing in evidence to support any such presumption.
The Coroner expressed his readiness to adjourn the Inquest to give time for a further surgical investigation; but the foreman intimated that the Jury did not wish it.
The Coroner then summed up the evidence, and dwelt particularly on the circumstance that the deceased was not heard to cry out after he was knocked down, whence he inferred that it was probable his death was occasioned by a seizure.
The Court was then cleared, and the Jury consulted for about five minutes, when they returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 5s. upon the horse.
The deceased was a sober man, and had lived in the neighbourhood all his life time. On the day of the fatal occurrence, he had been to his sister's in Tawstock, and was returning home to his situation quite sober. A very strange fatality seems to have attended his family; he was one of four sons: one of his brothers was drowned some years ago, another of them fell off his pony and broke his neck, and the wife of one of them was killed by the falling of a wall upon her.
It is earnestly to be hoped, that this sad event will be a salutary caution to all who are in the habit of riding furiously, and especially to the boy whose culpable heedlessness, on a Sabbath evening too, has thus been the means of hurrying a fellow creature suddenly into eternity: it is a lesson which he ought never to forget.
We are pleased to be enabled to testify to the great activity of our borough police in this case.

BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Friday last before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of ROBERT HOLLAND, basket maker and innkeeper, in Anchor-lane, in this town, who had hanged himself in the slaughter-house at the back of his dwelling, at an early hour of the morning. The deceased (who had lately addicted himself to drinking) had gone to bed late the night before, and between 5 and 6 o'clock in the morning his daughter, who found he had left his room, went down stairs, and found him hanging as we have described. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 11 October 1838
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Tuesday afternoon, at five o'clock, at the King's Arms Tap, Briton-side, Plymouth, before Mr R. J. Squire, Coroner, on the body of CHRISTOPHER BOUCHER, a horse porter, who was killed by a kick from his horse, whilst beating it in the stable. Verdict - Died in consequence of receiving a kick from a horse." Deodand on the animal, 1s.

Thursday 18 October 1838
PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - On Saturday last, MR WEBBER, super-annulated from the Royal Naval Hospital, died while in a beer shop, Stafford's-hill, Devonport, where he had just drunk a glass of cider: the cause of his death was apoplexy, brought on by natural causes, as appears by the verdict of the Jury.

Thursday 25 October 1838
EXETER - Coroner's Inquests. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, 15th inst., before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner for the City of Exeter, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, on the body of W. OSBORNE, aged 21. From the evidence of James Batten, it appeared that on the Friday preceding, the deceased and witness were employed in fetching stones in carts, each driving his own cart, to repair a road in the parish of Harpford. Witness was going after a load of stone, when deceased passed him in his cart, at full trot, he sitting on the shafts. When he had reached a hundred yards beyond witness, deceased turned a corner very sharply, and one of the wheels going over a bank, his cart upset. On witness coming up to the spot he found deceased lying in the road, bleeding very much, and unable to move. Assistance was obtained, and he was taken to the Hospital, where every care was paid to him, but he died from extensive injuries in the head. One of the witnesses deposed that his head was broken in pieces. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - On the following day another Inquest was held at the Red Cow, in St. David's Parish, on the body of a child named J. HAYWARD, only twenty months old. The child, it appeared, saw some other children the other side of the road, between the top of St. David's Hill and the Red Cow, and on endeavouring to cross to them was run over by a waggon. The child was picked up by its mother, apparently dead; and Mr Arscott, the surgeon, immediately came to its assistance, through whose exertions it rallied, and was apparently getting better until a day or two before its death on Monday. It died from some severe internal injury. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

BUDLEIGH SALTERTON - Melancholy Death. - An Inquest was held at the Rolle's Arms, Budleigh Salterton, on the 16th instant, by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on the body of MISS HARRIET SHIRLEY, of Sherington, near Kidderminster, who was on a visit to her sister, MRS GOULLETT, a resident of Salterton, whither she had come only the previous Tuesday. On Saturday, about the middle of the day, MISS SHIRLEY went out to take a walk on the Western Cliff: not returning at dinner time, her friends were alarmed, and MRS GOULLET first went to meet her; not finding her, persons were dispatched in all directions to seek her, but without avail. Late in the afternoon a young gentleman discovered the half of a footstep - the heel of a foot only, so close to the edge of the cliff, that he thought a person could not have advanced so far without going over the cliff, which is between 200 and 300 feet high. He went to the edge and looked down; at about 50 or 60 feet below him he saw a bonnet hanging to a bush; he mentioned it to a Mr Webber who was passing, who went home for a hook and line which he let down and pulled up the bonnet, which was at once identified by MRS GOULLET. Persons were then dispatched to examine the cliff from above and below, but no trace of MISS SHIRLEY was to be seen. Late in the evening, being satisfied that she must be there somewhere, a man of the name of John Teed was let down over the face of the cliff by a rope, with a candle and lantern, and in a fissure or gully of the cliff below him, he heard a groan. He was lowered to the spot, and there he found the unfortunate lady standing upright, with her arms crossed - her legs jammed in the narrow crevice. The man then raised her up by main force and lowered her to the beach, having first of all fastened a rope round her. She was here received by the people below, and under the direction of Mr Vowell, surgeon, who was in attendance, conveyed to MRS GOULLET'S house; she lingered in a state of insensibility till Monday morning, when she died, so that no clue could be offered as the cause of the melancholy catastrophe. the fissure in the rock in which the unhappy lady was found, was rather concealed under the face of it - so that a person desiring to throw himself off, could not have fallen into it. It was a particularly squally day, and it is supposed that her bonnet had been blown over the cliff, she approached to look after it, and thus fell over: although she had fallen 100 feet, there was not a single fracture of a limb - the symptoms under which she died being concussion of the brain. - Accidental Death.

Thursday 8 November 1838
HIGH BICKINGTON - A fatal accident happened yesterday (Wednesday) at Highbickington, to an elderly woman named MARY LOCK, who fell against the grate and caught fire to her clothes and was so dreadfully burnt that she died shortly afterwards. The Coroner is now holding an Inquest on the body.

BARNSTAPLE - Accident - On Monday evening last, WILLIAM ALLEN, of Ilfracombe, mariner, aged 23, belonging to the crew of the 'John and Elizabeth,' Paddon, master, lying at this port, was unfortunately drowned. The deceased was in the boat, raising the anchor (the vessel being about to remove to another berth) when the stern of the boat dipped under water, and he seeing her filling, called out to the captain, who told him to let the anchor go, but the rope to which it was attached being entangled with the boat, pulled her under, and him with her, and being unable to swim he sunk to rise no more. The grappling irons were quickly in requisition, but he was not picked up until he had been nearly half an hour in the water: and when brought on shore the usual efforts were resorted to, to restore animation, but they were unavailing. An Inquest was held on the following morning before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The sum of half a guinea was awarded to Stribbling, Millman, and Parminter, the three men by whose exertions the body was picked up, by the Barnstaple Branch Royal Humane Society, - connected with the Dispensary.

CLOVELLY - The late disastrous Gale. - The result of our inquiries relative to this appalling calamity, subsequent to the communication we made in our last 'Journal', does not mitigate the severity of its character, or shed one cheerful ray to brighten the gloominess of its features. Twelve boats, with their nets and gear, have been lost to their owners, and twenty one hapless individuals fell victims to the resistless fury of the pityless storm. The names of these ill-fated men are,- JAMES BRITTON, senior, JAMES BRITTON, junior, and JOHN BRITTON, father and two sons, residents of Clovelly, the former and latter having left widows and families; JOHN and WILLIAM SHERSEL, two brothers, both married men of Clovelly; JOHN LEWIS, who has left a widow and family; THOMAS JENN, and RICHARD LANE, all of Clovelly; JOHN BRAUND, an inhabitant of the adjoining village of Bucks, who has left a widow and three children; JAMES VEALE, and JOHN BAGELHOLE, who has left a widow and one child, also of the village of Bucks; JAMES RADFORD, and -- CARPENTER, of Ilfracombe, each of whom has left a widow and family; JAMES KELLY and RICHARD LOCK, of Appledore, the former having left a widow and six children, the latter a widow and three children; HENRY POOLEY, of Bideford, who has left al widow; HUGH BAYLEY, of Hartland; THOMAS TRICK, who has left a widow and two children; and PHILIP COWEL, who has also left a widow and family, both also of Hartland; RICHARD PARKER, of Bude; and another individual, a native of Cornwall, whose name was unknown to our informant. Of the bodies of these hapless men, two only have yet been discovered, those of POOLEY and BAKER, one of which was found on the beach in the parish of Northam, and the other in the parish of Abbotsham, the morning after the fatal catastrophe. It is thought that POOLEY was cast ashore alive, but by the violence of the surge was afterwards destroyed by being dashed against the rocks, as his corpse was disfigured with wounds and contusions. Inquests were held upon the bodies before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, and in each case the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 November 1838
EXETER - Melancholy and Distressing Suicide. - A Coroner's Inquest was held at the Axminster Inn, on Tuesday last, before the Coroner for Exeter, John Warren, Esq., on the body of MISS ELIZA SCLATER, aged 18, the daughter of MR SCLATER, nurseryman, residing in the Heavitree-road, who destroyed herself by taking arsenic. The deceased was a young person of considerable personal attraction, and her fate excited much sympathy and regret. Mr Caird, surgeon, of St. Sidwell's, was examined, who deposed, that he attended deceased, and was called in on Saturday morning 3rd inst., when he found her very ill and vomiting. Dr Macgowan was also called, he also attended the deceased, in company with witness, the same afternoon, when she acknowledged to him, that she had taken arsenic, about half a tea-spoonful in a roasted apple, at night. Deceased lingered until Sunday morning at two o'clock, when she expired. Half a tea-spoonful of arsenic was about a drachm, and was quite sufficient to destroy life. Witness had no doubt it caused her death. The stomach pump was not used, because Dr Macgowan and himself judged it would be of no service. Mr John Jarman, excise officer, was next examined: deceased was visiting at his house with his wife in April last; one night he was called out of bed in consequence of her being taken ill; found her talking wildly, and using incoherent language; she said her mother was dead, and that she saw her sitting on her coffin in the room. Witness did not think her in her right mind: he had heard also that the grandmother of deceased had been insane, and in confinement for several years. No other witnesses were called. The Jury expressed themselves satisfied with the evidence, and returned a verdict of "Temporary Derangement." We understand that a disappointment in love was the cause of the unfortunate deceased committing this rash act.

EXETER - Another Inquest was held the following day at the Red Lion Inn, in St. Sidwell's, on the body of ELIZABETH PEARCY, a servant in the employment of Mr Atwater, residing at the top of Salutary place, who was found suspended by a cord to a cloak pin in her bed room on Tuesday morning quite dead. Mr Atwater was the first to discover the deceased, with his son, who cut her down. The evidence of a charwoman, who worked at the house was adduced, who proved that the deceased had lately been very flighty and strange in her manner, and had received notice to quite her situation. She had also threatened on another occasion to commit suicide. Verdict, "Temporary Derangement."

Thursday 22 November 1838
EXETER - Melancholy Accident. - We have to record a most distressing and fatal accident, which happened on Friday night last, to the Defiance Coach, on its road to London. The Defiance left the Half Moon Inn, in Exeter, at the usual hour, having five outside and four inside passengers, and heavily laden. the night was very dark and foggy, which circumstance combined with the heavy load carried by the coach caused some apprehensions in the minds of several who witnessed its departure. These apprehensions have been fatally realized. On reaching Long Hill, near Yarcombe, about four miles from Ilminster, the coachman (named CHARLES BEAVIS) it is supposed from the darkness of the night, overshot, as it is termed, the hill, and not having time to put the drag on, before he commenced his descent, the weight of the luggage urged the vehicle on with too great a speed, and when about the middle of the hill, it was overturned with a tremendous crash. Poor BEAVIS was thrown by the jerk a considerable distance, and we deeply regret to say was killed on the spot, a dreadful and extensive fracture having been found in the back of his head. The passengers also sustained some injuries and one gentleman in particular, has met with a serious compound fracture of the thigh, and on being put to bed, at the George Inn, we understand, in Ilminster, amputation was pronounced necessary. With this exception however, we have not heard of any serious injury sustained by the passengers. The Vivid Coach was the next to pass by this line of road; the coachman of which offered every assistance, and was detained some little while, near the fatal spot: the passengers, however, were so frightened that none of them could be induced to proceed. BEAVIS was a sober industrious man, and bore an excellent character. He lived a servant with the late Rev. Dr Fisher for some years, and his conduct since driving the Defiance has always given satisfaction to his employers. He has, we grieve to state, left a widow and five young children. Since this was written we are sorry to hear that the gentleman whose leg was so much injured is since dead. His name, we are informed was BALDWIN, and his residence Bideford. The injury was a dreadful laceration of the leg by which the knee pan was torn off, as the poor gentleman refused to undergo amputation, mortification ensued. A Coroner's Inquest has been held on the body of BEAVIS, and a verdict returned of Accidental Death. A subscription we are happy to say has been commenced on behalf of the widow and orphan children.

Thursday 29 November 1838
ALWINGTON - An Inquest was held at Alwington on Monday last before H. A. Vallack, Coroner, Esq., and a most respectable Jury, on the body of a newly born illegitimate male child of ELIZABETH BRITTON, of that parish. This case caused great sensation in the neighbourhood, in consequence of the body being secretly interred, and a report being in circulation that the child had been born alive. Rev. J. Pine Coffin, the resident magistrate, instantly caused the churchyard to be searched and the body exhumed. From the testimony, however, of several witnesses, it was evident that concealment was not at all intended; and from the satisfactory evidence given by Mr Cowdry, partner of Mr Caddy, surgeon, Great Torrington, there was no doubt that it was an immature foetus. Verdict - "That the child was still born."

EXETER - The Late Melancholy Coach Accident. - We stated in our last, that the gentleman who was so dreadfully injured by this distressing accident, had since died. His name, it appears, was MR R. BAWDEN, assistant to Messrs. Wickham and Co., importers and general merchants, of Bideford. We learn from the Taunton Courier, that an Inquest was held on the body of the deceased, on Monday last, at the George Inn, Ilminster, before Mr Caines, the Coroner, of which the following are the particulars:- Mr C. H. M. Mules, sworn. - The deceased was one of the passengers on the Defiance coach, which was upset on Buckland hill on Friday night last; I found him in a house near the accident, laid on some straw, perfectly sensible; he appeared to have received a very serious injury of the lower extremity; I found a quantity of blood on the floor, which immediately led me to remove his boot and trousers; on the removal I discovered a very extensive laceration of the right leg, to the extent of ten or twelve inches in length; the knee joint was laid bare, the patella or knee pan much injured; the shock which the constitution had received was of a most dangerous character; I removed large pieces of gravel or flint, (assisted by the Rev. F. Lance, of Buckland St. Mary, who on hearing of the accident was at the house on my arrival,) which had got into the wound, and applied the usual remedies necessary in such cases, with all possible care and speed, and had the deceased conveyed in a coach to this house, (the George Inn, Ilminster,) and I accompanied him, holding his leg, &c. My father, who is a surgeon, was in attendance before the sufferer was removed, and rendered me his assistance, and he continued to do so as long as the individual lived. From the moment I discovered the extent of the injury, I considered the case a very dangerous one. On the danger of the case being made known to the deceased, I suggested the propriety of amputation being performed; he expressed himself in the strongest terms that the operation of amputation should never be performed: under these circumstances no alternative remained but to endeavour to save the limb: the deceased never rallied, nor did reaction take place after the accident occurred. I am satisfied the deceased had every care and attention paid him, and that his death was caused by the overturning of the coach: I have no doubt the wound was caused by a wheel of the coach passing over the limb; the deceased imputed no blame to any one. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." MR R. BAWDEN was 40 years of age: he was son of a respectable clergyman, and has other relations filling that sacred office. On the firm to which he was an assistant, being written to on Saturday, one of the gentlemen arrived the following day from Bideford, and the scene at meeting was beyond description. This gentleman states the deceased to have been in their establishment three years, and spoke highly of his integrity and good conduct.

COLYTON - Fatal Accident Whilst Hunting. - A melancholy accident occurred at Pratt's Hill, in the parish of Collyton, on the 13th instant, to JOHN HORLINGTON, whipper-in to the fox hounds of R. D. Cockburn, Esq., of Cotford House, Sidbury. On the morning of that day, the hounds met at the Three Horse Shoes, on the Lyme and Exeter road, and as they were drawing a cover near Boars down, they came to a four barred gate, which several horses cleared: Mr J. Wolcote asked HORLINGTON if he would ride his horse over, to which he assented, and having mounted he put the horse into a gallop with the intention of jumping over the gate, but being too near he could not clear it, and his fore legs came in contact with the highest bar which checked him, and the rider was thrown over and fell on his back: at the same instant, the horse came also over the gate and fell on him. He was removed to a farm house, where every assistance was afforded him, but he gradually sunk until the evening of the 14th, when he expired. An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased on Friday, the 16th, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, when the above facts were stated, and a post mortem examination having been made, it was ascertained that an extensive rupture of the bladder occasioned the immediate cause of death. A verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

KINGSBRIGE - Last week, an inmate of the Union Workhouse, named ROGER CLEVERLEY, obtained permission of the Governor to go to church, but instead of proceeding to a place of worship, he went to Salcombe harbour, where he deliberately threw himself into the river. The body has since been picked up, and an Inquest held thereon, with a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Another Inquest was held on the same day, (Thursday) on the body of JOHN LIDSTONE, who, on returning from Frogmore village on Sunday evening, fell into a large pool adjoining the lime kiln, on Dodbrook quay: a verdict of "Found Drowned" was likewise returned by the Jury.

Thursday 6 December 1838
LINTON - Inquest held by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner.- On Friday last, at Linton, on the body of CAPT. JOHN BLACKMORE, of that place:-
COUNTISBURY - On Monday, at Countisbury, (about three miles further up the coast,) on the body of JOHN WIDLAKE:- and on Tuesday, on the body of RICHARD FRY:-
These three unfortunate men left Lynmouth in a fishing boat on Wednesday morning last, at about three o'clock; they had not been out many hours when the storm came on; the gale was one of the most violent which the inhabitants ever witnessed; and the boat was seen in distress from shore very distinctly, but it was impossible to render her any assistance: and, after being tossed about some time, she overturned, and the master, and his two men were plunged into the water, and perished. The body of MR BLACKMORE was washed on shore the following day, and those of his two men on the Monday and Tuesday afterwards. - BLACKMORE has left a widow and five children; FRY, a widow and one child; WIDLAKE was a young man, aged 19, belonging to Dunster. The verdict in each case, 'Found Drowned.'

GEORGEHAM - On Sunday last, an Inquest was held on the body of a man which was picked up on the beach on Croyde sands, in the parish of Georgeham. Both the legs were gone, and the body was in a state of great decomposition: the initials, "I. B. C.," were observed on one of the arms; and it is conjectured to be the body of one of the poor fellows who lately perished at Clovelly. Verdict, 'Found Drowned.'

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident.- Three Lives Lost. On Wednesday, a fatal accident occurred also in the harbour. About noon, a waterman's boat, in which were three men, viz:- BARNEY CONNER, JOHN BASSETT, and -- FURGUSON, attempted to reach the 'Inconstant' frigate in the Sound, with a supply of milk and bread, but as they neared the Bridge, finding it impossible to proceed, put about, and on opening Barnpool were upset by a squall. CONNOR and FURGUSSON sank almost immediately; BASSETT, aged 18, clung to the boat, and drifted into the Pool, where he was picked up - life was not extinct, but we regret to state that the poor fellow (who was a great assistance to his mother and her seven children) died in the night at Creemill, where an Inquest will be held. The bodies of the two other unfortunate men have not been found. The boat lies on Creemill beach. BARNEY CONNOR was an inoffensive trustworthy man, well known among naval officers, as a regular attendant on all her Majesty's ships in port.

Thursday 13 December 1838
NEWTON ABBOT.- On Tuesday, the 4th day of December, an Inquest was held before J. Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners of the county, at the White Hart Inn, to enquire into the circumstances of the death of MRS PALK, aged 70. The principal evidence was Mr Louis Sweet, draper, who deposed that deceased came to his house on Monday afternoon, and staid to take tea with his mother, who is a sister of the deceased: she left about 8 o'clock, saying, that she felt unwell, and should go home and take a pill and go to bed; she did so, and on Tuesday morning Mrs Mann, in whose house deceased lodged, sent for him about 12 o'clock; when he came he found the door locked on the inside; with the assistance of Mr Phillips he forced the door open with a crow bar, and found MRS PALK lying on the floor quite dead. Her supper materials were on the table, with a box of pills, and some beer on the fire to warm, to all appearance she had died without a struggle. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 20 December 1838
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, at Derby, in this town, on the body of WILLIAM WEBB, a child of 2 ½ years old, who while standing before the fire on the preceding Saturday, accidentally struck the handle of a saucepan then over the fire, full of boiling water, and overturned it, and its contents fell over his shoulders and neck, by which he was so dreadfully scalded that he died the following morning. Verdict, "Accidental Death." - This is the fourteenth child his unfortunate parents have buried.

SOUTHMOLTON - A distressing accident occurred on Sunday evening last, about five o'clock, to a widow woman called SLOEMAN, who was burnt to death under the following circumstances. It appears that the deceased resided in a cottage alone, except at night, when a woman named Thompson slept with her. On the night in question Thompson intended to attend divine worship in the evening, and as the deceased usually went to bed very early, locked the front door and took the key in her pocket; but she had not been absent above five minutes before it was discovered, by a person passing the street, that the house was in flames, and on looking in at the window he saw the old woman enveloped in fire; she had come as far as the front door to come out, but was not able to do so: the door was instantly broken open and the fire extinguished, but relief came too late, she being so dreadfully burnt that death put an end to her sufferings at five o'clock the following morning. She stated that she caught her shawl on fire with the candle, but it is thought it must have originated from the fire in the chimney over which she was sitting taking her tea at the time the accident occurred. An Inquest was held on the body by Thos. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The deceased was 79 years of age.

TIVERTON - An Inquest was held on Friday, the 7th inst., before F. S. Gervis, Esq., Coroner for Tiverton, on the body of RHODA VINEY, aged six years. It appeared from the evidence that she was walking in Fore street, on the previous day, when a dog, who was trying to escape from a pack of hounds which were approaching, ran sharply against her and threw her with great violence against the flags. Mr E. F. Chamberlain, who saw the accident, took her up immediately, and carried her into his shop, in the front of which it happened. She was soon after taken home and died the same evening. Two surgeons who examined the body, found an extensive fracture of the skull, and a rupture of a blood vessel within the head. A verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 1s. on the dog, was returned.

CREDITON - Inquests: - On Friday last an Inquest was held at Crediton, before I. Partridge, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of MR T. ROBERTS, who was found in a linhay belonging to the Messrs. Smiths, solicitors, extended on the ground and quite dead, with a piece of small cord round his neck. Over the body of the deceased was a large beam with a cord suspended, with latter it is more than probable the unfortunate deceased in his last mortal struggles had broken. The principal witness examined was Mr Glencross, tea-dealer, of Bridgwater, who deposed that deceased had for several years been employed by him to travel with tea, but that in July last, he had left Bridgwater for Crediton, his native place, to set on business for himself. That on the evening before the rash act was committed, being at Crediton, he had called on the deceased who invited him to sup and take a bed, which was accepted. That after supper deceased suddenly left the room without taking his hat, and did not return: and that after waiting some time with the deceased's mother and other branches of the family, an ineffectual search was made for him. Several witnesses deposed that for some weeks they had observed a great deal of strangeness in the behaviour of the deceased. The Jury, after some consideration, came to a verdict of "Found Dead." - The same day another Inquest was held at Crediton, on the body of an apprentice boy of Mr G. Gregory, of Park, near Crediton. It appeared that some masons were engaged in throwing down a mud wall, and that it suddenly fell on the deceased, who was passing at the time, by which he was instantly crushed to atoms. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 27 December 1838
BARNSTAPLE - Caution to Mothers.- A fatal accident by burning occurred at Derby, in this town, on Friday last, to a child about six years old, daughter of ROBERT BATER, an operative in the lace factory. The deceased was putting a kettle on the fire, and the flames caught her clothes (which consisted merely of a light frock and an under garment); she ran into the street screaming for assistance which was promptly rendered her, but from the lightness of her dress the flames had so burnt her person that she survived only until the following Sunday. An Inquest was held on the body before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on Monday last, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

CHARLES - The carpenter BALE whom we noticed last week, who met with an accident at Charles, by falling off a scaffold though only seven feet high, is dead, having been paralyzed ever since the accident up to the time of his death. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body by Thomas Copner, Esq., and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

SOUTH MOLTON - An Inquest was held at Southmolton, on Sunday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM PEARCE, a child two years old, son of a labourer, whose clothes caught fire during the temporary absence of his mother the previous day, and he was so dreadfully burnt that death ensued a few hours after. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

OTTERY ST. MARY - An Inquest was held at Ottery St. Mary, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday last, on the body of JOHN APSEY, aged about 50, who was found dead in a field called Yonder Moor, near Bishop's Court, in that parish, on the previous morning. It appeared that the deceased, who was a miller by trade, had lived at Axminster, where he failed in business, and where it is believed his family still reside, had about a month or six weeks ago, been committed to Bridewell for not maintaining them. He called on Saturday afternoon at the house of Mr Richard Dening, of Ottery, who had married his wife's sister and who gave him some bread and cheese, and desired him to go home. He was afterwards seen by another person, when he complained of being very ill. He did not appear tipsy but in a stupefied idiotic state - he was then about 20 yards from the gate of the field leading into Yonder Moor. A cut was found over the left eye, but too slight to endanger life; and from the abrasions on the palms of both hands, and on his knees, it was inferred that the deceased had fallen forwards on his face and hands, and thus received the injury on the forehead. It was the medical opinion that death was occasioned by congestion of the brain, produced by exposure to the cold.

EXMOUTH - Another Inquest was held the same day at Exmouth, on the body of HARRIET MARE, who was found dead in her room on Sunday evening from an attack of apoplexy.

Thursday 3 January 1839
ASHBURTON - Singular Verdict - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday morning last, at the 'Crispin,' Ashburton, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a poor old man, named WILLIAM FRENCH, whose death had caused considerable sensation and anxiety, it having been reported that he had died from actual starvation. After four hours very close investigation, it was considered necessary, from the evidence adduced, to have a post mortem examination, which was performed by Mr H. H. Hale, Mr H. Gervis, jun., and Dr Soper. The Jury having adjourned until 7 o'clock, - on their re-assembling, it was stated that an abscess had formed on the brain, and a quantity of water was found secreted in the back part of the head, or back brain, which was also stated to be a sufficient cause of death. Notwithstanding this, the Jury were all deeply impressed from the former part of the evidence, with a conviction that great fault must rest somewhere, and that the poor man had really wanted the necessaries of life for some time past. The Jury having retired for about an hour, the foreman returned the following verdict - "The deceased died from a disorder in the brain, accelerated by the want of food." The deceased was 73 years of age, a very meek, inoffensive, and honest man: he had received temporary relief, but disliked the trifling formalities of application, and dreaded the very place of a Union house. It is a fact, that four or five days previous to his death, he had only taken a little bread soaked in hot water, and savoured with salt: he had not tasted animal food for several weeks.

Thursday 10 January 1839
BISHOPS NYMPTON - Inquests by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner. - On Friday last, at Bishopsnympton, on the body of WILLIAM TOUT, labourer, aged 62. Deceased was a man of eccentric habits, and betrayed symptoms of insanity: on the day before he was found to have committed suicide being suspended by a cord in his own house, quite dead. Verdict, "Hung himself during a fit of Temporary Derangement."

CHITTLEHAMPTON - On the same day at Chittlehampton on the body of MR THOMAS PARKER, of Hambow farm, aged 54, who was found dead in a pond in his own field. Verdict - "Found Drowned."

SALCOMBE - Between eight and nine o'clock, on Saturday night, there was considerable excitement felt in Sidmouth, at the unexpected death of WILLIAM CRABB, aged 55, who was found drowned in the river Sid, just below Salcombe turnpike-gate. The deceased was horsekeeper at the London Hotel, and had been sent to Lyme for the three horses which run in the 'Alert' coach, from Exeter to Weymouth, he was on his return, and within a quarter of an hour after he passed the gate, when he was quite sober, he was found in the middle of the river with his face downwards, and his head towards the stream, quite dead; an Inquest was held over the deceased by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on Monday at twelve o'clock. As there were no marks of violence on his person, it was the opinion of the Jury, after hearing the evidence, that he must have rode into the river to wash the horses' legs, when the rider's horse suddenly making an effort to drink, he fell over its neck with his head foremost into the water, and not being able to extricate his legs, he was soon dead. Verdict, "Found dead by Drowning and Suffocation."

Thursday 17 January 1839
WOODBURY - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner on Monday, the 7th inst., at Woodbury, on the body of JOHN HOW, aged 79 years. The deceased, who had been suffering from a slight cold for about three weeks previously, went to bed on Thursday evening about nine o'clock, after having partaken of some coffee and bread and butter. His wife, who saw him to bed, then left, as she was in the habit of doing, to attend a neighbour, from whence she usually returned in the morning. About half an hour afterwards she returned, on being sent for, and found the deceased sitting on the bed-side, he appeared very ill, and complained of a pain in his stomach and was perfectly sensible: medical assistance was procured, but the deceased had expired before its arrival. The cause of death was conjectured to be the rupture of a blood vessel internally, but no post mortem examination having been made, this could not correctly be ascertained.

DREWSTEIGNTON - On Tuesday the 8th inst., an Inquest was held at Redlake farm, Drewsteignton, by J. Gribble, Esq., on the body of MR RICHARD TOWNSEND, aged 72, who was found drowned in a pond on Sunday morning at Thornbury, in the parish of Hittisleigh; whether he had gone the day previous on a visit. A servant of Mr Rowe, deposed that the deceased left Thornbury between 7 and 8 o'clock on the Saturday evening, and he accompanied him with a lantern nearly through a field adjoining the pond, in which the deceased was found. The wind being rather boisterous at the time the candle blew out, when deceased requested the servant to go back, which he accordingly did. It is supposed that deceased wandered about the field and could not find his way, and intending to return got into the pond. Verdict "Found Drowned."

Thursday 24 January 1839
MARTINHOE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, in the parish of Martinhoe, on the body of GRACE BRAY, aged 47, the wife of a labourer. The deceased had walked the day before to the adjoining village of Parracombe, and had returned in the evening about 8 o'clock, took a hearty supper with her family, and retired to rest in her usual health, but before 12 o'clock she was discovered in her bed cold and a corpse. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - Awful instance of Sudden Death. - On Sunday morning last MRS SUSANNA DAVEY, landlady of the 'Ring of Bells,' Worcester Street, left her house in perfect health to go to Charles' Church, and on passing through the church-yard she proceeded to her husband's and her sister's grave, where she had within the past week caused a tomb stone to be erected, commemorative of their deaths: and whilst standing on the sod which covered her near and dear relatives, contemplating, it may be presumed, the frailty of life, she was taken suddenly ill, and would have fallen, had not immediate assistance been rendered her. After some time she was taken home in a carriage and medical aid procured, but without avail, - the silver chord of life was loosed, and about two o'clock in the afternoon she departed this life, affording another sad proof of the fragile texture of human existence. She never spoke or recognized any one after she was taken ill. On the following day an Inquest was held on her body, and a verdict returned of "Died by the Visitation of God:" - the cause of death was apoplexy. MRS DAVEY was 68 years of age, and has been a widow fourteen years; she had resided at the 'Ring of Bells,' for many years, conducting the house with the strictest propriety. She possessed an exceedingly kind and feeling heart, and was ever ready to alleviate distress: her kindness to her own poor relatives was unbounded. A remarkable circumstance took place on the morning of her decease. Some years since she prepared for herself a dress - white trimmed with lace - in which she desired she might be buried. A short time before she left her house on Sunday she took out this dress and requested her servant to air it before the fire while the house was clear, probably little thinking at that period, that within a few short moments she should require this last suit. Her orders were obeyed, and her "winding sheet" was lying on a chair when she was brought into her house in a dying state.

Thursday 31 January 1839
IDEFORD - On Thursday the 17th instant, the body of WILLIAM WOTTON, carpenter, of Ideford, was found suspended to an apple tree in an orchard belonging to Mr Rowell of that place; he was immediately cut down, but life was found to be extinct. It was supposed he had been there several hours, as the body was quite cold. An Inquest has been held on it by Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners of the County, and a verdict of "Hung himself in a Temporary Fit of Insanity," returned. No cause can be assigned for the rash act, except he had engaged to pay a certain sum of money on the following day, which he felt he should be unable to accomplish.

EXETER - Coroner's Inquest.- Alleged Ill-treatment of a Woman by her Husband. - An Inquest was held before J. Warren, Esq., the Coroner for Exeter, on Friday last, at the Red Lion inn, in St. Sidwell's, on the body of BARBARA SOUTHARD, aged 60, who, it was said, had met with her death in consequence of injuries received from her husband. From the evidence of John Johnson, whose wife was sister to the deceased, it appeared that she and her husband, who was a plasterer, occupied two rooms in his house. On the afternoon of the previous Wednesday, he found deceased in her apartments cold and very ill. He fetched her husband, who came in about five o'clock. The deceased then was then very faint and fell off her chair. The husband said she was drunk, and struck her several blows in the head. He then threw her down on the bed. The deceased did not speak again after that, and at eleven o'clock Mr W. Land, surgeon, was sent for, who pronounced her to be dead. The deceased was subject to fits, but Johnson deposed that she was a sober woman. This evidence was confirmed by Johnson's wife, who further deposed, that after having thrown his wife on the bed, SOUTHARD refused to allow a doctor to be sent for, and actually left her insensible there. The deceased never spoke, but groaned a good deal after receiving the blows. Mr Land was then called, who deposed that he had attended the deceased professionally for some time and had supposed her to labour under an affection of the heart, which might have caused sudden death, had no blow been inflicted: and as this gentleman seemed to wish to make a further examination of the body, the Inquest was adjourned till the evening. The Jury having then again met, Mr Land continued his evidence. He had examined the body of the deceased, with Dr Coster, and Mr Warren. He opened the head and found disease of the brain of long standing, which was sufficient to account for her death. He found no marks of violence on the exterior of the head, excepting a bruise on the temple, which might have been caused by a fall. He thought apoplexy was the cause of the death of deceased, and did not deem it necessary to examine her heart. Dr Coster confirmed this testimony. He thought that any violence would be likely to hasten the death of a person labouring under a disease like that of deceased, but he would not undertake to say whether it had done so in this instance. The Jury in consequence returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 7 February 1839
TIVERTON - Horrid Murder of a Gamekeeper by Poachers, near Tiverton. The greatest excitement has prevailed in the town and neighbourhood of Tiverton since Sunday morning, when at an early hour, reports were in circulation that a most ferocious murder had been perpetrated by poachers, and that a man called COTTRELL, an assistant gamekeeper of Thomas Daniel, Esq., (late an Alderman of Bristol) who possesses large estates in the neighbourhood of Tiverton, was the unfortunate victim. Various reports being in circulation, we felt it our duty to repair to the spot in order to obtain the most accurate information. We reached Tiverton yesterday (Thursday) about half past twelve o'clock, and found the inhabitants still in a state of much terror and anxiety in consequence of such a shocking occurrence having happened in their neighbourhood. We learnt that the Coroner's Jury had already sat upon the body, and pronounced their verdict of "Wilful Murder" against one of the poachers, Aaron Hagley, a husbandman of that neighbourhood, and two others, Thomas Hagley, and Matthew Maslen, as aiding and assisting.
In the course of our inquiries we learnt that, in consequence of repeated depredations having been committed on Mr Daniel's manors by the destruction of his game, - the alarm of persons residing on the estates from the discharge of fire-arms in the dead of the night, - and the breaking down of the fences, and other damage done to property, - the agents of the hon. gentleman felt it their duty to have a strong watch distributed, in order to detect, if possible, some of the offenders. Accordingly, on Saturday night two parties were organized: one consisting of the regular keepers and two assistants, (denominated watchers); and the other composed of three assistants. They were to take different routes, and proceeded accordingly: when at midnight, between the hours of twelve and one, the party of assistant keepers heard the report of guns. They made away in the direction of the sound, and soon discovered three poachers in the plantation. The poachers on finding they were pursued closely, turned and walked backward, two of them armed with bludgeons and one of them having a gun, which he presented in threatening attitude towards the faces of the watchers. On coming into a large field, adjoining the plantation, the poachers endeavoured to escape, but the watchers still followed them up, and they made off towards the old Bampton-road, on which they traversed a short distance; they changed their route, and went back towards Palfrey's farm; here they altered their line again, and came out in the old Bampton road, near Longshayne, about three miles and a half from Tiverton. They came on till they reached Knightshayes, when the deceased ordered one of the assistants to call the gamekeeper of Knightshayes for help; the poachers then went down over the hill as fast as they could, the deceased and the other watcher closely following them till they came to the bottom of the hill, when they crossed a large field towards Chetiscombe. From thence they went down a lane and got into Gaddle estate, crossing the town leat, and turned a little to the right over a stile: here one of the poachers struck COTTRELL in the head with his stick, but no blows were returned by him: they advanced a few paces further, when the man having a gun presented it towards COTTRELL, and with an oath said he would blow his brains out, and instantly fired; COTTRELL fell backwards, and died in a moment! - the murderers immediately ran off. In the corner of the field is a stile, over which the poachers and watchers came: about twenty paces from the stile is a portion of turned-up earth, upon which the blood of the unfortunate victim is still to be seen, as if "crying from the ground". Hundreds of the inhabitants have been on the spot to view the crimson relics, and many have carried away portions of earth and grass as sad mementos of this dire calamity. Full particulars of this frightful tragedy will be found in the evidence taken at the Inquest which we shall subjoin. It may be observed that, in the speedy detection and capture of the murderer and his partners in crime, the hand of providence is most remarkably to be traced. The surviving watcher, after capturing the body of his murdered companion, being single-handed, and without any chance of securing them, did not at once pursue the murderous gang, but made his way to Tiverton, when he first called on a man named Venn, the groom of Mr T. P. Wright, steward to Mr Daniel; he then proceeded with Venn, to Mr Wright's house, and rang the bell: whilst waiting there Aaron Hagley was observed by the watcher coming over Exe Bridge, near Mr Wright's residence, when he immediately exclaimed to Venn, "That's the man that shot JACOB COTTRELL. I know him by his walk." On Hagley coming nearer, he said, "I'll swear to him: he has a dark patch on his breeches:" and upon lifting the flat of his coat the patch showed itself. Hagley was then secured, and safely lodged in the Bridewell. He underwent a private examination before the magistrates on Sunday, when circumstances came out which led to the speedy detection of his companions: one of whom, it is currently reported, has made a confession of the whole of the circumstances; - we do not, however, vouch for the truth of this.
The unfortunate deceased was a fine athletic man, about five feet ten inches in height, of open countenance. He was much respected in his station, and has left a widow (who is far advanced with child), and four children. After the fatal wound had been received, the body was taken to Guddle, and from thence to the 'Royal Oak' inn, Newport street, Tiverton, kept by Mr Parkin, where it still remains in the coffin. Mr Macdonald, surgeon, was, as we are told, first called, after the body was brought to Tiverton, but that gentleman was not summoned to give his evidence on the Inquest. the charge of the shot, which appears to have been heavy, entered just over the left eye, perforating the lobe of the brain; a portion of it lodged in the head, being arrested by the bone flattening some of the shot: the rest of the charge went through the head, as is evident from the state of the back part of it. We hear that Mr Macdonald has since opened and thoroughly examined the head of the deceased, by authority.
The prisoner, Aaron Hagley, is a man about five feet seven inches in height; coarse brown hair: dark eyes: countenance somewhat contracted, but without marked signs of ferocity. He has altogether the appearance of a [?] labouring man.
THE INQUEST. - The Inquest was held in the Town Hall, Tiverton, before F. S. Gervis, Coroner, when the following respectable gentlemen were sworn in Jurors:- J. Beedell, Esq., Foreman. R. Lawson, Esq.; Capt Hodges; T. L. T. Rendell, Esq.; Mr Wm. Hodge: Mr Trix; Mr Chapple; Mr Goodland; Mr W. Melhuish; Mr Willis; Mr Sanders; Mr Steele; Mr Risdon; Mr Ellerton; Mr T. G. Beedell; Mr Eastbrook; Mr G. Voisey; Mr Kemp; Mr F. Pratt; Mr Sharland; Mr Merson.
The Jury met at six o'clock in the evening of Tuesday. After the Jurymen had been sworn, they went to view the body, (lying in the 'Royal Oak Inn,') and then returned to the Town Hall, when the Coroner adjourned the Inquest till Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock. The Coroner said, that it had been thought advisable to hold the Inquest privately; as, owing to the great excitement, business might be impeded; and he therefore announced that, by the authority he possessed, the public would not be permitted.
Wednesday Morning:- The Jury assembled, according to appointment, at 9 o'clock, and several of the Magistrates were present to assist.
James Bowerman sworn: examined by Mr Patch: lives at Coombland, in Tiverton; is a husbandman in the employ of Mr Daniel. On Saturday evening, the 26th, he was ordered by Mr Daniel's keeper, James Vincent, to meet William Winter and Jacob Cottrell (deceased) by the side of the Chapel path on Fairby manor, the property of Thomas Daniel, Esq.; he went accordingly: he went for the purpose of taking poachers, or any others disturbing the covers by night; they met at 8 o'clock: remained watching until five minutes past one on Sunday morning, when they heard a gun fired; it was a fine moonlight night. They then removed further down the plantation to a place called Brushford's close: hid themselves by the side of a wood rick, watching: heard a report, as of two guns close together, at two o'clock by his watch; remained on the same spot about half an hour; they then heard another gun fired; made their way as quick as possible to Poat's Close, where they thought the gun was fired: just before they came to the place, saw a man hide behind a bush; they all ran together as quickly as possible. At about the distance of five cloth yards they saw two others, all coming towards them, who ran a little way and then stopped; they discovered that one had a gun, and the others sticks, more than a foot long, with very large heads; witness and Winter had walking sticks, and COTTRELL had a pitchfork; when they stopped, the man having the gun presented it at them and said, "he would blow their brains out;" and the other two on each side said "Fire, fire!" They were then at the distance of four cloth yards from us; this was in the path, which is wide enough for a slide or cart to pass. It was light enough for us to discover the dress of the men. We then asked their names, and what business they had there? One replied that they had got tipsey in the night, and had gone out of their path. We asked them what they had a gun for at this time of Sunday morning: replied he had been to some place after it, and was going to carry it home. They then made their way out of the plantation towards Chapel path; and came to a plantation called Long Break: by this time the light was sufficient to enable them particularly to describe their dress. The man with the gun walked backwards, pointing it at them; he had an old-fashioned jacket one, much torn in the left shirt, there seemed to be something heavy in the pocket, which [?] it weigh down about the size of a bird:0 also [?] [?] small clothes much pieced and fustian leggings, [?] at the bottom; could not observe the face of the man with the gun, as he held it down; he had a hat on [?] torn, and the brims hanging down over his face, and [?] who the [?] was. One of the other men with a [?] but [?] a fustian jacket in pretty good condition, [?] small clothes, with a dark patch on the right thigh, red cravat, and a black hat. Knows Aaron Hagley; has known him 3 or 4 years when he lived at Mr Webber's at Coombland, had suspicion it was he by his walk, but could not see his face, as he kept his arm over it when he looked towards them; and the other man with a stick, wore a dark fustian jacket, corded trowsers, and was a thin man of pale complexion; observed that his cheek bones were remarkably prominent; had a good view of his face; the man with the gun was upwards of five feet, and appeared to be 35 or 40 years of age; the second, whom he thought to be A. Hagley, appeared to be about the same height: the third man was taller. When we came to Long Break, the pale-faced man turned round and struck me on the head with the stick: I did not say anything to him or strike him, they all went on together through the plantation to Palfrey's lane; they went some distance down the lane till they came to a gate; and then turned into Mr Roberts's grounds; they went into afield towards Hewing's farm; we followed close; they retreated towards the old Bampton turnpike road, and came again into Palfrey's lane, then into the road near Long Hayne; had some conversation with one of them as we went on. We asked their names; they asked why we wanted their names in particular: we told our names upon their asking; they said "Keep back, keep your distance," several times. They went on the turnpike road to the cottages of Mr Dickinson's gamekeeper, and we followed: I told Winter to call Mr D's keeper to help to take the men into custody: I said it loud enough for the men to hear. Winter went away, the three men ran fast down the turnpike road, until they came to a large ploughed field belonging to Mrs Poole, of Chetiscombe. I and COTTRELL followed close by the bottom of the field: we went over a gate into a narrow muddy lane, in one part of which there is a pit nearly knee-deep, through which we were obliged to go; we came out into a lane leading from Tiverton Chetiscombe: they crossed the lane into a moory plot on the left hand side, coming from Tiverton. We hallooed several times to Winter to come on: they went into a field, crossed the town leat, and turned a little to the right, over a pair of bars or stile, the man with the gun and another first, the other followed: I and COTTRELL went over the same bars. Winter was not come up: the best dressed man struck COTTRELL on the head with his stick as he was getting over the bars; no blows were returned, neither here or through the whole of the affair, nor any insult offered in any way; after the man struck COTTRELL, he went on and joined the others; we walked rather wider apart after we crossed the bars, COTTRELL was on my right side, I was rather nearer to the men than he was; I was about two land rods or ten paces distance from them, and about one from COTTRELL; when we came over the gate I observed the gun was in the hands of the person whom I supposed to be Aaron Hagley: I saw the man level the gun at JACOB COTTRELL, observing at the time, "I'm d--d if I don't blow his brains out," and then fired: COTTRELL fell; I did not hear any remark made by either of the others, nor did they do anything to prevent it, they were close together; they ran on towards Mr Chapple's without making any remark. I followed as nearly as I can say about 10 or 12 yards: I was afraid to go further, and returned to COTTRELL; he lay flat on his back; he was quite dead, bleeding much, his face was covered with blood; the moon was not so bright then; I went to meet Winter. I met him in the field adjoining; I looked at my watch and found it quarter past four o'clock; I told Winter that COTTRELL was killed, and we both went to get assistance to Mrs Poole's, Chetiscombe: we procured the assistance of the servant man; he went back with me to the place: we got a pig's ladder, and other persons came; we carried the body into Guddle Court, and left it there with the men, while I and Winter came on to Tiverton as quickly as we could. We called at James Venn's in Bampton street, the town clocks were striking five; Venn got up and came down; I told him what had happened, and he went with me to Mr Wright's near Exe bridge. Mr Wright acts as Mr Daniel's steward. Venn rang the bell and knocked, and Mr Wright appeared at the window; we were about 7 or 8 minutes at the door. While we were at the door, we saw a man coming over the bridge towards us; Venn said he thought the keeper was coming; I said I thought Wm. Webber, a man who works on the manor: Winter said "that is one of the men we saw in the cover." He was coming down the middle of the road; as he came nearer, he drew off towards the gutter on the other side of the street. When he was nearly opposite, I said "that is the man who killed JACOB COTTRELL." Then Venn ran and caught him: I also took him by the collar: he made no resistance. I knew him by his dress and walk; I observed him particularly, and did not speak to Venn till he was rather passed me; his walk is heavy and slow: I recognised him as Aaron Hagley; I am certain he was the man who fired the gun and killed COTTRELL; we were quite sober and Hagley appeared to be same. Mr Wright came down and opened the door. Venn told him that one of his men had been killed, and that we had got one of the men who had done it. Did not observe that Hagley made any reply; went into Mr Wright's kitchen; we examined Hagley's leggings, they looked very wet, and appeared as if the mud had been wiped off with straw or grass; Mr Wright sent Venn to get a constable; we remained there about ten minutes; a constable came shortly after, and took him away; I have seen the other two men at the police office in Tiverton; one of them I recognised to be the man who struck me and COTTRELL, as before named: his name is Matthew Maslen; the other I recognised to be Thomas Hagley, who carried the gun in the plantation before I saw it in Aaron Hagley's hands. I am certain they were the men; Maslen had on the same jacket, but not the same trowsers as before. Thomas Hagley had on a different hat, small clothes and gaiters, his jacket was the same.
By a Juror.- Aaron Hagley had apparently neither gun nor stick when taken. I learnt the names of these two while at the office.
W. Winter, a husbandman in the employ of Mr Styling, at Fire Beacon estate, in Tiverton parish, examined by Mr Patch. - On Saturday night last, was in a plantation called Pont's Close, with COTTRELL and Bowerman; we met at the Chapel path, on Mr Daniel's property; am employed by Vincent to watch poachers. (The evidence same as the other in the material point.) I followed with the others as described by James Bowerman, till we came to Mr Dickinson's cottage, and there left them, for the purpose of procuring assistance. I had sufficient opportunity of observing their dress; the man who had the gun had on an old fustian jacket, town on the left side; the pocket hung very heavily: he had an old rusty hat on, the brim hanging down over his face: corded light small clothes much patched, leggings torn at the bottom. I thought his face was rather dark; could not see more of his face than Bowerman: one of the men with the stick had on a light fustian jacket, tolerable good, light corded small clothes, with a dark piece on the right thigh, a red waistcoat, black hat (pretty good), had on leggings or gaiters. The third man, who also had a stick, was dressed very neatly, in a dark fustian jacket, I saw his face; had very high cheek bones, sunken cheeks, thin, and of pale complexion; very good black hat, corded trowsers; he appeared to be the tallest of them; I went to the cottage for assistance, but could not get any, not being able to make any person hear; staid only a few minutes, and went after my party, who were out of sight. I went into the turnpike road towards Tiverton; passed a ploughed field on the left hand side: I hallooed, and my party answered; I then turned and went in through the bottom of the ploughed field into a muddy lane; before I came into the muddy lane, I heard a gun fired; I went in that direction, and met James Bowerman coming towards me. I went with him into the next field, and saw COTTRELL lying on the ground dead, his face was covered with blood. I could not see where the blood came from; I went with Bowerman to Chetiscombe and procured assistance; we then took the body to Cuddle Court; then went with Bowerman to Tiverton. No insult was offered by our party. (Then followed a recapitulation of the evidence given by the former witness.) When he (Hagley) came nearly opposite, I said, "That is one of the men we followed," and Bowerman said it was the man who shot COTTRELL; he knew him from his dress. Venn went and took him. I did not hear anything said by him. Venn told Mr Wright that one of his men was murdered, and they had got the man who had done it. I saw a man strike James Bowerman on the plantation; one of the men I saw in the police office,; he was a thin faced man, was called Matthew Maslen. I knew Thomas Hagley by his jacket, size, and sound of his voice; his face was dark like the person I saw in the plantation; sometimes were close to the poachers, not a cloth yard distant at times. I never knew of any ill-will between Aaron Hagley and J. COTTRELL.
James Venn, examined by Mr Patch. - I am an occasional servant of Mr Wright; I was called on Sunday morning last just before the clock struck five, by James Bowerman: I looked out of the window and asked him what was the matter. In consequence of what he told me, I got up and dressed myself as soon as I could, and found Bowerman and Winter at the door; I went with them to Mr Wright's house; Mr Wright looked out of the window; I waited at the door, close to the gutter. I saw a man coming at a fast walk over the bridge towards us. I said "Vincent is coming, James." Bowerman and Winter were standing in the recess of the door. Bowerman put out his head and said, "No, it's not Will. Webber:" I said, "No, it's not Will. Webber, he does not walk like him. Be who it will, I will see who it is." He was walking on the off side of the street in the roadway. As he came towards us, he altered his pace very much, and walked very slowly indeed; as he came nearer to me, Bowerman went over to him, and spoke to him. He and Winter said, "That is one of the party." The man passed on a few yards, when Bowerman said, "That's the man that shot COTTRELL." I then ran across the street and took him by the collar: I looked in his face, and immediately recognised him. I said "Is that you, Hagley? how came you here this time of the morning?" He said he had been to Bickleigh, and came round by Batterleigh. I said, "You are the man we want." He seemed to draw very much from me, and I pulled him about. He cursed me, and said, "I have not killed a bird for the season, nor shot off a gun." Bowerman then took hold of his collar on the other side. When Mr Wright came out, he asked what was the matter; I said, "One of your men is killed, and we have got the rogue that did it." Mr Wright then brought a light. Bowerman said, "if that's the man, he has got a dark patch on his breeches." We took him into the kitchen, and asked him how he came so dirty, but he made no reply; the patch was above the knee, on the right side on the back part; his jacket was buttoned, and the patch could not be so well seen, but it was very visible when the coat was unbuttoned. Mr Wright then desired me to go for Perkins the constable, which I did; he came with me; we took the man to Bridewell; he had on a red cravat, but neither gun, game, nor stick with him.
Joseph Perkins, examined by Mr patch. - I am a constable of the borough of Tiverton; I was called by James Venn on Monday morning, a little before 6 o'clock. Went with him to Mr Wright's house in Bridge street, Tiverton; went into the kitchen; Mr W. said to me, "Here is a man whom you must take and put in prison;" there were three men there, strangers to me; I said, "Which of the men is it?" Mr Wright said, "That is the one," pointing to one on my left hand; I then took him to Bridewell; said nothing to him, nor he to me while going to the Bridewell: when there, I asked his name, he said "Aaron Hagley;" I said, "You are very wet and muddy, where do you come from?" he said he had come from his cousin's at Bickleigh, up through Boxwood; I asked him his cousin's name, he said it was Jacob Hagley; the jailer and myself searched him; in the waistcoat pocket was a box of lucifer matches; I asked him what he had done with them, as they looked quite new? he said he had bought them last night to light his pipe, at Henry Gould's on the Leat; I said, "How came you up Boxwood?" he said he bought the matches about 8 o'clock on Saturday night and went from thence to Bickleigh, and came up Boxwood on Sunday morning. I left him and went to Mr Wright's again, who desired that I would accompany Mr Macdonald, surgeon, to Guddle, to see the man that was killed; I did so; it was about 7 in the morning. When I got to Guddle, I saw the man laid on the pig's ladder, his face covered with blood; I perceived the left eye was knocked in; I considered the greatest part of the charge went into the eye; there were marks of several small shot about the forehead; the body was warm when I came: Mr Macdonald put his fore-finger about 2 ¼ inches into the socket; Mr M. and I then left. On Sunday afternoon I had the warrant to go to Templeton to apprehend Samuel Hagley. Before I started I went to Bowerman and Winter to get descriptions of the persons of the two others; I then went to Templeton, but could not find Samuel Hagley at Thomas Hagley's house, where he lodged; I saw Thomas Hagley, who said he did not know where Sam was; I went to an adjoining house, which was Maslen's, and saw Maslen, though I did not then know him; but his dress and appearance, as well as that of Thomas Hagley, struck me as being very much like the descriptions given by Bowerman and Winter; I then returned to Tiverton, and on Monday morning obtained a warrant against Thomas Hagley and Matthew Maslen; I then went to Templeton; Wood (who had a warrant to apprehend George Hagley) accompanied me. Coming near Mr Chichester's house, I aid to Wood, "Let us go to Aaron Hagley's House, perhaps we may hear something about them:" on entering the house I saw a man sitting smoking his pipe in the corner, who turned out to be George Hagley. Wood apprehended him; I found a gun under a furze faggot loaded with shot and slugs, thence I went to Templeton, and apprehended Thomas Hagley and Matthew Maslen; I first took Thomas Hagley in his own house, he had a ragged fustian jacket, breeches and leggings, the same that he had on the previous day when I saw him; I said to him, "You must go to Tiverton with me; if you go quietly I shall not hand-bolt you, if not I shall;" he trembled very much; I left him in custody of Venn, and went to Maslen's house, and told him he must go to Tiverton with me; his countenance altered, and he trembled much; he had on a velveteen jacket; I told him to put on his fustian jacket, and the boots that I saw lying by, and which on the Sunday I had observed to be very dirty; I went up stairs and found a very good fustian jacket, which I brought down and told him to put on; there was a pair of corded trousers hung on a rail, dirty, and darkish corded leggings, which were particularly dirty at the lower part of the legs; I told him to put on the clothes he had on, on Sunday, which he did; I then brought Thomas Hagley and Matthew Maslen to Tiverton to the police office. At Thomas's house I noticed a gun on Sunday night over the chimney piece; it was a flint lock; I observed on Sunday, that it had been very recently discharged, as there were marks of powder on the lock; On Monday it was cleaned; it belonged to Thomas Hagley.
Matthew Wreford, examined by Mr Patch. - I am a butcher living in Bampton street, in this town; I keep a shop and have license to sell game. On Saturday evening last on my return from market, I found four men in my house, it was about nine o'clock; these were Aaron Hagley, Thomas Hagley, and Samuel Hagley; I did not know the name of the other; at the time I saw him at the police office on Monday, he answered to the name of Matthew Maslen; they told me that they came to buy some bacon, but I had none; they purchased some hog's pudding, they remained in the house about half an hour after I came in, they had some ale to drink in my house, and ate the hog's pudding. I saw the barrel of a gun on the table; I believe it was a single barrel; I think to the best of my knowledge it was Tom who put the barrel in his pocket; all their pockets seemed full, but the impression on my mind was that Tom Hagley had a stock of a gun in his pocket; the barrel was a short one, about two feet long; did not see the stock I saw a little bag in the possession of Tom: can't say what was in it; it was something heavy, a little bigger than an egg, he put it in his waistcoat pocket. By a Juror: I gave them the ale; they left the house altogether, I have seen them before, I have sold them meat; I have seen Samuel Hagley, Thomas Hagley and Matthew Maslen; I have seen Aaron's wife; she came to my house Sunday morning about 9 o'clock; she asked if her husband was at my house last night.
Samuel Hagley, examined by Mr Patch. - I am a labourer, and quarter with Thomas Hagley, who lives at Lagg, in the parish of Templeton: on Saturday evening I heard that Thomas Hagley and Matthew Maslen were coming to Tiverton to buy salt; Thomas is no relation of mine. I called at my brother's house (Aaron Hagley), we came into Tiverton about eight o'clock, Aaron bought in my presence a box of lucifers, at Henry Gould's: after he went to Mr Wreford's in Bampton street, the game seller; we went in together and found Thomas Hagley and Matthew Maslen there when we went in. I have been at Wreford's and met all there before, it was understood that we were to meet at Wreford's on that evening. There were two guns in the company; I carried the percussion gun; there was only one produced at Wreford's; it was the one I had; we had something to eat and drink at Wreford's; we left Wreford's house about ten o'clock; part of what we had was paid for by Aaron Hagley. Aaron and Maslen went first out of the house; I went next, and Thomas next; went up Bampton street to the Castle gate. We were all four together at the Castle gate; we went to Bolham village, and on the road (passing butcher Newton's house) more than three miles, and then we turned up a wood on the right hand side; had no dogs with us; I remained with them until twelve o'clock. We went through woods and fields and plantations. I had a gun with me during that time; so had Thomas Hagley: the gun produced is the one I carried; (same as before, the percussion one;) I left them between twelve and one o'clock; I left them because I was by myself, and heard someone say "Come on, come on." I thought then it was time for me to be off; I was about thirty or forty yards from the others; I thought it was a strange voice I heard; it was a strange signal to me; before I left, there was a gun fired by my party; it was fired a few minutes before I left; about a half an hour before this, both guns were fired off quicker than a double-barrel gun could be fired. The gun last fired was fired by Thomas Hagley; when I left, I took my gun with me; we fired at birds; I went across the bottom away towards Ewing's; before I came to this place I heard a voice say, "Come on;" I went through the court, across the Cove chapel, thence to Cove bridge; and went down the lane to Hamesford, until I came to Little Hatswell; I remained in a linhay at Hatswell until daylight; went thence to Lurleigh to my brother Aaron's house; I took my gun with me there, and left it in the cupboard, where it was taken from; it was loaded but no cap on it; the gun belonged to Aaron; I know that Thomas Hagley has a flint gun, but am not certain of the gun produced so that I can swear to it. I think it the same. I left Aaron's on Sunday evening, about four o'clock, and slept at Whitnoll, Stoodley parish.
About twenty minutes after 8 o'clock on Wednesday evening, the Coroner summed up the evidence. The Jury afterwards retired to consider their verdict, and found Aaron Hagley guilty of "Wilful Murder," and Thomas Hagley and Matthew Maslen guilty, as there and then aiding and assisting. The Jury was then adjourned till this day (Friday) two o'clock for the purpose of giving time to complete the document.
The prisoners were removed to the Devon County Gaol.

WOOLFARDISWORTHY - Inquests Taken last week by Mr Vallack, of Great Torrington; County Coroner:- At Woolfardisworthy, on the body of a child, called ELIZABETH WAKELEY, who was burnt in consequence of her frock having taken fire.

MERTON - At Merton, on ELIZA ELLACOTT, aged 5 years, who was accidentally burnt during the temporary absence of her elder sister who was left in charge of her.

WEMBWORTHY - At Wembworthy, on the body of a tailor, called SAMUEL STEVENS, who whilst sitting and conversing by the fireside in perfect health fell from his chair and instantly expired. "Died by the Visitation of God."

SAMPFORD COURTNAY - At Sampford Courtnay, on the body of WILLIAM JACKMAN, a farmer's son, aged 16 years. The deceased with others had, on Thursday last, been for some hours tracing a fox n the snow, which they succeeded in destroying about the middle of the day. He, with two men, proceeded the same afternoon with their fox, with a view of collecting money, to the houses of the neighbouring farmers, by whom they were too liberally supplied with beer and cider. The three parted company in the evening, all much intoxicated; about 7 o'clock the poor lad was met, without his hat, rambling towards his home, being then within a quarter of a mile of it, and the next morning about daybreak he was discovered lying by the side of the road within a hundred yards of his Father's house frozen to death!

Thursday 28 February 1839
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Friday evening last, at the Union Workhouse, on the body of RICHARD JEFFRY, a labourer, who was brought in from Heanton the preceding Tuesday, and died the second day after. It appeared that the deceased had been working with a farmer at Heanton, but had no stated residence, and was accustomed to sleep in outhouses and in the open air; his employer, observing him to be in a very ailing state, called the relieving officer, and he gave him an order into the workhouse. He was then removed to Mr Greggery's the Braunton carrier, (who seems to have treated him with great kindness,) and conveyed in his spring van to Barnstaple. On his admission to the Workhouse between twelve and one o'clock on Tuesday, the Governor immediately placed him in the sick ward and sent for the surgeon, who arrived soon afterwards and ordered what was necessary; found him labouring under an active inflammation on the chest: the surgeon remained about the ward upwards of an hour and half. the Governor on the following morning observed the deceased growing worse, and he immediately went after the surgeon, who came directly, and found the deceased sinking by rapid effusion on the chest: the deceased afterwards appeared to rally a little, but again sunk, and died towards the evening, of an inflammation on the chest. Verdict accordingly. The deceased told the governor that some days before while in a state of perspiration he had drank largely of cold water, which no doubt accelerated his death. the Coroner cautioned the relieving officer, that he ought not to have given an order on the Union but to the surgeon in the district, who is always the best judge of the propriety of removal, and in future on all occasions, he told him he had better to send to the surgeon.

Thursday 14 March 1839
TIVERTON - An Inquest was held by -- Jervis, Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of SUSAN YELLAND, a woman of very weak intellect, who, in the absence of the person with whom she lodged, caught her clothes on fire, and before it was discovered, she was burnt in some parts literally to a cinder. Surgical assistance was promptly rendered, and she survived in agony nearly a day, before death relieved her from her intense suffering.

ASHREIGNEY - Melancholy Death. - An Inquest was held on Sunday last, in the parish of Ashreigney, before H. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM FORD, aged 23 years; the deceased was servant to James Harris, a little farmer, and on Friday last was left solely in care of the house while his master went to Chulmleigh market, where he remained all night in a state of drunkenness; next morning a labourer, in the employ of Harris, came to the house, and on finding the door bolted, suspected something was wrong; he proceeded to open the door, when the body of deceased was presented to his view a spectacle of horror, burnt like a cinder. It appeared that he was, when the accident occurred, in the act of providing his supper, and probably fell down in a fit, to which he was frequently subject. The deceased was about to be married.

Thursday 4 April 1839
DARTMOUTH - An Inquest was held by Mr R. Anthony, Coroner for the borough, and a respectable Jury, at Ellis's Ship in Dock Inn, on Monday, 25th ult., on view of the body of ROBERT MCLACKLAN, second mate on board the 'Brigantine Placentia.' It appeared from the evidence that the fore top in conjunction with the crew at the windlass, assisting in getting the fore top mast up, in doing which the block broke and struck the deceased on the head so that he never spoke afterwards. Mr J. Puddicombe, surgeon, who was with the deceased from a short time after the accident occurred to the time of his death, gave it as his opinion that the blow caused the rupture of the large vessels of the brain, the effusion of which caused his death. He was a single man, a native of Glasgow, aged 37. Verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY FRY, aged four years, daughter of JAMES G. FRY, landlord of the Nag's Head, in this town, who, while standing by the fire about noon the same day with a twin sister, caught fire to her clothes and was so dreadfully burnt that she survived but two or three hours. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 11 April 1839
BIDEFORD - Early on Saturday morning, a man of the name of REDICLEAVE, of the parish of Monkleigh, was found burnt to death on a lime kiln, on the new road to Torrington, near the brick yard, about one mile from Bideford. The man was seen in the course of Friday evening, in the town, in a state of intoxication. It is supposed that on his way home he called at the lime kiln to light his pipe, and fell in. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Instances of Sudden Death.- A man named PEARCE, residing in one of the cottages on the Hoe, Plymouth, was found dead in his bed by his wife on Thursday morning:- on her awaking she discovered that his appearance was unusual; she spoke to him, and he made no reply: and melancholy to relate, on further examination she found that life was totally extinct. An Inquest has since been held on his body by Mr R. J. Squire, and a verdict returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

DEVONPORT - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at the Cross Keys public house, Devonport, by Mr A. Bone, on the body of ELIZABETH FREEMAN, aged 67, who died suddenly that morning. It appeared in evidence, that in the night the deceased awoke her husband stating she was violently ill, and that while he was procuring aid she expired. Mr R. J. Laity, surgeon, having examined the body, stated that her death arose from natural causes, and a verdict to that effect was therefore returned.

EXETER - Sudden Death. - A melancholy circumstance occurred in the Guildhall Council Chamber, on Thursday last. As MR WINYARD, gunsmith of Exeter, was sitting hearing the evidence of cases before the court, he dropped suddenly down, and immediately expired. The deceased had been for some time past in a very delicate state of health, supposed to be brought on by pecuniary embarrassments. He has left a wife and two children to deplore their sudden bereavement. An Inquest was held in the afternoon on the body by John Warren, Esq., Coroner for this city, when Mr Harris, surgeon, gave it as his opinion, that death was occasioned by the rupture of the heart, or ossification of some of the vessels of the heart. A verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God," was consequently returned.

Thursday 18 April 1839
BIDEFORD - Fatal Election Affray.- An Inquest was held on Monday last, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner of the borough, on the body of JOHN VANSTONE, a moulder in Mr Parramore's iron foundry, who died that morning.
From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had been drinking at the 'Joiner's Arms,' in the market place, on the evening of the election, and being called by his wife and another woman, about ten o'clock at night, he went out, but instead of going home he joined an affray which had commenced in the passage leading to a yard behind the 'Joiner's Arms,' and the 'Farmer's Exchange.' The former was one of Mr Buller's, and [?], one of Mr Buck's houses: that deceased met with a blow on the side of his head which caused him to stumble a few paces, and then to fall forward on his face and hands. He was picked up bleeding by his wife and the other woman, and helped home. Mr Pridham, the surgeon, was sent for, and in his absence his apprentice went and dressed the wound. Mr Pridham saw the man either the same night or the next morning, and pronounced it a serious case requiring great care and attention; the man got better, and in a fortnight went to work again for a week, though against the surgeon's direction, and seemed pretty well; on the Sunday following, he became rather poorly, and on Tuesday Mr Pridham saw him again, and said he thought he was suffering from influenza, or fever. On Friday he got worse; and on Sunday Mr P. wished to have the attendance of another surgeon, and Mr Christmas Smith was called in.
From Mr Smith's statement, which was clear and satisfactory, it appeared that from the symptoms, and the use of the probe, Mr Pridham and he concluded the skull was injured, and proposed trepanning as the only chance of saving the patient, which was excessively doubtful. The operation was performed by Mr Pridham, in the presence of Mr Smith, and the extent of the abscess on the brain was discovered to be very considerable, and a quantity of matter escaped. The wound was dressed in the usual way; the patient seemed much relieved, and the symptoms improved up to eight o'clock in the evening, after which, clammy perspiration came on, and the man gradually sunk till two o'clock on Monday morning, when he died.
A post mortem examination having been made by Messrs. C. and T. Smith, by direction of the Coroner and Jury, Mr C. Smith detailed the particulars of the investigation, the result of which was, that he found an abscess on the brain, which was the cause of the deceased's death, the depression of the skull not being sufficient to produce that effect; that the abscess was caused by small sharp portions of bone lodged in the brain; that they could not have got there without violence; that witness was not surprised at deceased's being able to work after the blow, the inflammation having been prevented by medical treatment; that the occupation of the deceased, and the habits of life of men of that occupation, would render him more liable to inflammation; and that the sharp points of bone lodged in the brain would eventually, at an indefinite period, influenced by circumstances, have caused his death. Witness also stated that the wound might have been occasioned by any instrument having a termination about the size of the wound, a hammer, or by a fall against a hard substance.
The Inquest was then adjourned to the following day, to hear evidence as to the manner in which, and the person, if any, by whom the wound was inflicted.
One of the witnesses stated that he saw a person near the door of the 'Farmer's Exchange,' with a whip in his hand, with an iron hammer at the end, with which he struck three blows, one of which took effect on the head of a man who fell, but he did not know the person who struck, nor the person who fell.
Several other witnesses were examined, but nothing was elicited tending to implicate any individual. The darkness of the night; the drunken state of most of the crowd; the probable unwillingness of others to criminate any particular person; and perhaps more especially, the want of a public prosecutor; has, for the present at least, permitted the offender to escape.
Verdict, 'Manslaughter against some person unknown.'

WEAR GIFFORD - A lighter, laden with culm, was upset under the bridge on Monday evening last, about five o'clock. JOHN BLIGH, of Wear Gifford, one of the men on board her, instantly sunk, and was drowned. His body was not found until next morning, when it was picked up on a sand ridge. A Coroner's Inquest was held: Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

EXETER - Fire and Melancholy Accident.- A fire broke out on Friday evening last, in some outhouses attached to the premises of a man named REYNOLDS, a dairyman, residing near the bridge, at Alphington near Exeter. An alarm was immediately given, and the fire engines proceeded from this city to the burning buildings. The "West of England" was the first to arrive on the pot, quickly followed by the "Norwich Union" and "West Middlesex":- and a supply of water having been obtained, by the spirited exertions of the firemen, the flames were soon got under; not however, until a cow in one of the stables had been burnt to death, and several others more or less injured. We are sorry to have to record a still more melancholy accident arising out of this fire. As the West Middlesex engine was proceeding at a rapid pace towards the fire, in consequence of a sudden jerk, several of the firemen were thrown down. Among them was a respectable and industrious young man named HENRY CARPENTER, by trade a tailor, residing in St. Sidwells. He was thrown headlong before the engine, the wheels of which passed over his head, completely smashing it, and before he had reached the hospital, where he was immediately taken on a shutter, he had breathed his last. An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased before J. Warren, Esq., the Coroner for Exeter, on Saturday last, when a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 1s. on the engine. The injuries sustained by the unfortunate deceased were of the most dreadful description, and his remains presented a frightful spectacle.

PLYMOUTH - Accident.- An Inquest was held on Monday, at the Anchor and Hope, before Mr R. J. Squire, Coroner, on the body of BOUNTIFUL MAY DEMELLWICK, who met his death under the following circumstances. It appears that the deceased, who is a native of Plymouth, was employed as pilot on board the fishing lugger, Elizabeth and Mary, of Stonehouse, Jacob Collins, master, and on Monday morning the 8th instant, being on the fishing ground, he was engaged with two men in preparing a quantity of fish, to be delivered on board the smack Anne, of Weymouth, when that vessel bore up for the purpose of nearing the fishing boat, and not having let go the jib sheet quick enough, unfortunately ran the boat down. Two of the men succeeded in saving themselves, one by laying hold of the bobstay of the Anne and the other by holding on to the keel of the boat which had been capsized, but DEMELLWICK unfortunately was drowned; a few hours after the melancholy occurrence his body was taken up in the trawl of the smack Pheasant, of this port. - Verdict "Accidental Death." The deceased was a good seaman, and much respected. He has left a wife and three children to regret their loss.

PLYMOUTH - Distressing Occurrence. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at the Richmond Inn, Plymouth, before Richard Jago Squire, Esq., Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, on the body of LIEUT. J. A. PLEYDELL, late of the Royal Marines, whose death was unfortunately occasioned by throwing himself from his bed-room window into the area of his dwelling house in Oxford-street, while labouring under the effects of a frenzy fever. After examining Dr Young Younge and Mr Seccombe, his medical attendants, the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity". The lamented deceased was highly respected.

Thursday 25 April 1839
SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held on Monday last before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN ADAMS, labourer, of Allswere, about 3 miles from the town of Southmolton, who, on returning from Southmolton market on the preceding Saturday, in company with a fellow labourer (where they had been drinking, and the deceased had become intoxicated), having to pass over a bridge called Halsey Bridge, over the river Mole, about twelve at night, reeled against the bridge and fell over it, the side being so founderant that a child of five years of age might have fallen over it. His companion went immediately for assistance to the house of a Mr Eastman, miller, hard by, and knocked him up, and they went in search of the deceased, but in consequence of the darkness of the night could not find him; but as the morning advanced a number of persons engaged in the search, and at about 6 o'clock the body was found in a deep pool of water, about a land yard from the bridge. The Coroner directed the surgeon to examine the body strictly, but no marks of violence appearing on it, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." Thursday 2 May 1839
BIDEFORD - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH PALMER, an elderly person. It appeared in evidence from her daughter, that her mother went to bed on the night before as usual, when she complained of being poorly, and the next morning she was found a corpse in her bed and quite cold. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER - Caution to Mothers. - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the George and Dragon, in St. Sidwell's, on Tuesday last, before J. Warren, Esq., the Coroner for this city, on the body of ELIZA JORDAN, an infant aged 16 months. It appeared from the evidence of the mother, on the day before, the deceased was playing in the court before the house, when the witness went to get a pitcher of water. On her return the child was missing, and she called to her daughter LOUISA, a girl of 10 years old, to look for her. A boy named Evans, who was in the court, called to tell that her child was in the sink, in the court near the entrance to the house of witness, and on going there she found her laying on her face quite dead. The time of her being missed by the mother to that of her being discovered in the sink, did not exceed three minutes. Mr Besley, the surgeon, was called in, but all efforts to restore animation were fruitless. The boy Evans, who was also called in evidence, deposed that when he first saw the deceased in the sink, her legs were higher than her head. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Another Inquest was held by Mr Warren, on Saturday last, on the body of W. TREE, a person of weak intellect, who was employed about the yard and garden in light jobs, by Dr George Barnes, of Sowton. It appeared that the deceased had gone into the stable on Sunday week, where he had no right to go, when he was kicked in the leg by a horse. He was immediately taken to the hospital, and it was found that he had sustained a severe compound fracture, from the effects of which he died on Thursday night. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Thursday 9 May 1839
DARTMOUTH - Singular Death. - An Inquisition was lately taken before Mr Richard Anthony, Coroner, for this borough, at the Dartmouth Inn, on view of the body of GEO. HENRY GLASS, aged 7 years, who was strangled under the following circumstances:- It appeared that the deceased had attended the Sunday School, that as the procession of children was walking to church shortly after 2 o'clock - he, the deceased, retired and went to the garden and entered the privy which he fastened inside by a button - that on attempting to open the door he found the button caught in a singular way which made it difficult for adults at times to open. The poor lad then attempted to force himself out between the door and side post, and succeeded in getting his head and neck in, and finding he could not get on further, attempted to rise, which naturally as he drew towards the button, made the pressure much greater, so strangulation ensued: he was discovered in that position about two hours afterwards. A surgeon, was immediately sent for, but when he arrived, he found the child had been dead some time; on examining the body he found an indentation on the left carotid artery and jugular vein which prevented the blood flowing to the heart, which caused death. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury consulted for a short time and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 30 May 1839
MEAVY - On Saturday last a labourer named TUCKETT, about 24 years of age, residing at Meavy, put a period to his existence by hanging himself; it appeared that he suspended himself from a tree with his neckerchief. An Inquest has been since held on the body, and a verdict returned of "Temporary Insanity."

ST GILES IN THE HEATH - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was lately held at St. Giles-in-the-Heath, by Mr Vallack, county Coroner, on the body of THOMAS ROBINS, junior, a promising young man, about eighteen years of age, son of T. ROBINS, Esq., of Venn, in Launceston, and brother of MR ROBINS, attorney, Tavistock. The deceased, and a particular friend of his, called Carlyon, were riding together on a horse towards Launceston, the deceased riding behind, and carrying in his right hand a loaded percussion gun. Mr Carlyon's hat having fallen off in the road, the deceased drew the ramrod, and whilst endeavouring to reach the hate with it on the near side of the horse, the gun accidentally went off, and the whole load entered under the right ear, and killed him on the spot. It is probable that the gun was discharged by the right foot or strap of deceased coming in contact with the gun on the right or off side of the horse. The testimony given by Mr Carlyon was very clear and satisfactory, and the main points were corroborated by a labouring man, who was within four yards when the fatal accident happened. The deceased and Mr Carlyon were articled clerks with Messrs. Gurney and Cowland, solicitors, Launceston. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 6 June 1839
HEMYOCK - Manslaughter - A Coroner's Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on Monday last, at Symonds's Burrow Farm, in the parish of Hemyock, in this county, on the body of THOMAS NEEDS, labourer, about 19 years of age, in the employ of Mr W. Marks, the occupier of the farm. The deceased on the 24th inst., was in company with his fellow servants, Wm. Trickey, and Thomas Richards, in front of the barn, in the farm yard; he had been playing with William Trickey, who caught up his own hat and that of the deceased, and ran off with them; the deceased following him; Trickey then threw back the hat of the deceased towards the barn door, where Thomas Richards was standing, who caught it up and threw it under the mo[?] staddle. The deceased then came up to Richards and pulled off his hat and put it on his (deceased's) head. Richards said to deceased, "Let me have my hat;" who refused to give it him. Richards then said to deceased, "if thee doesn't let me have my hat, I'll shoot thee;" and he took up a gun which was standing close by, and which had been brought out in the morning for the purpose of killing rooks, put it to his shoulder, and pointed it towards the deceased, who was standing within two or three yards of the muzzle of the gun, with his face towards Richards. A man, named James Dyer, also in the employ of Mr Marks, called out to Richards, and warned him not to play with the gun, but to put it down. Whilst he was speaking, however, Richards fired the gun, and the deceased fell on his back on the barn floor - the shot took effect in the forehead of the deceased, who never spoke after. A surgeon was immediately sent for from Wellington, but before his arrival life was extinct. After a careful investigation, a verdict of 'Manslaughter' was returned against Thomas Richards, who is about 17 years of age, and who it appeared was aware that the gun was loaded. He has been lodged in the county gaol.

EXETER - Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the city workhouse, Exeter, on Tuesday evening, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICAHRD HALL, late a pauper in that establishment, who destroyed himself by cutting his throat. It appeared from the evidence, that about four o'clock in the morning of the 20th instant, the deceased was observed by another pauper to be lying in an unusual posture, with his head over the bed; and on examination, it was found that he had inflicted a deep wound in his throat, from which a large quantity of blood had flowed. A clasp knife was found in the blood, with which the deed had been done. On being asked why he had committed the act, he replied, "let me alone, I wish to die." Mr William Warren, a pupil of J. Tucker, Esq., Surgeon, was sent for, and was promptly in attendance, a messenger was also dispatched for Mr Tucker, who speedily arrived, when the wound was sewed up and dressed, and it was expected his life would have been saved; but on Monday evening, about ten o'clock he died. He was a quiet, inoffensive man, and very reserved: he had been labouring under a dropsical complaint, and expressed alarm at the swelling of his legs and arms, and was observed on Sunday to have shed tears on several occasions, but would give no reason for his distress. Every attention was paid to the unfortunate man by the medical officers, and governor of the workhouse; and before his death he expressed his thankfulness, and said, "I hope the Lord will forgive me for what I have done." The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 13 June 1839
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held by Mr Bone, at Stonehouse, on Saturday last, on the body of JAMES KELLY, a waterman, who was drowned near Drake's Island, on the previous Thursday. It appeared from the testimony of the witnesses, that a gentleman named Hosten had employed KELLY and another waterman named John Davis, to take him to Drake's Island and the Breakwater; they accordingly went to both these places, and whilst on the island the men drank a considerable quantity of liquor; KELLY became so intoxicated as to be unable on embarking from the island in the evening, to get into the boat without assistance. The other, though the worse for liquor, was not so drunk as KELLY. Soon after pushing off from the shore, KELLY lost his hat, and accused Davis of having struck it off his head, which Davis denied. KELLY then struck him; a fight ensued, which Mr Hosten attempted to put an end to by getting between the men, when they all three fell down in the bottom of the boat; the watermen rose before Mr Hosten; they then closed with each other, and whilst continuing the struggle, both fell over the side of the boat into the water; Davis clung to the gunwhale of the boat, but KELLY continued for some minutes under the water clinging to the legs of Davis: Mr Hosten called for assistance to some men who were fishing in a boat near the spot, who immediately came to him, and pulled the two men into the boat. Davis did not appear to have suffered from his immersion in the water, but KELLY was insensible and died in a few minutes. Mr Burrows, surgeon, of East Stonehouse, was examined and stated that he had no doubt of the deceased having died from drowning. The Coroner on summing up the case, explained the law relative to manslaughter, and self defence, and stated to the Jury that if they believed that the deceased and Davis were in the act of fighting and contending with each other when they fell into the water, - that Davis did more than necessary for self defence, - and if they also believed that either partly or entirely by the act of Davis, the deceased fell into the water, and thus became drowned, they should find him guilty of manslaughter. the Jury, after some deliberation, found a verdict of "Accidental Death," considering that the fall was, probably, more the effect of the intoxication of the men than of the combat between them.

WOOLFARDISWORTHY - Accidents:- An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Woolfardisworthy, by Mr Vallack, county Coroner, on the body of a child called JAMES SHORT, who fell off a stool into the fire, and died in consequence of the burns he received.

PYWORTHY - On Saturday last, at Pyworthy, on the body of JOHN BATTEN, aged 72, who whilst at work in a quarry there raising stones, the side of the Quarry fell in upon him, and killed him on the spot; he was taken out from under the stones and rubbish, in about ten minutes after the accident happened, in a mutilated state.

LITTLEHAM - On Monday last at Littleham, on the body of SAMUEL BARTHOLOMEW, aged 17, who was drowned in the river Torridge on the Sunday preceding, whilst bathing. - Verdicts - Accidental Deaths.

Thursday 20 June 1839
MEMBURY - Melancholy Suicide of a Pauper. - An Inquest was held at Haviland's Farm, in the parish of Membury, in this county, by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 31st May, on the body of THOS. COLLINS, who was found hanging in a linhay, in a field near the above farm, on the morning of the 30th ult. The body of the deceased was found suspended to one of the rafters of the linhay by a leather strap, and was then unknown, but was afterwards identified as that of THOMAS COLLINS, a labourer, of the parish of Stockland. From the evidence of the wife of the deceased, it appeared that herself, her husband, and three children, had been for the last four months inmates of the Union Workhouse, at Axminster, where they lost one of their children, after which the wife left the house and returned to Stockland to endeavour to procure work. On the Friday previous to his death, the wife received notice that deceased would leave the house on the next day, and she went over to meet him, and went with him to Stockland, where they slept the Saturday night, and on the Sunday he left, saying he would go to Membury and on to Chard to look for work, after which she heard nothing more of him until his death. It appeared also that the deceased went to Chard and applied for work, but was obliged to decline that afforded him, viz. that of driving the wheel-barrows, from a weakness in the knee. A verdict was returned of "Hung himself, being Lunatic."

TAMERTON - Suicide from Fright. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at Tamerton, on the body of JANE ELLIOTT, aged 13, who committed suicide by hanging herself. The poor girl had found a bundle of clothes in the road, and taking it home, her mother (a poor honest woman) becoming alarmed, charged her with having stolen it, and spoke of the consequences that might follow, which had such an effect on the mind of her daughter, as to cause her to commit the rash act.

Thursday 4 July 1839
SOUTH MOLTON - Inquest by Thomas Copner, Esq., at the Hare and Hounds Inn, in Southmolton, on Monday last, on the body of WILLIAM WEBBER, aged 15, who was found dead in the river Mole, the previous evening. The deceased lived with his uncle, MR JAMES WEBBER draper, of Southmolton, by whom and his family he was treated with the greatest kindness and affection. He was left at home on Sunday evening with MR WEBBER'S two children, while ha and his wife went to a place of worship (the deceased having been twice in the day to church): during their absence he accidentally broke a squire of glass, when, influence probably by a fear of his uncle's displeasure, he immediately went to the water side, a short distance from the town, and (as it is conjectured, for he was unobserved) precipitately threw himself into the stream. His body was discovered by persons passing a few minutes after, and attempts were made to restore animation; but life was extinct. It was a most painful coincidence that just as the body was taken out of the water, his father passed by, and, enquiring what had attracted the crowd, was informed that a boy was drowned; he went to the spot, and was horrified to behold his child, and fainted away. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict returned, "Found Drowned."

PILTON - Suicide. - Much excitement was occasioned in this village and throughout the borough on Tuesday morning last, by the discovery of the body of a young female, named MARY ANN CROCKER, aged 19 or 20, daughter of JOHN CROCKER, under-sexton of Pilton Church, lying on the sand near Pottington point. Reports were rife that the body exhibited marks of violence which warranted conjectures that the deceased was murdered - but we are happy to state that there is not the slightest ground for so horrible a suspicion, the evidence on the Inquest having left no doubt whatever that the unfortunate female (who appears lately to have contracted habits of irregularity and dissipation) was the cause of her own death by throwing herself into the water. A respectable Jury was convened at 12 o'clock before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, and the following facts were elicited:-
John Ley, labourer, of Barnstaple, stated that between the hours of four and five this morning, as he was walking down Pottingdon marsh, he saw a bonnet, cloak, and collar lying together; he took them up, and at a little distance observed something lying on the sand; he went to see it, and found it to be the deceased; he then went in to Mr Fisher's house, and to Mr Somerwill's lime kiln, to give information.
Mr John Somerwill deposed, that being informed by John Ley of a person lying dead on the sands, he, with two or three persons, went to it, and placed the body which was lying on her face on a plank, and removed it beyond the high water.
Mr William Fisher, of Pottington, stated that last evening about nine o'clock, he was standing on the marsh near the water, and saw the deceased, MARY ANN CROCKER, a short distance from Mr Somerwill's ship-yard, walking very fast down the marsh; she appeared not to notice any one, but proceeded right on; he observed her face to be unusually flushed and red; from that time he did not again see her until the following morning when he was informed that she had been found drowned.
Mr Charles Cutcliffe, surgeon, examined the body, and stated to the Jury that there was not the least ground to believe that violence had been used towards the deceased; and that he had no doubt whatever that her death was caused by suffocation in the water.
JOHN CROCKER, her father, was then called in by the desire of the Jury, a report having been circulated that in the evening he had quarrelled with his daughter and beaten her; this he positively denied, and stated, that at eight o'clock in the evening deceased returned from her work, and enquired for her sister ELEANOR; she was told that she had gone and taken the two children with her to see the boats come up; deceased said, "why could she not have waited?" and took her bonnet and cloak and left the house; and from that time witness never saw her until he identified her in the morning lying a corpse.
It was quite astonishing that death had made such an alteration in the body in so short a time; her face, which was very pale and delicate, was so much swollen and bloated that it was almost impossible to recognise a single feature even by those to whom she was best known.
The Jury returned a verdict "Found Drowned; but by what means she came into the water did not appear."

Thursday 11 July 1839
BARNSTAPLE - A melancholy and fatal accident happened on Tuesday evening, about five miles down the river near Fremington pill. A party of gentlemen were proceeding in their gig boat to Bideford, to attend the regatta the following day, when the wind being quite against them occasioned a heavy swell, and the boat shipped a quantity of water, filled, and went down. The crew instantly seized each his oar, by which they supported themselves until a boat which observed the disaster made to their help and took some of them on board, while others, being expert swimmers, safely reached the shore. Mr Knox, of the infirmary, was picked up in a very exhausted state, and taken to the house of Mr Dullam, of Fremington, where he was treated with much hospitality, and soon recovered. But a more lamentable fate befell another of the crew, MR CHARLES JAMES CLARKE, son of -- CLARKE, Esq., of Heanton Hill, in the parish of Heanton Punchardon, an articled clerk to Messrs. Roberts and Carter, solicitors, of this town. Having sustained himself in the water by the aid of his oar as long as he could he became exhausted, and sunk just as the boat was nearing to his relief. He was heard to call out for help, but it came too late. His body was washed on shore the next morning near Chevinor, and was taken to the residence of his afflicted parents, where an Inquest was held yesterday noon, before Thomas Copner, Esq., and a respectable jury, who returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.'

SWIMBRIDGE - Fatal Mistake. - This morning (Thursday), JOHN YELLAND, a servant in the employ of the Rev. J. Russell, of Torrdown, in the parish of Swymbridge, feeling himself unwell, took what he believed and intended to be a dose of salts, and having diluted it, drank the draught. He went immediately after to ride out with his master, but finding himself very ill returned home, and in half an hour was a corpse! It was found that he had poisoned himself by taking oxalic acid instead of Epsom salts. An Inquest is now holding on the body. Deceased had been many years; in Mr Russell's service, and was much respected.

Thursday 18 July 1839
BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held on Friday, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of STEPHEN BARTLETT, who was found by the person with whom he lodged, on Thursday night, in a dying state, and who expired before assistance could be rendered. Verdict - "Died from Excessive Drinking." The poor fellow lately came into the possession of between three and four hundred pounds, by the death of a relative, which, instead of a blessing, proved a curse to him, as it gave him the means of indulging his propensity to drinking, which, unhappily, has proved fatal to him.

Thursday 25 July 1839
DEVONPORT - On Tuesday night, an Inquest was held at the Dolphin Inn, Devonport, on the body of ANNA WILLIAMS, aged 68, a widow, who was found dead in her room the same morning. It appeared from the evidence of Mr R. J. Laity, surgeon, that the deceased had been subject for some time to epilepsy, and that she died from natural causes. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 1 August 1839
EXETER - Suspected Child Murder by its Mother. - About two months since, a young woman named MARY HELMORE, was taken into the service of Mr England of Exeter. Up to that time she had lived as servant with Mr John Radmore, of Thorverton, and she was highly recommended to Mr England. On Saturday she appeared to be very unwell, and was desired by one of the family to go to her bed-room, which she did. She was about her work as usual next day, but looked so ill as to excite the notice of the family. In the course of the day one of the servant boys observed a drain at the back of the house to be choked, and saw some large substance in it; he mentioned this to MARY HELMORE and said he would take it out, but she exclaimed - "For God's sake do not, or it will smell dreadful." One of the family observed to Mr England that the appearance of the woman was like that of a person just after confinement, he consequently directed a search to be made, and the body of a newly born infant was found in the drain, and proved to be the obstructing substance discovered by the servant boy on Sunday. Mr England communicated with the authorities, and an Inquest was held on the body, but the Jury not having any evidence before them as to the cause of death, returned a verdict of "Found Dead." They also expressed an opinion that MARY HELMORE was guilty of concealing the birth, and ought to be indicted for it. Mr Harris, surgeon, and two other medical gentlemen, examined the body of the child, and stated their belief that it had been born alive, and had breathed after it was thrown into the drain. Mr Harris also examined the person of MARY HELMORE, and stated that she had recently been delivered of a child. We have heard that the corporation of guardians of the poor, do not intend to prosecute in this case, consequently the woman is still at large.

BARNSTAPLE - Suicide By a Clergyman. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at Hannaford, in the parish of Swymbridge, near this town, on the body of the REV. HUGH NORTHCOTE, M.A., rector of Monkoakhampton, and formerly curate of Landkey and Swymbridge; who had destroyed himself by blowing his brains out with a gun in his bed room. The domestics heard the report of a discharge at about 5 o'clock in the morning, but were under no apprehension of the cause of it until, between 7 and 8 o'clock, their master not being down, they went to his room door to call him, but obtaining no answer, and the door being locked, they entered by the window and found him lying on his bed quite dead. It had been remarked that his manner lately betrayed much eccentricity; and circumstances were deposed to which left no doubt on the minds of the Jury that he was labouring under mental aberration, and they returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 22 August 1839
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Distressing Accident. - On Saturday last, a lad named TALL, in the service of Mrs Pote, of Woodford Farm, in Plympton St. Mary, was thrown from a cart which he was driving: the wheel went over his head and so dreadfully crushed it, that he died instantly. An Inquest has been since held on his body, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - On Monday, an Inquest was held at the Queen's Head, on the Parade, Plymouth, on the body of WM. REED, an extra-man in her Majesty's customs, who met his death under the following circumstances. It appeared that the deceased was employed on Thursday last, in taking charge of the stores for the barque Industry; that about 3 o'clock on that day he was standing by the gate way entering into Cole's Quay, at Richmond wharf, when the cart came in contact with the gate and knocked the head piece of the gate off, and which broke the deceased ribs, part of which perforated his lungs. The deceased lingered from Thursday until the Saturday following, when he died. Verdict, Accidental Death from a broken rib perforating the lungs;" deodand on the horse and cart, 1s.

Thursday 29 August 1839
MORETONHAMPSTEAD - An Inquest has been held before Joseph Gribble, Esq., at Pimmore, Moretonhampstead, on the body of JAMES MILTON, a servant to Mr Thomas Kelly of that place. On Wednesday last, deceased had under his charge a horse and cart, the vehicle being loaded with stone. This was to be delivered at a particular spot and in order to do this it was necessary the cart should be backed. In doing so that horse was stubborn, and not moving backwards in the way deceased wished, he struck it, upon which the horse suddenly sprung forward, knocked the deceased down, and one of the wheels passed over his body, and caused death. Verdict - 'Accidental Death.'

EXMOUTH - An Inquest was held at Foster's Dolphin Inn, Exmouth, by Mr Aberdein, on Thursday, the 13th inst. on the body of MR HANNIBAL JEWELL, of Exmouth, a superannuated Custom House officer, aged 72 years. It appeared that the deceased on Tuesday night, the 13th inst. after he had been some time in bed, complained to his wife of a great pain in his bowels, and she gave him two or three tea-spoons full of gin, which relived him. Shortly after, he again complained of a return of the pain, and it continuing to increase, his wife ran out of the house to get assistance, and on returning with a neighbour, Mrs Dalley, the deceased was found to be dead. The Jury returned a verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER - Fatal Accident.- On Friday morning a man named HILLMAN, aged 51 years, fell from a scaffold at Baring-place, Heavitree, and was killed on the spot. He was in the act of moving a large stone of about 3 cwt. at the time of the accident, which fell upon his head and caused instant death. An Inquest was held on the body the same evening by S. Warren, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of Accidental Death was recorded.

Thursday 12 September 1839
NORTH MOLTON - An Inquest was held by T. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on Saturday last, at Northmolton, on the body of WILLIAM SHAPCOTT, aged 45, a waggoner in the employ of Messrs. Hitchcock, Maunders, and Co., who accidentally fell from the waggon while proceeding from Southmolton to Northmolton the previous evening, and the wheels passed over his body; he died almost instantly; he has left a wife and two children to lament their loss. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 3 October 1839
LOXHORE - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., at Riddle, in the parish of Loxhore, on the body of AGNESS LATHAM, aged 24, a servant to Mr Richard Comer, who had died the day preceding. Deceased went to Barnstaple fair on Friday the 20th ult., and in the evening she returned with a young man (a servant to Mr Gill, of Bratton Fleming), whom she took into the kitchen: on the following day her master expressed his displeasure at her admitting a stranger into the house so late at night, and was angry with her the whole day. On Sunday morning she left her bed (in which another servant slept with her) and went down stairs in a hasty manner - returned again in about five minutes, and, by her own confession, she then took a small quantity of corrosive sublimate, mixed it with cold tea, and was soon afterwards taken vomiting and very ill: Mr Torr, surgeon, was sent for, and attended her until that day week, when she died. She had bought the poison by her master's orders, for striking the sheep. Her master gave her an excellent character, but it appeared that the girl was rather nervous, and of weak intellect. Verdict, - Temporary Derangement.

BRAUNTON - An Inquest was also held on Monday last, before T. Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH HOWE, wife of MR JOHN HOWE, a respectable yeoman of Braunton. On Saturday last, in the evening, deceased left her house, saying she was going to a Mr Smith's: she was seen soon afterwards in Chapel-street, but no one saw her from that time until she was found in the stream on Braunton marsh, drowned. It was satisfactorily proved that she and her husband and family lived on the best terms. Verdict, - Found Drowned.

Thursday 31 October 1839
EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, by John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of P. PALMER, who for very many years was a porter in the employ of Messrs. Kingdon, of Exeter. Verdict, 'Died by the Visitation of God.' The deceased was in perfect health up to the time of going to bed, his wife thought that she heard him breathe hard, and attempted to rouse him, but found him dead. He was a man of excellent character and much respected by his employers: his sudden death has left a widow and seven children in a state of the greatest affliction and distress. It is a case well worthy the attention of the charitable and humane, and any subscriptions for the relief of the distressed widow and family will be received and properly applied by Messrs. Kingdon, his late employers.

DREWSTEIGNTON - Singular Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, the 23rd inst., at the New Inn, Drewsteignton, before Mr Gribble, one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of MR ROBT. MIDDLETON, aged 70, a respectable tradesman, who was found drowned in a small stream of water. It appeared from the evidence adduced that deceased was returning from his usual employment the previous evening, and having to pass a gutter where there was a running stream of water, it is supposed that in the crossing of which deceased stumbled, and fell on his face, which being immersed in the water, occasioned his death. Verdict - "Found Drowned."

Thursday 7 November 1839
BISHOPS TAWTON - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, at Bishop's Tawton, on the body of an illegitimate female infant child, born of MRS NICKOLLS, the widow of MR NICKOLLS, who died some years before at Hulmstone Barton. It had been suspected for some days that NICKOLLS had been delivered of a child; and, on being questioned, she admitted the fact, and said she had interred it in the garden adjoining her house at Ley: a search warrant was obtained, and on the constable's going to execute it, she told him she would save him the trouble, and went to a chest in her bed room and took from thence a small coffin which contained the body of the child. The body was examined by two surgeons, who gave evidence that the child was very diminutive, not exceeding half the usual weight of a full-grown child; that it was born alive; but as the body bore no marks of violence, it was impossible to say that it died from unfair means, and they were rather of opinion that it might have come to its death from natural causes; the body was in a very bad state, having been dead more than a fortnight. There was no attempt on the part of the mother to conceal the child, she having shown it to her servant girl soon after its birth; it was then dead and seemed very small. After lengthened consideration, the Jury returned a verdict, "That the child was born alive, but how it came to its death no satisfactory evidence doth appear." The circumstance caused great sensation in the parish, the woman having moved in respectable life.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was also held before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday last, at Heanton Punchardon, on the body of JOHN ROWE, of this town, aged 81. The deceased left Barnstaple on Monday morning, in his boat to go a fishing; when the boat was about two miles down the river, a person from the Ashford lime kiln, saw a man lying across it motionless; he took a boat and went off, and found the deceased quite dead. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

MARWOOD - On Saturday last, a little boy named JOHN DUNSFORD, four years old, residing at Blatchford, in the parish of MARWOOD, in the absence of his parents, caught his pinafore on fire, and before assistance could be rendered him, was so dreadfully burnt, that, after lingering in agonies for about seven hours, he expired. An Inquest was held on the body on Sunday morning, before Thos. Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death." returned.

Thursday 14 November 1839
CHARLES - An Inquest was held on Friday week, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM BUCKINGHAM, labourer of the parish of Charles, aged 51. The deceased was in the act of discharging a load of corn from the cart, and pitching it upon the stack, when the horse moved a little forward and he fell back on the ground, and dislocated his neck and died instantly. He was a man of good character and was usually in the employ of the Rev. Richard Blackmore. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 28 November 1839
EXETER - Suicide. - On Friday evening last, an Inquest was held at the 'Anchor Inn,' in the Island, before John Warren, Esq., the Coroner for Exeter, on the body of MARY LANG, the wife of MR LANG, tinman, of Longbrook-street, who left her home about six o'clock on Thursday night, and was missing till about six on Friday morning, when her body was found by some men in the employ of Mr Strong, miller, in the Bonhay. Evidence was adduced to show that deceased had appeared for some days past in a low desponding way, and that on Thursday her appearance was very wild, and she had in the course of the day, on several occasions, uttered strange and incoherent ejaculations, without assigning any cause. There being no evidence to prove how the deceased came into the water, the Jury immediately, after retiring for about a minute, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." Nothing appeared on the Inquest to show that there had been any family quarrel, or that deceased lived on any other than affectionate terms with her friends. It is supposed that she had thrown herself into the water at the dipping steps, a short distance below Engine Bridge, (as her pattens were found on the steps,) and she had been carried down by the stream till stopped by the grating at Mr Strong's mills.

STONEHOUSE - Mysterious Death. - An Inquest was held by Mr A. Bone, Coroner, on the evening of Monday last, which was continued by adjournment on Tuesday and Thursday, on the body of ANN HELE, landlady of the 'Golden Lion Inn,' Stonehouse, who died on Tuesday the 12th inst., after an illness of several weeks. Her remains were to be interred on the Sunday following, but certain reports relative to the cause of her death, having reached the Coroner, he very properly instituted an Enquiry, and the result was that he thought it his duty to hold an Inquest on the body. The funeral was postponed, and a post mortem examination took place on Sunday, by Mr Burrows, surgeon, of Stonehouse; - and the Jury having viewed the body the following day, commenced the judicial enquiry. A private in the marine corps, named Isaac Willis, describing himself as an herb doctor, was desired by the Coroner to be present. It appeared from the evidence, which was of considerable length, that MRS HELE had had a disease in one of her knees for several years past, and for which she had several times consulted Mr Burrows and Dr Budd, who had succeeded in ameliorating the disorder but not in effectually removing it. The last visit of these gentlemen was between two and three months since, when it appeared the deceased found considerable relief from their treatment. About three weeks after that period, MRS HELE was induced to put herself under the care of Isaac Williams, a private in the Royal Marines, and who as we before stated, styles himself an herb-doctor, and who pretended he could cure her knee. She continued it seems to take his medicines and to follow his advice till Thursday the 7th instant, when her friends, finding that she was gradually getting worse, insisted on sending for Mr Burrows; he came, declared her to be seriously ill and prescribed for her, not knowing at that period that she had been taking medicine from any one else; he continued his visits till Sunday, when she was taken alarmingly ill, and it was not till that day that Mr Burrows knew that she had been following the advice of Williams. She never spoke after Sunday, and on Tuesday she died. There was nothing discovered by the post mortem examination of any deleterious substance: a pill was found in her bed-room, which contained six grains of calomel: but Williams declared that that was not his medicine, as he only used herbs; and he further produced to the Jury a list of cures which he had effected. The Jury, after consulting, returned a verdict on Thursday evening, 'That the deceased died from nervous irritation, but from what cause such irritation was brought on there was no evidence to show.' - The Jury, which was composed of respectable tradesmen, (Mr Mayne, of Union-street, being the foreman,) desired the Coroner to record their opinion that the practice of administering medicines by persons not duly qualified, was one which could not be too strongly condemned. The deceased was a fine woman, aged 25 years, and, with the exception of the disease in her knee, was in excellent health up to the period of her taking Williams's nostrums.

PLYMOUTH - Caution to Parents. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at Mr W. H. Farley's, Frankfort-street, Plymouth, before Mr R. J. Squire, Coroner, on the body of JAMES WILLIAM GUY, an infant 21 months old, who was burnt to death. The poor little sufferer, it appeared, was playing with the fire in the absence of its mother; the flames caught its clothes, and before assistance could be rendered, its clothes were literally burnt from its body, and the child expired a few hours after. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded. In all houses where there are young children fire-guards should be provided: the cost is trifling, and as a preventive to such accidents they are invaluable.

Thursday 26 December 1839
CULLOMPTON - Accidents at Collumpton. - On Monday, the 16th December, HENRY ODDEY, aged six years and half, during his parents' absence, was so severely burnt by his clothes taking fire, that he expired the following morning. On the same day HENRY BUSSELL, aged 24 years, agricultural labourer to T. W. Whitter, Esq., in pulling down a wall, fractured both his thighs, by a portion of the wall giving way much sooner than was anticipated. There was a very severe compound fracture of the right thigh, extending into the knee joint, which rendered it necessary that amputation should be had resource to. The operation was performed by Mr Maunder, assisted by Mr William Gabriel, and Mr Richard Thomas Smith. The poor fellow lingered until 8 o'clock on Tuesday evening, when death put an end to his sufferings. On Wednesday Inquests were holden on both, by James Partridge, Esq., and a verdict returned in each case of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Extraordinary Case. - The death of a mother in the act of giving birth to her illegitimate offspring, and of the child also, has occurred at Exeter, the circumstances of which are as follows:- On Monday last, a Jury was impannelled before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Pratt's Old London Inn, to inquire into the circumstances touching the death of MARY ROBINSON, a servant of Miss Woollcombe, residing in East Southernhay. The first witness called was:- Frances Eleanora Bingham, wife of Captain John Bingham, of the royal navy, who said the deceased was servant to Miss Mary Woollcombe, who is my sister, and who left Exeter, on a visit, on the 12th of October last, leaving her house in charge of the deceased. On Saturday night, the 14th inst., in consequence of some information which I received from a person of the name of Coleman, I applied to Mr John James, and afterwards went to my sister's house, in company with him, and Captain Back, of the police, and some other persons. I saw the front door opened. The other persons went up stairs, but I did not. William Back - I am an officer of the police in Exeter. About 10 o'clock Saturday night, in consequence of information which I received, I went to the house of Miss Woollcombe, Southernhay, in company with Mr Allen, a smith; I found at the door Mr John James, Mrs Bingham, Captain Bingham, and George Coleman. The front door having been opened by Allen, I, Mr James and Coleman, went up stairs. On going to the servant's room we found it locked on the inside. I am quite sure the door was locked on the inside, and that the key was in the lock. That door was also opened by Allen, and on entering the room we discovered the body of the deceased lying on the floor on her face to the best of my belief just as the Jury have now seen it. William Symons - I last saw the deceased on Wednesday last, the 11th of this month, about half-past 8 in the morning. She appeared cheerful and as usual. I delivered bread to her then. On Friday morning, about the same hour, I called at the house as usual, rung the bell, but did not get any answer. On Saturday morning, about the same time, I went again to the house, partly in consequence of not having delivered my bread on the day before, and partly on account of the following day being Sunday. I rung as usual, but got no answer, and I have not since seen the deceased. Sarah Dobell. - I am a widow, residing in this city, and have known the deceased for the last five years and upwards. About a fortnight ago I saw her at my house in Catherine-street. I suspected she was in the family way, and mentioned my suspicion to her, but she denied it, and gave me such reasons as induced me to suppose I had been mistaken. She complained of cold, and that her legs were swelling. I recommended her to take a dose of spirits of wine, juniper, and guaiacum, and at her request procured three pennyworth from Mr Knott, the druggist. She afterwards told me that she had taken it, and that she was a deal better. On Monday last, I procured a similar quantity from Mr Knott, and gave the deceased. On the following day I drank tea with the deceased, and she then told me that she had not taken the second dose. I never afterwards saw her alive. When I had the medicine at Mr Knott's, the person who served me told me that what I asked for was a very good thing. That was after I had described the state of the person for whom it was wanted. John Haddy James. - I am a surgeon residing in this city. I was at the house of Miss Woollcombe on Saturday night, in company, with Back, the police officer, Allen, the smith, and other persons. I was present when the servant's bed-room door was opened, as described by William back, in his deposition. The body was found just in the position in which it has been seen by the Jury this morning; I found the bed clothes scattered about the room in extreme confusion; a chair, upon which the deceased had apparently been leaning, placed near the fire-place; and near it the body, lying on the face and hands. On raising the petticoat the head of a child was perceived. I have this morning, in company with Dr Shapter and Mr Kempe, made an examination of the body. Mr J. described the appearances, and said he was of opinion that the deceased had got out of bed, and becoming faint, and falling with great violence on the floor, received a severe injury of the head, and died either in consequence of that, or its effects combined with the illness under which she was otherwise labouring. He said it was mere conjecture, but he thought it probable that the death might have taken place as far back as Thursday night. the Jury, after consulting together, returned a verdict, - "That the deceased was found dead on the 14th of December; that she was in the act of giving birth to a female child at the time of her death; but that by what means she came by her death (except as aforesaid) no evidence appears to the Jurors."

Thursday 9 January 1840
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on Monday last, on the body of MISS SARAH SHARLAND, of this town, who died on the Saturday evening preceding. She was sitting in her chair, and was suddenly seized with illness: a surgeon was soon after sent for, but she died within about three quarters of an hour of her seizure. She had been to the market not above a quarter of an hour previously, and during the day appeared in good health. Verdict, "Apoplexy."

NORTH MOLTON - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday the 31st day of December last, the REV. JOHN HODGKIN, vicar of Northmolton, on his returning from Southmolton about 6 o'clock in the evening, when within a quarter of a mile of his home, his horse suddenly sprung off, and the reverend gentleman fell backwards from his saddle upon the back part of his head to the ground, occasioning a concussion of the brain. A female happened to be near the spot at the time the accident occurred, and every assistance was speedily procured, when he was heard to speak for the last time, and to say "I shall die." He lingered in a state of insensibility until Sunday morning last, when death put a period to her sufferings at about 1 o'clock in the morning. An Inquest was held on the body on Sunday, before Thomas Copner, Esq., and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 16 January 1840
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, in Barnstaple, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY DOWNING, aged 3 years, who was killed by the wheel of a cart passing over her body. The child was coming out of a house in Ebberly-street, to pass across to her mother's with a jug in her hand, when a cart drawn by two horses came down the street, and the fore-horse touching the child, she fell, and the wheel passed over her body, before the driver had time to pull up. Two women were near the spot at the time, who gave their evidence that the man was driving a steady pace, and they thought the driver did not see the child, before the horse knocked her down. The man had the reins in his hand. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of one shilling on the wheel. The driver was the son of Mrs Westacott, widow, of Northmolton, and both by his own statement and from the testimony of the witnesses, it was clear that there was no blame to be imputed to him. The poor mother is called to sustain trouble upon trouble, her husband having left her twelve months ago for America, where he died shortly after landing, leaving two children there without a friend.

An Inquest as also held at Landkey, on Thursday last, on the body of ANN COTTLE, aged two years and half, daughter of a labourer, whose clothes took fire, of which deceased was so dreadfully burnt as to cause her death the same day. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 27 February 1840
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on Friday last, at Pilton, on the body of RICHARD FURZE, sawyer. The deceased ( who was a quiet, inoffensive man, and had been in the employ of Richard Thorne, Esq., for a great number of years) went to his work as usual in the morning; he complained to one of his fellow workmen that he was unwell, and soon after fell down in the saw-pit, and expired immediately. It was the opinion of the medical man that he died from an affection of the heart. Verdict, - "Visitation of God."

Thursday 5 March 1840
PLYMOUTH - Suicide. - On Friday evening last, an Inquest was held by Mr R. J. Squire, on the body of JOHN DUSTIN, who was found hanging in a shed situated in one of the gardens near the Citadel. John Wakeham, having been sworn, said: I have known the deceased about ten years; he earned his livelihood by working for the merchants in this port. I have not seen him till this morning for 3 weeks; he was then looking for employment; I saw him in New-street, between five and six o'clock; the deceased said, "Good morning Mr Wakeham - it is a fine morning;" I replied, "Yes." Deceased said, "How are times with you;" and said they were very slack with him. He then walked down New-street, towards the barbican; it was rather dark, and I cannot say whether he walked steadily or not. I never heard him say he would destroy himself; he was a single man, and about 54 years of age; I cannot assign any reason for deceased destroying himself; he had in general a fair proportion of work. I have never seen the deceased drunk; after he had taken anything to drink he became low spirited and lost. William Macey, landlord of the 'Maritime Inn," swore: I have known the deceased for the last twenty years; he was a quiet inoffensive man. Latterly I have observed that he appeared stupefied as if he had drank to excess; he always talked reasonably; he called yesterday at my house and had one pennyworth of beer; he told me he wished to see Mr Burnell about some fish. I did not see him again until this morning at about ten minutes past ten o'clock when I was at my garden outside the walls of the garrison, where I found him hanging and quite dead. The deceased attended church regularly; I never saw anything extraordinary in his manner except one morning last week when he came to my house and said "I think last night rats or cats were skirmishing about my room, but I don't think it was so, but that they (meaning his brother and sister) were trying to frighten me to break me off from my cruise." He sometimes would not drink for several days, but when he commenced would continue for a fortnight. SAMUEL DUSTIN, sworn: I am a warehouseman in the employ of Messrs Collier and Dunsford; the deceased, who is my brother, lived with me; for several days past the deceased appeared very low-spirited; before he went to bed last night he walked about the room muttering to himself half-an-hour; I did not understand a word he said; he slept in a bed-room adjoining mine; and he was in bed about ten o'clock; I heard his door open about a quarter before five this morning; since which time I have not seen him; the deceased latterly has appeared in trouble, but I cannot account for his committal of the dreadful act. He was in want of nothing. The Coroner then addressed the Jury, who, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "felo de se," and the remains of the unfortunate man were interred in the churchyard on the same night, without the rites of christian burial.

Thursday 19 March 1840
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held in this town, on Monday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SUSAN CLARKE, aged 37, a lodger in the house of Mr Smith, pawnbroker, in Boutport-street. Deceased had been ailing for some time, but had gone to bed no worse than usual; her daughter, who slept with her, on awaking in the morning, found her mother lying dead by her side; the surgeon gave his opinion that death was occasioned by disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly. BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident.- On Thursday last, a young man called BRAHAM PINKHAM, of Westleigh, was suddenly killed in the shipbuilding yard of Mr Johnson, East the Water. It appears that he was engaged in carrying a piece of timber, one end of which he bore alone on his shoulder, suddenly his foot slipped, when the timber fell on his head, and crushed it so violently as to cause instant death. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

NORTH MOLTON - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held before Thomas Copner, Esq., on Saturday last, near Heasleigh, in the parish of Northmolton, on the body of WILLIAM THORNE, aged ten years, who, whilst his mother went down to the brook to give the horse water, caught fire to his clothes, and was burnt so dreadfully that he survived but two hours. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 2 April 1840
MORETONHAMPSTEAD - On Thursday last, an Inquest was taken at Moretonhampstead, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of MARY ANN MATTHEWS, 4 ½ years old, whose clothes having on the preceding Sunday accidently caught fire, she was so dreadfully burnt, that on the same night death terminated her sufferings.

Thursday 9 April 1840
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held before Thomas Copner, Esq., on Friday last, at Rawleigh near this town, on the body of ARTHUR HEMMET, a little boy, two years old, son of PETER HEMMET, an operative in the Rawleigh lace factory. The deceased was out the preceding afternoon with his brother, a year older than himself, and in attempting to cross the stream, it is supposed that instead of going over the bridge, he ran into the water; his brother, who had gone over before him, in looking back, found him missing; and his body was presently afterwards seen floating down the stream. Assistance was procured, but a quarter of an hour had elapsed before the body was recovered, and the vital spark had fled. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held by Thomas Copner, Esq., at the Union workhouse, Southmolton, last week, on the body of a man named THOMAS CHALLICE, aged about 50, who having no friends in the neighbourhood, was admitted in the Workhouse in a week state, and died the next day. Verdict, - "Died by the Visitation of God."

IDE - Coroner's Inquests. - On Friday afternoon last, an Inquest was held at the New Inn, in the Village of Ide, before James Partridge Esq., County Coroner, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH GILL, wife of MR GILL, of Exeter, builder, who was found hanging in her bed-room on the preceding morning, and quite dead. The deceased who was some time since confined in the Lunatic Asylum, had been lodging for some time at the house of Mr H. Scanes, at Ide, having been recommended to do so for the benefit of her health. On the morning of Thursday, between three and four o'clock, she requested the daughter of Mr Scanes who was in the habit of sleeping with her, to leave her as she had not slept well, and thought she might sleep better if she were left alone. The young woman accordingly left her, and on going again to her bed-room at her usual hour of rising, she found her hanging by a handkerchief to the rod of the window blind. There seems no doubt that the unfortunate deceased was insane at the time she committed the rash act, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH - Awful Instance of Sudden Death. - On Tuesday afternoon, MRS COLE, wife of MR THOMAS COLE, Treville-street, Plymouth, while employed in the domestic concerns of her house, without any previous symptom of illness, suddenly fell down and died instantly. Medical aid was soon on the spot, but it was of no service - the spark of life had flown; - thus adding another proof to the thousands that have preceded, of the slight tenure with which life is held. An Inquest was held on her remains the following day at the Lamb Inn, when the Jury returned a verdict "Died from a disease of the heart."

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquisition was held by Mr R. J. Squire, Coroner, on Thursday evening, at the Globe Inn, Plymouth, on the body of a female unknown, who had been found on that morning under the eastern Hoe, the tide having just left the body. Her face and hands were entirely decomposed. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The body, however, has been since identified as being that of ELIZABETH TIPPETT, aged about 20, late a servant at the Pack Horse Inn, Treville-street, who had been missing for the last two months, and although search had been made for her, no intelligence had been obtained. She had for some time kept company with a private soldier in the citadel, but having discovered that he was a married man, it is supposed that the circumstance preyed so much on her mind as to cause her to commit suicide.

Thursday 16 April 1840
ILFLRACOMBE - Sudden Death - An Inquest was held on Monday last, by T. Copner, Esq., on view of the body of MR WILLIAM ALLEN, aged 68 years. It appears the deceased retired to rest about 9 o'clock on Friday night in his usual health; his wife awoke about 12 o'clock and found him quite dead. A surgeon was immediately called in, who was of opinion that water on the chest appeared to be the cause of death. Verdict, - Visitation of God.

Thursday 23 April 1840
KINGSBRIDGE - April 13, 1840. - Awful Instance of Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Exeter Inn, before J. Gribble, Esq., and a respectable Jury touching the death of ELIZABETH BURGOYNE, a servant to the Rev. Mr Smith, who died almost suddenly in consequence of fright from a cut of her finger. Mary Bush sworn:- I am ladies' maid to Mrs Smith, have lived in her service since February last; the deceased was cook; on Friday last was told the cook had cut her thumb; I went to the yard to see her, she appeared faint, and we put her to bed; she complained of pain in her back, and continued sick; the deceased often complained of sickness and a pain in her stomach, I saw her many times during the day, and left her at 11 o'clock the same night, she then appeared composed, and said there was no occasion to stay up with her. Jane Shepherd sworn: I am housemaid to the Rev. Mr Smith; I saw the deceased in the yard after she had cut her finger, she was put to bed; I gave her some gruel and tea and some opening medicine; I used to sleep with the deceased; my mistress considered it would be better for her to sleep alone that night; I saw her again the next morning about 6 o'clock, she then appeared very ill; I gave her some tea, and she then said she should die; she was then nearly gone, and died about nine o'clock the same morning; she was mincing some veal when she cut her finger; it was a very small cut. Mr W. H. Balkwill sworn:- I am a druggist; the deceased came to my shop and showed me her thumb, which was cut near the nail; it was a small cut; she appeared faint and alarmed; I dressed the wound and desired her to call again in the afternoon; I gave her no medicine; she had a very bad habit of body. W. C. Ford, Esq., Surgeon, sworn:- I was called on Saturday morning last, about 10 o'clock to see the deceased. I found her in bed; she was dead when I came into the room; I examined the wound, it was a mere cut of the skin, and of no consequence; I have no doubt but that her death was caused by fright, the bursting of a blood vessel, or some other organic disease about the heart. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

EXETER - Suicide for Love. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday afternoon at the 'Falcon.' in North Street, Exeter, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE WILLIAM TRENHICK, a fine young man aged 27, who had been found the same morning, suspended from a beam in an apartment occupied by him, in a house in the neighbourhood. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was a stonemason, his friends resided at Torquay, and he was a young man of sober and religious habits. He had lodged with a Mrs Salter, the wife of a servant in the employment of Mr Mortimer, since September last. About that time he formed an attachment for a young woman, a female servant, which at Christmas was broken off, in consequence of her having gone to a ball without his knowledge. Since the termination of this acquaintance a marked change had taken place in the manner of the deceased, and latterly he had become silent, reserved, and apparently labouring under distress of mind. On Sunday last, and for some days previously, he ate scarcely anything, and his conduct at times was very strange. He returned home on Sunday night quite sober, and went to bed without saying anything. Yesterday morning, at half-past five, he called to his landlady, who was still in bed, to make out his bill for the week, as was her custom, and went down stairs. The front door was heard to shut violently, as if he had gone out, but it was shown that if he had done so, he could not have come in again, without its being opened from within, as it had a latch key. Shortly after six o'clock, he was found by Mrs Salter suspended to a beam from a rope made of small twine, carefully twisted together, and formed into a running knot, in his bedroom. He was immediately cut down, and proved to be quite dead. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 30 April 1840
BIDEFORD - On Sunday morning last, a man was found dead in the cabin of the 'Robert,' London trader, lying at Bideford quay. His name was HENRY GOOD, of Bude. It is supposed he died of intoxication, as he had been drinking hard the preceding evening. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body, and returned a verdict of "Visitation of God."

EXETER - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, at Lee's White Ball public-house, Mary Arches-street, on the body of AGNES BIGNELL, 85 years of age, - a cripple and otherwise infirm, who had resided for about a year and a quarter in a room in that street. It appeared she had been last seen alive about 6 o'clock on the preceding evening, when a little girl who usually went her errands, fetched as was customary, half-pint of beer for her supper. On opening the door of her room on the following morning, she was found lying dead behind it. She had some chips in one hand, and some in her apron;, and it is supposed that when she dropped, she was in the act of preparing these for lighting her fire the following morning. The beer remained untouched, and the bed had not that night been slept on, so sudden does her transition appear to have been. She was a married woman, her husband belonging to Tiverton, but has been separated from him 25 years. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER - Suicide.- It is our painful duty to announce a most distressing act of suicide committed about 3 o'clock yesterday (Wednesday) morning, at Exeter, by MR S. T. GILBERT, who cut his throat in so determined a manner that the head was almost severed from the body. He was a traveller for the house of Messrs. Thomas Phipson and Sons, general manufacturers, Birmingham; and had been in Exeter about a fortnight. When the fatal event occurred he was at the house of Mr John Bond, cooper, St. Thomas, whose daughter he married; - she has been dead for several years, and he subsequently married a widow residing at Beaford in this county. He then commenced the drapery business at Southmolton, where his premises were destroyed by fire and a child of his wife by a former husband was burnt to death, by which sad event it is understood MR GILBERT lost an income of £40 per annum. He afterwards entered into business in Exeter as a partner in the firm of Gilbert and Brough, linen drapers, and has latterly been a commercial traveller. An Inquest will be held on the body by Joseph Gribble, Esq., when the cause of this rash act will no doubt be elicited.

NORTHPETHERWIN - An Inquest was taken before Mr Vallack, one of the Coroners of the county, on the body of ELIZABETH HICKS, a respectable woman aged 77, residing at Northpetherwin, on the 22nd inst., who was found burnt to death on the high road in consequence of the ignition of some straw which was placed there for the purpose of making potatoe manure. No evidence appeared how the fire originated. The body was dreadfully burnt, the clothes being entirely consumed. Near the spot where she was discovered there was a teakettle and a pitcher found, and it is supposed she had fallen on the fire in her endeavour to extinguish it. A boy was known to go to the house where the deceased resided, and took a stick of fire to his father to light his pipe, who was working near, and it is supposed that he must have dropt part of the fire on the straw, which caused this distressing and melancholy accident. The Jury, after making every enquiry, returned a verdict of "Found Burnt."

ASHBURTON - Sudden Death. - On Sunday the 20th inst., about seven o'clock, MR WILLIAM IRELAND FERRIS, school-master, of Ashburton, left his house to walk a short distance, and on reaching the house of a relative, he complained of being faint, and was provided with a chair to sit down, when his symptoms of illness became very alarming, a medical gentleman was immediately sent for, who promptly attended just as he breathed his last. He has left a widow and four children to lament their loss. An Inquest has been held by J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God," returned.

Thursday 21 May 1840
ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held in this town, Saturday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRY THOMAS, one of the crew of the 'Incentive,' of Plymouth, lying in this port, who had died suddenly on board the day before. From the evidence of the surgeon, it appeared that death was occasioned by the bursting of an abscess internally; and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect. The master and men gave the deceased a very good character.

NORTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the infant child of MR THOMAS STONEMAN, of this place, who died almost suddenly in its mother's arms the Wednesday morning previous. Verdict, "Natural Death."

DEVONPORT - Melancholy Death. - An Inquisition was held on Wednesday evening, at the Lamb Inn, Devonport, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a respectable old woman, called MARY METTERS, wife of a blacksmith in the dock-yard. It appeared from the evidence of the witnesses examined, that the deceased, who was a sober and temperate individual, had been subject to apoplectic fits, but was apparently in good health when her husband left to go in the yard, and was preparing to wash some clothes. Not long after ten o'clock however, a thick smoke was observed to issue from the chimney of deceased's apartment, No. 18, Ordnance-street, which attracted attention, and on the neighbours entering the room, she was seen in a sitting posture close to the fire, her clothes reduced to a tinder, and herself horribly burnt. Water was immediately thrown over her, and the fire extinguished, but no signs of life were perceived. The Jury after hearing the examination of the witnesses, returned a verdict of "Died from Accidental Burning."

NEWTON FERRERS - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Newton Ferrers, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of LT. YELLAND, R.N., late of that place. The deceased was much subject to asthma, and on Monday last he went, in company with one other individual, to fish on the Whiting ground, where they arrived about seven o'clock in the morning. Within half an hour after they had begun to fish, LT. YELLAND complained of feeling unwell, and said he thought he was dying, being at the same time attacked with cough. Within a few minutes afterwards he leaned his head on the gunwhale of the boat and expired. The man in the boat hailed some persons who were fishing near the spot, and who came to his assistance. The deceased was, however, quite dead before they came to him. The body was opened by Mr Spencer of Newton Ferrers, surgeon, who stated he was of opinion that deceased died from the effects of spasmodic asthma. - "Natural Death."

Thursday 4 June 1840
EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held before S. Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the King's Arms, in Coombe-street, Exeter, on the body of a man named DAVY, who was drowned in the river on Thursday evening. It seems that DAVY had incautiously laid himself down upon a heap of lime stones, close to the water's edge, and having by some accident fallen into the river, was drowned before assistance could be procured. - Verdict, 'Accidentally Drowned.'

EXETER - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Sunday evening last, between 9 and 10 o'clock, a MR CONNET, brother of the landlord of the Halfway house, on the Cowley Bridge road, was unfortunately drowned in the river near the Haven Banks Inn, opposite the lime kilns. The deceased had been passing the evening in the neighbourhood, and is supposed to have lost his way owing to the darkness of the night. We understand that his hat was seen floating on the water by some persons who were passing, and who caused immediate search to be made for the body, which, however, was not found until half-past two o'clock on the following morning. An Inquest has since been held on the body, and there being no doubt that the occurrence was purely accidental, a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 11 June 1840
EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday last an Inquest was taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at Stokes' Elephant Inn, North-street, Exeter, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH HEARN, wife of MR JOHN HEARN, currier, residing in Chapple's Court, in the same street, who was found dead in her bed-room soon after noon on the preceding day. Her husband was at his work, and the deceased, who was 55 years old, had been seen about ten o'clock in the forenoon; the discovery of her situation taking place when her husband came home to dinner. It is supposed she had gone up stairs to make her bed, having turned the key in the door below. A medical gentleman was called in, who gave it as his opinion that she had been seized with apoplexy, and when he saw her had been dead full three hours, the body being quite cold; and the Jury returned a verdict of 'Died by the Visitation of God.'

TORQUAY - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday the 2nd instant, an Inquest was held at her late residence, Torquay, on the body of MARY BALL, aged 65, for many years a highly respectable monthly nurse. It appears that the deceased went to bed on the Saturday night in good health, but much fatigued, and stated to the inmates that it was not her intention to rise very early the next morning. In consequence of her not making her appearance at eleven o'clock, her room was entered, when she was discovered to be quite dead. A medical man was called in, who gave it as his opinion that she had been dead several hours. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 18 June 1840
SWIMBRIDGE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at Denniton, in the parish of Swymbridge, before Thomas Copner, Esq., on the body of BARTHOLOMEW ASHPLANT, who had died suddenly the day preceding. The deceased had long suffered greatly from rheumatism in his legs, and had remained in bed during the last week, and applied blisters with much effect; so that on Tuesday morning he got up more free from pain than he had been for years; but he had not been out of bed many minutes, when he complained of a dreadful pain in his head; and having assisted him into bed again, the boy who was with him went down to go for the surgeon; but he had scarcely time to get the horse out of the stable, before the deceased expired. He had been an upper servant 27 years in the family of Admiral and Mrs Bury, and was much respected for his fidelity and general excellence of conduct. Verdict, - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 25 June 1840
ILFRACOMBE - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS HILL, aged 10 years, son of JAS, HILL, cordwainer of this place. The deceased was riding a fine spirited horse belonging to Mr Martin, of the 'Britannia Hotel,' when the animal, either frightened by a hat which a mischievous boy threw at him, or excited by another horse which was coming after him, set off at a furious rate; the deceased held on as long as he could, but although he had been accustomed to riding, he was at length thrown off with great violence on his head. Mr Sharland, of Morthoe, who saw the accident, immediately took him up and conveyed him to the shop of Mr Moon, surgeon, but he was found to have sustained a concussion of the brain, and was beyond the reach of surgical relief, and after lingering n great agony he died at 12 o'clock the same night. Verdict, "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 1s. upon the horse.

EXETER - Death by Drowning. - On Sunday afternoon last, a lad named GEORGE BENNETT, aged 14 years, was drowned under the following distressing circumstances. The deceased, who could not swim, in company with another boy named Saunders, a year younger than himself, went to the Shilhay-lake in St. Mary Steps parish in Exeter, for the purpose of bathing. Saunders, who could swim very well, undressed and jumped into the water, which was eight feet deep. The deceased directly afterwards did the same, and it being much out of his depth immediately sank. Saunders proceeded to his assistance and would have saved him, but deceased clung so closely to him, that to save himself, Saunders was forced to release himself from his grasp, and with great difficulty swam ashore. Shortly afterwards a man named Rogers dived for the body and brought it up, but all efforts to restore animation were fruitless. Among those who assisted to recover the body was the father of the deceased, who, while searching for it, was himself seized with cramp and had a very narrow escape. A Coroner's Inquest was held at the Custom-house inn, on Monday, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 2 July 1840
EXETER - Melancholy Death by Intoxication. - On Monday morning, between 5 and 6 o'clock, a woman named Galpin, who keeps a coffee stall on Exe-bridge, Exeter, observed the body of a man floating in the water, about 20 yards below the bridge, on the St. Thomas' side of the river. She immediately called her two sons who resided near, and who speedily procured a boat and took up the body, which they conveyed to the engine house at St. Thomas. The deceased was very respectably dressed, and on his person they found £1 15s. 6d., together with a handkerchief and two pair of gloves. His shirt was marked "H. PARSONS," and from this and other circumstances there was no doubt that the body was that of a gentleman of great respectability of that name, who formerly resided at Alphington, but has lately been lodging at Ipplepen in this county. The body, however, was so much decomposed as to destroy completely the identity of the features, and those who had known him long were unable to recognise him. It appears that MR PARSONS, who was 30 years of age, and a widower, left his home about three weeks since on a visit to his father in law at Oxford. The last time he was seen alive in this city, was on Monday the 22nd instant, between 9 and 10 o'clock. He was then in the skittle ground of the 'Seven Stars' public house, adjoining the bridge, and was very much intoxicated. He said he had been to Oxford and had come to Exeter on his way home. On going away from the skittle ground, he left a bundle behind him containing a pair of shoes and other articles of wearing apparel, and there can be no doubt that from being so much intoxicated, he fell accidentally into the water, close by which he was obliged to pass on leaving the skittle ground. A silly rumour was circulated, to the effect that the unfortunate gentleman had been murdered, but for this it will be seen by the circumstances above stated, there was not the least foundation. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday night, at the King's Arms, St. Thomas', before Jos. Gribble, Esq., County Coroner, and was adjourned until Tuesday morning, for the purpose of procuring additional testimony as to the identity. The Jury after a full investigation of all the circumstances, returned a verdict of - "Found Drowned."

LYMPSTONE - Sudden Death. - On Monday the 22nd ultimo, WM. LONG, a labourer, of Lympstone, aged 59 years, who was assisting to shear sheep at the farm of Mrs Nicks, in Woodbury, died in the following awfully sudden manner. The deceased, who appeared to have been some time ailing, and was labouring under symptoms of water on the chest, had helped to shear several sheep on the morning before. He had sheared one sheep and was employed on a second, when, as he was standing and leaning forward over the sheep, it struggled a little, and the deceased was in the act as it was thought of raising himself up to turn the animal, when he fell on his back on the floor of the barn,. He was immediately raised up, it being supposed that he had fainted, but he was quite dead. Medical assistance was immediately procured, and an effort was made to bleed the deceased without effect. An Inquest was held on the body before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 23rd inst., and a verdict returned of 'Died by the Visitation of God.'

HEMIOCK - Another Case of Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., on Thursday the 25th, at Hemiock, on the body of CHARLES MASEY, 79 years of age, formerly a blacksmith, who having been very unwell for some time past, left his house between three and four o'clock on the afternoon of the day previous, without saying where he was going, and was found lying dead in the road about two hours after, a quarter of a mile from the town of Hemiock. He was lying on his back by the side of the road near the ditch, with his head resting on a piece of wood, his hat off and lying about a foot from his head, and the stick with which he walked by his side. A verdict of 'Natural Death' was returned.

MORETONHAMPSTEAD - On Monday last an Inquest was taken at Moretonhampstead, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the body of WM. LETHBRIDGE, servant to Mr Samuel Croote, dealer in oats, who died on the preceding Saturday night, in consequence of injuries received the Thursday week before. At this time he was on his return from Okehampton, with a loaded waggon, and his account of the matter was this: - He said he was standing on the arm or shaft of the waggon, when his feet slipping, he fell to the ground, and both wheels on the nearside passed over him, causing such injuries as led to his death; and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The deceased was a native of Newton Abbot, about 20 years of age; had been in the employ of his master for some time, and had conducted himself in a manner that won for him the respect of all who knew him.

REWE - On Thursday last, MR JOHN WARE, of Heazel Barton, in the parish of Rewe, terminated his existence, by shooting himself with a fowling piece, in his own house. The deceased was 52 years old, unmarried, a respectable farmer, and in good circumstances. Symptoms of an aberration of the mind had before manifested themselves, and at the Inquest on Friday, a verdict of "Destroyed himself while labouring under Temporary Insanity," was returned.

Thursday 16 July 1840
UPLYME. - A melancholy accident occurred here on Wednesday evening last, the 8th instant, arising out of that heedlessness and want of caution so frequently exhibited by persons leading and driving horses. A lad about fifteen years of age, in the employ of Mr G. Webb, of Cornhays farm, in this parish, having been desired to lead three cart horses from the stable to the fields, haltered one horse which he mounted, and drove the other two before him. On his way he met a lad called JOEL JEFFORD, about ten years old, whom he suffered to get up behind him on the horse he was riding; when they came to the gate of a wheat field which it was necessary to pass through, the elder boy desired JOEL to get off and open the gate of the field, and after they got inside desired him to keep the higher side of the road through the field, between the wheat and the roadway, in order to keep the horses from the wheat. Instead of this JEFFORD kept behind the horses, driving them by throwing out his arms and hallooing, till he got them into a trot, and then ran after them urging them on, when the hinder horse of the two, a young bay cart mare, about three years old, kicked at him with her near hind foot and struck him in the belly. He fell immediately and became insensible; The other boy took him up and carried him some distance, when he procured assistance, and the poor little fellow was taken to a cottage near. Medical aid was sent for, but he died in about a quarter of an hour afterwards. An Inquest was held on the body, at the Talbot Arms, Uplyme, on Friday the 10th instant, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

HONITON - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., at Buckerell near Honiton, on Saturday the 11th, on the body of ABRAHAM SPARKES, an infant aged 1 year and 7 months, who came to its death by accidentally falling down the stairs in an house adjoining the one in which its parents lived, and into which the deceased child was in the habit of running to see its grandmother. A medical man examined the body externally, and was of opinion that death might have been occasioned by rupture of the spinal cords, of the rupture of some blood vessel internally occasioning pressure upon the spinal cord, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

APPLEDORE - An Inquest was held here on Thursday, the 9th, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY BEAUCHAMP, who was found dead the day previous. From evidence it appeared that the deceased, who was aged and of very eccentric habits, had been in the habit of keeping herself shut up in the house, with the doors and windows fastened, for the last year of two. On the Saturday before her death, a friend sent her some little presents, which she received at the door, and was not seen alive after. On the 8th the relieving officer called with her bread, when, not being able to get admittance, some neighbours entered at the window, and found her lying with her legs on the bed and her head on the floor, and from her appearance it was the opinion of Dr Pratt that she must have been dead twenty four hours. In the house was found nearly £5 in money, several papers of tea, and several bottles of different sorts of spirits, and with the latter we are sorry to say several of the neighbouring females made too free, for in about two hours after the deceased was found dead, the house in every respect resembled an Irish wake and strong tea and strong grog were the order of the day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 30 July 1840
LANDKEY - Death by Poison. - An Inquest was held on Monday last at Holnacott, in the parish of Landkey, before Thomas Copner, Esq., and a respectable Jury, of which Mr George Bale was foreman, on the body of WILLIAM SELDON, blacksmith, aged 24, son of MR WILLIAM SELDON, farmer, who was found dead in an outhouse the Saturday morning preceding. It was at first supposed that he had died of apoplexy; but on a suggestion that death might have been occasioned by poison, the Coroner ordered a post mortem examination, which, being taken by Dr Newbolt, confirmed the suspicion that poison was the cause of death. After the Jury had viewed the body, the following evidence was adduced:-
MARY SELDON, sworn: am sister of deceased; live with my father; my brother also lived with us; he was a blacksmith, and kept a shop in Landkey village; he came home in the evening sometimes at 9, sometimes later; we always staid up for him; never went to bed before he came home till Friday night; I then waited up till five minutes past 12, but the deceased had not arrived; got up at about six o'clock next morning; went out after wood to the rick to light the fire; and as I passed by, I opened the linhay door and looked in and saw him lying; I called, but he did not speak; called three times, and then went out and met my father and brother, and said, "here he is; " I did not know he was dead, but thought he might be asleep; he was a very sober man; always on the best terms with his family; my father and brother then went in and saw the body, and found he was dead; deceased had been living home some months; was always on good terms with us; never had any disagreement whatever; I saw him on Friday at six in the evening, and did not see him again till I found him.
John Mayne, of Landkey, labourer, sworn: Have known the deceased many years, saw him about twelve o'clock on Friday noon going towards Hannaford; he stayed at Hannaford till three or four o'clock, but never saw him afterwards; on Saturday morning, about six o'clock, I was called out of bed by deceased's brother, and found deceased lying in the pound house or linhay, like one asleep; he lay on his belly, his mouth partly open and straw in his mouth wet; took him up to see that there had been no violence done him, and found that nothing was amiss; his cap lay about five feet from the body; desired his father to let everything remain as it was.
WILLIAM SELDON, sworn: Am father of deceased; he has lodged and boarded with me a few months; he would be 25 next March; saw him last Friday at the court door as I was going to Barnstaple; returned about half past eight o'clock; he was not then in his shop: never saw him after till I found him a corpse in the linhay; he was a sober man; we had no dissension whatever; he was ill sometime ago; he had a complaint in his head; the surgeon attended him, and said he had a very curious head; he came home from Exeter ill; we have seen no lowness of spirits nor any change in him whatever; he was in perfect health on Friday, and I never saw him again till Saturday; the straw was not at all deranged; my wife was with me at Barnstaple market.
MARY SELDON recalled: Remember once my brother had a complaint and swelling in his head; heard him say that the doctor said he had a very strange head; he would sometimes go up and lie down on his bed before he took his supper; he complained in his head very much.
By a Juror: On Friday at five minutes to ne he was here and was going away; I told him dinner was nearly ready; he went away and did not come again till four o'clock, when he told me he had been to get a man to work with him; he dined as usual; the dinner was the same we all partook of.
JOHN SELDON, deceased's brother, was next examined, but there was nothing material in his evidence.
RICHARD SELDON, sworn: am deceased's brother; saw him at six o'clock on Friday evening, in the court; he asked me to go down to strike to him at work; went down at about seven to help him, but he was not at the shop at all.
WILLIAM SELDON, recalled: I took the contents out of deceased's pockets, in Mr Joce's presence; there was no paper that could have contained poison, nor any phial.
Dr Newbolt, sworn: Saw deceased on Saturday in the stable, lying on his face and hands, apparently in the position in which he died; it was then perhaps eight hours after death; caused him to be turned, and put my finger under his cravat; there was a frothy bloody matter escaping from his nose and mouth; I considered at first sight that he had died of apoplexy; on my return home, however, I reconsidered my examination, and brought to my mind that similar symptoms might be produced from any deleterious drug taken into the stomach; on examining the body today by the Coroner's directions, I found the whole surface of it of the same livid appearance as the face; I then proceeded, with Mr Davie and Mr Bencraft, to open the body; and at the bottom of the stomach I found extensive inflammation, great discolouration, the internal coat destroyed, and its appearance almost approaching to gangrene; the upper part of the stomach was perfectly healthy, and every other organ in the abdomen; the cause of death is unquestionably the administration of some deleterious ingredient, as portions of the internal coat were separated, which I have in my possession; independently of which it is impossible for a body to be in so perfect a state with a stomach so diseased, but by some drug which had occasioned a quick death; the internal coat of the stomach could not have been destroyed in a perfectly healthy man; nor could there be such discolouration; have no doubt whatever of the cause of death; cannot give an opinion of the drug which caused death, but I have the contents of the stomach, which I intend to analyze; remarked deceased's head; have never seen a more particular form of head in my life.
At the suggestion of the foreman of the Jury, John Goss, with whom deceased served his apprenticeship, was sworn: His evidence merely was, that the deceased was a very sober well-behaved young man, and that while he lived with him he used often to complain of his head and stomach.
This was all the evidence. The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said, they could have no doubt that the deceased had died by poison, and they would probably be of opinion, that he had administered it to himself; in that case, it would be for them only to determine whether he was in a sane state of mind or not, when he did it; if the latter, which he trusted the evidence would warrant them in believing, then they would find a verdict to the effect that he destroyed himself being temporarily insane.
The Jury, after a long deliberation, returned a verdict, "Died by Poison, but whether administered by himself or otherwise, no evidence doth appear."
The occurrence created some considerable sensation in Landkey village, as the deceased was well known, and bore an exemplary character as an honest, industrious, and religious man. We learn from Dr Newbolt, that his analyzation of the contents of the stomach proves that the poison of which the deceased died was opium.

Thursday 13 August 1840
BRIDFORD - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Sunday last, the 9th inst. at Bridford, on the body of a man named GEORGE HILL, aged about 70, who had on the preceding Thursday, cut his throat. He lingered however, until Saturday morning, when death terminated his existence. - There was some evidence adduced which proved insanity, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

CHARLES - Sudden Death. - An Inquisition was held on Friday last, by Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, in the parish of CHARLES, on the body of JOHN LEWORTHY, a mason, aged 64, who was working with his son in Bremridge wood, in that parish, apparently in perfect health, when the son observed his father bending on the left side, and heard him suddenly cry out, "William! William! my head, my head!" and never spoke afterwards. Verdict, - "Visitation of God."

BARNSTAPLE - A fatal accident happened yesterday (Wednesday), at noon, to JOHN, son of MR EDWARD SETTER BAKER, miller, of Port Mills, in this town, aged three years. It appeared that the little fellow, having taken his dinner, went into the mill with an apprentice; and in a few minutes his father, hearing a scream, ran out, and found him lying by a wheel on his back; the child faintly said "mother," and died almost immediately. The deceased must have been caught and struck down by one of the teeth of the wheel; there were some bruises on his person, but the injury was chiefly internal. An Inquest was held on the body of Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 20 August 1840
BRATTON FLEMING - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at Bratton Fleming, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of FRANCIS RIDD, an old man of that parish, who had left his home the day before to go for his pay, and was found some time afterwards lying dead in a field which was in his road. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

KINGS NYMPTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by Thomas Copner, Esq., at Kingsnympton, on Sunday last, on the body of MR GEORGE SKINNER, yeoman, of Collacott farm, aged 41, who, the previous morning, having prepared himself to go to Southmolton market, and appeared in perfect health, went into a back yard, and about half an hour afterwards was found on the ground a corpse. Verdict, - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 27 August 1840
BARNSTAPLE - Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary, on Tuesday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN SANDERS, labourer, of Pilton, aged 37, who, while working the day before in a quarry at Bishop's Tawton, with another man who was some distance from him, the rubbish or deads fell in upon him, and buried him up to the head; his companion obtained assistance instantly, and he was dug out; but it was found that he had received a terrible fracture of the skull, and his arm was broken, besides other serious contusions all over his body. He was removed to the infirmary, but died within five minutes of his arrival. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

NORTH MOLTON - An Inquest was also held on Saturday last, in the parish of Northmolton, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN BODEN, mason, aged 41, who, while riding in a cart with a scythe in it, passing through a narrow lane, the handle of the scythe, which was incautiously permitted to project out of the cart, was caught by the stump of a tree in the hedge, and by that means the scythe was brought in contact with the leg of the deceased, and cut through the artery, causing a dreadful effusion of blood, which occasioned his death before medical assistance could reach him, as he was then a mile from Northmolton, and some time necessarily elapsed before the surgeon arrived. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased was a very decent man, and has left a widow and three children.

BLACK TORRINGTON - Sudden Death. - On Monday night, as MR WARD, farmer, of Black Torrington, was ascending his stairs to go to bed, he was heard to say, "I shan't go up here many times more," and before the morning he was a corpse! Deceased was advanced in age. An Inquest was held on the body before H. A. Vallack, Esq., and a verdict returned, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 10 September 1840
BARNSTAPLE - The Late Fatal Accident in Barnstaple Bay. - the events of the past day or two have dissipated the feeble ray of hope which the imperfect evidence of last week permitted to the distressed survivors. On Tuesday morning, the body of MR HEAL'S son was washed in on Saunton sands, whence it was removed to Saunton court Barton, where an Inquest was held upon it before Thomas Copner, Esq; and scarcely had this melancholy duty been discharged, before the body of young LEWORTHY was also picked up, and underwent a similar inquisition. The bodies were in an advanced state of decomposition. The verdict in each case, "Found Drowned." The distress of the surviving members of the afflicted families is indescribable. The bodies of the other three have not yet been heard of.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide at Plymouth. - On Tuesday morning last the body of a female respectably dressed, was discovered by some young men who were bathing, about five or six feet from the rocks, off the public bathing place, under the Hoe. They brought it on shore and gave information to the police officer, and after some enquiry it was discovered to be the body of HARRIET ELSTON, a young woman who had lived for some time as a servant, at the White Hart Inn, Old Town, where she bore an excellent character. Nothing occurred at the Inquest to account for the rash act, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

PLYMOUTH - Another Inquest was held on Saturday last on the body of a child named ROBERT CROSS, who with several other children, was playing in Charles' Place, when he was unfortunately killed by the wheel of a waggon belonging to Mr Ford, butcher, which was driven by a man named Richard Horswill, to whom, however, no blame was attributable, as the vehicle was proceeding at a very slow pace. It appeared that the wheel passed over the boy's head, and consequently fractured his skull. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

OTTERY ST. MARY - A lamentable instance of the want of caution, which unfortunately too often prevails in looking after young children, occurred in this parish on Thursday the 3rd instant, in the person of a fine little girl named MARY E. ROGERS, not quite two years old, who was drowned in the river Tale. The deceased infant, who was the daughter of LEVI ROGERS, butler to Sir John Kennaway, Bart., had been seen playing with two other children, each of them a little older than herself, in the garden of Escot house, at some rails near a gate leading into the fields through which the river runs, and which was unfastened. The two other children returned some time after without their companion, upon which search was made and the body of the poor little infant was seen in the river, about thirty yards from the garden. A little box which she had been playing with was on the footbridge, and on a bush below the bridge was a small piece of rag, which it is supposed she must have let fall, and in reaching over for it had herself fallen into the stream. Medical assistance was procured, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held on the body on Friday the 4th instant, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict found, "Accidentally Drowned."

Accident on the River Dart. - On Friday a man named JOHN SALTER, employed in the salmon fishery, was followed by his child, a little boy five years old, to the fish-house on the Broad Marsh. The man then proceeded with a fellow labourer to his employment, and having in a short time missed the child, they both went to search for it. It was found lying in the river dead, where the water was but only 18 inches deep. An Inquest was held on the body the following Sunday, before J. Gribble, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" returned.

Thursday 17 September 1840
BARNSTAPLE - The Late Accident in Barnstaple Bay. - The body of RENDLE BLUMENDALE, another of the unfortunate sufferers in the recent catastrophe, was seen floating near the Croyde sands, on Sunday evening last, and was brought to shore by a countryman. It was much decomposed, but the articles found in the pockets sufficiently identified it. An Inquest was held the next morning, and a verdict returned of "Found Drowned." The body was interred in our churchyard on Monday afternoon, and was followed to the grave by a very large concourse of sympathising spectators. It is singular that the bodies of the three unmarried men have been picked up, but those of the two sufferers who have left families have not yet been heard of.

HEMIOCK - An Inquest was held on Thursday the 10th inst. at Hemiock in this county, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JANE THOMAS, an infant aged 4 months. The deceased child was put to bed with its mother on the Monday evening previous, in its usual health, but the mother awaking about one o'clock, and feeling the child, it appeared to be cold, and did not stir; on a light being brought it was found to be dead. It did not appear to have been overlaid or suffocated, but having been rather weakly from its birth it was concluded that a convulsion had been the cause of death. Verdict accordingly.

COOMBEINTEINHEAD - A distressing and melancholy accident has occurred at Coombeinteinhead. On Saturday week, some workmen were employed in ripping and dressing red rock for the building of a new parsonage house, for the Rev. Mr Wrey, when a mass of the rock gave way and buried a young man named URIAH GARRETT, of Abbotskerswell. Another man who was on the top of the rock at the time, was also killed, leaving a wife and five children destitute. When the body of the young man GARRETT was dug out, it presented a frightfully mangled appearance, his arm was nearly severed from his body, all his bones were broken, and his bowels protruded, and yet singular to say, his watch was unhurt and still going. An Inquest was held on Sunday, by J. Gribble, Esq., and a verdict of Accidental death returned.

Thursday 24 September 1840
PLYMOUTH - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning, before R. H. Squire, Esq., Coroner for Plymouth, on the body of a female about 25 years of age, named LYDIA BALL, a servant in the family of Mr Robert Hebron, Windham-place, Eldad, who cut her throat on Saturday evening last, about five o'clock. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

BARNSTAPLE - The Late Accident in the Bay. - On Saturday last, the body of WILLIAM HENRY LEWORTHY, the master and owner of the ill-fated boat which was lost with five men in her on the 31st ult., was picked up floating near Watermouth, and conveyed by some boatmen to Ilfracombe, where an Inquest was held upon it before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned, as in the other cases, "Found Drowned." All the bodies, save that of PULMAN, have now been recovered.

SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday last, at Southmolton, on the body of JOAN GARDINER, aged 62, who resided with her brother in law at the Tiverton inn, in that town, and who, having gone to bed the preceding evening, in her usual health, was discovered in the morning dead. - Verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 22 October 1840
EXETER - Melancholy Death. - On Monday evening, an Inquest was held at the Honiton Inn, Paris-street, on the body of MR FREDERICK WHITE, for 27 years the messenger of the Commissioners of Improvement in this city, who fell into the water on Saturday evening, being in a state of intoxication, and although his body was taken up in ten minutes, he was found to be quite dead. Verdict, 'Found Drowned.'

Thursday 29 October 1840
LANDKEY - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at Harford, in the parish of Landkey, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES BEER, aged three years and half, son of a labourer. It appeared that on Monday, the mother left deceased with two other children at home while she ran for some milk: she was absent but minutes, when, on her return, she was horrified to find that deceased had taken up some live embers from the fire-place in his apron, which instantly ignited and communicated to the rest of his clothes: the poor child ran into a neighbour's house, but before assistance could be rendered, he was so dreadfully burnt that his death ensued the following morning. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 12 November 1840
EXETER - Awfully Sudden Death. - A poor man named SQUIRE, a wool-sorter in the employ of Mr Maunder, of Exeter, went to his work on Monday morning at 6 o'clock. About half-past 7 he became unwell, and was shortly afterwards removed to his house which was very near; assistance was instantly procured, but it was of no avail, and he expired in about 20 minutes. An Inquest was held on his body next morning, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 19 November 1840
ILFRACOMBE - The Late Wreck of the American Ship, 'Collina.' - The bodies of three of the four unfortunate men who perished in the wreck of this ill-fated vessel on Monday se'nnight (as stated in our last), have been picked up near Baggy rock, the scene of their disaster. The body of the lad, JOHN GINN, was driven on shore on Wednesday, and of the master HENRY POTTER, and one of the men, JOHN HARMAN, on Thursday; and Inquests were held before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the first on Thursday, and on the other two on Friday: verdict in each case, "Accidental Death." The body of the fourth, who was an Irishman, has not yet been picked up.

COMBMARTIN - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at Combmartin, on Friday last, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRY BURGESS, a labourer, who was suddenly seized with illness near the turnpike-gate on the preceding day, and was conveyed home, but never spoke afterwards, and died in a few hours. Verdict, - "Died by the Visitation of God."

TIVERTON - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, on Wednesday last, on view of the body of ANN ALFORD, an aged woman, who had died suddenly. There had been a report circulated during the day that the deceased had been roughly treated by her husband, but it was proved to be without foundation. The Jury, after a full investigation into all the circumstances, returned a verdict that she had "Died by the Visitation of God."

SIDMOUTH - Shocking Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Friday, the 13th inst., at Sidmouth, before Mr Aberdein, Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL EVANS, a sawyer, who cut his throat on the morning of the Sunday previously. It appeared in evidence, that the deceased, who has left a widow and three children, and was about 40 years of age, had been in a low and desponding way for some time previously, and had been out of work for four or five months. On Sunday morning, the 8th inst., his wife got up, leaving him in bed. While dressing one of the children, heard a noise in the bed-room up stairs, as of something falling, and desired her eldest son, a boy of 10 years of age, to go up and see what was the matter. The latter on entering the room, saw his father lying on the bed, and a quantity of blood about it. An alarm was given, and one of the neighbours came, when it was found that the wretched man had inflicted an extensive wound in his throat, blood was flowing from it, and appeared all over that part of the bed which was towards the window; it was also tracked from a small dressing table, which stood at some little distance, to the bed. A medical gentleman immediately attended, who examined the wound, which extended across the throat: the windpipe was divided, but none of the large arteries. The deceased lingered until the morning of Friday last, when he expired, bronchitis having supervened after the infliction of the wound, and being the immediate cause of death. Deceased repeatedly declared that he had inflicted the wound himself, and a verdict was returned of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 26 November 1840
MORLEIGH - Accidental Death - A few days since, a son of MR R. ELLIOTT, yeoman, Grimpstonleigh, in the parish of Morleigh fell into a pond and was drowned. The firepan was found at the pond, and it is supposed the poor little fellow ( who was about three years old) was trying the depth of it when he fell in. An Inquest was held on the body before John Gribble, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned of - "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 3 December 1840
LAPFORD - Mysterious Deaths by Poison, at Lapford. Alleged Murder of Two Persons. During the last fortnight the inhabitants of Lapford, a little village near Chulmleigh, and adjoining the turnpike road from Exeter to Barnstaple,, have been very much excited in consequence of the death of two of their fellow parishioners, under circumstances calculated to induce a strong suspicion that they had come to their end by violent means. The facts of this case are so extraordinary, and the charge which it involves is one of so serious and highly criminal a nature, that although we were in possession of some of the circumstances on the day of our publication last week, we did not deem it right to allude to them until we should be able to lay before our readers some better and more authentic information than we then possessed. Now, however, that the preliminary investigation has closed, and that a Coroner's Jury has pronounced its verdict, we deem it a duty which we owe both to our readers and the public, to set before them the particulars of the case. It seems, then, that MR R. TUCKER, one of the deceased persons, resided at Lapford, and carried on business there as a maltster, although not, we believe, to any great extent. He was married to his present wife, MARY ANN TUCKER, formerly MARY ANN PARTRIDGE, about 2 years since, and has by her one child, aged about 12 months. This child did not form part of his family at the time of this distressing occurrence, having been recently placed with a relative, for the purpose, we believe, of being weaned. In MR TUCKER'S house resided himself and his wife, and a person named WILLIAM PARTRIDGE, the half brother of the latter, being the son of their mutual father by a former wife. PARTRIDGE used to assist TUCKER in his business, as a servant, and is generally reported to have been a harmless and inoffensive man. The only remaining member of the family, was a little girl, named AGNES PARTRIDGE of between 11 and 12 years of age; she is a younger sister of MRS TUCKER, and had gone to live with her, three or four months since, to assist her in doing her work. On the morning of Sunday, the 15th of November, all these parties breakfasted nearly at the same time, in MR TUCKER'S kitchen, on some bread and milk, which MRS TUCKER appears to have prepared for them. After the bread and milk had been eaten, MRS TUCKER also produced some bread and cream, of which they all partook, but whether it was cut into slices by her or not, is a matter of some doubt. Within two hours after breakfast, TUCKER felt himself very unwell, with a sickness and a cold shivering, and retired to bed. His wife procured some elder blossoms from a neighbour, for the purpose of making him some tea, and it does not seem to be denied, although there is no evidence bearing directly on the point, that she paid him as much attention as could be expected of her in the course of the day. At two o'clock he was seen by his father, who had been sent for at his request; he complained to him of being very ill, and described to him the symptoms under which he laboured. His father suggested to him the propriety of sending for a surgeon, and his brother, who was also present, offered to go for one, but the sick man would not consent for some time, saying he would rather wait until the morning and he should see how he was by that time. While they were discussing about sending for the doctor it was suggested that WILLIAM PARTRIDGE might be dispatched to get one, but on going to the back part of the house in search of him, he was found in the hay loft very ill, and with precisely the same symptoms as those from which MR TUCKER was suffering. In this state he was seen by MRS TUCKER herself and by MR R. TUCKER, the brother of the deceased. He continued very unwell, and in a short time came in and went to bed. In the course of the same afternoon, the little girl, AGNES PARTRIDGE, whom we have spoken of above, was taken sick and vomiting, and she too was obliged to go to bed. In the evening about nine o'clock, the surgeon, Mr Tidbould, of Chulmleigh, who had been sent for in the meantime, arrived, and continued in attendance until the decease of MR TUCKER. On the afternoon of the Monday, PARTRIDGE died, but TUCKER lingered until about half past seven o'clock on Wednesday morning, when he also expired. On that same morning the girl was sufficiently recovered to be able to come down stairs and she is now quite well. It is remarkable that from the period of their first attack up to the moment of their death, not a single expression escaped the lips of either TUCKER or PARTRIDGE, indicating a belief that they had been unfairly dealt with, nor, so far as human observation went, did they appear to have the slightest suspicion as to the cause of their sufferings. The impression among those about them seems to have been that their disorder was cholera, and one of the witnesses stated that she avoided going too near them believing them to have a contagious disorder. TUCKER during his illness spoke in the kindest terms of his wife and child, and when he found his end approaching and had abandoned all hopes of recovery (which was not until the Tuesday) he entreated his father to be kind to her when he was gone. It being considered necessary that an investigation should take place into the causes and circumstances of the melancholy deaths of TUCKER and PARTRIDGE, an Inquest was held on their bodies on Friday week, at the Malt Scoop Inn, in Lapford, before Mr Partridge, the Coroner of the District. At this Inquest Mr Tidbould, the surgeon, stated that he had ordered the evacuations from the stomachs of the two deceased persons to be carefully preserved, and that since their deaths he had analysed them and found that arsenic was combined with them. He stated his opinion also that the men did not die from natural causes. In consequence of this statement the Coroner judged it expedient that a post mortem examination of the bodies should be made, and he adjourned the Enquiry for that purpose, confiding the task of examination to Mr Empson, surgeon, of Crediton, in conjunction with Mr Tidbould. The result of the chemical experiments made by these two gentlemen fully bore out Mr Tidbould's former impression that the men had died from poison, and that the poison was arsenic. Rumours also got afloat that the little girl had been sent, on the day preceding the Sunday, to get some arsenic at Morchard, and constructions were put upon the case by no means favourable to MRS TUCKER. It was indeed broadly insinuated by many, that she had been guilty of the horrible crime of murdering both her husband and her brother, and various motives were assigned as having instigated her to the perpetration of so atrocious an act. It was said by some that she acted from the impulse of strong feelings of jealousy, but it is only fair to add that nothing transpired during the investigation, to justify such a suspicion, and, from the enquiries which we have made, we have no reason to believe that any such feeling was entertained by her. The more general report however was, that the deceased and his wife lived very unhappily together and that they had had a violent quarrel on the morning of the Saturday preceding the melancholy event. Upon this point too we derived but little information from the evidence given before the Coroner, for although it is clear that they had occasional quarrels, yet it does not appear that these had engendered anything like bitter animosity, nor did we hear of anything like threats of violence either on one side or the other. With respect to the alleged quarrel on the Saturday morning it is positively denied, as will be seen below, by the only two persons living who are competent to speak upon the point. On the other hand, there was nothing in MR TUCKER'S character of circumstances, which should lead one hastily to the conclusion that he had committed a deliberate act of self destruction. He was a young man, unencumbered by family, and unembarrassed in circumstances, and his business though not large was a very respectable ne. His family connections too were respectable, and he was neither addicted to vicious courses, nor reckless, intemperate, or dissolute in his habits. In short, in whatever point of view we look at this extraordinary affair, it is altogether dark and mysterious, and we are quite unable to afford any clue for its solution.
The examinations of the first Inquiry were strictly private; but at the adjourned Inquest on Thursday last, in the school-room, in Lapford church-town, 200 or 300 persons were present, and seemed to take great interest in the proceedings. Several clergymen and county magistrates were among them. The prisoner was also present, in widow's mourning, but she did not betray throughout the day the appearance of concern, but sat the most unmoved and indifferent of all the spectators. She is said to be in a state of pregnancy. The Jury was highly respectable; Mr William Raymond, being foreman. The three witnesses first examined, viz: Mary Hookway, Ann Gill and Elizabeth Raymond, deposed simply to the illness and death of the two deceased, whom they visited and attended to the last. The evidence of AGNES PARTRIDGE, sister of the accused, was most material: she deposed that she was sent by MR TUCKER on the Saturday morning, to Morchard, to Mr Paige's, for three pennyworth of arsenic to poison rats; MR TUCKER, before he sent her, wrote her errand on a slip of paper, lest she should forget it, "Three pennyworth of arsenic - poison for rats;" as she did not forget it, she did not show the paper to Mr Paige, but, having obtained the arsenic, brought it home, took the key of the malthouse and opened it, and put the arsenic on the cistern until MR TUCKER returned. She said it was in the malthouse that he sent her for the arsenic, and that there he wan ted to use it to kill the rats; she told no one of her having been sent, nor did any one see her: on the Sunday morning, witness came down and milked the cow and attended to the pigs, while the prisoner, her sister, got the breakfast: they all had milk and bread served up by prisoner in basins, and afterwards witness brought out the bread and cream and they helped themselves; [here was a variance in witness's evidence; she had before said that the prisoner cut up the bread in slices, and helped the bream round;] before breakfast MR TUCKER asked witness for the arsenic, and she went with him to the malthouse and gave it him, and the paper he had given her also, and left him there, and returned herself to the house; no one else was with them. Witness then deposed to the subsequent illness and death of the deceased, and her own illness, - Mr Paige was called, and his sister, but neither of them could swear that they had or had not served the last witness with arsenic; they had no recollection whatever of the circumstances. Mr Empson, and Mr Tidbould, surgeons, deposed that they had made a post mortem examination of the deceased, and had detected in both bodies, in the contents of the stomachs and in the stomachs themselves, and in the discharges they had made before death, considerable quantities of arsenic; they had no doubt whatever that they had both died by poison, and that poison was arsenic. MR MARK TUCKER, the father of the deceased, was also examined; he was very much affected; he deposed that he was sent for to see his son on the Sunday; found him very ill indeed; ordered a surgeon to be sent for, and Mr Tidbould came; on the Tuesday night he became worse, and then he feared that he should die and was very much distressed; indeed it would have turned the heart of a stone to have seen and heard him; he had no suspicion whatever of the cause of his death, and desired him (witness) to be kind to his wife. This was all the evidence.
MRS TUCKER, at the time when the Jury first sat, was not examined upon oath, but she made a statement to the Coroner, which was taken down in writing at the time; it did not materially differ from that of the other witnesses, as to the time when the deceased persons were taken ill, as to the symptoms of their disorder, the sending for the surgeon, &c. She did not assign any cause for their sudden and violent illness, and did not pretend to account for it in any way; she said the statement made by her sister as to the preparation of the breakfast was correct, and denied that there had been any quarrel between herself and husband before he went to Crediton on the Saturday.
The Coroner now asked her whether she wished to add to, or alter this statement in any way; she said "No," and he then requested her to sign it. She did so without the least hesitation or betraying the slightest symptoms of agitation.
The Coroner now asked if any one present had any evidence to give in reference to the subject matter of the Inquiry, but received no reply. He then adjourned the Court for some time, and, on its re-assembling proceeded to sum up the evidence. He commented particularly upon the evidence given by the girl AGNES PARTRIDGE, and pointed out some discrepancies between her statement of that day and that which she had previously given. In particular she had stated on her first examination, that her sister cut the bread and cream into slices, whereas that now she said that every one helped himself. She had also before been able to state the order in which the different members of the family got up on Sunday morning, which now she was not able to do. There was besides a difference in her statement in some other particulars, as well as several omissions of importance; he believed the Jury would recollect that she had at first stated that she had left the note, which she took to Morchard, with the person who had given her the arsenic, but she subsequently declared that she had brought it back and given it to MR TUCKER. The Jury would remember these points when they were left together to consider their verdict, and they would draw their conclusion accordingly. He begged them to dismiss from their minds the consideration of everything which they might have heard out of doors, and to return their verdict upon the evidence which had been given them upon oath, and upon nothing else. He would remind them, before he concluded, that their duty was not to acquit or condemn any man, but to enquire into the causes of death, and to see if the circumstances were such, as made it in their judgment necessary to send any individual for trial before another tribunal. They must not forget also that charges of poisoning were always exceedingly difficult of proof, from their very nature. the case was a very serious one, two of their fellow creatures had come to their deaths by violent means, and he had no doubt they would give the matter every consideration in their power. They would now be left alone to consider their verdict, and if they should find that they had need of his assistance, he should be most ready to render it.
The Court was then cleared, and the Jury were left alone in deliberation. They consulted for about an hour and a half, during the latter part of which time the Coroner was in the room with them. At a quarter past 7, the doors were opened, and the members of the Jury came out of the room and announced to the parties outside, that they had adjourned for half an hour, and it was understood that the result of their deliberations had been communicated by them to the Coroner. Great curiosity was expressed to know what the decision of the Jury really was, but all doubt upon the subject was soon removed, for it was evident from the proceeding of the Coroner, that the verdict was one of "Wilful Murder against MARY ANN TUCKER." The witnesses were sent for and bound over to give evidence against MRS TUCKER on the charge of poisoning and murder, and the Coroner issued his warrant for her apprehension and committal to the county gaol to abide the result of her trial. The verdict occasioned great surprise to those who had heard the evidence, as a different result had been generally anticipated. The Coroner having filled up the requisite forms, the Jurymen attached their names to the record, and the court broke up about half past 10 o'clock.
The prisoners conduct was but little altered by a knowledge of the perilous situation in which the verdict of the Jury had placed her. She maintained to the last that calmness and indifference of manner which had been remarked by every one who had attended the Inquest, and expressed her consciousness of her own innocence, and her confidence that the result of the trial would be, her full acquittal of the horrible crime imputed to her. She was removed from the room underneath the school-room, where she had remained from the time that the Coroner had finished summing up the evidence, to a public-house in the village, in custody of the constable, and thence she was removed to the Devon County Gaol, in a fly, on the following morning. On arriving at the prison she exhibited the same carelessness, and, for one in her situation, we may say, heartlessness of tone and demeanour, which has marked her conduct throughout, and which seems to us not the least incomprehensible part of this most mysterious and extraordinary case. She declared that she had no unpleasant thoughts at going into a prison on such a charge, and said if she had not been confident of her own innocence, she might have left the country, for that the opportunity to do so had been offered her. The members of her family have been much more painfully and seriously affected by this most distressing occurrence. Her father, who is a very old man, was alarmingly ill on the night of the Inquest, and her mother, who accompanied her to the gaol, was quite overcome by the intensity of her grief. The little girl, AGNES PARTRIDGE, was allowed to go at large, on a member of the family giving security to the amount of 100l. for her appearance at the Assizes.
The demeanour of the prisoner since hr confinement has been in one respect materially altered. She seems to be gradually awakening to a painful sense of the seriousness of her situation, and occasionally she has been quite overcome by her feelings, and has wept a great deal. Beyond this, however, - the natural effect of the solitude and cheerlessness of a gaol, - she has undergone no change. She still perseveres in declaring her innocence of the crime with which she is charged, and her utter ignorance of everything which could have led to such melancholy and disastrous consequences. Upon this subject she is altogether calm and composed, and expressed unabated confidence that the result of the trial will fully establish her innocence. She has been kept, through the considerate attention of the respected governor, Mr Cole, entirely apart from the other prisoners, with the exception of one elderly woman, who is her constant companion. It was reported yesterday afternoon, that she had made a full confession to the Governor, but we need scarcely add that that report was altogether without foundation. We understand that it is intended to make an application on her behalf to the Court of Queen's Bench, to remove the proceedings of the Inquest into the court by certiorari, with the view of getting her admitted to bail.
We hear that Mr George Tanner, of Crediton, has undertaken her defence.

BICTON - Awfully Sudden Death at BICTON - On Thursday the 26th ultimo, an Inquest was held on the body of THOMAS PILLER, at the above place, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner. The deceased, who was about 50 years of age, was a gardener in the employ of Lord Rolle, at Bicton; he lived at Colyton Raleigh, and on Tuesday last, after taking his dinner at his son's house at Bicton, returned to his work in the gardens about 2 o'clock in the afternoon. He was occupied in fencing round some plants, which occasioned his stooping very much. About ten minutes after 3 his son went to the gardens to see him, and on approaching the spot where he was at work, found him lying on his left side; he called for assistance to another man who came up, and they found him quite dead. Deceased had complained to his son of pain in the head for several days past, which he thought was worse on that day. A medical gentleman attended, who attempted to bleed the deceased but without success. Verdict, - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 10 December 1840
BERRYNARBOR - Death by Burning. - On Saturday last, a little boy, six years old, son of JOHN HICKS, carpenter, in Berrynarbor village, having been left at home while his mother went to Ilfracombe market, in attempting to take a potatoe out of the boiler which was on the fire, unfortunately caught his clothes on fire, and was burnt so dreadfully that, although surgical assistance was promptly called in, it was of no avail, and he died on the following Wednesday (yesterday). An Inquest was held upon the body this day before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

TAVISTOCK - Melancholy Suicide. - On Tuesday last Mr Bone, Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of MRS BREWER, wife of MR T. BREWER, a respectable veterinary surgeon of this town, who committed self-destruction on the preceding day by cutting her throat. It appeared by the medical evidence that she had been in a low and desponding state of mind for some time past, and that she laboured under a nervous disorder and frequent derangement of the digestive organs. The Jury returned a verdict, "That the deceased died from her own hands, but that from the evidence they were unable to come to any decision as to her state of mind at the time of committing the act of suicide."

Thursday 17 December 1840
WEST BUCKLAND - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at West Buckland, before Thomas Copner, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR HENRY HOLLOWAY, formerly a respectable yeoman at Stoodleigh, in that parish, aged 67. Deceased on the day before ate his dinner heartily, and was in perfect health; and having gone to a neighbour's, on his return to his own house, fell immediately down and expired. Verdict, 'Apoplexy.'

PLYMOUTH - Death by Fighting. - William Mallett, a youth apparently about 17 years of age, son of Mr Mallett, brass-founder, St. Andrew-street, and who appeared to be suffering from severe bruises on his head and face, was brought before the magistrates at the Guildhall, this day (Friday) charged with having caused the death of a lad named BROCK, the son of a man who was formerly a pork-butcher, residing in Old-Town-street.
It appeared from evidence of Edward Cove, Henry Skinner, Robert Foot, John Bishop, James Durant, and William Doidge, - all of whom had been companions of both the prisoner and the deceased - that Mallett had a short time since lent a young female, with whom he was acquainted, a song book, which she gave to her brother, who had taken it to sea with him. On the prisoner requesting her to return the book in question, she said she had given it to BROCK. The prisoner, therefore, asked BROCK to give him the book, when he, pretending the book had been given him by the girl, said he had lent it, and that he should not return it to the prisoner. This occasioned a dispute, which ended in the deceased challenging the prisoner to fight. Mallett, however, refused, and they then separated. The deceased, however, subsequently sent through a girl named Selina Cove, and the boy Bishop, challenges to fight, which were, on each occasion, refused by the prisoner, who expressed his disinclination to fighting, and attempted to keep out of the deceased's path. They however met on Thursday evening, under the piazzas of the Hotel, when BROCK again repeated the challenge, and after much aggravation on the part of the deceased, the prisoner unfortunately consented to fight, and they accordingly, about nine o'clock, proceeded to a field in the vicinity of the Hoe, where they fought until 10 o'clock, a great number of men and boys - to their disgrace be it recorded - being present, who, instead of interfering, and attempting to effect a reconciliation between the lads, assisted to prolong the combat. the prisoner was thrown on the ground several times, and appeared to be the greatest sufferer from the fight; when the deceased suddenly fell, and on being taken up from the ground was found to be senseless. He was taken to the 'Prospect Inn,' where he continued vomiting for some time. A surgeon was sent for, and he was removed to his own residence, where every means was taken to recover him, but all human efforts were of no avail, - the boy died at twelve o'clock. Mallett, on the conclusion of the fight, returned to his father's house, where he was apprehended by police constable Damerell. He was brought before the magistrates, as before stated, and on the evidence which we have given was remanded until Saturday to await the result of the Coroner's Inquest, which was held before Mr R. J. Squire, the Coroner, at Farley's 'Golden Lion Inn,' Old Town-street. The evidence which has been adduced is similar to that given before the magistrates. The Coroner's Inquest, which was held before Mr R. J. Squire, the Coroner, at Farley's Golden Lion Inn, old Town-street, and terminated in a verdict of 'Manslaughter' against Mallett, and two other boys, named James Cole, and William Lynes, who have been since committed to the county prison, to take their trial at the next assizes.

PLYMOUTH - Inquests were held on Monday and Tuesday last, on the bodies of two men, found floating near the Plymouth Breakwater; one of which has been identified to be CAPT. RYERS, of the 'Comet' schooner, wrecked on the Breakwater during the late gales. It is supposed that the other is the body of one of the seamen belonging to that ill-fated vessel. Verdict, Found Drowned.

BROADHEMBURY - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday and Thursday last, the 9th and 10th inst., on the body of MRS SARAH MATTHEWS, of Dureford, in the parish of Broadhembury, who died in the afternoon of Monday the 7th. The deceased, who it appears was about 54 years of age, had been failing and weak for some time past, but had not had any medical advice until the Thursday previous to her death, when she applied to a medical gentleman in the neighbourhood, from whom she received some medicine, which did her some good. On Sunday evening she went to bed at her usual hour, not having however been able to eat anything that day or the day previous. About half past twelve o'clock on the Sunday night, she awoke much frightened and requested to have some weak gin and water, which was procured, but she took some gin without mixing; she continued from time to time during the night to take some more gin which she conceived did her good, and in the morning (Monday), the medical gentleman who had before seen her was called in. He found her in a state of much excitement. She died about four o'clock that afternoon. The medical gentleman who attended the deceased not being able to speak positively as to the cause of death, a post mortem examination was considered necessary, for which the Jury adjourned until the following day (Thursday), when from the appearances which presented themselves, it was considered that the deceased had laboured under chronic inflammation of the lungs of long standing. A verdict of 'Natural Death' was returned.

TOWNSTALL - Melancholy Suicide of a Child. - A little boy called JOHN THOMAS HILL, about ten years old, was discovered last Wednesday hanging to the branch of a tree in the road leading to Townstall Church, within but a few minutes' walk of his home, and when taken down was quite dead. It appears from the Inquest held before Mr R. Anthony, Coroner, that the poor child had been up to this time a most obedient and dutiful boy; but had, from his schoolmaster's evidence, within a short time been rather inattentive in coming to school. The little fellow had of late often remarked that he was unfairly treated, which it is supposed, preying on his mind, was the cause of his destroying himself. On the morning of the day in which he committed the fatal deed, he had been absent from school by his mother's permission, and had been a few miles in the country with another lad who deposed at the Inquest, that he noticed that the deceased was much less talkative than usual. After coming home with this boy he dined with the family as usual, and after dinner washed his 'face and hands' and cutting the rope from a pair of "slings" used to carry milk pails with, to kit with him! His mother supposed he was going to school, but alas! it was the last time that she was destined to see him alive. He must have gone immediately and committed the rash act. The opinion of the Jury was that he did it whilst labouring under a fit of Temporary Insanity.

EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at the Valiant Soldier Inn, South-street, Exeter, before S. Warren, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on a poor man named KERSLAKE, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the preceding day. The deceased appears to have been in the employ of a farmer residing at some distance from this city, and to have been sent here with a waggon load of potatoes about a fortnight previously. He set out late in the day, and being much fatigued with previous hard work, it is supposed he was overtaken by sleep, and fell off the shafts, the wheel of the waggon passing over his body. He was taken up much injured by the accident, and was conveyed to the Hospital where, after lingering for about a fortnight, he expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 24 December 1840
SWIMBRIDGE - Inquests held by Thomas Copner, Esq. - On Saturday last, at Swymbridge Newland, on the body of a little girl named MARY ANN HICKS, daughter of a mason, residing in that village. The father had been at Barnstaple Market, and was returned, when, near his own house, he saw a heavily-laden cart passing his door, and a girl, whom he thought to be his daughter, close by the cart wheel, and instantly heard her cry, "Oh!" On running over he found that the cart wheel had passed over his daughter, whom he carried into his house, but she never spoke afterwards and died almost immediately. No blame whatever was attributable to the driver, who was on the right side of the road and driving slowly; and it can scarcely be conjectured how the accident occurred, unless the deceased was benumbed with the cold, and unable to move out of the way on the approach of the cart. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

FREMINGTON - On Monday last, on the body of MR WILLIAM WILLIAMS, yeoman, at Bickington, in the parish of Fremington, aged 83, who, on the day previous, was sitting before the kitchen fire in his usual health, when his son, who was sitting near him, observed him inclining forward, and threw his arms round him, when he heaved a sigh and died instantly. Deceased was a very respectable man, residing on his own estate, and was the oldest farmer in the parish.

FREMINGTON - An Inquest was also held, this day, at Combrey, in the parish of Fremington, on the body of MR SAMUEL CROCKER, a highly respectable yeoman, aged 65, who, going in one of his fields yesterday, complained that he was unwell, and went home, but when near his own yard, fell down, was conveyed in, and died almost immediately. Verdict, 'Visitation of God.' The deceased was much respected, and it is not a little singular that it is the second sudden death of a farmer in that parish during three days.

IVYBRIDGE - Melancholy Accident. - On Thursday last, a man named HORSWILL, employed in the union flour mills, Ivybridge, while in the act of shipping the gear, was caught by the machinery, which was in full power, and before assistance could be obtained to stop the mill, the poor fellow was, - dreadful to relate, literally torn limb from limb. His mutilated remains, when collected, bore a most distressing appearance: the head was severed from the trunk, and the arms and legs were separated from the body. He has left his wife and children in a state of destitution. The accident arose, we understand, by his frock catching the machinery. We would recommend workmen engaged in manufactories where machinery is employed, to wear their frocks within their trowsers. An Inquest has since been held on the body, and a verdict returned of 'Accidental Death.'

PLYMOUTH - A Man Found Dead at Plymouth. - On Saturday evening last, the body of a man named RICHARD HAM, of Launceston, was discovered lying on the mud of the Estuary, adjoining Five-field lane. It was taken to the workhouse, where an Inquest was held on his remains, on the following Monday, when the following evidence was given:- Mr Thomas Mayne, jeweller, of Union-street, Stonehouse, stated that on Saturday evening, between 5 and 6 o'clock, he was taking a walk over the Five-fields, and went down towards the beach of the Mill pond under the second field, lying between Stoke and Plymouth. The water was out and his attention was attracted by observing a man lying upon his face on the mud, about 15 or 16 feet from the field; he went near him and ascertained he was dead. There was no one in sight; he immediately gave notice of it at 'No Place Inn,' and then to the Coroner. One of his shoes was off; the hat had a handkerchief tied lightly over it, and under his chin, closely pressed on his head. On examining the hat, he found written on it, "RICHARD HAM'S hat, May 19, 1839." One leg was muddy, but there was no appearance of his having struggled. When the tide was up in the pond the water must have covered the body. The Jury after a short time returned a verdict of 'Died from Suffocation in the mud of the Mill-pond adjoining the Five fields.'

Thursday 31 December 1840
EXETER - Coroner's Inquest at Exeter. - Extraordinary Case. - An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, at the London Ale House, in St. Mary Arches-street, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a woman named SARAH GRIBBLE, who had been found dead in her bed on Saturday afternoon. The deceased was well known as a celebrated teller of fortunes, and her fame had secured her so extensive a practice among the love-sick damsels of our city and neighbourhood, that she was generally allowed to stand at the very top of her profession. She occupied a tenement in a back court in St. Mary Arches-street, consisting of two rooms of the smallest conceivable dimensions, one on the ground floor, and the other immediately over. The former of these was little better than a cold dark cell, as miserable and comfortless as can well be imagined; and it was here that the numerous visitors who came to seek for information of the good or evil things in store for them, were compelled to wait until the prophetess was at leisure to attend them. The room above stairs was that in which the deceased ate and slept, and in which she was accustomed to deliver her oracles; and here in fact the whole of her time has been spent for several years past. To convey anything like an accurate idea of the scene which presented itself on entering this apartment, would be altogether impossible; it was a scene indeed of filth and wretchedness, which, altogether, defies description In one corner of the room a space was partitioned off by a couple of deal planks, which served this singular being for a bed, and here with nothing but a heap of filthy rags between her and the floor, and with a miserable covering of the same description, she was accustomed to pass nearly every moment of her time. Clothes, or linen upon her person, she had none, - if we except an old pair of stays, which she wore next her skin, and a piece of coarse fustian cloth, which was tied round her waist. A dirty brown handkerchief was thrown over her shoulders, and tied in a knot upon her breast, and her head was covered with a cap which she had never been known to change during the time she had resided in the house. She wore neither shoes nor stockings, but, dressed (if we may use the term) as we have above described, she used to sit continually in the place which we have called her bed, remaining constantly in the same position, with (as one of the witnesses stated) "her nose and knees together." In her bed place were found, after her death, a great quantity of articles of food, which appeared to have accumulated for some time, and which there is much reason to fear had been purloined by servant girls, who probably found it more convenient to satisfy their curiosity at their master's expense than at their own. There were heaped together in one heterogeneous mass, potatoes, turnips, and vegetables of all kinds, fruit, butter, bacon, dripping, and a variety of other articles of similar description, which the deceased was never known to have purchased, and the possession of which by her can only be accounted for in the way we have described. A half pound of butter was found under her thigh immediately after her death, and the other provisions were directly at her feet. The only articles of furniture which we observed, were two deal chairs, a small table, a tea kettle, and some trifling vessels of earthenware. There were heaps of rags and dirt covering the whole of the apartment, and upon the mantel piece a bottle which had contained rum. The window was completely covered with cobwebs, and the odour exhaled from so much filth was, as may well be believed, intolerable.
Catherine Vaughan, the wife of a shoe-maker, residing in the same court yard with the deceased, said she had lived there about 18 months, and was in the habit of boiling her kettle for her. She never had any fire in her room, and never had anything cooked, except occasionally a small bit of bacon which witness dressed for her. Deceased used to sit continually on a heap of rags in the corner of the room, which she called her bed, and witness had never seen her laying down in it. She never wore linen of any description. The last time she saw her was between 11 and 12 on Friday night, when she gave her her tea, and she was then sitting as usual. She had been complaining of being ill, and witness had offered as she had repeatedly before, to send for the doctor, but she would not hear it. On going on the following day, in company with a person named Godfrey, she found MRS GRIBBLE dead. A message was instantly despatched for an officer, and Ginham promptly attended, followed shortly afterwards by Shears and Sparks, the beadles of the Corporation of the Poor. the deceased always pleaded the greatest distress, saying she had not a farthing in the world, and she could not tell how she should pay the rent that was due. She had been failing for some weeks, and fancied she was dropsical.
John Shears, beadle of the Corporation of the Poor, stated that he had, assisted by the other officers, made a search of the room and they had succeeded in finding money to the amount of about 94l. Of this sum 54l. 12s. 6d. was in sixpences, 34l. 11s in shillings, and 16s. in copper; there was but one half sovereign, and the remainder of the sum found was made up of half-crowns. About 11l. was found, wrapped in an old pocket, under the head of the deceased, but the greater portion of the money was found in two small baskets, in a corner of the cupboard, completely concealed by cobwebs. Other small sums were found wrapped in dirty pieces of rag, or paper, in other parts of the room, a great deal of the money was quite black and cankered, and had evidently not been disturbed for several years. The search was not yet complete.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."
While the old woman lived she was not known to have a relative in the world, but immediately on her death, and the discovery of the money becoming known, more than one person was found to claim kindred with her. She used at one time to keep a number of cats, who were her only companions, but latterly she had only one remaining, which has been loitering about the premises since the death of its mistress, and manifests a great anxiety to get into its old dwelling.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held at the Canteen in the citadel, Plymouth, on Saturday last, on the body of THOS. JOHNSTON, a private in the 53rd regt., who died from the severity of the weather, on his passage from Dublin to this port, on the night of the 16th inst. Evidence of this fact was given to the satisfaction of the Jury, and a verdict accordingly was returned. No blame was attributable to any one on board.

SALCOMBE - Dreadful Accident. - We lament that we have to record another melancholy instance of the general want of caution in the use of fire arms, which proved fatal to a fine little girl, named EMMA COTTEY, of Burndeys farm, in this parish. On the 22nd inst. a young woman named MARY ANN COTTEY, an elder sister of the unfortunate deceased, took up a gun which was standing in the corner of their inner room, with the intention of carrying it out to a young man from whom it had been borrowed; the gun stood nearly opposite the door leading into the outer room, where the deceased child EMMA, and another sister called RHODA, were standing. On the gun being taken from its position, the muzzle of it was towards the door. MARY ANN COTTEY, unfortunately touching the trigger, the piece immediately went off. The effect of the explosion was dreadful; EMMA was seen to fall instantly from off the window bench to the floor, and RHODA ran to another part of the room, shrieking with pain, when it was discovered that she was shot in the upper part of the left leg, and in the hip; EMMA was lifted up and put to bed, where she died in about two hours, the shot having taken effect in the lower part of the bowels. The gun had been left in the room loaded by a brother of the deceased, who had not given any caution to prevent its being touched. An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 24th inst., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" recorded. The other poor child remains seriously ill.

UFFCULM - A most melancholy and distressing event occurred on Friday the 18th instant, at the house of SHADRACH PEARCY, of this place, weaver. The eldest son, WILLIAM PEARCY, not being able to work at the factory on account of the frost, had remained at home, and about half past eight o'clock took down a gun which was kept hung up in the room, for the purpose of cleaning it; his grandfather and five brothers and sisters were there seated in the chimney, and round the fire; he had the gun in his hand with the muzzle towards the fire, and was endeavouring to take out the pin that goes under the barrel and fastens it to the stock, when the trigger hitched in his waistcoat and the gun went off and shot his brother MARK, an infant about four years old, who was sitting within three or four feet of him in front of the fire. The shot took effect in the back part of the head, carrying off the right ear and cheek and penetrated the skull, the child dying instantly. Providentially no other of the family was hurt, which may possibly be attributed to the shot taking effect so near to the muzzle of the gun on the deceased child; for had it been further off and room for the shot to scatter, more lives would probably have been lost from this distressing incident. The gun had been loaded by the father on the morning previously, to shoot a blackbird in the garden, who put it away in that state, but it did not appear that the lad had seen it or knew it was loaded. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, the 21st inst., before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner,. and a verdict of "Accidental Death" recorded.

MONKTON - The following dreadful accident occurred to a respectable farmer, MR HENRY BURROUGH, residing at Monkton, in this county, between five and six o'clock on Tuesday evening last, the 15th inst. He had been attending a sale at Aller Farm, in Upottery; and left the George Inn, Upottery, about five o'clock, mounted on a bay poney, and was seen on the road home by some men driving waggons, coming from Taunton to Honiton, which he passed, and was soon afterwards found in the road lying on his face, and quite dead; the pony, was seen in a hollow of the road about a quarter of a mile from where the body lay - the pony was a young and spirited one, and deceased was bleeding profusely from the ears and from a cut he had received in the head. Medical assistance was procured, and it was conjectured the deceased came to his death from a fracture of the skull occasioned by falling from his horse. Four £5 notes and two sovereigns and half were found upon his person, which fully contradicted a report that the deceased had been way laid and robbed. A verdict was returned of "Accidental Death" at an Inquest held before Mr Aberdein.

Thursday 7 January 1841
BIDEFORD - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Wednesday before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., on the body of JOHN MARTIN, who came by his death from slipping off a plank, and falling on his head on the wheel of the windlass of the 'Alert,' then lying at Bideford quay. Verdict, 'Accidental Death,' with a deodand of 6l. on the plank. MARTIN was a widower and has left 6 children.

Thursday 14 January 1841
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An awful instance of sudden death happened this day (Thursday) at noon, to a labourer named BENJAMIN RICHARDS, who went into the 'Ship' inn, on the quay, in this town, and called for a pint of beer, which was brought him; but before had time to lift it to his lips, he fell down and died instantly. The body awaits a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday 21 January 1841
ATHERINGTON - Deaths by Burning. - An Inquest was held by Thos. Copner, Esq., on Monday last, at Atherington, on the body of ANNA MAY, two years of age, daughter of a labourer residing in that village, who caught fire to her clothes on the preceding Saturday, during the absence of her mother, who had gone to fetch a pitcher of water, and was so much injured that her death resulted the following day. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SHIRWELL - Also, on Tuesday, an Inquest was held before Thomas Copner, Esq., at Shirwell-town, on the body of WILLIAM WILLIS, aged 18 months, son of a labourer, who, while in the kitchen playing, and in the presence of his mother, who was occupied in her work, accidentally set his clothes on fire; the mother, hearing the child scream, looked round and saw him enveloped in flames. Assistance was immediately rendered, but the sufferer died the day after. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - On Tuesday, an Inquest was also held by Thomas Copner, Esq., in a linhay in Hawley-field, near Sowden, in this borough, on the body of JOHN WESTACOTT, butcher, aged 62, who hung himself between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. Two men who were at work at the bottom of the field, saw the deceased go into the linhay, and place a hurdle against the door-way; and then, as they thought, attempt to go up into the hayloft; but as he appeared suspended for a minute or two in the same position, it occurred to them that he was hanging himself; and they ran instantly, and finding their suspicions confirmed, cut him down; but did not think of conveying the body to the Infirmary, which was near, or animation might possibly have been restored. The deceased was a most intemperate man, and had ruined his prospects and family: he had not been seen by the inmates of the house in which he lodged since the preceding night when he retired to bed, nor was any thing known of him afterwards until he committed the rash act. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Coroner's Inquest. - A Man Frozen to Death. - On Friday last, an Inquest was taken before Joseph Gribble, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, at Smalridge farm, in the parish of Moretonhampstead, on the body of MR JOHN GUY, yeoman, who was found dead on Mardon-down (a common adjoining the above estate) on the Monday preceding. It appeared from the evidence of FRANCIS GUY, son of the deceased, that his father left home on the morning of Saturday the 9th instant, to go to Mr Wreyford's, at Dockham, about a mile and half from his own home, in order to get some ferrets, to endeavour to clear a house of vermin. He had addicted himself to drink, and sometimes left his home for several days together; consequently, his family were not much alarmed at his not returning at night. But the weather being very inclement, and not returning on Sunday morning, one of the family went to Dockham in search of him. It was there found that the deceased had been drinking on the preceding day at the public-house in the village, kept by Mr George Taverner, but left between two and three o'clock on the same afternoon, at which time he was seen to pass through the village towards his home; apparently, however, in a state of intoxication, as he was seen to fall in his way. On receiving this intelligence search was immediately made after him, messengers being dispatched to every neighbouring farm house, as well as to the town of Moreton, and to Dunsford, but in vain; no intelligence could be obtained of the unfortunate man, the inquirers not succeeding in finding any one who had seen him from the time of his leaving Dockham. In a state of the utmost alarm the search was continued throughout the Sunday, and renewed on Monday morning, in the course of which day he was found by his son FRANCIS and an apprentice boy, some little way out of the regular path between Smalridge farm and Dockham, lying on one side in a crooked position, dead, and frozen to the ground!! There was no appearance of his having struggled. On this evidence the Jury returned a verdict of "Found on Mardon-down in Moretonhampstead, having no marks of violence."

Thursday 28 January 1841
CULMSTOCK - Death from Excessive Drinking. - An Inquest was held before Mr Aberdein, on Wednesday the 13th inst., at Culmstock, on the body of HENRY WALL, labourer, aged 39 years. It appeared that the deceased returned home to his lodgings on Monday night, between 10 and 11 o'clock, rather tipsey; he ate some bread and cheese, and then said he would have something to drink, and he went out again and returned with a half gallon jug of beer. There were then in the house the landlord, James Sheen, and his wife and brother. The deceased put the beer on the table, and swore he would drink it up in two minutes: the woman said, "Don't Harry, it will kill thee." He then bet with James Sheen he would drink it in two minutes - he poured it out into a pint cup, and drank it at four times following, drinking up the whole in about two minutes. The deceased then sat down before the fire, and appeared to be sleeping, and on the woman's return in about a quarter of an hour, she and her husband removed him to a back room, and laid him down on some hay, covering him up with bags to keep him warm. This was between 11 and 12 at night; he was very drunk and insensible, and they continued to look at him several times afterwards, when they perceived a considerable discharge from his mouth, and saw gasp twice; they called in assistance, but deceased died soon after 12 o'clock. Verdict, - 'Died of Apoplexy, arising from excessive drinking.'

SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Effects of Drunkenness. - On Saturday night last, or rather early on Sunday morning, Farmer CHRISTOPHER WESTACOTT, of Oldridge, in the parish of Northmolton, left his town from market on his way home: but being in a state of intoxication, it appears he missed his way, and waded through the river Mole, and sat down on the side of a hedge, where he was not found until Tuesday morning, though scores were in search of him, and when discovered was a lifeless corpse. A Coroner's Inquest sat on the body on Wednesday, and returned a verdict of Found Dead.

Thursday 4 February 1841
BRAUNTON - Child Burning - A fatal accident happened at Braunton yesterday, to the daughter of a labourer named CLIFFORD. Deceased had been left at home with a younger brother, whose clothes caught fire, and she, in extinguishing it, unfortunately caught fire to her own, and before assistance was rendered, she was so dreadfully burnt, that she died this morning. The body now awaits a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday 18 February 1841
PETER TAVY - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at Petertavy, before Mr Bone, Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM RICE, of Dartmoor. The deceased was a farmer, and was found on Coffin Down, on Sunday afternoon, lying in the snow quite dead, and apparently frost bitten. It appeared from the evidence adduced that RICE left Tavistock on Friday evening about nine o'clock in a state of intoxication, in company with a man who was going the same road with the deceased, and they parted on the road about two miles from Tavistock. About three o'clock on the following morning, Mr Willing, a respectable farmer, living on the moor, not far from the house where RICE had lived, was roused by a noise in his courtlage, and on opening his window he was asked by a man, who he is confident was RICE, the name of the place where he was; when he informed him at Ringworthy. Willing then endeavoured to persuade him to remain there until daylight, the weather being extremely severe; but the deceased on being told the name of the place, immediately went out of the courtlage, and was not again seen until Sunday afternoon last, when he was found dead, about a quarter of a mile from his own residence. Mr Pearse, surgeon, of Tavistock, was examined, and stated as his opinion, that the deceased had died from exposure to cold; the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 25 February 1841
BROADHEMBURY - Melancholy Deaths of Children by Fire. - On Wednesday, the 10th inst., an Inquest was held by Mr Aberdein, at Kerswell, in Broadhembury, on the body of ELIZABETH SWEETLAND, aged 15 months, who died from injuries received from its clothes taking fire.

On Saturday, the 13th inst., another Inquest was held by the same worthy Coroner, on the body of SARAH ANN WILKINS, an infant 8 months old, who was also burnt to death. This was a case, to say the least of it, of gross neglect, amounting to inhumanity. The poor little infant was left by its mother, tied into a chair before the fire with the string of her gown, while she went to the village shop to do some errands, or to have a gossip, as the case might be, and was absent as she said, 10 minutes. The child was heard to cry during her absence, and the neighbours went in, when the poor little thing was discovered lying on its side, in front of the fire between the fire irons, the greater part of its clothes burnt off, and its body literally roasted: it died in a few hours after.

EXETER - Several Inquests have recently been held also by Mr Gribble, Coroner, on the bodies of infants who have come by their deaths in the same melancholy way, viz. - Feb 8, at the Turk's Head, St. Thomas, on the body of JOHN BAKER, aged 6 years, who, in the absence of his mother, was accidentally burnt to death.

LODDISWELL - Feb. 10, at Read's Farm, Loddiswell, on the body of SILVANUS WILLING, aged 6 years, whose death occurred in a similar way.

DODBROOKE - Feb. 11, at the King of Prussia, Dodbrooke, on the body of JOHN JARVIS, aged 3 years, also burnt to death.

BUCKFASTLEIGH - Feb. 13, at the Sun Inn, Buckfastleigh, on the body of WILLIAM BARTLETT, whose clothes accidentally caught fire, which caused his death.
In all cases a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned, but the Coroner very properly impressed on mothers the fearful responsibility attached to them, for carelessly leaving their helpless children to such cruel contingencies.

Thursday 11 March 1841
CHULMLEIGH - An Inquest was held on Friday last, by H. Arthur Vallack, Esq., at Chulmleigh, on the body of JAMES PONSFORD, who complained, whilst at work in a barn, of weakness; - he left his work, and shortly after arrived at his house and expired suddenly. 'Died by the Visitation of God.'

Thursday 18 March 1841
SWIMBRIDGE - Inquest. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday last, by H. Arthur Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, at Swymbridge, on the body of J. W. SHAPLAND, who expired suddenly whilst in the enjoyment of perfect health. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God." In consequence of the recent illness and death of Thomas Copner, Esq., the duty in the Barnstaple district devolves on Mr Vallack.

TAWSTOCK - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday morning last, as HENRY OLIVER, aged 12 years, son of JOHN OLIVER, of Tawstock, smith, was driving a dung-cart in the employ of Mrs Pethebridge, of Pill, the cart accidentally upset, and the edge of the cart, coming upon the head of the deceased, cleft it in two, and he died instantly. An Inquest was held upon the body, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 25 March 1841
SUTCOMBE - Inquest. - The following Inquest was taken by H. A. Vallack, Esq., on Monday last. On JOHN BATE, farmer, aged 52 years, at Lane farm, in Sutcombe, who was killed by a fall from his horse, on his return from Torrington great market, on Saturday last, being unfortunately in a state of intoxication. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 April 1841
CHUDLEIGH - Distressing and Determined Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Chudleigh, on Monday, on the body of a man named SAMUEL TUCKETT, about 30 years of age, who committed suicide on Sunday morning, in the most determined manner. It appears that the deceased between 6 and 7 o'clock in the morning first cut his throat, and afterwards hung himself to a beam in a stable belonging to his mother. While in this position it is supposed he must have been kicked by one of the horses as marks were found upon his person. His own mother was the first that discovered the body, but not until life was extinct. The instrument with which he first attempted self-destruction, as a small clasp knife which was picked up near him. The deceased had been for some days past obviously labouring under lowness of spirits, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 15 April 1841
STONEHOUSE - Melancholy Instance of Sudden Death. - On Wednesday, an Inquest was held on the body of MR EVENS, licensed-victualler, of Barrack-street, Stonehouse, late a serjeant in the Royal Marines. MRS EVENS stated that her husband had retired to rest at an early hour in the afternoon, and that on going into the bed room for the purpose of giving him some tea she found him insensible. She instantly sent for a surgeon, who on his arrival stated that he must have been dead some hours. A verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 29 April 1841
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Burning. - Alfred Drake, Esq., the newly-elected Coroner for the Borough, entered upon the duties of his office on Monday last by holding an Inquest at Newport, on the body of MARY PARSONS, a little girl, who, being left alone in the house during the temporary absence of her mother, who had gone to the other side of the street on an errand, caught her clothes on fire, and was burnt so dreadfully that death ensued shortly afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death by Burning."

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Plough Inn,' East-street, Plymouth, on Monday last, by Mr Squire, on the body of a Chelsea pensioner, named LIDSTONE, who had hung himself in the passage of his residence on the preceding evening. Witnesses were called, and from their testimony it appeared that the deceased had been in a state of intoxication nine successive days. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 13 May 1841
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - Alfred Drake, Esq., the Coroner for this borough, held an Inquest on Monday last, at Rawleigh, on the body of a child about 3 years old, named GEORGE STRADLING, son of JOHN STRADLING, of that place, who was found dead floating in the mill stream at Rawleigh, on the morning of the same day, having, it is supposed, fallen into the stream whilst at play on the bank. Another child narrowly escaped drowning on the following Wednesday near the same spot.

Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, aged 2 years, son of JOHN PRISCOTT, who in playing by the fire, on Thursday last, caught his clothes in a blaze, and was so dreadfully burnt that, after lingering in great pain until Monday last, he died. Verdict, "Accidental Death by Burning."

EAST BUDLEIGH - An Inquest was held at Leat's Pound Farm, in this parish, on Friday last, before James Partridge, Esq., one of the Coroners for this county, on the body of HENRY LEAT, aged 67 years, whose death was caused by the fall of an oak pollard tree, the limbs of which struck him down in its fall, and so severely injured his back as to cause his death on the day after the accident. The principal witness was William Tedbury, a carpenter, who was engaged in felling the tree; who said, when he cut away the root, he called to several persons who were near to go out of the way, that the deceased moved several feet from where he stood, but the branches f the tree struck him down. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 5s. on the tree.

Thursday 20 May 1841
ARLINGTON - Suicide. - A lamentable act of self-destruction was committed at Arlington Beccott, in the parish of Arlington, on Tuesday last, by MRS BLACKMORE, the wife of MR CHIRSTOPHER BLACKMORE, a respectable farmer of that place. It appears the deceased had been in a desponding state, and was much disturbed in her sleep the night before, but attended as usual to her duties in the morning; shortly before 11 o'clock she went into the garden near the farm-house, where she was found soon after with her throat cut, and quite dead. The razor with which she perpetrated the fatal act lay by her side stained with blood. The deceased has left a family of four children, the youngest of whom is 13 years of age. No cause whatever can be assigned for this rash act, as deceased was in comfortable circumstances, and lived with her family in much domestic happiness. An Inquest was held on the body the following day, when the Jury unanimously agreed upon a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - On Saturday morning, MRS COLWILL of this town, was found dead in her bed, to which she had retired the preceding night in perfect health. The Coroner's Inquest returned a verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 27 May 1841
TIVERTON. - Melancholy Accident at Tiverton. - An Inquest was held by Mr Gervis, at the Guildhall in Tiverton, on Tuesday last, on the body of MR JAMES FOX, who had met with a melancholy death by drowning, in the course of the afternoon. Mr Mulcock, traveller for the firm of Foster, Porter and Co., London, deposed that he had arrived by the mail in the morning, and going to the commercial rooms of the Three Tuns Inn, met with the deceased gentleman, whom he had seen on the previous evening at Exeter. MR FOX appeared in good health and spirits, and he had no reason to suppose that he laboured under any mental malady. It being market day and no business likely to be done, it was proposed that they should go, during the afternoon, to fish in the river Exe. They left the inn about a quarter before two and after fishing up the stream for about an hour, MR FOX proposed that they should bathe, from which his companion endeavoured to dissuade him, but without success. The deceased then entered the water, which at this place was not much above his hips, and began splashing it over his face and hands. The witness had been sitting on the bank for a few minutes, when he perceived that his companion had disappeared. He ran backward and forward in the hope of seeing the body before he went for assistance, but could not. Had he done so, he should have endeavoured to have got him out. Mr Towell, smith, of Bolham, stated, that between four and five in the afternoon, he was told by a person in the road that some one had been drowned in the river near the weir, and requested his assistance. On coming to the spot, he saw the body of the deceased lying with his face downwards; the water was there six feet deep. He was lying about six or seven yards from the bank, and about a foot or two beyond him the water was much deeper. Mr Towell dived after him, and brought him to the bank; he should suppose the deceased about 27 years of age. The Jury found a verdict of 'Accidental Death.' The deceased was a commercial traveller in the firm of Barteel and Co., Noble-street, London, and was reported to have in his possession very valuable property. From the suddenness of the awful circumstance, and the respectability of the deceased, the event has created a great degree of excitement in the town. The deceased was a very fine young man. He has no parents living, and an only sister, who is too ill to be informed of the melancholy fate of her brother. He was interred on Saturday ,at St. Peter's Church.

BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - We lament to have to record another melancholy instance of self-destruction. The perpetrator and victim is ELIZABETH COLLACOTT, a young woman only 18 years of age, daughter of a labourer at Derby, in this town, and herself employed as a lace-mender at Rawleigh. It is said that she had been receiving the addresses of a young man who four months ago enlisted as a soldier much in opposition to her wishes, - and that on that occasion she threatened to poison herself; last week the youth came home on duty in quest of a deserter, but from his not paying the deceased so much attention as her former acquaintance warranted her in looking for, she apprehended the alienation of his affections to some other object, and on Thursday evening in a fit of jealousy, took a large dose of arsenic (which she obtained at the house of her brother-in-law, who had procured it to poison rats). The usual effects of violent vomiting ensued, and although at first she denied that she had taken any deleterious substance into the stomach, she at last confessed the truth, and was conveyed to the Infirmary, where the stomach-pump was applied, and all that medical skill could do to relieve her was tried, but with no effect; she lingered in great agony until Saturday morning, when she expired. A post mortem examination was taken, which proved that death was the result of poison. An Inquest was held before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough; but no evidence was adduced which could throw light on the cause of the rash act, except that deceased was observed to be very melancholy after the arrival of the soldier. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The Coroner took occasion to animadvert upon the too common practice of keeping deadly poisons in the house for domestic purposes.

Thursday 10 June 1841
STONEHOUSE - Awful Case of Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the Queen's Arms, Stonehouse, on Thursday last, before H. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, (in the absence of Mr Bone,) to inquire into the cause of the death of BETSY HANNAH HOYTEN, the wife of a superannuated pensioner, residing in Rowe's Court, Stonehouse. It appeared from the evidence, that both deceased and her husband had been in a state of intoxication for nine days. HOYTEN, according to his own account, retired to bed quite drunk about 11 o'clock, by himself, and on waking about half-past two, and finding his wife absent, he went in search of her, and on opening his room door for that purpose, he discovered her lying at the foot of the stairs; he alarmed the neighbourhood, and when they discovered she was dead, they immediately sent for a surgeon, who informed the Jury, that in the absence of appearance of external violence, and of suspicious circumstances, it was his opinion that deceased had died from some internal disease, probably apoplexy, accelerated by the continued use of intoxicating liquors. The Jury returned their verdict, that deceased had been found dead, but how or by what means she came by her death, did not satisfactorily appear to them.

Thursday 17 June 1841
ILFRACOMBE - Suicide. - We regret to hear that GEORGE HARRIS, Esq., of Ilfracombe, late a partner in the local bank there, committed suicide this morning, by cutting his throat with a razor. The Coroner was summoned and left about ten o'clock to hold his Inquest on the body; but at the time of our going to press, he has not returned, and we are unable to give further particulars of this sad event.

Thursday 24 June 1841
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - We were unable last week to report the melancholy particulars of the suicide of CAPTAIN GEORGE HARRIS, of the Cove, in this place, or the result of the Inquest on the body. It came out in evidence before the Coroner, Richard Bremridge, Esq., that deceased had lately laboured under great despondency of mind; - that he had complained to his medical attendant only a day or two before, that his depression of spirits made his mercantile duties irksome to him and unfitted him for active life. His children were on a visit in a neighbouring parish, and his servants wee alone with him in the house: early on Tuesday morning one of them heard groans proceeding from the unfortunate gentleman's bed-room, and on entering it beheld her master sitting in bed with the blood streaming from a frightful wound in his throat, which he had inflicted with a sharp-pointed knife that was still clenched in his hand: when discovered, he was not quite dead, but the vital spark fled soon after the surgeon's arrival. Other evidence was adduced, tending to show the gloomy and despondent state of the deceased; and the Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Derangement. CAPTAIN HARRIS was a highly respectable gentleman; and since the private banking-house (of which he was a partner) merged into the National Provincial Bank some years ago, he had been rather largely engaged in ship-building.

Thursday 8 July 1841
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide in the Barnstaple Union Workhouse - On Saturday morning last, an Inquest was held in the Board room at the Workhouse, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM CROSSMAN, one of the inmates, whose death was caused by a wound which he inflicted on his throat on the previous Wednesday night. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was an old soldier who had passed many years in India, and who entered the Workhouse with a worn-out constitution between two and three years ago. Ever since his admittance he had been subject to occasional attacks of disease, and about six weeks ago became a permanent inmate of the sick ward. On Wednesday afternoon, he mentioned to John George, the nurse of the ward, that he wished to have a little toast and water, and whilst the latter went to procure some, CROSSMAN took a razor which George was in the habit of using, and secreted it under the bolster of his bed. It is rather singular that during that afternoon, in conversations which he had with the nurse and with Thomas Powe, a fellow inmate, he mentioned how kindly he had been treated since he had been in the house. He was then evidently meditating self-destruction, for almost immediately after the other inmates had retired to rest he inflicted two dreadful wounds on the front part of his throat, one of which was upwards of four inches long and two inches deep, and which nearly severed the windpipe; the other a tremendous gash, but neither so long or so deep as the former. He then lay down, anticipating a speedy dissolution, but not finding his expectation realized, he again seized the razor and made two deep wounds in his arm, thinking that he should thereby bleed to death (as he afterwards expressed himself). He did not then, however, die; and on the following morning, the nurse, having found his bed deluged with blood, caused Mr Torr, the surgeon, to be sent for, on whose arrival the injuries which the unfortunate man had inflicted on himself, were discovered. Mr Torr proceeded to dress the wounds, and then finding him perfectly sane and collected, asked him his motive for committing so rash an act; to which CROSSMAN replied, that his pain was so very great that he had done the act in order to get rid of it, as he saw no other way in which he could relieve himself. The Rev. Henry Luxmoore subsequently attended him, to whom he detailed the manner in which he committed the acts, and his motive for having done it, in substance as we have above stated. To both Mr Torr and Mr Luxmoore he said that he had no fault whatever to find with his treatment in the house, which had been always very good. He lingered until Friday afternoon apparently without suffering much, when he died. - Verdict, Felo de se. He was buried between 9 and 10 o'clock the same evening in the churchyard without religious ceremony.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at Pilton, on Friday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JOSEPH BALLER, fellmonger, aged 60. Deceased had risen in the morning in his usual health, and was preparing to go down stairs, when he suddenly fell and expired almost immediately. Verdict, "Died of Apoplexy." - Deceased was a freeman of this borough, and voted at the election. It is said that his death is to be attributed to the excitement which the contest induced. This is the second instance of sudden death within two days arising from the same cause.

EXMOUTH - Extraordinary and Dreadful Suicide. - This town was thrown into great consternation on Friday last, by a report that a private in the party of the 9th Lancers, quartered here during the election in Exeter, had destroyed himself in the most deliberate manner by blowing his brains out with a pistol. The report proved unfortunately too true and the following are the circumstances of the case. The deceased, whose name was TERENCE SHIELDS, was billetted with several of his comrades at Bastin's Globe Inn. They slept in rooms at the top of the house. In the morning the deceased had been out on parade, and had returned to his sleeping room for the purpose of shifting his parade dress. This was about half past 10 o'clock. One of his comrades was with him for the same purpose, but, having changed his dress before the deceased, left the room, and went to the stables. About five minutes afterwards, the report of fire arms was heard in the room, and an alarm being given, the unfortunate man was found extended on the floor quite dead, half of his face being blown off. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, when evidence was given eliciting the above facts. It appeared that the pistol with which this dreadful deed was committed belonged to the deceased, and so determined had he been in his purpose, that he had actually loaded it with 4 rounds of ball cartridge. The balls were found lodged in the ceiling with a portion of the scalp of his head. The deceased had betrayed no symptoms of insanity, excepting a slight melancholy, previous to destroying himself: and one of his comrades deposed that 5 minutes before his death he was perfectly cool and collected. He was somewhat given to drinking, and had been intoxicated two days previously, which circumstance seemed to have preyed on his mind. His Sergeant gave him a good character, describing him as a quiet and inoffensive man. He was 24 years of age and not married. After deliberating upwards of four hours, the Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se, and the unhappy man was buried privately the same evening, no funeral service being read over his body.

Thursday 22 July 1841
TAWSTOCK - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Eastacombe, in the parish of Tawstock, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MRS ANNE THORNE, aged 86, who died the day preceding, after an illness of a few hours. Verdict, - "Visitation of God."

PILTON - Fatal Accident. - On Sunday afternoon last, a lad named CHARLES HAZEL DYMOND, 13 years of age, son of JOHN DYMOND, saddler, of Pilton, was bathing near Pottington point, with several companions, when, venturing beyond his depth, and being unable to swim, before assistance could be rendered him, he sunk. Every attempt was made to recover the body, but ineffectually, until the next morning, when it was found not far from the spot where the unfortunate accident occurred. An Inquest was held on Tuesday before Henry Vallack, Esq., Coroner (in the absence of Richard Bremridge, Esq.) and a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning" was returned.

Thursday 29 July 1841
DREADFUL MURDER AT EXETER. - On Saturday morning last, the inhabitants of Exeter were thrown into a state of the greatest consternation and alarm, in consequence of a report that MR NATHANIEL BENNETT, a clerk in the West of England fire office, was missing from his home, under circumstances which gave but too much reason to believe that he had come by his death by unfair means. MR BENNETT was a young man who had for many years filled a situation in the West of England office, although not a native of the city, and was much and deservedly respected by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. He resided with his sister, at the house No. 7, in Colleton Terrace, Holloway-street, but MISS BENNETT is at present, we understand, absent from home with another brother on a visit to London. He was missing from his home at breakfast time on Saturday morning, nor did he make his appearance at the office as usual. At an early hour in the morning, however, a hat and stick, which were identified as having belonged to him, were picked up near the water, at the bottom of the lane leading from St. Leonard's church to the river. The impression at first was that the unfortunate young man had committed suicide, but certain appearances of blood near the spot, coupled with the fact that one of his gloves had been picked up at some distance off, towards the city, seemed rather to indicate that he had been murdered. A search for the body was immediately commenced, but for some hours it was unsuccessful, and it was not until nearly five o'clock in the afternoon that it was eventually taken out of the water on the western side of the river, nearly opposite the spot at which the hat and stick had been found. This circumstance strengthened the suspicion of unfair play, because, even supposing the deceased had in the first instance fallen into the water, it was next to impossible that his body could have been carried, by any current of the river, to the spot at which it was ultimately discovered. But if any doubt could have existed upon the subject before, that doubt must have been entirely dispelled by an examination of the body itself. It was found that the bridge of the nose was broken, and there were marks of severe bruises on the forehead and about both eyes. A single shilling only was found in the pockets of the deceased, and his watch was gone, although a part of the guard-chain, which was broken, was left remaining about his neck. It seems, therefore, that the object of the perpetrators of this diabolical deed, whoever they were, was plunder. The body was removed first to the Custom-house Inn, kept by Mr Badcock, and afterwards to the residence of MR BENNETT, in Colleton Terrace. A post mortem examination was made on Sunday, by Messrs. Barns and Edye, surgeons; but we are unable to state the conclusion to which those gentlemen arrived, for the reasons stated below. The police officers were on the alert as soon as the body was found, with a view to discover the perpetrators of this horrid crime, and before Sunday night several parties, both male and female, had been taken into custody on suspicion of being concerned in the murder.
We are not in a situation to publish, so fully as we could have wished, the facts which have already transpired, the Coroner having decided that the investigation should be a private one. We feel bound, however, to give the public such information as we have been able to obtain, and, we believe, so far as it goes, it may be relied on as authentic. MR BENNETT, it appears, although a young man of very steady habits, had been induced to go, on Friday evening, to the Cattle Market Inn, in the Bonhay, where a great number of persons had assembled, in consequence of the fair which had been held there during two or three days. While there, he as observed to be making an incautious display of some money which he had about him, and which, it is to be feared, excited the cupidity of some reckless characters who are always to be found assembled at such times. He was seen also to enter into conversation with some women of loose character who were in the house at the time, and some of whom reside close to the place where his hat and stick were picked up, and from all we can learn we have reason to believe he must have made an appointment with one of them to meet her near her own home. Be this as it may, he did not leave the inn until half an hour after midnight, and then he was followed by three young men of suspicious appearance, who had been in the house during the evening, and had no doubt seen the deceased making a display of his money. Two very respectable young men to whom MR BENNETT was known, observing this, went after the deceased, and having told him their suspicions offered to accompany him home. This offer being accepted, they went with him until they came within sight of his own residence, which he pointed out to them, and saying he would not trouble them to go any further, he thanked them for their kindness, and bade them good night. The two young men then returned towards South Street, but the deceased instead of going into his house, must have gone on the road and towards the lime kilns. This appears to have been the last time he was seen alive by any one to whom he was previously known, and it is worthy of remark that at that time he did not appear to be intoxicated.
An Inquest was held on the body on Monday morning, at nine o'clock, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury. The Jury was summoned to meet at Field's Windmill Inn, but the room being found too small for the number of persons who attended, it was adjourned at an early hour to the Three Cranes Inn, in South-street. After the Jury had been sworn, they adjourned to the late residence of the unfortunate deceased, No. 7, Colleton Terrace. Mr Edye, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination in the course of Sunday, pointed out to the Jury various bruises, on the eyes, forehead, and lips, which appeared to be the only marks of violence upon the body. The face, however, was very much discoloured. The deceased must have been a strong, powerful, young man. The Enquiry excited, as may be supposed, a considerable interest, and a number of highly respectable persons attended to listen to the proceedings.
The Coroner said he hoped nothing would be published while the Enquiry was pending. There is no doubt he had the power to order that the investigation should be private, and, if he were told by the gentlemen who attended to conduct the Enquiry, that such a course would tend to further the ends of public justice, he should feel himself bound to make the order, unless a pledge were given that nothing should be published.
Mr Robert Cornish, and Mr William Kingdon, jun., expressed their belief that the publication of the evidence would frustrate the ends of justice.
Mr George Pye, as Foreman of the Jury, expressed on their behalf a wish that the room should be cleared.
All persons except the witness under examination and the gentlemen who are engaged in conducting the Enquiry, were then ordered to leave the room, and the evidence was taken in private.
FURTHER PARTICULARS - The Coroner and Jury were engaged in the investigation until half-past nine o'clock, when they returned a verdict of Wilful Murder by Drowning, against some person or persons unknown. The case is therefore left to the sifted by the Magistrates. There are, we understand, seven or eight persons in custody, all of whom are young men, (under 21,) resident in Exeter, who have been long leading profligate and dissolute lives. There are, unfortunately, a number of characters of this description infesting the city, and we have frequently had to record cases of outrage committed by them upon the property of the citizens. This is the first time, however, that any of them have been suspected of being implicated in a deed of such frightful violence.

TORPOINT - On Saturday, an Inquest was held at the St. Germains Union House, Torpoint, on the body of a poor man named LAUDER, who met with his death by receiving a slight push from an inmate. His weak state (being upwards of 80 years of age) caused him to fall, which broke his thigh; mortification ensued and occasioned his death. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening last at the Poltimore Inn, St. Sidwell's, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female named ELIZABETH JAMES, who was accidentally run over on Tuesday by a cart belonging to a person named Treud, of Heavitree. The unfortunate deceased lingered for four days, when she expired from the fright and injuries she had received. Verdict, - "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 40s. on the cart.

Thursday 26 August 1841
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - Considerable excitement was produced in this town on Sunday and Monday last, by the death of MR ROBERT PAGE, aged 28, master of the National School, in consequence of a rumour that his illness and death were attributable to the operations which he had undergone from Dr Cronin, for the cure of deafness, which deceased laboured under. An Inquest was required, but, from the absence of the Borough Coroner, it was delayed from an early hour of Sunday morning (when deceased died) to six o'clock in the evening of Monday, when, the Coroner not being returned, his father, Henry Drake, Esq., (acting as his deputy,) summoned a Jury at the school-room, to Enquire into the circumstances of the death of deceased. The Jury consisted of thirteen highly respectable tradesmen; and Mr Robert Arnoll was foreman. Having been sworn, they proceeded to view the body, which was in an advanced state of decomposition, and on their return the following evidence was adduced:-
MRS PAGE, wife of deceased, (who was overcome with grief,) deposed, that on Sunday the 8th instant, deceased complained of pain in his back, and thought he had taken cold by sitting with his back towards the open window in church; he took a little opening medicine, and next day was better; in the evening walked with a friend to Bickington, and on his return remarked that the exercise had done him good; on Tuesday and Wednesday he appeared quite well; at dinner-time on Wednesday he took up a paper, in which he saw that Dr Cronin was coming to Barnstaple, and told witness that he thought he should consult him; witness advised him to wait until he had heard whether Dr Cronin had been useful to others; but on Thursday he went; witness had no idea that he intended to have an operation performed, but on his return as he passed the window he looked remarkably ill, and when he came into the house he sat down in the chair apparently faint; witness was alarmed, and asked what was the matter? and he replied, "I am only a little excited - I have had the operation performed;" he took no dinner but a little milk; in the evening he appeared better, and said he should go again next day, as the doctor had told him that the operation must be followed up every day; witness endeavoured to dissuade him, but he persisted and as he would go, she accompanied him; she observed that deceased's tongue was very thickly coated, and pointed it out to the doctor, who said deceased had a slight cold, but she need not be alarmed; he then underwent the operation by the insertion of an instrument up his nostrils, and the injection of air through a tube into his head; deceased started when the instrument was applied, but the doctor said, "Sit still - take care:" in answer to the questions of the doctor, deceased first said he felt the air in his forehead, then in his throat, then in his ear, on which the doctor said, "That is right - I wish you to feel it in the ear;" the doctor gave him some drops to drop into the ear, which deceased used, although witness wished to ascertain what they were composed of before she applied them; on his return deceased was faint, and so continued till the evening, but would not allow that it was the effect of the operation; next day (Saturday) he went again, much in opposition to witness's persuasion, but he thought the operations had a little relieved his hearing, and he was very desirous of completing the cure, if possible, but he came back very unwell, and so continued getting worse; he took pills and draughts according to the doctor's prescription, made up by Mr Symons, druggist: at 12 o'clock at night he was very ill indeed, had violent diarrhoea, and urged and bled at the nose profusely; continued ill all night, and was often delirious; got up for a few hours on Sunday, but was excessively weak; witness would give him no more of the medicine, and on Monday morning sent for Mr Symons and asked him what it consisted of: he assured her that there was nothing injurious in the pills or the liquid, but the drops he knew nothing of, as he did not prepare them: wished Mr Symons to feel deceased's pulse, but he declined, as he was not a surgeon, but offered to send Dr Cronin to see him; in the course of the forenoon, Dr Cronin came, and saw deceased, but said his illness was only the effect of the medicine, and he would soon be better - that he had a slight cold, and, he thought, an attack of jaundice; he asked witness if her husband were bilious, and she replied that he was not - that his health was very good, and that it had not cost him 10s. in medicine since they were married, which was four years; the doctor then gave another prescription, but the medicine still acted violently on deceased's bowels; next day he was no better but weaker, and the doctor again changed the medicine, still assuring witness that it was merely a cold and would pass off; on the Wednesday he was again worse, and was constantly delirious, with only very brief intervals, when he complained of a strange sensation and heaviness in his head, but was in no pain; in the course of the day the doctor came, and thought him better, and told witness he would soon be well, and ordered him to walk out in the air, which he did with some assistance, but was soon obliged to return to bed, which he never left again; on the next day witness felt more alarmed, and wished to call in another medical man, which Mr Luxmoore recommended, and on her expressing her wish to Dr Cronin, he said he had no objection, and would meet the gentleman whom she might call in at any hour he would appoint; witness went for Dr Budd, and he came, but she did not send to Dr Cronin, nor see any thing more of him; Dr Budd gave her no hopes of her husband's recovery, but gave him medicine, and he soon after fell into a sound sleep, by which he appeared refreshed; in his delirium, he was constantly calling out, "Pump the gas out of my head which you have pumped into it." On Saturday morning the doctor thought him much better, but towards the afternoon he became worse, and felt that he was dying; he told witness he was going to leave her, and prayed God to bless her, and charged his father to take care of his infant children; he often said, "Oh! 'tis the gas that has done it - I wish I had hearkened to you, and not gone to him at all;" he complained that the pain was in his forehead and temples, but chiefly by his ears; he continued to get worse during the night, and died at five o'clock in the morning. Deceased's general health was very good; he had not complained until the Sunday, and the cold appeared to have passed off before he went to the doctor.
Dr Budd deposed that he was called in to the deceased on Thursday; found him delirious - pulse at 180 and very tremulous - in a profuse perspiration, and with violent diarrhoea; gave him medicine which composed him; the next day he evinced unequivocal symptoms of inflammation of the membranes of the brain, of which he had no doubt he died, but how the inflammation was produced, he could not determine; it might arise in a hundred ways.
By a Juror:- The injection of a stimulating fluid into the ear certainly would be likely to bring on inflammation; it would give a shock to the nervous system; the patient had taken cold before, and was consequently more susceptible of injury from the operation; it would have been much more satisfactory, if we could have made a post mortem examination, but decomposition is too far advanced now to enable us to detect the existence of recent inflammation; I have no doubt that he died of inflammation of the membranes of the brain, but the examination of the body could not prove whether death was caused by the operation or not. I think the operation highly dangerous; it has caused instant death in the hands of an educated and eminent physician - I allude to Dr Turnbull; the operation is not of a trifling nature and to be had recourse to in every case of deafness; a patient ought to be apprised of its dangerous character, and if he choose to run the risk of it, the operator would be justified in performing it, but not otherwise; it is, in fact, firing an air gun into the ear; in the case I have referred to, the patient, who was a young man of 18 or 19 had undergone the operation repeatedly before, but on the last occasion the shock was more powerful, and it killed him; I do not think the oil which was dropped into the ear is likely to have hurt him; if an examination of the body had been made immediately after death, we should have discovered if the drum of the ear had shown inflammation, but decomposition now forbids it. - [These remarks of Dr Budd were elicited in answer to the questions of jurors.]
Rev. Henry Luxmoore was examined, but his deposition was not material; he had visited the deceased almost daily after Monday last, and was astonished at his rapidly increasing weakness, and urged upon MRS PAGE the propriety of calling in a medical man of the town to see him. The reverend gentleman's evidence proved the very great kindness and attention with which he had ministered both to the bodily and spiritual wants of the deceased up to his death; and that it was at his instance or suggestion that the Inquest was held on the body.
This was all the evidence. It was proposed that the Coroner should sent his warrant to order the attendance of Dr Cronin, or that a messenger from the court should inform him that the Inquest was going on, to give him the opportunity of attending, if he thought proper; but a majority of 7 to 6 of the Jury considered that no good end could be obtained by the examination of Dr Cronin, and the proposition was overruled.
The Jury retired, and after a brief consultation returned the following verdict:-
"Death from inflammation of the brain; but whether produced by a recent operation or by natural causes, the impossibility of a satisfactory examination of the body of the deceased, in consequence of its decomposed state, precludes the Jury from judging."

Thursday 9 September 1841
COMBMARTIN - Inquests before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. - On Monday last, two Inquests were held within the district of Mr Bremridge on cases of sudden death. The one was on the body of MARY LANCEY, of Combmartin, aged 68, who was at work in the harvest field of Farmer Berry, at Berrynarbor, the preceding Saturday, and about two hours after dinner (of which she had eaten heartily) she was taken suddenly ill, and died before medical assistance could reach her. Deceased was in very humble circumstances, and her abode exhibited the appearance of extreme poverty.

NORTH MOLTON - The other case was on the body of MR THOMAS YENDELL, a respectable yeoman, of Nadderhead, in the parish of Northmolton, aged 72, who had gone out a short distance from his home the preceding evening to direct a woman on the road to Southmolton and not returning as he was expected, his family became alarmed, and instituted an immediate search, when they soon found him lying in the road quite dead. The woman whom he had gone out to show her the road appeared at the Inquest and stated that having proceeded a short distance from his house and put her in the way, he turned back from her to go home, and appeared in perfect health. He must have almost instantly been seized with illness and expired. Deceased was a very corpulent man, and the surgeon who attended the Inquest gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from effusion of blood to the brain. - Verdict in both cases, - Died by the Visitation of God.

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide at Plymouth. - A most determined act of self destruction was committed on Wednesday by JOHN HUNDREY, a cordwainer, at the residence of his brother, JOSEPH HUNDREY, a hair dresser, living in Russell-street. It appears that the suicide was a man about 30 years of age, and that since he had attained the age of 17, he had been afflicted with epileptic fits. His conduct for several days subsequent to an attack of this nature has been very violent, generally manifesting itself in a refusal to work, the utterance of bad language, and a disposition to create a disturbance by destroying the household furniture of his friends. He had a fit about a fortnight before he committed suicide, since which he had done no work. He resided with his father, who is also a cordwainer, living in Willow-street, and on Tuesday evening he told him that he would not work and that he (his father) should maintain him. He left his father's residence, apparently delirious, at 6 o'clock, and returned about half-past ten; he was then very violent, and threatened to break everything if he could get into the house. The father not thinking himself or his family safe, should the deceased get into the house, called a police officer, by whom he was taken to the station house, although not charged with any offence. At half-past six o'clock on the following morning he was liberated, when he immediately proceeded to his father's residence, which he entered by the back door. His father told him he had better call on Mr Horrell, who would employ him, as he had refused to work at home; but the deceased in reply told him he would not do so, as the Mayor and policeman had informed him that his parents must maintain him. He then left the house by the way he entered, and went round to the front door, and attempted to get in by lifting the sash, but on being prevented he broke four panes of glass. The father asked him what he would do if he (the father) died? to which the deceased replied, he would rather cut his throat than go into the workhouse. On the glass being broken the father ran to the station house to procure assistance, and the deceased proceeded to his brother's shop in Russell-street. This was about half-past seven. His brother did not take any notice of him, and as there was nothing in his conduct which differed from his usual demeanour, he left the shop a few minutes after his entrance, to bathe. The father on his return from the station house, went to his son's residence in Russell-street, and there he found the deceased, who was sitting in a corner on a chair. The father said, "Oh, you are there," and he replied, "I have done it" (alluding to his wounded throat). - The father, who was much alarmed, immediately left to procure a surgeon; and Mr Whitting and Mr Jenkin Thomas, who resided opposite, hearing what had occurred, went to offer assistance. They also found him sitting on a chair, and blood issuing from his throat. He had a razor in his right hand, and on Mr Thomas exclaiming, "My God! what have you done," he made no reply, but flourished the razor toward his throat, and rising up, went forward to the looking glass. He placed himself in front of the glass, and made another cut at his throat. Mr Thomas immediately seized him and having pinned him against the wall, called for assistance, but none was rendered, although many persons (to their shame be it recorded) were present. The razor was, however, taken from his hand, and a surgeon was again sent for. The deceased attempted to speak, and uttered the words "I will." Mr Bellamy, surgeon, arrived in about ten minutes afterwards, and the deceased, who appeared infuriated at his presence, rose up suddenly from the chair, attempted to fight, said, "Be off," and having slipped between Mr Bellamy and the wall, secured another razor, and before it could be taken from him he had inflicted another severe wound across the throat. Mr Bellamy seized him, and they both fell on the floor, and deceased, without a struggle, instantly expired. An Inquest was held the same day before Mr Squire, the Coroner, at the Prince of Wales Inn, in Russell-street, when the above facts were elicited from the witnesses who were examined. A verdict of "Insanity" was returned, and Mr Thomas was commended by the Coroner and the Jury for the humane, prompt, and proper conduct he had manifested.

Thursday 23 September 1841
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Star Inn,' in this town, before Henry Drake, Esq., (in the absence of his son, Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner,) on the body of JOHN SMITH, master of the schooner 'Victoria,' of this port. Deceased's vessel was lying at Prideaux's quay, and on Friday evening the master of the 'Swallow,' which was lying near, came on board, and the two captains and the mate of the 'Victoria' went down into the cabin and sat drinking for an hour. The master of the 'swallow' rose up to leave soon after nine o'clock, and deceased directed his mate to go and see him ashore; and presently after deceased went up on deck, and getting near the side of the vessel unfortunately fell overboard. The mate heard him say to himself, "Steady, steady," and immediately a splash ensued - the captain had fallen over. The mate immediately called to the master of the 'Swallow,' and assistance was procured, but it did not appear that he ever rose to the surface, the deceased being a very heavy man; and it was upwards of an hour before the body was recovered, when every effort was made to restore animation, but without effect. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased has a wife and several children resident in Bristol; and has been in the employ of the Messrs. Arter, of this town, merchants, for nearly 20 years, who speak in the highest terms of his skill as a sailor and his diligence in promoting the interests of his employers; although there is too much reason to fear that his unhappy addiction to drinking led to his untimely fate.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was also held on Monday evening, in this town, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MRS ELIZA WILLS, wife of MR JOHN WILLS, master of the 'Peter and Sarah,' of this port, who complained of illness in bed, and died almost immediately. - Verdict, 'Visitation of God."

ILFRACOMBE - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday, an Inquest was held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of MRS LYDIA RENNELS, aged 63 years, who had complained of being unwell the preceding evening, and went upstairs and wished her daughter to get her some gruel, but when she brought it up, she found her mother quite dead. Verdict, 'Visitation of God.'

BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SARAH LEMON, aged 81. The deceased, whose occupation has been that of a nurse, had been taking tea at Mr Grant's, Ford Farm, on the Torrington road, and at six o'clock she left to return home, but had scarcely crossed the road when she dropped down and died instantly.

Thursday 21 October 1841
SOUTHMOLTON - The Floods - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, we had such heavy and continuous rains that the rivers and streams were swollen so as to render the roads impassable in almost every direction, and many who were intending to come to our market were stopped and compelled to return home again. Part of the parapet of the south side of Mole bridge, at the bottom of the town towards Tiverton, was washed away by the pressure of the water, and a little boy named BENJAMIN WILLIAM EARLE, son of a mason of this town, was carried away with it; but although numbers witnessed his situation, so impetuous was the current that assistance was impossible, and the poor little fellow was drowned. His body was found next morning two fields below the bridge, and an Inquest was held on it on Monday, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 28 October 1841
LYMPSTONE - Inquest - On Monday afternoon, an Inquest was held at the "New Inn," Lympstone, on the body of LROBERT HOMAS BOWDITCH, aged 25, a mason, residing at that place. It appeared in evidence, that the deceased, together with his brother, DANIEL BOWDITCH, had been drinking at the Swan Inn, on Saturday week, the 16th inst; they remained until a late hour, and did not leave until the landlord of the Inn, Thomas Baker, had, with the assistance of his household, put them out of the house. On getting outside, it appeared that deceased fell, thereby injuring his head, and causing a small wound in the scalp; he was taken to his house, and notwithstanding every care, and the application of every kind of sceptic by the medical man, the bleeding of the wound could not be staunched, and he lingered until Friday last, when he sunk from exhaustion. The Jury, after a patient investigation of six hours, returned a verdict of "Died from an injury received in his head from a fall." This is another lamentable instance added to the already large catalogue of the fearful consequences arising from drunkenness.

PARRACOMBE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday) at Parracombe, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH JONES, aged 70, who had been at work cutting turf the morning of the day preceding, and, returning home at about 11 o'clock, fell down just at the step of her door, and when taken up was found speechless, and survived but half an hour. The opinion of the medical man was that death was occasioned by effusion of blood in the head. The Jury returned a verdict, "Died by Visitation of God."

Thursday 4 November 1841
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Inquests held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., the Coroner. - On Saturday last, at Chittlehampton, on the bodies of ANN WHITFIELD, of that place, and her infant child. The deceased was overtaken by premature labour induced by scarlet fever, and died soon after giving birth to a still-born male child. Verdict in the case of the mother, "Natural Death;" and on that of the infant, "Still-born."

BRATTON FLEMING - And on Monday last, at Bratton Fleming, on the body of a little boy called WILLIAM DARCH, aged 5 years, son of ROBERT DARCH, labourer, whose clothes accidentally caught fire while he was at play with his brother in the kitchen of his father's cottage on the preceding Saturday, from which he was so dreadfully burnt that his death ensued shortly afterwards. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 November 1841
BARNSTAPLE - Inquests held before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner. - On Saturday last, at the North Devon Infirmary, on the body of CATHERINE JACKSON, aged 60, widow of a pensioner, and residing in Hardaway-head, who was brought into this humane institution the evening before, in a shocking state from burning, having caught her clothes on fire during the temporary absence of a woman who was in the habit of sleeping with her and assisting her in her infirmities. The flames were observed by a neighbour passing, who went in, and, with further help, succeeded in extinguishing them, and conveyed the sufferer to the Infirmary, where she survived in much agony but a few hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death." The deceased was a remarkable woman, having accompanied her husband throughout the peninsular war, to the scenes of which she often adverted with much emotion.

BARNSTAPLE - On the same day, an Inquest was held on the body of GRACE PASSMORE, aged 76, who died suddenly at her house in Derby the day preceding. Deceased had been in her usual health, and had walked the day before her death a distance of two miles: she was sitting in her chair in her wretched and filthy apartment, and died without a groan. Deceased, who was better known by the name of PUGSLEY, was mother of a notorious woman of that name who was transported from this borough a few years since. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

BISHOPS TAWTON - Inquests held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner. - On Tuesday last, at Bishop's Tawton, on the body of MARY JANE GENT, aged two years, daughter of a farmer of that parish, MR HUMPHREY GENT. The deceased being left in the kitchen of her father's dwelling the day before, with her brother and sister, for a few minutes, unfortunately approached the fire, which caught her clothes, and although help was instantly at hand, so severe were the injuries she had received that they proved fatal the following morning. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

CHITTLEHAMPTON - And on Wednesday the 10th, at Chittlehampton, on the body of WILLIAM SKINNER, aged two years, son of MR ALEXANDER SKINNER, yeoman, of Cleave farm, in that parish, who had been missed by the family on the afternoon of the day preceding for half an hour, and on search being made for him, his body was discovered in the pond by the farm-yard quite dead. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

APPLEDORE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held here on Friday the 5th instant, on the body of PRISCILLA BERRY, wife of WILLIAM BERRY, shipwright. From evidence adduced it appears that the deceased, at 1 o'clock the previous day, was engaged in washing, when she put her hand to her head, fell down, and instantly expired. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 25 November 1841
SWIMBRIDGE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last at Swymbridge, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES ROWCLIFFE, a servant in the employ of Lieut. Shapland, who died suddenly the day preceding. The opinion of the surgeon was that death resulted from the rupture of a blood-vessel in the hart, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 2 December 1841
MEMBURY - An Inquest was held on Tuesday the 23rd instant, at Membury, on the body of THOMAS FURZEY, aged 72 years, who was found drowned in the river Yarty, on the Saturday morning previous. The deceased, who was in the employ of Mr William Blackmore, of Membury, miller, had been sent out to various places to deliver grist, and to bring home corn to be ground; he had a donkey with him to carry the grist, &c.; he left about eight in the morning and did not return; the rain had fallen that day and the waters were out. In consequence of his not returning, inquiries were made in the direction he was sent, and it was found he had been to Mr Newbery's of Yarty, where he had been accustomed to cross the river by a foot bridge, and on proceeding further the donkey was found without grist, corn, or pad upon it. It appeared as if it had been through the water, being thoroughly washed. The body of the deceased was found the following morning about a mile below the foot bridge, and it is supposed that he had attempted to pass through the river on the donkey near the foot bridge, where the water was ascertained to be five feet deep, and had been higher, and that he was carried away by the stream.

Thursday 9 December 1841
TOTNES - Extraordinary Case of Death from Violence. - A great sensation has been created at Totnes, by the death of a man named KELLY, a travelling pedlar, in consequence of severe blows given him with a poker by a woman with whom he was in habit of travelling. At an Inquest held on Friday, at the 'North Star' inn, before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, the following evidence in reference to this melancholy case was elicited:- John Symons sworn:- am ostler at the 'Kingsbridge' inn, in this town; on Saturday week last, the 20th November, about 7 9o'clock in the evening, I saw the deceased in company with a woman, who appeared to be his wife; the woman was sitting in the settle opposite the fire place in the kitchen of the 'Kingsbridge' inn - the man was standing before the fire; soon after I came in I saw the woman take up the fire poker and strike the man over the left side of the head: I heard no angry words pass between them, she was about to repeat the blow, when I interfered, and took the poker from her; on receiving the blow, the man fell on one side, but not off his seat; saw no blood flow; both the man and the woman appeared to be very tipsy; there appeared to have been no quarrel about another man; the landlady came in soon after and ordered both of them out of the house, and they left quietly together; they appeared to have been drinking in the house. Mr William Killock, surgeon, sworn:- first saw the deceased on the Wednesday after Saturday the 20th of November; commenced attending him professionally on Monday last, November 29th; examined him generally; found extensive swelling and inflammation on the back, which deceased said was caused by a blow; examined his head and found no symptoms indicating that he had been struck on the head with a poker; there were appearances of blows given with the fist; when I first saw him there was no appearance of wounds on the back, but bruises; the wounds appeared to have been produced by irritating applications; dressed the wounds, and used all necessary applications; continued to attend him daily; he appeared to be gradually sinking up to the time of his death, which took place on the 2nd instant. The blows received by deceased, in my opinion, produced violent inflammation, which was the cause of death; he told me that the woman struck him with the poker; he said her name was SARAH BAKER; he was never married to her; when I told him he was in a dangerous state, he appeared to be aware of it. The room having been cleared, the Jury consulted for about a quarter of an hour, and then returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against SARAH BAKER. The woman, SARAH BAKER, is a very tall and masculine-looking creature. She left this neighbourhood a few days ago, in company with another travelling pedlar, and has been pursued by Bishop, the constable, in whose charge she is, no doubt, safely lodged by this time.

FENITON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Feniton, in this county, on Friday the 3rd December, on the body of a poor old man, named JOHN MOXEY, aged 91 years, who left his home, the poor house in Feniton, between 3 and 4 o'clock in the afternoon of the day previous; and not returning, search was made for him that evening in the neighbourhood, but without effect, until the following morning, when he was discovered in a field about a quarter of a mile from the village, quite dead. The night had been wet, stormy, and tempestuous, and a verdict was returned of "Died from Exposure to the Inclemency of the Weather."

Thursday 16 December 1841
SANDFORD - Melancholy and Fatal Accident from the Careless Use of Fire Arms. - On Saturday morning last, a young man of the name of SAMUEL CROSSMAN, a labourer, having a gun with him, left his father's house in the parish of Sandford, and proceeded towards a farm called Kinneford, in the parish of Stockley, and was not seen from that time until Sunday morning, when his body was found dead in a copse on Emethay estate, in the parish of Stockley, the butt end of the gun between his legs, his hat several feet from him: there were marks of blood about the face: the lips were unhurt, but the muzzle of the gun must have been in his mouth, as the upper jaw was completely driven into the head, and a large hole in the back part of the head: there were several shots in the hat, and it was scattered over with blood and brains: on the lock of the gun there were remains of a cotton handkerchief, which must have caught fire by the blasting of the powder, it being burnt to a cinder, as were also the knees of his breeches, gaiters and stockings. His legs were also greatly scorched. Deceased had but one load of powder and shot, and that he had borrowed, with the gun, from a young man of the name of Cousins.
An Inquest was held on Tuesday at Wooland Downes, before James Partridge, Esq., Coroner, when the following verdict was returned:- "That the deceased came to his death by the accidental discharge of the gun."

BRIDESTOWE - Dreadful Accident. - An Inquest was held at Bridestowe, on Tuesday last, by Mr Bone, County Coroner, on the body of a respectable farmer, named JOHN FRIEND, who lived at Fernworth, in that parish, on an estate of his own. It appeared that the unfortunate deceased was returning in a cart from Tavistock market on Friday last, and contrary to the wish of his wife, would persist in riding on the shafts, and having indulged rather too freely at Tavistock, when near his own house, he unfortunately fell underneath the cart, the wheels of which passed over his abdomen. Mr McLeod, surgeon, of Okehampton, was promptly in attendance, and did all that science and attention could do; but on Sunday evening death relieved the unfortunate individual from further suffering. - Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 23 December 1841
LANDKEY - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the little boy, son of --- BOSSEN, a labouring man of Landkey, who was missed as we reported a fortnight ago, and whose body was taken up from a pool not far from the village on the day preceding, thus confirming the fears of his parents that he had been carried off by the stream which flows through the village, and which was unusually high in consequence of the late rains and had overflowed the roads. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday evening, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, on view of the body of WILLIAM CHAPPLE PAWLE, Esq., comptroller of the customs of this port, who had died suddenly the day preceding. It appeared from the evidence adduced, that the deceased, having official business at Paige's pill, walked out to the turnpike gate, where the Exeter mail overtook him and he got upon it behind the coachman; but he had not been seated more than four minutes before the coachman felt him to lean over upon him, and on looking round found that he was apparently ill and on the point of falling off the coach; he put his arm back, and held him round the waist, and a van happening opportunely to be passing, with the assistance of the driver, and of Mr Passmore, silversmith, who was walking on the road and came up at the moment, he removed him from the coach into it in a state of insensibility: the van was driven immediately back to this town, but before its arrival the deceased had expired. Mr Cooke, the surgeon, was instantly called, but his aid was ineffectual. The opinion of the surgeon on the Inquest was that death had been occasioned by the cold affecting his chest, induced by the velocity with which deceased was driven through the air, and a verdict of "Visitation of God" was returned. The deceased was much respected in his office; and to his family the stroke was most afflictive, he having left home in the morning in unusually good health and spirits; and the event is yet the more affecting as it is the third time that death has lately entered their domestic circle, a son and daughter of the deceased having both died within twelve months.

ILFRACOMBE - An instance of the extreme uncertainty of human life occurred here on Monday morning last, MISS CHARLOTTE COOK, aged about 53 years, having gone to the cupboard on an errand for the servant girl, and not returning so soon as she expected, the girl went in search of her, and found her in a reclining posture quite dead. An Inquest was held on the body the next day before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of 'Visitation of God' was returned.

Thursday 30 December 1841
PLYMOUTH - Remarkable and Awful Instance of Sudden Death.- On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held at the "Elephant and Castle," in Plymouth, before Mr Squire, on the body of CATHERINE AVENT, aged 32, who died suddenly on the morning of that day. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had been a servant to Mrs Cottle, who was tried and convicted at the Plymouth sessions for a robbery. She attended the Hall, on the day the trial came on, and feeling fatigued did not return that night to her residence at Devonport. On the following morning, (Wednesday) she visited Mrs Cottle in prison, and then returned to the house of a friend, and whilst in the act of taking her breakfast she fell suddenly back in her chair, and shortly after expired. Medical aid was immediately procured, but human efforts were of no avail - the vital spark had fled. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Southmolton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner of the district, on the body of MR GEORGE WEBBER, of Chittlehampton, yeoman, aged 57, who was seized with apoplexy while attending the Southmolton market the day before, and was removed to the "Red Lion" public house, where he died a few hours afterwards. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 6 January 1842
BISHOPS TAWTON - A Fatal Accident occurred on Tuesday last, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, to MR WILLIAM STANBURY, yeoman, of Yeotown-farm, who was going out with his wife in the morning to visit a neighbour, when his brother-in-law, Mr John Baker, who occupies a farm hard by, passed with his gun, and the deceased left his wife to accompany Mr Baker, promising to return to her shortly. They went down to the river side, where the deceased had seen a flock of wideons the day before; and while he was in the act of pointing out a bird to Mr Baker, by some accidental means, which neither of them could explain, the gun went off, and the charge lodged in deceased's bowels. He was enabled to walk home although in much pain, and went immediately to bed, where he lay perfectly sensible for two hours, when he expired. Mr Law was in attendance, but the injury was too serious to admit of surgical relief. To the surgeon and to his friends, deceased again and again expressed his inability account for the accident, and his persuasion that no blame was attributable to his brother-in-law. Deceased was a steady and very respectable young man, a tenant of Robert Chichester, Esq., of Hall, and had only been married about twelve months; and his wife is expecting confinement every day. An Inquest will be held upon the body this afternoon.

APPLEDORE - Coroner's Inquests. - An Inquest was held here on the 30th ultimo, by Arthur Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JAMES LIMBURY HOLMAN, late master mariner of this port. The deceased, who for many months past has suffered under great depression of spirits, became much worse, and died suddenly on the 29th. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

APPLEDORE - At the same time, an Inquest was also held on the body of a female child, the daughter of THOMAS TUCKFIELD, mariner, of this port, who, in the absence of her mother, caught her clothes on fire and was so dreadfully burnt that she expired shortly after. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - A Distressing Case of Suicide occurred in this town on Sunday last to a young gentleman of independent fortune, MR ALEXANDER P. PATON, son of GEORGE PATON, Esq., of Barbacon-terrace. It appears that the deceased, who had just become of age, was of an exceedingly low and desponding turn of mind - his habits were remarkably recluse, and he rarely went out of doors, although in tolerable bodily health. On Sunday he did not come down stairs at his accustomed hour, and in the afternoon his sister went to his room and found him dead. A bottle was by his side, which had contained laudanum (and which he frequently used medicinally); it was now empty, although on the preceding day it was known to have had a quantity of three ounces in it. Medical aid was called in, but it was of no avail, as life had been extinct some time. An Inquest was held on the body the day following before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner and a very select Jury, by whom a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned. The event has plunged the highly respectable family, of which the deceased was the hope and promise, into indescribable grief, which was augmented by the absence of the father, who had left a few days previous for London, but who returned t0o his distressed family last evening.

Thursday 20 January 1842
ILFRACOMBE - Sudden Deaths. - Inquests held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. - On Monday se'nnight, at Ilfracombe, on the body of MRS CORNISH, wife of the retired light-housekeeper of Lundy Island, who had died suddenly the day preceding.

BRAUNTON - On Friday last, at Braunton, on the body of MR PHILIP MAYE, aged 44, clerk in the office of Mr Bower, of that place, (formerly solicitor of Totnes, and late clerk in the office of Messrs. Drake, of this town,) who was seized with sudden illness on the Wednesday preceding, and lay insensible until the following day, when he died.

TWITCHEN - And at Twitchen, near Northmolton, on Saturday last, on the body of ROBERT BLACKFORD, labourer, aged 79, who was found dead in his bed the day preceding. - Verdict in each case, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 3 February 1842
SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Friday night last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRY THOMAS, thatcher, of this town, who was found dead in a lime-pit in the parish of Northmolton, in which was a depth of 20 feet of water, on the morning of that day, having his hat tied down to his head with a cord, to which were attached two pieces of iron. Deceased had been missed from his home for eight days, and from the depressed state of mind which he had laboured under for some time, the Jury had no hesitation in believing that deceased had destroyed himself, and that when he committed the act he was in a state of Insanity; and a verdict was returned to the effect that deceased was Found Dead, and that he had been Labouring under Temporary Insanity.

EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the "Custom House" inn, on the Quay, on the body of MR CHARLES RATCLIFFE, son of MR RATCLIFFE, of St. Thomas, miller. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased, who had lately become much addicted to drinking, took tea with his family on Christmas eve; he was then sober, and upon good terms with all in the house. He left after tea, and did not return home for the night. On Christmas day, between one and two, his father, being exceedingly uneasy about him, sent the servant to search for him. She found him at the mill, in the Shillhay, and asked him to come home to dinner. He said he should not. This was the last time he was seen alive, and although every search was made, no trace could be found of him till yesterday morning, when a body was found floating in the river, just below the ferry, by Mr Badcock, of the "Custom House" inn. It was so much disfigured that it was quite impossible to recognize it, but it was identified by the clothes and by a snuff box and pocket book found in the pockets. No evidence was given to show how he come in the water, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

WHIMPLE - Distressing Calamity and Death. - An Inquest was held at Trull farm-house, Whimple, on Tuesday last, on the body of ANNE SWEETE, aged fifteen, servant to Mr Trickey, of that farm. It appeared from the evidence of Mr Trickey that the family went to bed at 10 o'clock last Saturday night, when the deceased also went to bed. She slept in a room by herself. About half-past 12 she burst into her master's bedroom, with her clothes all a-blaze of fire, screaming, Master, dont'e scold me, dont'e scold me! He sprung out of bed, rushed downstairs with her, and rolled her in a rug. Mr Mery, surgeon, was immediately sent for, and dressed her wounds. She died within twelve hours. Mrs Turle, a neighbour, attended deceased till her death. She informed her that she had gone up to bed at ten, and having mended one of her stockings, went down again to mend the other. She had no candle, and thrust a couple of sticks into the embers on the hearth, by the light of which she knelt down to work. Overcome by fatigue she fell asleep, and must have slept an hour and a half. She was awoke by the fire, and then rushed up stairs as stated. She suffered much for two hours, and her pain then subsiding, she sank gradually into death. The tinder from her clothes was found in the track of her flight. The Inquest was held in the bed-room of her master whose hands and feet are dreadfully burned. This is a most distressing calamity - the family living in a make-shift way in the outhouses, owing to the house being in course of rebuilding. It was a mercy they were not all destroyed. The ill-fated maiden bore a good character.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquests. - It is our painful duty to announce the sudden death of MR PRIDEAUX, late of North-street, Plymouth, at his house at Kingsbridge, on Tuesday last, the 25th ult. On the morning of that day, having taken his breakfast in bed, he complained of indisposition, and requested to be left quiet and alone for an hour and a half, in order that he might be enabled to get a little sleep, he having passed a restless night; about noon MRS PRIDEAUX went to her bedroom, where she found him suspended from the bed-post by a handkerchief; she called for assistance and he was immediately cut down; Mr Toms, the surgeon, was instantly called, but all efforts to restore animation proved unavailing and it was the opinion of the medical attendant that life had been extinct at least an hour. The deceased had been for some time labouring under severe indisposition from suppressed gout, and his spirits were greatly depressed.

PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, on the body of MR SAMPSON HAKE, aged 74 years, who was found on the previous day in his bed-room at his son's house, Tavistock Cottage, with his throat cut. It appears from the evidence adduced at the inquest on the body, that the deceased, who was of temperate habits, and possessed an even but reserved disposition, was formerly a respectable yeoman residing at Chattleburn, near Brixton, Yealmpton, but that he had lately been much reduced in circumstances, being dependent for support on his son, MR RICHARD HAKE, butcher, of Plymouth. This is supposed to have preyed on his mind, and joined with the fact deposed to by his daughter-in-law, that since an attack of the brain fever some years since, "he frequently did not know what he was about," there can be no doubt but that at the moment he committed the fatal act, he was suffering from an aberration of intellect. He always appeared to be on the best terms with his family, and nothing unusual was observable in his manners throughout the day previous to his decease. He attended divine service twice on that day and retired at his usual hour to rest; and it was not until about eight o'clock on Monday morning, that his daughter-in-law, MRS HAKE, on entering his bed-room to awaken him, found him lying on the bed covered in blood, and quite dead. After the examination of a number of witnesses, there being nothing which could lead the Jury to believe that the deceased had died otherwise than by his own hand, and that at a time when his reason was impaired, they of course returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 10 February 1842
FILLEIGH - An Inquest was held on Monday last at Filleigh, on the body of a child aged three years, called WILLIAM COOK, son of a labourer of that place, whose clothes caught fire in the absence of his mother, by which he was so severely burnt that he expired soon afterwards. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 17 February 1842
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Inquest by Richard Bremridge, Esq. - At Chittlehampton, on Saturday last, on the body of GRCE ASHELFORD, aged 54, who was found dead in a wood, whither she had repaired for the purpose of gathering wood a short time before. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

SOUTH MOLTON - Also, on Tuesday last, at Southmolton, on the body of an infant, daughter of JOHN ADAMS, carpenter, who died suddenly. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

CHULMLEIGH - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday at Chulmleigh, on the body of MRS SOUTHWOOD, widow of the late MR BENJAMIN SOUTHWOOD, of that town, who, when in the act of dressing herself on Monday, suddenly fell down and expired. She had been previously in her usual health. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 24 February 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - Much consternation and feelings of deep regret were excited in this town on Friday evening last, by the intelligence of the sudden demise of RICHARD JEVE, Esq., manager of the Barnstaple branch of the West of England and South Wales District Bank. Deceased had suffered recently from gout, but was as well as usual on the day of his decease, until the afternoon, when, having retired into the private room of the bank, in company with two gentlemen who had called upon him on business, he was seized with apoplexy (the third attack), and survived in a state of insensibility but two hours! The facts came out in the evidence before the Coroner's Inquest, which was held the same evening before Alfred Drake, Esq., and a highly respectable Jury at the "Golden Lion" hotel. The Jury having been sworn, proceeded to the residence of deceased to view the body, and on their return Mr Parry, of Lee, deposed that having lately seen the deceased two or three times respecting some very material evidence he was to give on a trial in which Mr P. was concerned, he had on Friday, about a quarter before three, called at the bank, as agreed, in company with Mr Dickinson, to take a memorandum in writing of such evidence; - that he requested deceased to retire into the private room, where, after a short conversation, in which deceased complained that he was suffering greatly from gout, they were about seating themselves for the purpose of entering on the business of the visit, when deceased exclaimed, "Oh dear, what a dizziness I feel in my head!" - Witness and Mr Dickinson perceiving the hands and features of deceased much convulsed, supported him, and witness called for some water. The deceased articulated faintly, "Mantel piece;" and witness, on turning round, saw a jug of water there, from which he gave deceased a little to drink and sprinkled some over his face; at the same time calling Mr Dene in from the bank. That gentleman immediately fetched MRS JEVE; and Dr Budd passing at the instant was called in. Mr Winter, who had been sent for, arriving soon after, deceased was bled but without avail; for he never spoke afterwards, and died about five o'clock. Mr Dickinson gave similar testimony; and the jury without hesitation brought in a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." Deceased was an old resident of this town, and had been engaged as chief clerk and cashier at the banking house of Messrs. Pyke, Law, and Beacraft, (now the local branch of the National Provincial,) for a series of 26 years; and for the last two years had been employed as manager of the District Bank; in both which capacities he had enjoyed the highest confidence of his principals and directors, and the esteem of the numerous clients of those establishments. He was also contractor of the Barnstaple gas works.

SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquests. - On Tuesday last, by Henry Vallack, Esq. (in the absence of Richard Bremridge, Esq.,) on the body of JAMES WERE, aged 5 years, son of a carpenter, who, during the temporary absence of his mother-in-law, caught his clothes on fire some time the week preceding, whereby he was so dreadfully burnt that he lingered until Tuesday, when death put an end to his suffering.

SOUTH MOLTON - Also, on the same day, at Town House in the parish of Southmolton, on the body of SAMUEL CROCKER, servant of Mr John Thorne, yeoman, who was thrown or fell from a horse which he was riding the night preceding, and was found not far from his master's house quite dead. Verdict in each case, "Accidental Death."

MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Death from Excessive Drinking. - A wretched man named MATTHEW FROST, aged 58, who had contracted an inveterate habit of drunkenness, was at the "Union Inn," in Moretonhampstead, in this county, on the 29th ultimo, intoxicated as usual, and was boasting of the quantity he had drank that day; when a farmer named Clampitt, who was present, most wickedly offered to pay for a pint of gin if FROST would drink it in two minutes, to which he assented, and the innkeeper readily supplied the draught (fatal, as it proved), which the infatuated man drank, and instantly fell into a state of stupor, from which medical aid could not fully recover him, and after languishing 17 days in much suffering, he died on Thursday last. An Inquest was held on the body, and the Jury returned a verdict, "That deceased died from Excessive Drinking of Gin." Great blame was justly imputed to Farmer Clampitt and to the innkeeper. - [Ought they not to be indicted for Manslaughter?]

Thursday 3 March 1842
SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held in this town on Friday last, by Henry A. Vallack, Esq., (in the absence of Richard Bremridge, Esq.) on the body of an infant daughter of a mason named BADCOCK, who died the same morning in violent convulsions. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 10 March 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Friday evening last, the wife of MR CORNISH, bookbinder, of this town, was suddenly seized with illness, and died almost immediately. An Inquest was held on the body before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, and on the evidence of the medical man, whose opinion was that the deceased died of apoplexy, a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

TORRINGTON - A melancholy circumstance happened here on Tuesday morning. At about half-past two o'clock, the inhabitants were alarmed by the cry of "Fire!" It was soon ascertained to have proceeded from the Castle House, occupied by MRS DEANE. The engines were put into instant requisition; but, although the fire was confined to the sleeping apartment of MRS DEANE, we regret to state that the unfortunate lady received such injuries as to cause death before she could be removed. It appears that the deceased, who had arrived at a very advanced age, had always a lighted candle or lamp in her room during the night, and it is supposed that she left her bed at the above hour, and in returning to it her night clothes became ignited. Her maid, who sleeps in an adjoining room, being alarmed by her groans, immediately went to her assistance, but she could render no aid, the room being filled with smoke and fire. In her attempts to extinguish the flames, which enveloped her mistress, she became so dreadfully burnt that her life is despaired of. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict accordingly returned. MRS DEANE was an old inhabitant of the town, and was highly respected. She is the relict of the late REV. WILLIAM DEANE, and mother of the present ANTHONY DEANE, Esq., of Webbery, in this county.

PLYMOUTH - Another Victim to Excessive Drinking occurred at Plymouth last week in the death of MR JOHN WILLIAMS, a commercial traveller, who, by the evidence of a girl of the town with whom he had been living at Plymouths several days, was continually drunk for some time preceding his death, his daily allowance (which he often exceeded) being a pint and half of brandy and a bottle of wine, besides a pint of brandy which he always took with him to bed and generally consumed before breakfast. A surgeon was called in when he became ill, but such was the state of his liver and stomach that no medicine could restore their healthy operation, and he died in a day or two. The Coroner's Inquest returned a verdict of "Died from Excessive Drinking."

EXETER - Sudden Death. - The following awful instance of sudden death took place at Bystock House, the seat of Edward Divett, Esq., M.P. for Exeter, on the morning of Sunday the 27th ulto. MR WM. NORRIS, the butler, who had lived with the family for the last 21 years, went out to walk through the grounds as he was generally accustomed to do before breakfast, and at about a quarter before 8 o'clock was found by a footman who was about to take down the outer hall shutters, laying on the ground in the gravel walk outside the front door; he appeared to be sensible but speechless; medical assistance was immediately procured, and he was bled, but without effecting any change, and he died about twelve o'clock on that day. The deceased had gone to bed the night previous about eleven o'clock, when he appeared in his usual health, and had been seen and spoken with by a nursemaid in the family, not half an hour previous to the attack, who met him as he was going to his room with some warm water. An Inquest was held on the body on Tuesday the 1st instant, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 17 March 1842
APPLEDORE - A Gig-boat upset and seven lives lost. - A most melancholy and disastrous occurrence took place at this port on the afternoon of Sunday last in the capsizing of a pilot-boat and the loss of all hands on board. At about half-flood, a number of vessels being seen in the bay, the two gigs belonging to the port were launched to go over the bar and pilot them in. They were both ambitious to be out first, and were looked at with interest by many from the shore as they glided along. The ground sea at the mouth of the bar was high; one of them, however, got through it safely; but the other, not being so stiff a boat, was unequal to the difficulty, and in endeavouring to turn her to come back, she was capsized, and six of her crew were instantly buried in the billows. The other clung a few moments to the bottom of the boat, till a heavy sea washed him off, and he sun like his companions to rise no more. They were watched from the shore by their friends with agonizing interest, and boats were instantly put off, but they were too late to render assistance, and they returned towing in the gig. The fatal event has caused a great sensation here, and has cast a gloom over many a family. One poor woman ran over the rocks frantic; - she had lost all her household, two sons and a lodger. There is one reflection that mitigates this distressing event. They have left no wives and families to mourn their untimely end, as they were all unmarried; but three or four of them had widowed mothers dependent on them. Their names were as follows:- JAMES FISHER, THOMAS FISHER, JOHN TAGGARTH, HENRY TAGGARTH, WILLIAM HOOPER (a freeman of Barnstaple), JOHN COOPER, and THOMAS MARSHALL. It is a remarkable fact, that in the boat that got over the bar safely, six out of the seven of the crew were married men with large families. Three of the bodies have been picked up - one on Tuesday and two on Wednesday, on the back of Braunton burrows, being those of THOMAS FISHER, THOMAS MARSHALL, and JOHN COOPER. Inquests will be held upon them this day.

Thursday 24 March 1842
KNOWSTONE - Suicide. - On the 14th instant, an Inquest was held in the parish of Knowstone, before James Partridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT MIDDLETON, a man of rather weak intellect, and a pauper of that parish, who had committed suicide, by lacerating his left arm with a razor, and bled to death. It appeared that on Saturday the 5th, he had received half-a-crown for labour, from a farmer of the parish, and that he went to a public-house, and spent the greater part of it. In consequence of spending the money, an altercation took place between him and his wife. On Sunday morning following he was heard to say that he would destroy himself, and one of his children observed that he took a razor and made a slight laceration in his arm, from which blood appeared; soon after which he left his house, and about nine o'clock the same morning he was discovered lying upon his face in a barn, a few hundred yards distant from his cottage. He was desired to leave the barn which he did, and walked in the direction of a coppice on the other side of the field, and was never seen alive afterwards. He was accidentally found on Sunday the 13th by his landlord, in the coppice towards which he had been seen walking. The body presented a most emaciated spectacle, enveloped in rags and filth, with the same shirt in which he had left the union at Christmas. In the left arm were several slight lacerations, but one had divided the artery and caused death; in his waistcoat pocket was found a razor stained with blood. The Jury returned a verdict of Felo de se, and he was accordingly buried in the church-yard, between the hours of nine and twelve the same night.

Thursday 31 March 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Thursday evening last, a man named GREENWOOD, well known at this port as a mariner, having been formerly master of the 'George,' was on board a boat at Castle Quay, near the North Walk, where he was seized with sudden illness, fell into the arms of his son, and died instantly! An Inquest was held on the body before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, which returned a verdict of "Visitation of God."

APPLEDORE - The bodies of WILLIAM HOOPER and JAMES FISHER, lately drowned by the upsetting of the pilot boat here, were taken up on Saturday last; the former at Greysand Hill, the latter near the Lighthouses. Inquests have been held upon them, and verdicts of 'Accidental Death' returned.

Thursday 7 April 1842
COMBMARTIN - Inquest held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. - On Monday last, at Combmartin, on the body of MR THOMAS WILLIS, farmer, aged 26, who was seized with illness the day preceding and died in a few hours. The opinion of the medical man was that death was occasioned by the rupture of a vessel in the heart. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 14 April 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on the 4th instant, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HARPER, aged 50, a labourer of the parish of Bishops Tawton, who, being employed in the lime-kiln at Pill, in that parish, on the 23rd March last, in attempting to reach a stone above him, threw himself off his balance and fell to the bottom of the kiln. He was instantly taken up, when he was found to have received injuries in his back, by coming in contact with a piece of iron in his descent; and he was removed without delay to the North Devon Infirmary, where surgical assistance was rendered him, but in vain, as he expired on the 3rd April. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BIDEFORD - A Child Burnt to Death. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., on the body of a fine boy about 7 years old, named BALE, who was burned to death in the Old Town, Bideford. It appeared by the evidence of some of the neighbours that the child had been left alone by the parents in the house, and that the child caught his clothes on fire from the grating of the fire-place. The poor little fellow ran into the street, and his bitter cries brought some neighbours to his assistance, and after great trouble they extinguished the fire, but he was so dreadfully burnt that he died the following day in great agony.

Thursday 21 April 1842
SOUTHLEIGH - Suicide. - A most melancholy instance of self-destruction occurred in the village of Southleigh, in this county, on Saturday week, in the person of an aged labouring man, named AMOS POWER. From the evidence elicited on the Inquest, which was held on Monday the 11th before Mr Aberdein, Coroner, it appeared that the unfortunate deceased had an allowance of 1s. 6d. per week from his parish, and occasionally did a little work, but had been in a low and depressed state for some time past, expressing himself in trouble without saying what it was: he had also said that he had been so two or three times before and that bleeding relieved him, and had asked his landlord if he could perform that operation for him; he also applied to a druggist at Colyton to bleed him, who declined to do so, saying it would do him no good. On the morning of Saturday he went up into his bed-room, which he was frequently in habit of doing, and of staying there nearly the whole of the day. About six in the evening his landlord came home, and went up to enquire if his wife should send up any thing, and on opening the door discovered the deceased seated on the floor between the bed-side and his box, his head leaning on the box, which was on the left side of him, and surrounded by a pool of blood. Thinking deceased had cut his throat, he called for assistance to examine him, when it was discovered that the wretched man had inflicted several wounds on his left leg, the stocking of which he had taken off - one very large one, just above the calf, in the hollow of the knee. He appeared to have been dead some time, and must have bled to death. It would be a matter of curious conjecture in this case, as to whether the one idea, or monomania, that bleeding would relieve his trouble, so frequently expressed by him, had led him to attempt in this way his own cure, and so fell a victim to his self-delusion - or whether the rash act may be attributed to those influences which frequently lead to hardy and determined suicide. The Coroner and Jury inclined to the former opinion, and returned a verdict of destroyed himself, being lunatic.

Thursday 28 April 1842
ILFRACOMBE - Suicide. - Great sensation was produced in this town on Monday evening by the report that MR GEORGE GOSS (whose name occurred so frequently in our columns a few months ago in connexion with his election to the office of registrar of births and deaths for the Ilfracombe district) had committed suicide by hanging himself to the post of his bed. The facts of the melancholy case, as they came out in evidence on the Inquest the next evening, at the "North Country Inn," before Henry Arthur Vallack, Esq., Coroner ( who officiated in the absence of Richard Bremridge, Esq.) were briefly as follow: the deceased had been employed during the last year by a renting farmer named George Ley, to serve as his deputy in the office of overseer of the parish to which he (Ley) had been appointed; - that in the discharge of his duties considerable sums of money had come into his hands from poor rates; part of which, to the amount of from £120 to £130, he had lately been instructed to pay into the treasurer of the Barnstaple Union, as per order of the Board of Guardians on the parish; - that on Monday last the overseers all met to make up their accounts preparatory to their quitting office, and in order to produce them before the auditor of the Union the following day; - that GOSS, who was present, was called upon to produce the receipt of the treasurer for the above amount (but which it turned out he had never paid, but had appropriated to his private use), when he made an excuse that he had left the receipt at home and would go and fetch it, and return in a few minutes or half-an-hour. the parties waited anxiously a considerable time for his return, but finding that he did not make his appearance they became uneasy, and set out in quest of him; they went to his house, but he was not to be found; then to all the public-houses which he was in the habit of frequenting, but in vain; the town was hunted over, and many were employed in the abortive search, and after a considerable time Mr James Phillips, one of the overseers, (and who had entrusted deceased with £30, part of the £120, to pay the treasurer) returned to his house and told MRS GOSS that he was sure her husband was in the house, and insisted on searching it; MRS GOSS did not object, and they proceeded upstairs, and finding one of the bed-rooms fastened on the inside, Phillips, called out, "It is of no use your keeping the door fast; if you do not open it, I will force it open;" and no reply being returned he forced open the door, and was shocked to behold the unhappy wretch hanging by his neckerchief from the top of the bedstead, and quite dead: two razors were lying open on a chest close to the body. He was instantly cut down, and a surgeon called in, who attempted to bleed him, but without effect, as he had been some time dead. This was all the evidence adduced at the Inquest. - The Coroner expressed much dissatisfaction at the paucity of the evidence, and asked if no one could come forward to speak to the moral character of the deceased, or to his general habits, and remarked that he had never before met with an instance in which so great reluctance to give information was betrayed. The Jury could not at first agree to a unanimous verdict; consequently they were locked up, and after a considerable time they came to a conclusion that the deceased was labouring under Temporary Insanity. Deceased was well known in the neighbourhood, and had lately adopted the occupation of an auctioneer.

Thursday 5 May 1842
SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN CHANTER, of Northmolton, labourer, aged 70, who had been to work on Saturday last and retired to bed in his usual health, but was soon after seized with sudden illness which terminated fatally before midnight. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 12 May 1842
PLYMOUTH - A man, named SEARLE, residing in Looe-street, was found hung in a linhay, near Lipson-hill, on Thursday last; he had been missing for several hours, and on a search being made, his body was discovered as above described. The deceased had been a dairyman for many years, and it is rumoured that distressed circumstances disturbed his mind and drove him to the committal of the dreadful act. He had been in a desponding state for some time. An Inquest has been held on his body, and a verdict returned of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 19 May 1842
On Tuesday se'nnight several men were unlawfully engaged in "skimming" or netting the river Tamar for trout, between Druxton bridge and Lether bridge, when one of them, called PERKINS, a labourer, slipt into a deep pit, and was drowned in the presence of his three companions, who unavailingly endeavoured to extricate him. The body was not got out of the water for an hour and half. An Inquest was held by the Coroner, Mr Vallack, at eleven o'clock on the night of the following day, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Melancholy Suicide. - On Monday morning, about 6 o'clock, a person in the employ of Mr Tanner, in passing over the Shillhay bridge, Exeter, observed the body of a man in the water, which on being taken out proved to be that of MR HENRY NORTHAM, son of MR NORTHAM, ironfounder, whose premises adjoin the spot. The body was clothed only in a shirt, under waistcoat, and stockings, and from the evidence adduced at the Inquest held the same evening, there appeared no reason to doubt that the unfortunate young man had committed suicide. He had been unwell for several days, and had had medical advice, but on Sunday he sat up during the greater part of the day, and took his tea with the family. He laboured at times under great lowness of spirits, and was a good deal distressed in his mind by circumstances of a pecuniary, but of a strictly personal nature. He must have gone out at the back of the house through his father's garden into another small garden which adjoins, and thence into the water. He must have done so only a short time before his body was found, as at five o'clock the door between the two gardens was closed, while at six o'clock it was wide open. It is difficult to conceive how he could have effected his purpose without being discovered. The Jury found a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 26 May 1842
BIDEFORD - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Sailors Arms,' East-the-Water, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN MOUNTJOY, a boy of four years of age, who died in consequence of having been severely burnt about three weeks previously. It appears that the child had been left in the room with several other children, and in attempting to take a potatoe out of a saucepan, that stood on the fire, caught his clothes on fire, the effects of which were the cause of his death. Verdict accordingly.

Lamentable Accident. - On Monday, as MR THOMAS WYER, of Tavistock, was returning from Launceston, his horse took fright on Lawhitton Down, and he jumped out of his gig, which caused a rupture of a blood vessel in the head. He walked for two miles after the accident, but was ultimately carried to a public-house in the road, when, on lying down, the blood began to flow from his ears, and in the course of the day he died. An Inquest was held there on Wednesday, after which his remains were brought home. MR WYER had attended the funeral of his aged father but a few days before.

Thursday 9 June 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, soon after noon, HENRY LIST, nine years of age, youngest son of MR LIST, of this town, paper-maker, having gone to bathe in the river with several of his schoolmates, as the tide was coming, suddenly fell into a deep pit near the Blackrock, above the bridge, and neither he nor his companions being able to swim, he sank: they immediately gave an alarm, and two men came in a boat, and with a grappling-iron succeeded in recovering the body in about three-quarters of an hour, by which time life was, of course, quite extinct. The agony of the parents may be better conceived than described. An Inquest was held on the body in the evening before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Inquests held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner:- SOUTH MOLTON - In the parish of Southmolton, on Friday last, on the body of BETTY SMITH, aged 56. The circumstances of the death of the deceased were exceedingly mournful: her husband was ill and at the point of death on the day preceding, and the clergyman of the parish of Filleigh had been sent for and was coming to administer religious consolation to him: preparatory to his visit the clergyman had sent a small quantity of chloride of lime to be sprinkled on the room, at the smell of which the stomach of the poor woman was much offended, and she retched so violently as to rupture a blood-vessel in the brain, from the effects of which she died before medical aid could be obtained: very soon after her husband followed her to the "bourne whence no traveller returns!" The Jury gave a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." They were both interred in the same grave in Filleigh church-yard on Sunday last, and were followed to their final resting place by a crowd of spectators whom the peculiarly affecting coincidence appeared deeply to impress.

HORWOOD - On the same day, at Horwood, on the body of WILLIAM GAYTON, aged 26, a farm servant in the employ of Mr Joshua Downing. It appeared that on the preceding morning at seven o'clock, deceased was proceeding to the field with a mare of his master's which he was leading by a long rope, when the animal appearing to be fidgetted by the fore-harness which was upon her, suddenly kicked the unfortunate fellow on the head with amazing violence, by which his skull was fractured and the brain laid open. He was taken home to his master's, and surgical aid speedily obtained, but he lay insensible until seven in the evening, when he expired. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 16 June 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday se'nnight, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of MARY SUMMERWILL, aged 65, who resided in Davie's-lane. Deceased, on going upstairs to bed on the 29th of May last, fell from the top of the stairs to the bottom, and by the accident sustained severe injuries in her head, from which she lay insensible (under the care of Mr Cooke, surgeon) until the night of the 3rd instant, when she expired. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BIDEFORD - On Sunday afternoon last about two o'clock, a young man named JAMES HIGGINGS, a sailor on board the schooner 'Amelia,' of Padstow, went to bathe in a pool in the bed of the river, opposite Cross Park, with another man, and shortly after entering the water, having got beyond his depth, and being unable to swim, he sank; and before efficient assistance could be rendered, he was lifeless. He was eventually taken out of the water by the pool being dragged with one of the fishing nets, and conveyed to an inn on the Quay, where Messrs. Pridham and Brock, surgeons, were in immediate attendance and used every means in their power to resuscitate the body, but without effect. On Monday morning an Inquest was held on the body before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned." He was interred the same evening.

BRADWORTHY - An Inquest was held by Mr Vallack, on Monday last, at the poor-house, on the body of JOHN PARFIT, who died suddenly the preceding day. - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 23 June 1842
BIDEFORD - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday) at the 'Dove,' in Lower Gunstone-street, Bideford, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN WILLIAMS, an infant of three months old, which had died at midnight on Monday. The Inquest appears to have excited some little interest, and our correspondent has sent us a long report of it, which, in consequence of the late hour of its arrival, we are unable to make use of in full, but the principal facts elicited in the Inquiry appear to be the following:- The deceased was daughter of THOMAS WILLIAMS, who is a jockey, and is rarely at home, and from the evidence appears to be a man of very indifferent character, often ill-treating his wife, and allowing her sometimes but a shilling in a fortnight to maintain herself and child: the child had not been healthy ever since its birth, but was more unwell than usual on Sunday, and refused the breast: on Monday it was seized with convulsions violently, and neighbours who came to see it recommended the mother to send for a surgeon, but she declined, saying that her husband would be angry with her for incurring the expense, but desired Susan Houlford to go to the shop of Mr Griffiths, druggist, for a pennyworth of soet drops: Mr G., learning that it was for a child only three months old, declined to send the article asked for, but put up a powder composed of jalap and rhubarb, which he directed to be diluted in water and given to the patient; but the medicine did not take effect, and the child died at 12 o'clock that night. There was nothing to impeach the conduct of the mother, who seems to have been a kind and affectionate parent, but had lately been in great want from the neglect of her husband. The Coroner animadverted in strong terms on the prevalent practice of chemists and medicine venders prescribing and administering medicine, which, besides rendering them amenable to the law, often was perilous to and sometimes destructive of human life. The Jury concurred with the Coroner in condemning the practice to which he referred; at the same time they attached no blame whatever to Mr Griffiths in this case, and returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 14 July 1842
COMBMARTIN - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at Combmartin, on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM LEY, labourer, who was at work at a lime quarry in that parish, on the morning of the same day, when a quantity of accumulated deads fell in upon him and crushed his chest, whereby his instant death was occasioned. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 28 July 1842
MODBURY - Fatal Accident. - As MR GEORGE WHITEWAY BICKFORD, of Edmeton Farm, near Modbury, was incautiously holding a gun opposite the entrance of his house, and not being aware that it was loaded, put a cap on the nipple to clear the dust, when unfortunately it went off and lodged the whole contents in the side of his nephew, a little boy aged six years, who was standing in the passage, and not observed by MR BICKFORD. An Inquest was held on Wednesday, by John Gribble, Esq., and a verdict of 'Accidentally killed by shot from the gun,' returned.

COMBMARTIN - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at Combmartin, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY JANE BROWNE, infant daughter of a labourer of that place, who was suddenly seized with illness on Saturday last, and died very shortly afterwards. The opinion of the medical man was that death resulted from inflammation of the bowels; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

SOUTH MOLTON - An Inquest was held this afternoon at Southmolton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., on the body of JOHN ALLEN, mason, aged 40, who died suddenly last night from an attack of apoplexy. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 4 August 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARITY DARKE, aged 52, a dairy-woman for many years living in Newport, who had been at her usual avocation and in her usual health and spirits in the morning, but when she returned home about 11 o'clock, she had scarcely been in her house two minutes, when she was suddenly seized and fell to the ground. Medical aid was called in; but she was quite dead, nor did she speak or move after she was seized. The opinion of the medical attendant was that she had died from the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain; and a verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 11 August 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning, at Hardaway-head, in this town, by Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of WILLIAM THORNE, aged 60, who was formerly a respectable farmer at Gorwell in this parish, but had of late years been greatly reduced. Deceased was as well as usual on the Saturday; when, about one o'clock on Sunday morning, he complained to his wife ( who had been out to a late hour at work, and for whom her husband had waited up) that he felt unwell, and she helped him to bed when he bade her and his child a last farewell, and died almost instantly. The opinion of the parish surgeon, who was called in, was, that death resulted from apoplexy. Verdict - "Visitation of God."

TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - A shocking accident happened to a labouring man named THOMAS MOON, aged 42, of Torrington, who was employed in raising stones at Score Quarry on the new road from Ilfracombe to Braunton. It appears that the unfortunate man had laid a train to blast some rock, and retired at a proper distance; but, after waiting some time, thinking the powder had not ignited, he returned to see the cause, and at that moment the explosion took place, so that the poor man's head was blown to atoms, and of course death was instantaneous. He has left a wife and eight children to mourn their loss. The Inquest was held on the body the next day, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. A subscription has been made for the distressed family, and about £12 already obtained, which will, it is hoped, be considerably increased.

TAWSTOCK - Suicide. - An unfortunate young man, named JOHN ANDREW, aged 30, of Chappletown, in the parish of Tawstock, son of a respectable farmer, committed suicide on Monday last by throwing himself into the river Taw above New-bridge. There is no doubt that he was insane, having been once an inmate of a lunatic asylum, and his conduct and manner frequently betrayed mental aberration, so that his friends caused him to be closely attended, and it was in the temporary absence of his attendant that he perpetrated the deed. He effected his purpose most deliberately, walking into the river to beyond his depth, when he committed himself quite passively to his fate. He was observed in the river and assistance instantly afforded, but before he could be got out of the river he was quite dead. Verdict, "Insanity."

ATHERINGTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH JUDD, in the parish of Atherington, aged 35, who died suddenly on the Thursday preceding. - Verdict, "Visitation of God." The opinion of the medical man was that death ensued from the rupture of a blood vessel in the lungs.

BIDEFORD - The body of MR BROOK'S daughter, who was drowned above a fortnight since, was picked up on Saturday last, by a boatman named Richard Cole, near the locks in the parish of Wear Gifford, floating up the river. He immediately conveyed it to the parents' house, where an Inquest was held on the same, by Thomas Pridham, Esq., Coroner. Verdict, "Found Drowned." The interment of the body took place the same day.

Thursday 18 August 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Drowning. - A melancholy and fatal accident occurred yesterday (Wednesday) morning to MR EDWARD SMITH, aged 18, a promising young man belonging to the establishment of Messrs. Vellacott, drapers, of this town. The deceased had got up at an early hour, with a fellow apprentice, and went out to bathe in the river near the Black-rock, an exceedingly dangerous spot, which is nearly every year fatal to one or more, from the deep pits with which it abounds, and into which the incautious are imperceptibly betrayed. This unfortunate youth went into the water before six o'clock, when the tide was quite out, and was seen by his companion swimming across the river, when suddenly a minute afterwards he missed him - he must have been seized with cramp, or in some other way disabled, and sunk instantly, for he made no cry or signal of distress, or his companion who was close by must have perceived it. The affrighted lad lost no time in running back to the town and procuring a boat furnished with grappling irons, which were industriously plied for more than an hour with no effect, and the efforts of many bathers, who sought to discover the body by diving, were equally unsuccessful; but in about an hour and half afterwards a net (which had been in use at a remote part of the river, and could not be sooner obtained) was thrown out and in its first draught enclosed the body, which was taken into the boat and quickly conveyed home, where a surgeon was in attendance; but from the length of time which had elapsed (the body had been in the water more than two hours) any attempt to restore animation was out of the question. An Inquest was held upon it in the forenoon, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The deceased had but very recently come to the Messrs. Vellacott's from Taunton; but by the amiability of his disposition and the exemplary excellence of his conduct, he had acquired the high regard of his respectable employers. He was a son of the REV. JOHN SMITH, formerly the much-esteemed minister of the Wesleyan congregation in this town, but now of Hayle, in Cornwall.

COMBMARTIN - Fatal Accident. - A fatal accident happened on Monday morning last, at the Combmartin Lead and Silver Mines, to PHILIP LATHAM, a miner, aged 24, who was descending the shaft in a bucket, when the chain which suspended it broke, and he was precipitated to the bottom, a depth of 120 or 130 feet. When picked up, he was found to have sustained severe injury at the back of the head, but was yet alive, and surgical assistance was instantly rendered him; but so severely was he hurt that he died in fifteen minutes. An Inquest was held on the body in the afternoon before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The deceased has left a wife and two children in circumstances of extreme destitution; and we are happy to learn, that the company, commiserating their condition, have made a munificent grant to their relief; and at the annual meeting on Wednesday, the shareholders after dinner contributed individually to enhance the grant. This is the first fatal accident which has occurred in the works since the mine was opened in 1836.

APPLEDORE - Shocking Occurrence. - A melancholy affair happened on Tuesday last at Appledore. A mariner, named OWEN SMITH, came home at an early hour of the morning, in a state of intoxication, and ordered his wife to rise and get his breakfast. As she did not obey him as promptly as he wished, he dragged her down stairs, and in so doing inflicted such injuries on her that she survived but a few hours. The brutality of the husband's conduct will be estimated, when it is known that the poor unfortunate creature was in an advanced state of pregnancy. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday, which was adjourned to permit a post mortem examination; and the result of the adjournment we have not heard.

Thursday 25 August 1842
BIDEFORD - The body of the unfortunate BARTHOLOMEW PICKARD was extricated on Friday afternoon last, about 3 o'clock, after considerable labour and exertion assiduously and unremittingly bestowed by the other men employed on the works. An Inquest was held the same day about six o'clock in the evening, before Thomas Pridham, Esq., Coroner: verdict, "Accidental Death." It is just to the proprietors of the culm works to state that the various reports which have been in circulation respecting the mismanagement of the proceedings, and the danger attendant on working the mine, are entirely unfounded. The evidence adduced before the Coroner and Jury was perfectly satisfactory as to the precautions used in timbering, shoaring, propping, &c., and that there was no lack of materials for the purpose as has been represented. The above is the first fatal accident that has occurred at the works. The body was interred the following day in the new burying ground, being borne to its resting place by a procession of the members of the Rechabite society, and followe3d by a large concourse of persons. It is understood that the shareholders will defray the expenses connected with this calamitous affair; and it is hoped they will be influenced by the benevolent example of the proprietors of the Combmartin Mines and remember the widow and fatherless children.

Thursday 1 September 1842
CULLOMPTON - Much excitement was caused here on Sunday morning last, by the suicide of MR JOHN FROST, of the 'Red Lion Inn,' aged about 29. It appears that for several years he had been paying his addresses to a young lady in the neighbourhood, but owing to the opposition of her father the engagement was some months ago broken off between them. The deceased, however, again renewed his courtship. On Saturday last, in his interview with her, she expressed her determination never to marry him without her father's sanction, which she was afraid she should never get: and he consequently became exceedingly agitated, insomuch as to be observed by many people during the day; and on the Sunday morning he again went to see her, and on her again expressing the same sentiments she had the day before, he left her, shook hands, wished her well, and said she should never see him more. He had not been gone many minutes before the report of a pistol was heard; and on the servant going to see from whence it proceeded, found the deceased behind Mr Farrant's house quite dead, he having shot himself through the head. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Tuesday, and after a lengthened investigation the Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity. MR FROST was a steady and respectable young man, and his untimely end has cast a gloom on the inhabitants generally.

Thursday 8 September 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident through Drunkenness. - On Wednesday last, an accident, which was attended with fatal consequences, befell WILLIAM KELLY, aged 45, a man well known in this neighbourhood, having been for several years employed as a bill-sticker, and to blow the horn of the 'Advertiser.' He had been to Ilfracombe for a horse, which he rode back, and had arrived within two miles of the town, when he got into a van which was passing; but being very drunk, he fell off, and the wheels passed over him, mangling him frightfully - dislocating his collar bone, crushing his chest, fracturing his ribs, and one of his arms and legs. He was taken up and carried home to his wife, who, with singular inhumanity, rendered him no assistance, but left him in the kitchen all night, and until nearly noon next day, (imagining, as she alleged, that he was merely drunk, as he often was, and had sprained his leg,) when neighbours came in and got the poor wretch conveyed to the Infirmary, where he lay in great suffering until 10 o'clock at night, when he died. An Inquest was held on the body the next day (Friday), before Alfred Drake Esq., Coroner, which returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury very strongly animadverted on the disgusting barbarity of the wife, who was called into the room, and severely reprimanded by the Coroner; but she appeared utterly insensible to her disgraceful misconduct, and entirely unaffected by the melancholy fate of her husband.

Thursday 22 September 1842
HALWELL - On the 5th inst., a melancholy accident occurred in the parish of Halwell, in this county, to a labouring man named JAMES WIVELL, who with a fellow-workman had gone into a corn field for the purpose of drawing on a waggon the remaining 6 or 7 dozen sheaves, and was in the act of riding on the part of a load towards the stack, when, in consequence of the unevenness of the ridges, he was jerked off and received such injuries that he only survived till the 15th. On Saturday an Inquest was held by Henry Vallack, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded. The poor fellow was an industrious man, aged 62, and has left a widow and nine children.

Thursday 29 September 1842
STOKEINTEIGNHEAD - On Saturday afternoon, Joseph Gribble, Esq., and a Jury assembled at the Church-house Inn, Stokeinteignhead, to hold an Inquest on the body of WILLIAM SANDERS, aged 64. It appeared that deceased and a man of the name of Pike, had a quarrel in a harvest field. Soon after the deceased exhibited symptoms of pressure on the brain. John Scarborough, Esq., surgeon, of Shaldon, proved having been called in to the deceased, and that it was his opinion the deceased died from pressure on the brain, but without a post mortem examination he could not say from what it proceeded. Several witnesses gave Pike a good character. The Jury, under the direction of the Coroner, returned a verdict of "Died from Pressure on the brain."

Thursday 6 October 1842
LAPFORD - Inquest by James Partridge, Esq., at the 'Union' inn, in the parish of Lapford, on the body of JOHN WARREN, labourer, of Southmolton, aged 62. The deceased fell at Crediton, whither he had been with a horse and cart for Mr George Furse, tanner, and the wheel passed over his body: he was very anxious to be taken home, and he was immediately lifted into the cart and carried a few miles, as far as the above inn, when he was put to bed, and before medical assistance could be obtained, he was a corpse. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 October 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at Pilton, in this borough, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN DUNN, aged 52, formerly a respectable yeoman, of Strand Houses, in the parish of Ashford; who, on the preceding evening, died after an illness of about half an hour. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

WEST DOWN - Coroner's Inquests. - On Friday, at Westdown, on the body of the daughter of --- SCAMP, a labourer, whose death was caused by her clothes taking fire on the preceding Wednesday: Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BERRYNARBOR - On Sunday, at Berrynarbor, on the body of a man named THOMAS HUXTABLE, aged 70, of that place, who had been missed since the preceding Wednesday, and was found the Sunday morning in a cove on the beach there. The deceased was subject to mental aberration, and the general opinion was that he had committed suicide; but as there was no evidence of that fact, a verdict was returned of "Found Drowned."

BRATTON FLEMING - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at Benton, in the parish of Bratton Fleming, on the body of SUSAN BURGE, a little girl five years old, daughter of MR JOHN BURGE, yeoman, who had been left with a younger brother for a few minutes by their mother, when the boy took a flaming rush from the fire, which communicated to the clothes of the deceased, and so severely burnt her that she died after six hours' suffering. The father of the child is so dreadfully affected that he has been in fits ever since the occurrence. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday last, a little girl named ELIZABETH JENKINS, aged six years, went into a house of a labourer named Jebbet, and somehow caught her clothes on fire, which were completely consumed, and the poor little sufferer survived but a few hours, presenting a shocking spectacle, there being scarcely an inch of her person which was not burnt. An Inquest was held on the body on the following day, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. At the time of the above accident, no one was in the house but a daughter of Jebbet's, named Mary, aged 13, who did all in her power to extinguish the flames, and caught her own clothes, whereby she is dreadfully burnt and doubts are entertained of her recovery, although Messrs. Southcombe and Tanner were early on the spot and did their utmost to alleviate the sufferings of both the unfortunate girls.

ILFRACOMBE - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, a fatal occurrence took place at Damage Farm, in the parish of Ilfracombe. The respectable tenant, Mr Shapland, had employed an old man, named STEPHEN DRAPER, in blasting a spar in one of his fields which he was about to till: he had seen him at work in the morning and cautioned him to be careful, but, as the man was accustomed to the employment, he felt no uneasiness on his account. At dinner time, however, a lad went to call DRAPER, and presently returned saying that he was dead. Mr Shapland hastened to the spot and found the poor fellow lying dead and cold near the place where he had been at work, with his face and other parts of his person frightfully mangled. there is no doubt that his death was occasioned by the premature explosion of the powder with which he had charged the rock. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner; and as no positive evidence could be given of the cause of death (no one having witnessed the accident) a verdict of "Found Dead" was returned. Deceased was a steady man and had long been in Mr Shapland's service.

BIDEFORD - A Child Burnt to Death. - On Sunday morning last, at Bideford, a little girl, about 10 or 11 years of age, the daughter of THOMAS NEWMAN, cooper, Potter's Lane, was put to attend the fuel of a common oven, belonging to a Mrs Backway, a neighbour, and in whose absence for a short time she caught her clothes on fire, and in her fright fled into the street towards her home, when the fire was speedily put out, but she was so dreadfully injured that she died the same evening. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the following day, when the Jury returned a verdict of 'Accidentally Burned to Death.'

Thursday 27 October 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held at the 'Rose and Crown' Inn, at Newport in this borough, on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY PITTS, wife of WILLIAM PITTS, of that place, aged 53, who, being alone in her room the day before, accidentally set her clothes on fire, and was so much injured as to survive only a few hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Inquests Held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner:- ILFRACOMBE - At Ilfracombe, on Tuesday, on a body supposed to be that of ROGER NIXON, master of the brig 'William Wilberforce' (the property of William Tynemouth, of Newcastle, 165 tons burthen per register, laden with stone coal from Milford, bound to London,) which was wrecked off Lee, in that parish, during the gale of Sunday night, as is reported by our Ilfracombe correspondent in another column. And on the day following, on the bodies of five men supposed to be the crew of the unfortunate vessel, which were washed on shore the day preceding. The spectacle of six brave fellows, some of them remarkably fine looking men, and all in the prime of life, thus prematurely hurried to their graves, was very affecting. Verdict in each case, "Found Drowned."

Thursday 3 November 1842
HIGHBRAY - Inquests were held on Monday last, at Highbray, in the parish of Southmolton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the bodies of ANN LETHBRIDGE and MARY ANN TAYLOR, each aged 10 years, the former daughter of JOHN LETHBRIDGE, gamekeeper at Castle Hill, and the latter of a labourer. It appeared that the deceased had been at school at Castle hill on the preceding Friday, and were returning home in company with four or five of their schoolmates, when, instead of taking their proper road, they went across the park and were passing over a plank which is temporarily thrown across the river Bray by the workmen exclusively for their own accommodation, when MARY ANN TAYLOR slipped her foot and fell into the stream, and catching hold of the clothes of ANN LETHBRIDGE in her fall, pulled her in with her. The children went immediately and gave the alarm, and the parents were soon on the spot; but night coming on, and the stream running very strong, the search was unsuccessful; the next day it was resumed, but still without success; but on Sunday the bodies were discovered about a mile from where they fell in, lying very near each other. The verdict in each case was "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 November 1842
COMBMARTIN - An Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the 5th of November, at Combmartin, on the body of MARY ANN ALLIN, aged three years. It appeared from the evidence that deceased on the 4th of November had gone into the house of a neighbour called William Draper; and while playing with a child about the same age, the frock of deceased took fire, and she was so seriously burnt, that she died in a few hours. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 17 November 1842
BARNSTAPLE - Distressing and Fatal Accident. - On Thursday night last, an exceedingly distressing affliction occurred to the family of MR HUET, dancing master, of Litchdon-terrace, in this town. MR HUET was going out, and had gone into the passage, having forgotten his umbrella, which MRS HUET (who was sitting in the parlour, suckling her infant, six months old) observed opposite her, and rose up quickly to fetch, when, by a most unfortunate misadventure, is rising from her chair, the head of the infant came in contact with the sharp corner of a square mahogany table before which she was sitting, and which inflicted a dreadful wound in the soft part of the crown of the head. The blood instantly gushed out, and the affrighted and agonised mother called for assistance. A surgeon was instantly on the spot who stayed the haemorrhage, but the little sufferer sank into a state of collapse, from which he never rallied, and died within an hour of the occurrence. An Inquest was held upon the body the day after, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. We are informed that the agony of the parents (as, indeed, might readily be conjectured) is extreme; nor is it a little aggravated by the calumnious and cruel reports which were too freely circulated upon the subject.

Thursday 24 November 1842
ATHERINGTON - Inquests held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner:- On Monday last, at Atherington, on the body of PHILIP ISAAC, of that parish, aged 77, who died suddenly on the day preceding, of palsy in the brain: verdict, "Visitation of God."

BRAUNTON - Also, on the same day, at Braunton, on the body of MARY VICKERY, aged 20, wife of JOHN VICKERY, of that place, shoemaker, who died the day preceding, three hours after having given birth to an infant. The opinion of the medical man was that death resulted from the exhaustion produced by childbirth, and a verdict was returned accordingly. The child died a few hours after its parent.

PLYMOUTH - Death at Plymouth from a Gun-shot Wound. - We regret to record the death of a serjeant of marines, named THOMAS TATCHELL, under the following melancholy circumstances, offering another example of the fatal effects arising from the incautious use of fire-arms. On Thursday morning last, about 11 o'clock, the deceased, with two persons named Thomas Spurway and James Kemp, the latter a grocer, residing in William-street, Morice-town, who had been sparrow shooting together, were returning to Morice-town, Kemp carrying the gun, which was loaded with small shot; Spurway observing it was cocked said it was dangerous to carry it in that state, took the gun from Kemp, and after showing him the way to uncock it, Kemp not knowing how to do it, this being the first time he had ever fired a gun, returned it cocked into Kemp's hands that he might do it himself. The deceased was then a short distance a-head. In Kemp's attempt to uncock, the gun suddenly exploded and its contents entered the deceased's side, who cried, "Oh! oh! you have killed me!" and staggering about fell to the ground. He was taken home and almost immediately after expired. On Friday evening an Inquest was held at the 'St Aubyn Arms,' Morice-town, Devonport, on the remains of the unfortunate man, when after the preceding circumstances had been deposed to, a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 1s. on the gun. The deceased had lately retired from the service, having been pensioned from the 'San Josef;' he was about 40 years of age, and was a remarkably fine and athletic man. The circumstance is rendered still more distressing from the fact that Me Kemp and the deceased were near neighbours, living but two doors one from another, and on the most friendly terms. TATCHELL was a man much respected, and has left a wife to mourn his untimely end.

Thursday 1 December 1842
NORTH MOLTON - Inquests held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. - On Thursday last, at Northmolton, on the body of the male bastard child of JANE CREWYS, singlewoman. It appeared in evidence, that JANE CREWYS had been living in Chulmleigh as a servant; that she had left her service, and had gone to a house belonging to her mother at Chulmleigh, where she remained some days; - that her mother was living at Northmolton, as housekeeper with Mr Charles Purchase, and that on the 15th November the said JANE CREWYS went to her mother at Northmolton, and that she slept with her; - that she had not informed her mother of her situation, but was taken in labour early on the following morning, and was safely confined; that she was afterwards removed to the house of a farmer Lock with the child; - that all possible care was taken of the child;- that there was no external mark of violence; and from the evidence of Mr Ley, surgeon, there appeared to be no doubt that the child died a natural death from congestion of the lungs, and a verdict accordingly was returned. - [We have been induced to go into particulars in this case, from a report that the child had been improperly got rid of, for which, however, there appeared to be not the slightest foundation.]

BERRYNARBOR - On Monday last, at Berrynarbor, on the body of FANNY NORMAN, a widow woman, aged 83, who died suddenly on Sunday last. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God in a natural way, from an effusion of blood on the brain."

SOUTH MOLTON - On Monday last, at Southmolton, on the body of ROBERT HOLLY, aged 32. Deceased was a woolcomber, and had been working at Southmolton, but his home was Wellington, and thither he intended to have proceeded on Saturday, but was prevented: in the evening of that day he was at the 'Hare and Hounds' public house, where the woolcombers' club holds its meetings, and had drank to excess, when he fell down in the settle, and rested his head on the knee of a man who was sitting by him: the landlady essayed to take him to bed, but the man on whose knee he reclined thought she had better not, as he was asleep, and would be and bye awake refreshed: an hour afterwards, however, he was lifted up, and to the astonishment of the company, was found to be dead. He was a man of industrious habits and bore a good character; but there is reason to fear that in this instance his intemperance was the lamentable cause of his death. It was the opinion of the medical man who examined the body that death had resulted from effusion on the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

BIDEFORD - Death by Burning. - On Monday last, a Coroner's Inquest was held before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little boy named PARSONS, aged four years, who met his death in consequence of having caught his clothes on fire. It appears that the mother and father were both absent at the time of the accident, leaving four small children by themselves in the house, with no one to take care of them. The Coroner stated that this was the fourth case that had occurred within a few days in the same neighbourhood of children having been burnt through the carelessness of parents, on which he commented severely, and expressed his conviction of the necessity of some legislative provision to prevent accidents of a similar nature: in which the Jury heartily concurred.

Thursday 8 December 1842
TRENTISHOE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at Trentishoe, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE FORD, an old man of that place, a labourer, who died the day before suddenly. - Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 15 December 1842
COMBMARTIN - Inquests held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. - On Saturday last, at Combmartin, on the body of MARY LEY, the infant child of a labourer in that place, who died suddenly the day preceding from convulsions induced by teething. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

TAWSTOCK - And on Wednesday (yesterday) at Tawstock, on the body of JANE MARTIN, an elderly female of that place, who was suddenly seized with apoplexy while sitting smoking the day before, and actually died with the pipe in her mouth! - Verdict, "Visitation of God."

BIDEFORD - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday last at the 'Swan Inn' before Thomas Pridham, Esq., on the body of an infant female child, reported to have been unfairly dealt with. It appeared from the evidence adduced before the Jury, that the child was illegitimate, being the third issue of the mother, whose name is SUSAN HOBBS; - that she was attended by a person named Grace Trace, as midwife and nurse; - and that only one other person was in the room at the time of the delivery, named Fanny Gregory; and the report of the child's having been murdered was circulated by some of the inmates of the house in which the mother was confined, by way of retaliation on a woman named Perkin, who refused to allow HOBBS to be admitted to one of the beds, and she was consequently delivered in the kitchen, where there was neither bed or any other convenience. Trace stated that she had previous been engaged by HOBBS to attend her some time and on Tuesday morning about three o'clock she was called to the performance of her duty, and HOBBS was delivered about two hours after her arrival; - that the child was exceedingly weak, and she placed it in a warm bath without effect; - that there was nothing in the house at the time for the woman to make use of, being in great poverty and destitution, although she had every requisite provided for the child, and that she never left it until life became extinct; - that the woman reported to have laid violent hands on it had not been in the room during her stay with the mother. There being nothing to substantiate the report which had been put in circulation, the Coroner animadverted severely on the remissness of the midwife Trace, in not procuring further assistance when she saw there was danger, notwithstanding her high pretensions as being "thoroughly up to her business"; having, as she stated, been engaged in no less than 604 similar cases without medical assistance, and never had a failure before. It appears that there are six rooms in this house, occupied by no less than six families, that of Gregory amounting to eight, and the total number to sixteen, besides other visitors who occasionally lodge there. The Jury were, of course, unable to return any other verdict than "Natural Death."

Thursday 22 December 1842
BIDEFORD - It is our painful duty this week to record a most distressing occurrence, which has plunged one of the largest and worthiest families of the neighbourhood into the deepest grief: - it is the suicide of THOMAS VELLACOTT, Esq., of this town, a very old and highly respectable tradesman, an alderman of the borough, and lately its chief magistrate. The event transpired on Tuesday morning, at seven o'clock. An Inquest was held before Thomas Pridham, Esq., Coroner, in the forenoon; when the evidence of Thomas Mackenzie Smith, Esq., the medical attendant of the deceased, fully satisfied the Jury that the unfortunate gentleman was labouring under hypochondriasis when he committed the fatal act, having been affected by this distressing malady for several months, which was accompanied with severe nervous derangement, inducing extreme mental despondency; and with this evidence they instantly and unanimously agreed in a verdict of 'Temporary Insanity.' It appeared that MR VELLACOTT had got out of bed at an early hour to go to the water closet, and remaining rather longer than usual, MRS VELLACOTT became alarmed, and called MR V. jun., who instantly hurried to the closet, where he beheld the appalling spectacle of his father in the agony of death. Medical assistance was instantly obtained, but it was entirely unavailing. It is impossible to describe the sensation which was produced in the town by the event; the utmost consternation prevailed; the business of the market was suspended; the deepest regret was expressed on every hand, and the tenderest sympathy in the affliction of the bereaved family, which comprises MRS V. and ten children. From his honourable standing in the town as one of its principal inhabitants for nearly half a century, as well as the extreme good nature, generous hospitality, and enlarged public spirit, which were characteristic of the deceased, he had acquired universal esteem, and his death (especially in so lamentable a way) is regarded as a public calamity.

Thursday 5 January 1843
EXMOUTH - A melancholy accident occurred here in the afternoon of Monday, the 26th ult., to a poor man named JOSEPH RICHARDS, a mariner, who was drowned by the upsetting of a boat, on his return from Topsham. The deceased, who has left a wife and five children to lament their loss, had left them up the river in company with Mr George Weeks, of Exmouth, in the forenoon, and was on his return home with him; they left Countess Weir about one o'clock in the afternoon. The wind was rather against them, but the tide was running down. Two sails, a lug, and a sprit sail were hoisted; they got abreast of Starcross about four o'clock, when a brisk wind got up, and they were obliged to tack, and some water coming into the boat, the deceased was occupied in baling it out and Mr Weeks was at the helm; a sudden squall of wind took the boat, and it was capsized and both the deceased and Mr Weeks were thrown into the water. The deceased could swim and Weeks caught one of the boat paddles and gave to him, which he took, and said that he (Weeks) had better go his way, as he would do the best he could for himself. Weeks saw him no more after that. The boat was upset on the Exmouth side of the river, something more than a cable's length from the shore. Weeks swam as far as he could, but when about twenty fathoms from the shore became quite exhausted, and was drifted on shore quite insensible. Search was made for the body of the deceased early on the following morning, but it had not been driven ashore; the seine was put out, and at length the body together with the boat was hauled on shore. An Inquest was held on Wednesday the 28th ult., and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was recorded.

WITHYCOMBE RALEIGH - An Inquest was held by Mr Aberdein, on the same day, at Withycombe Raleigh, on the body of ELIZABETH DYER, aged 75, the wife of MR DYER. The unfortunate deceased was subject to fits, and being alone in the parlour of her dwelling house, by the fire, was found on her knees, with her head in on the fire, and resting on the grate. She was quite dead, and the head presented a most horrid spectacle, the integuments of the face being wholly burnt away, and nothing left but the blackened and singed skeleton of the cranium and the facial bones.

Thursday 12 January 1843
FREMINGTON - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Saturday last before Henry Vallack, Esq., (in the absence of Richard Bremridge, Esq.) on the body of MARY ANNE PICKARD, daughter of a labourer, at Bickington, in the parish of Fremington; who on the Thursday preceding, having been left by her parents in the kitchen, unfortunately caught her clothes on fire, and received such severe injuries as to occasion her death the next day. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

CHITTLEHAMPTON - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Friday last, at Chittlehampton village, before Henry Vallack, Esq. (in the absence of Richard Bremridge, Esq.) on the body of GEORGE WHITEFIELD, aged ten years, son of a labouring man. Much excitement prevailed in the village in consequence of a report that deceased had met his death through the mal-treatment of his master, Mr William Buckingham, of Combe, who was alleged to have beaten him severely. It is satisfactory, however, to find from the evidence of two medical men who had made a post mortem examination of the body, that there was not the slightest foundation for the report; - that, in fact, death resulted from inflammation of the lungs, nor was there any bruise or mark of violence on the body except a slight contusion on the buttock, not at all sufficient to produce any internal injury. A verdict of "Died by inflammation of the Lungs" was returned.

TAVISTOCK - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, on the body of an old man named WILLIAM PENGELLY, who obtained his livelihood by conveying letters to persons residing in the neighbourhood. The deceased, who was 72 years of age, had been ill for three weeks, but considering himself better, and pressed by pecuniary matters, he had proceeded to Pound, the residence of Sir Anthony Buller, and was on his return to Tavistock, when he became very ill, and sought assistance at the cottage of Joseph Chubb, a miner. Chubb and his wife, in the most humane manner, attempted to relieve his sufferings, and at the express wish of the deceased procured a cart to convey him to Tavistock. The illness of PENGELLY continued to increase, and he expired just as he arrived at his residence. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

SIDMOUTH - Melancholy Occurrence at Sidmouth. - On Wednesday afternoon the 4th instant, about half-past three o'clock, the following melancholy accident happened at this place to MISS GREAVES, a respectable lady of Sidmouth, residing at Fort Fields. Two young gentlemen, Mr Robert Coates, of Sidmouth, and Mr William Geo. Cunningham, of Sidbury, had been riding their horses on the beach for some time in company together, and after stopping in front of Fort Cottage with the sister of the latter, they had cantered on towards the end of the road beside the beach towards the York Hotel. The unfortunate lady, MISS GREAVES, whose untimely end is universally deplored by the poor and indigent of the neighbourhood, was just crossing the road from the main street of Sidmouth, leading from the town to the beach, when the horse rode by Mr William Cunningham came in contact with her and knocked her down before he had time to pull it up. She was taken into the York Hotel, where she was assiduously attended by Mr Jeffery, surgeon, till her death, which took place in about half an hour. An Inquest was held on Friday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Thursday 19 January 1843
LINTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on the 12th inst., at Linton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., on the body of JANE GEEN, daughter of CAPTAIN GEEN, of that place, who was taken unwell in the morning of the day before, and in the evening, after having taken her tea, became suddenly worse, and died immediately. Death is supposed to have resulted from aneurism; and a verdict of "Visitation of God" was returned.

PETROCKSTOW - Death by Burning. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at Petrockstow, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., (in the absence of Henry Vallack, Esq.,) on the body of JAMES MALLET, child of a labourer, aged 2 years, who, having been left the day before by his mother while she went to fetch a pail of water, set his clothes on fire, and on her return she found him so dreadfully burned that after lingering till the morning of the next day he expired. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 26 January 1843
SWIMBRIDGE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Swymbridge on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., on the body of ELIZABETH DELBRIDGE, aged 58, wife of the sexton of that parish, who, on the 17th instant, being in the churchyard and in the act of calling up to her husband who was in the belfry, was suddenly seized with apoplexy, and fell back on the ground, in which state she lay insensible until the following Friday, when she expired. Deceased had had two previous attacks. It was reported that a stone had fallen upon her in the churchyard, but in the absence of any external marks of injury, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by Effusion of Blood on the Brain."

BIDEFORD - On Wednesday last, (yesterday) a Coroner's Inquest was held before Henry Vallack, Esq., on the body of a male child, son of MR MARQUIS, of Kenwith-farm, in the parish of Northam, which had been found dead in the cradle on the morning of the day preceding, being about eight months old. William Ackland, Esq., surgeon, having been immediately sent for, stated it as his opinion that death was occasioned by a rupture of a blood vessel of the heart; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

EXETER - On Friday last an Inquest was held before Mr Warren, and a respectable Jury, at Ash's 'George and Dragon' inn, Black Boy-road, St. Sidwells, Exeter, on the body of the REV. ROBERT HOLE, a gentleman who was found dead in his library on the preceding afternoon. MR HOLE'S residence was in a lawn, on the left, and a short distance from the road as you ascend from the upper part of St. Sidwell-street, towards the Black Boy Turnpike. He was a bachelor, and not discharging any pastoral duties. His establishment consisted of himself, a housekeeper, a servant girl, and a man came occasionally to work on the lawn, &c. According to the evidence of the housekeeper, she left on Thursday, about or soon after noon, to come into the city in order to purchase articles that were wanted in the house, her master then being just as usual. She got home again about two o'clock, and wanting to speak to MR HOLE, knocked at the door of the library, but received no answer. She said her master usually read a great deal, and spent much of his time in his library, and when so engaged did not like to be disturbed. Imagining this to be the case at that time, she made no further effort, but went on with her domestic employments. About three o'clock, however, it became requisite that she should receive his directions for dinner, and she again went and knocked at the door, and having done so repeatedly and receiving no answer, she opened it, when she saw her master lying on his back in front of the fire place. She went to, and endeavoured to lift him; - the body then (from its proximity to the fire) feeling so warm, that she imagined he was faint, and a person was immediately despatched for medical assistance. She, however, soon discovered that life was extinct. Mr Land, surgeon, was promptly in attendance, but human could be of no avail. Under those circumstances the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 2 February 1843
PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident. - On Monday evening last the following distressing accident occurred at the Flock Manufactory recently established by Mr James, at the Old Victualling Office, Plymouth. The clothes of a young woman named ELEANOR HOUGHTON, who was employed in the manufactory, having become entangled in part of the machinery which revolves with great rapidity, her body was immediately drawn in, and repeatedly carried round before she could possibly be extricated. The moment the perilous situation of the unfortunate sufferer was discovered, the most prompt assistance was afforded by those on the spot, but the injuries received were such, in the opinion of the medical gentlemen, who were quickly in attendance, as to have caused almost instantaneous death. An Inquest was held on the following day, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 9 February 1843
ASHFORD - Inquests by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. - Yesterday, at Ashford, on the body of JOHN MOUNTJOY, aged three years, son of a labourer, who was standing before the fire on Monday, when the flame caught his clothes, and on the return of his mother (who had not been absent two minutes) she met him running out of the house with his clothes in a blaze, and his person was so much injured from the accident that he died yesterday morning. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

PARRACOMBE - Also, at Parracombe, on Saturday last, on the body of ELIZA ROOK, four years of age, daughter of a labourer, who died suddenly on the 29th January. As no medical man was in attendance, the registrar, on application being made to him for a certificate to bury, refused it until an Inquest had been held, which accordingly took place on the 4th, when evidence being adduced which left no doubt that death resulted from inflammation in the bowels, a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 16 February 1843
TORRINGTON - On the 13th instant, an Inquest was held by Mr Vallack, County Coroner, at Bradworthy, on the body of ELIZABETH BRAY, a girl four years old, who was so severely burnt the preceding day as to survive but a short time. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held on Thursday last at Ilfracombe before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ASPASIA FRANCES SUSAN GILLARD, the infant daughter of a person of that place, who came to her death by having been overlaid by her mother in bed the night before. A verdict of "Died by Suffocation" was accordingly returned.

Thursday 23 February 1843
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday, (Wednesday) at the Back-lane almshouses, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY NEWCOMBE, aged 78, who appeared to be in her usual health until six o'clock the preceding evening, when she suddenly complained of illness, and before assistance could be obtained she was a corpse. - Verdict, "Visitation of God."

HIGHBRAY - Inquest before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. On Thursday last at Highbray, on the body of an athletic young man, named PHILIP ROOK, a labourer of that parish, who on the day before was seized with apoplexy, and continued insensible until his death, which occurred next morning. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

ATHERINGTON - Also on the 21st, at Atherington, on the body of MARGARET SLOOMAN, aged 93 years, who died suddenly from a fit of apoplexy the day before. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 2 March 1843
SWIMBRIDGE - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Friday last at 'Stone Cross Inn,' in the parish of Swymbridge, on the body of a labouring man named EDWARD CRIDGE, aged 50, who on the day before was returning from Barnstaple towards Northmolton (being in the employ of Mr Richard Shapland, land-surveyor, of that parish) with a load of coals, in a cart drawn by two horses, when about three miles out of town he was attempting to get up on the cart, when he fell from the shaft, and the wheels passed over him, crushing his breast severely. Some other carters who were in company came to his help and lifted him upon the cart, not imagining that he was mortally injured; but before they had gone far they observed his countenance suddenly to change, and he died almost immediately. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

KNOWSTONE - On Friday the 17th instant, an Inquest was held at the 'Mason's Arms Inn,' in the parish of Knowstone by Mr James Partridge, Coroner, of Tiverton, on the body of JOHN WARE, servant to Mr Joseph Bray, of Towhill in that parish, who on the Tuesday preceding was returning with a load of lime from Tiverton, and within less than a mile of his master's house was found dead in the road. It appeared that two of the wheels had passed over his body and produced instantaneous death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned by the Jury, with a deodand of 7s. 6d. upon the waggon, 5s. upon the lime, and 5s. upon each of the three horses.

Thursday 9 March 1843
WEARGIFFORD - Melancholy Accident. - On Thursday last a most frightful occurrence took place at the culm mines near this town. A young man named HARRIS, aged 20, son of MR HARRIS, of Weargifford, yeoman, being there for the purpose of carting away culm, he had the curiosity to go near the shaft through which the men were then engaged in drawing up the culm; and stooping to look down, his foot slipped, as is supposed, (for no one saw him at the moment,) he was precipitated to the bottom, a depth of 70 feet. It is supposed that he must have come in contact with one of the buckets, there being one ascending and the other descending at the time, as one of his legs was completely severed in two parts, and several parts of his body dreadfully mangled. He also sustained a severe concussion of the brain. When first taken up, he appeared stupefied; but after a little time became completely outrageous, and died as they were removing him. He was taken home to his father's, but ordered to be removed back again to the same parish by the Coroner, who held an Inquest on the mutilated remains the following day, at the 'Rising Sun' public house at Gammaton Moor. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 16 March 1843
BIDEFORD - On Wednesday 8th instant, an Inquest was held on the body of a child that had died suddenly at Northam, before Henry Vallack, Esq., Coroner. The deceased was an illegitimate child of MARIA JONES, now of Bristol but formerly of this neighbourhood, and had been placed with Mrs Saunders of Northam, the mother's sister, to be nursed. William Ackland, Esq., surgeon, was in attendance at the Inquest by the Coroner's request; and gave his decided opinion that the child had died from hydrocephalus, brought on by an affection of the mesentery glands of the bowels. - Verdict, "Natural Death."

BRAUNTON - An Inquest was held this morning (Thursday) at Braunton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT NORMAN, aged 23 years, a labourer of that parish, who, on Saturday last, in going from Blakewell, in Marwood, with a load of spears to Braunton, fell from his horse into a stream of water, but was got up without having sustained any apparent injury; but on his return home at night he was taken alarmingly ill, and the surgeon was sent for, who found him labouring under an acute disease of the bladder, which he had long suffered from, but which was now aggravated by his accident, his unfortunately intoxicated condition, and his having remained several hours in his wet clothes. He continued to grow worse until Tuesday, when he died. The verdict of the Jury was, that he came to his death by the Visitation of God, but his end was accelerated by his having remained so long in his wet clothes.

Thursday 30 March 1843
BISHOPS TAWTON - Inquests held by Richard Bremridge, Esq. - On the 27th March, at Bishop's Tawton, on the body of WILLIAM DOWDLE, of Barnstaple, labourer, aged 53, who was found dead the morning preceding on the limekiln at Bishop's Tawton, belonging to Mr Vicary. Verdict, "Died from suffocation on a lime kiln." It is much to be regretted that the proprietors of lime kilns do not exclude the public from their kilns by gates and fences.

CHITTLEHAMPTON - On the 28th, at Chittlehampton, on the body of RACHEL KNILL, aged 11 years, daughter of ELIZABETH KNILL, widow. It appeared that the deceased was accidentally burnt at a neighbour's house on the 14th February, and was removed to her mother's, where Mr Joce, surgeon, attended her until her death, which occurred on the 27th. A circumstance came out in the Enquiry which justly called forth both from the Coroner and Jury a severe rebuke of the inhumanity betrayed by the mother of the deceased. It appeared that the injury she received was principally on her right side, so that she was compelled to lie on the left; and the bed being a hard dust bed, her side became a complete wound by the constant pressure, and the surgeon directed her to be removed to a feather bed which was in the room, and in which the mother slept with her paramour (a man named Joce); but although the direction was thrice repeated, the brutal mother neglected to attend to it, alleging as her excuse that the bed belonged not to her but to Joce, and that he would not allow the child be removed to it. The woman was a very abandoned character. The Coroner very sharply reproved her, and the Jury noticed her conduct in their verdict.

Thursday 6 April 1843
TRENTISHOE - Inquests by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. - On Saturday last, at Trentishoe, on the body of MR JOHN HOYLES, yeoman, of that parish, aged 76, who died suddenly the day preceding from the rupture of a blood-vessel of the heart. Verdict accordingly.

MARWOOD - On the same day, at Marwood, on the body of MR JOHN LARAMY, yeoman, aged 43, (the particulars of whose unfortunate suicide we gave last week) who died on that day. Verdict, 'Temporary Insanity.'

ILFRACOMBE - On Monday last, at Ilfracombe, on the body of GEORGE PRICE, mason, aged 67, who died suddenly the day before of apoplexy. Verdict accordingly. Deceased had attended church in the evening service, and before 11 o'clock was a corpse.

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday afternoon a fatal accident occurred to a man named COCK, public carrier between Bideford and Black Torrington. He had come to Bideford market in the morning: but his horse being weakly, he left his vehicle on the road, and got his load back conveyed to the spot by a fellow carrier: and having laden his waggon proceeded on his journey, riding in front of it; but not long after the horse and waggon were met without the driver, and going at a rapid rate; and at some distance in the road the poor fellow was found crushed and mangled shockingly, and quite dead. It is supposed that his feet had slipped from the cart, and he had fallen under the wheels. - An Inquest was held n the body next day and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 13 April 1843
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - On Monday evening last, as some children were amusing themselves on the Exe Bridge, a cart laden with lime, and drawn by two spirited horses, was passing at the time, when unfortunately a child between seven and eight years of age, son of MRS BODY, of Chevithorne, attempted to cross the road, and was knocked down by the front horse; the wheel passed over a portion of his head, the driver at the time being incapable of assisting, being in a state of intoxication. The child survived about half an hour. A Coroner's Inquest was held the following morning, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned, with a deodand of 4s. on the horses, cart, and lime.

EXETER - Death by Burning of a Lunatic Pauper in the St. Thomas Union. - An Inquest was held at the St. Thomas Union, on Friday last, on the body of MARY COURTENAY, a female lunatic, who was an inmate of the Union-house. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had managed to elude the vigilance of her keeper, and had wandered unknown to any one into an apartment, where she caught her dress on fire, and was dreadfully burnt before the flames could be extinguished. She lingered a few days, and died from the effects of the casualty the day before the Inquest was held. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 27 April 1843
Fatal Accident. - A dreadful and most appalling accident occurred on Thursday last, about half past six o'clock in the afternoon, between the towns of Chudleigh and Newton Abbot. At the Kingsteignton turnpike gate, about a mile and a half from Newton, the Plymouth mail overtook the waggon of Mr Medland, from Exeter to Torquay: the brother of the proprietor of the waggon, MR JOHN MEDLAND, was driving, sitting upon the shafts; as the vehicles came abreast of each other, a person who was sitting behind the driver of the mail, caught hold of the end of MEDLAND'S whip, which was hanging over his shoulder, and in a thoughtless moment, gave it a sudden pull; MEDLAND grasped the whip, and as the mail was going faster than the waggon, he was in a moment dragged off, and falling between the two vehicles, the hind wheel of the mail passed over his leg, which it broke, and the wheel of the waggon over his head crushing it in a most dreadful manner, and causing his death almost instantaneously. The deceased was generally respected in his occupation; he was about 26 years of age, and is unmarried. An Inquest was held at Torquay on Saturday, but the Enquiry was adjourned in consequence of the person who was the unfortunate cause of this melancholy catastrophe not being present. But as there could be neither malice nor design in the case, there can be very little question for the Jury.

LANDKEY - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday last, as a little boy named WILLIAM COURTENAY, 4 years of age, son of JOHN COURTENAY, labourer, was at play with his cousin by the side of the lime quarry of Mr Buckingham, of Hill, in the parish of Landkey, he accidentally slipped under the railings which surmount the quarry, and fell into it at a depth of sixty feet. He was found at the bottom of the pit, and instantly taken up, but he breathed only once or twice afterwards: his throat was laid open, his skull fractured, and he was otherwise greatly mangled. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday, before Henry Vallack, Esq., (in the absence of Richard Bremridge, Esq.,) and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 11 May 1843
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - Another Victim to the vice of Intemperance. WILLIAM GEORGE, a single man, nearly 40 years of age, who was in the service of Richard Bremridge, Esq., of this town, in whose family he had lived for several years, and received the greatest forbearance, having been held in estimation for his fidelity. He had unhappily contracted an unconquerable propensity for drunkenness; and when in the discharge of his duty on Saturday last, appeared in a disgraceful state of intoxication, for which he was very properly rebuked; when under the mingled influence of vexation and inebriety, he withdrew and repaired to the loft of his master's stables, where he was discovered in the afternoon of the following day, suspended from a rafter of the roof, quite dead. An Inquest was held on the body, on Monday morning before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, when the Jury found a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

BARNSTAPLE - Another Inquest was held the same day, by Alfred Drake, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM IRELAND, aged 25, which was found the preceding day lying on the beach of the river a little above the Bridge, quite dead. The deceased was an agricultural labourer, and had been in the service of Mrs Parkin, of Westacott, in the parish of Landkey; unhappily he was subject to epileptic fits, which had latterly increased upon him, and in consequence of which he was obliged to leave his place about three weeks since, and had been since living with mother in this town; but on Saturday last, believing himself better, he went to his mistress's to resume his labour, when he found that another person had been engaged to supersede him. He returned to the house of his widowed mother, about the middle of the day, and said that he should go into the country to seek for service; after which no traces appear to have been found of him till his body was discovered as before stated. It seems when he felt a fit coming on he was in the habit of running till he fell beneath its influence. Hence it is supposed that being scared with a fit whilst on his way over the Bank, he had ran and fallen in the place where his body was discovered. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

Thursday 18 May 1843
ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held in this town on Thursday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., on the body of MRS SARAH SHAPCOTT, aged 73, (whose death we announced in our last). The deceased had got up in the morning of Wednesday apparently in her usual health, and was at breakfast, when she suddenly fell from her chair in a seizure, and expired before the surgeon could reach her. Death resulted from ossification of the coronary arteries, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 25 May 1843
LANDKEY - Melancholy Death by Poison. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning last, at Bableigh, in the parish of Landkey, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury (of which Mr George Bale was foreman), on the body of MR JOHN JONES, of that place, yeoman, who had died suddenly on the Saturday preceding. The Jury having viewed the body, the evidence of the afflicted widow was taken, from which it appeared that deceased was in Barnstaple in his usual health on Friday, and returned early in the evening, and retired to bed soon after nine; in the morning he got up between five and six and went down, but came back to his bedroom shortly after and complained to his wife that his stomach was disordered; she imagined it to arise from flatulency, in which he was subject, and advised him to take a little gin; he did not do so, however; but he drank a half-pint of milk, and afterwards took a cup of tea, which his stomach rejected: about noon he came in still complaining of illness, and went to bed, and took a glass of brandy and water; his daughter came up soon after, and found him out of bed and looking dreadfully ill, and as he seemed to get no better, MRS JONES sent to Barnstaple for Dr Budd, but before his arrival deceased had expired. He had been unwell occasionally for some time past, and the impression which the nature of the evidence produced was that death resulted from apoplexy. In consequence, however, of rumours which had been in circulation, and in the absence of any decided opinion from the medical man, the Jury thought it right to require a post mortem examination to be taken, which the Coroner ordered, and Dr Budd and Mr Knox proceeded to make it; the result of which showed that the body was in a perfectly healthy state in all its vital parts except the stomach, the condition of which disclosed the melancholy fact that death had been occasioned by a large dose of some corrosive poison. On this discovery the Coroner adjourned the Inquest until Thursday (this day) at 10 o'clock, to give time to the medical men to analyse the contents of the stomach, in order to ascertain the description of the poison, as well as to make enquiries as to where it was obtained, and how or by whom it was administered. - [The Inquest had not concluded when we went to press.]

COMBMARTIN - Inquest. - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Combmartin on Tuesday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., on the body of JAMES WONNACOTT, aged two years, son of WILLIAM WONNACOTT, of that place, labourer; who the day before went outside the door of his father's cottage, and was missed by his mother, who followed him in a minute or two, and found that he had fallen head foremost into a pan of water which was placed by the wall near the door, and on running to his help the unhappy parent was shocked to find him quite dead, and all efforts to restore animation were in vain. - Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 1 June 1843
Death of MR JONES, of Bableigh. - At the adjourned Inquest on Thursday last, it was established as the result of an analysis of the contents of the stomach by Dr Budd, that the poison of which deceased died was arsenic; but not a little of evidence was forthcoming to prove by what means it was administered; and the most diligent enquiries of all the druggists in the neighbourhood led to no information of his having obtained that or any other poisonous drug from the shop of any of them; nor could the family supply the slightest intelligence on the subject. The Jury, therefore, had no alternative but, under the direction of the Coroner, to return an Open Verdict, to the effect that death was occasioned by arsenic, but how or by whom administered there was no evidence to show. - [We have been requested on this subject, by Mr Symons, of this town, druggist, to give the most explicit contradiction to a report which he says is in circulation, to the effect that deceased purchased poison at his shop.]

Thursday 15 June 1843
BRAUNTON - An Inquest was held at Braunton on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH LEWIS, daughter of a widow of that place, aged 13 years. Deceased had been in a delicate state of health, and was walking out on the morning of Saturday to go to the beach for the benefit of the air, when a few yards from her mother's a blood-vessel on the lungs ruptured, and a copious haemorrhage ensued from the effects of which she died in a few minutes. Verdict, 'Visitation of God.'

Thursday 22 June 1843
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Drowning. - On Saturday last, two respectable tradesmen of this town were coming along the beach just beyond the Pottington lime kilns, when they saw a man's clothes on the ground, and as they could observe no one in the water or in sight, they gave information of the circumstance on returning to the town, and persons went out to examine the clothes, when they were recognised (by the watch which was in the pocket) as belonging to MR WILLIAM PHILIPS, baker, who was concluded to be drowned, and a search was instituted for the body, which was picked up the next (Sunday) morning in the weir at Strand Houses. On Monday an Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, when evidence was taken as to the finding of the body in the weir and the clothes on the beach, and a verdict returned - "Found drowned, but how or by what means does not appear to the Jury." The deceased (who was in his 41st year) had carried on the business of a baker for some years. He was spending the evening before up to a very late hour at a public-house, and returned home some time in the course of the night, when words occurred between him and a member of his family, and he left again and was not seen afterwards alive. It is conjectured that he went into the water early in the morning to refresh himself, and either got beyond his depth or was seized with cramp and so drowned.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Monday morning an Inquest was held before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM SELDON, of this town, maltster, aged 57. The deceased had for a few days complained of a slight indisposition, for the removal of which he proposed taking an aperient medicine; and on Saturday, after having attended to his usual avocations, and walked out to Bickington to view his potatoe crop, in the evening he took a dose of medicine, and retired to rest, he seemed comfortably composed when his wife went to bed, and on waking about five o'clock the next morning, MRS SELDON discovered that he had left his bed, and suspecting that he had arisen to turn a floor of malt in the malthouse, she called up her son to go to him; but on with-drawing the curtain of the bed, she was alarmed by seeing her husband seated on a night commode, with his head resting against the wall; and on hastening to his assistance she found to her inexpressible grief that he was a corpse. After the examination of witnesses, and taking the opinion of a medical gentleman (to the effect that death resulted from apoplexy), the Jury returned a verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

BARNSTAPLE - Subsequently on the same day, an Inquest was held before Alfred Drake, Esq. on the body of SARAH RICHARDS, aged 72; who, on retiring to rest on Thursday evening, fell down in a fit of apoplexy, and lingered until Saturday, when she expired. She had been a faithful and much respected servant in the family of Mr Drake, for little short of 40 years; and only on Tuesday last received an appointment by the charity trustees to one of the apartments with the emoluments in Penrose's almshouse. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

NEWTON ABBOT - Fatal Accident - Just before ten at night on the 18th inst., as Messrs. Leslie and MORICE, medical students, the former a nephew of Mr Leslie, of Newton Abbot, surgeon, and the latter on a visit to the same gentleman, were returning at a rapid pace on the new road towards Newton, they met a fly and separated to let the carriage pass between them. Unfortunately, however, MR MORICE kept so close to it that the point of the shaft struck his thigh, tearing a wound about six inches in length on one side, and three on the other, thus completely penetrating the limb, which it passed through under the bone, and this with such force that the shaft was broken by the shock. This was extracted by his friend, with assistance that chanced to be at hand, and MR MORICE was taken to the 'Globe Inn,' where instant assistance was rendered by Mr Leslie, but medical skill was of no avail, for after lingering in great torture, he expired on the night of Saturday last. An Inquest was taken on the following day before Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned, with a deodand of one farthing on the horse and carriage, to the driver of which not the slightest blame is attributed, he being on the proper side of the road, and driving at a moderate pace. MR MORICE was a student at the University of Edinburgh, and with a friend, on a pleasure trip through Devonshire, when thus prematurely cut off.

Thursday 29 June 1843
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Drowning. - On Friday last, about midday, THOMAS MARTIN (a young man of 21) son of a labourer and apprentice to a shoemaker residing in Derby, in this borough, went out to enjoy a bathe in company with several other young men, at Pottington point, about half a mile from the town. He had swan across the river and was returning, when he was suddenly seen to exhibit signs of distress, and called for assistance; but his companions were at too great a distance to reach him soon enough to be of any service to him, and he unfortunately sunk to rise no more. An alarm was immediately given, and the drags obtained, but four hours elapsed before the body was recovered, when it was removed to the house of his afflicted parents, where an Inquest was held upon it before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, and the Jury after hearing the evidence returned a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning." As the deceased was an expert swimmer, it is conjectured that an attack of cramp was the cause of his death. He was to have been married in the course of a week; but his unhappy betrothed has now to exchange the bridal dress for the habiliments of woe.

BIDEFORD - Melancholy ~Accident. - On Friday last, as a girl named THORNE, aged 12 years, daughter of WILLIAM THORNE, carrier between Bideford, Barnstaple, and Torrington, was sitting by the fire, she caught her clothes in a blaze which could not be extinguished until it had inflicted injuries which led to fatal consequences. She died on the following day, when an Inquest was held before Thomas Pridham, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidentally Burnt to Death was returned. It appears that this was the result of the careless practice of allowing the poker to remain in the fire until red hot, when it falls out, as in this case, and does mischief. What adds to the calamitous nature of this circumstance is that is the third of the same family that has fallen a victim to this deadly element.

Thursday 6 July 1843
ALPHINGTON - Death by Fighting. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday last at the Admiral Vernon, Alphington, before Joseph Gribble Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN PINSON, a shoemaker of Alphington, who died from injuries received in a pitched battle for 15s. a side, fought on the 27th May last, between him and Henry Baker, a labourer of Alphington. The Jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" and the Coroner issued his warrant for the apprehension of Baker, who was taken into custody the same day, by Hele, the constable of Alphington, and lodged in the county jail to take his trial at the next assizes.

Thursday 13 July 1843
NORTH MOLTON - Inquest. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at Northmolton before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an infant son of MR SHAPLAND, yeoman, called JOHN SHAPLAND, aged two years, who on the day preceding was attacked by epileptic fits, of which he died. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

BROADWOODKELLY - Suicide. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at Broadwoodkelly, before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN PEARCE, labourer and sexton of the parish, who had committed suicide on the day preceding. Deceased had for some weeks been in a desponding state, and had made attempts at suicide previously - one of which was by essaying to throw himself off from the tower, from which he was prevented by the height of the parapet: on Thursday morning, however, during the temporary absence of his wife, while he was in bed he obtained his razor, with which he cut his throat so effectually as nearly to sever his head from his body, and on his wife's return she found him quite dead. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 20 July 1843
BISHOPS TAWTON - Fatal Accident. - A distressing occurrence transpired last evening (Wednesday) at Tawton Mills, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, two miles from this town, by which MR SAMUEL FORD, miller, aged about 40, lost his life. It appeared that the deceased was about to stop the mill, when, instead of using the implement which is provided for the purpose, it is supposed he attempted to arrest the cog-wheel with his hand, and that his shirt-sleeve was caught by the wheel, and he was dragged with it into the machinery, which presently stopped, and the painful cause was discovered. He was instantly taken out, but scarcely breathed afterwards; his right arm and his chest were frightfully mangled and crushed, and otherwise he was greatly bruised. Death must have been almost instantaneous. An Inquest was held on the body this morning before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

APPLEDORE - An aged widow named LEWIS, an old inhabitant of the place, was found dead in her bed on Tuesday morning. She had retired in apparently good health on the previous evening, and on her son's going up to call her to breakfast, he found that life was extinct. An Inquest was held on the body yesterday, before Henry Vallack, Esq., and a verdict returned of "Visitation of God."

Thursday 27 July 1843
EXETER - Death by Drowning. - On Wednesday a little boy named BAIRD, the son of a tradesman in Summerland-street, Exeter, whilst bathing in the Bonhay, got out of his depth and was drowned. An Inquest was held on the body; when the usual verdict in such melancholy cases was returned.

Coroner's Inquests. - PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at the Devon and Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, on the body of RICHARD BREALEY, a house porter, whose death was occasioned by the falling of an iron railing, at the back of Tavistock-place. It appeared from the evidence, that on the preceding Friday evening, the deceased was passing No. 17, Tavistock-street, when he saw a sailor, who, it appeared, wanted to see one of the servants, attempting to get over the courtlage wall. He asked deceased to assist him, he did so, but on the sailor's taking hold of the railing on the top of the wall, the railing gave way and fell upon the head of deceased, inflicting very severe injuries. Mr Toms, plumber, who was on the spot almost immediately after the accident, assisted deceased as much as he possibly could, and he was taken to the hospital, where he expired after some hours suffering. The sailor's name was Allen, and belonged to the 'Fisgard.' A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TOPSHAM - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday last an Inquest was held at Topsham, before James Partridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a lad named WILLIAM LITTLE, aged 15 years, who came by his death under the following circumstances. The deceased was a cabin boy, belonging to a vessel called the 'Owners Goodwill,' Capt. Western, and having occasion to draw a bucket of water from the river, was leaning over the side of the ship for that purpose, when the rail which supported him gave way, and he was precipitated into the Exe. There happened to be no one on board at the time, except two children, who were of course unable to render him any assistance. The poor lad struggled a good deal, but there was no one by who had power to help him, and although an immediate alarm was given, he sank exhausted before effectual aid could be afforded him. Every exertion was made to recover the body, but, for some time, without success. It was eventually brought to the surface by the means of a boathook, by a person named Thomas Barrett, mate of the schooner, 'Eclipse.' It had then been under the water about half an hour, and it is therefore hardly necessary to add that life was quite extinct. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

CHIVELSTONE - Fatal Accident. - On the 14th inst. an Inquest was held at Prawle, near Chivelstone, on NICHOLAS EVANS, aged 41 years. Deceased was employed in the coast-guard, and while looking through a telescope he fell down from a cliff to the beach below. Assistance was immediately rendered, but he had received such injury in his head, that he lived but a few minutes. Verdict, "Accidentally Killed."

Thursday 3 August 1843
WALKHAMPTON - A Coroner's Inquest was held at Walkhampton, on Friday last, on view of the body of a child aged about eight years, named GEORGE GRAY, who had gone with another lad, about 16 years old, to work on the moor near Sheepstor, "turfing," and after working about three hours, the elder boy very improperly left the child by the side of the turf rick to go to two men who were employed on another rick about a quarter of a mile distant. Near the child were two horses grazing, which had brought the four persons from their homes to the moor. At this time it was raining very hard - the mist was driving strongly, and was very thick. The three persons, on going to the spot where the child had been left, could find neither the child nor the horses, and imagining that the child had gone home with the horses, they made no further search, but also proceeded to their homes. On their arrival they discovered that neither child nor horses had been heard of. The father of the child and others, traversed the moor with lanterns all night, but without success. On the following day the two horses were found in the fens, but though twenty persons were on the moor the whole of Wednesday in search, the boy was not found until the Thursday morning, when he was discovered between ten and eleven o'clock, lying on his breast on the moor, on the ground, several miles from the spot where he had been at work. He lived about half an hour. The Coroner strongly animadverted on the conduct of the lad who had left the child, as well as that of the men who suffered him to be absent from the deceased so long. The parents of the child appeared in great distress. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 10 August 1843
TAVISTOCK - Suicide. - On Tuesday morning last, JOHN SECOMBE, aged 64 years, who had been for upwards of 29 years waiter at the 'Bedford Hotel,' was discovered in an out house, hung to a beam, and quite dead. The loss of his situation, and the prospect of poverty, is supposed to have been the cause of his committing the rash act. An Inquest was held in the evening, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

TAVISTOCK - On Wednesday last, a man named ROWE, whilst engaged in loading a barge at Newquay, near Tavistock, fell over the plank, and before he could be got out life was extinct. An Inquest was held on the body, when the Jury came to the decision that he fell overboard whilst in a state of intoxication, which caused his death.

Thursday 17 August 1843
TAVISTOCK - On Wednesday last, as a person named PIKE, in the employ of the Tavistock iron company, was returning from Launceston with a cart, he by some means fell under the cart, and received such severe injuries that he did on the spot. An Inquest was held the next day, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Suicide. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at Keyham Barton, near Plymouth, on view of the body of MR THOMAS WRIGHT, late a captain in the service. The deceased about three months since was afflicted with fits, accompanied with great despondency and melancholy, and at intervals he became violent and outrageous, insomuch that his friends were induced to remove him to a lunatic asylum. Accordingly he was placed under the care of Dr Langworthy, at Plympton Asylum, and subsequently, after six weeks' treatment, he was so far recovered as t be restored to his friends. On Wednesday last, he was brought to the house of his brother-in-law, Mr Elliot, of Keyham Barton, and he appeared perfectly tranquil and in the best of health. Up to Saturday night he continued without evincing any symptom of the returning malady, and retired to rest apparently well and cheerful between 10 and 11 o'clock. The following morning, about 7 o'clock, Mrs Elliot went to his room to summon him to breakfast, and the door being partly open she noticed a strangeness in the appearance of the bed, as the deceased was lying with his feet projecting over the edge of the bed and the clothes were spotted with blood. Mr Elliot was immediately called, and on his examining the bed he found deceased weltering in his blood, with his throat cut in a ghastly manner, the wound extending from ear to ear, the head being almost severed from the trunk. He was still alive and sensible, but his eyes were closed. Mr Elliot in this agonising moment exclaimed, "Good God! WRIGHT, what have you done?" when the deceased opened his eyes and faintly articulated, "I am happy," at the same moment motioning his hand in sign to be assisted to some water. On its being given him, he sipped it twice, but the fluid escaped from the wind pipe and fell on the bed. Medical aid was promptly in attendance but in vain. After an investigation which lasted some hours, the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

ASHBURTON - Horrible Murder. - This town has been thrown into the greatest consternation by the discovery, on Friday last, of a most horrid murder. About one o'clock in the afternoon of Friday, as a boy was picking ferns in a field near the Denbury or Broadhempston-road, about a quarter of a mile from the town, he saw the clothes of a female under some broil or hedge cuttings, with a basket on the top of it. He immediately ran into the town to get some one to go and see what it was, and having got two men, named Harris and Morrish, they went to the field, and found it was a woman, who had been killed, and covered with two faggots of broil; the body was in the hedge drain, at the corner of the field. Being the only persons on the spot, they did not remove anything, but informed the authorities of it. The overseer, and Mr Hele, a medical gentleman, with a great number of people, proceeded to the spot, and, on removing the broil and basket, a shocking sight presented itself. The body of a female was lying on its face, the bonnet being off. The head appeared in a dreadful state, a great quantity of blood entangling the cap and hair. She was quite dead and stiff, and on taking her out of the drain, a thrill of horror ran through the people present, about 25 or 30, who had arrived first on the place. On examining her, the head was found terribly mutilated, and a large wound on the right side of the head above the ear; another severe one on the forehead, fracturing the skull, and a heavy blow near the left ear. The eyes were swollen close with blows, and the face was otherwise shockingly mutilated. Her right hand and arm were dreadfully bruised, and the hands clenched, as if defending herself from her assailant. A man, named Harding, immediately recognized her, as being REBECCA TOOLEY, of Totnes, who was here on the fair day (Thursday, the 10th inst.). The body was taken to the 'Old Bottle Inn House,' Lawrence's-lane, where the surgeons examined it, and found, in addition to the above dreadful wounds, that the whole of the ribs, on the left side, were broken in, as if she had been jumped on by a heavy person; altogether, a more savage murder was never heard of. The deceased was of small stature, and attended fairs, selling nuts, &c. Her basket contained her nut bag, but no nuts. Her bonnet was under her, and a large quantity of blood was under her face. An Enquiry was opened in the evening, at the 'London Inn,' by John Caunter, Esq., a magistrate, in the absence of the Coroner, and a great deal of evidence was procured, as to who she was, and where seen last. On Saturday, Joseph Gribble, Esq., Coroner, opened the Inquest at the 'London Inn,' before a highly respectable Jury, Thomas White, Esq., Pear Tree House, foreman. The Inquiry was adjourned to Monday, and as yet nothing more than the most vague suspicion, as to the perpetrators of this horrid deed, has transpired. She was seen with horse jockeys in the evening, at this end of the town; but it would be premature to state anything further, until the investigation has closed, which does not appear at present likely to be for some days. This melancholy event has thrown this town and neighbourhood into great confusion, every person seeming anxious that the diabolical villains may be speedily discovered.

GOODLEIGH - Inquests before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner:- On Saturday last, at Goodleigh, on the body of SAMUEL ACLAND, labourer, aged 80, who had gone to rest as well as usual on the night of the 11th, and having occasion to get out of bed at about midnight, he fell on the floor and died instantly. The medical man gave his opinion that death resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

CROYDE - Also, on Saturday last, at Croyde, on the body of WILLIAM RICHARDS, mariner, whose death by an accidental upsetting of the boat of the 'William and Mary' we reported in our last; and on the following Monday an Inquest was held on the body of JOHN COUSENS, mariner, who was RICHARDS'S companion on the unfortunate occasion and shared his fate: the body of the former was washed on shore on the 12th, and that of COUSENS on the 13th. The verdict in each case was "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 September 1843
TORQUAY - Fatal Accident. - On Sunday morning, two youths went out to bathe, from a boat, off Tor Abby, when one of them named PARISH, about 19 years old, was unfortunately drowned. The body was soon recovered and conveyed to the 'Crown and Anchor Inn,' where it awaits a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday 14 September 1843
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Drowning. - A case of accidental death by drowning occurred in this town on Tuesday last, to WILLIAM VICARY, 13 years of age, son of RICHARD VICARY, formerly landlord of the 'Theatre Inn.' The deceased, with several companions, went out at the dinner-hour to bathe just at the back of Litchdon, between the two lime kilns: the tide was out, and he had not gone far into the river when he stepped into a deep pit, and being unable to swim he felt himself sinking and called out for help, but his companions could not assist him, for they were little fellows, like himself, and only one of them able to swim. An alarm was made, and a young man named Hares came quickly to the spot, and dived and brought up the deceased, who had been in the water something less than a quarter of an hour. He was instantly taken to the Infirmary, and the most persevering means were employed to restore animation, but without success. An Inquest was held on the body in the evening, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death." This case confirms for the present year the remark which is almost proverbial in this town, that somebody is drowned above the bridge just before every annual fair day.

Accidental Deaths. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Kentisbury, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY HARDING, aged 50, wife of a labourer, who on the Thursday before was at work in the harvest-field, and standing on a cart laden with oats, when the cart suddenly moved on, and she lost her balance and fell to the ground, by which her spine was dislocated. She was taken home, and surgical assistance obtained; but the injury was mortal, and she died the following Saturday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, before James Partridge, Esq., Coroner, at Wonford, in the parish of Heavitree, on the body of WILLIAM HENRY PRING, a boy of two years old, who had been unfortunately killed on the Wednesday preceding, under the following distressing circumstances:- A boy, in the service of Mr Havill, butcher, had harnessed a horse, which had been borrowed for the occasion, to his master's cart, which was standing at the time in a linhay, by the side of the road. He had got into the cart, and taken hold of the reins, for the purpose of driving off, when the horse, on which unfortunately no blinkers had been put, from some cause or other, suddenly started off, darted across the road to where the deceased was playing with several other children and before the poor little fellow could get out of the way, he was knocked down, and killed on the spot. It was proved that the horse was not accustomed to blinkers, even when driven in a cart, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 5s. on the horse.

Thursday 21 September 1843
COMBMARTIN - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last at Combmartin, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN LOVERING, aged 23 years, who was at work in the mines the day before, and in the act of hauling out a lot of rubble, when a stone fell out of the kibble upon his head and fractured his skull so as to occasion his death in a few minutes. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

MARIANSLEIGH - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was also held before Mr Bremridge, at Mariansleigh, on Saturday last, on the body of MARY RICE, 11 years of age, daughter of a labourer, and apprentice to Farmer Cockram, of that parish, who was alone in her master's house on the 6th instant, and attending to her culinary duties, when her clothes took fire, and she was so severely burnt before assistance reached her that after lingering in much suffering for ten days she died from the effects of the accident. Verdict accordingly.

BURRINGTON - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday the 20th at Burrington, before Mr Bremridge, on the body of ELIAS MILLS, aged 51 years, a small farmer of that parish, who destroyed himself on the Monday preceding. The deceased was a hard-working and honest man, married and having a family of 10 children, two or three of whom as well as his wife had lately been ill, which, with other circumstances of an afflictive nature, appeared to have preyed on his mind, and induced despondency, which many of his neighbours had observed, but which was not so alarming as to suggest to his family the necessity of imposing any restraint upon him. On Monday morning he went to a neighbour's to borrow a gun, with which he was afterwards seen near a barn on his farm: he was missed for some hours, and his son went in search of him, and in the barn found him weltering in his blood and quite dead, the gun having fallen between his legs. He must have put the muzzle in his mouth and pulled the trigger with a crooked stick which lay by his side; his scalp was perforated but not greatly shattered, and death must have been instantaneous. Evidence of his low desponding state of mind was adduced, which satisfied the Coroner and Jury of the Temporary Insanity of the deceased, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 28 September 1843
PAIGNTON - Man Drowned. - As a young gentleman named HENRY BELLOWS, 21 years of age, was bathing on our coast on Friday last he met his death under the following circumstances:- It appears that he went on the sands with another person named Richard Compton, to bathe, and before the deceased had been in the water long he got out of his depth, and being unable to swim he sank, and before assistance came, the vital spark had fled. An Inquest was held by John Gribble, Esq., of Ashburton, and a verdict of 'Accidentally Drowned' returned.

SIDBURY - An Inquest was held on the 22nd inst., before Mr Aberdein, Coroner, on the body of SUSANNA ANNING, aged 83 years, the wife of MR JAMES ANNING, of Sidbury, yeoman, whose death was caused by the injuries she received from a fall on the 11th inst. It appeared that the deceased's son, GEORGE WHITELOCK ANNING, an idiot, between 30 and 40 years of age, always lived with his father and mother, and was generally kept chained to a settle by day, and to his bed by night. That the deceased was in the habit of letting him loose when they were by themselves, which she had unfortunately done on the occasion of this accident. That after dinner on the day in question, the deceased handed her son her pocket handkerchief to wipe his face, which he threw down on the floor, and after picking it up she was going across the kitchen to sit down in the window seat, when he came behind her, and putting his hands on her shoulders pushed her down. The deceased having raised an alarm, two men, who were working in the court yard adjoining, ran to her assistance, and on coming into the kitchen they saw the deceased on her knees on the floor, and no other person in the kitchen but her son (the idiot): they helped her up, and the deceased did not appear much hurt, but said her right thigh was a little strained, and in consequence of the deceased's side becoming more painful she was put to bed, which she continued to keep and in the course of a few days, not getting better, medical assistance was procured, and every attendance given her up to the time of her death. It was stated that the idiot was generally harmless, although at times mischievous, but never known to use violence to any person. His mother was very fond of him, and had constantly the charge of him and he was very fond of his mother. The deceased stated during her illness at different times, that her son did not intend to hurt her. After a full examination of several witnesses, the Jury upon the evidence produced before them, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 5 October 1843
HOCKWORTHY - Alleged Murder - A man named ISAAC COLLARD, a small farmer residing in the parish of Hockworthy, has been lodged in our county gaol on a charge of murdering his wife. The prisoner was committed by the Coroner, Mr Partridge, in consequence of a verdict of "Wilful Murder" having been returned by a Coroner's Jury. He was brought to the prison in custody of the constable, on Thursday night last; but the offence is alleged to have been committed on the Monday preceding. The death was occasioned, as far as we have been able to learn, by his having thrown the unfortunate woman over the stairs, while in a fit of intoxication. COLLARD is 51 years of age and has ten children, the youngest of whom is just 20 months old.

Thursday 12 October 1843
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the 'Rolle Arms,' on Rolle's-quay, adjoining this town, on the body of GEORGE DALLING, aged 17, son of MR THOMAS DALLING, master mariner, whose accidental death by drowning we reported the week before last. The body was washed on shore at Pottington on Monday afternoon, and removed to the father's house at Derby, which, being within the borough, the County Coroner (to whom the Inquest belonged) could not hold the Inquisition there, and it was accordingly removed to Rolle's-quay. The body was in a very decomposed state. Evidence of the finding was given and a verdict of "Found Drowned" returned.

SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - On Friday last, MR WILLIAM NUTT, woolcomber and baker, who had just assisted the corpse of Mrs Willmetts to the grave, and was still on the ground while the minister was proceeding with the burial service, was suddenly seized and expired in a few seconds. An Inquest was held on the body the same evening by James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, and a verdict accordingly returned. The deceased was an old and very worthy member of the Wesleyan Society, having been one of the earliest converts to Methodism in that town, and sustained the office of class-leader for 34 years. His death is lamented by a large circle, to whom his pious and consistent demeanour will ever endear his memory.

OTTERY ST. MARY - An Inquest was held on the 5th inst., before Mr Aberdein, Coroner, on the body of JOHN BAILEY, lately residing at Bow, near Crediton, who was found dead in the river Otter, near Gosford-bridge, in the parish of Ottery St. Mary. As reports were in circulation that the deceased had come to his death by violence, which reports were strengthened by the fact of no money being found on him, and the pockets of his trowsers being turned inside out, when the body was taken out of the water; and as it was alleged there were bruises of a recent date on his arms and hand, and on the back of his neck; some interest was excited. On examining, it appeared some wearing apparel and other articles were found in the road, not in a bundle, but scattered here and there over a space of about twenty or thirty feet. There were no foot-steps as if any struggle had taken place, but the clothes were very near the spot at which the body was shortly afterwards found. The deceased was in the habit of carrying his dirty clothes with him in his pockets, and his pulling out the articles which were found in the road accounts for his pockets being turned inside out. The body was identified by WILLIAM BAILEY, of Exmouth, as being that of his father; he stated the age of deceased to be from 48 to 50 years, and said he had for many years travelled the country repairing pianos and organs. The mistress of the public-house at Alphington also identified the body, as that of a person who slept at her house on the previous nights of Saturday, Sunday and Monday and who at that time appeared destitute of money, not even paying for his bed. The landlord of the 'Fair Mile' Inn also swore to it, as the body of a man who left his house on the Tuesday night, between nine and ten o'clock, and who appeared almost destitute of money, and very low in spirits. The body was examined by a medical gentleman, who stated the bruises on the arms and hand of the deceased not to be of recent date, and only mere skin bruises: the appearance on the back of the neck was not a bruise, but arose from extravasated blood: there had been evidently no struggle in dying the hands being open and extended, and, in his opinion, the death of the deceased was caused by drowning. The Jury after a lengthened investigation, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 26 October 1843
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - On Monday an Inquest took place at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' Exeter, on the body of WILLIAM HOWE, the circumstances attending whose death, as detailed in the evidence, were as follows:- the deceased, who was a very muscular, tall, and strong-built man, resided at Cullompton, and on Friday evening came in to Exeter market. He left at an early hour in the morning, and at twenty minutes after eight was seen walking homewards a short distance from a place known as Pinn Hill: at this time he rambled a great deal, and appeared very tipsy. About three miles from Exeter he was overtaken by the 'Quicksilver' mail, which was then going down Pinn Hill. The night was very dark, but the coachman, just before the horses were upon the man, saw him, and called out for him to get out of the way, which he could have done had he been sober. Directly he saw him he pulled the horses on one side, and the deceased must have been knocked down by the horse or by the bar. He pulled up within fifteen yards of the place; but the deceased was found dead. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Distressing Case of Suicide. - On Friday last, a man named HOOPER, employed as messenger at the Devonport conservative reading room, and a navy pensioner, committed suicide in a most deliberate manner by taking arsenic. It appeared from the evidence that the unfortunate man had been in rather a desponding state for a short time previous. An Inquest was held on his remains on Saturday, by Mr Bone, and a verdict returned of Insanity.

TORRINGTON - An Inquest was held on Sunday last, by Henry Vallack, Esq., Coroner on the body of a woman, named CANN, aged 75, who had come from Barnstaple on the previous day on a visit to her daughter; but on the morning of that day she was taken suddenly ill, and expired shortly after. Verdict "Visitation of God."

Thursday 2 November 1843
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZA WATTS, daughter of WILLIAM WATTS, joiner, of Derby, in this town. It appeared that the deceased was taken ill on Friday last; her paroxysms of pain were so violent that she told her mother she thought she was dying, and urged her to send for medical assistance: the mother, however, considering that her illness would pass off, neglected to call in professional aid until Saturday, when the deceased getting no better but rather growing worse, she sent for Dr Bignell, who declined to come, and on again being sent to, with the assurance that he should be paid his fee, he still refused to attend; and Mr Cooke was then sent for who came immediately, but before he had been in the house two minutes the girl died. Mr Cooke was examined at the Inquest, and gave evidence that he considered from the symptoms that death had resulted from inflammation in the bowels, and that if immediate relief had been applied, life might possibly have been saved. The Jury expressed much indignation at the inhuman conduct of the mother in so long delaying to send for a surgeon after the deceased had so earnestly desired it, and returned a verdict of "Visitation of God," with a request that the Coroner would express his decided disapprobation and censure of the conduct of the mother of the deceased and of Dr Bignell. [We learn that Dr Bignell (whose kindness to the poor in his constant attendance at the Dispensary is too well known to need remark) had just come a long journey and was unable to go out when sent for, and referred the person who came to him to another medical man in the street.]

FREMINGTON - An Inquest was held at Fremington yesterday (Wednesday) before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES SLADER, aged 15, parish apprentice to Farmer Isaac Start of Collacott, in that parish. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was taken ill on Friday last, and was confined to the house until the night of Monday, when he died, no medical man having been called in, or any medicine administered except a little balm tea. In consequence of a very strange appearance which the upper part of the person assumed soon after death, a post mortem examination was taken; the result of which was to prove that deceased died from inflammation of the lungs. The Coroner severely censured the master for his great neglect in permitting his apprentice to sicken and die without calling in professional aid. The Jury found a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 9 November 1843
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday evening last, at Derby, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH CHAPPELL, single woman, aged 25; and from a report having been prevalent that the deceased had died from the ignorant and neglectful manner in which she had been treated by the midwife who attended her in her recent confinement, considerable excitement prevailed amongst the neighbours as to the result o the Enquiry. It appeared on the examination that the deceased had been confined in the early part of last month, and that a woman called Mary Priscott was sent for by her sister to attend her, who stayed with her for a few hours after the birth of her child, and then left her without having previously rendered some of the most essential assistance requisite on such an occasion; and although she stated it as her opinion that deceased was in a very exhausted and delicate state when she left her, she did not return to see her for four days, when she found her very ill and in rather a precarious state; she then prescribed some medicine for her, which, however, had not the desired effect. From the evidence of one of the witnesses, it appeared that the deceased had not herself the slightest confidence in Priscott's skill as a midwife, but from her wish to keep the subject of her confinement as private as possible, she did not object to have her, on her sister's representation; and that in her confinement she had expressed herself in strong terms against the treatment she had received from the midwife, and on more than one occasion remarked that her treatment would certainly be the cause of her death. The Coroner directed a post mortem examination of the body to be made, but from the length of time which had elapsed since the death of the deceased (which had taken place on the previous Friday morning) the medical gentleman was unable to state with sufficient certainty the immediate cause of death, although he entertained no doubt in his own mind that death had been caused by maltreatment and neglect during and subsequently to her confinement. Under these circumstances, the Jury returned a verdict 'That the deceased had died from the Effects of a Difficult Birth and Hard Labour.' and strongly condemned the conduct of the midwife. After the Jury had delivered their verdict, the Coroner directed Mary Priscott t be called into the room, and he then told her that although the evidence before the Inquest had not been sufficiently strong to implicate her criminally, still she had had a narrow escape from being committed to gaol on a charge of manslaughter: he warned her to be careful how she trifled with the lives both of mothers and their offspring, or he might possibly consider it his duty on some future occasion to have her dealt with in rather a severe manner. The result of this Inquest affords another proof of the necessity which exists of early information being given the Coroner of any deaths occurring out of ordinary course; as had proper information been given in the above case, the verdict of the Jury might have been different from what it was.

BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at Marwood, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., on the body of JOHN LEY, of Pilton, in this borough, patten-maker, aged 26, who was at work in Hartnoll wood, in the parish of Marwood, on Saturday, with a man who was helping him to remove some timber he had bought for use in his business from the wood to the turnpike road, when he fell down under a heavy stick which he was carrying on his back up a hill. It was first supposed that death had resulted from accident; but from the opinion of Dr Bignell, who had before attended the deceased in a seizure, and as there were no marks of injury on the body, the Jury found a verdict of "Visitation of God."

BRATTON FLEMING - An Inquest was held at Bratton Fleming on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM SAUNDERS, aged two years, son of a labouring man of that parish, who had died suddenly the day preceding. It appeared that the child was seized with alarming illness, and died in a few minutes apparently from suffocation. The opinion of the medical man who examined the body was that death resulted from croup, to which effect the Jury returned their verdict.

EXETER - An adjourned Inquest was held on Wednesday, at the 'Ring of Bells Inn,' in West-street, Exeter, on the body of a male infant, which had been born on the previous Saturday, and had died on Monday, the mother being a young unmarried woman named JOHANNA GOSWELL, living on Quay-hill. The Inquest had been adjourned for the purpose of enabling Mr Kempe, the medical attendant called in to attend the mother, after labour, to make a post mortem examination of the body, which presented a very livid and unusual appearance:- this, however, was accounted for by the mother, as being the result of a fit suffered previous to death; this the nurse denied, but stated that the child was born with every appearance to indicate that it would be very short-lived. It was evident that no preparations had been made previous to the birth for the reception or welfare of the child. Mr Kempe stated that he had examined the body attentively, and was satisfied that the appearances which had caused so much suspicion might have arisen from natural causes. A feeling was general among the Jury that very great inattention had been shown to the comforts of the deceased, by which probably its death had been hastened. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

SOUTHMOLTON - Infanticide. - On Friday last an Inquisition was taken by James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for Southmolton, on view of the body of a newly-born child, belonging to JANE SHAPCOTT, a widow residing in Northmolton, on whom suspicion fell of having been clandestinely delivered. Mr Ley, surgeon and apothecary of Northmolton, was called upon to examine her, who gave it as his opinion that she had recently given birth to a child. On her premises being searched she confessed, and also informed the constable who had her in custody where she had deposited the body. He accompanied her to a wood called Mackland's-wood, in this parish, where it was found. The Jury having viewed the body (which had several marks of violence about the neck and face) and heard the evidence of Mr Ley, shortly returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against JANE SHAPCOTT, who was committed to Exeter Gaol, there to await her trial at the next assizes.

Thursday 16 November 1843
DAWLISH - On Sunday, at the Mills in this town, a boy named STONEMAN, connected with the establishment, fell between the wheel and wall, which jammed him so completely, that he could not be extricated until part of the wheel was sawn off by those whom his shrieks called to his assistance; but he died in a few minutes after. An Inquest was held on Monday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 23 November 1843
KENTISBURY - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Kentisbury, on the body of MARY DENDLE, a widow woman, of that place, aged 79 years, who was walking on the highway on the 7th inst., when a cart happened to be passing just at the moment the deceased was attempting to cross the road; the boy who was driving called out to her, but being extremely deaf she did not hear, and the wheel came in contact with her, threw her down, and passed over her left leg, which it fractured. Deceased was taken home and surgical aid was called in; but mortification intervened and death ensued on the 17th. There was not the slightest blame attributable to the boy. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

TRENTISHOE - On the same day at Trentishoe, on the body of JAMES MOORE, an infant about five months old, son of a labourer of that parish, who was left by his mother in the kitchen near the fire on the 27th ultimo, while she was absent for a short time, and although she took the precaution to tie the child by a cord to the chair, it is supposed that an elder child who was in the room must have untied the cord, for on the mother's return she found the infant lying on the hearth with its face dreadfully burnt. The little sufferer lingered until Friday last, when death relieved it. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

NORTHMOLTON - Accidental Death of a Mother and her Infant Child. - On Saturday last, a most distressing calamity occurred to ELIZABETH, the wife of MR PETER STONEMAN, of Northmolton, woolcomber, aged 29, and ROBERT, their infant son, aged 11 months, who were both killed by the accidental overturning of a cart. It appeared by the evidence adduced on the Inquest (which was held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the following Monday), that MRS STONEMAN left her husband's house about two o'clock on Saturday in a light cart, drawn by a horse which she had been in the habit of using, and was on her way to visit some friends at Barnstaple, having taken her child with her, when a few minutes after she had left the head of the town, intelligence was brought by a person who was passing that a cart had upset in the road a quarter of a mile from Northmolton, the horse was on back kicking, and a woman lying with her neck under the edge of the cart. Assistance went immediately to the spot, and found the unfortunate deceased as described, and having extricated the horse, lifted the cart, and released the deceased, who was lying on her side quite dead; the child was folded in its mother's arms and covered with her cloak, and as the persons who first came up did not know that the child was with his mother in the cart, they made no search for its body until a person came who knew the fact, when the cloak of the mother was thrown open, and the infant found under it quite dead. It appeared that the horse was pastured in a field on the road, and there is no doubt that in passing by it, the animal attempted to turn up to the gate as usual, and overset the cart, and produced the melancholy calamity above recorded. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death" with regard to the mother, and "Died by Suffocation" as to the child. The deceased was a respectable woman and generally esteemed; and the shock to her husband, who is thus so suddenly bereaved of his wife and child, cannot be described.

Thursday 30 November 1843
BISHOPS TAWTON - Death from Neglect of a Midwife. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at Cuckold's-lane, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy-Coroner, on view of the body of ANNE GUARD, aged 34, wife of a mason of that place, whose death had occurred the preceding Saturday under the following painful and disgraceful circumstances. Deceased was confined on Friday morning, and after a very favourable labour gave birth to a male child: during her confinement she was attended by her mother, who appears to have been in the habit of acting as midwife, but how incompetent she was to the responsible duty the fatal issue proved. Deceased went on well for a few hours, when an alarming effusion of blood came on, upon which an express was sent to Mr Joce, of Kerscott, surgeon, who came as quickly as possible, and found the patient in a very exhausted state: he at once suggested that an obvious and most important part of the midwife's duty (the removal of the placenta) had been omitted, but such was the extreme debility of the deceased, that he could not attempt the necessary operation immediately without certain death to her, and consequently he arrested the effusion of blood and ordered stimulants, which, however, did not succeed in rallying the deceased, and on visiting her again in the evening, he found her case hopeless, and she died the next morning - a victim to the neglect of an incompetent pretender. The Jury found a verdict that death arose from effusion, occasioned by a want of necessary attention to the deceased; and the Coroner most properly admonished the mother of the extreme impropriety of her conduct, pointed out to her that, however unintentionally, she had been the unquestionable cause of her daughter's death, by attempting to discharge an important service in the most critical juncture of a woman's life, for which she was entirely unfitted: and told her that in the event of such an occurrence again transpiring, he should feel it his duty to order her for trial on a charge of manslaughter. The practice too commonly resorted to in the country, especially by the lower orders, of employing irregular practitioners on such occasions, when the utmost skill of the profession is sometimes unhappily insufficient to reserve life, cannot be too loudly condemned and exploded.

ATHERINGTON - An Inquest was also held on Wednesday (yesterday) at Atherington, before Mr Toller, on the body of JOHN BROWN, a labourer, aged 51, who was going to his breakfast on the morning of Friday last, when he was seized suddenly in his head; he was removed to bed, and Mr Jones, surgeon, of Highbickington, was sent for, who attended him most assiduously until the following Tuesday, when he died, having never spoken or been sensible after he was first taken. - Verdict, "Visitation of God by Apoplexy."

ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held at Ilfracombe yesterday (Wednesday), before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD CROSSCOMBE, of that place, tailor, aged 72, who had slept in his house alone (his son having left him for Southmolton the night before), and not coming down to open his shutters in the morning, a neighbour went in by a ladder and found the deceased dead in his bed. - Verdict, "Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - We regret to state that MR SAMUEL WILLIAMS, solicitor, of Plymouth, was taken suddenly ill at his residence, Boons' Place, on Sunday morning last, while in bed: and though medical assistance was immediately obtained, he died in a few hours. An Inquest was held on his body, by Mr Elliot, Deputy Coroner, and a verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 7 December 1843
NORTH MOLTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, in the parish of Northmolton, on the body of PHILIP COLWILL, aged 56, a farm labourer, who was seized while at dinner the day before, conveyed home speechless, and died in the evening. - Verdict, "Apoplexy."

NORTH MOLTON - On the following Saturday (the 2nd instant) also, in the parish of Northmolton, on the body of ELIZABETH TIDBOALD, aged 25, who was living with her sister at Buttery in that parish, and on the 29th November complained that she was ill, and thought herself dying, and in five minutes expired. A post mortem examination established that death resulted from enlargement of the heart, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

CHITTLEHAMPTON - Suicide. - An Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on Friday last, at the house of John Jenkins, in the parish of Chittlehampton, on the body of HENRY WRENTMORE, aged 52, who was sojourning at the public-house of Jenkins, and on the day before (Thursday) was found hanging by his cravat at the post of his bed. Deceased had evinced symptoms of mental derangement, but not sufficiently decisive to induce the landlord to watch him, or place him under restraint. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity." Deceased was a pensioner, and of respectable parentage and connexions.

BRAUNTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held this day (Thursday) before Richard Bremridge, Esq., at Park, in the parish of Braunton, on the body of MR ROBERT CHICHESTER, yeoman, aged 32, whose death occurred yesterday by a lamentable accident. Deceased rented the weir at Fremington, and was going out to draw it soon after noon, when instead of riding round the weir by the usual and safer route, he took a nearer way, and unhappily got into deep water, where the horse plunged violently and, it is presumed, threw his rider, who sank to rise o more. The accident was observed, and parties went immediately to lend assistance, and in dragging a pit of 13 feet deep the body was taken up, one hand having the net firmly clenched within it. Attempts were made to restore animation, but without effect. Deceased was generally esteemed as a respectable and kind-hearted man, and his premature death will be deeply deplored.

MEETH - A Serious Affray. - On Saturday night last a dispute arose between some young men, who were drinking at a public-house, in the village of Meeth, near Hatherleigh; blows at length ensued, and MR JOHN REED, the landlord, interfering, was struck several times by John Vanstone, a young man of the same village. MR REED expired on the following morning, and the young man was taken into custody. On Monday last a Coroner's Inquest was held on MR REED, who is an elderly person, and very much respected in this neighbourhood. A post mortem examination of the head was made by William Risdon, Esq., Medical practitioner at Dolton, who gave his evidence that the deceased came to his death from a contused wound, received in the back part of the head; that deceased had also several external marks on the forehead, arm, and thighs. The investigation occupied upwards of six hours, when every means used to elicit the truth failed, by the vague and contradictory evidence given. The Coroner, Mr Vallack, in his address to the Jury, observed, he had never in any court before heard so much perjury, and was sorry the evidence given would not warrant a verdict it deserved: he would wish to remind the gentlemen of the Jury that if they knew of any evidence which ought to be brought forward, or if any future evidence should be obtained, they were in duty bound to notice it, and he should not forget his duty. He would, therefore, suggest to them a verdict that deceased died from a mortal wound, received in the back part of the head, but how or by what means there was not sufficient evidence to prove - which verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 14 December 1843
EXETER - Death from Excessive Drinking. - An Inquest was held on Thursday evening at the 'Golden Eagle Inn,' in Bartholomew-street, Exeter, on the body of MARY ANN VENTON, aged 35 years, who had died on the preceding evening, under appalling circumstances, having been found in a ginshop at the corner of Friernhay-street, lying on a chair, in a state of great intoxication, with three little children standing by her crying, and being carried to her home, where she shortly afterwards died. The Jury returned a verdict - "Died of Apoplexy, hastened by excessive drinking."

BRAUNTON - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Braunton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT DUMMETT, aged 70 (father of the well-known postman of that name,) who had committed suicide by hanging himself with a halter from an apple tree in the orchard of Farmer John Hunt, the day before. Evidence was adduced to prove that deceased had laboured under great depression of spirits for some time, and on that account his sister had come to live with and take care of him: but as he appeared better than usual on Sunday morning, and urged his sister to go to a place of worship, she went: but it appeared that soon after she left, he watched an opportunity to go into a stable adjoining, and take a halter, with which he committed the fatal act, and was found on his sister's return suspended as above described. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

BERRYNARBOR - An Inquest was also held on Wednesday (yesterday) before Richard Bremridge Esq., at Berrynarbor village, on the body of WILLIAM LEWORTHY, aged 7 years, son of a blacksmith of that place, whose death was occasioned by an explosion of gunpowder under the following circumstances. The day before two miners called at LEWORTHY'S house, and asked permission to leave their hors of powder, which was granted, and they were deposited in a place in the kitchen, which the deceased observed, and took an opportunity soon after to take out some of the powder, which he put in his pockets, and which by his lighting a touch paper accidentally became ignited, and exploded with so much violence as to force out the window. The father hearing the noise was alarmed, and ran from his shop to the house, and met the deceased at the door with his clothes and the lower part of his person all a body of fire. Instant assistance was given, but the poor little fellow was so dreadfully burnt in the abdomen, that his death resulted in 12 or 14 hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

WESTDOWN - Sudden Death. - A case of sudden death happened at three o'clock this morning at Westdown, to SUSANNAH TUCKER, aged 60, wife of MR RICHARD TUCKER, of Southdean, in that parish, yeoman: who went to bed as well as usual last evening, but her husband was awoke this morning at the hour named by hearing her sigh heavily, and just as soon as he could get out of bed to strike a light, she breathed her last. The Coroner has proceeded to hold an Inquest on the body.

FREMINGTON - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Fremington, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ALICE DAVEY, widow, aged 73, who had been out at a friend's house the Tuesday before, and was seized with sudden illness, and conveyed home, where she lay speechless until Saturday, when she died. Verdict, "Apoplexy."

MOLLAND - An Inquest was held on Wednesday (yesterday) at Molland, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of EMILY DART, an infant of a month old, daughter of a blacksmith of that place, whom her parents found dead in bed on their getting up on Tuesday morning. The opinion of the surgeon who was called in was that she had died from convulsions; and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 21 December 1843
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on Saturday last, on the body of ELIZABETH POOLE, aged 77, an inmate of one of the Back-lane almshouses, who was severely burnt by her clothes taking fire on the 5th inst., from the effects of which and the fright attending it, she died on the 12th. Verdict accordingly.

SWIMBRIDGE - Another Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Monday last, at Swymbridge, on the body of FANNY ANNE NOTT, aged six years, daughter of MR THOMAS NOTT, farmer, of that parish, whose clothes caught fire in the kitchen of her father's house on the 6th, from the effects of which she lingered until the 16th, when she expired. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - On Tuesday an Inquest was held at 'Valiant Solder' Inn, in Exeter, on the body of JOHN MELDON, a servant in the employ of Mr Melhuish, of Cheriton Fitzpaine, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on the previous day. From the evidence it appeared that on last Friday evening he went from his master's house to drive home the cows and the bull. He was found shortly afterwards leaning against a hedge; and on being questioned, he said he had been tossed by the bull. His face was covered with mud and blood, and he was then conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he continued in an insensible state until death relieved him from his sufferings: a concussion of the brain was considered to be the immediate cause of death. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

STONEHOUSE - An Inquest was held at the 'Lord High Admiral,' Stonehouse, on Wednesday and Thursday last, on the body of a child named SKINNER, who was suspected to have accidentally poisoned itself by sucking lucifer matches. The mother stated that he attention was first drawn to the case by smelling the breath of her child, which was two years and a half old, of phosphorous, or rather of lucifer matches; subsequently on searching she found several matches about the bed. Mr Sheppard, surgeon, gave evidence that he had opened the body of the child, and could state positively that the child had died from the effects of sucking lucifer matches, which had produced inflammation of the stomach, and subsequently death. Verdict - "Died from taking lucifer matches."

Thursday 28 December 1843
NORTH MOLTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at Northmolton on Christmas-day, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ESTHER LEWORTHY, of that parish, aged 65, who was seized with sudden illness on the preceding Saturday, while out at her work, and was taken home, and medical aid sent for, but it was unavailing: she lay insensible about four hours, when she died. Verdict - "Death by Apoplexy."

BISHOPS NYMPTON - An Inquest was also held at Bishopsnympton, on Wednesday (yesterday), before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of JOHN SHAPCOTT, aged 71, a labourer of that parish, who was coming down stairs the day before rather late in the forenoon, (having lain in bed later than usual, complaining that he was unwell,) when the woman of the house heard a noise in the stairs, and on going up found the deceased lying insensible: she called assistance, and removed him to bed, where he lay three or four minutes, groaned once or twice, and expired. A medical man gave his opinion that death resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 11 January 1844
ALVERDISCOTT - Inquests:- On Saturday last an Inquest was held at Alverdiscott, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN THORNE, labourer, aged 70, who was out at work for Mr Alford the day before, and a boy who happened to be passing in the middle of the day found him very ill, and went for assistance, and he was taken home and put to bed, where he lay till an early hour next morning, when he died. It was the opinion of the medical man whom the Coroner called in, that death resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

NORTH MOLTON - An Inquest was also holden on Tuesday at Northmolton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., on a child named GRACE BENDLE, two years of age, daughter of THOMAS BENDLE, whose death happened by her putting the spout of the teakettle of boiling water in her mouth, by which she was shockingly scalded, and lingered till Friday last, when death relieved her from further suffering. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 February 1844
TAVISTOCK - On Friday a little child called MALLETT, was burnt to death in this town. It appears that there were three children of the same family left playing together, and in the absence of the parents, by some means the clothes took fire, and before assistance came death had closed her sufferings. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday 8 February 1844
BERRYNARBOR - An Inquest was held on Tuesday at Berrynarbor, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN RICHARDS, aged 4 years, son of a labourer of that parish, whose death was occasioned by his clothes catching fire while he was at school the day before. The poor little fellow, upon the occurrence of the accident, ran out into the road for assistance; but before the fire was extinguished he was so severely burnt that death ensued in twelve hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 February 1844
SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held at Southmolton, on Tuesday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of JAMES BARNES, aged two years, an illegitimate child of URITH BARNES, who was left by its mother with a sister about six years old, in a house by themselves the day previous, when the poor little fellow caught his clothes on fire, and was burnt in a dreadful manner. Messrs. Southcomb and Tanner, surgeons, were speedily on the spot, and did all in their power to alleviate its suffering; but it survived only about 12 hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 28 March 1844
COMBMARTIN - An Inquest was held on Saturday last before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Combmartin, on the body of MARY CUTCLIFFE, wife of MR EDWARD CUTCLIFFE, of that place, aged 60 years, who was seized in a fit of apoplexy while employed in making up a bed the night before, from which she died in the course of two hours. Mr Cooke, surgeon, was called in, but deceased lay insensible from the time of her seizure until her death. Verdict, 'Visitation of God.'

Thursday 4 April 1844
TIVERTON - Manslaughter at Tiverton. - On Monday morning a man was found dead at the 'Red Lion Inn,' in this town, with his clothes saturated with blood. Constables were indefatigable in their exertions to secure the perpetrator of the horrible deed, and about one o'clock the man was captured in an obscure place in Elmore. In the afternoon an Inquest was held at the Guildhall. The evidence showed that the deceased, whose name was FRANCIS PERRY, an agricultural labourer, was drinking the evening before (Sunday) at the 'Red Lion Inn,' with a man named James Leatt; they drank six pints of half-and-half, and left at about eleven o'clock at night: they walked together up Gold-street, where a man named Tozer, who had been a schoolfellow of deceased, joined them, and they proceeded, but had not gone far when two men who had been drinking at the same inn, came up to them and appeared disposed to make a quarrel, in which they succeeded, and one of them, whose name was James Acland, struck deceased and he fell to the ground, and his head was so injured by the blow and the fall that he was taken back to the inn, where he lay insensible until six in the morning, when he died. This evidence was confirmed by two or three witnesses. The prisoner Acland was apprehended on the following day, (Monday). The Inquest was adjourned to Wednesday, when the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against Acland, who was committed to take his trial on the charge.

CROYDE - An Inquest was held on the 25th ultimo before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, at Croyde, in the parish of Georgeham, on the body of PRUDENCE BUTSON, aged eight years, who, on the 12th February last, while in the kitchen of Mr George Dyer, at play with two other children, approached too near the fire, and the flame caught her clothes, by which she was severely burnt in various parts of her body, and after lingering in much pain for six weeks, she died on the 24th ult. - Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

EASTDOWN - Another Inquest in a case of child burning was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, at Eastdown, on the 28th ultimo. The victim in this case was JANE MOCK, aged eight years, daughter of a labourer of that parish, who was at school in the National School-room on the 19th ultimo, when, standing too near the grate, her apron caught fire, and although very speedy assistance was rendered her, she was so dreadfully burnt before the flames were extinguished, that she survived but seven days afterwards. - Verdict, 'Accidental Death.' The accident occurred during the dinner hour, and in the absence of the mistress of the school, who had gone home to dine.

TAWSTOCK - An Inquest was also held on the 30th ultimo, at Lake, in the parish of Tawstock, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a newly born male child of MARY DOBB, single woman, daughter of a labourer of good character, living at that place. the facts of the case are singular. The mother had been a servant in the house of a gentleman of the neighbourhood until three months ago, when she left in consequence of a bad leg and returned to her father's house, where her mother lay ill and (as was believed) at the point of death: here she remained until the 29th ultimo, when, after complaining of illness, she got out of bed and a full-grown child fell from her, much to the astonishment of her sister, as well as of a nurse who was attending her mother, neither of whom had the slightest idea of her pregnancy. The child was dead, and it was the opinion of the medical man that it had never breathed. The unhappy parent explained that she was afraid of the effect which the intelligence might have on her afflicted mother, and therefore kept her condition a secret. It appeared that she had made provision of articles of apparel necessary for the child, and as there were no circumstances to warrant a suspicion of any intention on her part to destroy it, and as the opinion of the medical man was that the child was still born, the Jury unhesitatingly found a verdict to that effect. The mother of the girl died within a few minutes of the birth of her grandchild.

Thursday 2 May 1844
HOLSWORTHY - An Inquest was held on Saturday, on the body of a poor woman called GLIDDON, aged 40, whose clothes caught fire, by which she was so dreadfully burnt that she died soon after. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BISHOPS NYMPTON - An Inquest was held on Friday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Bishopsnympton, on the body of WILLIAM BURGESS, aged two years, son of a labourer of that parish; who left his home the preceding afternoon, and was walking by the side of the mill-stream, into which he is supposed to have fallen, for he was found in it drowned about an hour after. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

TAWSTOCK - Also, in the parish of Tawstock, on Wednesday (yesterday), on the body of HANNAH TAMLYN, aged two years, daughter of PHILIP TAMLYN, of that parish, labourer, who was left in the kitchen the preceding morning while her mother went out for a pitcher of water, and on her return in about two minutes she found the poor child enveloped in flames, having caught her clothes on fire, and she was so severely burnt that she survived but three hours. The corpse presented one of the most shocking spectacles that can well be conceived, the flesh being burnt to a cinder. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 9 May 1844
ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held on Friday last at Ilfracombe, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JANE CREEDY, aged 27, wife of a blacksmith of that town. Deceased had lately been confined, and had since taken cold and was afflicted with jaundice: early in the morning of Thursday the surgeon was called up, and found her suffering from a severe attack of bronchitis, which caused suffocation within a few minutes after he left the room. Verdict, "Natural Death."

SHERWILL - Also, at Sherwill, on Monday last, on the body of CATHERINE THORNE, aged 59, wife of FRANCIS THORNE, labourer, of that parish. Deceased had gone to bed the night preceding in her usual health, and about three o'clock on the Monday morning her husband was awoke by a violent shaking of the bed, and on turning to his wife found her apparently ill and speechless; he instantly called his son, who went off to Barnstaple for the surgeon, but soon after he had left and long before the surgeon's arrival, she had breathed her last. The opinion of the medical man was that death resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

NORTH MOLTON - Also, on Tuesday, at Na[?]d Farm, in the parish of Northmolton, on the body of WILLIAM BAWDEN, aged 24, a farm labourer in the employ of Mr Webber. Deceased left his master's house the morning before with a cart and two horses to go to South Aller for lime, accompanied by a fellow servant driving a cart and one horse: they proceeded at a rapid rate, and the deceased urged his horses to their full speed, and got out of sight of his companion: who, on his coming up just at the turn of a corner in the road, found the cart overturned and the shaft-horse with it and the leader standing still while the deceased was lying on his face insensible: he took him up and found blood issuing from his hears, and having taken him to the nearest farm house, procured the attendance of Mr Ley, of Northmolton, surgeon, who pronounced the case hopeless, and in the afternoon the deceased expired. He had sustained a severe concussion of the brain, one of the blood vessels of which had burst, which occasioned death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 1s. on the cart and horses.

Thursday, 16 May 1844
LYNMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at Lynmouth, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH STADDON, aged about 50, who was walking in her garden on the morning of the day preceding, apparently in very good health, and was seen soon after by passers by, lying down in the path as if she had fallen: a person went to her, to whose enquiries she replied in a very feeble voice, and being evidently ill, she was removed to bed and a surgeon sent for, who administered the usual applications in cases of apoplexy, but without effect, as the deceased lingered only until night. - Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 23 May 1844
COMBMARTIN - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Crooner, on the body of JOHN REED, of Combmartin, labourer, aged 84, who was seized with sudden illness the day before, and died shortly after. The surgeon gave it as his opinion that death had ensued from a rupture of a blood vessel in the chest. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

SWIMBRIDGE - Also, on Monday, at Kentisbury, on the body of JOHN COURTENAY, labourer, aged 82, belonging to the parish of Swymbridge, who was seized with apoplexy on the 17th, and lingered insensible until the 19th, when he died. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

ILFRACOMBE - Also, at Ilfracombe, on Monday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HICKS, harbour-master of that port, aged 68, who was seized on the Friday preceding with apoplexy, and lay speechless and insensible until the next morning, when he died. Medical aid was at hand, but was of no avail. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 30 May 1844
BRAUNTON - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Pippacott, in the parish of Braunton, on the body of ANNE TRUMP, aged 10 years, daughter of a labourer of that place; who was employed in getting breakfast on the morning of the 4th May, for her grandmother, with whom she slept, when her clothes accidentally took fire, and although her grandmother came quickly to her assistance and extinguished the flames, she received such injuries in her arms and legs that she lingered in much pain until the 27th, when she died. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., at the inn known by the sign of the 'First in and Last out,' on the body of MARY MITCHELL aged seven years, who was burnt the preceding day by her clothes taking fire during the absence of her mother. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

DEVONPORT - Violation and Suicide. - An inmate of the Devonport Workhouse, called JOHN LEAMAN, about 60 years of age, was detected on Saturday last, under circumstances which gave assurance that he had been guilty of a most atrocious violation of the person of a little girl only nine years of age. The charge was not given to the authorities of the establishment until the next day, when, preparatory to other proceedings, the master stopped LEAMAN'S leave at the gate. On his presenting himself, as usual, at the gate on going to church, he was informed that his leave had been stopped, and he turned away, and was not heard of for an hour and a half afterwards, when it was discovered that LEAMAN had secured the door of the room as before, and finished his career by self-destruction. He was suspended by the neck by a rope, and apparently had been dead some time. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, when a verdict of "Felo de se" was returned.

Thursday 6 June 1844
TOPSHAM - Death from Intoxication. - On Whit-Monday evening a man, named JOHN MATTHEWS, was in the dancing room attached to the 'Ship Inn,' at Topsham, with two companions, one of whom called for half a pint of rum. While this man (Long) was talking to the servant girl about the payment for the liquor, MATTHEWS, who was sitting by, took up the measure which contained it, and drank it off at a draught, saying at the same time he would bet a large sum that he would drink off forty in a similar way. The act was so sudden, that no one was aware of his intention until it was too late to prevent it. Shortly after this, the house was cleared, and after the men got into the street, MATTHEWS fell heavily on the ground. He was raised by his companions, and assisted home, but instead of going to bed, he sat down on a chair, where he remained the whole of the night. The next morning he was found quite dead. An Inquest was subsequently held on the body, and a verdict, that he died from Excessive Drinking returned.

Thursday 13 June 1844
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR HENRY GIBBS, of this town, coal merchant, who had died suddenly on the morning of that day. It appeared on evidence that deceased had complained of being unwell the day before, but got up at about his usual hour (six o'clock) on Friday; he became suddenly ill while in the act of dressing: and went into a room adjoining, which was occupied by his son, whom he told that he was dying. MR GIBBS, jun., instantly went for Dr Budd, but deceased breathed his last within half an hour of his seizure. It was the opinion of Dr Budd that death came from internal haemorrhage occasioned by the rupture of one of the vessels of the heart. The Jury found a verdict of "Visitation of God." Deceased was much respected, and had carried on business in this town for a period of nearly 40 years.

ATHERINGTON - Sudden Deaths - Inquests held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. - On the 4th June, at Atherington, on the body of ELIZABETH, wife of MR WILLIAM NANCEKIVEL, yeoman, aged 56; who was taken suddenly ill on the morning of the 2nd, and died a few hours afterwards. The opinion of the medical man was that death resulted from disease of the hart; and a verdict to that effect was returned.

COMBMARTIN - At Combmartin, on the 3rd instant, on the body of JOHN PEAKE, labourer, aged 76, who on the Saturday previous went to his daily work in the morning on the Common near the town, and while taking his dinner with his fellow labourer, he fell down and died almost instantly. The surgeon gave it as his opinion that death ensued from a rupture of a vessel in the chest; and a verdict accordingly was returned.

SWIMBRIDGE - At Swymbridge, on the 8th, on the body of ELIZABETH PEARCE, widow, aged 71, who appeared to have been in her usual health on the morning of that day, and had taken her breakfast and gone out to her work, and was found shortly afterwards lying in the road quite dead. The medical gentleman conceived death to have resulted from a rupture of a vessel on the heart, and the Jury found a verdict accordingly.

COLATON RAWLEIGH - Suicide - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at Colaton Rawleigh, on the body of JAMES WOODLEY, aged 68, who was found in a field on the 27th of May, with his throat cut, but not dead. From the evidence it appeared that Mr E. Taylor, yeoman, of Newton Poppleford, saw deceased lying in a field near the road side, and on going up to him saw that his clothes were covered with blood. He asked what was the matter, on which deceased pulled down his handkerchief, and with great difficulty articulated, "Cut my throat, sir." Mr Taylor said, "Who cut your throat?" and deceased answered, "Did it myself, sir." There was a long gash in the throat, which appeared to have been made some time. He was about to remove deceased from the field on a horse, but he was so crippled with rheumatism that this could not be done, and Mr Taylor went for assistance. Mr John Sellick said that he had been called on to render assistance by Mr Taylor and tied a handkerchief round deceased's neck, and helped to remove him from the field. He asked him why he had cut his throat, and he replied that he had been so tempted for a fortnight that he could not help it, and that he was not the first that had done such an act. A woman named Loveday Rossiter, who had the care of deceased after he was brought to Colaton, stated that he told her he had been so tempted during three weeks that he could not help cutting his throat, and that the same influence which had caused him to do so prevented him from making known the temptation. The daughter of deceased stated that he had lately been subject to violent pains in his head, and that his conduct showed that his mind was affected. He died soon after he was found in the field. The knife with which he cut his throat was found near where he was at first discovered. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - The Late Fatal Accident at PLYMOUTH - The Inquest on the body of the boy WARN, who met an untimely end by the breaking down of a swinging machine, at the fair, as reported in our paper last week, on Saturday last, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against John Pickering, and John Shore, the owners of the machine. Several of the witnesses examined deposed that the swing was in a rotten condition, which circumstance was pointed out to the two men above-named, but unfortunately, although repeatedly warned of its dangerous condition, they continued its operations.

Thursday 20 June 1844
KINGSWEAR - An Inquest was held on Monday, on JOHN LANGDON, aged 45 years, who, while drunk, fell over two flights of steps: he was found lying on his back with his skull fractured, and he must have died instantaneously after the fall, as he was seen but a short time previously. Verdict, "Accidentally Killed."

Thursday 27 June 1844
EXETER - Lamentable and Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at Lisson's 'Acland Arms,' St Sidwells, on Monday morning, on the body of a young man, named CHARLES PARKHOUSE, who met his death by drowning on the day preceding, under the following circumstances. The deceased was 22 years of age, and by trade a tailor, in the employment of Mr Sampson. At six o'clock on Sunday morning he was called, according to a previous arrangement, by a companion named Broom, also a tailor, with whom he had agreed to bathe. They went to a place called Duck's Bridge, on the mill leat below the Old Abbey. Neither of them cold swim. They walked into the water together at a spot a little below where the bridge formerly stood. They soon found themselves in a deep pit, and out of their depth. Broom got out of the pit and found a footing, but the deceased was not so fortunate. Broom took hold of him thinking to help him out, but in doing so again lost his footing, and was obliged to let him go to save himself. The deceased soon sank, not having spoken a word from the time of getting into the water;, Broom ran to the Old Abbey and made an alarm, and then came to Exeter to the lodgings of the deceased. The parties residing near the spot used every effort to recover the body, but did not succeed until an hour and a half after the accident occurred, and then of course life was quite extinct. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death." It is hoped that the repeated accidents in the river will call the attention of the Commissioners to the necessity of forming a commodious public bathing place.

MILTON ABBOT - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Milton Abbott, on the body of HENRY DODGE, a lad eight years of age. the deceased was returning from Dartmoor to Milton with his eldest brother, who was driving a loaded wagon, when the child complained of being fatigued, and to afford him relief, his brother placed him on the shafts of the waggon. On going down a hill the horses trotted at a fast pace, and the driver jumped from the waggon and ran some distance with the horses, and when he succeeded in stopping them his brother was missing, but on looking back he saw him lying in the road. The child was perfectly insensible, but after the application of some water to his face and temples he revived, and at that time no external mark of injury was observed upon him. He walked on with his brother a short way, when he suddenly dropped to the ground, and was then taken up and carried in his brother's arms, who was informed by a person that he was dead, and on looking in his face he was assured of the distressing event. The deceased's breast-bone, it appeared, had been crushed. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 July 1844
BRENDON - Suicide - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Brendon, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY BURNELL, aged 48, wife of DAVID BURNELL, of that place, blacksmith. It appeared that early in the morning of the preceding Sunday the deceased was missed from her dwelling, and her daughter (a child of eight years of age) happening to go into an outhouse, found her mother lying on the ground with a piece of cord round her neck, and above her was a beam from which a similar piece of cord was hanging. She gave an immediate alarm, and the poor woman was taken up insensible, but not dead. Medical aid was instantly sent for, but the deceased lingered in a perfectly senseless state till the following Friday, when she died. There was no doubt that she hung herself, and that the cord had broken. A great deal of evidence was given to show aberration of mind on the part of the deceased, which led the Jury to return a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 18 July 1844
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, at Newport, on the body of SUSAN CRANG, aged seven years, daughter of MR JAMES CRANG, gardener. It appeared that on the preceding afternoon the deceased was walking with her elder sister on the bank of the Taw near Pill, when she slipped off the bank into the water, which in that place is of considerable depth. The sister ran for assistance, which was soon obtained, but the body was not taken up for nearly an hour, when life was quite extinct. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 1 August 1844
BRANSCOMBE - Inquests by R. Aberdeen, Esq. - At Branscombe, on the body of a labouring man named BARTLETT, aged 30, who was found dead in a Lime Kiln, on the 21st, and which was burning. The face and upper part of the body of the deceased being completely destroyed by the fire, he was identified by the clothes which were not burnt. It appears that the deceased went to the Lime Kiln for the purpose of dressing some potatoes (some having been found about a foot and a half from the edge of the Kiln) quite burnt. A small pitcher of the deceased's was also found by his side in the Kiln, with some gooseberries in it. There being no marks of any struggle on the ground outside the Kiln to indicate that any such had taken place, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXMOUTH - At Exmouth on the 23rd inst., on the body of ELLEN GEORGINANA DALLY, aged about seven years, who whilst playing with lucifer matches on the 20th inst., accidentally set fire to her clothes, and from the injuries she received died the following day. Verdict "Accidental Death."

BUCKFASTLEIGH - An Inquest was held here on Wednesday last by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the county, on the body of an old man named PHILIP LEE, aged 86, who was found dead in his bed on the previous morning. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

TORQUAY - Mr Cockey also held an Inquest on Friday last at Torquay, on the body of a young man, named DAVID HADLEY, aged 23, an engraver. It appeared by the evidence of a person named Cook, who stated he was a master engraver, that the deceased had travelled with him as his workman for the last three years, and on Wednesday evening about seven o'clock the deceased and himself went to the cove to bathe, and the deceased swan out in the sea about thirty yards, and on returning he called out and said he had the cramp. Cook immediately swam to his assistance to get hold of him but could not save him. - Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 8 August 1844
MORTHOE - An Inquest was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, in the village of Morthoe, on Friday last on the body of JOHN BENNETT, aged 2 ½ years, son of GEORGE BENNETT, of that place, labourer. It appeared in evidence, that on the day preceding, this child with several others went out into the field, where he unfortunately ate some of the berries of a noxious weed called the nightshade: he was presently seized with convulsions, and was taken home to his father's house, where he was soon after seen by Mr Stoneham, of Ilfracombe, surgeon, who happened to be in the village, and who administered an emetic and adopted other remedial means; but the child never rallied but sunk rapidly and died at six the same evening. The contents of his stomach which he had vomited left n doubt of the cause of death; and another child, who had also partaken of the poison, but in a smaller quantity, was similarly seized, but his case yielded to the effect of medicine - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

CREDITON - An Inquest was held at Bow, on Monday last, on the body of MR PHILLIP MARRACK, supervisor of excise, stationed at Crediton, who was found on the road near Bow in a state of insensibility, and bleeding behind his head (his horse standing by his side,) by two farmers returning late in the evening from Exeter Lammas Fair. It is supposed that the unfortunate deceased fell from the horse exhausted with the length of his journey and heat of the weather, as the horse is as docile as the most timid could wish. The deceased was attended by Messrs Warren, of Bow; Empson, of Crediton; and latterly by Mr Barnes; but the nature of his wounds baffled all their skill. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 August 1844
SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest.- On Tuesday last an Inquest was held at Woodhouse Farm, in this parish, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for this borough, on the body of MR WILLIAM DEE, a respectable yeoman, aged 40, who was found suspended by a cord to an apple tree in his orchard in the morning of the same day, about 10 o'clock. It appeared that the deceased had been in a deranged state of mind for a week or two, and had absented himself from his house in the morning, when a search was soon made for him, and he was found in about two hours quite dead. - Verdict, "Destroyed himself while he was in a state of Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest at Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall, on Friday at six o'clock, before John Edmonds, Esq., the borough Coroner, on the body of JAMES HAYNES, a cartman, in the employ of Messrs Scott, brewers. The Jury having viewed the body, the inquisition proceeded, by the examination of several witnesses from whose evidence it appears that deceased has for some months past occasionally drank to excess, and at times manifested an unsound state of mind. On Friday morning he went to his work as usual, and left the brewery with the cart to deliver beer as directed: at about half past ten in the forenoon he was at the 'Robin Hood' public house, in New-street, where he drank some gin and water, and then requested a porter to go with him to deliver some beer. On leaving New-street, he drove the horse and cart to the Hoe, immediately above the Public Bathing Place, where he left and went down over the rocks, saying he was going to bathe his leg (deceased had a diseased leg): but on coming to the water's edge he was observed to throw up his hands and plunge into the water. The party who accompanied him, a porter named Sargent, did not attempt to rescue deceased, but drove the horse and cart back to the brewery. Alarm was raised by some young gentlemen who were bathing near the spot, and the body was taken out of the water by Mr John Bowden, who on arriving at the spot immediately plunged in. It was conveyed to the Hospital, and every means tried to restore animation without success. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity, produced by excessive drinking."

PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Melancholy Occurrence. - On Sunday last, MR CORK, a respectable yeoman, residing at a farm in the parish of Plympton St. Mary,, died in consequence of taking saltpetre, in mistake for epsom salts. It appears that, towards the evening of that day, MR CORK, on returning from some part of the farm, where he had gone to inspect the cattle, complained of indisposition, and being in the habit of taking salts, called for a dose, when unfortunately some saltpetre, kept in the same cupboard, was mixed by his daughter by mistake, and taken immediately by the deceased, who made an observation on its peculiar taste. Shortly after violent illness ensued, and medical aid was obtained, but he expired within three hours of taking the saltpetre. MR CORK was above 60 years of age, and much and deservedly respected. An Inquest was held on his body the following day, and a verdict that the deceased came by his death from taking saltpetre by mistake, was returned.

Thursday 22 August 1844
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the house of WILLIAM JEWELL, mariner, at Castle-quay, in this town, on the body of his daughter, ELIZA, aged 17 months, who appeared to have been in her father's courtlage on the morning of that day, and fell with her head downwards into a bucket of water which was standing there, where she was found about half an hour afterwards quite dead. It is supposed that the little creature was attracted by something at the bottom of the bucket, and in leaning over the edge to look at it overbalanced herself and fell in. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held at Southmolton, on Thursday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of JOHN OLIVER, blacksmith, aged 74 years, who appeared in perfect health, but dropped down in the house in which he lodged on Wednesday evening, and instantly expired. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 26 September 1844
EXETER - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last an Inquest was taken at Elmore's 'Pack Horse Inn,' St. David's Hill, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for Exeter, on the body of MR JOHN PERRIAM, from the time of their erection an inmate of Atwill's new alms houses, in the North-road, who died suddenly that morning. It came out that MR PERRIAM had acted as a bailiff for Messrs. Terrel and Roberts, of that city, solicitors, and in this capacity, some two or three weeks since, went to the village of Ebford, in the parish of Woodbury, to take a distress on the goods of a labouring man named Richard Back, for the sum of 1l. 5s. In this he was accompanied by his son, a stout man named HENRY PERRIAM. Back, however, grossly maltreated both, using a poker in a manner most fearful, as also his fist: and, in fear for their lives, causing both father and son to evacuate the house. Both were injured, indeed the son very seriously, and Back is now in the county gaol to take his trial at the next assizes for the offence. These circumstances rendered an Inquiry before the Coroner, and a post-mortem examination of the body of MR PERRIAM necessary: and this was conducted by Mr Warren and Messrs Harris and Son, surgeons. But these gentlemen gave it as their opinion that disease of the heart was the immediate cause of death; there being nothing in the appearances to lead them to attribute it to a blow, although violence such as the deceased was said to have been subjected to, might have accelerated it; - and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

SHERWILL - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at Blatchford, in the parish of Sherwill, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM LOVERING, of Combmartin, yeoman. The deceased had been at Barnstaple fair the day before, and left between seven and eight o'clock, in company with three neighbours, all on horseback: deceased had drunk freely, and about a mile and half out of town rode off from his companions, and gallopped furiously down the hill towards Blatchford, close by which he was met by the van of John Pugsley, the Ilfracombe carrier, which was driven by his son, who heard the deceased approaching at a very rapid rate and called out to him, but had scarcely spoken when his horse came in contact with the horse of the van, on which deceased's horse sprang off towards the hedge, and in so doing the point of the shaft caught deceased in the leg, and he instantly fell under the horse in the van, and his own horse ran away. Deceased got up and exclaimed, "Oh my God! I am murdered!" and staggered to the hedge and reclined against it. By this time one of his companions had come up and found him bleeding most profusely from the thigh, and instantly sent back to the town for a surgeon. Mr Torr was very quickly on the spot, but deceased had expired before his arrival. He ordered the body to be removed to the adjoining house of Mr Smith, where he examined it and found a dreadful wound in the deceased's thigh, five inches long and of the same depth, which had divided the femoral artery, and extended into the abdomen. The verdict of the Jury was "Accidental Death;" and the foreman requested the Coroner to admonish the driver of the van against the practice too common with such vehicles of keeping out into the middle of the road instead of by the proper side. It is a singular fact that deceased was born on the 19th September (Barnstaple Fair day,) married on that day, and killed on the 45th anniversary of his birth-day.

MARWOOD - An Inquest was also held on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Milltown, in the parish of Marwood, on the body of AGNES LITTLEJOHN, aged 22, daughter of a labourer of that place. Deceased had lived as a servant in a respectable family at Barnstaple, where she was taken ill on the Monday previous, and on the same evening went home accompanied by a friend to her father's house in the van; she continued ill, and the next morning her father went to the parish surgeon, Mr Parker, who enquired her symptoms, gave the father medicine for her, and said he would come to see her the next morning: being, however, sent for again before the day expired, he went out and saw her, and found her labouring under hysterical fits, which he conceived to arise from pregnancy; as some of the medicine he had sent had been administered, he did not think it necessary to prescribe further for her, and left intending to see her again the next day; but having learnt afterwards that another medical man had been sent for by the friends of deceased, he did not repeat his visit, and deceased expired about nine the next morning. In consequence of reports of deceased's pregnancy and suspicion that she had died from poison, the Coroner ordered a post mortem examination, which was taken by Mr Parker, and confirmed his opinion that she was in an early stage of pregnancy, but totally disproved the suspicion of her having taken poison; and the opinion of the surgeon was that death resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain, induced by hysterical fits brought on by her delicate situation. Verdict, "Natural Death."

Thursday 3 October 1844
COMBMARTIN - Death by the Accidental Discharge of a Gun. - A lamentable occurrence took place at Combmartin, on Sunday last, which resulted in the death of SARAH GUBB, a young woman of that place, aged 16 years. It appears that the deceased had gone to the house of John Saunders, innkeeper, on the forenoon of Sunday, to enquire after his grand-daughter, Mary Ann Saunders, who was ill in bed; deceased went upstairs to see her, and was accompanied by John Saunders, brother of the sick person, aged about 8 years: after having enquired how she felt, she sat down by the side of the bed, and had not remained above five minutes, when the boy John Saunders took up a gun which was in the corner of the room to show it to deceased, and by some accident as he had the gun across his shoulder and was going to put it in its place, the piece discharged and the charge lodged in the forehead of deceased, who uttered a loud shriek, and fell to the ground: persons came upstairs to her assistance, and found the blood flowing most profusely from two dreadful wound sin her forehead; the resident surgeon did not happen to be home, but the presence of Mr Stoneham, of Ilfracombe, was very quickly obtained, but on his arrival life was almost extinct, and deceased expired within 10 minutes afterwards. An Inquest was held on the body on the following day, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned, with a deodand of 1s. on the gun.

NEWTON TRACEY - Sudden Death - An Inquest was also held before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Newton Tracey, on the 2nd instant, on the body of THOMAS MILLS, sen., labourer, of that parish; who had been at work on Monday with Mr Moggridge, and went to bed in his usual health; but when he arose next morning at half-past five, he complained of being ill, and was carried back to bed, and medical aid sent for, but before the surgeon's arrival he had expired. The opinion of Mr Torr was that death resulted from effusion of blood upon the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

BISHOPS NYMPTON - Accidental Death - An Inquest was held this morning (Thursday) before John Henry Toller, Esq., at Bishopsnympton, on the body of WILLIAM SPARKES, of that parish, labourer, aged 36, who went to his work the day before, digging stones in North Pillavin Quarry, when a boy passing by the place in the forenoon, saw a coat lying, and a quantity of rubbish which appeared to have newly fallen in, and conjecturing that some one must have been buried, he gave an alarm, and two men came, and having removed the rubbish to the amount of about three tons, found deceased underneath quite dead, and with his head and body much mutilated. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Sudden Death at Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young woman named MARIA SPILSBURY, who was found dead in her bed on the morning of that day. The deceased was servant to Mrs Harvey, a lady who is residing temporarily in that city, and is lodging at Mr Gliddon's, No. 42, Southernhay. The evidence left no doubt that the death had resulted from natural causes, and a verdict to that effect was accordingly returned.

Thursday 10 October 1844
BRAUNTON - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday), at Beercharter, in the parish of Braunton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH SKINNER, aged 17 months, daughter of MR THOMAS SKINNER, farmer. It appeared from evidence that on Wednesday last deceased was at play in her father's kitchen, and happened to get hold of a large nail, which she carried in her hand, and with which she unfortunately fell, and the point of the nail entered her eye to the depth of an inch, and inflicted serious injury. Its effect up the spine appeared to be immediate for the little sufferer instantly lost the use of her legs, and was carried to bed; and the surgeon (Mr Pick) was called in, but she lay growing worse and worse until yesterday morning, when she died in strong convulsions. The opinion of the surgeon was that death resulted from a formation of matter in the brain, caused by the accident. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

HONITON - On Tuesday morning last, the wife of HENRY PARSONS, a tailor of this town, took a quantity of arsenic. Medical assistance was procured as soon as it was discovered, but it was of no avail; she lingered until Wednesday morning, when she expired. It appeared upon the Inquest held on Friday, by Mr Partridge (in the absence of Mr Aberdein), that deceased had been in a melancholy way for some time; that she dressed her child on the Monday morning, and gave it to a neighbour to take care of it, saying, at the same time, it was the last time she should dress it; and that HENRY, meaning her husband, would do better without her; and other similar statements, evidently showing a deranged state of mind, and a verdict accordingly was returned. It is but justice to the husband to say that he has uniformly treated his wife with great kindness.

Thursday 31 October 1844
BARNSTAPLE - A Coroner's Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Union Workhouse on Monday last, on the body of JOSIAS GUARD, aged 46, a pauper belonging to the parish of Bishop's Tawton. The following statement was made by the Master, and proved on oath by Richard Dennis (the porter), Edward Scamp, and Henry Watts, paupers in the sick ward. JOSIAH GUARD was brought into the Union-house on Saturday the 26th instant, in a cart upon a bundle of straw, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, with an order of admission from the relieving officer; he appeared very ill and was very dirty; he was immediately taken to the men's sic ward, and the medical officer sent for, to whom he stated that he had lately fallen into a limekiln, but had not received any injury from the accident; the medical officer examined him, but could not find any external injury by the fall: he was cleaned, put to bed, and medicine administered to him, and he appeared quite comfortable; between the hours of eight and nine the same evening he requested to go to the water closet and on his way there dropped down dead. Rev. Durard Baker, the clergyman of Bishop's Tawton, attended the Inquest, and stated that he was a man of very improvident habits, preferring sleeping on limekilns to being in bed in his own house; that death could not have been occasioned by want, for he had ascertained the amount of his earnings within the last three weeks to be sufficient to support him; that he had frequently relieved him himself in kind, and that a gentleman of the village had given him a suit of clothes, which, as soon as he obtained it, he immediately pawned for six shillings; some time afterwards the reverend gentleman redeemed the clothes, but they had not long been restored to GUARD, before he pawned them again: everything had been done to reclaim him, but to no effect. After the medical officer had been examined, the Jury returned their verdict - "Death by the Visitation of God."

BARNSTAPLE - Death by Burning. - On Friday last, during the absence of his mother at market, CHARLES HODGE, aged 6 years, son of SEBASTIAN HODGE, carpenter, residing in Boutport-street, in this town, being left alone most culpably in the kitchen of his father's house, unhappily approached too near the grate and caught his clothes on fire: assistance was speedily rendered him, the fire extinguished, and the little sufferer removed to the Infirmary, where he died in great agony the following day. An Inquest was held on the body before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, which resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday an Inquest was held before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Exeter, on the body of WILLIAM STILES, a coal-guard in the employ of the Great Western Railway, who met his death on Wednesday. John Harle, engineer in the company's employ was on duty on Wednesday, conveying a train of trucks laden with coal from Dunhall, near Bridgwater, to the Exeter Terminus; and the deceased was on duty in the same train. Two trucks were left at Hele station, when STILES got off the truck on which he was riding, to perform his duties at the station, and the engineer stopped the engine to enable him to do so. After stopping the engine, several of the trucks moved forward by their own force. Shortly after, the engineer heard an alarm, and on getting off to see the cause, found the deceased jammed between the outside framing of two trucks. The deceased called to the engineer to go a-head, and they moved on the engine as promptly as possible and released him. He was taken to the station-house, and a surgeon sent for; but before he arrived the deceased begged to be taken home, and was accordingly placed in a chair on his truck and brought to Exeter, when a fly was dispatched for Mr Kingdon. That gentleman soon arrived at the terminus, and found the deceased in such a state as led him to believe that the injuries he received were fatal. His hands were cold, and no pulse could be felt at the wrist. Every means to restore warmth were used. The body of the deceased was much bruised. On examining the trucks, Mr Kingdon found a space of three inches only into which the deceased had been jammed. The deceased died about 12 o'clock on Wednesday night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

NEWTON BUSHEL - Last week a fatal accident happened to a little boy, the son of MR WILLIAM DAWTON, paper manufacturer, which has occasioned the deepest grief to his bereaved relatives. The poor child, who was about six years of age, while playing on the banks of a stream used at the paper mills, unfortunately fell into the water, and was soon hurried by the rapid current underneath a wheel employed to propel the machinery for crushing bark at Mr John Vicary's tan-yard by which he was so dreadfully injured, that death speedily followed. The Inquest which was held on the body, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 November 1844
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the 'Ebrington Inn,' in Newport, on the body of MR ELEAZER LAZARUS, aged 56. The deceased was a resident of Exeter (where he had a wife and numerous family), and had been in this town a few weeks pursuing his business as an itinerant dealer in watches, spectacles, &c. He had been as well as usual up to the day previous, when, being in the village of Newport, he called in at the 'Ebrington Inn,' complaining that he was unwell, and asked the landlady to draw him a glass of beer, which was served to him, and he was in the act of lifting it to his mouth, when he suddenly fell off the settle, and was taken up dead. The opinion of the surgeon (Mr Hole) was, that death resulted from apoplexy (to which his habit of body predisposed him), and a verdict to that effect was returned.

NORTH MOLTON - Sudden Death - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday) at Northmolton, before John Henry Toler, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a labouring man named WILLIAM PLACE, aged 70, who was sleeping at the house of Mr Nicholas Purchase the Tuesday night, and was found dead in his bed at seven o'clock next morning. He had been spoken to about five o'clock, and said he had slept very well, so that death must have ensued within the next hour. The opinion of the surgeon (Mr Ley), who was called in, was that death resulted from the rupture of a vessel in the heart, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

BERRYNARBOR - Another case of almost sudden death occurred at Berrynarbor this morning, to a young woman of the name of MARY ANNE FOWLES, aged 16, daughter of MR FOWLES, a confidential servant of Joseph Davie Bassett, Esq., of Watermouth. Deceased had written a letter last evening, which she took to the village post-office, and on her return she accidentally fell over a slight obstruction in the road, but did not appear to have sustained material injury, and got home and went to bed, but was soon after taken violently ill, and died in the course of the night. The Coroner is gone to hold an Inquest on the body this afternoon.

Thursday 14 November 1844
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Monday evening, as ELLEN SPEARMAN, aged nine years, daughter of MR RICHARD SPEARMAN, of this town, was playing with several other children on the Quay, she accidentally fell over into the tide, which was almost level with the Quay at the time, and was drowned: on the receding of the tide the body was discovered about 50 feet from the place she fell over. Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, held an Inquest on the body on Tuesday evening, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - The Jury strongly recommended that posts and chains should be placed at the edge of the Quay, to prevent similar accidents in future.

HEANTON PUNCHARDON - Death by Burning - An Inquest was held at Heanton Punchardon, on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM MULLAND, aged 2 ¾ years, son of a labourer of that place, who was left in his grandfather's house alone on the Saturday preceding, and soon afterwards a person came in and saw the little fellow in flames, and trying to brush the fire from his face: a girl came in and wrapped him in her shawl, by which the flames were extinguished; but the little sufferer languished until the next day when he died. Verdict, "Accidental Death by Burning."

Thursday 21 November 1844
APPLEDORE - An Inquest was held by Mr Vallack, at Appledore, on Saturday last, on the body of a lad named JOHN SNOW, a native of Hartland, an apprentice in the brig 'Wellington.' The deceased was found at daylight the same morning alongside the ship 'Augusta;' and it appears that in going on board that ship on the previous evening, the ladder turned over on one side and the deceased fell; a large wound appeared over his eye, but no one could be found to give evidence, the accident having occurred in the night. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

JACOBSTOW - Sudden Death - On Monday morning about 10 o'clock, MR WILLIAM COOMBE, late of 'The Hundred of Stratton' Inn, at Wainhouse Corner, in the parish of Jacobstow, innkeeper, was found dead in his bed by his servant girl. It appears that a long dispute or disputed account was on Monday to be settled by arbitration between him and his landlord. One of the gentlemen (arbitrators), according to appointment, called on MR COOMBE, at Highway (where he had lately resided since leaving the inn): the servant immediately ran upstairs to apprise her master of the gentleman's arrival, when to her great astonishment she could get no answer by knocking at the door; and on entering his room found him quite dead in his bed. On the following day an Inquest was held on the body by Gilbert Hambly, Deputy Coroner, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned. MR COOMBE has been a widower for two years, leaving several children, and is about 65.

BROADWOODWIGER - Inquest before Mr Bone, Esq., Coroner. - On Monday last, at Broadwoodwiger, on the body of RICHARD PAGE, aged 15 years, the son of a farmer. The deceased had been playing with his sister, after partaking of a hearty supper, when he suddenly fell to the ground under the stroke of death. - Verdict, "Died of Apoplexy."

Thursday 28 November 1844
BUTTERLEIGH - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at Butterleigh near Tiverton, on the 21st inst., on the body of HENRY QUICK, miller, who came to his death by having accidentally become entangled in the machinery of the mill. The deceased has left a wife and family.

Thursday 5 December 1844
GEORGEHAM - Inquests Holden before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner - On the 20th ult., at Georgeham, on the body of WILLIAM REDMORE, a child of 2 ½ years old, son of RICHARD REDMORE, labourer, who was left alone in his father's house on the 18th, and was soon after found by a neighbour so shockingly burnt that he survived only until the next morning.

LANDKEY - Also, on the 28th ult., at Landkey, on the body of JAMES WOOLLACOTT, 3 ½ years old, son of a labourer of that place, who was in his grandmother's house, in the village, on the morning of the 27th, and on leaning over the fire to take a piece of cake which was on the hob, his apron caught fire, and so rapidly did the flames prevail that, although assistance was speedily rendered, he had sustained injuries from which he died in 6 or 7 hours.

BERRYNARBOR - Also, on the 4th inst., at Berrynarbor, on the body of RACHEL BAMENT, aged 3 years, daughter of GEORGE BAMENT, a labourer, who was in her father's kitchen on the afternoon of the 3rd, in company with an elder sister, when she went to the fire and took up a piece of coal with the tongs, by which her clothes became ignited, and so severely was she burnt that she expired the next morning.

In each case the verdict was "Accidental Death." - This wholesale "slaughter of the innocent" is a shocking evil, which appears to defy prevention. The substitution of the less inflammable fabric of woollen, instead of cotton clothing, is one of the most effectual palliatives of the evil which has been suggested.

Thursday 12 December 1844
SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held at Southmolton on Monday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of the Borough, on the body of LOUISA TAPP, an infant daughter of WILLIAM TAPP, labourer, who was seized with a convulsive fit the day previous, and almost instantaneously expired. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER - Death from Drunkenness. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, at Moore's London Ale-house, in St. Mary Arches-street, Exeter, on the body of SUSAN BRADFORD, aged 65, the wife of a watchmaker in that neighbourhood. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was much addicted to habits of intoxication. On Friday evening her husband came home about 8 o'clock, and found her lying drunk at the foot of the stairs. He endeavoured to get her up, but for some time without effect. At length, however, he induced her to get up stairs, assisting her and holding the candle, that she might not trip and fall. He had got her to the top of the stairs, and, as he thought, safely landed, when she suddenly staggered and fell backwards into the passage again. The effect of the fall was to cause a concussion of the brain and other injuries, of which she lingered in much pain until Saturday morning, when she died. The Jury found a verdict in accordance with this evidence.

Thursday 19 December 1844
MARTINHOE - Inquests held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. - At Martinhoe, on Monday last, on the body of RICHARD RATTENBURY, aged 22, son of MR JOHN RATTENBURY, of that parish; who left his father's house on Sunday morning, and staying longer than he was expected, his brother went out to look for him, and found him lying by the side of a hedge hard by; he spoke to him, but deceased did not reply, but sighed twice heavily; supposing him to be in a fit, to which he was subject, he ran to his father's house for assistance, and deceased was brought home, and Mr Clarke, surgeon, of Linton, sent for; but deceased expired before his arrival. The opinion of the surgeon was that death arose from the rupture of a vessel on the brain; and a verdict to that effect was returned.

ATHERINGTON - At Atherington, on Tuesday last, on the body of JOHN LANCEY, aged 63, whose wife worked at Burriott Mills, in that parish, where he was on Sunday morning assisting his wife, and on her remarking that she smelt something burning in the mill, he went into the cog-pit, where the wheel caught him, and he was crushed to death instantly! The mill was stopped, and the body extricated, shockingly mangled and quite dead. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXBOURNE - At the rectory, Exbourne, on Tuesday last, on the body of MARY ANDROMACHE BRAILSFORD, the infant daughter of the REV. HODGKIN BRAILSFORD, minister of that parish; who was found by the nurse dead in her cot between seven and eight o'clock the previous morning. She had been unwell the day before, but at about four o'clock in the morning the nurse looked at her, and she appeared to be sleeping comfortably. The opinion of the surgeon was that death arose from a convulsive fit, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

BRAUNTON - At Braunton, on Wednesday, on the body of MARY GRIBBLE, the daughter of WILLIAM GRIBBLE, labourer, whose accidental burning on the 27th ult. we recorded a fortnight ago, and who lingered on in much agony until Wednesday morning, when she died. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held in the Southmolton Union Workhouse on Saturday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of the Borough on the body of JOHN PARMINTER, aged 70, who attended on the morning of that day at the Hall of that establishment to receive his accustomed weekly relief, when he dropped down, and instantly expired. - Verdict, 'Died by the Visitation of God.'

Thursday 26 December 1844
BARNSTAPLE - Inquests by Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner. - On Tuesday the 24th, on the body of MR RICHARD BLACKWELL, saddler, aged 61, who expired suddenly on that morning about nine o'clock, at his residence, in the Square, in this town. He had got up in his usual health and was employed in his shop, when he suddenly felt a pain in his head, which induced him to retire to the kitchen, where he complained of sickness, and reclined his head on the table. Mr Cooke, surgeon, was immediately sent for, but before his arrival the vital spark had fled. Verdict, 'Apoplexy.'

MORTHOE - Inquests by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. - On Thursday the 19th, at Morthoe, on the body of WILLIAM COCK, labourer, aged 50, who was working in company with two other men in a quarry on the day preceding, when a large stone fell on his head, causing instant death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BICKINGTON - On the 20th, at Bickington, on the body of JAMES SQUIRE, aged 54, who had been unwell for several days: on the morning of his death he had taken breakfast in bed, without complaining of being worse, but on a person going into his room about 12 o'clock he was found dead. Verdict, "Died from an effusion of blood on the brain."

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