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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1845-1854

Articles taken from North Devon Journal

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs]

Names Included:- Adams; Aford; Aldham; Allen(2); Andrews; Anthony; Arthur; Ash; Ashton(2); Avery(2); Babb; Baglelow; Bailey; Baker(5); Baldwin; Bale(2); Bament; Bamsey; Barrow; Barry; Bartlett; Bassett; Bastard; Bate; Bates; Baxter; Beadle; Beer(5); Bell; Bennett; Berry; Bickford; Bickley; Bignell; Binney; Bird(2); Blackmore(3); Blackwell; Blagdon; Blake; Blight; Bond; Boon; Bragg(2); Brailey; Brame; Branch(2); Branscombe; Braunton; Brent; Brick; Brimley; Brock; Brookes; Brown(2); Browning; Buckham; Bull; Bulley; Bumstead; Bunker; Burgess; Burt; Burton; Butler; Campitt; Cann(3); Capel; Cater; Chalice; Chappell; Chapple(3); Chiswell; Chope; Chubb; Clark; Clarke(2); Clogg; Coark; Cockram(2); Colley; Collings; Collins; Coneybear; Congden; Connebear; Connibear; Coombes; Corney; Cornish; Cornow; Corsar; Costello; Cosway; Cotten; Cotterell; Cottle(2); Courtenay(2); Cousins; Craig; Creedy; Crews; Crispin; Crocker(2); Croker; Cutland; Daniel; Dart(3); Davey; Davies; Day; Delbridge(2); Delve; Dennicombe; Dennis(2); Densham; Derrick; Dobles; Dockitt; Dodd; Doddridge; Douglas; Draper(2); Drew; Dunn(4); Dunsford; Dyer(2); Earle; Ebbles; Edgar; Edwards; Ellacott; Ellis(5); England; Essery; Evans(2); Fairchild(3); Farrell; Fewings; Fillman; Finch; Finning; Fisher(4); Flashman; Floyd; Folland; Ford(3); Foss; Fosse; Fowler(3); Fox; Fraser; French; Friendship(3); Frooke; Fry(2); Gale; Galliford; Gammon(2); Garry; Gawden; Gay; Gayton; Gear; Geen; George(2); German(2); Gerry; Gifford; Gilbert; Gill(4); Gillard; Glanville(2); Gliddon; Glover; Godfrey; Goldsworthy; Gooding; Goodwyn; Goss(2); Gould; Govier; Greek; Green; Greenslade; Greenwood; Gribble(2); Griffey; Griffith; Groves; Guscott; Hainworth; Hallett; Halls; Hambly; Hammett; Hammond; Hancock; Handcock(2); Hanford; Harding(4); Hare; Harris(4); Harvey; Haskings; Hayman; Hayward; Headon; Heale; Heard; Heath; Herman; Hernaman; Herring; Hester; Hext; Hicks; Hiern; Hill(7); Hine; Hobbs(2); Hockin; Hodge(2); Hole; Holland; Holloway; Honeywell; Hooker; Hookway; Hooper(3); Hopkins; Hore; Horn; Horrell; Howe; Hoyle; Husband; Huxtable(2); Isaac; Isherwood; Jackson; Jarvis; Jeffry; Jewell(2); Joce; Johns; Jolly; Jones(4); Keal; Kean; Kelland; Kelly; Kemble; King; Kingdom; Kingdon; Knapman; Knight; Knill; Knowles; Knox; Lake(3); Landray; Lang(2); Laramy; Laskey; Law; Lear; Lee(3); Lethaby; Lethbridge; Lewis(2); Ley(2); Light; Lilly; Lillycrap; Lock(3); Lockyer; Lovering(4); Lowther; Luxmore; Luxton(3); Macgrath; Maddock; Maddocks; Madrick; Manley; Mann; Manning(3); March; Marsh; Marshall; Martin(2); May(2); Mears; Medland; Michelmore; Mills(2); Millman; Milman; Mitchell(2); Moase; Mock; Mogford(2); Moon; Moore; Morrish(2); Mounce; Mugridge; Muxworthy; Nehm; Newcombe; Nickle; Norman(3); Northcott(2); Nosworthy; Nott(3); Nutt; Oatway; Oldridge; Oliver; Osborne; Page(2); Palfreyman; Parker; Parkhouse; Parkin; Parminter; Parr; Parson; Parsons(2); Partridge; Passmore(2); Paul; Paull; Paynter; Peake(3); Pearce; Peard(2); Pengelly(2); Penney; Perrin(2); Pethebridge; Petherick(2); Philips; Phillips(2); Pickard(3); Pidsley; Pike; Pile; Pim(2); Pollard; Ponting; Pook; Poole; Popham; Powning; Prince(2); Princeps; Probert; Prouse; Pugsley(2); Purchase; Purrington; Pyle; Pyne; Quick; Rabjohns; Radford; Radley(3); Rawle(2); Redwood; Reece; Reed(3); Rendell; Rice; Rich; Richards(6); Ridd(2); Riggs; Ripley; Rock; Rogers; Rookley; Rouncifull; Rowe; Ryder; Salter(2); Sanders; Saunders; Scott; Seccombe; Sercombe; Seward(2); Shaddick(2); Shapcott; Shapland; Shute; Skerry; Skinner(3); Slade; Slee; Slocombe; Smallacombe; Smith(2); Snape; Somerville; Southcote; Southey; Sprague; Spurway; Stacey; Staddon; Stamper; Stanbury(2); Stancombe; Stapleton; Start; Statt; Steer(2); Stephens; Stevens(4); Stone; Stoneman(3); Sullivan; Sutton; Sweet; Symonds; Tamlyn; Tapp; Tapson; Taylor(8); Thomas; Thorne; Trick; Trump; Tucker(3); Tuplin; Turner(5); Tyte; Vanstone; Venn; Vernon; Vicary; Vigers; Vodden; Vosper; Wadham; Wakely; Ware; Warren(2); Waters; Way; Weakley; Wear; Webber(5); Wedlock(2); Wellsford; West; Westacott(6); Westaway; Westlake; White(3); Widden; William; Williams(2); Willis; Wilson; Wolland; Wood(2); Woolacott; Worth; Wotton; Wreford; Wright(2); Wyatt; Wybron; Wyse; Yelland; Yeo(2)

Thursday 9 January 1845
A Shocking and Fatal Coach Accident. - On Thursday afternoon as the Great Western coach was coming down the hill near Folleton House it met a woman in charge of three children; the oldest (a child belonging to a neighbour called HONEYWELL) she placed against the hedge and told it to stand still, while she with the other two crossed the road; she had scarcely left before the little creature followed her, and the horses coming in contact with it knocked it down, and from the injury the child received it showed no signs of life when taken up. It was brought by the coach to Totnes, and left at the Plymouth Inn. - An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday, and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned, with a deodand of 1s., which was immediately paid. Not the slightest reflection could be laid to Mr Gillard, the coachman, who attended the Inquest.

PLYMOUTH - Death by Excessive Drinking. - On Tuesday afternoon, a Coroner's Inquest was held at Plymouth, on the body of ROBERT HODGE, aged 45. Verdict - "Died by apoplexy, caused by excessive drinking." The above ROBERT HODGE had been a teetotaller six years; about two months since he unfortunately listened to the inducements of some who were in the habit of drinking, broke his pledge, gave himself up to the poisonous draught, and, as vice brings its punishment, the extreme use of ardent spirits soon put a termination to his existence.

SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - At Southmolton, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on Thursday last, on the body of SARAH, daughter of THOMAS HILL, labourer, aged one year and seven months, who, during the momentary absence of her grandmother, in whose charge she was left the day previous, caught her clothes on fire, whereby she was burnt in a shocking manner, and survived but a few hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 23 January 1845
SOUTH BRENT - Death from Prussic Acid. - Mr Francis held an Inquest on the 12th instant, at South Brent, on MR WM. JAMES WARREN, nephew of Mr Williams, surgeon, of that place, a gentleman 23 years of age, who, on Friday the 10th, committed suicide by taking prussic acid. From the evidence it was shewn that deceased had been suffering from "delirium tremens" for several days previous to the occurrence, and that on the above-named day he succeeded in getting away from his grandmother, Mrs Williams' residence, and although immediately followed and overtaken by the female domestic who attended on him, he refused to return, and threatened her with violence if she pursued. She, however, continued to follow, endeavouring in vain to persuade him to return. On arriving at his uncle's house he at once entered the surgery, and locked the door before the servant had time to enter. Assistance was called for, and immediately it arrived the door was broken open, but the unfortunate gentleman was found lying on his back, foaming at the mouth, and with no motion except convulsive twitchings of the shoulders, neck and face. He was at once conveyed from the surgery, and breathed once or twice after being brought out. Upon the counter of the surgery was the bottle which contained the prussic acid, with the stopper out, and a glass measure, with a portion of the poison at its bottom standing by the side. From the quantity missing from the bottle, deceased must have swallowed nearly an ounce of the deadly fluid. Scarcely ten minutes elapsed between the time of his leaving his grandmother's residence and his death. Most satisfactory evidence was given to the Jury that he was at the time labouring under delirium, and they returned the verdict, "Death caused by taking prussic acid, not being at the time in a sound state of mind."

Thursday 6 February 1845
FREMINGTON - Fatal Accident. - A melancholy accident occurred on Friday last the 31st ult., at Mr Puddicombe's lime kiln, situated at Fremington Pill, about three miles from this town, which has spread a gloom over the whole of that parish. JOHN FAIRCHILD, one of the men employed at the kiln, having incautiously d[?] without the [?], soon found that the sulphurous effluvia from the culm affected his respiration, and called to his brother-in-law, RICHARD GAYTON, for rescue; who instantly lowered a rope, which, in drawing him from his perilous situation, unfortunately broke. GAYTON then immediately descended to the poor fellow's assistance, but the exhalations proving too strong for him also, another man, named Shaddock, jumped down, and Taylor, a fourth man, stood ready to render immediate aid, should it be necessary, who, soon perceiving that Shaddock was overpowered, put a board and slid down. He happily succeeded in getting him up, and he ultimately recovered. By the time the neighbourhood became alarmed and GAYTON and FAIRCHILD being got out, medical assistance was procured, but life was extinct. They were men of sober and industrious habits, have each left a wife with a very large family. We are informed that eight of GAYTON'S children are under 15 years of age, and the number of children thus suddenly bereaved is near 20. An Inquest was held on the bodies the next day, before John Henry Toller, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" in each case returned.

GEORGEHAM - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday) in the parish of Georgeham, on the body of a little girl, named MARY ANNE BRICK, who died the day preceding, in a convulsive fit, at the house of her uncle, Richard Redmore. The evidence of Mr Pick, surgeon, assigned convulsions arising from indigestion or teething to have been the cause of death and a verdict accordingly was returned.

KINGS NYMPTON - Death by Burning. - On Thursday last, as a child named CAROLINE LAKE, aged 3 ½ years, was in the kitchen of the dwelling house of James Manning, labourer, of Kingsnympton, being left alone for a few minutes, she set fire to her clothes by playing with the fire, and was so dreadfully burnt that she died the next day. An Inquest was held on the body by John Henry Toller, Esq., and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' returned.

MARWOOD - Death by Paralysis. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of MR GEORGE SMITH, aged 64 years, farmer, of Huish, in the parish of Marwood, who, returning from Barnstaple market on the 17th ult., was seized with sudden illness, and fell off his horse on Whitefield-hill, where he was picked up insensible and speechless by some members of his family who had gone in search of him. A surgeon was called in, who pronounced him to be seized by paralysis, and he lingered insensible until the 29th, when he died. A verdict in conformity with the circumstances was returned.

MARWOOD - Death by Burning. - Another case of child burning occurred in the parish of Marwood on the 30th ultimo, to a child named MARY ANN CORNEY, 2 ½ years old, daughter of MR WILLIAM CORNEY, who, in the temporary absence of her mother to fetch some water, caught her clothes on fire, and became so much burnt that death ensued in the evening. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of JOHN PICKARD, a miner, aged 32, who met with his death on Friday, in the mines of the Bideford culm works. It appears that the deceased was in the act of repairing some wood work in the mine, when a part of the timber gave way, and fell with a quantity of culm on the deceased, and suffocated him: his body was taken out about an hour after the accident. - Verdict, "Accidental Death." - A brother to the deceased was killed in the same mines about two years since.

EXETER - Manslaughter at Exeter. - At the adjourned Inquest on Saturday last, on the body of CHARLES DERRICK, who died from the effects of fighting (as we reported last week), the Jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against the principal and seconds in the fight, who were thereupon committed for trial at the next assizes.

BRADNINCH - A fatal accident occurred here on Tuesday morning last, about two o'clock, to a poor fellow named CHARLES ADAMS, the driver of a ballast waggon, employed upon the Bristol and Exeter Railway. The deceased was employed in some repairs upon the road, which are always done by night, to prevent, as far as possible, interruption to the trains; he was driving his ballast waggon, drawn by horses, behind another set, driven by another man, which were moving at so slow a rate as to prevent deceased from getting onward as rapidly as he wished. He therefore ran forward, to stimulate the horses with his whip, to do which he was obliged to run across the line, as the horses were attached to the off corner of the waggon. The application of the whip caused the horses to move forward suddenly, and the deceased as suddenly ran back, to get out of the way of the waggons. In doing this however, he unfortunately fell, and the waggons passed over his legs. Surgical assistance was immediately procured, but the injuries he had received were of such a character that it was deemed desirable to remove him at once to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, proper precaution being taken to stop the haemorrhage. In the Hospital the unfortunate man was attended by Mr Barnes, but he lingered only a few hours; the accident happened at two o'clock, and by ten he was dead. An Inquest was held next day, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner for the city of Exeter, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 13 February 1845
NORTH MOLTON - Inquest - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Northmolton, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of URSULA KINGDOM, aged 88, who lived with her son-in-law, JOHN COCKINGS, and on Saturday night, on going up stairs to go to bed, she fell over the stairs to the bottom, where she was instantly picked up, and was found to have received a severe contusion of the head, from which the blood flowed profusely, and which caused her death within half an hour, and before a surgeon could arrive. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Tuesday, at Aller-cross turnpike-gate, in the parish of Southmolton, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of WILLIAM MOGFORD, aged 40, who, the day previous, was dreadfully shattered by an explosion of gunpowder in a rock at Needy Cleave, from the effects of which he died soon after. It appeared the deceased, who was employed in the quarry, had charged the rock with powder, and set fire to the fuse, when he repaired to a place of safety to await the explosion: but as it did not take place so soon as he expected, he imagine the fire had gone out, and he repaired to the spot to see if such was the case, when the explosion took place, and he was blown with the pieces of rock to a considerable distance, where he was picked up in a mangled condition. Messrs. Southcombe and Tanner, surgeons, were as early as possible on the spot; but their efforts were of no avail, as he survived but three hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death." The deceased was a man much respected, and had been a member of the Independent congregation in this town for many years.

Thursday 20 February 1845
BARNSTAPLE - Concealment of Birth of an Illegitimate Child. - An Inquest was held at the 'Exeter Inn,' in this town, on Wednesday (yesterday), at noon, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of a male infant child, which had been found the evening preceding under the following circumstances. A woman named MARY BARROW, aged 28, had been living for several years as servant at the 'Exeter Inn,' and enjoyed the highest confidence of her mistress, who had lately observed an enlargement of her person, which she was disposed to attribute to a dropsical tendency, as the woman was of a delicate habit, and laboured under a bodily deformity. On Tuesday morning she complained of being unwell, and her mistress (Mrs Tinson) advised her to go up and lie down on the bed, which she did, and Mrs T. went up several times to see her during the forenoon, however, between five and six o'clock, hearing a great deal of noise in the bedroom (which happened to be over the kitchen), Mrs Tinson went up, and was astonished to see blood on the floor, and on going to the night-stool she observed appearances which left no doubt on her mind that the woman had given birth to a child, but on charging her with it, she denied it with the utmost confidence, and persisted in her denial although her mistress continued to reiterate the charge. Mrs Tinson sent for a neighbour, whose conviction was concurrent with her own, and whom she desired to fetch a midwife, who came immediately, and arrived at the same conclusion, and told the woman she had given birth to a child, but she still affected to deny it, until at length, finding further attempt at concealment to be abortive, she confessed that it was so, and that the child was in a chest in the room - that she had delivered herself, and that the child lay on the bed without her being able to remove it for about ten minutes, when she took it up and found it dead, and put it in the chest. the midwife went to the chest and found the child as described by the mother, wrapped up in a cotton gown. The Coroner was apprised of the circumstances, and summoned a respectable Jury (of which Mr George Symons, druggist, was the Foreman), before whom the facts above stated were deposed to; but as the Jury thought it necessary to have a post mortem examination, the Inquest was adjourned until seven o'clock in the evening: when Mr Cooke, surgeon, attended and deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, which was that of a fine healthy male child; that he had no doubt that the child was born alive, and that it had breathed several times, as the lungs were fully inflated; that there were no external marks of injury, except a slight bruise on the head, which was not at all sufficient to have occasioned death; and Mr Cooke's opinion was that the child would have lived if it had been properly cared for, but had most probably died from neglect of such attention as it should have received after its birth. Other evidence was given, of no material purport: and the Jury, after deliberation, arrived at a verdict, "That the child was born alive, but how it came to its death there was no sufficient evidence to prove." The woman is going on favourably: she has received the attentions for some time of a labouring man named Buckingham, who is supposed to be the father of the child. We understand that the case will be noticed by the magistrates, so soon as the woman is sufficiently recovered to appear before them.

SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Monday last, at North Aller, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of this borough, on the body of MR THOMAS SKINNER, yeoman, aged 40, who was found drowned in an old lime pit at South Aller, about half a mile from his own house the same morning. The deceased attended the Great Market here and sold some stock on Saturday, and returned home at night, when he appeared depressed in spirits, but retired (as the family supposed) to rest soon after. About one o'clock on Sunday morning he was heard go down stairs, and his brother got up and followed him, but could not overtake him; but when he arrived at the quarry he discovered his hat and found the ice broken (the water being frozen over): on which he aroused the inmates of the house adjoining, which is within two gun shots of the pit, and every exertion was resorted to to discover his body, but without avail, until Monday morning about eight o'clock. Hundred were on the spot on Sunday, to witness intrepid conduct of a man in a trundle, and others on a raft with grapples, to recover the body, the pit being very large and the water near 40 feet deep. It appeared that a young woman to whom he had been paying his addresses for the last 10 years had latterly been slighting him, and on Saturday last refused to meet him, although importuned by friends to do so. She has another and more favoured paramour in view, with whom the deceased saw her in company the same day. - Verdict, "Found Drowned."

EXETER - An Inquest was held on Monday, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at the 'George and Dragon' Inn, in St. Sidwell, on the body of ELIZABETH GOSS, 68 years of age, the wife of a labouring man, residing near the inn. She was sitting by the fire, on Sunday, with her husband and idiot son, when she leaned back in her chair, and expired in less than a quarter of an hour. The Jury returned a verdict of 'Died by the Visitation of God.'

CULLOMPTON - On Sunday morning last, MR STAMPER, steward of Bethel Walrond, Esq., of Dulford-house, was found dead on the Exeter-road, near Westcott farm, about two miles from Collumpton. There was a severe wound in the back of the head, but there was no other sign of violence. His dress was undisturbed and unruffled; his hat was lying near him. He appeared to have dropped his whip about twenty yards off. He had gone out on business after dinner, collecting head rents of the Manor of Aller Peverell, a manor belonging to Mr Walrond. He had spent the evening with Mr James Martin, of Tye, and left his house at ten o'clock, on horseback, having borrowed a horse from a friend. He was found about a mile from Mr Martin's residence. The horse found its way about one in the morning to his owner's house; and they, supposing that he had turned it home, did not go to look for the rider. The night was bitterly cold: the frost was severe, and it is possible that he might have fallen off through the horse sliding. An Inquest was held on Monday last, by Jas. Partridge, Esq., at the 'Hare and Hounds' inn, to which the body had been removed on its being found. The Coroner did not think it necessary to have any surgical examination of the head, and the Jury returned a verdict that he had been accidentally killed through a fall from his horse. The deceased was a man of sober, business habits, and much respected.

Thursday 27 February 1845
HEANTON PUNCHARDON - Inquests: - Sudden Death. - On Thursday last, at Wrafton, in the parish of Heanton Punchardon, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SARAH BLACKMORE, aged 70, wife of a labourer of that village, who was found dead in her bed the same morning. The evidence of Mr Pick, surgeon, was to the effect that death was occasioned by the rupture of a vessel in the chest, and a verdict in conformity thereto was returned.

NORTHAM - Also on Tuesday last, at Northam, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, (in place of Mr Vallack,) on the body of JOHN SYMONDS, an elderly man of that village, who on the Sunday before fell in a fit of apoplexy off the chair on which he was sitting, and was removed to bed, and the assistance of Dr Pratt called in, but he lay insensible until the next day, when he died. Verdict, "Apoplexy."

ILFRACOMBE - Also on Friday last, at Ilfracombe, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN RICHARDS, mariner, aged 60, who was seized with sudden illness the day before in his dwelling house, and lay insensible until the next morning, when he died. Mr Moon was called in to attend him, and gave evidence that death resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

WEST BUCKLAND - Suicide - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, in the parish of West Buckland, on the body of JOHN HOLLOWAY, aged 28, son of a farmer of that place, who had drowned himself the day preceding in a quarry pit on his father's farm. It appeared that deceased had unfortunately been drinking during the morning, his father being absent at Barnstaple market: and at dinner time, the work not being done which he ought to have performed, his mother found fault with him, on which he rose from dinner and engaged the assistance of a man and maid servant in order that he might get his work done by the time his father came home; but instead of going to his work (tilling potatoes) he went away and was absent for an hour or two, at which his family became alarmed, and went in search of him, and on the side of a deep quarry pit his clothes and watch were found, and in the pit his dead body, leaving no doubt that he had drowned himself. Deceased had often threatened to drown himself when he was in liquor, and it was this threat that induced the alarm of his mother at his absence. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

EXETER - Shocking Suicide of a Clergyman. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning, before John Partridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the REV. WILLIAM SALTER, of Mount Radford, Exeter. The Enquiry took place at the deceased gentleman's residence, and, from the evidence there given, it appears that on Saturday morning last he arose at about ten o'clock and came down into the parlour. His wife was laying out the breakfast, and asked him to sit down, but, without answering, he took up his hat and gun, and went out into the garden. A report of a gun was soon after heard, and on one of the female servants going into the garden, she found her master weltering in his blood, with the gun laying on his arm. Mr Norris, surgeon, afterwards examined the body and found a wound in the palate extending through the skull, and a corresponding hole in deceased's hat. From the circumstance of the muzzle of the gun being bloody and the position of the gun itself, he gave it as his decided opinion that the wound was self-inflicted, and not accidental. There was no evidence of what the gun was charged with, but the Jury, after hearing that deceased was 70 years of age, and had been in low spirits for the last two weeks, returned a verdict, "That he shot himself during a fit of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden and Mysterious Death at Plymouth. - On Saturday last, MR WILLIAM AVERY, of Plymouth, clerk to the collector of excise, which responsible situation he had ably filled for many years, died suddenly, under very mysterious circumstances. It appears that, on Friday evening, he came home about half-past eight o'clock, and proceeded shortly afterwards to bed, apparently in his usual health. On the following morning, the servant, by the desire of MRS AVERY, took up his breakfast; she saw him in bed, looking just as usual. He did not, however, leave his bed room, observing that he did not feel himself sufficiently well to go to the office. At eleven o'clock he complained of being much worse, and his wife, who was greatly alarmed, sent immediately for medical assistance, and about twelve o'clock Mr Andrews, surgeon, arrived. He found him in an excited state, trembling greatly, with pulse scarcely perceptible, but he saw no danger; he gave him a small portion of brandy as a stimulant, and applied hot flannels to his feet, and while thus attending him, AVERY said, "Oh doctor, I shall die! If you knew but all you would say so too; what will become of my little wife? They have driven me to distraction - let me come out of bed, and I will tell you all." Mr Andrews, fearing from what he had said, and from his altered appearance, that he had taken or had had poison administered to him, sent for his partner, Mr Freeman, AVERY still saying he should die. Mr Freeman arrived shortly after, but every effort to relieve him proved of no avail - he gradually grew worse, and died about one o'clock. During the last quarter of an hour he sank most rapidly, and became insensible before he had time to make the statement to Mr Andrews, which he evidently intended to do. An Inquest was held on his body on Saturday evening, by Mr Edmonds, the Coroner. Mr Andrews deposed to the facts above stated, and further stated that, by order of the Coroner, he had made a post mortem examination of the body: he found the heart and lungs in a healthy state, but the coats of the stomach were lined with a whitish substance, the nature of which he could not accurately state without analysing it; and the contents of the stomach he had also secured, in order that it might undergo a similar process. He died within an hour after witness first saw him. MRS AVERY was most attentive, kind and affectionate, and he never witnessed such a distressing scene as was exhibited when the fatal event was made known to her. He had no reason to apprehend danger when he first came in. The Inquest was then adjourned until Tuesday, to give time to have the contents of the stomach, &c., analysed. This distressing circumstance has caused considerable excitement in the town, as the deceased was well known and generally respected. It is too clear, we fear, that his death has arisen from poison; and from his expressions it may be safely considered administered by his own hands, but at present no cause can be assigned for the rash act. His affairs connected with his office are said to be promptly correct, and he was always most regular in the execution of his public duties. He was married about five months since (being then a widower) to the widow of a master mariner, who was drowned in the London trade several years before. AVERY was about 40 years of age.

Thursday 6 March 1845
NORTH MOLTON - Coroner's Inquests:- An Inquest was held at Northmolton, on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of the infant daughter of WILLIAM GOVIER, of that place, who died in a convulsive fit in her father's arms on the Tuesday preceding. A verdict to that effect was returned.

NORTH TAWTON - At North-tawton, on Saturday inst., before Richard Bremridge, Esq., (in place of Mr Vallack,) on the body of ELIZABETH TAYLOR, aged 68, who did suddenly in her house the day preceding. The medical man gave his opinion that death resulted from aneurism of the heart, and a verdict accordingly was returned.##Also, at Lynton, on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of AGNES COLLINS, aged 42. Deceased was a person of imbecile mind, and lived with her mother: on the 18th ultimo she was sitting in the kitchen, and in attempting to take an apple from the fire, which had been put there to roast, the flames caught her clothes, and burnt her arms and breast severely, from the effects of which she died on the 27th. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 March 1845
COMBMARTIN - Sudden Death - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at Combmartin, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOANNAH BERRY, aged 74, who, on getting out of bed on the Saturday preceding, was taken in a fit, and lay insensible until the Monday following when she expired. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

MOLLAND - Child Burning - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Molland, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN DART, aged 2 years, son of a blacksmith of that place, who on the day before was left alone in his father's house for about five minutes, while his mother went on an errand to a neighbours, and on her return she found the child had set himself on fire, and was so burnt that he survived but two hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 March 1845
TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - On Friday night last, as GEORGE NORMAN, a waggoner, in the service of George Braginton, Esq., of this town, was returning from Barnstaple with his master's waggon and two horses laden with bones, and had come to within a mile of the town, at the brow of the hill on the commencement of the common, it is supposed that he must have neglected to drag the wheels, or that the horses became restive and ran into the hedge row - but, from whatever cause, the waggon was overturned, and the wheel passed over the chest of the driver, who was found a few minutes afterwards lying in a ditch or pool of water by the hedge with his face in the water and the load partly upon him, and quite dead. The horses were overtaken on the common, with one of the shafts attached to them: the other had disengaged itself from the harness and was found in the road. An Inquest was held on the body the next day before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned, with a deodand of 1s.

Thursday 3 April 1845
BRAUNTON - A girl of this parish, named SUSAN PETHERICK, aged 14, who was at the cockle-ridge yesterday, on Braunton Burrows, for the purpose of collecting shell fish, fell (it is supposed) into the water and was drowned. Her body was picked up this morning and awaits a Coroner's Inquest.

BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, by Thomas Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of ELIZABETH WELLSFORD, a girl of seven years of age, who accidentally caught her clothes on fire on the previous day in the house of a neighbour, and died in a few hours afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

COPPLESTONE - Sudden Death - On Saturday week last, an Inquest was held at Copplestone, in the parish of Colebrook, upon the body of JOHN GRIBBLE, a blacksmith of the above parish. The deceased was in church on Good Friday, and while thee an alarm was given of a fire having broken out in the premises of a relative of his. The deceased ran out of the church towards the fir, but on his way he dropt down and when taken up was found to be quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of died by the Visitation of God. The deceased was 78 years of age; he had carried on the business of a blacksmith more than 50 years, and was highly esteemed as an honest and industrious man.

Thursday 10 April 1845
ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held at Lidford, in the parish of Ilfracombe, on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JAMES GEAR, aged two years and four months, son of MR BENJAMIN GEAR, yeoman, who on the preceding day was found by a labourer lying dead in a pond in the court yard of his father's farm, into which there was no doubt he had accidentally fallen. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

Thursday 1 May 1845
NORTH MOLTON - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Northmolton on the body of MRS MARY ALLEN, aged 75. Deceased had lived in the house of her nephew, MR RICHARD ALLEN; and on Sunday morning last, had gone upstairs in her usual health to dress, when she was heard by her niece to make a noise as if scraping the floor, on which she went into her room and found that she had fallen down in a fit. Mr Ley, the surgeon, was called in; but his aid was of no avail, as deceased lay insensible, and died within two hours. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 15 May 1845
EXETER - Accident. - On Thursday an Inquest was held before the Coroner for Exeter, at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' in that city, on the body of JOHN HALLETT, a lad about 12 years old, in the service of a farmer at Woodbury Salterton, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital on Wednesday. About a fortnight since the deceased left his master's yard, sitting on the shafts of a cart drawn by a restive mare, which he was driving to field. He was shortly after found in an adjacent field lying on the ground, the mare having run away; and on being asked what was the matter with him, replied that he didn't know, only he could not stand. He was taken to the Hospital, where it was ascertained that one of the cart-wheels had passed over the middle of his person, and caused such injury that a very painful operation was rendered necessary. The patient lingered until Wednesday, when he expired in great agony. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 22 May 1845
EXETER - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD PIKE, aged 52, who had died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital, under the following melancholy circumstances. The deceased was a small farmer, residing in the parish of Ottery St. Mary, and was in Exeter on Saturday with a waggon and two horses. On his return he stopped at Heavitree, and took some refreshment, in company with several other persons, who were going in the same direction. They started nearly together, the deceased, with his waggon, being ahead of the rest. When near the five mile stone, his companions lost sight of him for awhile, and on getting to the brow on the hill, they found him lying on the ground, bleeding and insensible. His waggon was about thirty yards in advance of him - the horses still trotting. He was taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where every attention was paid him, but he survived only a few hours. There can be no doubt that he had been thrown out of the waggon, and that the wheel had gone over his head. There was an extensive fracture of the base f the skull, with effusion into and laceration of the brain, and these injuries were sufficient to account for death.

Thursday 12 June 1845
EXETER - Suicide. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Adelaide Inn,' Haven Banks, St. Thomas, Exeter, on the body of JOHN THOMAS BALDWIN, master of the ship 'Hector,' of Yarmouth, now lying in the Exeter Basin. The witnesses state that the deceased, who was subject to fits of insanity, came on the deck of his vessel on the previous night about twenty minutes past nine, and having climbed over the rail, let himself down into the water. Twenty minutes elapsed before he could be taken out, and then life was extinct. The deceased had received a letter from the owners of the vessel just before, the contents of which were conjectured to have affected his mind. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide in a fit of Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 19 June 1845
SOUTHMOLTON - Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Southmolton, on Friday last, by James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of WILLIAM CONEYBEAR, tailor, who was found suspended by the neck with his neckerchief, to the bedpost, the same morning. Deceased removed his goods on the occasion of the late fire, and had been in a state of intoxication on every day since that time. - Verdict, "Destroyed himself during a Temporary fit of Derangement."

ILFRACOMBE - Sudden Death. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of an aged man, named MATTHEW GERMAN, of this place. The deceased has for some years past lived apart from his wife in a miserable dwelling, being supported by pay from the parish, and by doing small jobs as a joiner. It appeared in evidence that the night previous to his death the deceased called at the house of one of his sons, and asked for something to drink; his daughter gave him some coffee, and he then left to go to bed, apparently in good health; no more was thought of him till the next day, about two o'clock, when his son went to look for him, and found his door bolted on the inside; he forced an entrance and found the poor old man in his bed a corpse. It appeared he must have died immediately on getting into bed, and without a struggle, as the bed clothes were not at all deranged. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 26 June 1845
PARACOMBE - An Inquest was held on Saturday se'nnight, at Paracombe, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of SUSANNA LETHABY, aged 15 years, daughter of a small farmer of that parish, called JOHN LETHABY, who had died suddenly the preceding Thursday. There were rather unusual circumstances attending the death of deceased, which created suspicion in the minds of the neighbours. It appeared that the deceased was as well as usual on the morning of the day in question, and went to work with her father, who was ploughing, with a couple of horses, the foremost of which deceased led; in turning one of the farrows she fell, and the horse trod on her stomach; she complained of much pain, but soon after returned to her work, and continued until dinner-time, when she went with her father home, but could eat but little dinner; she returned to the field, and in the afternoon was sent back by her father for some cider, when she told her mother she had drank a pint and half of water, and that her bowels were in much pain: her mother cautioned her not to drink the cider, and she carried it to her father, to whom she soon after complained of giddiness, and confessed that she had drank some of the cider, which her father supposed had affected her head; she lay in the hedge while he went home with the horses, and on his return she was dead. No medical man was called in at the time; but the Coroner took a surgeon with him (Mr Michael Cooke), who gave it as his opinion, from the nature of the evidence and the appearance of the body, that death had resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 3 July 1845
WEST ANSTEY - Suicide - An Inquest was held on Saturday se'nnight, at West Anstey, by James Partridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH TAPP, a servant living at Slade farm, in that parish, who had committed suicide by taking corrosive sublimate on the preceding Sunday, from the effects of which she lingered in great agony until Thursday night, when she died. It came out in evidence that she was pregnant by a man named John Cockram, who had promised her marriage, and whom she had seen walking with another woman on the Sunday, and the feelings occasioned by this hated sight led her to commit the fatal act. the Jury returned a verdict of "Felo-de-se;" and her remains were buried at dead of night without the religious rites of sepulchre. During the Inquest there was an angry collision between the Coroner and the surgeon, Mr Trevor, of Dulverton, who had attended the unfortunate deceased, and to whom she made a confession of her condition by the cause of her rashness, but whom the Coroner would persist in not calling in evidence, alleging that the facts were clear enough without a medical witness, and he would not therefore put the county to the expense of calling him - a decision against which the surgeon protested, and was ordered out of court for his insolence! We judge there must have been an ancient grudge between the parties. The contest on such an occasion was most unseemly.

Thursday 24 July 1845
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at Plymouth, on the body of MARY ANN BAKER, the widow of the late MR BAKER, grocer, in that town. The poor woman had been in a state of insanity for some time, and having escaped from her residence on Tuesday, she proceeded to the Hoe, and after sitting on the rocks near the public bathing place for some time, she was seen by some parties at a distance to throw herself into the sea. An alarm was instantly given, when a waterman named Lambridge, attracted by the cries, ran to the spot, and most heroically plunged into the sea, caught the woman, and brought her safely to the beach. She was taken home in a state of insensibility, where she lingered for a few hours, and though the first medical aid was procured, her system had received such a shock that she sunk under it. These facts having been deposed to, the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 31 July 1845
CREDITON - Fatal Accident. - A man named GRIBBLE, who was returning from his work to Crediton about six o'clock last evening, in company with his fellow workman, was overtaken by the mail cart from Northtawton a little this side the Barnstaple Cross turnpike-gate, when the shaft of the cart entered his head on the one side and protruded on the other. Death, of course was almost instantaneous. It appears from the statement of the person driving, that the horse shied, and running off became unmanageable. The other man had a very narrow escape. An Inquest will be held on the body as soon as the Coroner can attend.

Thursday 7 August 1845
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held this morning (Thursday) before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, at the house of a person called Vickery, living at the head of Bear Street, in this town, on the body of the infant child of a single woman named HARRIETT FISHER, who lodges with Vickery. The child was born a week ago and the night before last the mother awoke and found it dead in her arms. There was no evidence to shew that death arose from other than natural causes, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, a distressing accident occurred at the new timer-yard of Mr Hugh Ballment, at Rolle's quay, near this town, by which the life of PHILIP ROGERS, aged 54, an old and faithful servant of Mr Ballment, was sacrificed. The waggoners had brought in a load of timber from Eggesford, and one of the pieces (about a ton and half) was fastened on a pair of high wheels for the purpose of being drawn from the road where it was lodged into the years; the waggoners had unhappily become intoxicated, and the head man had left his team in the charge of his assistant, who, instead of guiding the horses in the centre of the road, suffered the off wheel to get between two pieces of timber, and the horses going at a smart pace the wheel came violently against a projecting knot in one of the pieces, by which the chain secured around the piece they were drawing in was driven off its place, and the pole of the trip-wheels suddenly resounded backward and alighted unfortunately on the head of the deceased, who was behind the piece of timber. He was struck to the ground insensible and never spoke afterwards: he was picked up and instantly conveyed to the Infirmary, where all that surgical skill could suggest was attempted, but without effect: and the poor fellow died during the night. He had been for many years in the service of Mr Ballment, by whom he was highly esteemed for his honesty and industry, and has left a large family to deplore his untimely end. An Inquest was held on the body, on Monday, at the Infirmary by Alfred Drake, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned, the Jury expressing an opinion that the two waggoners in whose carelessness the accident was attributable, deserved to be severely reprimanded. The destitution of this family, thus bereaved of their only dependence, suggests an appeal to the charity of the benevolent.

Thursday 28 August 1845
BIDEFORD - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held by Thomas Pridham, Esq., the Coroner of the Borough, on Thursday last, on the body of THOMAS RYDER, aged 67. It appeared that MR RYDER was on a visit from Hartland, to his son-in-law, MR COULL, in Bridge-street: that he retired to bed on Wednesday evening in apparently good health: that on Thursday morning he was found dead in his bed. Verdict - "Visitation of God."

Thursday 4 September 1845
KENTISBEER - An Inquest was held before Mr Aberdein, Coroner, on the 28th of August, on the body of MOSES ROOKLEY, a labourer, who obtained his living by working in the Scythe stone pits, in this neighbourhood and came to his death under the following circumstances. On Wednesday last the deceased was at work, with his son and daughter, in a pit which he rented of Mr Francis Broom, of Uffculm. About 12 o'clock he was posting up the roof of the pit, about 100 yards from the entrance, when suddenly the earth, sand and stones, fell in on him and covered him entirely as he stood upright; his daughter (aged 20) was knocked down and also covered therewith. The daughter was not in so far in the pit as the deceased, and the brother, a fine little boy about 12 years of age, who was nearer the entrance of the pit, ran to rescue her, and after half an hour's severe labour, succeeded in removing the earth with his hands from her head and face, so as to prevent suffocation, and then went for further assistance. Whilst he was gone, the daughter called to her father, and asked him if he was buried; the deceased replied, "Yes, I am just dead, and shall never speak to you any more." After that some more earth fell down on him, and she heard him groan and subsequently heard him talking to himself (as she expressed it), as though he was praying, but she could not understand what he said. As soon as the little boy (the brother) returned with some other whetstone men, they proceeded to extricate the daughter and then searched for the deceased, and in about an hour found him about five to six feet further in, standing in an upright position, with his arms uplifted, covered with earth and stones, but it took another hour before the body was got out. In the mean time, the Rev. Mr Thompson, the clergyman of Blackborough, who was early present at the spot, and manifested the greatest interest and kindness, had procured the attendance of Mr Maunder, surgeon, Cullompton, who tried to bleed the deceased and apply restoratives, but to no purpose. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

NEWTON - Manslaughter by a Navvy. - An Inquest was held here on Tuesday, touching the death of JOSEPH GOODING, a navvy, aged 22, whose death was stated to be the result of injuries received during a drunken brawl with another navvy, named John Thomas. It appeared from the evidence, which was exceedingly conflicting, some asserting that the deceased was drunk, others that he was sober, that Thomas, who is commonly known by the name of "Devon," went into Fisher's beer shop on the previous day, while much intoxicated, and asserted that he considered himself as good a man as any in England: in consequence of which deceased agreed to fight with him. The landlord immediately ordered them out of the house, and they retired to a garden behind, and fought violently for near half an hour, the deceased getting the worst of it. Deceased then said he would have one round more; it was a very severe one, and ended by both parties falling to the ground, deceased being under. He was immediately taken up by his mate, and the only words he uttered were, "Ned, take care of my dog." He was then removed into the beer shop in an insensible state, medical assistance procured, but without avail, as he died on the following morning. A post mortem examination took place, when it was discovered that the cause of death was the rupture of a blood vessel in the head. A verdict of Manslaughter was returned, and Thomas was committed for trial at the summer assizes.

OTTERY ST. MARY - Sudden Death - An Inquest was held before Mr Aberdein, on the 27th inst., at Ottery St. Mary, on MR JOHN MAYNARD HENRY BATE, solicitor, who was found dead on the 26th, in his own house. From the evidence, it appears that deceased on the Monday evening, was in liquor, and remained at an inn at Alphington, near Ottery, until after twelve o'clock at night, where he drank some gin and water. About twelve o'clock, the landlady awoke deceased, who had fallen asleep, and told him it was high time to go home. He arose and went to his house, and there had some more gin and water. On Tuesday, about twelve o'clock in the day, a carrier having brought some goods for the deceased and on enquiring who was MR BATE'S housekeeper, found the landlady of the inn had been doing for him. He sent for her and she came, and enquired what he had; and on being told she opened the kitchen door, (she having the key,) and the goods were taken into the house. She turned round towards the lobby door, and discovered the body of the deceased near to the door, lying at the bottom of the stairs in the lobby, with his head upon his right arm, out-stretched, and candlestick near it. There was a little bloody discharge, which came from his mouth, on the floor: his face and hands were very black, cold, stiff: and he appeared to have been dead some hours. The deceased's medical gentleman was sent for, who stated at the Inquest that he had been his medical attendant for nearly 30 years, and having described the way in which the body of deceased was lying when he came, that he had seen him repeatedly attacked with fits, which threatened apoplexy, that he had examined the body and found no marks of violence, and had no reason to believe that the deceased had died other than a natural death and that he was of opinion death was caused by apoplexy.

COMBMARTIN - Accident - An Inquest was held at Combmartin, on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of AARON HAYMAN, a child four years of age, the son of a blacksmith, of that parish, who, the morning before, was sent by his mother to purchase a little tobacco to take to his father, who was at work in the mines; he was not missed until the evening, when his cap was seen floating on the pond adjoining the counting-house of the Miss Tenement, and the water being let off, the body of the deceased was found quite dead. There was no evidence to show how deceased came into the water, but the most probable conjecture was that he had gone too near the edge of the pond, and had fallen in. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 11 September 1845
SOUTH MOLTON - An Inquest was held at Ford Farm, Southmolton, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of the Borough, on Friday last, on the body of MR WILLIAM HASKINGS, aged 75, who expired the preceding morning suddenly. Verdict, "Natural Death."

BISHOPS NYMPTON - An Inquest was held at Cross Farm, Bishopsnympton, on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM HILL, aged 18, who was killed on Friday evening, by the wheel of a waggon passing over him in returning from his father's harvest field. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

CHITTLEHAMPTON - An Inquest was also held at Fullabrook Farm, in the parish of Chittlehampton, on Monday last, on the body of a little girl, the daughter of MR JOHN DYER, aged 3 years, who was discovered floating in a well on the premises, having been missed but a short time. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - The body of MR EDWARD STEPHENS, whose accidental death by drowning was recorded in our paper three weeks ago, was picked up on Thursday last, near Watermouth, having been observed floating on the water by some men fishing, who got a boat, and with some difficulty drew the body into Combmartin. It was in an advanced state of decomposition, and was lodged in the 'New Inn' to await a Coroner's Inquest, which was held the next morning before Richard Bremridge, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The body was afterwards removed to this place; and interred in the churchyard, being attended by a very large concourse of persons. The reward of £5 which had been offered by the Misses Bailey for the recovery of the body, was paid to the men who picked it up; and other persons engaged in the search were liberally rewarded from funds left by those ladies for that purpose.

Thursday 25 September 1845
TIVERTON - An Inquest was held on Thursday, before Mr Mackenzie, Coroner, on the body of THOMAS HANCOCK, schoolmaster, who was found in the dam of Core Mills, by Mr Adams, of Brushford, the previous morning. The deceased had deposited a letter at his lodgings, stating that he was going abroad, and desiring his watch to be given to one of his acquaintance. A love affair is supposed to have led him to his untimely end. - Verdict, "Found Drowned."

Thursday 9 October 1845
DEVONPORT - A woman of the unfortunate class, named ELIZABETH RIGGS, who has resided for a period of fifteen years in various houses in the neighbourhood of Cornwall-street, Devonport, deprived herself of life on the evening of Saturday last, by taking a quantity of arsenic. An Inquest has since been held on her body, and a verdict returned of Insanity.

Thursday 23 October 1845
BARNSTAPLE - Death of JOHN LAW, Esq., - Seldom has our weekly task involved a duty of greater pain and sorrow than we experience in making the announcement which heads these lines. The dispensation of an inscrutable Providence, which has deprived the town of one of its worthiest and most useful inhabitants, has snatched from us a highly valued and constant friend. The suddenness of the stroke aggravates its severity; and the sacred time and place of its occurrence deepen the solemnity which always belongs to the surprise of death.
MR LAW occupied so public and respected a position in the borough, and his connexion with it has extended over so long a term, that we should neither satisfy the dictates of our own attachment, nor meet the expectations of our readers, if we confined our notice of his premature demise - (for, to the interests of society, the death of the good is always premature) - to the usual record of our obituary.
A native of Barnstaple, MR LAW early commenced active life by succeeding to the extensive mercantile concerns of his father a portion of which he continued to within a year of his death, when the expiration of his lease in the lime kilns severed the last link of his association with commercial life. In the year 1810 he was one of the six original partners who set on foot the North Devon Bank, and was (save one) the last survivor. In the active management of the business of the bank, MR LAW continued to take share (interrupted frequently by his delicate health) until the year 1836, when it passed into the National Provincial company.
Soon after his majority, he was elected a member of the corporation; twice filled the office of Mayor under the old system, and, indeed, was the last of his line, for it was while he occupied the civic chair that the municipal act took effect, and the self-elected body was removed to make way for a more popular constitution; and, although of politics adverse to those f an over-whelming majority of the new Town Council, it was no mean tribute either to his moderation or to his high qualification for the Mayoralty, nor was it less honourable to the moderation of the new Town Council, then in the plenitude of their popularity and power; that they chose MR LAW to continue in office, thus reciprocating the distinction which their predecessors had conferred on him - the old corporation having made him their last president, and the Council their first. Equally honourable to both parties were the subsequent acts of the Council, in choosing him Alderman, and recommending him to the Secretary of State as a borough magistrate, to which office he was appointed, and the duties of which he continued to discharge with praiseworthy diligence and unblemished rectitude and impartiality up to the time of his death; nor will it be felt as a reproach by his colleagues on the bench, if to him we attribute a large share in the credit of the better public order which makes the present state of the town pleasingly to contract with its condition but a few years ago.
In all his commercial transactions, liberality and honour were his unfailing characteristics: on the bench he was inflexibly just - sufficiently stern to evil-doers, but unsparing in his exertions to vindicate the innocent and avenge the injured: in private life, he adorned every social relation; his companion to the poor "devised liberal things:" his manners were bland and inviting; and in his extensive intercourse with his townsmen, he was accessible to all classes, as the sympathising friend, the experienced counsellor, or the reconciling mediator.
His public services as the active Treasurer of the turnpike trust are best attested by the condition of the finances under his management, and the vast improvement in the roads which he was a principal agent in effecting. As the Treasurer of the Infirmary, the Friendly Institution, the Agricultural Society, and most of the local charities, he was unremitting in his attentions, and his services will be very much missed.
The circumstances of his death were peculiarly solemn. He had been as well as usual, and arose on Sunday morning last full of health and spirits, and pleasantly remarked to one of his attendants, who was complaining of indisposition, that though so much her senior he should lie to bury her; so little did he imagine that death was at the door! He went alone to church, and proceeded to his pew, in which he had scarcely composed himself when he was observed by his son who sat behind him suddenly to fall forward: MR HOOPER LAW instantly sprang to his father'[s assistance, and he was conveyed into the vestry, where he sighed twice or thrice and died within a minute. Several medical gentlemen (Dr Budd, Mr Curry and Mr Hiern) were on the spot, but the spirit had escaped from its lifeless tenement! The effect on the congregation may be imagined. The minister, who had scarcely begun the service, with difficulty proceeded; and all felt the force of the impressive truth - "In the midst of life we are in death."
The body was removed to his late residence in Litchdon, where an Inquest was held upon it the next evening, before Alfred Drake, Esq., and a Jury of gentlemen, (of whom Stephen Bencraft, Esq., was foreman,) who returned a verdict of "Visitation of God."
Solemn was the effect on the minds of the inhabitants as soon as the mournful event became known; and a spontaneous expression of regret attested that the deprivation of so worthy a man and so pre-eminently useful a citizen was felt to be a public loss. The remains are to be interred on Saturday next, in the family vault at Bishop's Tawton.

Thursday 6 November 1845
TAWSTOCK - Fatal Accident - Yesterday (Wednesday) as a man named THOMAS HAMMETT of Harracott, in the parish of Tawstock, was riding in a donkey cart near his home, he was about to strike the animal, when he accidentally overbalanced himself, and fell back over the cart, alighting on his head. He was picked up and found to have received serious injury; and the assistance of Dr Jones, of Highbickington, was called in, but ineffectually, as the poor fellow died within three or four hours. An Inquest is to be held on the body today.

Thursday 13 November 1845
BARNSTAPLE - Frightful and Fatal Accident. - We had just time in our last to notice briefly a terrific accident which happened in this town soon after noon on the 6th instant, by an explosion of gunpowder on the premises of MR MILLS, in the Square. We are now enabled to furnish further particulars: and we are sorry to have to record a fatal result in the death of the little boy, son of MR MILLS, who was the cause and victim of the occurrence. MR MILLS was in his shop engaged with a commercial man, when he was alarmed by a loud report, and a simultaneous motion of the goods on his shelves, which fell in all directions. He instantly ran upstairs, and was shocked to see the roof of his house blown off, and the back part of the premises a total wreck; while lying under a quantity of rubbish was his eldest son, who had been blown up by the explosion, and had fallen again with the rafters of the roof. The tremendous noise, the scattered portions of the building, and the clouds of dust and smoke which were seen to envelope the premises, speedily called crowds to the spot, who were anxious to render assistance; and before it could be ascertained whether or not there was further danger, the benevolent feelings of the Superintendent of Police prompted him to venture himself into the shattered and almost falling house. The first object of his solicitude was to rescue the apparently lifeless body of the child, whom he reached and found him yet living, but in a most deplorable condition. He was conveyed to the Dispensary, and thence to the Infirmary, but his injuries were found to be such as to defy relief and to preclude hopes of recovery: he languished in much agony till nine o'clock at night, when death put a period to his sufferings. In an interval of comparative ease he was enabled to reveal the cause of the disaster, stating that he went up to the store-room, on returning from school, to make a squib, and took a lucifer match with him, which ignited and communicated the spark to a barrel of gunpowder (containing from 15 to 20 lbs); and hence the fearful consequences. s There was at first great fear that the younger brother of the deceased had shared his fate, but he was found to be safe, having left his brother in the store-room to come down stairs but a moment or two prior to the sad event. The West of England fire engine was brought to the spot, and played on the timbers which the flames had slightly caught, and on a quantity of powder which yet remained in the room and had not exploded. It would be vain to attempt a description of the effects of the accident upon the house: the roof blow off completely, the windows burst out, the furniture of the rooms shivered to atoms, and scarcely aught but the walls remaining, and they in a shattered state. Nor was the damage confined to the premises of MR MILLS: the house of Mr Young opposite shared in it, as did those of Mr Cooke, Mr Symons, and Mr Gray, slightly, a few panes f glass in each being broken. It was fortunate that the front door of MR MILLS'S iron-mongery shop was open, which preserved it from injury; but the straw bonnet shop adjoining was closed, and here the explosion took fearful effect, blowing out the window, and hurling the stock into the street. It is wonderful, considering the public situation of the house, and the hour of the day, that no injury was done to passers-by; and the escape of a lady (Mrs Newton Lee) at the lodgings of Mr Young was yet more remarkable: she was in her dressing-room at the window (which is immediately opposite MR MILLS'S) when the accident occurred, and large pieces of wood and iron were thrown by the concussion into the room, and passed with great violence on each side of her, but fortunately without touching her.
To MR MILLS, who is an industrious young man, the loss by this casualty is very serious, besides the laceration of his feelings which the death of his child must occasion; and as we are told the office in which the stock was insured does not hold itself responsible for the damage (being caused by explosion, of which an exception is made in the policy,) we are glad to find that a subscription is being raised for his relief, and we can with confidence commend the appeal to the sympathy of the benevolent. The actual loss sustained by MR MILLS has been ascertained to exceed £100; besides consequential losses (from the suspension and derangement of his business) to a considerable amount.
The heroic conduct of the Superintendent of Police on the occasion is beyond all praise, and has suggested to many who witnessed it the propriety of making a subscription to present him with a piece of plate - a design in which the public will warmly unite.
The great danger of large deposits of gunpowder in the midst of the town, thus painfully demonstrated, has caused a general conviction in the minds of the inhabitants of the necessity of providing a magazine in the suburbs; and the attention of the Town Council (as will be seen from our report) was directed to the subject on Monday last. An object of such obvious propriety requires no advocacy to support it.
An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on the body of the child, and a verdict agreeable to the circumstances returned.

Thursday 20 November 1845
CHARLES - Death by Drowning - A little boy named GEORGE BURGESS, aged five years, son of a turnpike-gate keeper, in the parish of Charles, was found drowned in the river Bray, into which he had accidentally fallen, on Monday. An Inquest was held on the body by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

DEVONPORT - Child Murder at Devonport. - On Thursday last an adjourned Inquest was held at the 'Queen's Head,' Stonehouse, on the body of an infant child, which had been found with its throat cut, at the residence of Mrs Salmon, a lady in Durnford-street. From the evidence it appeared that ANN HEARD, servant to the above-named lady, was on Monday last found to have been delivered of a child, the child being in the same room where the young woman was then in bed. A post mortem examination had taken place, by which it was discovered that the child was born alive. The Jury having consulted, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against ANN HEARD, who is now in custody, and will be removed to the county gaol as soon as the state of her health will permit.

Thursday 11 December 1845
YEALMPTON - Melancholy Occurrence. - On Wednesday evening last, about half-past seven o'clock, MR SAMUEL GLANVILLE, of the 'Yealmpton Inn,' Yealmpton, passed the Laira-bridge gate, on horse-back, on his road home, and after passing about a quarter of an hour the horse returned back again without the rider. D. Screen, tollman at the bridge-gate, thinking MR GLANVILLE had stopped at the 'Morley Arms,' took the horse thither, but not finding MR GLANVILLE there, went some distance on the road with the horse, and in the rise of the hill opposite Pomphlett farm-house, near the two mile stone, he discovered MR GLANVILLE laying on his hands and knees, apparently lifeless, with his hat and stick lying by him, and the single part of the bridle in his hand. He was taken to the 'Morley Arms,' and after examination, was pronounced to be dead by Mr Nutt, surgeon, of Plymstock. Intimation of the deeply distressing event was conveyed to his wife and family at Yealmpton, whose agony at the melancholy bereavement cannot be described. An Inquest was held on his body at the 'Morley Arms,' by Mr A. B. Bone, on Friday morning, and a verdict returned of "Died by the Visitation of God." The deceased, who was well known as the driver of the Defiance coach for many years, was much respected. He was about 53 years of age, and has left a widow and seven children to mourn their loss.

Thursday 8 January 1846
HEANTON PUNCHARDON - Fatal Occurrence. - We regret to have to record another loss of life connected, in some degree, with the late wrecks on this coast, making the fifth life lost by casualties arising indirectly therefrom, besides the much greater number engulphed by the sea in these dreadful catastrophes. On Saturday last, there was an auction near Croyde bay for sale of the wreck and cargo of the luckless 'Sarah,' which MR WILLIAM HAMMOND, a highly respectable inhabitant of Heanton Punchardon, set out to attend, driving in a light market-cart, and having his two sons with him, besides a lad to lead the horse. Unfortunately, instead of pursuing the high road, he preferred to take a very dangerous and unfrequented bye-way passing across a large portion of the Saunton estate, and in going through a gateway leading from one of the fields on the farm to Saunton down, the off-wheel of the cart got into a trench, by which the vehicle was upset instantly. MR HAMMOND thrown out, and, shocking to add, part of the iron by which the seat was hung penetrated his back, severed the spinal cord, and caused immediate death! The two boys and the servant were uninjured. The body was removed to Braunton, where an Inquest was held upon it before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, which returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was a member of a most worthy and respected family, and has left a widow and five children to deplore his untimely death.

Thursday 15 January 1846
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, an accident, which resulted fatally, occurred to an aged female, wife of MR EDWARD HERRING, formerly baker, living in Vicarage-street, in this town. Deceased was alone in her bed-room by the fire about noon, when her husband, who was down stairs, heard her scream, and on going up to her found her in flames, her clothes having taken fire. The flames were speedily extinguished, and surgical aid was obtained; but the injuries sustained were so severe that, after lingering in much pain, the unfortunate lady expired on the following afternoon. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict agreeable to the circumstances was returned.

TAVISTOCK - On Monday last an Inquest was held on the body of RICHARD ROWE, seven years of age, whose death was occasioned by the following circumstance:- It appeared that the deceased, with three other boys of about the same age, was drawing a limb of a tree through King-street, Tavistock, and making a noise. Physick, the police officer, ordered them away; they not complying, he made towards them, and the boys attempted to run away, but the deceased could not run so fast as the others, fell down, and was much frightened. An inflammation on the brain was the result, which caused his death. A verdict was given accordingly.

Thursday 22 January 1846
BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by Thomas Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on Friday last, on the body of REBECCA DUNN, the wife of SAMUEL DUNN, of Monkleigh. The poor woman had been in Bideford, and on proceeding homewards dropped down and died instantly in the turnpike road. - Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 29 January 1846
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, a lad called JOHN BINNEY, only son of MR BINNEY of the 'Commercial Inn,' in this town, whilst at play with several other boys at the lower end of the quay, in jumping from the quay to a vessel, fell into the river and was drowned. The body was taken out of the water about half an hour afterwards, and every means was tried to restore animation, but without effect, as the vital spark had fled. On Tuesday evening Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body, and a verdict of "Drowned by Accident" was returned. [The death of this fine little boy was the more afflictive from the fact that his father was lying at the time alarmingly ill, at the point of death. The distress of the mother when her only son, who had but just left her full of health and vigour, was soon after brought in a corpse, may be better conceived than described.

APPLEDORE - The body of THOMAS HOOPER, of this place, whose accidental death by drowning on the 19th we reported a fortnight ago, was taken up on Monday last, at Paige's Pill, in Barnstaple river. An Inquest was held upon the body before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, which returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held in this town, on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of an aged woman named JANE STANBURY, whose death was occasioned by her accidentally setting her clothes on fire on Monday the 12th instant. It appeared in evidence, that the deceased, who lived with another aged woman, was sitting by the fire, when the other left the house to fetch some water, and was not absent more than ten minutes, when on her return she was horrified at meeting her companion rushing out of the house all in flames. Two other neighbours were soon on the spot, who succeeded in putting out the fire. The poor woman lingered in much pain from the effects of the accident until Thursday last, when she died. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 5 February 1846
PLYMOUTH - Distressing Case of Suicide. - An Inquest was held on the body of JOHN H. DAVIES, an accountant, who was found dead in his house, in Norley-place, on Thursday night, with his throat cut. It appears that the unfortunate man, who was of a very excitable temper, had been quarrelling with his wife and family for many days past; and on Wednesday he was served with a summons to answer the complaint of his wife before the magistrates. He refused to attend, and on Thursday morning Mr Cooke, one of the town sergeants, went to the house to tell him that the magistrates were waiting. The door was locked, and the officer could gain no admittance, but the deceased looked out of the window, and said, "I shall not attend; tell the magistrates that;" and on Cook again desiring him to come down, he replied, "Be off; you have had your answer." A warrant was then issued for his apprehension, and put into the hands of the police. The Superintendent and several policemen went to the house, but could gain no entrance, and no one replied to the repeated knocks at the door. At 9 o'clock in the evening the door was forced open, when the unfortunate man was found lying on his bed, his throat cut nearly from ear to ear, a carving knife and a razor lying near, and from the appearance of the body it was certain that he must have been dead several hours. Two letters were found in the house, in the handwriting of the deceased one addressed to Mr Hainsselin, auctioneer, of Devonport, authorizing him to sell his furniture, and the other had neither address nor date, but contained a statement of his domestic squabbles, and complaining that he had been badly treated. His will was also on the table, in his own handwriting, dated January 29, giving all his property to his brothers, in trust for his children, his younger children in preference to the elder. These facts were proved by the evidence of the police, and the handwriting was identified by the brother of the deceased. Several witnesses, among whom was Mr Oldroy, deposed to the violence which had been, from time to time, manifested by the deceased towards his wife and children, threatening to murder them, &c. The Coroner very ably summed up, and the Jury, after some consultation, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." He has left a widow and six children.

Thursday 5 March 1846
SOUTHMOLTON - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at Southmolton, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of the infant son of JOHN MANLEY, who expired suddenly the same morning of a spasmodic fit. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 26 March 1846
BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on Monday last, on the body of JOHN PENNEY, aged 38 years. It appeared that the deceased was discharged from the marines about two years since from illness, and has been residing in Bideford about six months: he went to bed as usual on Saturday night last, and was heard by another person (who slept in the same room) to cough in the night, and was found dead the next morning. Verdict, - "Visitation of God."

DEVONPORT - Death From Fighting. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Barnstaple Inn,' Princes-street, Devonport, upon the body of GEORGE NOSWORTHY, a youth of about 19 years of age. The deceased was an apprentice to Mr Swanson, boot closer, Pembroke-street, and having on the 27th ult. quarrelled with his master's son about some trifling matter, s scuffle ensued, and both fell to the ground. They were then separated, but in a few days afterwards NOSWORTHY was taken ill, and notwithstanding medical aid was procured, he died on the 11th instant. The remains having been subject to a post mortem examination, Mr Bennett, the surgeon, expressed it as his opinion that deceased died from the effects of a blow which he had received on the left temple; the immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs, which would not, he said, have resulted from natural causes. The father of the deceased was present at the Inquiry, and put to the witnesses several questions, the object of which was to show that a workman had held the deceased while John Swanson maltreated him. This was, however, denied. The Jury, after consulting for some time, returned the following verdict:- "Died from congestion of the lungs, produced by an inflammatory fever resulting from injury on the left temple; but how such injury was occasioned, no sufficient evidence appeared to the jurors."

Thursday 2 April 1846
TIVERTON - Melancholy Suicide. - On Tuesday afternoon a good deal of excitement was occasioned in Tiverton and its neighbourhood, by the intelligence that MR JAMES PARTRIDGE, a solicitor of that town, and one of the County Coroners, had committed suicide, by drowning himself in the canal, near Tidcombe-bridge. The deceased was observed, shortly before five o'clock, walking through Gold-street, in the direction of the canal, and at that time nothing unusual was observed in his manner by those who saw and spoke to him. About half-past five, Mr William Hepper, of Tiverton, gardener, who was engaged at Tidcombe, the seat of the Rev. William Rayer, on looking out of the window of the garden-house, saw the deceased walking on the banks of the canal above Halberton. Near Tidbcombe-bridge, he stopped and looked about him for a minute or two, and then walked towards a broken place in the bank, and there went down to the water. He then took his hat from his head and placed it upon the surface of the canal, and immediately walked into the middle of the water himself. His head, however, was not entirely under water, but his bald crown appeared above the surface and remained dry. Mr Hepper immediately came out of the garden-house, and with a person named Stephen Boobier, whom he called to his assistance, proceeded to the canal. Here they found they could do nothing, as neither of them could swim; and Mr Hepper then ran back to the house to get better assistance. About twenty minutes after the deceased had walked into the water, William Carew Rayer, Esq., son of the Rev. William Rayer, arrived, and immediately swam in and brought the deceased to the canal banks. Under the direction and with the assistance of Mr Rayer, the body was conveyed to Tidcombe House, and a messenger despatched for medical assistance. About twenty minutes afterwards, Mr Mackenzie, surgeon, of Tiverton, arrived and applied every means for restoring animation, but without success. Mr Coward, surgeon, of Tiverton, also attended in a few minutes afterwards. The body was subsequently brought home to the late residence of the deceased in Bampton-street, Tiverton. On Wednesday afternoon the Inquest on the body took place at the house in Bampton-street, before Mr Mackenzie, Coroner for the Borough. The above facts were deposed to by various witnesses, after which Mr Coward, the medical attendant of the deceased for 20 years, was examined, and stated that he was very frequently in ill-health, being subject to erysipelas and a disorder in the liver; in August last he was attacked with a determination of blood to the head, and had recently suffered from an attack of apoplexy. Other witnesses spoke to lowness of spirits and loss of memory, and expressed their belief that the mind of the deceased had been for some time impaired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." It is stated that the deceased's affairs have of late been very much embarrassed; and that about a month ago he applied to Mr Frost, of Tiverton, druggist, for half-a-phial full of prussic acid. Mr Frost declined to supply this demand, upon which he appeared much annoyed. It is added that he subsequently obtained the poison from another druggist; but the circumstance reached the ear of his medical attendant, who, it is reported, took immediate steps to prevent any evil results. It is not a little remarkable that the three last Coroners of that division of the county in Mr Partridge's jurisdiction, viz - the deceased and his two immediate predecessors - committed suicide. The act of self-destruction by a Magistrate whose peculiar office it is to inquire into cases of sudden and violent death, affords a melancholy subject for reflection.

Thursday 9 April 1846
BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner of Bideford, on Wednesday last, on view of the body of the infant child of SAMUEL BLIGHT, a tailor, living on the Strand. It appeared that the child was left for a short time in the house by the fire side, and was shortly afterwards heard screaming, having caught her clothes on fire, from which she was burnt very much, and soon afterwards died. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Thursday 16 April 1846
PLYMOUTH - Manslaughter in PLYMOUTH - There has been a great deal of excitement here, owing to Mr Edmonds, the Coroner, having issued his warrant for the exhumation of the body of a woman named REBECCA WYATT, the wife of a beer-shop keeper, living in Lower-lane, who had been buried more than three months. The house kept by the deceased and her husband was a very low one, being used as a brothel as well as a public house, and, as is common in such cases, the man and his wife lived a very miserable life together, frequently getting drunk and fighting in a disgraceful manner. It appeared from the evidence adduced at the Inquest, which was begun on Wednesday, that on the 21st of December last the husband of the deceased quarrelled with her and struck her several times. She then ran into the wash house, and took up a piece of wood to defend herself with; but he got hold of it and struck her over the face so severely, that he knocked out three of her teeth. The injuries were so severe that she was confined to her bed in a condition of great suffering till her death, which occurred on the 1st of January. Mr Giles, a surgeon, was called in on the 28th and he continued to attend her till her death, when he gave the usual certificate, that she had died from effusion on the chest and head. Both the Coroner and the Jury strongly reprobated this conduct of the surgeon; and in order to ascertain, if possible, the cause f death, the Inquest was adjourned till Thursday afternoon, at five o'clock, to give time for a post mortem examination by Mr Freeman, another surgeon. On Thursday evening the Jury again assembled, and Mr Giles having given evidence as to the identity of the body, Mr Freeman described its appearance, stating that the face was greatly decomposed, and that there was a great quantity of extravasated fluid blood in the right cavity of the lung, the jaw bone had been severely bruised, and several of the teeth forced out of their sockets. Mr Freeman added, that if he had been called in as a medical man to attend such a case, and the woman had died, he should most decidedly have felt it his duty to have had a judicial investigation into the cause of her death. The Jury, after a few minutes deliberation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter against the husband of the deceased. They also thanked the Coroner for having made the Enquiry. WYATT has been apprehended and committed for trial on the Coroner's warrant.

Thursday 23 April 1846
SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death in Church. - On Sunday last, just at the commencement of the church service, an old woman named DOROTHY MACGARTH, aged 82, fell down suddenly ill in her seat. She was instantly conveyed out of the church, but ere she could reach the outer walls the vital spark had fled. Dr Riccard, who was in church at the time, promptly attended, but without avail.

SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident.- On Monday last, as a little girl named EMMA, aged 2 ½ years, the daughter of JOHN KINGDON, tailor, was crossing the road in South-street, the wheel of a laden cart passed over her back, whereby she was instantly killed without a struggle. An elder sister, aged 5, seeing her danger, endeavoured to catch her, when she was also thrown down, and one of her legs bruised in a dreadful manner, but she is doing as well as can be expected.
An Inquest was held in both of the foregoing cases before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of the Borough, on Monday: in the former case the verdict was "Visitation of God;" in the latter, "Accidental." No blame is attributed to the driver of the cart, who was leading the horse on the near side, and was going slowly; the child attempted to pass on the off side.

PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT - Fatal Accidents: - On Saturday last, a seaman named WILLIAM HARRIS, of H.M.S. 'Favorite,' died from the effects of a fall from the fore top-masthead of that ship. He was about to remove the pendant, when he accidentally slipped and fell on the deck. An Inquest was held on view of the body on Tuesday, when a verdict agreeable to the circumstances was returned.

PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT - An Inquest was held on the 13th inst., at New Quay, on the body of WILLIAM SERCOMBE, who was accidentally drowned in the Tamar. The deceased (a blacksmith of Bridestow), with his journeyman, had gone on Good Friday last to see Wheal Maria mine. They afterwards went to Calstock, where they dined, and having become intoxicated they left that place on their way home about 9 o'clock; they missed their route and wandered into the river, mistaking the proper landing place, and the deceased sunk in the stream and was drowned. His companion made an alarm, when persons came to the spot; and having crept for the deceased some time he was picked up dead, about 40 yards below the landing place, about half an hour afterwards. Verdict accordingly.

PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday, a mason named JOHN SULLIVAN, about 30 years of age, on returning from his dinner to his work, on one of the houses erecting at the N.W. end of John-street, in Plymouth, suddenly dropped down and expired. He had been in ill health previously. An Inquest was held on the body before John Edmonds, Esq., the borough Coroner, on Thursday, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday 14 May 1846
SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at Southmolton, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of the borough, on the body of LOUISA ANN, the infant daughter of CHARLES LOCK, who instantly expired on a person's lap. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of MARY CHING GEORGE, aged 14 years. It appeared that the deceased, who was quite blind, being alone in a room in her mother's house, her clothes by some means took fire, and she was burnt very much, but survived the accident about a fortnight. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Occurrence. - We regret to state that an accident occurred on the evening of the 1st inst., on board H.M.S. 'Belleisle,' which resulted in the death of a youth named BIGNELL, a Clerk's Assistant on board that vessel. The deceased, who had but recently joined the service, was crossing a hatchway, when he slipped his foot, and was instantly precipitated into the hold, from which place he was removed, in a state of insensibility, to the Royal Navy Hospital, where he died on the following day. An Inquest being held upon his remains, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 21 May 1846
BRADWORTHY - On Wednesday an Inquest was held on the body of a new-born infant, which was found in a linhay the previous day. It appears that the child belonged to MARY PICKARD, a single woman, who delivered herself in the night. She went to bed at the usual hour, but rose some time after, and returned again to her bed. In the morning she arose with the rest of the family, and nothing of the affair was known till the child was discovered in the linhay. The medical man stated in his evidence to the Jury that the child was born alive, which the mother denied. A warrant is out for the mother, who has absconded, on charge of concealing the birth.

Thursday 11 June 1846
BIDEFORD - Death by Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of WILLIAM REED, aged 18 years, an apprentice on board the 'Henry Alexander,' of Bideford. It appeared that the deceased, whilst bathing in the river Torridge, on Thursday evening, was seen at a distance struggling in the water, and cries of distress were also heard, but before assistance arrived he had disappeared. The body was recovered about two hours afterwards. Verdict - "Drowned whilst bathing."

PLYMOUTH - Suicide at PLYMOUTH - A melancholy and most distressing suicide was committed on Tuesday morning last by MR W. B. PROBERT, painter and glazier, of Russell-street, Plymouth. The deceased, who is a master tradesman, appears to have recently suffered considerable depression of spirits, and occasionally exhibited signs of his mind being disordered. On Tuesday morning he went out, according to a previous engagement, and commenced painting a portion of the premises attached to the 'Globe Hotel,' and in the course of the morning he fell twice apparently from a lightness of the head, and at about eight o'clock he returned to his house for the purpose of taking his breakfast, but his family, thinking from the strangeness of his manner that he was unwell, induced him to go to bed. About three quarters of an hour after this, his niece, JOHANNA LYDE having occasion to go into the room, saw him as she supposed leaning against the post of the bed. She went up to him and shook him, and receiving no answer was about to leave the room, when she discovered a piece of cord attached to his neck. She immediately, with great presence of mind, ran over the stairs, and procured a knife, and promptly cut the cord by which he was hanging to the post of the bed. Her shrieks alarmed the rest of the inmates of the house, who came to her assistance; and shortly after a medical gentleman arrived, but it was found that deceased was quite dead. An Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when evidence to the effect of the foregoing statement having been taken, a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was found. The Coroner and Jury commended the presence of mind displayed by the niece in promptly cutting down the body on making the unpleasant discovery that her uncle had hung himself.

EXMINSTER - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday last an Inquest was taken at Exminster, before Frederick Leigh, Esq., one of the Coroners for Devon, on the remains of HENRY SPURWAY, between 50 and 60 years of age, engaged as a watchman on the South Devon line of railway. He was placed on duty on the proceeding evening near the atmospheric engine house at Countess Weir, and it is imagined must have sat down on the atmospheric tubing and fallen asleep. The last train down leaves Exeter at ten minutes past ten at night, and passed this place at the usual rate, without anything attracting the attention of engineer or conductor. On the following morning, however, the men having the care of preparing the engine for the up journey, found about it such marks as left no doubt but that some one had met their death, and search being made along the line, the remains of the unfortunate man were found. With the exception of a small portion of the jaw which still adhered, the head was entirely destroyed, and there were appearances as if the body had been dragged several yards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was married, and has left a son and daughter, but these are grown up.

BRIXHAM - Suicide and Verdict of Felo de Se. - On Monday afternoon last an Inquest was held at Brixham, on the body of JOHN GOSS, a lad aged 15, farm servant to Mr John Harvey, a respectable yeoman of Sherford, in the parish of Brixham. Charles Symonds, a labourer, in the employ of the same party, having been sworn, deposed that the deceased was working in a field with him on Saturday last, when the deceased asked witness what o'clock it was, and then went away as he said to a place called Gore, and witness heard nothing further of the deceased until his death. Richard Rogers, of Brixton, labourer, stated that on Saturday night, about 9 o'clock, he saw the deceased hanging at Kidgshill Gate; he procured assistance, and examined the deceased, who was hanging by his braces, quite dead. WILLIAM GOSS, the father of the boy, said the deceased was servant with Mr Harvey; he was a sober lad, and he could not account for his rash act. He appeared very comfortable and happy and witness knew of nothing likely to have affected his spirits. One or two other persons were also examined, but their evidence elicited nothing of any material interest to the Inquiry. No other evidence was adduced to show that any cause existed for the rash act, and the Jury after consulting returned a verdict of Felo de Se, and the remains of the poor unfortunate child have since been interred in consecrated ground, but without the rites of sepulchre.

Thursday 18 June 1846
EXETER - On Tuesday, as a workman named MADDOCKS, in the employ of Mr Harvey, mason, of Exeter, was entering the 'Smith's Arms,' in Waterbeer-street, he fell down in an apoplectic fit and expired almost immediately. He had been taken ill in the same way previously that day, but had apparently somewhat recovered before the fatal seizure took place. He was a middle-aged unmarried man. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday at the 'Smith's Arms', before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Died from Apoplexy in the Head" was returned.

EXETER - A melancholy and fatal accident occurred in Exeter, during the past week:- MR RICHARD GOULD, an elderly gentleman, residing in Albion Place, St. Sidwell, was repairing the balcony in front of his first floor window, when he suddenly lost his balance, and fell upon his head and hands, upon the ground beneath - a distance of several feet. His skull was fractured by the blow which he received; both his wrists and two of his ribs were broken, and he was otherwise seriously injured. He was immediately taken up, and surgical aid promptly rendered; but, after lingering through the week, he expired on Saturday, from the effects of the fall. An Inquest was held before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on Monday afternoon, and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' returned.

SLAPTON - An Inquest was held here on June 10th, on the body of CHRISTOPHER JEFFRY, aged 78 years, who was found hung in a stall adjoining his house. Deceased was well known in the towns of the South of Devon, as a vendor of fresh fish, and was known by the name of Cutty. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 2 July 1846
BARNSTAPLE - Inquests held by Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough. - At the Infirmary, on Friday last, on the body of JOHN WOOLACOTT, aged 20, servant to Mr Tyte, of Bishop's Tawton, whose severe injury by the running away of a horse which he was driving at plough was reported in a former paper, and which terminated fatally on the 25th. Verdict, "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 1s. 6d. on the horse and plough.

BARNSTAPLE - Also at the Infirmary on the 29th, on the body of GEORGE CONNIBEAR, aged 54, labourer in the employ of Mr Smith, of Morthoe, who was assisting in making a hayrick on his master's farm on Saturday se'nnight, when he fell backwards from the hay cart on his head. He was taken up in an almost insensible state, and conveyed to his house, which was hard by, where he was seen by Mr Stabb and Mr Stoneham, of Ilfracombe, surgeons, and at their recommendation was brought to the Infirmary, where he lingered until the 27th, when he died from fracture of the spine. Verdict, "Accidental Death," with a deodand of 6d. on the cart.

Thursday 16 July 1846
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accidents - On Wednesday last, a lad named JOHN HORE, of Bideford, whilst bathing in the river Torridge, about a mile above the bridge, got out of his depth, and was drowned. His body was taken out about two hours afterwards; and on the following day an Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., the Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" returned

BIDEFORD - On Friday last, whilst a poor man, named WILLIAM BAGLELOW, was in the act of descending a shaft at the Bideford culm mines, he slipped his foot from the rope by which he was descending, and fell to the bottom of the shaft, and was instantly killed. His body was taken out directly afterwards in a most shattered state. An Inquest was held the following day, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

BIDEFORD - On Saturday last, whilst ROBERT CLARK (who had been in the service of Mr S. C. Doidge for a number of years) was storing salt in Mr Doidge's cellars, he fell from a pile of salt on which he was standing to the ground, and fractured the vertebrae of his neck. The poor fellow lingered until Monday morning, when he expired. An Inquest was held in the evening, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

LANDKEY - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Landkey, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES BRIMLEY, son of MR WILLIAM BRIMLEY, of Dean, in that parish, aged 11 years, who was at work the day before loading stones from a quarry and leading the horse, from which he returned home about six o'clock in the evening perfectly well; on his return he went into the house and had a piece of bread and butter with which he went out into the yard, and his brother who had just returned with a cart load of stones was standing by him, when he suddenly fell down dead with the piece of bread and butter in his hand. A post mortem examination was taken the next day, by which it was discovered that death was occasioned by the rupture of a vessel in the heart, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

COMBMARTIN - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Combmartin, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM PEAKE, aged 60, who was working with his son in the hay field, the preceding Tuesday, when he fell from the top of the rick to the ground, by which he sustained a fracture of the vertebrae of the neck, from which paralysis of the lower extremities ensued, and he lingered until Thursday, when he died. Mr Cooke, surgeon, who had been in attendance upon him, gave evidence of the nature of the injury which led to his death, and a verdict in conformity with it was returned.

Thursday 6 August 1846
Inquests: Held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner.
BRENDON - On Monday se'nnight, at Brendon, on the body of WILLIAM RAWLE, a labourer of that place, who was found dead in a quarry pit on the Saturday preceding by a person passing by, but by what means he came into the pit there was no evidence to show, but it was believed that he had fallen in by accident. Verdict, "Found Dead."

CHARLES - At Charles, on Monday last, on the body of GRACE TAMLYN, aged 20, who had committed suicide under the following circumstances. Deceased was learning the business of a dressmaker at Southmolton, from which she usually came home to Charles on the Saturday and returned again to her work on the Monday morning. In accordance with this practice she came home in a farmer's cart on Saturday last, and went the next day to Goodleigh to spend the day with a married sister; she was observed to be low and melancholy, but did not complain of illness; she returned home the same night and slept in a room with her sister, who got up on Monday morning leaving her in bed, but called her about half-past seven, when she got out of bed, and appeared to go to the press where her clothes were; the sister went to blow the fire, and presently heard something dropping into a tin bucket in the room under the bed-room, and on going to see what it was found it to be blood; on this discovery she ran up stairs and found the deceased lying out over the bed with a frightful wound in her throat from which the blood was issuing profusely: she did not move, and appeared to be quite dead. There was other evidence to show that deceased was subject to fits and had lately exhibited very great despondency, but no reason for it was assigned. She had committed the fearful act most effectually, the wound being six inches in length and extending to the bone of the neck, such as to occasion instant death. A verdict of "Temporary Derangement" was returned.

HEANTON PUNCHARDON - On the same day, an Inquest was held on the body of RICHARD DRAPER, of Heanton Punchardon, who was drowned while drawing the salmon weir opposite Heanton Court on the 15th ult., (as reported by us at the time.) and whose body was not found until Tuesday last, when it was picked up near the spot by John Slader, of Barnstaple, fisherman. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was found.

Thursday 27 August 1846
BARNSTAPLE - Melancholy Death of MR J. H. KNOX, House Surgeon and Secretary to the North Devon Infirmary.
A very painful sensation was produced in this town on Monday morning last, by the intelligence that MR KNOX, the long and much respected resident surgeon at the Infirmary, had been found dead in his bedroom. On Enquiry we learnt that the deceased had got up at half-past seven o'clock, and visited the wards, as was his custom. He had desired to be called at six o'clock, for the purpose of getting his reports and accounts ready for the auditor of the institution, whom he had appointed to see in the forenoon: but it did not appear that he had risen when the servant called him, nor was he known to be up until his visit to the wards. Having gone round to attend to the patients, he returned to his bedroom, and nothing was seen or heard of him further until half-past nine, when he desired that his breakfast might be brought up, requesting to have a cup of tea instead of cocoa (which he had been drinking for some days). the breakfast was taken into his sitting-room (which adjoins the bedroom), but it did not appear that he had partaken of it at all. About the same hour the porter called at his door to know if he had any commands in the town, as he was going out; when the deceased appeared to be in the act of shaving, and gave him two or three messages to deliver. About ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after, the matron (Mrs Priscott) went to him and found him still partly shaved. She asked for her weekly check, which he told her he would write when he got out into his sitting-room; and she remarked that a patient who had come in overnight was better, and had passed a quiet night; to which he playfully answered that he was glad of it, and that she (the matron) "must allow him the next time to know something more of medicine than herself." Nothing more was seen of him until about a quarter to eleven o'clock, when the male nurse went to his door and knocked, and receiving no answer opened the door and went into the bedroom, where he was shocked to find MR KNOX lying on his back on the floor, apparently quite dead, with his razor on the table not wiped, and his face still but partly shaved. the nurse instantly ran to the nearest medical man, Dr Bignell, who was not at home, but arrived within a few minutes, accompanied by Dr Budd, the physician of the institution (who had also been summoned,) but their help was of no avail, deceased being quite dead, and they were of opinion that he must have been so some time, perhaps within a few minutes after the matron last saw him, as the body was nearly cold. The intelligence of the mournful event caused the utmost consternation; for the auditor and committee were on their way to the Infirmary, where they were to have met deceased with his accounts, which he had engaged to prepare to be presented at the annual meeting the next day.
The Coroner for the borough (Alfred Drake, Esq.) having been apprised of the event, a highly respectable Jury was summoned to sit on the body. The Jury assembled at three o'clock, and consisted of - Mr Charles Carter, Mr Hatherly, Mr Legallais, Mr Chanter, Mr Thomas Arter, Capt. Williams, Mr Hutton, Mr Borlase, Mr Willis, Mr A. J. Browne, Mr W. H. Hole, and Mr W. A. Dene. Having first viewed the body, the Jury proceeded to receive evidence of the facts we have already narrated. In considering the case of death, Dr Bignell gave it as his opinion that it had arisen from apoplexy, to which the appearance and habit of the deceased would predispose him; in addition to which he was labouring under a violent cough, which suggested the probability that a vessel in the head might have given way during a fit of coughing. Dr B. also added that other medical men agreed with him in his judgment, although, of course, it was impossible to assign the cause of death positively, there being no external marks. In answer to a question from a Juror, Dr Bignell stated that the same appearances as the body of deceased exhibited might be presented in a case of death by poison; nor did he think that the fact of a quantity of saliva, which had issued from the mouth of deceased and was seen upon the carpet, militated against his opinion of death having been the result of apoplexy, or was of itself sufficient to render a post mortem examination necessary. Some gentlemen of the Jury, however, (two of whom were medical men,) having doubts on the case, especially from the absence of distortion of the features or any of those external appearances which usually indicate apoplexy, considered that a post mortem examination was necessary, as well for the satisfaction of the friends of deceased as of the public: which, after much conversation, was resolved upon, and an adjournment consequently took place to five o'clock the next afternoon (Tuesday); Dr Bignell being charged by the Coroner with the assistance of Mr Herbert Role, to make the examination of the body. The adjournment was fixed at an hour after the annual meeting of the institution should have taken place, in order to determine, from information which might be there presented, whether there was any truth in rumours which had come to the ears of some of the jury as to the inaccuracy of the accounts of deceased.
On the reassembling of the Jury, at five o'clock on Tuesday, the examination of the body having in the meantime taken place, and the contents of the stomach been carefully analysed by Mr Herbert Hole, in the presence of Dr Bignell, the latter gave decisive evidence, as the result of such analysis, that death had been occasioned by prussic acid. Dr Budd, who was also present at the examination, gave evidence to the same effect; in which all the surgeons who were present concurred. No bottle, paper, or any other trace of the poison being found in the room, the medical men were of opinion that it was taken in a solid form, and, so large was the quantity found in the stomach, that death must have been almost instantaneous. This evidence, of course, rendered it the duty of the Jury to enquire in what state of mind the deceased was when he committed the fatal act; to which end William Avery, Esq., the Mayor, (who with some other gentlemen had been looking into the accounts,) was called in evidence, and stated, in answer to questions from the Jury, that from the hasty investigation that had been made into the papers of the deceased, it had been found that they were in a very deranged and complicated state, and not at all fit for presentation at the annual meeting for which it had been the duty of deceased to have them ready; and that the examination gave too much reason to conclude that the accounts of deceased in former years were also incorrect. The Jury asked whether the information of the accounts was merely such as might result from indolence or want of system in keeping them, or whether there was reason to believe that there existed any de[?] on the part of the deceased: to which Mr Avery replied that he feared the latter was the case, although to what extent he could not yet say - Mr Pitman, also, who was an intimate friend of the deceased, was called in evidence, and deposed that he had lately observed that deceased laboured under considerable excitement whenever any allusion was made to his accounts; and that on Saturday last he was with him in the morning, before he expected the visit of the auditor, and was apparently much distressed, saying with tears that he did not know how he should meet the subscribers at the annual meeting: witness endeavoured to calm his mind, and wished to ascertain what was the amount of his difficulties, intimating that his friends would, no doubt, come forward to assist him: but deceased did not seem disposed to go fully into particulars, and left. He was at his house again on Sunday night so late as half-past ten, after having returned from church with him, and appeared depressed and not in his usual spirits. Witness further said that when he received the intelligence of his death it occurred to him, from his previous state of mind, that he might have put an end to his existence in a state of temporary desperation. The domestics of the establishment, who had been examined that day before, were re-called, and again asked as to the appearance and manner of the deceased at their last interviews with him; but they agreed in stating that they had noticed no change in him, but that his manners and conversation were as usual. After retiring for conference, the Jury returned in about ten minutes with an Open Verdict, to the following effect:- "That the deceased came to his death by means of prussic acid administered by himself; but in what state of mind he was at the time of his committing the act, there was no sufficient evidence to enable them to determine.
After giving their verdict, the Jury came to a resolution to express their unanimous conviction that the offices of House Surgeon and Secretary (both which the deceased held) should not be filled by the same individual, in order that one might be a check on the other and that in future two auditors should be appointed to examine the accounts, and to be changed annually:- precautions which, had they been before adopted, might, in the opinion of the Jury, have prevented the melancholy event which they were now called upon to investigate. They further expressed their conviction that this case was one which proved the necessity of a post mortem examination in all cases of persons being found dead without any external marks to account for their death.

Thursday 3 September 1846
TORRINGTON - Supposed Suicide. - The most intense excitement has prevailed in this town since Monday last, from the circumstance of the mysterious death of an old and highly respected inhabitant, MR GEORGE STONEMAN, tanner, who was found drowned in the river Torridge, at an early hour on Monday morning, near Rotherry bridge, about a mile from the town on the Bideford road. On the preceding day (Sunday), deceased had attended his usual place of worship (the Baptist chapel) three times; but during the evening service, before the commencement of the sermon, he left in rather a hurried manner, complaining to a person as he went out of a violent pain in his stomach. MRS STONEMAN followed him home almost immediately, and after having sat for some time he appeared restless and complained of feeling unwell. At about nine o'clock he left the room saying he wanted to go behind; but as he did not return so soon as he was expected, MRS STONEMAN sent one of the children to call him, but he could not be found. After waiting some time longer the family became alarmed, and the fear suggested itself that he might have fallen into the tan pits: search, however, was made for him in vain, but it was discovered that he had unlocked a door that communicated from his back premises into a lane. This fact served but to increase the anxiety of the family, and many persons ran and rode in all directions in quest of him, but he was no where to be found nor could any tidings be heard of him. The solicitude of his friends became overwhelming, and the worst forebodings were irresistible. The search was continued all night fruitlessly; but at an early hour the next morning, as Mr Charles Veysey and Mr Bickell were examining the river, the Newfoundland dog which accompanied them discovered something in shallow water near the bridge above mentioned, which turned out to be the body of the deceased. No time was lost in getting it out, and the intelligence was conveyed to his agonised family, whose feelings on seeing the corpse of a beloved husband and parent who had so lately left them alive and in tolerable health, may be conceived but cannot be described. From the situation in which the body was found, the only conclusion that can be formed is that he must have got over the side of the bridge, but whether he fell accidentally or precipitated himself therefrom into the fatal abyss must for ever remain a mystery. From the circumstance that his watch stopped between 9 and 10 o'clock, it is presumed that the catastrophe must have occurred soon after he left his home; and rather in corroboration of this opinion, a person who lives near the bridge heard a cry as if of distress about the same hour, but took no notice of it. Deceased had been for some time labouring under a chronic complaint of the chest, accompanied by nervous affliction, from which he sometimes suffered much; but never betrayed anything bordering on insanity, and from his habits, as well as from his constitution of mind, he was considered to be most unlikely ever to entertain the thought of self destruction. A Coroner's Jury sat on the body on Monday, whose verdict was "Found Drowned." This awful and inexplicable event has plunged an affectionate wife and interesting family of 7 children into the profoundest grief. Deceased was a highly respectable man; and few persons enjoyed a larger share of public esteem. His character as a citizen, in the domestic circle, and as a religious professor, was alike exemplary and unimpeachable. His remains were interred in the burying-ground of the Baptist chapel yesterday (Wednesday), and were followed to the grave by an immense concourse of sorrowing friends and spectators. Deceased was in the prime of life, about 50 years of age.

Thursday 10 September 1846
FREMINGTON - Inquests; - A most painful excitement was produced in the parish of Fremington on Monday morning last, by the rumour that two deaths by violence had occurred in the curse of the preceding night - the one a case of infanticide, and the other of suicide. In the former case the surmise was not borne out by the evidence, but in the latter the proof was unhappily but too plain. The circumstances are narrated in the following report of the Coroner's Inquests.
On the morning of Monday, Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner for the county, was summoned to hold a court to Inquire into the circumstances attending the death of the male infant child of ANNE COCKRAM, servant to Mr John Dullam, of Conbrew, in the parish of Fremington. It appeared that the mother had lived in Mr Dullam's service some eight or nine weeks, previous to which she had been residing for two or three months with Mary Hooper, her sister, at Bickington. No suspicion of her pregnancy seemed to have existed: but on Monday morning, about half past six, she knocked at the door of her mistress's bedroom, and asked to see her; Mrs Dullam went into her room, and found her ill, and by her request sent immediately to Bickington for her sister, who came shortly afterwards, and on asking her what was the matter she burst into tears, but made no answer: from certain appearances about the room, Mrs Dullam was induced to look under the bed, where she found a parcel, which proved to be a male infant newly born and quite dead. Mr Cooke, surgeon, of Barnstaple, happened to be in the village and went to the house, where he saw the mother, who admitted that the child was hers, and said it was born about four o'clock; that she fainted on the birth of the child, and on her recovering her senses found it lying on the floor dead. Mr Cooke made a post mortem examination at the instance of the Coroner, and was of opinion that the child had breathed, but was suffocated by having fallen with its face on the floor during the unconsciousness of the mother. In this opinion the Jury concurred, and returned a verdict accordingly.

FREMINGTON - Suicide - The Coroner and Jury having disposed of the former case, immediately adjourned to Rookabear, in the same parish, to hold an Inquest on the body of JOSEPH PARKIN, aged 21 years, son of MR JOSEPH PARKIN, of that place, farmer. Deceased had been accustomed to work with his father on the farm: the evening before (Sunday) he was in Fremington village, outside the 'New Inn,' where John Tremlett, a blacksmith, saw him, whom he invited to accompany him into the inn to drink, but Tremlett refused and passed on; deceased again pressed him to drink, but Tremlett still declining, he caught hold of him and said, "If you will not I will ground you." Deceased, however, being intoxicated at the time, fell, but afterwards got up, and Tremlett left him outside the inn. About an hour afterwards (between 8 and 10) deceased went to Tremlett's house and began to write a letter, which he afterwards broke up: on leaving he said, "Good night, you will never see me again;" Tremlett and his wife asked him what he meant, and in reply he said, "Have you heard nothing?" they said they had not, and he added, "I am going to leave on Monday," and afterwards said he was going to Bristol, Bath, and London; Tremlett's wife intimated her supposition that he was going to enlist, but he answered that he had something better in his head than that: he appeared hurried and excited, and left the house, nor was he seen afterwards alive. Next morning James Brannam, of Bickington, was passing by the quarry pit by the road side at Muddlebridge, and seeing clothes lying on the brink and no one by them, went and examined them, and in the pocket found a prayer book with the name of deceased in it: he communicated this fact to the deceased's father, the pit was dragged, and the body recovered shortly afterwards. There was no other evidence adduced, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

BURRINGTON - Singular Death of Twin Children by Suffocation - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday) at Burrington, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the bodies of MARY HEARD HARRIS and JULIA HEARD HARRIS, twin-daughters of a blacksmith of that place, called JAS. HARRIS, who had been found dead in bed the morning of the day before. It appeared that the mother of the deceased was the daughter of GEORGE and AMY HEARD, in whose house she lived; her husband took his meals with his father and mother in the same village, but lodged with his wife at her parents'. On the night of Monday last the children (who were 14 weeks old) were as well as usual, and had enjoyed good health from their birth. The grandmother undressed one of them, and the mother the other, and they were both put to sleep in the same bed which the father and mother occupied. The grandmother retired to rest about 10 o'clock, leaving her daughter up to wait for her husband, who was late, having been out to work at Swymbridge, several miles from his home. About 11 o'clock the grandmother heard the children cry, and called their mother, who with her husband (by this time returned) came immediately to bed, the children lying one on each side of them. The husband got up in the morning soon after four o'clock to go to his work at Swymbridge, leaving his children (as he supposed) asleep. About six o'clock, the screams of the mother called the grandmother into her room, when she said, "The dear babies are either dead or dying." the grandmother ran and obtained water for a hot bath, but the application was useless - both the children being quite dead. A messenger was sent to Mr Tidboald, of Chulmleigh, surgeon, who arrived shortly after, and found a mark on the forehead just above the left eye of one of them, and a slight discharge from the left nostril. There were no other external appearances. He examined the pupils of the eyes, and found the conjunctivae free from any fullness of the blood-vessels which might indicate the presence of poison in the stomach; and his opinion, given before the Jury, was that death in each case had resulted from suffocation. Evidence was given of the utmost affection for their children on the part of both the parents; and there being no circumstance whatever - save the singularity of the death of both at the same time - to occasion suspicion to the contrary, the Jury returned a verdict in each case in conformity with the surgeon's opinion.

CHITTLEHAMPTON - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday (yesterday) afternoon, between three and four o'clock, as JAMES RICE, of Chittlehampton, John Pornell, of Bleadon, and other labourers on the works of the Taw Vale Railway, were employed on a portion of the line at the east end of the cutting through Penhill, a quantity of the gravelly soil slid away (loosened probably by the late rains), and RICE, who was in a stooping position packing in the earth to form the bed of the sleepers for the rails, was thrown down by it and partly buried, and his head came with violence against an iron rail. He was speedily extricated, and surgical aid sent for instantly, but the poor fellow never spoke and died almost immediately, having sustained a fearful fracture of the skull with laceration of the brain. An Inquest was held on the body by Richard Bremridge, Esq., this (Thursday) morning, which resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death." The man Pornell experienced a fracture of the hip, and was removed to the Infirmary; and another man of Southmolton received a slight contusion of the knee. The cutting was a very shallow one, not more than seven feet, and the quantity of soil which fell scarcely exceeded a waggon load.

Thursday 17 September 1846
FREMINGTON - Inquests: - We regret to report another fatal accident on the works of the Taw Vale Railway, which occurred on Monday evening last to a young man named WILLIAM DRAPER, aged 16 years. Deceased was employed as a mason's labourer in building the sea wall at Fremington Pill, and accidentally fell from the wall into deep water. His father, who was near, saw him fall, as did several other persons, who in vain attempted to render assistance; but the poor fellow struggled for a few moments, then sunk to rise no more. The body was recovered three hours afterwards, and removed to the 'New Inn,' in Fremington village, where the Inquest was held, before Richard Bremridge, Esq. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

LOXHORE - An Inquest was held on Wednesday (yesterday) before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Lower Loxhore, in the parish of Loxhore, on the body of MARY ANN LARAMY, aged nine years, daughter of ALEXANDER LARAMY, of that place, labourer. Deceased was dipping some milk in front of the fire, when the flame caught her clothes, and she was presently in a blaze. The parents were not in the house; but her grandfather, an old man and quite blind, attempted to extinguish the fire, and in so doing caught his own clothes, and was in danger of sharing the poor child's fate. A neighbour named Richards was apprised of the accident, and hastened to the spot, and succeeded in putting out the flames. Mr Parker, of Barnstaple, surgeon, was instantly sent for, and arrived soon after, but the injuries proved fatal within a few hours of the occurrence. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

CREDITON - A melancholy accident occurred n this neighbourhood on Saturday last, by which an unfortunate man named PARR lost his life. He was engaged at a house called Brandice, in the repairs of a very deep well, and while at the bottom his fellow workmen heard him give the signal to be drawn up, at the same time exclaiming 'quick, make haste;' they immediately commenced hoisting the bucket he was in, but when about half way up the poor fellow must have lost his senses from the foulness of the air, as he fell to the bottom of the well, breaking his neck in the fall; drags were immediately procured, but life was of course quite extinct when he was got up. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Monday, when a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned.

EXETER - An Inquest was held on Friday evening, at the King's Arms, West-street, Exeter, on the body of HELEN JARVIS, aged one year and nine months, the illegitimate child of a woman named CAROLINE JARVIS, residing in that neighbourhood. It appeared from the statement of the mother, who now cohabits with another man, not the child's father, that she put it to bed on the floor about eight o'clock on Wednesday evening, and remained in the room with it until eleven, and that she then went out to get a candle, leaving it fast asleep. She was absent not more than a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, and on her return proceeded to strike a light; by the light of the match she caught sight of the child lying before the fire, but the light went out again before she had time to examine it. She ran out and called her mother and brother, who came to the room with some other persons, and the child was found quite dead - literally roasted to death. Mr Lyddon, a surgeon, was sent for, but, of course, could render no assistance. The persons who came into the room when the alarm was given, concurred in saying that there was then no fire in the grate; and the strong improbability that the absence of the mother was so short as she had represented it, led to the adjournment of the Inquest until Monday. In the meantime, a post mortem examination was made, but nothing was found to indicate ill treatment or violence, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Thursday 24 September 1846
SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held at Southmolton, on Monday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of the borough, on the body of MR JOHN POOLE, aged 75, a well known sheep dealer, who was found dead in his bed the preceding morning. Deceased went to bed on Saturday night apparently in perfect health, and was heard to get up in the morning and to go bed again, and about two hours afterwards was found quite dead. - Verdict, "Found Dead."

Thursday 1 October 1846
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - A deplorable accident, attended with a fatal result, occurred on Tuesday evening last, to SAMUEL GEEN, mason, of this town. Deceased was in the employ of Mr James Dell, and was with his master at the warehouses of Messrs. Maunder, in Tuly-lane, for the purpose of stopping a leak in the skylight. There is a succession of trap-hatches in each floor from the top to the bottom, for the convenience of drawing up and letting down goods. Deceased was sent to fetch a short ladder to get up on the roof from the top floor, and was desired to shut down the trap-hatches in his way. Unhappily, he neglected to do so; and on his return with the ladder, he must have turned at the head of the flight of stairs to get the ladder clear from the wall, and moved backwards a little too far, and was precipitated over the edge of the second floor to the ground, a distance of 21 feet. The accident was not seen, but his master and an assistance of the Messrs. Maunder heard a fall, and on going to see what it was, were just in time to see the poor fellow reach the bottom. They instantly ran to his help, but found him insensible, having sustained a severe wound in the back of his head, fractured his collar-bone and left arm, and other injuries. He was taken home to his house in Bear-street, where surgical aid was obtained, but he lay insensible until four o'clock the next morning, when he expired. An Inquest was held on the body, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, by which a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased was a steady and industrious man, 63 years of age, and a freeman of this borough.

FILLEIGH - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Filleigh, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH MUGRIDGE aged 3 years, daughter of WILLIAM MUGRIDGE, of that parish, labourer. On the Tuesday previous the child caught her clothes on fire in her father's kitchen (where she was left alone), and although her screams brought in the neighbours to her assistance immediately, she had sustained such injuries before the fire was extinguished as proved fatal to her the next day. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 8 October 1846
OTTERY ST. MARY - Extraordinary Suicides. - An Inquest was held before Mr Aberdein, on the 29th Sept., on MARY ANN OLDRIDGE, of that place, silk weaver, aged 22, who (together with another young woman named Jane Smith) on the 25th Sept. took a quantity of arsenic, from which OLDRIDGE died on the 28th. It was proved that deceased and Smith went to a druggist's shop together on the 25th, and the deceased asked for three-pennyworth of arsenic. She was asked what she was going to do with it, and replied that it was for her mother, who wanted it to kill rats. An ounce and half in paper marked "Arsenic, poison," was delivered to her. they both returned to the factory to their work, and during the afternoon they went to a cider shop and called for half a pint of cider, into which they put a portion of the arsenic and drank it between them. They were gone about half an hour; soon after their return the deceased went out of the room and returned with a jug of water, and then they mixed up some more of the arsenic and drank it off. Some time after they were both taken sick, and at length a surgeon was sent for, it having been ascertained from deceased's statement they had both taken poison. Mr Tinney, the surgeon, applied the usual remedies, but the deceased died on the 27th. A post mortem examination of the body was made, and a considerable quantity of arsenic detected in the stomach. The deceased gave no statement of her feelings or symptoms to the surgeon, and was very averse to the use of any remedial measures. During her illness the deceased was visited by Dr Cornish, of Ottery, who stated at the Inquest that she informed him her reason for taking the poison was that she could not bear being jeered at as she had been by her workfellows in the factory about a half sovereign it was stated she had ran away with, and which belonged to a young man who had given it to her to get changed. It was also stated at the Inquest that the deceased did not appear in an insane state of mind, but on the contrary talked very rationally with the parties who conversed with her. The Jury after four hours' consideration returned a verdict of Felo de Se. The other young woman (Smith) has since died.

Thursday 22 October 1846
BIDEFORD - Accident. - An Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday last, on the body of MARY BRAGG, aged 78, who, on going to bed the previous evening, fell over the stairs, and was taken up dead. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 October 1846
SOUTH MOLTON - Inquest - At Southmolton, on Thursday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of WILLIAM OLIVER, blacksmith, aged 62. The deceased drank tea the afternoon before, apparently in perfect health; but almost immediately after he fell down and instantly expired. - Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 5 November 1846
SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - At the Southmolton Union Workhouse, on Thursday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of the borough, on the body of WILLIAM WEBBER, an illegitimate child, aged nine weeks, who was found dead in the bed in his mother's arms the same morning. A report having got into circulation that many of the bastard children in the house were starved to death in consequence of their mothers' refusing them nourishment, after a long investigation and the examination of a great number of witnesses, the further Enquiry was adjourned to the next evening, in order to give time for the medical officer to make a post mortem examination. On removing the scalp he discovered a contusion, which induced him to delay proceeding until he had seen the Jury at the adjourned Inquest, in consequence of which, on the recommendation of the Coroner and medical officer, the Inquiry was further adjourned to Saturday, in order to procure the attendance of another medical man. The result was that it was their opinion that the blow was not sufficient of itself to cause death, but that death was caused by suffocation. Verdict, "Died from Suffocation, but whether from design or accident there was no evidence to shew."

Thursday 19 November 1846
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Accident. - On the morning of Thursday last, a deplorable accident occurred at the yard of Messrs. Westacott, Ship-builders, by which WILLIAM TUCKER, mariner, aged 59, belonging to Appledore, was so seriously injured that he died shortly afterwards. Deceased was employed in painting the yard-arm of a vessel, when his feet slipped and he fell to the deck, a distance of 32 feet. He was picked up in a dreadfully mangled state, and carried to the Infirmary: but his injuries were too severe to admit of relief, and he died in horrible torture within about two hours of the accident. An Inquest was taken on the body next morning before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner of the borough, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

TIVERTON - Melancholy Sudden Death. - On Tuesday 17th instant a man named POOK was coming from Washfield to Tiverton market, and about a mile and half from the town overtook a cart belonging to Mr Tapper, of Sampford Peverell. He asked the driver to allow him ride, who consented, and POOK got into the cart. A few minutes afterwards the driver, not getting an answer to a question put to POOK, looked into the cart and found him dead. He was taken to the 'Worth Arms Inn,' in Tiverton, to await a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday 26 November 1846
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Packet Hotel,' in this town on Wednesday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner for the division, on view of the body of WILLIAM WRIGHT, of Plymouth, mate on board the schooner 'Hero,' Barnes master, then lying at this port. Deceased was about to make fast the stern chain of his vessel on the preceding Monday night, and on getting into a boat which was lying under the stern the chain ran away with him, and he fell with one leg in the boat and the other in the water: he was much frightened, and afterwards complained of a stitch in his side: he went to bed and did not get up in the morning, but was supplied with coffee in his berth, and remained till towards noon, when one of the seamen went in to see him and found him in great pain, and he soon after died. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, was called in, but his help was unavailing. At the direction of the Coroner, Mr S. made a post mortem examination of the body, which discovered the cause of death to have been congestion of the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - In the Southmolton Union Workhouse, on Friday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH MANN, aged 45, an inmate belonging to Witheridge, who was found dead in her bed the same morning. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 10 December 1846
SOUTH MOLTON - Inquest - At Shallowford, in the parish of Southmolton, on Wednesday, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY FLOYD, aged 90, who on that day se'nnight accidentally caught her clothes on fire and was much burnt: she lingered until Tuesday, when she expired. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased was formerly nurse maid in the family of the late Earl Fortescue for a great number of years; she nursed the present Earl, from whom she enjoyed up to her death a liberal superannuation.

Thursday 17 December 1846
KNOWSTONE - Deaths of Children by Burning. - An Inquest was held on the 4th, at Knowstone, before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of EMMA HARDING, aged four years, daughter of WILLIAM HARDING, agricultural labourer, who caught her clothes on fire in her father's house on the 26th October, and ran out into the road, when the neighbours saw her, extinguished the fire, conveyed her home, and sent for a surgeon, who was soon in attendance, and prescribed for her, but she lingered until the 29th November, when she expired. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

INSTOW - On the 14th, at Worlington, in the parish of Instow, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., on the body of MARY ANN CUTLAND, aged 4 years, daughter of JAMES CUTLAND, of that place; who, on the Friday previous, during the absence of her mother, who had gone to Instow quay, being left in the care of her grandmother, went into a neighbour's house, where she caught her clothes on fire, and was severely burnt. The aid of Mr Pridham, of Bideford, was called in, but the child only survived until the following Sunday, Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of THOMAS BUTLER, aged 66, formerly a respectable tradesman as a gunsmith in this town, but for many years in reduced circumstances, and lately lodging in a cottage behind the 'Royal Oak' public house, in Holland-street, where he died. The evidence showed that deceased was not in good health, and had gone to bed early on the Sunday evening, and in the course of the night the person in whose house he lodged, hearing him groan heavily, went into his bedroom and enquired after him, but he said he was not worse; but at about half-past seven in the morning, she went again to see him, and found him lying on his face quite dead. Reports had been circulated to the effect that deceased died from want; but it was proved at the Inquest that his son had been very attentive to him, and had ministered to his necessaries. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 14 January 1847
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the 'Eagle Inn,' Bartholomew Street, on Friday, and, by adjournment, on Monday, on the body of MRS CRAIG, the wife of MR CRAIG, a tea-dealer, who had died on Tuesday morning, and respecting whose treatment certain unpleasant rumours had been in circulation. The poor woman had complained greatly of pain in the back on Saturday night, became much worse on Sunday, was delivered of a child on Sunday evening, and died as before stated between eight and nine o'clock on Tuesday morning. There was nothing unusual in the circumstances of the confinement, except that her mind slightly wandered. Her death was quite unlooked for by Mr Lyddon, the surgeon who attended her, and by those about her. Her husband was absent from home during her illness, and on receiving a letter from him she said, "The villain kicked me on Thursday night, and left me without money." There was a mark on the hip, which might have been occasioned by a kick, and some marks were on the neck also, but Mr Lyddon and Mr Harris who had made the post mortem examination, did not connect these at all with the death of the deceased. The Jury found a verdict of "Natural Death."

PLYMOUTH - Sudden Death. - On Sunday WILLIAM SEWARD, servant in the establishment of Jonathan Luxmoore, Esq., of North street, Plymouth, went to an outhouse for some fire wood; being absent some time it was thought he had gone to his own house in the neighbourhood; but upon inquiry it appeared he had not been there. Upon searching the premises it was discovered that something prevented the door of the outhouse opening without force, and he was there found quite dead. While the Inquest was sitting, an intimation was given to the Coroner (John Edmonds, Esq.) of another death - A woman named FROKENSHIRE, about five doors distant from the spot where the Jury was sitting, while in the act of writing a letter, fell from her chair and instantly expired. It appears she had in her letter alluded to the death of SEWARD.

PLYMSTOCK - Suicide. - A few days since, MR JOHN PEARCE, a highly respected yeoman in the parish of Plymstock, was found hanging in an upper room of his house. Surgical aid was promptly at hand, but life was extinct. Deceased was in his 78th year. An Inquest has been held, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Thursday 21 January 1847
CHITTLEHAMPTON - An Inquest was held on Wednesday lat, at Collacott, in this parish, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the son of WILLIAM COTTLE, labourer, aged about two years, who was left with two other children in his father's kitchen on Monday, during the temporary absence of the mother who had gone out for some fuel, when his apron caught fire, and he was instantly in flames. The screams of the other children brought the father to the spot (who was at work in a limekiln hard by), but the injuries received by the deceased were so severe as to result in death the next day. Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday 4 February 1847
BIDEFORD - Death by Burning - We regret to announce the accidental death by burning of the eldest son of the HON. CAPTAIN CAPEL, of Woodtown, near Bideford, which took place one day last week. The young gentleman, who was 11 years of age, was in his nightgown, ready to get into bed, and was standing with his back to the fire in the nursery, when the draught of the fire-place caught the loose night-dress and drew it towards the grate, whereby it was instantly in a blaze. The unfortunate boy's screams brought his mother to his assistance, who threw him on the floor and extinguished the flames; and the skilful aid of Dr Caddy was instantly called in, but the injury to the back and the spinal marrow was such as to occasion death on the third day after the occurrence. An Inquest was held on the body, which returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Nothing can exceed the distress of the parents at this calamitous affliction.

Thursday 11 February 1847
HIGH BRAY - Inquest. - At Highbray, Southmolton, on the 9th inst., before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of HENRY the son of HENRY LETHBRIDGE, gamekeeper to the Right Hon. Earl Fortescue, who was found dead on his mother's breast the same morning, aged 12 weeks. Verdict, Died from Suffocation.

PLYMOUTH - On Saturday, an Inquest was held before John Edmonds, Esq., the borough Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN WEDLOCK, a young woman of about 24 years of age, who was found dead in Castle-street that morning. It appears that this unfortunate young woman, who had not arrived in this town from the country more than about four months, was on Friday in company, drinking in one of the public-houses in Castle-street, with a Marine and others, late in the evening. She was taken to bed, being too much intoxicated to go herself, and in the morning was found dead beside her bedfellow. After a patient inquiry, the Jury returned a verdict of - 'Died through excessive drinking.' This is the third case of death from intoxication which has occurred in this town within the last four or five weeks!

Thursday 18 February 1847
FRITHELSTOCK - Inquest. - At Frithelstock, on Tuesday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of MARY GERRY, aged [?], daughter of RICHARD GERRY, of that place, labourer. Deceased, on Sunday forenoon, had gone to a neighbouring well for water, as was her daily [?], when by some accident she overbalanced herself and fell head foremost into the well in which the water was 15 feet deep. Her screams in her descent drew to the spot her uncle, LEONARD GERRY, who looked into the well, and seeing a bonnet floating, concluded some one must be in it, and hastened to obtain a ladder and a crook, with which he drew out the body after it had been submerged about half an hour. Life, of course, was extinct. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

FREMINGTON - At Rockabear, Fremington, on Wednesday, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., on the body of ANNE NOTT, aged 8 years, whose clothes caught fire in her father's kitchen on the preceding Saturday, (her mother being at the time confined in bed, and the deceased down stairs alone,) and although help was soon afforded and the flames put out, she received such injuries as to occasion her death the following Tuesday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

LANDKEY - At Bennett's, in the parish of Landkey, on Thursday (this day), before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM JONES, of that place, aged 56. Evidence was given by Mr Bale Smith, of Acland, that deceased was at his house last evening, between six and seven, with some apple and cherry trees for sale; he was intoxicated at the time, and after remaining a few minutes took up his trees on his should and left. He was not afterwards seen alive; but at a later hour of the evening, as Jeremiah Thomas, of Landkey and his wife, were returning together from Youlden, on passing Lower Acland court-gate they saw a man lying with his head in a pool of water, and on going up to him found that it was deceased, who was quite dead, and his bundle of fruit trees was lying on his shoulder. They called for assistance, and Mr Westacott and his man-servant quickly came out and took up the body, which Mr Westacott placed in his cart and sent it to deceased's house. There was a slight scalp wound on the side of the head, which doubtless was inflicted as deceased fell, but it was the opinion of the medical man who attended (Mr Dene) that death resulted from suffocation, and the Jury found a verdict to that effect.

BIDEFORD - AWFUL CATASTROPHE - An Omnibus Run Over Bideford Quay, and Eight Persons Drowned In It. - It has never been our lot to record, as occurring in this locality, during the more than twenty years over which our labours have extended, any casualty so intensely afflictive in its nature or so fatal in its results as that which we have this week the melancholy task to chronicle. The conception of eight persons, in the full enjoyment of health, and at a season of gaiety and recreation, imprisoned in a close vehicle, suddenly precipitated into the foaming billow, and hurried to instant death, is one which presents to the mind a picture of horror and dismay which can scarcely be surpassed; while the knowledge that the tragedy is attributable to a palpable neglect of the public safety, long pointed out and inveighed against, does but aggravate its distressing character.
Monday last was the annual fair of the borough of Bideford; and the next day, being the market day as well as the second day of the fair, the town was exceedingly full, visitors having collected in great numbers both from the neighbouring towns and the rural district. To these the town of Torrington had contributed its quota: and after partaking in the business or amusements of the day, a party of 10 or 12 persons from that place had assembled on the quay about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, to return home in a one-horse omnibus (called most infelicitously, as it has turned out, the 'Safety' omnibus), of which George Bowden, a common carrier from Torrington to Barnstaple and Bideford, was the owner and driver. The evening was very dark, which, with the sound of the washing of the tide that was nearly up to the edge of the Quay, conspired to give a dismal aspect to the scene, which the lighting of the scanty lamps very partially relieved. The omnibus was to start from the 'King's Arms,' and the horse having been put to, and the vehicle crowded inside by nine persons some altercation took place between the driver and a woman named Stocker, who was on the roof, but whom, being very much intoxicated, he was unwilling to take on: however, she persisted in sitting where she was, and the driver prepared to proceed. The horse had been accustomed, so it is said, to be a little restive at starting (and no wonder, for the poor creature's shoulders were terribly galled), and in order, as it is supposed, to prevent her from running back, a man named George Handford, who was going to Torrington, in the 'bus, stood behind it, while the driver was at the animal's head and gave the word to start, which the horse obeyed but with evident uneasiness, at first moving back a little, and then forward unsteadily, going from side to side, until the vehicle had advanced a few yards and was just outside the stable of the 'Newfoundland Inn,' where the horse turned as if to go in, but the driver checked her, and she got out into the road and then instantly inclined towards the other side, and had reached to within as foot or two of the edge of the Quay, when the driver pushed her inwards towards the road, and in so turning the shafts broke off, and the horse, with the shafts at her side and the driver by her head (who did not know for the moment but that the 'bus was behind her), went out to the middle of the road, while the vehicle, having acquired its momentum, slowly declined over the few feet which interposed between it and the edge of the Quay, and rolled head foremost into the tide! The night was dark, and in the prevailing noise the splash was but faintly heard: but an alarm was instantly given, and from the Quay the vehicle was watched for a few brief moments, gradually drifting with the tide, , and then sinking into the abyss. The agony of the spectators at the sight was only exceeded by the untold, inconceivable anguish of the unhappy victims of this unforeseen fatality. The first perception of the awful fact appeared to paralyse the bystanders; but Handford, who remained behind the vehicle until it went over, and who knew not but the horse and driver had gone in with it, seeing it floating, at once jumped upon it, and called out for a rope, but none was at hand, or he thinks (although it seems scarcely probable) that he might have been able to prevent the vehicle's sinking until its ill-fated inmates had been rescued. As it was, he could do nothing; and having remained on the roof until he was three feet under water, he consulted his own safety by swimming to shore. The woman on the roof, who was incapable of effort, floated off, was buoyed up by her dress, drifted downwards a few yards, and was fortunately got on shore: she was insensible, but was promptly removed to the house of Mr Cornish Saunders, where assistance was instantly afforded, and she was recovered, and after a sound sleep awoke altogether unconscious of all that had transpired! One only of the inside passengers was saved, viz., Mr Michael Chappell, a respectable glove manufacturer of Torrington, who had sufficient presence of mind to burst out the window of the door of the 'bus, and by a desperate effort (in which he was impeded by one of his agonised companions who laid hold of his feet) he forced himself through the aperture, and swam ashore, assisted by a soldier, who gallantly plunged in to his help. Not a wail was heard from the drowning captives - no succour could be afforded, for the 'bus could scarcely be seen - slowly it receded until submerged in the foaming tide, bearing with it eight immortal beings thus suddenly and momentarily bereft of life and hope!
The excitement on shore now began to be augmented fearfully. The news had spread abroad, and the town was on the spot at the instant. Convivial parties were summarily irrupted, and the voice of mirth was hushed in the cries of distress and the expressions of sympathy. The dense darkness, and the uncertainty of the position of the vehicle, tantalised and defied all help: and the victims were reluctantly abandoned to their fate.
But "Who are the victims?" became now the enquiry eagerly uttered from a thousand lips. Words cannot portray the frantic agony with which persons from Torrington, and their friends, or relatives, besieged the spot, tortured by the apprehension that a loved child, or parent, or husband, or wife, was among the dead. Some, in the frenzy of their suspense and alarm, were ready to rush into the water, as if in desperate hope to save the victims, whose fate, alas! was now too certainly sealed. After some considerable delay (which might be censured but that the circumstances forbade all hope that they could be made use of with success) grappling irons were brought to the spot, but from the current of the receding tide the vehicle had been borne down some yards from the place of its descent, and efforts were made in vain to discover it until above two hours from the occurrence of the accident, when it was found three feet under water: it was dragged to a ship lying by and secured until the tide had receded further, when about eleven o'clock at night, it was brought to the side of the slip.
During these anxious hours the crowd on shore was continually increasing. Thousands upon thousands thronged the Quays; and before the discharge of the bodies from the prison of their death, great numbers had arrived from Torrington, (whither the mournful tidings had been conveyed by Mr Reed,) who abided the result in inexpressible anguish.
Our correspondent from that place gives as a vivid description of the effect which the first intelligence of the catastrophe produced. The news flew through the town; and all who had friends or relatives at Bideford were instantly hurrying to and fro enquiring the names of the sufferers, and distracted with the fear that their loved ones were included in the melancholy number.
By about 11 o'clock, the tide having sufficiently retired, the task of resolving the painful doubts of the survivors was commenced. The door of the ill doomed vehicle was opened, and a scene presented itself such as it has been the fate of but few to witness. There were eight bodies, cold in death, some seated in their places, as if death had supervened even the sense of danger; - others, whose convulsed features betrayed a dismal consciousness of peril and the hopelessness of deliverance; - others with uplift hands, as if imploring Heaven's mercy; - and others in an erect posture, as though pressing to the door in the vain attempt to escape. It was a harrowing sight! The vehicle was entered, and the bodies were handed out one by one; and as each was recognised, the lamentations of the friends, whose worst apprehensions were now too surely realised, were truly heart rending - and the bodies were conveyed to the coach-house of the Newfoundland Inn, where they were laid out in sad array to await the Inquisition of the Coroner. The friends of the deceased kept long watch by the lifeless clay, and watered it with tears of sincere but fruitless grief: while the teeming crowd wasted silently away, but the midnight hour had long passed before the neighbourhood of the spot resumed anything of its wanted quiet.
The driver of the vehicle, who was said to be intoxicated, ( a charge which certainly was not borne out by the evidence,) so soon as he discovered the fearful fact that his omnibus with its living freight was overboard, became almost frantic, and in his distress would have plunged after it had he not been prevented. It is not surprising that the crowd should suspect him of negligence and load him with reproaches; and at the instance of the Mayor he was committed to the lock-up house, to await the Coroner's Inquest, by which, however, he was honourably acquitted of blame - except, indeed, of risking the lives of parties with a horse which evidently had been addicted to a dangerous trick at starting.
The blame of the accident much more justly belongs to the authorities, by whose neglect the Quay has been left for years in a state of danger which to strangers has always been astonishing, and to which the inhabitants can only have been reconciled by the blunting effect of habit. Not, indeed, that illustrations of its insecurity have been wanting: the instances have not been few or distant of men walking over the unprotected side of the Quay and being drowned, and of horses running over and sharing the same fate; and it is well known that a few years ago one of the members for North Devon, when on his way to the place of election, escaped being precipitated over it, with his carriage and four crowded by his friends, by an interposition which was scarcely less than miraculous. That the public highway, for an entire length of 1,200 feet, and in some parts of it of trifling width, should be without the slightest protection or fence to check the heedless travellers' descent to a watery grave - that the principal street of the town should present at the foot of its steep declivity the undefended edge of a river, to be escaped only by turning a sharp corner on either side, - these are facts which deserve the highest reprehension, as they disclose a reckless disregard to the public safety that is utterly unpardonable in a civilised community. To whom the neglect is attributable we know not: we understand the point is in dispute: our business is not to meddle with the question of liability, but to insist that such a scandalous nuisance should be instantly abated.
It remains to us only to record the names of the victims of this sad catastrophe, which are as follows (all being of Torrington): FANNY FRIENDSHIP, wife of JOHN FRIENDSHIP, of New-street, nail maker, aged about 40, leaving four or five young children:- ANNE NORMAN, a widow residing in an almshouse, and aged about 65; - ELIZABETH FRIENDSHIP, wife of JOHN FRIENDSHIP, of Castle street, rope maker, and daughter of the last named, aged 35, leaving six young children; - MARY ANNE FRIENDSHIP, a child of 11 years old, daughter of the last named; - ANNE PAGE, wife of JOHN PAGE, boot maker, of South-street, aged 40, no family; - JOHN CHAPPELL (Brother to Mr Michael Chappell, who extricated himself,) glove manufacturer, and fellmonger, a highly respectable man, aged about 65, of Well-street, leaving a wife and grown-up family: - JOHN PASSMORE, of South-street, worsted manufacturer, a middle-aged man, leaving a wife, but no family; - and ELIZABETH GRIFFEY, aged 60, an unmarried female, for many years a valued domestic in the family of the late Dr Smith, of Bideford, but lately keeping a little shop in New-street.
THE INQUEST - Was held at two o'clock on Wednesday, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, and a highly respectable Jury, consisting of - Thomas Burnard Chanter, Esq., foreman; Mr Joseph Berry, Mr John Carter, Mr John Dyer, Mr George Oatway, Mr William Vinson, Mr Philip Richards, Mr James Landon, Mr Philip Pady, Mr James Vanstone, Mr William Major, and Mr John Beer.
The Jury assembled at the 'Newfoundland Inn,' where the bodies were lying; and having been sworn and made view of the deceased, the Court adjourned to the Town Hall, where a crowded audience attended.
Mr Jennings appeared on the part of Bowden, the driver of the omnibus, to watch the proceedings; and Bowden, who had been locked up all night, was brought into the Court to hear the evidence.
The first witness was - Robert Stafford, landlord of the 'King's Arms,' on the Quay, Bideford: I was on the Quay when the accident happened: saw the vehicle start from my door, and go on so far as Mr Maunder's coach-house door: the horse went on pretty well when she started, but there was a little difficulty at first; when outside Mr Maunder's stable the horse turned round as if to go into it, and the driver Bowden, who was by her head, tried to lead her on, but she ran backwards, and I saw the horse detach herself from the omnibus, which ran over the Quay, and I saw it sink within a minute it went over: the driver was not drunk in my opinion; the load was not greater than the horse would take: I have seen her draw heavier loads; I have examined the shoulders of the horse; they are a little raw, but I have seen them much worse; I do not think there was any fault in the driver; I did not see him whip the horse; he puts up at my house; I have often seen the horse start, but never saw her jib before that I know of; she did not start off no free as some horses do; the driver was by her head at the time; he seemed to manage the horse as if he knew what he was about.
By the Foreman: I think the horse must have run in the omnibus nearly two years; the driver was not on the box when he left my door; he sometimes does get on the box before he starts; I saw the horse put in, but she did not wince at all that I saw as if she could not bear the weight of the collar; do not know any particular reason why the driver did not get up on his box, except that he might probably want to call at another house.
By a Juror: I have seen the horse sometimes hesitate at starting; she did not go so pleasantly as some horses.
By the Coroner: I have seen several accidents occur before by horses going over the Quay; I have long felt that the Quay is in a most unsafe and dangerous state; if so slight a defence as a chain had been there, the accident would not have happened.
A Juror said he had often come from Barnstaple with the driver, but never saw any impropriety in his conduct; but he had seen the horse jib a little at starting.
Mr William Taylor was the next witness: I was on the Quay last night at a quarter before seven; I witnessed the accident from beginning to end; the horse started very unsteadily, pulling to the right and left: I saw no one in charge except George Handford; there was a dispute because a woman who was on the roof would not come off; some person said she was drunk; I saw no one as driver, but Handford was at the back of the omnibus; it appeared to me as if there was no one to guide the horse; the omnibus at first went so near to the edge of the Quay that I screamed out; the horse then inclined towards the stables of the 'Newfoundland Inn,' and then went backwards towards the edge of the Quay, where the omnibus went over with its back foremost; I was with a friend who was looking for an omnibus for Barnstaple; I was shocked and almost petrified when I saw the omnibus go over; saw it float for a moment or two; there can be no doubt that if there had been a chain as a defence to the edge of the quay, the accident would not have happened.
By a Juror: I saw considerable danger, in my opinion, before the accident occurred, the 'bus being so near to the edge of the quay; I could not see whether the horse extricated herself from the vehicle; the vehicle appeared to bound off the quay like a vessel from the stocks.
Mr Michael Chappell, the person who was rescued from the omnibus after it went over, was called as an evidence; but it was said that he was so ill as to be unable to attend, having had two doctors with him all the night.
Mr John Bishop sworn: I was on the Quay last evening a little before seven; I was close by when the horse first stated; I saw the horse jib at Stafford's door, at her first starting; she did not go off as a horse would do that readily took the collar; the horse then went on, and I stood with Stafford, who said a minute after, "They are turned into Maunder's stables;" and then almost immediately cried out, "By God, they are gone over the Quay." I hurried to get a boat. I did not see the horse break from the omnibus. I do not know the horse; did not see the driver near her; the night was very dark; saw a man get out of the omnibus after it was in the water, and swim towards the shore: I pushed out an oar, thinking that others might get out and be glad of its help.
By the Foreman: I can't say if the omnibus had lights or not.
By the Coroner: I think the Quay requires a protection of some kind; that has long been my opinion, and that of many besides; if there had been such a fence as a chain, the accident could not have happened.
By the Foreman: I have heard of an instance, no longer ago than last night, of a person walking over the Quay and being drowned; it is the universal opinion that the Quay is in a dangerous state from the absence of some protection.
George Handford sworn: Am a carrier; am in the habit of coming to this town with a van; was on the Quay last night at a little before seven; saw the 'Safety' van start from Stafford's door; I was at the tail of it; the horse started very well for anything I saw, and went as far as Maunder's stable, where she turned her head towards the coach-house; I heard Bowden speak to the horse; I was still at the back of the van; I was going home in it, but did not get in on the Quay as it is a dangerous place, and we were overloaded, or had a full load; the horse went backward as I thought, but I afterwards found she had bolted with the shafts; I still kept behind the omnibus, and felt it going forwards, until it went over the Quay; I instantly jumped upon it, and if persons had thrown a rope out to me I think I could have held on, and saved the whole; as it was I remained in the 'bus until I was three feet under water, and the 'bus still drifting outwards, I swam ashore; I believe there were nine persons in the omnibus; when I was on the 'bus in the water I saw Mr Michael Chappell looking out of the window of the door; he was striving to get out, but I could not help him; he was still in the water when I swam ashore; I did not see him land, nor did I know he was saved until I saw him afterwards ashore; there was a woman of the name of Stocker on the top of the 'bus, and as it went into the water head foremost, she floated off and drifted down, and was saved; I did not know but the horse and driver were with the 'bus when it went out over; but after I came ashore I met the driver and was surprised to see him; I said, "Are you saved? have you not been in the water?" He said he had not - that the mare had broken away from the 'bus with the shafts, and he went with her; if there had been a slight defence to the edge of the Quay, the accident would not have happened, as the 'bus was going very slowly.
By the Foreman: I had my feet on the ground at the back of the 'bus on starting; am sure the horse did not move backwards six inches; I won't say she did not wince from the soreness of her neck ; when we were first going to start Bowden was on the box, but I persuaded him to get off and go to the head of the horse; I always do so myself, as I think it better to lead across the Quay; did not see him strike the horse; was with Bowden all the day except an hour or two, but he only took a glass or two of beer, and the share of a pint or two with four or five others; I will swear that I think he was sober; I have no interest in either the mare or the 'bus; I was not a partner with him yesterday; if I had been about buying the horse, I will not say whether I would have been satisfied with his starting; she was a safe horse to carry six or eight or ten people; was fully equal to her work; the omnibus is not licensed; travels under four miles an hour; can't say how many the 'bus should carry; would not object to drive or to buy the horse; I did not know but the horse went over with the 'bus; have seen the horse jib a little at starting, but there is not a better horse in Torrington, and I never saw her refuse a load, but she would do her own work and others too, have seen her go up Torrington hill with a load; she has had a sore shoulder, and I helped Bowden to dress it some time ago.
Mr William Ward sworn: I am a farmer of Great Torrington; was on Bideford Quay at the time of the accident; was at Stafford's door when the omnibus started; the horse started very well; he did not start right off, but there was no backing that I could discern, the horse went on a little way and turned towards the coach-house, from that he turned off to his proper road, and then directly to the other side, and I thought the horse, omnibus and all, went over the Quay together; I saw the driver at the head of the horse both when she started and when she turned back from the coach-house; I think the driver was fully able to take care of his horse; I could not see the 'bus go over, but on my going to the place I saw the driver with his horse, and the shafts at her heels, and the 'bus was in the water; the least obstruction would have stopped the bus from going over.
By the Foreman: I spoke to the driver on the Quay, and saw nothing the matter with him; did not see but he was sober; he had the reins in his right hand.
Mr William Pridham sworn: was in my office on the quay last evening, and ran out just as the horse had detached herself from the omnibus; the driver was at the head of the horse, and to me it appeared as if he did not know but the horse had the omnibus at her heels; saw the omnibus go over the Quay within a moment or two of its separating from the horse; the driver in my opinion did all he could do under the circumstances; did not know the horse, as to jibbing, the staunchest horse may be restive, particularly if he have had a few days' rest; it was so with a horse I started this morning - a better horse there could not be, but he had had a week's rest, and was restive at starting: I think the Quay is extremely unsafe; I have often trembled to see my coach start on the Quay; I always wish to have the omnibus taken on the foot of the bridge, for I always fear to see persons getting into the 'bus on the quay, for if the horse should be at all restive, over the Quay they must go; I have known many accidents occur both to horses and men; there ought most certainly to be a protection from the edge of the Quay; I lost a horse there myself once; two men fell over the Quay last night, one of whom was drowned and the other rescued; I think, on market days, the thoroughfare on the Quay is much impeded, and the public convenience much interfered with, by the placing of carts on the Lord of the Mayor's part of the Quay, but I do not know that there is any byelaw against the practice.
Dennis Sullivan sworn: am superintendent of police of this borough, watched the men with the grappling irons searching for the omnibus in the river that evening; saw the omnibus brought in to the edge of the quay, and waited until it was dry, when the bodies were taken out one by one, and I saw them deposited in the 'Newfoundland Inn,' the bodies just seen by the Jury are the same that I saw taken out of the omnibus last night.
Thomas Norman sworn: knew all the bodies, and identified them as those described in the Inquisition. [The witness was much affected, as among the deceased were his mother, sister and niece. He bitterly complained of the defenceless state of the quay, which inclined to a descent from the highway to the edge. If it were on an ascent, there would be less danger, and posts and chains might then be unnecessary, for carts and omnibuses would be stopped on [?], whereas on a descent there was nothing to interrupt them. He here [?] testimony on the good conduct f the driver, with whom he had often used from Torrington to his work at Bickington, and a steadier man he never wished to travel with. Whether any other of the friends of the survivors might find fault with him or not, he could not tell, but on his part, much as he felt for the loss of his friends, he could not blame the driver. The only persons to blame were the corporation of the borough, or the lord of the manor.]
This being the whole of the evidence, the Jury withdrew to consider their verdict, which they speedily found to the following effect:- "That the deceased were accidentally drowned, and that no negligence or blame was to be imputed to George Bowden, the driver of the omnibus, but the Jury strongly recommended that either by indictment or presentment the Insurers [?] of the quay be brought before the proper authorities. The verdict was received with much applause.
The Coroner very generously intimated his intention to present the amount of his fee towards the fund opened in aid of the destitute families of some of the deceased; and the Jury, at the instance of their worthy foreman, imitated the example by relinquishing their fees for the same purpose.
The Inquest terminated before five o'clock, upon after which the bodies were removed by their friends, preparatory to their sepulchre.

BIDEFORD - ANOTHER DEATH BY DROWNING. - As if to verify the adage that "casualties do not come alone," a melancholy episode to this distressing catastrophe occurred the same evening in the accidental decease of MR RICHARD PRINCE, aged about 53, a respectable farmer and lime burner, belonging to Clovelly. The deceased had come into the market in the morning accompanied by two of his workmen, and bringing a quantity of wheat for sale, he sold his wheat and received the money (£9); he seems to have been addicted to drinking, and was in the 'London Inn,' on the Quay, a little before 7 in the evening; drinking with a few of his neighbours; the alarm of the omnibus going over the Quay having been given, all his companions went out to see what was the matter, leaving him alone in the room; he must have gone out soon after, because a woman saw him excessively drunk, rambling towards the edge of the Quay, who ran over to him, and led him up towards Toper-street, where she [line blurred], but the next morning, between 9 and 10, his body was found drowned outside the Quay, just opposite Bridgeland-street. The face was shockingly eaten by the rats, and in his pockets above £13 was found. The body was taken to the 'Ship Inn,' where the Inquest was held upon it the same morning before Thos. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, when the above facts having been deposed to, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." There can be no doubt that the unfortunate fellow, being greatly intoxicated, rambled over the Quay and so came by his death.

UPLYME - Dreadful Death. - An Inquest was held on the 6th inst., on the body of a man named HENRY FOWLER, a quarry man, aged about 30 years, who was in the employ of Mr Job Fowler ,lime burner, whose body was discovered on Thursday morning, the 4th instant by another workman named Bowditch, lying in the middle of the kiln. When Bowditch got to the kiln, the flames were between 5 and 6 feet above the top of the kiln, which was rather unusual; he was about to put on some more lime stone, when he saw something black lying in the middle of the kiln, and on looking very earnestly at it, distinguished the body of a man, lying on his back, with his left leg drawn up. He called assistance, and the body was got out, and was identified by the small portions of the dress, which deceased had on, which was not consumed by the fire, to be the body of the deceased. The body was roasted to a cinder, not a feature of the face could be distinguished, and his left leg was separated at the knee joint, by the action of the fire. The deceased had been drinking at a public house in the evening of Wednesday; when he left, he went to his master's house, and left there between 8 and 9; he was in liquor, but appeared to be capable of taking care of himself. The lime kiln is about 30 yards from Mr Fowler's house. No noise was heard after deceased left the house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

PLYMOUTH - Another Instance of the Uncertainty of Human Life occurred in Plymouth, on Tuesday. - A policeman, whilst on duty in Bedford-street, discovered, about six o'clock in the morning, lying in the snow, a young man in a state of total insensibility. He did not appear to have been in that state long, for the body was quite warm, and was only partially covered with the snow that was at that time heavily falling. He was immediately conveyed to the Station-house, and a surgeon summoned, but life was quite extinct. The deceased was the son of MR FROOKE, tailor, of Saltash-street, and when he received this awful visitation, he was going to a morning prayer-meeting. He was only 19 years of age, and bore a most irreproachable character. At the Inquest held at the Guildhall, on the same day, a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God," was returned.

Thursday 25 February 1847
BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - A young man called DANIEL ENGLAND, son of the toll-gate keeper at the south gate, while conversing with his cousin at his house, East-the-water, on Saturday last, fell down and instantly expired. He had previously been in perfect health, and had attended the launch of a vessel the same morning as a member of the band which was hired for the occasion. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday last, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" returned.

Thursday 4 March 1847
MESHAW - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Meshaw, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM WEBBER, a farmer of that parish, aged 27 years. From the evidence it appeared that on the Saturday preceding, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, deceased was returning from Southmolton market in company with Messrs. John Webber and James Carter, two neighbouring farmers: the deceased had drank freely, and when he had got about a quarter of a mile out of the town, he rode away from his friends, who cautioned him not to ride too fast, as his pony had thrown him off several times; he, however, persisted in galloping at the full speed of his pony, and they followed him fearing an accident would happen; they had not gone far when they picked up his hat, and presently heard the pony coming furiously towards them, and rode in close to the hedge to keep out of its way, but the animal came with its full force against the pony of Mr Carter, and the concussion was such as to throw both the riders off. Deceased was taken up and complained of pain in his head and legs, but was put into a cart that was passing by and conveyed home. Mr Flexman, of Southmolton, was sent for, who immediately on seeing him pronounced it to be a case of imminent danger, and deceased survived only a few hours. The opinion of the medical man was that death resulted from extravasation of blood upon the brain caused by the fall; and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The horse of Carter was killed by the accident on the spot, and himself injured, but not dangerously.

Thursday 18 March 1847
DARTMOUTH - Two instances of sudden death occurred in this town last week, one of a widow named FOX, who lived in a house by herself, the shutters of which being shut at an unusually late hour in the morning, the door was broken open, and she was found prostrate on the floor and nearly insensible; she died shortly afterwards. The other was a woman named LIGHT, who dropped down dead whilst speaking to a neighbour in her own house, of the sudden death of MRS FOX. Inquests have been held on the bodies, by Mr Puddicombe, Borough Coroner.

EXETER - Death by Drowning. - A melancholy case of this kind occurred in Exeter on Tuesday. MISS ELIZABETH ISHERWOOD, about 17 years of age, who it is understood has no parents living, but is in the care of an aunt, was placed from Bath, her previous place of residence, with the Misses Langsford, milliners, 235 High-street, to be instructed in the business. No cause is assigned for such conduct; but yesterday she left the Misses Langsford's house, was seen in her course towards the river, and, it is said, afterwards seen walking in the fields between Head Weir and the Railway Station, and in a short time the body was discovered and taken from the water, but the unfortunate young woman was dead. An Inquest will be taken before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, at five this afternoon.

Thursday 25 March 1847
SOUTH MOLTON - Inquest. - At Southmolton, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner of the Borough, on Monday last, on the body of JAMES VERNON, sawyer, aged 65. Deceased was sawing a piece of timber the preceding Saturday, when the cramp by which it was fastened slipped, and poor VERNON, who was the top sawyer, fell off, the piece falling on him, whereby he was dreadfully injured about the head, chest and arms. Mr Tanner, surgeon, was soon on the spot, and had him conveyed home; but he lingered only a few hours, dying the same evening. Verdict, "Accidental." The pit sawyer was uninjured.

Thursday 8 April 1847
BICKINGTON - Fatal Accident on the Taw Vale Railway Works. - On Friday last (Good Friday) an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the Inn in Bickington Village, on the body of JOHN MITCHELL aged 28 years, who had died from the results of an accident on the Taw Vale works the day before. It appeared that deceased was employed in drawing some carriages on the rails, and was about to attach them on to other waggons which were stationary on the line, when just as he was coming up to them, he went to the front of his waggons to unhook a chain, and the moving waggons coming in contact with the still body of waggons, the deceased was jammed between them. Other workmen on the line came to his help, but he expired almost immediately. The body presented a shocking spectacle, the right side of the chest being crushed in upon the lungs. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of GEORGE PHILLIPS, a child four years of age, son of HENRY PHILLIPS, a farm labourer, living in a lone cottage about a mile out of this town. It appeared from the evidence of a sister of the deceased, a girl eight years of age, that she was left at home on Saturday last, with deceased and another little brother about six years of age (the mother being out at work); that about three o'clock in the afternoon the eldest little boy had left the house to get some milk, and she was engaged in washing down the window seat, when the deceased, who was playing near the fire place, cried out, "Anne! Anne!" and on looking around she saw his clothes in flames: she took up a pitcher to throw some water over him, but found it empty; she then went to the stream and got some water and threw over him, and by this time the other boy came home, who immediately ran off for his father who was at work about a mile away. The father stated that when he returned he found the deceased outside the door, sitting on the step, and dreadfully burnt; he took him in his arms and put him on the bed, while a neighbour, who had by this time arrived, ran into the town for Mr Stabb, surgeon, who was soon on the spot, but found it impossible to preserve life, the injury being so severe; and the little sufferer lingered till three o'clock the following morning and then died.

Thursday 22 April 1847
ILFRACOMBE - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - A distressing accident occurred on the afternoon of Friday last, between five and six o'clock, under the following circumstances. The man servant of --- Erle, Esq., (a gentleman residing at Hillsborough-terrace, Ilfracombe,) was driving his gig (or dog cart) from Ilfracombe to meet his master who was returning to Barnstaple from Exeter by coach that evening: the horse was a very fine and spirited animal, above sixteen hands high: when on the road near the village of Muddiford, between three and four miles from Barnstaple, the horse stumbled and fell, and the vehicle being high on the wheels the man (whose name was James Davis) was thrown out on his face; and the horse, having got upon his legs, and finding himself at liberty, ran off at furious speed, and pursued his career unchecked until he reached Westaway, about one mile from this town. As it was the evening of the market day, when many were returning from town on horseback and in their market carts, it is surprising that a collision had not sooner taken place; but at Westaway, it was the unfortunate lot of an old man named THOMAS LILLY, of Marwood, aged 63, an agricultural labourer, to be passing from his work towards his home in the parish of Pilton, just when the infuriated animal came up at the top of his speed; an either not being aware of his danger or being unable to get out of the way, he was struck down by the point of the shaft or the collar, and with such fearful violence that the whole of the ribs on his right side were fractured. The family of Peter White, Esq., of Westaway, were attracted to the spot, by the screams of persons who witnessed the accident, happening to pass at the time, and administered humane assistance to the poor man, who lay in the road with scarcely any signs of life; but having taken a little brandy he appeared slightly to revive, and was immediately removed to the Infirmary, where, however, he died within two or three minutes of his arrival, never having spoken after the sad occurrence. The horse maintained his heedless course down the village of Pilton, and after overturning some buckets which were in front of Mr Carter's cooperage, was eventually brought up by a cart with which he came in contact, and by which the gig was upset and the horse thrown on his side. While he lay on the ground, Mr Bencraft and Mr Gilbert, who happened to be riding by, assisted by other persons, detached the vehicle and released the animal, which appeared to have sustained but trifling damage. Mr Bencraft rode back to ascertain what had become of the driver, and found him hurrying on as fast as he could after his horse, having suffered severe lacerations of the head and face, but not being seriously injured. An Inquest was held on Saturday, at the Infirmary, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of the deceased; but no evidence being forthcoming as to the case of death (the persons who had witnessed it not being in attendance), the Inquest was adjourned to Tuesday, at one o'clock, and in the mean time the witnesses were summoned. Messrs George Lewis and John Hancock, of Berrynarbor, as well as Mr Eyre's servant, gave evidence of the circumstances in the effect given above; and the Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 April 1847
BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - On Monday last, a young man of this town, named WILLIAM FROST GREENWOOD, 19 years of age, had been spending the day at Peppercombe with two of his friends, who were returning in a gig together in the evening, and called at the 'Swan Inn,' at Alwington, to take a glass of beer, when MR GREENWOOD complained suddenly of illness, exclaimed quickly, "I shall die! I shall die!" was carried at once to bed, and expired in the landlady's arms within ten minutes! A post mortem examination of the body was made the next day by Mr Thompson, of Bideford, which discovered the cause of death to have been disease of the heart. An Inquest was held on the body by John Henry Toller, Deputy Coroner, and a verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 13 May 1847
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of WILLIAM SUTTON, aged 33, who was employed as a navvy on the works of the Taw Vale Railway, and had died almost suddenly the preceding Saturday. It appeared that deceased lodged at the notorious home kept by the Tuckers, in Back-lane, where he cohabited with a daughter of his host; he had been unwell on Friday and Saturday, and had been treated by a medical man for the gravel; on the evening of Saturday he went to the 'Southmolton Inn,' to meet his brother who had received his wages for him, and returned to his lodgings and drank sixpennyworth of brandy, soon after which he complained of feeling worse, screamed as if in violent pain, and died almost immediately. From the infamy of the place in which he died, and from the inability of his medical attendant to account for his death, suspicion of unfair play was entertained, and a post mortem examination was ordered, which was made by Dr Rodd, and Mr Cooke; and at the adjourned Inquest the next day, the latter gentleman gave evidence that death resulted from Natural Causes in the rupture of one of the vessels of the heart, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

BISHOPS TAWTON - Sudden Death - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, at Bishop's Tawton, on the body of RICHARD CONNEBEAR, aged 67, agricultural labourer, who had been found dead the Saturday preceding in the orchard in which he had been at work. It appeared that deceased had been engaged by farmer Powell to turn up an orchard, and was so employed on Saturday; but as he did not return in the evening, his wife became alarmed and went to Mr Powell's to inquire for him; Mr Powell thereupon took a lantern and went into the orchard, and by the root of an ash tree lay the body of deceased quite dead and cold. In consequence of reports that he died from want, the Coroner ordered a post mortem examination, which was taken by Mr Joce, of Kerscott, who deposed as the result of it that death had been caused by apoplexy, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

SOUTHMOLTON - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at Bishopsnympton, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY MOGFORD, a widow woman, aged 70, who resided at the house of Mr George Rowcliffe. It appeared that Mr Rowcliffe is a cripple, and the deceased was accustomed to wait upon him: she had put him to bed on Monday evening, and went down stairs to take her tea, and he went to sleep; some hours after a little boy who resided in the house came to him and awoke him, saying that "Granny had fallen into the fire;" upon which he got down as soon as she could, and found the deceased lying by the fire on her stomach, and quite dead: her person was greatly burnt. There was every reason to presume that deceased was taking her tea pot from the fire, and fell into it, probably in a fit. A verdict of "Found Dead" was returned.

Thursday 20 May 1847
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., at Pilton, in this borough, on the body of ANN FRENCH, a child of two years old, daughter of JOHN FRENCH, maltman to Mr George Balsdon. During the temporary absence of the mother the day before, for the purpose of purchasing some bread for the family, in which she did not say above five minutes, the deceased, who was most incautiously left alone in the house, must have approached the fire and caught her clothes; for, on the mother's return, she found the little sufferer behind the door, with her clothes consumed, and her person dreadfully burnt, and the house full of smoke upstairs and down. She called in the assistance of a neighbour, who took up the child and put her to bed; and Mr Cutcliffe, being in instant attendance, did all that could be done to assuage her pains and preserve her life; but within about two hours death had claimed its victim. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 17 June 1847
SOUTHMOLTON - Lamentable Suicide. - An Inquest was held this morning (Thursday) before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough of Southmolton, on the body of JAMES HARDING, Esq., of Buzzacott, Combmartin, aged 48. Deceased was a gentleman of weak intellect, and occasionally betrayed mental aberration. He had been for some time on a visit to his brother, JOHN HARDING, Esq., of this town, whose house he left in the afternoon of yesterday, and nothing was heard or seen of him afterwards until this morning, when his body was found in the river Mole, by Parkhouse, near this town. Nothing unusual had appeared in his conduct previous to his leaving his brother's house. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

MILTON DAMAREL - Cruel Treatment of an Old Man. - A Coroner's Inquest was held before Mr Vallack, on Monday, upon the body of JOHN STEVENS, an old man, aged 79, who died on the Saturday. His daughter, MARY STEVENS, proved that on Wednesday evening her father, who had been to see her sister, came home, and complained that he had been very ill used, and should not live, stating that he had called at the beer house at Vengreen for half a pint of small beer, and that William Rattenbury, a farmer, who was there, abused him very much, and with a stick beat him across his legs, hands, and other parts of his person, and that the landlady had attempted to ward off some of the blows with a chair. The next day the old man got up, but was soon obliged to go to bed again, and died on the Saturday following. Several other persons, who met the old man on his road home, stated that they heard him complain of the ill-usage, and say that he should not live. The landlady, Mrs Fishleigh, stated that Mr Rattenbury, who was not drunk, reproached the deceased for having parish pay; to which STEVENS answered - "Mr Rattenbury, you've a long family yourself, and you don't know what they might come to." She declared that though Rattenbury had a stick, he never once struck the old man. She never left the room, but once to go into the parlour and cellar, and she must have heard if any blow had passed. STEVENS was there three parts of an hour, and left Rattenbury there who did not rise from his seat till afterwards. - Mr Pearce, surgeon, of Holsworthy, stated there were several bruises on the body, and one on the left shin where the skin was broken, likely to have been done with a stick. STEVENS had a hernia and was disposed to dropsy, and any person speaking roughly to him might hasten his death by excitement. The Coroner expressed surprise that the landlady had seven seen Rattenbury strike the deceased; he was afraid she had not stated all she knew, for he believed STEVENS was ill-treated, because his statement on his road home to different persons agreed with the statement he had made at home on his dying bed; and besides the bruises were still to be seen. Something might transpire to throw more light on it; in the mean time at his recommendation the Jury returned a verdict to the following effect:- "That the deceased came by his death through ill treatment, but how received there was no evidence to prove." This case has excited great interest in the neighbourhood, and many heads have been shaken over it. It was Mr John Fishleigh who first represented the facts to the Rector; and the reverend gentleman, with some neighbouring farmers, thought the case required investigation, and sent for the Coroner. Great indignation is felt here at an attempt made to pack the Jury, which the Coroner very properly prevented. When the names of the Jurymen were called, among the rest were an uncle, two brothers in law, and father in law of Rattenbury; but Mr Fishleigh called the Coroner's attention to it, and the unjust attempt was consequently defeated, the Coroner expressing great displeasure. The landlady, whose evidence was not thought quite satisfactory, is a relative or Rattenbury, and he is also said to be a good customer of her house. We trust this affair will be thoroughly investigated. The statement of the deceased not having been taken in writing is unfortunately not available as legal evidence, whatever moral reliance may be attached to it.

Thursday 1 July 1847
EXETER - Shocking Suicide at Exeter. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the 'White Horse Inn,' on the body of MARY BAKER, a widow aged 57, who had destroyed herself that day under the following appalling circumstances:- It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was cook in the service of a family on Southernhay, who went out of town on Thursday morning at seven o'clock, leaving the deceased and the housemaid at home. The deceased appeared very much depressed in spirits, and did not eat much breakfast, saying that she did not care much about it. She subsequently made up the beds with the housemaid, and about ten o'clock was last seen in the kitchen. The housemaid missed her from the house at eleven o'clock, but took no notice of her absence, thinking that she had gone out for a short time. About half-past twelve, the housemaid became uneasy, and finding that the deceased had not got her bonnet and shawl with her, she feared that something had happened. She then notice a stream of blood in the area, issuing beneath the wall of a dark closet, between the pantry and wine cellar. She called in the servant of the family next door, who brought another person with him, and on proceeding through the pantry to the room beyond, the deceased was found lying on her face and hands, weltering in blood. Surgical assistance was promptly procured. The carotid artery was not divided, and it was the opinion of Mr Harris, that, could timely assistance have been rendered, her life might have been saved. Mr Caird, surgeon, stated that he had attended the deceased on Tuesday by the desire of her mistress, and found her in a state of nervous excitement. It appeared that about a fortnight ago, a female fellow-servant, with whom she had lived 17 years, had been seized with a paralytic attack in the night, in consequence of which she was obliged to leave her place. This the deceased had taken much to heart, and her manner and appearance had much altered since. She had previously been a pleasant, rosy-looking person; but a witness who met her in the market on Tuesday stated that the deceased looked "yark" and quite stared at her, and when she asked her how she did, replied that she was very bad and couldn't throw that off her spirits. The deceased had lived with her late mistress 19 years. The Jury found that the deceased destroyed herself, being at the time of Unsound Mind.

SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident. - A melancholy occurrence took place on Tuesday night, near this town, by which the life of a fine young man was sacrificed by the most reprehensible habit of drivers riding on the shafts of their waggons. WILLIAM KNILL, aged 28, a steady man in the employ of Mr Hugh Ballment, of Barnstaple, timber merchant, was engaged with others in drawing oak timber from beyond this town to his master's yard. They had two waggons in charge, and KNILL was with the hinder one. About nine o'clock at night, having passed through the Deer Hill turnpike gate, on the new line of road to Barnstaple, a short distance from this town, the waggons were met by a female at the foot of the hill moving on steadily; but a little distance from the spot towards the turnpike gate, she observed the body of a man lying in the road, and on approaching nearer saw that he was dead, a quantity of blood saturating the ground from his head which appeared to have been crushed. The woman obtained assistance, and the body was carried to the Union house, which is not far from the place, where a medical man was sent for, but his help was unavailing. There is no doubt that deceased was riding on the waggon, fell asleep, and tumbled off, and the ponderous vehicle passed over his head. It is remarkable that he had a narrow escape of a similar catastrophe not more than twelve months ago. His comrades proceeded with the waggons several miles before they discovered the poor fellow's absence, when they returned and found the event as we have described. An Inquest was held on the body the next day before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for Southmolton, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 8 July 1847
NORTHMOLTON - Most Awful Circumstances. - A case of accidental death has occurred in this village during the last week under circumstances of a distressingly melancholy and awful nature. On Friday night, or early on Saturday morning, a woman in decent circumstances, dressed in disguise, having an empty sack in her hand, made an attempt to enter the corn mill of Mr Ley, miller, situated in the village of Northmolton. She had been seen in the village about 11 o'clock at night, respectably attired; but nothing further appears to be known of her until the next morning (Saturday), soon after five o'clock, when the miller's man entered the mill, and his attention was immediately attracted to a pair of shoes lying by the wheel: on looking more narrowly he was terrified at observing, between the inner wheel of the mill and the wall, a human arm stretched out. In the utmost consternation and alarm he summoned his master and fetched the constables, who came instantly and found that a body was pressed betwixt the wheel and the wall, but so tightly that it required the assistance of nine men to lift the wheel before the remains could be extricated. The body was at length got out, and proved to be that of a woman named RICHORD WESTACOTT, aged 55, wife of a decent man in the village, a schoolmaster: her neck was broken, her person fearfully town and mutilated, and she must have been dead for several hours. It appeared that the miller had latterly missed corn from his mill on several occasions, and had watched a few nights previously, but without detecting the depredators. There is an aperture above the axle of the water wheel, through which he suspected the entrance must have been made (although apparently too small for any grown-up person to get through): and therefore, on the night in question, he left the mill wheel slowly turning round, thereby to prevent the access of the thieves. However, through this opening the unfortunate woman ventured to enter, and in the attempt came to her untimely and ignominious end. Deceased was a person of respectable connexions, but her character for honesty had been long suspected. An Inquest was held on the body before John Henry Toller, Esq., Coroner, and an Open Verdict returned of "Found Dead between the wheel and the wall." The occurrence has caused an extraordinary sensation in the parish, and it is hoped that so awful a warning may not be without a salutary influence.

TIVERTON - On Friday last, a young person named PURRINGTON, fell down in apparently lifeless state, at the house of Mr Crease, plumber, where she was employed as a charwoman. Medical aid was immediately procured, and although some signs of life were then manifested, she in a very short time breathed her last. An Inquest was held on the body in the evening of that day when the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 29 July 1847
NEWTON ABBOT - Distressing Occurrence. - A very melancholy and fatal accident occurred on Buckland Barton, near this town, on Saturday last, to MR ELIAS RENDELL, an old and highly respectable agriculturist. He left his residence according to his usual custom, about three o'clock in the afternoon of that day, for the purpose of going over the land and paying his workmen on an adjoining estate; and as the rooks are just now troublesome, and the rabbits very numerous about him, he took with him his gun, to destroy as many of them as came in his way; not returning to his home at the usual time, search was made over the estate, through that night of most tremendous and awful storm, but without discovering any trace of the unfortunate gentleman, and as it will probably be remembered, some months since, this estate was the scene of a fatal scuffle with poachers, in which the life of one of his labourers was lost, and that of his brother deliberately attempted, the agonising suspense of the family may be readily imagined. About five o'clock on Sunday morning, the body of MR RENDELL was discovered, extended on his face and hands, near the hedge of a field not far from his home, dead, stiff, and cold, pierced through the heart with the contents of his gun, which lay against the hedge. It appears the communication between the field in which the deceased was found and that adjoining, is through a gap in the hedge, and as MR RENDELL was aged, though not infirm, it is supposed that, endeavouring to steady himself with the gun, the trigger either caught in a twig, or by placing it too sharply on the ground, the lock being remarkably easy, it exploded, the contents entering the pit of the stomach and passing through the back. The deceased was highly respected in his neighbourhood, and as an old and esteemed tenant of his landlord Sir Walter Carew, Bart; and from his long experience as a practical agriculturist, and his sterling thorough English yeoman-like character, was regarded throughout his district as one of the "right good sort." An Inquest was held on Monday, by Mr Cockey, Deputy Coroner, of Ashburton, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The body of this ill-fated gentleman was found by his son.

Thursday 5 August 1847
BIDEFORD - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before Thos. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of HUGH PROUSE, who was drowned in the river Torridge (as we reported in our last), when a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 12 August 1847
BARNSTAPLE - Melancholy Suicide. - Much excitement was occasioned in this town on Monday morning last, by the report that MR CHARLES BLACKMORE, an old inhabitant and well known as a medical practitioner of more than 40 years' standing, had committed suicide by throwing himself out of his bedroom window. On Enquiry the rumour turned out to be too true: the occurrence happened at about half-past three o'clock in the morning, and though the unfortunate gentleman was alive when picked up, death ensued at about seven o'clock. The particulars of the sad event are given in the evidence before the Coroner's Jury, from which it was satisfactorily shown that deceased had been for several weeks in a state of mental derangement, and had once before attempted self destruction.
The Inquest - took place at two o'clock in the afternoon of the same day, at the dwelling house of deceased in Boutport-street, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, and a highly respectable Jury, of which Charles Roberts, Esq., was chosen foreman.
The Jury having been sworn proceeded to view the body, which lay in the dining room. After which the following evidence was taken:-
Mrs Sarah Thorne, who had for many years resided with deceased as his housekeeper, and who was deeply affected, deposed as follows:- I lived with deceased, and was in the room with him this morning; it was about half past three o'clock when the catastrophe happened; he had been restless all night, and I had been walking about the room and on the staircase with him; I was afraid he would have fallen over the banisters; he complained greatly of pain in his head and fluttering at the heart; he had been ill for some time, but worse for the last three weeks; he was always in dread of some person's coming to him, and would often express himself so; it might be about a month that he had been worse, but he has been in a low nervous way for twelve-months past; he was very ill all yesterday, and told us he should soon be gone; he retired to bed about nine o'clock at night; in the course f the night, perhaps about 12 o'clock, he got out of bed, complaining that he was very ill; I fetched some arrowroot for him, which he took, and appeared more composed; when I went out of the room I told him not to touch the window, to which he replied, "A little sir"; he did not open the window at that time; he had always a great dislike to having the window opened by the undersash, for fear any one should fall out of it; he lay down again and fell asleep, and I threw myself on the bed for a few minutes, and not having had any rest for several nights (in consequence of being up watching by him) I fell into a doze, from which I was suddenly awoke by hearing the window lift up; I sprang off the bed and ran towards the window; I was in time to catch hold of him by his nightshirt and his arm, which was the only part of him not out of the window, and I screamed aloud for assistance; I supported the sash with my shoulder, while I held on by his arm; his son-in-law and daughter (who lived in the house) ran in and assisted me; I think his face must have been towards the street; I did not hear him speak; he had complained some time before of want of air, but I told him there was air from the chimney and the door; we all held on to him as long as we could, but the linen gave way and I lost my hold, and when Mr Leworthy (his son-in-law) could hold on no further, he fell; I ran down with my maid, found him on the pavement, but he did not speak; we brought him in, and he died in about three hours after; I do not think he had been well ever since he fell from his horse more than twelve months ago; he had been wandering in his mind for some time, but I never expected he would commit such an act.
By a Juryman: I think he was in trouble about his circumstances; his late nephew used to make an allowance to him, which was curtailed after his decease; he was in great trouble about it, and sent for his widow to come to see him; she came to him the other day, and told him the allowance should be continued, but he said - "Betsy, I am very ill - you have come too late - I am dying." Dr Bignell, Dr Budd, and Mr curry had been very kind to him, and attended him frequently.
[As to the witness's statement of the curtailment of the deceased's gratuity from the widow of his late nephew, we are informed that it is altogether a mistake - the allowance had been regularly paid to him, and our informant was both the channel of its payment and was with the lady when she called on deceased a few days before his death, when she assured him in the kindest manner that the gratuity should be continued to him as long as he lived, and, if possible, increased - an assurance which seemed much to comfort him. We think it right to make this statement, as we find undeserved censure is sought to be cast on the lady in question].
Mr Humphrey Leworthy was the next witness. I have resided with MR BLACKMORE rather more than 12 months; he has been ill for some time, but worse for the last two months; he kept troubling himself about different things; one was about a bill of a few shillings which he had sent in for his attendance on the wife of a serjeant, and which was sent back to him to make out a new one; he used to speak of it frequently, and would express himself afraid of being taken up about it; I do not know that he was in any trouble about his pecuniary affairs or circumstances; his spirits were very low and his appetite bad; one thing would trouble him and then another; I went into him this morning about two o'clock, my wife was ill, and wished to see Mrs Thorne, and I remained with deceased the while; he was standing by the bedside; I asked him to get into bed, but he replied - "I am in great trouble; I have seen a man standing over there outside Mr Curry's window;" I said - "What of that?" - He answered - "It is all about the serjeant's bill; he is coming to take me away to a dungeon, and I shall never see the daylight again till I am brought out for trial"; I tried to comfort him and he went into bed, and I soon after left the room; the next thing I heard of him was about half past three o'clock; I ran up to his bedroom on hearing the last witness screaming, and found that he had got out of the window, and she was holding him by his wrist and shirt; I caught hold of him as tight as I could with both my hands, and we drew him up a little; but the shirt gave way, and with the jerk he fell two feel below the edge of the window; I held on by his wrist until I had nearly lost my footing and when I could sustain the weight no longer I was compelled to let him fall; his face was towards the wall; he slipped through my hands and fell on the pavement; I never heard him speak at all.
Mr Curry, surgeon, whose house is directly opposite to that of deceased, was the next witness. I have known the deceased for some years; have seen him frequently the last few weeks; have observed that he looked ill and in bad spirits; when I spoke to him he told me he was not well, and could enjoy nothing; about a fortnight ago I was called up in the middle of the night to come over to deceased, who had attempted to poison himself; I found the family half frantic; the deceased had suddenly run down into his surgery, where he had taken the bottle of morphine, of which he took not less than six drachms; when I came to him, which was within a very few minutes, he said - "I've done it - I've done it: it is no use - let me die." I told him I could not do so, but should do the best I could to save him; I immediately administered a powerful emetic, and followed it up by others, which succeeded in inducing a violent vomiting, by which, and by keeping him from sleeping and moving him about the room, we got over the effects of the morphine; he complained afterwards of great thirst and of much nervous excitement; I never took leave of him at night without his telling me that he should not live until the morning; the influence of the morphine was more to stupefy than to excite him; he had a desire to see Mr Luxmore (the vicar), and he called upon him, and would have called oftener, but deceased said he would send when he wished to see him again; his only comfort seemed to consist in having the bible read to him; he used to be fond of a newspaper or an amusing book, but he had lately given them up altogether; this morning, soon after three o'clock, I heard in my sleep a most dreadful noise, which I can never forget; it awoke me and I heard several voice screaming and distinctly recognised that of Mrs Leworthy saying, 'Father! Father!" and Mrs Thorne crying, "Hold on! Hold on!" I expressed immediately to Mrs Curry my fear that poor BLACKMORE was trying to get out of the window; I hastened to dress myself and was hurrying down stairs, when my door bell rang violently, and I found Mr Leworthy who had come to call me to the deceased; I went instantly, and found him lying on a blanket in the passage, with his head doubled up and apparently dead; I made use of means to restore animation, and soon after perceived him slightly sensible; he had sustained a concussion of the brain, several ribs were fractured, his right arm was injured, and there was a large emphysematous over the chest; his mind had been for some time decidedly deranged: during the election he was much excited, and could not bear the noise of the band; he consulted me, and I recommended him not to go out to vote. I should add that when I heard Mrs Thorne say, 'Hold on! Hold on!" I heard also a voice, which I recognised to be that of deceased, exclaiming, "Let me go! Let me go!" Speaking afterwards to me of his attempt to poison himself, he said - "I am mad, sir - I am mad; I did not know what I was doing. It was done in an instant."
Dr Bignell, who had attended MR BLACKMORE for some time, and was called to him soon after the fatal event occurred, confirmed Mr Curry's evidence as to the disordered state of deceased's mind, an instance of which he gave as having happened the Sunday week previous, when deceased told him that "Dr Budd was gone to Plymouth to bring up his brother, who was to cut him up to find out what was the matter with him." The Jury expressed themselves perfectly satisfied, and unhesitatingly found a verdict of "Insanity."

Thursday 19 August 1847
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Tuesday morning last, while the inmates of the union workhouse were at breakfast, one of them, named WILLIAM PUGSLEY, of the parish of Loxhore, aged 74, suddenly dropped down dead! the opinion of the medical man was that death occurred from apoplexy, and a verdict was returned by the Coroner's Jury (before Alfred Drake, Esq.) of "Died by the Visitation of God." Deceased was an exceedingly well-conducted and religious man; and his uniformly good behaviour had secured him the marked notice and esteem of the officers of the establishment.

Thursday 26 August 1847
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of EDWARD WILLIAMS, aged two years, son of MR JOHN WILLIAMS, tallow chandler and maltster, of Pilton, in this borough; who, on the afternoon of the Saturday preceding, while at play in his father's yard, accidentally fell into a tub of wort which had been drawn off about ten minutes and left to cool. The tub was about eighteen inches high and about half full; and the little fellow was severely scalded about the bowels, chest and neck. Medical aid was instantly called in, but was of no avail; he lingered until the following morning five o'clock, when he expired. These facts having been detailed in evidence by the afflicted father, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

CREDITON - Tuesday, 24th August, Death by Drowning. - An accident of a melancholy nature occurred here on Saturday last. As the second son of CHARLES HAINWORTH, Esq., surgeon, (a lad about 16 years of age,) was bathing with two of his comrades at Bullmarsh, he was induced to go too far beyond his depth, and was very soon seen to sink to rise no more, in the well known pit where so many young swimmers have been deceived. Although many persons were speedily on the spot, yet the body was in the water at least two hours before it was possible to recover it, the pit being so very deep. An Inquest has this day been held on the body.

Thursday 2 September 1847
HIGHBICKINGTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on the 3rd ultimo, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., on the body of WILLIAM SHADDICK, aged 13, servant in the employ of Mr Richard Slee, a farmer, of this parish. Deceased was leading a horse and laden cart from the corn field to the mowstead, and is supposed to have fallen, and the wheel passed over his body: his mistress, hearing the horse and cart coming into the yard faster than usual, went out and found the poor boy lying on the road: he was conveyed to bed, and Dr Jones sent for, but he died the next morning from internal haemorrhage. Verdict, Accidental Death.

WESTDOWN - An accident, which issued fatally, occurred on Tuesday se'nnight to MR JOHN CLOGG, aged 68, formerly a farmer of this parish, who was at work in the corn field of Mr Coats, of Mullacott, and standing on the rick, when, in offering his hand to another man to help him on to the rick, the sheaves on which he stood slid away from under him and he fell to the ground head foremost, by which several of his ribs were fractured and he was otherwise bruised. He was instantly removed home, and Mr Stabb, of Ilfracombe, surgeon, was in attendance; but the fractured parts of the ribs having forced their way into the lungs, death resulted from that cause on the following Friday. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday morning, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, which returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - Shocking Accident. - A poor man, named EDWARD GROVES, a pilot of this harbour, was acting in that capacity on board one of her Majesty's cutters off this place, when he was unfortunately knocked overboard by the main boom, and notwithstanding every effort to save him he was drowned. His body was picked up and now waits a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday 9 September 1847
PLYMPTON ST. MARY - Melancholy Accident at Laira. - Three Boys Drowned. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon last, at 'Laura Inn' Crabtree, on the body of three boys, named HENRY MADDOCK, CHARLES BUMSTEAD, and SAMUEL HUSBAND, inmates of the Plympton St. Mary Union. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest, it appeared that an old man, an inmate of the workhouse, to whose care the boys of the Union were consigned, took them all on Saturday morning, numbering about 11 or 12, to walk. On coming to the Laira, he gave them permission to bathe (for which he had not the least authority) above a place called the Amphitheatre, at the Saltram grounds. The boys stripped, and went into the water, and suddenly a cry was heard from one or more of them that MADDOCK and others had fallen into a pit. Burns looked round and saw the boys with their heads above the surface of the water apparently as if they were in a pit. Burns then went into the water a short way, but stated that he was unable to reach them. He then called out for assistance, and a man named Richard Hellyer, who was in a barge sailing down the river jumped into his boat and sculled towards them. He immediately dragged the boys successively out of the water and put them across the boat with their mouths downwards. They had not been in the water more than two minutes. They were then taken to the 'Laira Inn,' and Mr Stephen Pode, surgeon, who happened to be near the spot, came in a few minutes and used every possible means for the recovery of the lads, but without effect, as life was extinct. The Coroner having examined the Governor of the Union and other witnesses, briefly summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict in each case of 'Accidentally Drowned.' After the verdict the Jury handed in a memorandum signed by the Foreman, of which the following is a copy: - "The Jury feel called on to express their decided opinion that the man Burns, from his age and infirmity is quite unfit to have the uncontrolled charge of so large a number of boys, as it appears in the evidence, he was unequal to render the necessary assistance to the boys when in danger."

EAST DOWN - Fatal Accident - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Eastdown, on the body of JOHN HANDCOCK, aged 67, a labourer, of that parish, who was employed the day before in the harvest field of Mr Charles Smith, of Bowden, and in the evening was standing upon the oat rick which he was engaged in making, when by some unexplained accident he fell off the rick to the ground upon his head: he was seen to fall, and was taken up instantly and assistance rendered him, but he did not breathe after the accident, having dislocated his neck. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SHERWILL - An Inquest - was held on Wednesday last, at Sherwill, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of PHOEBE PERRIN, aged 12 years, daughter of a labourer of that place, who died the day before from the effects of severe burns which she sustained on the 10th June last from her clothes having taken fire while she was engaged in her father's kitchen. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 16 September 1847
BIDEFORD - Death by Burning. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner of the borough, on the body of ELIZA WAKELY, aged 3 years, a child of poor parents residing in Torrington-lane. It appears that the child was left with two others alone in the house, when her clothes took fire, and her cries attracted the attention of a neighbour, who went in and extinguished the fire. The child was burnt very severely, and lived but a few hours. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday, in Back-lane, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of JOHN PIM, aged 33, watchmaker, in the employ of Mr Mallett. It appeared in evidence that deceased was as well as usual when he returned home on Sunday night, about half-past nine; but within half an hour afterwards he was seized with violent illness, attended by copious haemorrhages, for which remedies were applied by Mr Hole, surgeon, who was sent for to attend him, but he continued to grow worse until half-past eight the next morning, when he expired. The medical man gave evidence that death was occasioned by the rupture of a blood vessel in the lungs, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

MARWOOD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Marwood, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN WYBRON, blacksmith, aged 53, who had died suddenly the preceding day. Deceased had been at Pippacott to see a horse, the Saturday preceding, and retired to rest about seven in the evening as well as usual: between five and six o'clock the next morning the wife of the deceased was awoke by hearing him say, "Lord have mercy upon my soul, how I sweat." His son, who was in an adjoining room, heard his father call out, and ran in to his room, where he found him apparently very ill, and took him up in his arms, where he held him while his mother called a neighbour to his assistance. A woman called Anne Knill came in and took the deceased from the arms of his son into her own, where he lay about ten minutes, and then died. Mr Parker, of Barnstaple, surgeon, was sent for, and arrived shortly after deceased had breathed his last. At the Coroner's direction the surgeon made a post mortem examination of the body, and pronounced that death had been occasioned by the rupture of a blood vessel on the brain. Verdict accordingly.

WEARGIFFORD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Jope's Bridge, in this parish, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH TURNER, aged 65, wife of a labourer. It appeared that deceased had been ailing for some days, but not seriously so; on the morning of Thursday her daughter took breakfast to her in bed, of which she partook with more than her usual appetite, but her daughter, felling rather uneasy about her, left word in the village to desire that when the surgeon passed through he would call and see the deceased. Mr Caddy, of Torrington, happened to pass that morning, and called at the house of deceased, and immediately went up stairs, where he found her in bed dead. From the appearance of the body he judged that death might have occurred an hour before. A post mortem examination was taken by order of the Coroner, which disclosed that death had resulted from ossification of the aorta, and a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned.

SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Marsh, in the parish of Northmolton, on the body of MR JAMES WEBBER, of Southmolton, a respectable draper, aged 49, which had been found drowned in the river Mole the preceding afternoon. Deceased was an early riser, and left his house at about five o'clock in the morning, having been met at about half past five by Mr Arthur Cawsey, a currier, in a field belonging to the Glebe, going in the direction of the place where the body was afterwards discovered. Not returning as usual, at his breakfast hour, his family became concerned, and their alarm increased as the day drew on: a search was consequently instituted for him, and about five o'clock his body was observed lying in the stream by a little boy who was accompanying his grandfather, Henry Thomas, a thatcher, on the bank of the water in quest of deceased. The water was not more than three feet deep in that place. They removed the body to the nearest house, but life must have been extinct many hours. It is conjectured, that deceased was bathing (which he was in the frequent habit of doing), and was taken in a fit while in the water. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide. - On Wednesday, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of PHILIP BRANSCOMBE, overseer at the tannery of Messrs. Tanner and Co., Portland Square. He left his lodging in the Tavistock Road at six o'clock that morning, and went to the tan-yard, where he stopped for a short time, and was not seen again until noon, when he was found hanging in a stable quite dead. To the persons with whom he lodged, his manner has for some time appeared very strange, particularly so on Wednesday morning. It was also stated that he had been before confined in a lunatic asylum. The Jury, after adjourning until Thursday, returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 23 September 1847
CRUWYS MORCHARD - Another Case of Poisoning. - For several days the magistrates and Coroner of Tiverton have been engaged in investigating a charge of murder against a young married woman, named FISHER, who is suspected of being concerned in causing the death of her husband by administering arsenic. The deceased was a farmer's labourer, and had been employed by a lady of the name of Partridge, at Woodford. He there became acquainted with ANN LEE, the sister of a publican's wife, at Washford Pyne, and was married to her three months since. They went to live at Stubborn Farm, near the village of Morchard, five miles distant. They apparently lived happily together until the latter end of last month, when, from some cause or other, she left him, taking with her some papers, which bore the amount he had saved, and which he had left in charge of Miss Partridge. On the 27th ult. he called on the parish clerk to solicit his assistance in obtaining the documents she had gained possession of, she having, as it was proved by Miss Partridge, endeavoured to obtain the wages he had saved. The deceased then was in good health. The next morning he was a corpse. At the Coroner's Inquiry it was shown that the prisoner had returned to the deceased. She slept with him the night previous to his death, and at four o'clock in the morning she sent for her sister, Mary Hodge, as her husband had been taken unwell, and then left to go to the surgeon at Woodford. Very soon afterwards he died. Mr Wood, a druggist residing at Tiverton, deposed to two females coming to his shop some weeks since to purchase arsenic. They asked for poison for rats, and he sold them half an ounce. He believed the widow of the deceased was the party to whom he sold it. On hearing what he intended to state to the Jury as to what she had purchased at his shop, she denied ever being there, and added, "You are come to swear away my life." Mr Haley detailed the result of the post mortem examination. The presence of white arsenic was clearly indicated, and he believed the quantity to have been sufficient to have caused death. The Jury, however, found "That the deceased died of poison taken in his stomach and bowels, but by whom administered there is no evidence to show." The widow being apprehended on a charge of having poisoned the deceased was examined and remanded.

Thursday 14 October 1847
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at Rawleigh before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of ELIZABETH NOTT, aged 7 years, daughter of PHILIP NOTT, of that place, labourer. It appeared in evidence that deceased, with an elder brother and an infant sister, was at walk the day before in the fields which lie between Rawleigh and Derby and in crossing a narrow plank which is thrown over the Yeo, the deceased slipped into the stream, which is much swollen from the late rains, and is nearly five feet deep in that place: her brother gave the alarm, and Mr Jewell, gilder, who happened to be fishing near the spot, ran to her assistance, and in the course of five minutes (as soon as the violence of the current would allow him) succeeded in getting her out, and sent off to the town for surgical aid, but on Mr parker's arrival very shortly after, he found the vital spark had fled. The Jury expressed their just reprobation of the carelessness which permits so dangerous a bridge in a crossing which is much frequented, especially by children (several of whom have already lost their lives by similar accidents); and the Inquest was adjourned until Saturday, for the purpose of obtaining information of the proper party (if any) to whom the duty of making a safe bridge belongs.

TIVERTON - On Friday last, the inhabitants of this town were forcibly reminded of the uncertain tenure on which life is held, by the sudden death of MR WILLIAM WESTAWAY, tailor, of Fore-street. About ten o'clock on that morning, one of the inmates of the house, finding that MR WESTAWAY had not yet risen, entered the room, and found him lying lifeless on the bed. There was no distortion of features, nor was the bed deranged; the body was quite cold, from which it is judged he had been dead for some hours. the deceased was 40 years of age, and had been some time labouring under a disease of the heart. On the succeeding day, an Inquest was held, which was adjourned to Monday. In the meantime, a post mortem examination of the body took place, when the heart was found in a very diseased state; and the Jury, on again meeting, returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 25 November 1847
WESTDOWN - Child Burning. - An Inquest was held at Westdown, on Saturday the 13th inst., before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM HORRELL, aged four years, son of a labourer. the evidence shewed that deceased was left alone in his father's house on the preceding afternoon; that the attention of a neighbour was attracted by screams proceeding from it, and on going to the spot she found the deceased in flames. She extinguished the flames and made applications to the burns, which were very severe. Mr Stabb, of Ilfracombe, was sent for, who arrived soon after, but at once pronounced the case hopeless, and death succeeded the same night. Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

LITTLEHAM - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Saturday the 20th, before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of SAMUEL MOORE, aged 15 years, son of WILLIAM MOORE, of this parish, labourer, whose death occurred under the following circumstances. Deceased was a servant of Farmer Henry Clarke; and had accompanied his master the morning before (Friday) to the house of Farmer Taylor, for the purpose of riding home a horse which his master had purchased at a survey the preceding evening; the horse (which was said to be a very quiet animal) was given into the hands of the deceased, who mounted him and rode off, while his master went in another direction. About two hours after the deceased was picked up in the road, within a mile from Taylor's, at a place Chennett's bridge, lying on his face, and apparently dying. He was conveyed to his father/s where Mr Turner, of Bideford, was sent for, who hastened to the spot, but found the boy dead. There were no marks of external injury; but the opinion of the surgeon was that death had resulted from dislocation of the neck produced by a fall. From marks of hair on the ground just where the boy was found, it is presumed that the horse fell with him and threw him. Verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at the infirmary, on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of JOHN TAYLOR, aged 43, a mason belonging to the parish of Landkey, who had died the preceding day from the effects of injuries received by falling from the scaffolding of the mansion house of Robert Chichester, Esq., of Hall (the particulars of which appeared in our last). Deceased had sustained extensive injuries, nine of his ribs being fractured, besides his thigh and arm. The Jury found a verdict of 'Accidental Death'; nor did it appear that any blame whatever was attributable to the erection of the scaffolding, which was built with great care and strength. Deceased has left a widow and five children to deplore his untimely death.

TORQUAY - Mysterious Death. - Nov. 17. The following startling occurrence has created the most painful sensation in this neighbourhood. A Coroner's Inquest relating to it was held on Tuesday, and the subjoined facts are gathered from the evidence of the witnesses examined:- On Monday morning, between 1 and 2 o'clock, Mr Rowe, a surgeon, was called upon to visit a MRS PAGE, the widow of a chymist and druggist, who carried on business in the Strand. On reaching the residence he was informed by Mr White, the assistant in the shop, that she was in a sinking state, and that he thought she was in the pains of labour. On Mr Rowe entering the bedroom, he found her almost insensible. He questioned her as to whether she was in pain, and she replied "Yes." He then endeavoured to ascertain if what had been told him was correct, which she resisted. Restoratives were immediately applied, but she gradually sunk, and died shortly afterwards. He then made the usual inquiries f the servant girl, who assured him that she knew nothing of her mistress being in the condition supposed. The apartment was then searched, and about seven or eight feet from the bed he found the body of a full grown female child, wrapped in a quilt, which had apparently been dead two or three hours. There were marks on the throat which gave rise to a suspicion of violence having been used. It was stated, however, that they might have been caused during the birth, and that it was possible that the mother might have placed the infant where it was found. It appeared that the husband of the deceased had been dead upwards of 12 months, and, according to the testimony of Susan Tress, she went to her bedroom shortly after 6 o'clock on Sunday evening. About 8 o'clock she called Tress, and complained of being faint. At ten she seemed better. Between 10 and 11 the assistant, who had been out during the day, came home and the girl informed him of her indisposition, and asked him to see her. He enquired of the deceased if he should send for a doctor, and she replied there was nothing the matter, only that she was a little faint. Tress remained with her till [?] and finding her worse she sent for the surgeon. The girl observed that she had never suspected her mistress being in the family way until her sister accused her of it on the previous Saturday, which she denied. Mr Solley, the surgeon, said that he believed the mother had died of exhaustion consequent on want of proper medical aid, and that the death of the child was occasioned by neglect immediately after its birth. A most careful Inquiry having been gone through, the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony as to the cause of death.

Thursday 2 December 1847
WELCOMBE - Inquests held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner:- In the parish of Welcombe, on Friday last, on the body of MR JOHN GIFFORD, a respectable farmer of that place, aged 43, who died from the effects of a severe kick in the bowels received on the Saturday night previous from a mare of his, which was sick, and which he was attending in the stable. He lingered in much pain until the following Wednesday, when he expired. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

DOLTON - Also, in the parish of Dolton, on Sunday last, on the body of ROBERT FOLLAND the younger, aged 23, servant in the employ of George Luxton, Esq., of Winkleigh. It appeared that deceased was driving his master's two-horse waggon, laden with coals, on the night of Thursday the 25th ultimo, when, in turning the double door leading into Mr Luxton's farm yard, the near horse not turning quickly enough, he was pressed between the point of the shaft and the door post, by which one of his ribs was fractured, and penetrated the lungs. Mr Dingley, the surgeon, was in immediate attendance, and administered relief, but the injury issued fatally the next morning. Verdict, "Accidental death."

BRAUNTON - Also, on Tuesday last, at Braunton, on the body of a little child of three years old, named RICHARD ELLIS, son of WILLIAM ELLIS, of that place, labourer, who died on Monday from injuries received on the Monday preceding, from his clothes taking fire during the absence of his mother, whereby he was severely burnt in the lower extremities. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 9 December 1847
LANDKEY - Death from Drunkenness - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at Landkey, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of RICHARD MOCK, aged 25, a mason of that place, whose death had occurred under the following awful circumstances:- On Monday night deceased, who was greatly addicted to intemperance, was at a public house at Swymbridge, much intoxicated; between 8 and 9 o'clock he left in company with another man of Landkey, who was very desirous of seeing him home, but he could not get him further than to within half a mile of the village, and was obliged to leave him on the road. His companion informed the mother and brother of deceased, who went in quest of him, but could not find him. Next morning, however, he was found by the side of the road, four miles in an opposite direction from his home, near Kerscott Hill, in a state of extreme exhaustion and apparently on the point of death. He was removed to Mr Joce's, surgeon, but before he reached the spot life was extinct. The verdict of the Jury was that death resulted from exposure to the wet and cold.

SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - Much alarm was occasioned on Thursday last, in this town and the neighbourhood, by a report that a person had been found dead in the road in the parish of Bishopsnympton, who was supposed to have been murdered. The fact of the finding of a dead body turned out to be true; but the conjecture of foul play was happily groundless. It appeared that MR THEOPHILUS FLASHMAN, of this place, saddler, aged 33, had gone into the country on business the day before; he was seen alive about six or seven o'clock in the evening, by a servant to Mr Bucknell, of [?] Hide farm, in the parish of Bishopshnympton, of whom he asked the way to Ashmill, about a mile and half off, and proceeded on the road in that direction; the next sighting at half-past six, Mr John Shapland happened to be going from Knowstone to Bishopsnympton, and in a lane commonly called Week lane he found the deceased lying in the road, cold and dead: he called for assistance at the adjoining farm, and Mr Sharland and Mr Crocombe helped him to remove the body to Middle Week farm; there was a little blood on the nose as if from a blow, and his face was very dirty; in his pockets a £5 note and other money was found, and his watch was safe. Mr Tanner, a surgeon, was called, who pronounced as his opinion that death had resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain, and a verdict to that effect was returned, at the Coroner's Inquest held the Friday following before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner.

Thursday 23 December 1847
HARTLAND - Inquests held by John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner:- At Hartland, on Monday last, on the body of MARY ANNE NICKLE, aged 16 years, daughter of a labourer of that parish, who was in her father's bedroom the Thursday night preceding attending on one of her younger sisters, when, without any apparent violence, a quantity of blood issued from her mouth, and she sank down and died within ten minutes after. Mr D. D. Carter, surgeon, gave his opinion that the cause of death was from the rupture of one of the pulmonary vessels of the lungs, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

SHEEPWASH - At Sheepwash, on Tuesday, on the body of CHARLES LOCK, thatcher, aged 72, who was found dead in the road on the Saturday night preceding, with no mark of violence on his person, and there was no reason to believe that his death occurred other than from natural causes. Verdict, 'Visitation of God.'

Thursday 30 December 1847
BEAFORD - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY PETHERICK, a child of a year and half old, daughter of a labourer of that place, called JOHN PETHERICK. This was a case of accidental burning. The child had been left by the mother, during her temporary absence, in the care of an elder brother; and before her return a neighbour had been attracted to the spot by the cries of the deceased, whom she found in flames: assistance was at hand, the flames extinguished, and a surgeon sent for; but the child died the same evening. - Verdict accordingly.

ROBOROUGH - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Sunday last, a melancholy accident occurred at Elfordtown, Roborough down, from which CAPTAIN PETER SAMPSON HAMBLY, formerly of Longbrook House, Plympton, met his death. It appears that the deceased had recently taken lodgings at the above house (Elfordtown), and on the morning of the above day he proceeded in a phaeton drawn by one horse to Buckland Church, about two miles distant, accompanied by MRS HAMBLY and a servant maid. After the conclusion of the service, the parties returned home, the horse going very quietly until they had come to the lodge gates. Here the servant maid got down to open the gate for the vehicle to pass, and, fortunately for herself, did not get up again. As soon as it had passed the gate, the horse set off at full speed down the hill leading to the house, and the deceased (who drove) seems to have lost all command of it. An empty cart happened to be standing in the avenue, and against this the phaeton struck and immediately capsized, throwing MR and MRS HAMBLY out on the path. The former was killed upon the spot, while MRS HAMBLY escaped with only a few bruises. The deceased was a stout, heavy man, of about 63 years of age. On Tuesday, an Inquest was held upon the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was immediately returned, after hearing evidence to the above facts.

Thursday 6 January 1848
TIVERTON - On Tuesday, an Inquest was held before Frederick Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner for the Borough and a respectable Jury, on the body of WILLIAM KELLAND, head ostler at the 'Three Tuns Hotel,' who was found dead in one of the stables on the previous evening. The deceased, who was a powerful athletic man, standing nearly seven feet high, and a great favourite among the commercial travellers, had been drinking, rather freely during the afternoon, and is supposed to have missed his footing while ascending to the hay-loft over the stable, as he was found at the foot of the ladder, with severe bruises about the face. Several witnesses were examined at length, and, after a patient investigation, the usual verdict in such cases was returned.

Thursday 13 January 1848
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday night last, and (by adjournment) on the Monday after, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of AMELIA HORN, aged 25, wife of WILLIAM HORN, of Zion place, tailor, whose death took place rather suddenly on the Friday morning. She had been under medical treatment, but as her death occurred unexpectedly to her medical attendant as well as to her friends, a post mortem examination was made, from which it resulted that death was caused by inflammation arising from natural causes, and a verdict in conformity therewith was returned.

CHITTLEHAMPTON - The infant child of MARY COURTENAY, of this village, single woman, died suddenly in his mother's arms on Saturday morning last; and, in consequence of reports which were prevalent insinuating unfair means as the cause of death, the Coroner was applied to hold an Inquest. On Monday last, John Henry Toller, Esq., attended for the purpose, when the evidence of Mr Joce, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination of the body, left no doubt that the child had died from Natural Causes (retention of urine), and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

BRAUNTON - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM TAPP MAY, a child, 2 ½ years old, son of THOMAS MAY, plumber, of that place, who died from the effects of drinking boiling water from the spout of a kettle on the fire in his father's kitchen the Saturday previous. It was the work of an instant, and before the mother could turn round the fatal injury had been received. Mr Vellacott, surgeon, was in attendance on the little sufferer, but he lingered only until the next morning, when death relieved him. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 January 1848
BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held by T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on Saturday last on view of the body of THIRZA JEWELL, a young woman living a domestic servant with Mr Jennings, solicitor. The deceased complained on Friday evening, and Mr Vernon, surgeon, calling at Mr Jennings's, he was requested to see her, which he did, and gave her a dose of medicine. The next morning she was found in a dying state and lived but a short time. Mr Vernon was of opinion that she died from an affection of the brain. The Inquest was adjourned to Monday, at the request of some of the Jury, to have a post mortem examination performed on the deceased. On Monday Mr Thompson, who had performed the examination, stated to the Jury that he was of opinion that the deceased died from congestion of the brain. Verdict accordingly.

ILFRACOMBE - Suicide. - Considerable sensation was produced here on Monday last, by the report that a blind man named JAMES FOSSE, who lived by himself, was found in his room suspended by the neck quite dead. An Inquest was holden on the body on Tuesday, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., when it appeared from the evidence that deceased had for some days pervious shewn symptoms of insanity. A poor old man and woman, who occupied a room under the same roof, finding the deceased did not get up as usual on Sunday morning, knocked at his bedroom, and receiving no answer, they called some of the neighbours, one of whom got a ladder and looked in at the window, where he saw him hanging at the bedpost. The door was then forced open, and the poor fellow was found to be quite dead. Near the body lay a razor, and a quantity of blood on the floor; and on examination they found an incision in the throat, so that there is no doubt the deceased first tried to put an end to his existence by cutting his throat, and afterwards completed it by hanging himself. The Jury were satisfied from the evidence that the deceased laboured under Temporary Insanity, and gave a verdict to that effect.

BARNSTAPLE - Inquests:- On Saturday evening last, an Inquest was held before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of ELLEN CANN, aged six years, daughter of a woman living in Westacott's row; near the infirmary, whose death occurred from accidental burning. On the 28th ultimo the child was left in her mother's room alone, when she caught her clothes on fire, and alarmed the neighbours by her screams, who rendered her assistance and extinguished the flames, and on the return of the mother the little sufferer was removed to the Infirmary, where the best means that could be employed were put in operation and continued with unabated attention, but the burns were so serious that, after a fortnight's torture, the child died on the night of Thursday last. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Also on Thursday last, at the 'Fox and Goose,' Anchor-lane, on the body of THOMAS HARVEY, a pensioner, aged 76, who was found dead in his bed that morning. Deceased had long been resident at the 'Fox and Goose,' and was addicted to excessive drinking; but it appeared that though the preceding day was his quarterly pension day, he had not given way to excess, having complained for some days of being unwell. He had retired to rest the night before, not worse than usual; but in the morning, when a lad took his breakfast to him in bed, he found him dead. The Jury did not think it necessary to call in a medical opinion; but in the absence of any circumstances tending to a contrary judgment, they returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

PLYMOUTH - Death in a Pugilistic Encounter. - An Inquest was held on Monday at Stoke, on the body of a labourer named FRANCIS HOOPER, who met his death in a fight with another labourer, called Joseph Thomas, on the evening of the 27th ult. Deceased had, it seemed, been drinking freely in the course of the day, and so also had Thomas, but not to so great an extent. The two soon became quarrelsome in their cups, and while sitting in the tap-room of the 'Cross Keys' nothing would suit the deceased but that he must "have it out," and accordingly he stripped to the waist, and going over to the other man struck him in the mouth. A scuffle then took place, in which deceased received a severe bruise on the arm, which although of no seeming consequence at the time, soon became inflamed, and erysipelas ensuing caused death. On this evidence, a verdict of Manslaughter was brought in against the man Thomas, who was committed for trial accordingly at the next assizes.

Thursday 27 January 1848
BRAUNTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held in the parish of Braunton, on Tuesday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN ANDREWS, the son of a farmer in that parish. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was sent on the morning of the preceding day, with a horse to get it shod, and that in his way to the place he fell, and was dragged along the road, whereby he received a concussion of the brain and bruises about the head. He was taken up insensible and carried to his father's house, where notwithstanding he received every proper care and treatment, he died on the same evening. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 February 1848
BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - On Monday last an Inquest was held before Thomas Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on view of the body of MRS MARY ANN WHITE, the widow of the late MR SAMUEL WHITE, of Bideford, silversmith. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased retired to her bedroom about half-past twelve o'clock on Saturday night, being at the time in liquor, and about half an hour afterwards she was heard to fall heavily on the floor. A young man, an inmate of the house in which she lodged, went to her room, in which there was no light, and after feeling about the room, found her lying on the floor with her clothes on; he lifted her on the bed, placed her on her side, and left her. The next morning she was found dead, lying on her face and hands on the bed! The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Suffocation."

DEVONPORT - Fatal Accident. - We regret to state that a melancholy accident occurred in the Dock Yard at this port on Saturday last, by which a young man, named STEER, who was employed as a shipwright in that establishment, lost his life. The deceased, who was, it is said much respected, fell from the upper deck beams to the main deck of H.M.S. Indefatigable, one of the new ships now constructing. When picked up, it was found that his injuries were so extensive as to render his removal to the Royal Naval Hospital necessary, and on the following Wednesday death put a period to his sufferings. An Inquest was held upon his remains, on Thursday, when a verdict was returned accordingly.

DEVONPORT - A Man Run Over. - On Saturday evening, an Inquest was held in the Workhouse, Devonport, on the body of SAMUEL PASSMORE, 70 years of age, a porter residing in Dockwall-street. It appears that on the previous evening (Friday), he was coming from Plymouth, with his hand cart, in a state of intoxication, and on reaching the head of Stonehouse Hill, was met by the Era omnibus, running toward Plymouth. The deceased was on one side of the road, and the omnibus was about to pass him, when he suddenly crossed the road, and came in front of the horses; the driver not having time to pull the horses up, they knocked the poor fellow down, and then, together with the carriage, passed over the lower parts of his body. The deceased was immediately taken up and conveyed to the workhouse, but died from the effects of the injuries thus received on the following morning (Saturday). Several witnesses were examined, none of whom attached any blame to the driver of the bus. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, and the Jury consulted for a short time, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 10 February 1848
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner of the Borough, on the body of CHARLES JAS. CARMICHAEL SCOTT, the infant son of CAPT. SCOTT, aged 10 months. CAPTAIN SCOTT has for some few days been lodging at Mr John Bridgman's, in High-street: the deceased had been long ailing, but his death occurred suddenly on Sunday morning in his nurse's arms. The opinion of the medical man left the Jury no room to doubt that the cause of death was disease in the heart, and they returned a verdict to that effect. The Inquest was held by the express wish (and at the personal expense also, we may add) of CAPT. SCOTT.

COMBMARTIN - An Inquest was held on the 2nd inst. at the 'George and Dragon,' in this town, before John Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM DART, aged 4 years, the son of a labourer, who was left the previous afternoon in his father's dwelling house, in care of an elder brother aged six years, when a piece of turf fell off from the fire and caught the apron of deceased, who was immediately in a blaze: his brother ran out to get assistance, and neighbours came in and extinguished the flames, but the deceased expired the same night. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

NORTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held on the 31st ult. before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM SHAPLAND, a labourer, aged 61. It appeared from the evidence of several witnesses, that the deceased, who was formerly a sort of bailiff in the employ of the late Mr Acland, of Little Bray, had of late years been leading a very irregular life, not having constant employment, and having no fixed home, but living partly on charity, and sleeping about in stables and outhouses, generally in the vicinity of Hole Water, where he formerly occupied a cottage. On the night of Friday se'nnight he was found in a hay-loft of Farmer Shapland, of that place, whose son saw him, and finding that he was unwell he carried him some tea and cake, covered him up, and left him more comfortable. Later in the evening Farmer Darch, having heard that the deceased was in the hay-loft, went with his son to him taking with him a glass of gin and water and some bread and butter; but as he did not answer to their call, they got a lantern, and were surprised to find the poor fellow dead. The body was removed to Northmolton village, where a post mortem examination was made upon it by Mr Ley, surgeon, whose evidence proved that death resulted from strangulated hernia, and not from want or exposure. Verdict accordingly. The deceased had a great abhorrence of the workhouse, and could never be persuaded to apply to the parish for relief.

HIGHBICKINGTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on the 5th inst., before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of THOMAS CHOPE, a carpenter, belonging to the parish of Huntshaw, aged 67, whose death occurred under the following melancholy circumstances. It appeared that on the 27th ult. the family of Mr Edward Toat, of Weargifford, were driven in a cart to the funeral of Mr Tout's mother at Ashreigney. Their road lay through Highbickington, and they stayed to take some refreshment at the 'Ebberly Arms.' Henry Isaac (a servant of Mr Tout's) had been driving, but his master afterwards took the reins, and left him to follow on a horse of Mr John Tout's, of Ashreigney. The horse was a spirited one, and after having gone on some way he broke into a gallop with the pony of William Gabriel, who was also going to the funeral. On the road before them they saw the deceased, and attempted to pass him one on each side of the road, but unfortunately he endeavoured to jump out of the way and came in contact with Isaac's horse, which threw him down, and the concussion also threw his rider off. The old man was taken up insensible and conveyed to a neighbouring cottage, where Dr Jones was sent for, who found that he had received a severe wound in the head, a large portion of the frontal bone being driven in, besides several other contusions, from the effect of which he died on the 4th instant. The Jury returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.'

KINGSBRIDGE - An Inquest was held at East Rawle, on Monday last, on the body of REBECCA WOOD, aged 49, who came by her death in a most melancholy way. From the evidence. it appeared that her son, a young man, had borrowed a gun from a neighbour to shoot some small birds. He loaded the gun in his mother's kitchen, and whilst he was in the act of putting a cap on the nipple, the gun (by some means) went off, and lodged the whole contents in his mother's abdomen. The poor woman lingered about two hours, when death put an end to her sufferings. What makes the affair even more distressing is, that her son, who was very affectionate and dutiful, had only returned from sea the previous Friday, after a long absence, and at the time she was shot, she was preparing dinner, expecting two or three relations to partake of it and welcome her son home: the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ASHBURTON - Death of a Miser. - For the last thirty years, an eccentric character, named JOHN RICH, has resided in this town; during that time he has been in the habit of travelling through the various parishes in South Devon, as a dealer in old rags, old iron, &c. His custom has generally been to leave this town on Monday mornings, and not to return until Saturday evening. From his very singular and penurious habits, he was considered to be worth a large amount of money. He would at times be the proprietor of several bullocks, which were frequently domiciled alongside his bedstead in his own apartment, which was only a kitchen, in one of the courts near the old shambles, in North street. And often times has it been his consolation and delight to clean and feed them, particularly on Sundays. Fifteen years ago, he met with a vender of matches and other articles; a fair damsel, who attracted our hero's notice. After exchanging a few friendly words, and reflecting on the happiness of a married life, popped "the interesting question." The fair one unwilling to slip so golden an opportunity, blessed him with smiles of approbation, and accompanied him to his house, where, after mutual exchanges of love and fidelity, she became the mistress of the Hermitage; and he entrusted her with the secret of his treasures. After a few days, he again took his rounds in the neighbouring villages; but in his absence the faithless woman contrived to abstract the sum of £20, with which she decamped. On his return, finding he had been duped, he immediately applied to the parson of the parish, soliciting his advice concerning the loss, in order to get it restored with the thief. Failing in this, he screwed up his courage and made a desperate attempt to recover the property, by applying to the celebrated "white witch" of Exeter. All proved of no avail; and since that time he has declared vengeance against the gentler sex, not admitting any one within his house to cook his victuals or to wash his shirt, these indispensable offices having been performed by himself. Time rolled on: and he still amassed cash and deposited the same in the Exeter and other provincial Banks. Last Monday morning a report was spread that poor old RICH was no more. This proved true. On our correspondent visiting the hovel, a strange scene presented itself. At one end of the room lay the old miser, who was 71 years of age, on a bed of rags, while every part of the kitchen was strewed with rags, the refuse of different loads brought home in bygone days and fit only for manure. An Inquest was held on Monday night, and a verdict of "Apoplexy" was returned. On the corpse being lifted to be placed in the coffin, a search was commenced by his two sisters who reside near Totnes, for property which was considered to be about the house. A pair of old breeches were discovered, containing in different parts, sewed strongly between the lining and corduroy, 40 sovereigns. This seems to be a precaution adopted after the robbery for the purpose of securing the cash until a sufficient sum was accumulated to be deposited in some bank. A further search being made, an Exeter Savings Bank book was found, folded in a piece of old tin, for the amount of £60 placed in the bank about the year 1820. Also writing stating that the sum of £200 had been placed in the late Totnes Bank, and £63 in the Western District Bank in Plymouth. It is considered the old miser has died worth several hundreds of pounds, but a mystery remains at present as to where the other "writings" are deposited.

Thursday 17 February 1848
DEVONPORT - Melancholy Suicide. - Considerable consternation was excited at Devonport on Sunday, by a rumour that MR ROBERT WEAKLEY, landlord of the hotel in Fore-street, known under his name, had committed suicide. On Enquiry the report turned out to be too true, and excited universal commiseration from the great respect in which the deceased had been held by all classes, and the strict integrity which had characterised all his dealings. On the evening of the following day an Inquest was held at the hotel before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, when the particulars of the case were gone into and the evidence taken. It appeared that for some time past MR WEAKLEY had been in bad health, which appeared to have affected his mind. He suffered from pains in the head, of which he complained often. Mr Edward Sole, solicitor of the deceased, deposed to his depressed state of mind and incoherence of manner of late, from which he judged him quite unequal to the management of his business. He also appeared, from the evidence of servants upon the establishment, to have been strange in his demeanour for a few days previous to his untimely end, and to have given his orders in a very confused and self contradictory manner. On Saturday night the deceased seems to have gone to bed as usual, and about half-past seven on #Sunday morning one of the servant maids took him a cup of tea according to custom. He then asked how his daughter, MISS WEAKLEY, was, she having been unwell lately, and on being told that she was still very unwell he said, "Poor soul! I am sorry for her!" On the servant girl quitting the room, he told her to bring him his clean linen when he should ring the bell. Nothing more was heard of him until about ten o'clock, when MISS EMMA R. WEAKLEY, his grand-daughter, went into his room, expecting to find him in bed, and discovered him hanging from the bed post. He was suspended by a cord, one end of which was fastened round the top of the post and the other end round his neck. His feet were not more than four or five inches from the ground, and about two inches from them on the floor was a cushion seven inches high. He was in his shirt and flannel waistcoat. On hearing the above facts the Jury without hesitation returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased had destroyed himself while in a deranged state of mind. MR WEAKLEY was in his 73rd year, and from having carried on business as an hotel keeper for forty years he was well known in the town and (as we have before said) was also universally respected.

Thursday 16 March 1848
BIDEFORD - Melancholy Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on view of the body of the late MR THOMAS ANTHONY, of Bideford, aged 68 years.
It appeared from the evidence that MR ANTHONY had lately been labouring under great illness, and on Tuesday afternoon last he was missed from his room, when a search was made for him, and after some time his body was discovered in the4 water tank, at the top of the house: it was taken out with difficulty, but life was extinct. Mr Jones, surgeon, said he had been professionally attending him for the last month, and saw him in bed on Tuesday morning last; he was then in a very excitable state, and said he was certain he was mad. Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held at the Union Workhouse, before James Flexman, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM WARREN, an old pensioner, who died the preceding evening. Deceased was discovered lying on the new road near Bunker's in this town, on the morning of Sunday last, by the Police, who conveyed him to the station house, where they soon discovered that it was something more than drunkenness that ailed him (being an inveterate tippler, he had often lodged in the station house); he was immediately conveyed to the Union Workhouse, and S. E. Cutcliffe, Esq., (the house surgeon,) and his son, were promptly in attendance, and discovered a fracture in the head; they did all in their power to alleviate his suffering, but he lingered until Monday night, when he expired. Mr Cutcliffe, jun., made a post mortem examination of the head, and discovered some congealed blood on the brain from the effects of the blow. Verdict, "Died from the effects of a blow, but how inflicted there was no evidence to show." It is supposed that he fell, and received the blow on falling.

Thursday 6 April 1848
PLYMOUTH - Distressing Case of Suicide at Plymouth. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, and by adjournment on Thursday, the 28th and 30th ult., at the Guildhall by John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR THOMAS HOOKER, a respectable inhabitant of this town, who had been an accountant in Mr Edward Nettleton's establishment, in Whimple Street, for the past ten years, the unfortunate man having in a fit of insanity taken a quantity of arsenic mixed with opium, and which occasioned his death. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased for some time past had been greatly addicted to intemperance, from which reason Mr Nettleton had been obliged to discharge him, and he left his situation on Saturday last. On Sunday he purchased some arsenic at Mr Denton's in Old Town-street, saying he wanted it for the purpose of destroying the cats, which had killed his pigeons, and he requested that opium might be mixed with it, as he said it might ease their pain in dying. the poison was sold him by Mr Denton, as he had known him many years, and, of course, had not the least suspicion that he intended to use it improperly. He took the deadly drug, there is very little doubt, on Monday evening, at the 'Three Crowns' public-house, on the Parade; he afterwards went to his own residence, in Clarence-street, and retired to bed. In the course of the night his wife was alarmed by his loud breathing; she got out of bed, and soon discovered that he was alarmingly ill. Medical aid and other assistance was immediately procured, but all exertions were useless, and he died in the course of an hour or two.
Such are the facts of the distressing case. A letter was found in his pocket, of which the following is a copy, and which was written, there is no doubt, immediately before he took the fatal draught:-
"I wish I could write the music of the Dead March in Saul! I would say, God bless my dear wife! but I'm afraid that as everything goes wrong with me, that might be also reversed, considering that it would come from so polluted a person. I faithfully promised to pay Rendle and Square this month, and others, amounting in all to £96.10s.; and not a sou to pay. Altho' I hardly dare to say, God bless my wife, I think Justice must without my invocation, that is, if any person ever deserved to be blessed. She is at this moment fretting her life out, because of my absence. Fate! what is Fate? Here goes.!
This letter and other circumstances were ably and clearly pointed out by the Coroner to the Jury, as sufficient proofs to justify them in coming to the conclusion that the deceased when he committed the fatal act was in a state of insanity. The Jury after some consultation returned a verdict to the effect that the death of the deceased was occasioned by poison, administered by his own hand while in a state of insanity. It appears that on a post mortem examination there was a quantity of arsenic found in him, sufficient to kill six men.

Thursday 27 April 1848
GEORGEHAM - An Inquest was held on the 13th instant, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of EMMA HAYWARD, aged 2 ½ years, daughter of MR JOHN HAYWARD, of this parish, farmer, who had died the preceding day from the effects of her clothes taking fire. Deceased's mother had gone to the well for a pitcher of water, which was a short distance from her dwelling, and had left deceased sitting on a stool in the kitchen, cautioning her not to go near the fire: on her return, however, she met the deceased running towards her with her clothes in flames. She afforded her all possible help, but the destructive element had done its work - the child died the same evening. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

MERTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ROBERT YEO, farm labourer of that place, who was at work ploughing in a field the Saturday before for Mr John Gordon, farmer, when he was seen by a fellow labourer suddenly to fall. He ran to his assistance, and found him insensible, and he died within a few minutes. The attendance of Mr Risdon, surgeon, who was called in to see the deceased, showed that death resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel in the left auricle of the heart, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 4 May 1848
ARLINGTON - Suicide. - An inquest was held this morning (Thursday), before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of AGNES FRY, wife of MR FRY, of Twitchen farm, in this parish, who was found hanging to a tree in a plantation on the farm the day before. She had been in a desponding state of mind for a long time, but it was not suspected that she would attempt to do violence to herself, and the necessity of watching her movements therefore did not suggest itself to her family. She left her house in the morning of yesterday to go to her sister's, and in the middle of the day she was seen by a little girl standing, as she though, against a tree: she mentioned this to MR FRY, who immediately went and found that his wife had hanged herself. Her feet were almost close to the ground, and she was quite dead. She had left no children, and was much esteemed by her neighbours as a quiet respectable woman. Verdict, 'Temporary Insanity.'

Thursday 11 May 1848
FILLEIGH - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held this day (Thursday) at Filleigh, on the body of MR THOS. FISHER, of that place, who died suddenly the day before. Deceased had gone to rest on Tuesday night in his usual health; but in the morning, on his son (who slept with him) awaking, he found his father dead and cold by his side. A post mortem examination, made by Mr Flexman, proved that death resulted from apoplexy, and a verdict accordingly was returned. The deceased was an old and faithful servant, as valet, to late Earl Fortescue, by whom, and by the present earl, he was highly esteemed.

Thursday 25 May 1848
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday) in Litchdon-street, in this town, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of HARRIET WADHAM, aged 21 years, daughter of MR GEORGE WADHAM, boot and shoemaker, who had come home from a situation at Taunton about a fortnight since in consequence of a slight illness, and had not been in good health since, suffering chiefly from debility: but on Tuesday, about half past two o'clock, she complained of faintness, and expired within ten minutes. The assistance of Mr Hiern, her medical man, was called in, but without avail. Verdict, Visitation of God.

Thursday 1 June 1848
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HARRIET GLANVILLE, 14, a servant girl, in the employ of Mr Snell, Ebrington-street. The deceased caught her clothes on fire on the 8th of May, by which she was dreadfully burnt; she lingered until Friday evening last, when death put an end to her sufferings. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Disobedience to Parents. - The fearful consequences which sometimes arise from disobedience to paternal commands were illustrated on Thursday, when an Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' in Exeter, before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of EDWARD DOBLES, a lad between ten and eleven years of age, and which had been found in the Exe below Trew's weir, at a place called Belleisle. The father of the deceased, a shoemaker residing in Holloway-street, deposed that on Sunday evening he sent him with an elder brother to attend service at Trinity Church, which begins at half-past six; and being ill he desired them to return immediately afterwards. About seven o'clock he was informed that they had not been to church, and he had since learnt that they went to the Quay, and took a boating excursion. They did not return until half past eight, when he chastised the eldest boy, but the deceased ran away, and he did not see him afterwards alive. The boy did not return, and inquiries were made for him in every direction without success. On Thursday, as a labourer, named Charles Couch, employed at the paper mills at Trew's weir, was at work near the river, he observed the top of the boy's head just above the surface of the water. The body was in an upright position, and apparently stuck fast in the mud. He procured a boat-hook, with which he dragged the corpse to land. The clothes were on, and no marks of violence were visible. The body was taken to Whyborn's house of reception, and thence removed to the father's. No clue could be discovered to the way in which the lad had got into the water, and the Jury returned a verdict of 'Found Drowned.'

Thursday 8 June 1848
PLYMOUTH - Distressing Accident. - On Monday evening, about six o'clock, a boat containing eight men was unfortunately upset at the foot of Milbrook Lake, when the whole party was precipitated into deep water, and one of them named COOMBES, a farmer residing in Millbrook, was drowned, although immersed not longer than about three minutes. The accident was observed by several parties, and among them by the crew of one of the dockyard boats which was near when the casualty occurred; these men made the most energetic efforts to rescue their drowning fellow creatures, and too much praise cannot be given to them for the prompt and vigorous assistance which they afforded. But for their active efforts the loss of life would probably have been much greater. The body of COOMBES, as well as that of a son-in-law of his who, it was found, was also in a dying state, was soon conveyed ashore, to the 'Mutton Cove Inn,' where medical assistance being obtained the latter was happily restored to consciousness: but the restoratives produced no effect upon the other, life being completely extinct. An Inquest was subsequently held, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 22 June 1848
HIGH BICKINGTON - On Monday morning last, as a labouring man named JOHN KING, of the parish of Highbickington, was at work on the Taw Vale Railway at Chappletown, employed in drawing off deads from a cutting, a large quantity of earth suddenly loosened and fell upon him. The accident was observed by his fellow workmen, and the poor man was immediately extricated, but he gave very partial signs of life, and expired from his injuries in about half an hour. Dr Jones, of Highbickington, was promptly on the spot, but before his arrival the deceased was beyond all human aid. An Inquest was held on the body before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the following day, at which Dr Jones gave evidence that the wounds on the head caused by the accident were the occasion of death, and a verdict in conformity thereto was returned.

BIDEFORD - Extraordinary Suicide of a Lady. - A case of suicide, under circumstances of a peculiarly painful nature, (and connected with which rumour speaks of facts still more distressing,) took place here on the afternoon of Wednesday last. The unhappy victim of her own rashness is MRS MARY MADELINA BOURMASTER DOUGLAS, aged 39, wife of MAJOR DOUGLAS, of the Royal Infantry, daughter of the late General Sir William Dixon, and sister of Capt. Dixon, of the 'Caledonia' flag-ship, Plymouth. She had been married to MAJOR DOUGLAS about 21 years; and the fruit of their union was 10 children, 7 of whom survive, their ill-fated parent.
The deceased had been in India, with her gallant husband almost ever since their marriage, and only returned therefrom to her native shores about twelve months ago (on the ground of ill-health). MAJOR DOUGLAS (hastened home unexpectedly, it is said, by painful intelligence which reached him abroad) landed at Southampton some three weeks since, and posted immediately to Exeter, where he met the deceased, with whom he repaired to this place, and engaged a suite of apartments in the High-street, where they were lodging when the fatal event occurred.
Nothing particular happened, at all connected with the sad catastrophe, until Thursday se'nnight, when the deceased lady called at the shop of Mr Joce, druggist, and asked for a poison to destroy cats, mentioning prussic acid. Mr Joce had not a supply in stock, but sent out to another druggist from whom he procured an ounce bottle with which he furnished her, at the same time informing her, in answer to her questions, that it might e mixed in milk. On this bottle (a small green one, with a glass stopper) there was the usual printed label, as it came from the manufacturer:- "Hydrocianic acid: Scheele's strength. Should be kept in a well-closed bottle and in a cold place." On the following Monday she called at Mr Joce, stating that she had accidentally dropped the bottle and spilled its contents, and asking to be [blurred] a second quantity. Mr Joce again sent out, and obtained similar bottle, which he sold the deceased. This bottle was labelled as the other, but on neither did the world "Poison" or "Prussic Acid" appear, nor any caution as to the use of its deadly contents.
The deceased had appeared as usual up to the afternoon of Wednesday, although the person with whom she lodged deposed that she was frequently much dejected, and that her manner often suggested to her doubts of her perfect sanity. The family had all dined together (MAJOR and MRS DOUGLAS and three of their children), and deceased seemed in good spirits, and talked with her husband with a parent pleasure of their proposed embarkation for India in October.
Soon after dinner, at nearly five o'clock, deceased rose from the table suddenly and went upstairs to her dressing-room, and after the lapse of about half a minute came hurriedly down, and rushed into the drawing-room, where she immediately fell senseless of the floor. MAJOR DOUGLAS called for assistance, and the domestics were instantly in attendance, and raised the unfortunate lady to the sofa. Messengers were dispatched for a surgeon, and within five minutes Mr T. Mackenzie Smith (who chanced to be at home when the servant came) was on the spot, and found life not quite extinct, but death occurred within a minute of his arrival. The Major showed the surgeon a bottle which he had taken from deceased's dressing table, and on looking at it he immediately pronounced that it had contained prussic acid. It was almost emptied, although its contents were sufficient to have destroyed not merely one, but twenty lives! Mr Smith applied the stomach pump, and the fluid dislodged from the stomach sufficiently indicated the cause of death, the peculiar odour of that deadly mixture being strongly betrayed.
On going to the dressing-room, Mr Smith found on the platform of the looking glass upon the dressing-table a pair of scissors, and the stopper and covering belonging to the bottle, so that there could be no doubt that the infatuated lady precipitated herself from her husband's presence, and instantly repaired to the fatal dose. The distress of MAJOR DOUGLAS may be conceived, but it cannot be described. His attentions to his wife had been observed to be uniformly of the most tender and indulgent kind.
The deceased appeared to have been resolutely determined on her own destruction, for it is said that she had poured out the contents of the bottle she had first obtained in a tea cup in MAJOR DOUGLAS'S presence, and was about to take the draught, when he, suspecting that it might be noxious (but not knowing what it was), dashed the cup from her hand. We give this as a rumour, not being able positively to ascertain its truth; but it is certain that the empty bottle was afterwards discovered in the apartment of the deceased.
Some of the relatives of the deceased came here immediately on being apprised by special messenger of the dreadful circumstance, but left again before the funeral. The Inquest on the remains took place at the 'Barley Mow' public house on Thursday morning, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the Borough and a highly respectable Jury, of which Mr John Hogg was Foreman.
The following evidence was produced:- Mrs Catherine Lee, in whose house deceased lodged, was the first witness. She deposed that the deceased came to her husband's house about a fortnight since, with her husband, MAJOR DOUGLAS; they engaged her lodgings, and had occupied them ever since; the last time she saw MRS DOUGLAS alive was yesterday (Wednesday), about one o'clock; she had been in a very excited state during the time she had lodged with witness; she had said to witness of an evening that she intended to go away the next morning, without, as witness believed, having the least intention of doing so; witness had said to her husband that she though there was something very strange about MRS DOUGLAS; she had frequently found her crying. From all she had seen she believed MAJOR DOUGLAS to be an excellent husband; he had been in England only a short time.
Mr James Joce was the next witness. He stated that he was a druggist, and resided at Bideford; a lady who lodged at Mrs Lee's had been at his shop to his knowledge on two different occasions; about a week since was the first time, when she asked for prussic acid to destroy some cats, and enquired particularly how she was to use it; witness had none by him, and he sent out and purchased an ounce, which he sold deceased; it was in a blue glass bottle similar to the one now produced; the bottle was full; the word "poison" certainly was not marked on it; he did not perceive any excitement betrayed by the lady, nor anything to awaken his suspicion or to induce him to hesitate to sell her the article; the bottle was labelled "hydrocyanic acid," with the usual marker's label.
Mr Thomas Mackenzie Smith, surgeon, on being sworn, deposed that yesterday (Wednesday), between four and five o'clock, he was summoned in great haste to go to Mr Lee's; he went immediately, and met MAJOR DOUGLAS in the passage, who enquired if witness was a medical man, and whether he had brought his stomach pump with him; witness replied in the affirmative, and went directly with MAJOR DOUGLAS to the drawing-room, where he found a female lying on the sofa, with one or two attendants; the blue bottle now produced was shown to him by MAJOR DOUGLAS; it had contained hydrocyanic acid, and when full would hold eight drachms; deceased expired shortly afterwards; witness went upstairs into the bed-room the deceased had occupied, and in front of the looking-glass he saw the pair of scissors now produced, with the part of a bladder, which appeared to have been the cover of the stopper; hydrocyanic acid is a deadly poison, and ten drops would endanger human life: the blue bottle, if full of hydrocyanic acid, would be sufficient to kill a great number of persons: witness used the stomach pump, and perceived by the smell of the mouth that deceased had taken hydrocyanic acid; the contents which were evacuated from the stomach had the odour peculiar to that poison; witness had no doubt whatever that the death of deceased was occasioned by her having taken hydrocyanic acid.
Mr Joce, on being re-called, added to his former evidence, that the lady who he had reason to believe was MRS DOUGLAS, purchased the ounce of hydrocyanic acid which he had before spoken of on Thursday last; and on the following Monday she again came to his shop and said she had met with an accident and broken the bottle she first purchased, and asked to be supplied with another bottle, which witness accordingly sold her.
This was all the evidence: and the Jury, having been addressed by the Coroner, immediately returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity;" at the same time expressing their conviction that Mr Joce had not used due caution in vending an article of such a deadly nature without properly labelling it and enquiring more particularly into the purpose for which it was required. This admonition they desired the Coroner to convey to Mr Joce, which he did in very impressive terms. The remains were interred in the higher burial ground on Saturday morning.

Thursday 29 June 1848
BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held before Thos. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday last, on the body of WM. CANN, aged 75 years. Susan Williams stated that the deceased was a retired gardener, and a man of very temperate habits, and enjoyed good health: he had lived with her for upwards of two years, and during that time had not required medical assistance. Yesterday morning he got up at 5 o'clock, his usual time, and appeared very well; about 12 o'clock, on returning from a walk, he said he felt poorly in his stomach, and would take a pill: he then went upstairs and laid down on the bed; about 4 o'clock, not hearing him, she requested her husband to call him; he knocked at his bedroom door, and receiving no answer he went into the room, and found him dead; he appeared to have been dead for some time. The Jury returned a verdict of - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 6 July 1848
ILFRACOMBE - It will be recollected that a fishing smack called the 'Sea Bird,' belonging to this port, was lost, and all hands perished, on Saturday the 20th of May. A few pieces of the ill-fated vessel are all that could be found from that time till early on Sunday morning last, when intelligence was brought by a person from Martinhoe that a dead body had been picked up at Leymouth the day before, which proved to be that of the master of the lost vessel: and about the same time the body of THOMAS MARSHALL, one of the crew, was picked up a little to the westward of this harbour, and brought home and lodged in his own house. A Coroner's Inquest being necessary, the authorities at Martinoe and also of Ilfracombe sent to Barnstaple to inform the Coroner of the circumstance, but unfortunately he was not at home. The friends of the master of the vessel therefore decided to bring the body to Ilfracombe to await the Inquest which took place before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on both of the bodies, about 11 o'clock on Monday night; and as there was no evidence to show how the accident happened, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how or by what means did not appear to the said Jurors."

BARNSTAPLE - Awfully Sudden Death. - On Friday night last, about nine o'clock, a striking illustration of the uncertainty of life was afforded in the decease of MR SAMUEL CLARKE, aged 76, an old resident of this town, living at North Walk Cottage. MR CLARKE had been to the front-door (in the absence of his servant) to take a loaf from the baker's man, which he handed in to his lodger, Miss Mackenzie, who had scarcely shut the door of her apartment, when she heard a noise in the passage, and on going out to see what it was, found the deceased lying on the floor insensible. She instantly alarmed the house, and MRS CLARKE came and sent for a medical man, and within a few minutes Mr Winter arrived, who found the deceased quite dead, and pronounced that he had died from apoplexy. An Inquest was held on the body the next day before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, which returned a verdict of "Died by Visitation of God."

Thursday 27 July 1848
BARNSTAPLE - Death of a Woman Through Drunkenness. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, a t noon, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, at Belle-alley, in Back-lane, in this town, on the body of BETSEY HALLS, aged 51, widow of the late JOHN A. HALLS, of Torrington, auctioneer, who had died the preceding evening from the effects of a fall while she was in a state of intoxication.
It appeared from the evidence that the deceased resided with her sister in Belle-alley. She was a person of depraved character, and had been drinking on Monday at a public-house in the neighbourhood: she left that house (the 'Brickmaker's Arms') by about half-past five in the evening, and though she was evidently the worse for what she had drunk, she did not appear incapable of taking care of herself. She was not again seen until her sister, who had been out during the afternoon, returned between five and six o'clock, when she found the deceased at the foot of the stairs insensible, and a large pool of blood which had flowed from a wound in the back part of her head. She was removed to the kitchen, and a neighbour came in and applied a plaster to the wound; but, strange to say, no medical man was sent for, and the unhappy creature lay and died! Between 10 and 11 that night Mr Cooke, having heard of the circumstance, went to the house and found that deceased had expired some time before. The opinion of the surgeon was that deceased had gone upstairs (which was evident because her shoes were found under her bed), and had fallen backwards over the stairs, whereby her skull was fractured, which caused her death. In the absence, however, of any direct evidence, the Jury found a verdict of - "Died by the Visitation of God."

MARWOOD - Inquests. - An Inquest was held at Marwood, on the 18th instant, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ROBERT GAMMON, aged 11 years, son of MR PHILIP GAMMON, of that parish, yeoman, who was at work in a hayfield on his farm the day before, in company with his brother, when, as he was returning from a hayrick to have the cart laden, he hitched his foot in a water course, and the mare that was in the cart, in attempting to get out of the way, trod with one of her fore feet on his face and one of her hind feet on his bowels. His brother, with others in the meadow, ran to his help, and got him up, but he complained of great pain in his bowels, and was taken home, when the assistance of Mr Winter, surgeon, of Barnstaple, was speedily obtained, but the poor little fellow continued to sink and died the next morning. The opinion of the surgeon was that some internal organ of the abdomen had been so much hurt by the horse's foot as to occasion death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

GOODLEIGH - An Inquest was also held on Monday last, at Goodleigh, on the body of JOSEPH DENNIS, of that place, carpenter, aged 62, whose death resulted from the following accident:- Deceased was generally in the employ of John Budd, Esq., of Willesley, and was so on the 19th inst., on which day he had to cut off the limb of a tree in order to make room for a hayrick which was being made: in order to reach the limb, he was standing on a ladder about 20 feet from the ground: Mr Budd's hind was with him, and on hearing the limb crack while the deceased was sawing it, he got out of the way to avoid its falling on him: the deceased, in attempting to do the same, unfortunately caught hold of a dead limb, which gave way with his weight, and he fell heavily to the ground. He was speedily conveyed to his home in a cart, and Mr Cooke, of Barnstaple, surgeon, was sent for, who found that he had fractured his collar bone and several of his limbs, and had also received serious injury in his lungs which occasioned great difficulty in breathing. The usual applications were made, but deceased expired the following Saturday. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 August 1848
SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held by James Flexman, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female illegitimate child of HARRIET SHADDICK, a servant in the employ of Mr Attwater, chemist. The fact of her pregnancy being unknown to any of Mr Attwater's family or her fellow servants, and her own denial of it after taking her bed, coupled with her mother's attending her, and the finding of the child in bed three or four hours after its birth quite cold, gave a very suspicious aspect of foul play having been used. Dr Riccard was called in, and also examined at the Inquest, and as a post mortem examination was necessary to ascertain if the child had breathed, an adjournment took place to enable him to make it; and on Tuesday the Jurors resumed their Inquiry, when the medical testimony of the child's never having breathed satisfied the Jury, and a unanimous verdict was found accordingly.

Thursday 10 August 1848
PARKHAM - An Inquest was held on the 2nd inst., before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Parkham, on the body of FANNY ASHTON, aged 7 years, daughter of a labourer of that place, who was missed from her father's house in the afternoon of Monday the 31st ult., and after a long search her body was discovered in a deep well by the side of the turnpike road; but the deceased had not been seen by any person from the time she left her home in the afternoon, except by a young woman called Wade, who observed her running very fast in the direction towards the well. How or by what means she came into it there was no evidence to show, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 24 August 1848
BRATTON FLEMING - An Inquest was held at Bratton Fleming, on Tuesday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN ROCK, of the parish of Sherwill, aged 37. The deceased was on a visit on the preceding Sunday at the house of a relation, Mr John Darch, at Tocking Mill Farm, in Bratton Fleming, and after having eaten a hearty dinner he sat down to read, and went out of the house at half-past four to go, as it was supposed, into the orchard. Nothing was seen of him for half an hour, when a little boy, who met Mr Darch as he was returning from church, told him that a man was lying with his face and hands in the water. He went immediately, and found the deceased lying as described, with his face in a running stream, and quite dead. The deceased had for years been subject to fits, and there is no doubt that he was seized with a fit as he attempted to cross the gate which led into the orchard, and fell from it into the stream which flowed beneath, where he was suffocated. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death by Burning. - An Inquest was taken on Monday evening last, at the North Devon Infirmary, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of WILLIAM PIM, aged five years, son of a widow of that name, living on Rolle's quay. It appeared that the mother of the deceased had given her children their breakfast, and had removed a frying pan in which she had been dressing some meat, and left it by the fire-side, while she went out of the house on an errand, leaving the children in the room in their night dresses. Within a minute or two an opposite neighbour was alarmed by screams proceeding from PIM'S room, and hastened thither, when she found the deceased in flames. She did her best to extinguish them, and the mother presently returned, and by their united efforts they put out the fire, and made some immediate applications t the little sufferer's burns, and then removed him to the Infirmary, where every attention was paid him, but the injuries were so severe that the child expired the same afternoon. From head to foot the poor little creature had scarcely a sound spot which the flames had not scorched. It appeared that he had replaced the frying pan on the fire (where the mother found it on her return), and in so doing the accident occurred. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 September 1848
EAST ANSTEY - An Inquest was held at East Anstey, on the 25th ultimo before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of EMMA MANNING an infant fourteen weeks old, illegitimate daughter of GRACE MANNING, who lived at the house of her father, a farmer in that parish. Deceased had been in good health from her birth; and about three o'clock in the morning of the 24th her mother had suckled her, when she replaced her in bed between herself and a servant girl who was sleeping with her: on awaking about three hours after, she found the child lying on her face and stomach, and quite dead. The evidence of a surgeon (Mr Flexman, of Southmolton) who was called in, went to show that there was no ground to suspect that death had resulted from unfair means: and his opinion was that it was an ordinary case of suffocation. The Jury were satisfied, and found a verdict to that effect.

CHITTLEHAMPTON - Fatal Accident - An Inquest was taken at Chittlehampton on the 28th ult., before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HANFORD, mason, aged 34, who had come to his end by an accident in the adjoining parish of Warkleigh on the Saturday preceding. Deceased was at work with two other men building a cob wall, on the top of which deceased was standing, when he suddenly fell to the ground, a depth of about eight feet. His companions instantly helped him up, but he never moved, and scarcely breathed, and died within a minute or two. The evidence of Dr Jones, of Highbickington, sowed that he had for three years attended deceased, who was subject to epileptic fits; and his opinion was that in one of these fits he fell from the wall, and in the fall fractured one of the vertebrae f the neck, which caused death. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

WEST BUCKLAND - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was taken on the 26th ult., at Middle Stoodleigh, in the parish of West Buckland, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, o the body of SUSAN GERMAN, a child of five years of age, daughter of MR NICHOLAS GERMAN, farmer. On the 24th, the farmer and his son were at work in the harvest field, when his wife went to take them their dinner, leaving the deceased in the house, but having taken the precaution to extinguish all save a very little fire in the vessel on which she had been scalding milk, and to caution the deceased not to go near it; but she had not left the house more than a minute, when she heard the screams of deceased in the road, and on hastening back found her in flames, she having, as she said, caught her pinafore and frock, and then gone out into the road, where the draft fanned the flames so as to envelope her. the mother and another daughter rendered all possible assistance and extinguished the flames; and Mr Joce, of Kerscott, was speedily sent for, and administered suitable applications; but the little sufferer expired during the following night. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

WEST BUCKLAND - Another Death by Burning. - An Inquest was taken on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at West Buckland, on the body of MRS MARY FAIRCHILD, aged 78, widow of the late clerk of that parish. The deceased resided with her daughter, and had been bed-ridden for two or three months past; but on the Tuesday before her death she had got down stairs for a few minutes. Her mind was enfeebled, and she had expressed herself incoherently on the Sunday morning; but in the afternoon she appeared better, and her daughter left the house and went to her place of worship, from which she returned very shortly (the service being nearly over before she came), and heard on her way home that her mother was burnt; she hastened to the house and found her lying in the kitchen, having left her bed room almost in a state of nudity, and come down stairs, where she approached too near the fire, and had become severely burnt. A neighbour had come in, and thrown water over her; and Mr Cutcliffe, from Southmolton, was immediately sent for, who came and pronounced that death must ensue, which was the case the same night. Verdict, "Found Burnt."

Thursday 5 October 1848
BICKINGTON - An Inquest was taken, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on Thursday last, at the 'Greyhound Inn,' in the village of Bickington, on the body of RICHARD LUXTON, aged 60, who was employed on the works of the Taw Vale Railway at Fremington Pill. Deceased had been at work in the afternoon, and left at about half-past three o'clock; he was at his lodgings in Fremington village at six o'clock, and proposed to be at the works again at half-past 11 at night: he left his lodgings between 6 and 7, and was never seen again alive, but his body was found the same night by a limeburner belonging to the works, lying in the pill and quite dead. There was no evidence to show by what means he came into the Pill; but as it was near the footpath, there was every reason to suppose that he had either missed his way, or else fallen from the path into the river, and so was drowned. Verdict, 'Found Drowned.'

Thursday 12 October 1848
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on view of the body of THOMAS FRASER, aged 10 years, eldest son of MR FRASER, comedian, now sojourning in this town. We gave in our last the fact of the missing of the deceased, who left his father's house, on the Quay, on Friday the 29th ult., and was afterwards seen by his opposite neighbour, Mr Boyne, to go out of his passage towards his father's, from which time no trace could be had of him. It was generally believed that he had fallen over the Quay, and was drowned; and this melancholy truth was confirmed on Monday last, when a body was seen floating with the coming tide outside the Quay, and on its being brought to shore, it was identified by the afflicted parents as that of their lost child. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

GEORGEHAM - An Inquest was held yesterday at Georgeham, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARTHA LOVERING a little girl, the daughter of a labourer, six years of age, who on the previous day accidentally caught her apron on fire while placing a frying pan on the hearth. The little girl's cries for help attracted the attention of a neighbour, named Elizabeth Dyer, who immediately ran to her help, pulling at the deceased's clothes, and rubbed oil over those parts of the body which had been severely burnt, viz. the stomach, throat and hands. Mr Pick, surgeon, of Braunton, was at once sent for; but his efforts proved unavailing, as she died the same night. Verdict, "Accidental Death from a Burn."

BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Union Workhouse, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE WILLIAM, aged 45, an itinerant dealer in spectacles and other optical instruments. It appears the deceased had arrived in Bideford from Barnstaple, having lately been discharged from the Barnstaple Union contrary, as he said, to the advice of the medical officer of that establishment, who did not consider him in a fit state to leave the workhouse. Shortly after he arrived at Bideford, and while he was lodging at a house for the reception of vagrants, the deceased was taken very ill, and application was made for the attendance of the parish surgeon, which was immediately granted, and all necessary medical attention was paid to deceased. The medical man recommended his removal to the Union Workhouse, and on Friday an application was made to the relieving officer for that purpose, which, after his paying a visit to the deceased, was acceded to. After his removal to the Union, it was discovered that he was in a most debilitated state; and notwithstanding every attention was paid by the officials which his condition required, he died in about two hours after his admission. A report was raised that the man had died from want of the necessaries of life; and the Coroner, under the circumstances, thought it his duty to hold an Inquest on the body, at which the most convincing evidence was adduced that he had experienced the kindest attention at the hands of the officers of the Union-house, and entirely exonerating them from all blame in the matter. Verdict, 'Died from Natural Causes.' Deceased, we understand, had been suffering severely from yellow jaundice.

Thursday 19 October 1848
LANDKEY - Death by Drowning. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday), at Newland Mills, Landkey, in the house of Mr George Mogridge, on the body of ABRAHAM CHAPPLE, of Swymbridge, aged 59, for many years hind to John Nott, Esq., of Bydown. Deceased had been to attend the court of the late Lord Rolle's trustees on the day before at Landkey, where he drank freely, and left between six and seven in the evening, in company with Thomas Houle, who helped him some distance on the road, from which he proceeded towards home alone. Nothing further was seen of him until between six and seven the next morning, when Miss Fanny Mogridge, sister of the occupier of the Mills at Landkey Newland, saw a body lying in the mill leat, which, on being taken out, proved to be that of deceased. His money and watch were found upon him, and there is no doubt that he accidentally fell into the water and was thereby drowned. Verdict, "Found Drowned."

TAWSTOCK - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Friday last at Chappletown, in the parish of Tawstock, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of GEORGE YELLAND, 48 years of age, a labourer employed on the Taw Vale Railway works. Deceased was at work on an excavation, and observing the earth by the side of him suddenly giving way, he ran to escape from it, but it caught him as he was running, and buried him. Assistance was instantly rendered, and he was got out in a minute or two; but the fall of the earth had broken his neck, and inflicted a dreadful wound at the back of the head. Death, of course, must have been instantaneous. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased has left a widow and nine children. He had been one of the sub-contractors.

NORTHAM - An Inquest was taken yesterday (Wednesday) morning, at Northam, near Bideford, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of THOMAS LANG, a child of 18 months old, son of JAMES LANG, a labourer of that parish, whose death was occasioned by a severe scald sustained on the 10th inst., from a can of boiling milk, which was on the table, and which the little innocent pulled from the table and upset its contents over its breast. Medical assistance was at hand, but the sufferer lingered until Monday last, when death relieved it. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 2 November 1848
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - The infant child of MARY ANNE SKERRY, who was sentenced to be transported at our quarter sessions last week, died in our borough prison on Thursday last (the day but one after its mother's conviction). Rumours were abroad that the child (which was but 10 days old) had died from violence; but the evidence at the Inquest, which was held on Saturday before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, altogether disproved the imputation, and showed that death arose from Natural Causes, and that the mother's conduct towards her child had been tender and affectionate.

EXETER - Awful Event. - On Thursday an Inquest was holden at Belmont Lodge, near Exeter, the residence of Mrs Snow, on the body of HARRIET DAY, the cook, 36 years of age, who died suddenly on Wednesday,. It appears that about ten o'clock on that day she was talking with the coachman, and told him that the servants would have an early dinner. He replied that he should not be home; to which she answered that in that case he must be content with pot-luck, as she would not keep the dinner about. Her mistress then called her into the pantry to give her directions about dinner for the family. The deceased took down two dishes from the shelves, and was in the act of removing another, when her heel slipped, and she fell heavily, being a very stout woman. She was immediately placed in a chair, and a surgeon was sent for. Mr Edye came, but she was dead. She never moved or spoke after falling on the floor. She had been in the house a year and nine months, and during that time had had only one day's illness. Mr Edye said he considered death to have been occasioned by disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 9 November 1848
MARWOOD - Suicide. - An Inquest was taken on Thursday last, at Metcombe, in the parish of Marwood, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of MRS ANN GAMMON, of that place, aged 53, widow of the late MR GAMMON, who died some months since. On the day before (Wednesday), there had been a sale of deceased's stock, she being about to relinquish the farm. She had assisted at the sale, but was observed to be not in her usual spirits; indeed, for some time past, as it was shown on the Inquest she had been subject to frequent dejection of mind. About half-past 11 at night, while the auctioneer (Mr Corney) was settling with some purchasers at the sale, it was said that deceased was missing and had not been seen for half an hour. Search was immediately made on the premises and outbuildings, and, after some time, the body was found by deceased's brother (MR WILLIAM DYER, of Ilfracombe) and Mr Robins, of Berrynarbor, in a well, about four feet deep, with the head downwards and quite dead. The Jury found a verdict of "Found Drowned."

TRENTISHOE - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held at Trentishoe, on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY ANNE RICHARDS, two years old, daughter of JOHN RICHARDS, of that place, carpenter. Deceased was left by her mother in the kitchen on the 18th ult., and on her return, within three minutes, she met her with her clothes on fire. She hastily extinguished the flames, and a neighbour (Mrs Lynch), who has been accustomed to give assistance in such cases, came in and found that the child had been severely burnt about her bowels, but she appeared to mend until Sunday last, when she suddenly became worse, and died the same night. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 16 November 1848
MOLLAND - Death By Intoxication - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at Molland, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR JAS. BAKER, of that parish, farmer, aged 56, whose death occurred under the following circumstances. On the Wednesday preceding he had gone to Southmolton with his son on horseback, and after they had finished their business they drank together at the 'Ring of Bells,' in that town, where two farmers of the neighbouring parish of Withypool joined them. They all left together to return home, and about a mile and half out of town, the deceased being in advance of the rest of the party, his son observed him incline a little on one side, and then fall off to the ground: he hastened forward, and helped him up again, when deceased complained of having knocked his head, but thought it would pass presently: they went on for about a mile, when the deceased became sick, and as he appeared to be tipsy, and complained of being very unwell, his son left him at the house of James Moore, at Northmolton, for the night. He did not return next day, which excited no surprise in his family, for her was often in the practice of staying from home for days together. On the Friday, however, he was brought home, and on his son asking him if he was worse, he said he was not, nor was he better. The son sent for Mr Collyns, of Dulverton, surgeon, who found him with symptoms of concussion of the brain, for which he bled him copiously and applied leeches, but death resulted the next day (Sunday). The medical man gave evidence that, on a post mortem examination of the body, he found the skull fractured, which had occasioned pressure on the brain, from which he died. Verdict, "Accidental Death from a Fall."

Thursday 30 November 1848
PLYMOUTH - The Cholera. - At the Guildhall, on Friday, an Inquest was held upon the body of a young woman named MARGARET FARRELL, 24, one of a number of convicts who arrived in the Sound on Monday, in the 'Cadet,' which put in from stress of weather on her voyage to Hobart Town. It appears that the deceased was attacked on Tuesday night, when the surgeon, Mr John Corthwaite Bowman, happened to be on shore, being unable to return to the ship from the severity of the weather. Early the next morning (Wednesday) however, he was sent for, and found the deceased in a complete state of collapse, the extremities cold, and somewhat purple, no pulse perceptible, and labouring under incessant vomiting and retching. She was removed in blankets to the hospital, where she expired on Thursday morning, and the body was then removed to the shore. It appeared that during the time the ship was at Woolwich, the cholera prevailed on board another convict ship, and also in the Milbank Prison, whence the convicts were taken. Before the embarkation of the convicts, the 'Cadet' was removed upon Mr Bowman's representation, from the place where she was lying, to what he deemed a more favourable position. Mr B. gave it as his opinion that deceased had died of malignant cholera, a great number of cases of which he had seen in the course of his practice. He stated that there was another case of undoubted cholera on board, and a surgeon from the Naval Hospital was doing duty there. The Coroner stated that he considered it necessary, as he had to report in other quarters the result of the Enquiry, to take the testimony of another gentleman upon the case, and called Dr Cookworthy, who stated that after examining the body, and coupling its appearance with the evidence of the surgeon, he had no doubt death had resulted from malignant cholera. The Jury upon this consulted, and returned the verdict that deceased died of malignant cholera, after an illness of 29 hours' duration. No remarks were appended to the verdict, as it was considered that the Government authorities would take every necessary precaution.

HOLSWORTHY - Another Awful Instance of the Careless Management of Poison. - Mon Monday, the 20th inst., at Lakes, a farm occupied by Mr Charles Brown, in the parish of Holsworthy, John Dymond, one of Mr Brown's servants was passing from one part of the farm to the other of it to join some other work people at dinner. In crossing a hedge he changed to meet with a quart bottle containing some liquid and carried it on with him; upon his reaching the persons with whom he was about to dine, he, not thinking the bottle contained anything which might do harm, asked a boy called WILLIAM REECE, to drink. The boy being thirsty, and not thinking of danger, immediately drank. Very shortly afterwards he commenced vomiting violently, so as to alarm the whole present, causing them to fear that the bottle contained anything unfit to be drank. Mr Brown coming to them soon after this, and finding what had taken place, discovered that the bottle contained a solution of ?Corrosive Sublimate, some of which he a long time before had used about his sheep, and had quite forgotten that he had hid away the remainder in the hedge. The poor boy, REECE, went directly for medical aid to the town of Holsworthy: he continued ill, however, up to Saturday last, at which time he died. An Inquest was held on the 28th, before Henry Vallack, Esq., Coroner, which occupied many hours, and resulted in Dymond being committed for Manslaughter. The state of mental suffering of poor Dymond can be better imagined than described.

Thursday 7 December 1848
MARWOOD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Muddiford, in the parish of Marwood, before John Henry Toller, Deputy Coroner, on the body of a labouring man named RICHARD TAYLOR, aged 77, who, on the morning of the preceding day, was found by Mr Joseph Irwin lying in the road, and complaining of great pain in his back and chest: Mr Irwin humanely removed him to his house, and sent for medical assistance, but before the arrival of the surgeon he had expired. A post mortem examination by Mr Parker proved that death resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel in the chest, to which effect a verdict was returned.

Thursday 14 December 1848
DREWSTEIGNTON - On Wednesday the 6th inst., at the 'Sandy Park Inn,' Henry A Vallack, Esq., one of the Coroner's for the County of Devon, held an Inquest on the body of JAMES GOLDSWORTHY, who was the engine worker at the Wheal St. Ann's copper and tin mine, at Drewsteignton. Two witnesses proved the deceased was much intoxicated last Sabbath morning, when he came to the mine, and soon after he threw off his coat, and precipitated himself into the mine's shaft at the depth of 33 fathoms; when assistance reached him he could speak, but soon after died. Verdict, "That the deceased, in a temporary state of insanity, caused by drunkenness, destroyed himself."

Thursday 21 December 1848
BIDEFORD - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, on view of the body of EMILY DANIEL, wife of JOHN DANIEL, of Bideford, ship carpenter. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased had been complaining on the preceding evening of a severe headache. Her mother was in the house at the time, but left her at seven o'clock. On one of the neighbours going into the house at half-past seven, the poor woman was found lying prostrate in front of the fire, and an infant child which she had held in her arms had fallen by her side. The neighbour took up the child, and in a few minutes Messrs. Acland, Thompson and Turner, surgeons, were in attendance, but each pronounced her past recovery, and soon after she died. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God." It was the opinion of the medical men that the cause of death was the prevailing epidemic (influenza), acting on a weakened brain and stimulated by low living. The poor woman was 33 years of age.

Thursday 28 December 1848
HEANTON PUNCHARDON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'George Inn,' Heanton Punchardon, on Tuesday, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN ESSERY, the spoor fellow who was drowned off Pottington Point, as reported by us three weeks ago. Deceased was picked up by a man named George Jeffery, at half-0past nine o'clock on Monday morning, on the Strand at Greenaborough, very much disfigured, and wearing a pair of canvass trousers and a pilot cloth coat. The father of the deceased identified him as his son, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 4 January 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Burning. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the North Devon Infirmary, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of EMMA PARSON, aged five years, daughter of a labouring man who lives at Gutherstone, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton. On the preceding day, the deceased's father was in the field, and her mother, having occasion to go into the village of Newport, left her in charge of an elder sister, who left the kitchen to go upstairs for a minute, and was alarmed by the screams of deceased, who had caught her clothes on fire: the sister hastened down, and burnt her hand severely in endeavouring to extinguish the flames, but, being unable to do so, she called her father, who came quickly and succeeded in putting them out. The little sufferer was conveyed in a dreadful state to the Infirmary, where it was seen at once that she could not survive many hours, and she died the same night. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Inquest. - On Thursday, an Inquest was held at the 'Fountain Inn,' Exeter Quay, on the body of GEORGE BUCKHAM, tailor, a native of Topsham. It appeared that the deceased, in going aboard a vessel lying at the Quay, mistook one vessel for another, the night being dark, and is supposed to have tripped his foot in the chain and fallen overboard. The body was not recovered for nearly three quarters of an hour after, when life was found to be extinct: another man trying to render assistance also fell overboard, and very nearly shared a similar fate. -Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 January 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Suspicious Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by 4 o'clock, at the Guildhall, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MARY ANNE HEALE, aged 28, wife of ARTHUR HEALE, brazier, whose death had occurred the night before after a very brief illness, and under circumstances which induced suspicion - happily proved by the investigation to be groundless - that she had been unfairly dealt with - a suspicion which gathered strength from the fact that HEALE and his wife had had serious differences some time ago, on account of which they had been living apart, and had only returned to reside together within the last two or three months. In consequence of the notoriety of these facts much excitement was produced, and many gentlemen (including some of the borough magistrates) were present during the Inquisition. the Jury having been sworn, and having elected Mr Henry Fleming to be their foreman, repaired with the Coroner to the house of deceased, in Lovering's Court, Boutport-street, to view the body, accompanied by the surgeon, Mr Winter. On their return, the following evidence was taken.
Mary Ann Smith deposed that she was a servant, and lived in the same house with deceased; had known her for the last three weeks; had seen her many times a day; she always appeared in good health, but sometimes complained of the headache; her husband and she lived on very good terms; had heard no quarrelling between them, nor had heard deceased complain of him; about half past eight o'clock last night, witness heard the bell of the kitchen (in which deceased lived) ring violently; witness hurried in and found deceased on her knees vomiting, with her hands on the fender before the fire; witness lifted her up and asked her what was the matter; she said that she was very ill, and that her pain was in her head; witness lifted her on her lap, and others of the inmates came in and conveyed her to bed; gave her a little gin and water, which her stomach immediately threw off; her husband had gone to bed before her with their child; when deceased was brought into the room, he said it was a bilious attack, and she would get better by and bye; he did not get up, nor did he say anything about sending for a medical man; witness had seen deceased about a quarter of an hour before, when she appeared as well as usual. Witness did not remain long in the room; saw HEALE some hours after, about half-past one o'clock when he said his poor wife was dead; he appeared much affected. Witness, as well as Mr Webb who came into the room, recommended HEALE, when they carried his wife to bed, to send for a doctor, and he said he would if she did not get better shortly: but, on speaking to deceased, she said she would rather not at present.
Elizabeth Litson, who also lived in the same house with deceased, spoke to her having known her for three months, during which deceased had been a servant at Mrs Lovering's; had seen her every day; her husband and she lived very comfortably; witness heard her say, only the day before yesterday, that he was very kind to her, and that she had never lived more happily with him than during the last two months. This witness corroborated the evidence of the former one, as to her having been alarmed by the ringing of the bell, and by groans proceeding from deceased's apartment, whither witness hastened, and found deceased as before described; she many times said, "Tis in my head - 'tis in my head." Witness assisted her to bed, and recommended the doctor to be sent for. HEALE got up after some time and went to Mr Winter (with whom deceased had formerly lived as a servant) from whom he soon after returned with a box of pills, of which they administered two to the deceased, who seemed to be relieved, and fell into a doze. Witness left the room; but her mother and Mrs Webb remained with HEALE by the bed side of deceased.
The mother of last witness confirmed the testimony already given both of the good terms on which deceased and her husband had been living, and of the circumstances of her sudden illness. She further stated that she remained in the room with deceased and her husband until about 11 o'clock, when she went to bed, desiring to be called if deceased should grow worse. Soon after one o'clock HEALE came to her door in great alarm, saying that he feared deceased was dying; and witness hurried to her bed side, after which she breathed once or twice, and then died. HEALE was in great distress at the event.
Mr Winter, surgeon, gave evidence that he had known the deceased for many years; she had always enjoyed good health; deceased called on him a month or six weeks ago, and complained of a pain in her side; she thought it was a sprain brought on by her having lifted her mistress (who is disabled); witness gave her an embrocation, and recommended her not to attempt to do so again without assistance; witness had never seen her since alive, save once when she was passing down the market. Just before half past ten o'clock last night, HEALE came to witness and described his wife's illness; did not ask witness to go to see her, but wished some medicine; witness inferred from the symptoms that her stomach was disordered, and inquired what she had been eating, to which her husband replied that they had had hashed mutton to dinner - that he did not come home from his work until half-past seven, after which they had tea for supper - that they both drank out of the same teapot, and that he had gone early to bed because the child was crying. Witness gave HEALE four laxative pills, and directed two to be taken immediately, and recommended her head to be bathed with cold water and vinegar (which was done); heard nothing more of her till half past two in the morning, when HEALE and his brother came and called him up, saying that deceased was either dying or dead; witness went immediately and found her dead, lying on her left side. Witness requested the attendants to examine particularly if there were any marks of violence on the body, for, knowing the ill-treatment she had formerly received from her husband, he confessed that his suspicions were awakened. In answer to a Juryman, witness said he could not pretend to say what had been the cause of death, without a post mortem examination; but his impression was that something had given way in the head.
Having heard this evidence, the Jury unanimously resolved, on the motion of Mr Cornish, that a post mortem examination of the body should be taken and expressed their wish that Dr Budd should assist Mr Winter in it. The Jury adjourned until Monday for the result.
On their reassembling on Monday, Mr Winter stated that he had made an examination of the body, in conjunction with Dr Budd: that they found the stomach perfectly healthy, but that the head revealed the cause of death, in the rupture of one of its vessels. There was no doubt whatever that death had been occasioned by apoplexy. A verdict to that effect was therefore returned.

NORTHAM - Death by Burning. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of ROBERT HANDCOCK a child three years of age, the son of a labourer at Northam village. It appeared that on the Thursday previous, the child had been left in the house sitting by the fire, and while in this position a cotton apron, which he had on, caught in a blaze, and he was speedily enveloped in flames. Haring his screams, a neighbour, named Ann Punchard, rushed into the house and succeeded in extinguishing them, but not till the child had been dreadfully burnt about the right arm, back, and throat. Medical assistance was immediately procured, but he died on the following day. Verdict, "Accidental Death from Burning."

ROBOROUGH - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the house of Mr John Rockhey, of Combe Mills, in this parish, on the body of an infant child, born on the day previous, of a single woman named ELIZABETH THORNE, living at Mr Rockhey's, in the capacity of housekeeper. As there was no evidence to show that the mother had been guilty of any neglect to her offspring, and a woman named Judd, together with a midwife named Thomasin Lake, having testified that the infant had since its birth had been suffering from convulsions, a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 18 January 1849
WESTDOWN - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at Westdown, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILMOT ELLIS, aged 90 years, who had been found dead in her cottage the day before, under the following circumstances:- The old lady lived alone, but was kindly attended to by Anne Collings, a neighbour, who had seen her on the Sunday evening preceding, when she left her rather unwell; the next morning she went to see her, but found the door fastened, and so on several subsequent visits; until at last, fearing something unusual was the matter, she got her husband to enter the cottage by a ladder at the upstair window, when he found the deceased lying at the bottom of the stairs, partly dressed, with a wound in her forehead from which much blood had issued, and quite dead. The circumstances induced the belief that, in the midst of dressing, she wished to go down stairs for some purpose or other, and in doing so accidentally fell to the ground. Mr Parker, surgeon, examined the body, and gave it as his belief that death had resulted from a wound in the forehead occasioned by an accidental fall, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

NORTHAM - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - A Little Girl shot Dead by her Brother. On Monday last a distressing occurrence, occasioned by the incautious use of fire-arms, took place in the village of Northam. A lad of 13 years of age, named THOMAS FISHER TUPLIN, son of MR JOHN TUPLIN, of the 'Swan Inn,' had managed, in the absence of his father, to get possession of his gun and of the means of charging it. He amused himself with the dangerous weapon for some time in the garden attempting to shoot sparrows, and then took it into his father's kitchen loaded, where was his sister alone, a little girl eight years of age; and when he was in the act of putting on a fresh cap to the gun, by some accident the piece discharged, and melancholy to add, the contents lodged in the head of his sister, JANE TUPLIN, who fell dead on the floor instantly! An Inquest was held on the remains on the next day, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, when, from the evidence adduced, the Jury could come to no other conclusion than that the unfortunate affair was altogether accidental, and they returned their verdict accordingly. The distress of the parents, and of the boy at this sad result of his carelessness, is indescribable.#

Thursday 25 January 1849
BRADWORTHY - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the house of Mr Charles Mountjoy, at Bradworthy Mills, on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN NORTHCOTT, aged 18, who had come to his death under somewhat singular circumstances. It appeared from the evidence of Mr Mountjoy, that the young man had been sent out by him on the previous day, about two o'clock in the afternoon, with flour and meal to be delivered in the neighbourhood, telling deceased that he would be expected home at seven o'clock. Not having returned at the time named, Mr Mountjoy became rather uneasy, and at eight sent a boy named Jennings in quest of the deceased, but the boy returned without having heard any tidings: at ten o'clock he was again sent, in company with another boy named Parish, with a horse. Eleven o'clock passed without any sign of the boys or the deceased, when Mr Mountjoy himself set out, but he had not proceeded far before he met the boys with the body of NORTHCOTT in the cart. Jennings deposed that he found the cart turned over in the hedge trough, and the deceased under it, the rail of the cart resting on his head. He was quite dead. Mr Eusebius Rouse, surgeon, of West Putford, examined the body and gave as his opinion that deceased had died of suffocation, in consequence of the cart having upset and fallen upon him. Verdict accordingly.

TORRINGTON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the Union Workhouse on Friday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, (Mr Dennis Kingdon, foreman,) on view of the body of an infant child named JOHN BIRD, aged four months. The deceased had been received into the Union on the Monday previous, having every appearance of being in an unhealthy state, and on Thursday last he died. From the evidence of Richard Batten Rouse, Esq., surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination of the body, it appeared that the child had died of congestion of the lungs, to which effect a verdict was returned.

OKEHAMPTON - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, by Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, at Sticklepath, near Okehampton, on the body of EDWIN FINCH, son of JOSEPH FINCH, five years old, who was killed and dreadfully mutilated by the water-wheel at the Iron Foundry there. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 February 1849
ROSE ASH - On Thursday last an Inquest was held before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, for the Barnstaple District, at North Grendon Farm, in this parish, on the body of JOHN BOND, son of MR THOMAS BOND, farmer, of that place. The deceased had not been well for some days previous to his death, and on the preceding Tuesday was at work with his elder brother in the barn. It appears that he had eaten a hearty dinner a short time before he resumed his thrashing. On a post mortem examination being made by Mr Haley, it was ascertained that apoplexy was the cause of death, and the Jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 22 February 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Death from the Kick of a Horse. - A fatal accident occurred in this town, on the afternoon of Monday last, to a young man called JAMES PURCHASE, aged 19, an ostler employed at the 'Shipwright's Arms' and elsewhere. A man of the name of Scriggins was engaged in riding a young horse, which was rather fresh, but had never heretofore given evidence of vice; when, in riding him over the new road, the spring-bar of the saddle gave way, and he slipped off his seat to the ground, but sustained no injury, Scriggins then returned to the Square to get a saddle of his own which he had left at the 'Shipwright's Arms' at the early part of the day, where he saw deceased standing at the door, and asked him to go in and fetch the saddle, while he (Scriggins) remained with the horse. Deceased did so, and returned with the saddle on his head, with which he came towards the horse, which, it is supposed, took a distaste at it, and while deceased was in the act of putting on the saddle, the horse turned round and with both heels kicked him violently in the chest. The poor fellow fell to the ground, but rose in an instant, and again fell on the pavement, his face coming against the kerb stone, by which it was much bruised. He was instantly taken up and conveyed into the 'Shipwright's Arms,' where every kind attention was paid him, and the surgeon (Mr Cooke) immediately sent for, but death had followed within a minute of the accident. There was little external mark of the blow, the injury being an internal one. An Inquest was held the next morning, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, which issued in a verdict of "Accidental Death from the Kick of a horse."

Thursday 8 March 1849
INWARDLEIGH - An Inquest was taken on Thursday last, before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of LOVEDY MATILDA MEDLAND, 6 years of age, daughter of MR WILLIAM MEDLAND, yeoman, of Westacombe, in this parish. As the poor child was returning from school, she had to cross a mill stream by a narrow foot bridge, on which a portion of snow happened to have fallen, which caused the feet of the deceased to give way, and she was instantly immersed in the water and drowned. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 22 March 1849
SWYMBRIDGE - Fatal Accident. - On Friday morning last, a little girl, about seven years old, named MARY RADLEY, the daughter of WILLIAM RADLEY, labourer, of Swimbridge, went, as she was accustomed to do, to a neighbour's house to look after the child. After she came she asked the mother of the child, who was still in bed, whether she should blow the fire, who replied that she might. In about five minutes the girl rose up to alter the position of the tea kettle, which was on the fire, when some fire flew out and caught her clothes. She screamed out, and assistance was almost immediately at hand, but she was so much burnt that she died a few hours afterwards. An Inquest was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., on Saturday last, when the verdict returned was "Accidental Death."

SOURTON - Inquests: - An Inquest was taken on Monday last, at Sourton, near Tavistock, before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ANN GUSCOTT, five years of age, daughter of SIMON GUSCOTT, at Torr. By some means unknown her clothes took fire, and she was so dreadfully burnt as to cause her death. "Accidental Death."

MARISTOW - On the next day (Tuesday), an Inquest was taken before Mr Vallack, on the body of JOHN GLIDDON, labourer, who was accidentally killed from blowing lime stone at Lee Quarry, in Maristowe; the hole exploded sooner than was intended, the deceased having incautiously used rush instead of the safety. "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 March 1849
TETCOTT - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was taken at Tetcott, before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM GEORGE, aged 21, servant of Mr Chapple, of Nethercott. The deceased being in a state of intoxication, on returning from Holsworthy, fell, and the wheels of his waggon passed over his body, and caused his death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BRIXHAM - A Coroner's Inquest was held at the 'Crown and Anchor', on Tuesday the 20th on the body of a young man named BARTLETT. The deceased was a fisherman, and but lately out of his apprenticeship. The vessel to which he belonged being on the beach, and the water about half tide, the poor fellow had to go down the steps at the eastern pier to cross some boats that were lying near, to get to his own ship. It is supposed that from the dense darkness of the night, and the shelving condition of the steps, BARTLETT must have slid and fallen backward and from the blow have become insensible, and in this state have rolled into the water. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidentally drowned," remarking, at the same time, that they considered the condition of the pier and steps very unsafe, and requesting the Coroner to notify the same to the proper authorities, in order that something may be done to prevent similar accidents. BARTLETT was a very steady and industrious young man.

BRIXHAM - A second Inquest was held on the same day, at the 'Crown and Anchor,' on the body of a young lad named COLLINGS, who died from a rupture of the intestines, caused by a fall while playing at "leap frog" with some other boys. One of them, over whom COLLINGS was about to jump, suddenly gave way, and precipitated deceased forward on his face, which caused his death. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 5 April 1849
Distressing Case. - An Inquest was held on Saturday the 27th inst., on the bodies of MARY SPRAGUE, aged 67 years, and her grandchild, who died from the effects of being burnt. It appears that the deceased and her grandchild were sitting at the fire, and by some accident unknown the child's clothes became ignited, and the old woman in endeavouring to put it out caught her own clothes. Persons soon came to their assistance, but they were so dreadfully injured that they both died on the following day. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - On Monday se'nnight an Inquest was held at the Church-lane Alms-houses, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of one of the inmates called MARY DELVE, an old woman of excellent character, who had died the Friday before, aged 79. Evidence showed that she was as well as usual until the middle of the day, when she was seized with sudden illness and taken to bed, where she lay partly insensible, and Mr Cooke, surgeon, was sent for, who pronounced that she had sustained an attack of apoplexy, from which she died at eight o'clock. Verdict, "Visitation of God."

Thursday 12 April 1849
ILFRACOMBE - Fatal Accident to a Pleasure Party on Easter Holiday. - A sad catastrophe happened on Monday evening, by which two respectable families of this place have been plunged into the deepest distress by the bereavement of two promising young persons; and a more extensive loss of life was narrowly averted. It has been a practice here for many years for parties to enjoy the Easter Monday by a cruise on the water; and among others which partook of this kind of recreation of Monday last was a party of four, consisting of Mr Camp, of the 'Clarence Hotel,' Mr Walter Toms, Mr Thomas Walters, and MR THOMAS CHISWELL, JNR., who set sail in the course of the forenoon in the 'Jenny Lind,' and proceeded down the coast towards Mort. Having reached a point called the Hazel-bushes, about two miles from this port, they went on shore to take refreshments and to spend a few hours in recreation. Here they met another party on a similar errand. The pleasures of the day over, they were about to return home at half-past four o'clock; but, as the 'Jenny Lind' was off at anchor, they all, to the number of nine, entered another boat, about 15 feet long, which they had scarcely done, and were just moving off from the shore, when suddenly she heeled and turned over, precipitating the whole of her living freight into the water! It was the work of an instant, nor is the occasion of the accident quite clear; but it is supposed that the heaving of the ground sea threw some of the party off their feet upon one side of the boat, which capsized her. The consternation of the moment is past description. some of the party, including Mr Camp and Mr Toms, being well able to swim, disengaged themselves from their companions and reached the shore; from whence they lost no time in plunging in to the rescue of those who remained struggling in the water - a humane endeavour in which they were effectively aided by Mr Philip Dennis, who had been of the party, but had left to return by land, when, happening to look round, he does not know why, he was horror-stricken at observing his late companions at the mercy of the tide. He rolled down over the cliff to the peril of his life, and being an expert swimmer, was in the water instantly to render assistance. By their joint exertions they succeeded in bringing four of them to the shore; but two of the party, viz., THOMAS CHISWELL, aged 21, eldest son of MR THOMAS CHISWELL, cabinet maker, and JOHN LOVERING, aged 13, eldest son of MR EPHRAIM LOVERING, of the 'Barnstaple Inn,' unfortunately sunk and disappeared. Mr Dennis, however, made further efforts, by diving near the spot, to discover the poor young men; but, after persevering for some time, he was obliged to abandon the attempt as hopeless. The party hastened to the town, where those who had been immersed in water, and who were suffering from the effects of their exposure, received all requisite attention and were fully restored. Another party, consisting of Edward Jerman and three others, repaired to the fatal spot in order to search for the bodies as the tide receded; and, after some hours, they discovered them lying on the beach, just in the place where they must have sunk; and not far from them were two guns which had fallen out of the boat when she capsized. A boat was sent round from the harbour to fetch the bodies, which were brought back to their afflicted families at an early hour the next morning. Their distress at receiving the lifeless remains of those who had left them but a few hours before in the possession of full health and spirits, may be better imagined than it can be described. An Inquest was held on the bodies, on Tuesday afternoon, at the 'Clarence Hotel,' before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., and a very respectable Jury (of which Mr John Toms was foreman), when, evidence to the effect above stated having been adduced, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was unhesitatingly returned. Poor CHISWELL was a fine young man, who had just returned to his home after an absence of above 12 months in another part of the county, and was on the eve of leaving for London for the purpose of perfecting himself in his business preparatory to his joining his father in it. This mournful stroke, however, has blasted the fond anticipations of parental tenderness.

ILFRACOMBE - Suicide of a Gentleman of Fortune. - A melancholy instance of self-destruction occurred on Tuesday morning last, by which WALTER FREDERICK GOODWYN, Esq., mysteriously cut off his existence in its very prime, at the age of 38. The deceased, who was a retired captain in the Madras army, had been living for some years in this place, where, by his marriage, two or three years ago, to the relict of the late Blackmore Vye, Esq., he became connected with some of its principal residents. It appears that within the last week or ten days, he had been appointed, greatly to his annoyance, to the office of one of the overseers of the parish. This circumstance seems to have aggravated a tendency to restlessness and despondency which the deceased had previously betrayed, especially with regard to his circumstances, which he imagined to be in a most embarrassed and ruinous state, although his income was well known to be a very handsome one, and his circumstances, both pecuniary and domestic, altogether easy and agreeable. On Monday morning, CAPT. GOODWYN left by the omnibus to go to Barnstaple, where he had some little business; and while there he obtained at the chemist's shop of Mr Mackrell (to whom he was well known, and in whose house at Ilfracombe the Captain was residing) a half-ounce of prussic acid and a similar quantity of chloroform, alleging, as his pretext for asking for the former article, that he wanted it for the purpose of killing a dog. He did not return to Ilfracombe that night; nor were his family greatly alarmed at his absence, for MRS GOODWYN inferred that he had remained with some of his friends at Barnstaple. Such, however, was not the case. He left that town between five and six o'clock, and called at 'Fry's Hotel,' midway between the two towns, at about seven o'clock, and there had drank two glasses of brandy and water, and requested the landlady, strangely enough, to lock him into the room in which he was sitting (for what purpose can only be conjectured), but she found some pretext for declining to do so, and the deceased left her house somewhere about eight o'clock. No trace is known of him until an early hour the next morning. It is presumed that the distracted gentleman must have passed the dismal night in wandering about the fields, indulging, but hesitating to execute, his fatal resolve. Between five and six o'clock in the morning, he was seen by a mason who had been at work for him, at Heale, about a mile from Ilfracombe, where his bewildered appearance was such as to attract the particular attention of this person, who followed him in his rapid walks and runs through the several fields and woods, but who, on seeing that the deceased noticed him following him, was induced to give up the pursuit, leaving the unhappy man in a field called Killacleave, about a mile and half on the road, towards Barnstaple. This was the last time he was seen alive; and after a very short interval (perhaps half an hour or an hour) he was found in that same field, by a messenger who was on his way to Barnstaple, lying by the gate dead, with a phial bottle in his hand too surely revealing the agent of his untimely end. The man (who was the parish constable) lost no time in apprising the family of the deceased, as well as their medical attendant, of what had happened; and the body was speedily removed to the residence of the deceased, in Hillsborough Terrace; while the agony of his widowed partner, as well as his widowed mother, at the dreadful event, was scarcely greater than their astonishment. On his person was found a letter, written the previous evening at the 'Golden Lion,' Barnstaple, and addressed to Mr Henry Day, manager of the National Provincial Bank, at Ilfracombe, which declared his fearful purpose, and attributed it to his "irretrievable embarrassments" - the merely fanciful creation of his own disordered imagination. It declared his inability to live under the consciousness of having squandered the property of his dear wife, to whom it begged Mr Day to break the mournful intelligence, and to whom, as well as to his mother, it enclosed a letter, the contents of which have not transpired but they are understood to relate to family matters.
AN INQUEST - was taken on the remains the same afternoon, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, and the same Jury as in the former case, who, having gone to the house of deceased and made view of the body, returned to the Public Rooms, when the following evidence was adduced.
George Bear: I am constable of the parish of Ilfracombe; knew the deceased WALTER FREDERICK GOODWYN; at about a quarter before seven this morning I was going towards Barnstaple, when, at the distance of about a mile and half from Ilfracombe, I observed a body lying inside the gate of a field; I considered it was that of deceased, and got off my horse and went towards it, when I found that it was so; deceased was at that time quite dead; in his right hand I observed a small phial bottle, which I now produce; the cork was in it when I found it; I lifted the deceased, and rode back towards the town for assistance; I met a man called John Bryant, and a little further on met another man called Thomas Knight, whom I told of what I had discovered, and desired them to take charge of the body until my return; I repaired immediately to the house of deceased, where I saw one of the servants, whom I asked for her master, and she informed me that he was not home - that he went to Barnstaple yesterday, and had not returned; I said to her and to the other servants, "Don't be alarmed: I have found your master about a mile and half up the road dead;" I asked who was the surgeon of the family, and was told it was Mr Stabb, to whom I then went, and informed him of what had happened, and gave into his hand the phial bottle I had taken from the deceased, which he carefully wrapped up and sealed in my presence, and from him I have now received it to produce it here; I went to get assistance to remove the body home, and Mr Stabb rode up my horse to the spot, where I followed him on foot. I saw deceased last alive n Saturday last, when he brought me some notices to serve, but I observed nothing in his manner otherwise than usual.
Thomas Stabb: I am a surgeon, residing in this place; soon after seven o'clock this morning, the last witness came to my house and said he wanted to see me - that CAPT. GOODWYN had poisoned himself; I came immediately down and saw Bear who told me that he had found the body of deceased in a field called the Killacleave; I took his horse and went to the spot, having first sealed up a bottle which Bar gave me, and which he said he had taken from the deceased; I found the deceased lying in the field before mentioned, perfectly dead; a man called Knight, who was in charge of the body, pointed out to me that there was something in the breast of the deceased, which I took out, and found it to be a letter addressed to "Henry Day, Esq., N.P. Bank, Ilfracombe. To be forwarded Immediately." The letter which Mr Day now produces is the same. I made no further examination of the body at that time. Mr John Avery, of this place, happened to be passing in an empty fly, and offered to take the body back to the town, which he did, and lodged it in the house of deceased. In pursuance of the Coroner's warrant, I have since made a post mortem examination of the body, in conjunction with Mr Stoneham; on opening it, a smell of prussic acid was emitted; all the general organs were in a state of full health; the stomach, first secured at both ends, was removed, and was found to contain a small quantity only of a dark grumous fluid, which emitted a stronger smell of prussic acid; the interior of the stomach had a dark corrugated appearance - the vessels all unusually full; it is impossible to say, from the appearance of the stomach, what quantity of prussic acid it contained; I am of opinion, from the examination I have made, that deceased died of poison, which poison was prussic acid; I cannot say with certainty how long he had been dead when I first saw the body, but I should certainly say he had been alive within three hours; on the body being carried home, it was placed in the dining-room, the door of which was locked and the key kept in my possession until I returned with Mr Stoneham to make the post mortem examination; I found no other letters upon his person except the one addressed to Mr Day; in his waistcoat-pocket I found his pocket book, which I now produce; he had also a purse upon him containing gold and silver; the pockets did not appear to have been at all disturbed; the other articles were a penknife, a pencil case, a small rule, a bunch of keys, and a pair of spectacles and case. I have attended the family of CAPT. GOODWYN for some years; never attended him personally, for I never remember him to have required medical assistance, but I was in the frequent habit of meeting him; saw him last alive on Saturday last, when he was in a very excited and disturbed state of mind; he was particularly annoyed at some parochial business that he had to transact; he complained that the duties of overseer, to which office he had just been elected, were oppressive and annoying ; he was at this time standing in the street in company with his co-overseer, Mr John Down, when I saw that he left the place abruptly. I was present at the opening of the above-named letter addressed to Mr Day, and within it were contained two other letters - the one addressed to deceased's wife and the other to his mother; those letters I have since received from MISS GOODWYN, and now produce them; they were delivered to me, at my suggestion, for the purpose of being produced to the Coroner, and read by him to the Jury if he should think it necessary.
Thomas Macrell:- I am a chemist, and reside at Barnstaple; knew the deceased very well; he was a tenant to me, occupying a house lately the property of my deceased brother, and of whose will I am executor; I saw the deceased last alive yesterday, when he called on me to remind me of a promise I had made to him to have the house painted, which I engaged to have attended to in the course of a month; after that business was arranged, he asked for some prussic acid, for the purpose, he said, of killing a dog; I told him a half-ounce would be sufficient, and sold him a bottle containing that quantity; I have no doubt that the bottle now produced is the same I then supplied him with - it has my label on it in my own hand writing; he afterwards enquired about chloroform; I told him I did not think it was adapted to his purpose, as it might merely throw the animal into a state of stupor, from which it might afterwards revive; his reply was that he required it for a different purpose, and I accordingly supplied it - the same quantity as the prussic acid, and in a glass-stoppered bottle; he left both articles at my shop, as he said he should not go out of town until the afternoon (this was about noon), and would call again for them; I understand from my young man that he did calla gain, but I was then absent. I have seen CAPT. GOODWYN frequently, but I observed nothing unusual in his manner at my interview with him yesterday. In answer to a Juryman, the witness said it was not usual to him to supply prussic acid except to persons he knew well: if he had noticed anything unusual in CAPT. GOODWYN'S manner, he should not have supplied him with it.
William Waldron:- I am an assistant in the shop of Mr Mackrell, of Barnstaple; saw CAPT. GOODWYN in Mr Mackrell's shop yesterday; I was there when he first called; heard him give Mr Mackrell the order for prussic acid and chloroform; heard him state the purpose for which he required the prussic acid - that of destroying a dog; the articles were put up and left on the counter at his request until he should call again for them; about five o'clock in the afternoon he came again to the shop, took up the two bottles, inquiring if they were his, and on my saying that they were he put them into his pocket, bade me good afternoon, and left the shop. I observed not the slightest peculiarity in his manner.
John Mitchell: I am a solicitor, and reside at Ilfracombe; I was well acquainted with the deceased, and had been acting professionally for him for upwards of 12 months; I saw him on Thursday, Friday and Saturday last; he was with me for two hours on Thursday, and appeared very much excited about parish business; he spoke also on other subjects, as matters of business, which had annoyed him for many months past; he complained of his rents not being punctually paid, and I think it pressed upon his mind that he was temporarily embarrassed; I convinced him that he was not embarrassed, as he conceived himself to be, and he left me apparently satisfied. The next day I saw him again, when he complained much of parish business, and of a case of appeal against the removal of a pauper, with which, as overseer, he had to concern himself. As an officer of the army, he was not a man of business, and business appeared to be irksome and annoying to him. I never heard of any unpleasantry of disagreement in his family; as his professional man I knew his handwriting, and I identify the handwriting on both the letters now produced (i.e., to his wife and mother) to be his. My impression is, that ever since his appointment as one of the overseers, which was about a week since, his mind has been greatly perplexed and agitated.
Henry Day: I am the manager of the Ilfracombe branch of the National Provincial Bank; I knew the deceased very well; I am one of the trustees under his marriage settlement; I saw him last on Thursday evening, but observed nothing unusual in his manner; he has sometimes complained to me of his rents being in arrear, but I have no idea that his affairs were at all embarrassed, or that he imagined them to e so; I never heard, and have no reason whatever to believe, but that his domestic circumstances were altogether agreeable; I received a letter from Mr Stabb this morning, which was written by CAPT. GOODWYN and was addressed to me; it is dated from the "Golden Lion Hotel, Barnstaple, ½ past 5 p.m." In it he complains that the making of the new road (opposite the Britannia Hotel), and the division of the Paradise property, was his ruin. I should say, from the appearance of the letter, that at the time he wrote it deceased was in a state of great agitation. The two letters produced by Mr Stabb were enclosed in mine. (Witness produced and read the letter addressed to him by deceased. It was evidently that of a man who regarded his circumstances as desperate, and to whom life was therefore intolerable. It spoke in terms of great affection towards his wife, to whom it enjoined Mr Day to break the distressing intelligence.)
John Berry: I am a mason; I reside at Heale, in this parish; I have worked for some time for the deceased; saw him this morning between five and six o'clock, and was struck by his appearance being excited and much otherwise than usual, so much so that I followed him for a long distance, and at length lost sight of him as he went into a field called Killacleave; I saw that he sometimes rambled in his walking, and at other times he ran at his full speed, and did not appear at all as usual. About a week ago I went to deceased to ask him to come up to see some work that I was doing for him, but he said that he was so agitated in mind that he could not come up.
This was all the evidence. The Coroner said he did not think the letters to the wife and mother of deceased material, and would not therefore read them unless the Jury wished it. The Jury expressed themselves perfectly satisfied without them, and instantly returned a verdict - "That deceased destroyed himself, being at the time labouring under Temporary Derangement."
We find that the unfortunate Captain called, on coming into this town on Monday, at the druggist's shop of Mr Alfred Hayman, at Pilton, and asked for poison - mentioning prussic acid and chloroform - for the purpose of destroying a dog. Mr Hayman told him that he had the articles, but was not accustomed to supply them except to professional men, and therefore begged he would excuse him for declining to serve him. The Captain was annoyed and repeated his request; but Mr Hayman, thinking his manner rather strange and excited, and being unacquainted with him, very prudently persisted in excusing himself from complying with his wish.

Thursday 19 April 1849
EXETER - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Friday evening, an Inquest was held at the George and Dragon, St. Sidwell's, before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of CHARLOTTE MANNING, a young woman, 28 years of age, whose death had been caused by an accident of apparently a very trifling nature. It appeared that deceased was on her way to Heavitree to see her husband, (who is living in the service of a gentleman there,) when she came into collision with the wheel of a barrow driven by a boy, and which inflicted w wound upon her leg, causing a rupture of one of the large vessels. The poor woman was suffering from varicose veins, and the haemorrhage which immediately ensued was frightful. She was taken into one of the houses in Belmont Place, but it was found impossible to arrest the bleeding, and the poor woman died almost immediately. The poor creature was newly married, and was buried within a week after her wedding day. At the Inquest the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

HIGHBICKINGTON - Fatal Accident. - On Friday last, an accident occurred to a respectable and aged farmer of this parish, MR JOHN ALFORD, 78 years of age, on his return from Barnstaple Market. He had gone to the Market in the morning, riding in his market cart, and accompanied by his son: they left early to return home, when, on the road between Newbridge and Chappletown gate, the deceased, who was sitting by the edge of the cart, accidentally fell over and alighted upon his head: his son lifted him up, but found that he had received serious injury on the crown of his head, and was speechless: he conveyed him home, with the help of Mr Thomas Cann, of this parish, who came up soon after the accident, but the deceased breathed his last before he reached his home. Dr Jones was called in to view the body, in whose opinion death had resulted from concussion of the brain. An Inquest was held on the body the next day, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner; when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased was perfectly sober at the time of the mournful occurrence.

BRATTON FLEMING - An Inquest was taken, on Thursday the 29th ultimo, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH RIDD, aged 3 ½ years, daughter of JANE RIDD, of this parish. The deceased caught her clothes on fire on the 27th, early in the morning, during the momentary absence of her mother, who was re-called to her kitchen by the cries of the deceased, whom she found in flames. She gave instant relief; but the child had received such serious injuries that death ensued the following evening. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

WEARGIFFORD - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner for the County, on the body of WILLIAM DUNNING WEAR, aged four years, residing with Susan Parr, in this parish; who, on the day before, was at lay with another child in the garden adjoining Parr's cottage, at the foot of which flows the mill-leat, into which the deceased accidentally fell, and floated down the stream: his little companion ran into the cottage and reported that "WILLIAM WEAR was swimming down the leat." Assistance was given instantly, and the body was quickly recovered, but quite dead. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 26 April 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - A Coroner's Jury assembled on Monday afternoon in the Board-room of the Union-workhouse (for convenience sake), to enquire into the cause of death of MR CHARLES WILLIAMS, an old and worthy inhabitant, who had died the Friday night previous, after a few hours' illness, from an attack of apoplexy. The borough Coroner, Alfred Drake, Esq., being unable to attend himself from indisposition, appointed Mr Kingdon, solicitor, to act as his deputy.
The Jury having been duly empanelled, of which Mr John Barry was foreman, proceeded to the late residence of the deceased in Gaydon-street to view the body; but on their arrival there the Coroner informed them that, in consequence of the length of time which had elapsed since the death took place, he understood the body was in a condition in which it could scarcely be seen without danger to their health, and he would therefore dispense with their personal view.
MRS WILLIAMS, widow of the deceased, gave evidence that on the evening of Friday, she found that her husband had fallen down in the yard at the rear of their house from an attack in the head: she called assistance, and removed him to the parlour, where he so far recovered as to describe the way in which he was seized, but gradually sunk till he expired a few hours after.
On the return of the Jury to the place of meeting, MR THOMAS WILLIAMS, son of the deceased, gave evidence that he had taken tea at his father's on the evening of Friday, and had but just left him when he was recalled by a messenger, who informed him of his father's attack. He instantly sent for Dr Budd, who applied the usual remedies without effect. His father had been known to have a tendency to apoplexy for many years, and had a constant pain in his head; for which he had consulted several medical men, who were of opinion that sooner or later it would prove fatal. His father lived for seven hours and half after he was first seized, and died on Saturday morning at an early hour.
A Juror enquired if MR WILLIAMS was aware when the Coroner first had knowledge of the decease; to which witness replied that, thinking it possible the Coroner might deem it proper to hold an Inquest on the body, he had called at his residence at half-past ten on Saturday morning, when Mr Drake promised to let him know his determination in an hour, at the expiration of which he sent him word that he should hold an Inquest, but not until the Monday following; witness remonstrated, and asked, if Mr Drake were unwell, whether he could not appoint a deputy to act for him; but the answer was that he should not hold the Inquest till Monday, and would appoint no deputy.
The Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Died from Apoplexy."
There was a general expression of dissatisfaction on the part of the Jury at the Coroner's delay in holding the Inquest after he had determined upon it, and a feeling that the Enquiry was altogether unnecessary, as he deceased had died from clearly ascertained causes without the shadow of a suspicious circumstance. This feeling they expressed in the following resolution, which was unanimously passed:- "That in the opinion of this Jury the Inquest on the body of CHARLES WILLIAMS has been most unnecessarily held, and the feelings of the surviving relatives harrowed without any justifiable reason. That the Foreman be requested to transmit this Resolution to the Borough Recorder."

EXMINSTER - Self-Destruction by a Madman. - On Tuesday, an Inquest was held at the Devon County Pauper Lunatic Asylum, at Exminster, before Frederick Leigh, Esq., Coroner, on the body of one of the patients, named CHARLES PILE, aged 34 years, who had committed suicide on the preceding day. From the evidence it appeared that on Monday, about two o'clock, shortly after the patients had dined, the deceased was found in the general washing room of the ward, dead, having hanged himself by his neckerchief to the bracket of the roller of the towel-runner. A door of the room was open at the time during which the deceased must have perpetrated the fatal deed, and one of the attendants was within ten yards of the spot taking his sinner; the second attendant was in the day room with the other patients. The Jury returned a verdict that death had been caused by the deceased's own act, whilst labouring under Insanity. At the same time they exonerated all in the establishment from blame.

TORQUAY - Melancholy Accident. - A lamentable catastrophe occurred here on Tuesday night, by which two persons met with an untimely death in the following manner:- It appears that CHARLS DENSHAM and his wife lived in Melville-street, and they were in a wash-house adjoining the premises; the latter, it is supposed, was at work at the time, and the former, it is conjectured, was reading a newspaper to her. At the back of this wash-house was a high wall, which was in a very insecure state, and about 11 o'clock it fell down and buried all beneath it. Several of the neighbours heard the crash, and one of them proceeding to the spot discovered the cause of the accident, but did not hear any groans, and was not aware that any one occupied the wash-house at the time. But early the next morning the bodies were found under the ruins quite dead; the man, still retaining his hold of the newspaper, appeared as if he had died quickly; his wife, however, from the body being still warm, probably lingered some time. The deceased had no family; but the melancholy event has caused much sensation throughout the town. The Coroner's Jury returned a verdict to the effect that their deaths were caused by the falling of the wall, and that the proprietors of the same ought to be reprimanded.

Thursday 31 May 1849
ASHREIGNEY - An Inquest was held on Monday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of FREDERICK PARKHOUSE, a little boy, nine years of age, son of WM. PARKHOUSE, of this parish, thatcher. Deceased was taken ill on Thursday, and complained of a pain in his bowels; but it appeared to pass off, and he became as well as usual. About midnight, however, he awoke and complained of severe pain, and vomited very much. His mother sent for Mr Luxton, surgeon, of Winkleigh, who hastened to the spot, but found that the poor child had died before his arrival. From the abdomen being much swollen, and from other appearances of the body after death, and especially from the fact that a sister of the deceased was labouring under similar symptoms, suspicion was awakened that deceased might have eaten something deleterious. The Coroner accordingly ordered a post mortem examination, which was made by Mr Luxton, with the assistance of Mr Tidboald, of Chulmleigh. No trace of poison, however, was detected, and the opinion of the medical gentlemen was that death resulted from intense inflammation of the bowels, and a verdict to that effect was returned. The little girl is since better.

BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - The body of RICHARD BLACKWELL, of this town, mason, whom we stated in our last to be missing, and who was believed to have drowned himself, was observed on Sunday, about noon, floating in the river near the new road. the body was conveyed to the 'Union Inn,' Derby, where an Inquest was held upon it the next day before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, which could arrive at no other verdict than that of "Found Drowned;" there being no evidence to show how deceased came into the water. The remains were in an advanced state of decomposition.

PLYMOUTH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday, and by adjournment on the following day, at the Tamar Inn, Morice Town, upon the body of STEPHEN SNAPE, a private in the 82nd regiment, who came by his death under circumstances which created a suspicion that he had been unfairly treated. It appeared that after the review on Saturday last deceased repaired to Morice Town, where he got into a state of intoxication, and was fighting and quarrelling with various parties on the edge of the Tamar canal up to half past 12 o'clock at night. He was then lost sight of; and the following morning about 7 a.m. his body was discovered in the canal, about 200 yards from the spot where he had been last seen. At the adjourned Inquest the evidence of Mr Tripe, surgeon, went to show that deceased had died by suffocation produced by drowning, and not from any injury previously received. The statements of the other witnesses examined tended to the same effect; and the Coroner, in summing up, observed that there did not see any reason to suppose but that the death of the deceased had resulted from accident while in a state of intoxication. He firmly believed that nine-tenths of the various crimes committed in this country could be traced to the single vice of drunkenness. The Jury then retired, and after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned, but how or by what means there was not sufficient evidence to show." Deceased was 20 years of age, and his general character was a good one.

Thursday 7 June 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Sunday afternoon last, between the hours of three and four, as a number of boys, chiefly belonging to the Derby factory, who had just left the Sunday-school lately established there, were bathing in the river at Pottington point, one of them, called CHARLES FISHER, aged 14, son of a lace-twister, who was the first to go into the water, ventured too far, and the force of the current, which was flowing strongly at the time, carried him off his legs, and hurried him up the river. His companions (among whom was one of his brothers) observed his danger, and heard the poor boy cry for help, but they were unable to render it; and after rising two or three times to the surface, he disappeared. The body was not recovered until Tuesday morning, when it was found thrown upon the shore by the Tawstock bank, not far above Barnstaple bridge. An Inquest was held on it before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, which resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, JAMES VANSTONE, a labourer, 60 years of age, in the employ of Mr Walter Cock, builder, of Torrington, sustained a fatal accident on the old Torrington road, two miles and a half from Barnstaple, near St. John's Chapel, in the following manner. It appears that the poor man was engaged in drawing timer for Mr John Lee, cabinet maker, of Torrington, and when at the place named a portion of this timber had to be removed from the cart which had conveyed it from Barnstaple to that driven by the deceased. While in the act of removing a large log of wood, two men being in front and deceased bearing up behind, and just as the fore part found a resting place on the cart, by some means poor VANSTONE'S attention was called off: he lost his equilibrium, and fell, the end of the log falling upon him and fracturing his skull and neck. He was at once removed to the North Devon Infirmary, where every attention was paid to him, but he died on Tuesday evening. An Inquest was held on the body this day at 12 o'clock, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. Deceased bore an excellent character, and had been in Mr Cock's employ for more than 20 years.

Thursday 14 June 1849
UFFCULME - Frightful Death. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, on the body of WILLIAM COTTERELL, aged 15. The lad had been sent an errand on horseback by his master, Mr Wm. Wood, of Kentisbear, and on his return, about a mile from home, the horse suddenly started, by which the deceased was thrown off, and his left foot being entangled in the stirrup leather, the horse set off at full speed, and after dragging him upwards of a quarter of a mile, the saddle fell off, and the deceased was left in the road. He was picked up within a few minutes quite insensible, covered with blood, the back part of his head cut, and the bone exposed; his left leg was broken, his face scratched and bruised very much, and the greater part of his clothes torn off. A part of his shirt and waistcoat was pulled over his head and down over his arms. He was lying on his back in a ditch, and his arms were crossed before his face. When picked up, he groaned heavily, and appeared to suffer very much. Medical assistance was procured, but he expired in a few minutes after the surgeon arrived.

Thursday 21 June 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Deaths. - Two Inquests were held on Tuesday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner of the Borough, on persons who had died suddenly. The first was at Rawleigh, on the body of ROBERT CREEDY, aged 50, a smith in the employ of Mr Willshire, of the Newport Iron Foundry. It appeared, from the evidence of deceased's wife, that on his return from his work the night before she gave him his supper, of which he partook as usual, and soon after went to bed. His wife followed him, and after she had got into bed she heard her husband making a strange noise, and spoke to him, but receiving no answer she turned round and saw that he was insensible, and observed a strange motion in his throat. She immediately got up and called her next door neighbour, Philip Pearse, who came in, and seeing in what state the poor fellow was, he lost no time in going into Barnstaple to the parish doctor, Mr Parker, who, however, declined to attend unless an order was obtained from the overseer. Pearse therefore hastened to the assistant-overseer, Mr Western, at Westaway, and obtained the medical order, with which he returned to Mr Parker, who accompanied him to the house of deceased, whom he found dead, and the wife stated that he expired within a quarter of an hour of Pearse's first leaving to fetch the surgeon. The opinion of Mr Parker was that death had resulted from apoplexy, and the Jury found a verdict, "Died by Visitation of God." It is said that deceased, who was a bird fancier, was much irritated on his return home by finding that one of his birds had been allowed to escape from its cage, and that he retired to bed in a rage: but nothing of the kind came out at the Inquest.

BARNSTAPLE - The other case was that of SAMUEL EDWARDS, aged 40, of this parish, labourer, in the employ of Mr Thorne, contractor of the Taw Vale Railway. Deceased had been in the country on the Sunday preceding, where he had drunk freely of cider, and returning at night much in liquor. The next morning he again drank, but went to his work as usual, complaining, however, of pain in his bowels. He complained so much in the afternoon that the head horse-keeper on the works, William Cann, sent for a little brandy for him, of which he partook and seemed relieved. After the day's work, he attended to his horses, and then went up into the loft (where he was often in the habit of sleeping) and lay down, but did not take off his clothes. Cann saw him between 11 and 12 at night, and asked him how he was; to which he replied that he felt easier. On the Tuesday morning, when a fellow workman, called Thomas Skinner, was in the stables at his work, deceased came down from the loft at about half-past seven, and appeared to be in much pain. Skinner persuaded him to have a doctor, and offered to go with him to the Infirmary; but deceased declined, saying that he should be better by and bye, and having gone into the out-house he returned back to the loft again. Skinner went to breakfast at eight o'clock, and returned to the stables in about half an hour; and, on going to the loft, he found the deceased lying on his face upon a bundle of straw, and receiving no answer when he spoke to him, he feared that he was worse, ran to call in another man, who returned with him, and on turning deceased over they saw that he was dead. The condition of the loft showed that deceased had vomited very profusely. Mr Cooke, surgeon, was called in about half an hour afterwards, and gave evidence at the Inquest to the effect that, in his opinion, death had resulted from inflammation of the bowels, brought on, no doubt, by the quantity of acrid liquid he had taken into his stomach. Verdict as in the former case, "Visitation of God." Deceased, who was a friendless poor fellow, was interred the same evening, in the clothes in which he died.

BONDLEIGH - Inquests:- On Monday last, an Inquest was taken before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, at Bondleigh, on the body of JAMES ROUNCIFULL, 24 years of age, farm servant of Mr Henry Western, of that parish, who was accidentally killed at South Tawton by the overturning of a cart upon him. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

MORETONHAMPSTEAD - The same day, at Chagford, near Moretonhampstead, before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM CAMPITT, farmer, whose sudden death was suspected to have been caused by poison, but the investigation satisfied the Jury that he died from Natural Causes - English Cholera, brought on by drinking a quantity of cider.

BRAMPFORD SPEKE - A distressing and fatal accident happened to a poor man of the name of BAMSEY, an inhabitant of this place, on Friday last. He was at work with his son, a lad of about 17 years of age, at Netherexe Barton, sawing timer, and having descended into the sawpit for the purpose of adjusting it, he unfortunately moved the piece of timber forward, when it fell on his neck and across his shoulders, crushing him to the ground. He never spoke nor moved afterwards, but died instantly. An Inquest was held on Monday by Frederick Leigh, Esq., and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 28 June 1849
BARNSTAPLE- We regret to hear of the sudden death, at Ilfracombe, last night or early this morning, of MRS CORSAR, wife of JOHN CORSAR, Esq., of Clarence-place, Newport, in this borough. MRS CORSAR had not been in good health lately, on account f which she went a few days ago, accompanied by her now bereaved husband, for a short sojourn to Ilfracombe, where her health appeared to improve, but a sudden attack in the course of last night terminated her life. The Coroner has just been summoned and is gone to hold an Inquest on the remains. Deceased was a most estimable lady, and was highly respected.

LIFTON - INQUESTS: On Thursday last an Inquest was taken at Lifton, before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM CONGDEN, labourer, who was accidentally crushed to death by the drum wheel of the machinery belonging to Lifton quarry. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

WERRINGTON - On the same day, Mr Vallack held an Inquest at Werrington, on the body of HENRY SLEEP WESTLAKE, 14 years of age, servant of Mr James Blake, of Yeolm Mills, who was accidentally drowned whilst assisting in cleaning the tunnel belonging to the said mills, in consequence of the hatch giving way, which was placed at the mouth of the tunnel to keep the water back into the mill leat. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

WERRINGTON - On the following day (Friday), another Inquest was taken in the same parish, before Mr Vallack, on the body of THOMAS STANBURY, 42 years of age, who was found drowned in the river Tamar. The deceased was the head man of Mr Gregory, yeoman; and in the afternoon went in search of some strayed bullocks. He was subject to fits, and from the evidence it is believed that he fell into the river during one of those seizures. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 12 July 1849
LANDCROSS - Suicide. - On Friday afternoon last, as Mr Jennings, an attorney, of Bideford, was returning from Torrington, he saw the body of a female floating in the stream which runs under the iron bridge into the river Torridge, whereupon he left his gig, plunged into the water, and rescued the body, which, however, was found to be quite dead. Several persons collected, but it was some hours before the body was recognised: but at length it was discovered to be that of BETTY JEWELL, aged 67, wife of HUGH JEWELL, of Bideford, labourer. She had been last seen that morning by a neighbour with whom she left the key of her door. She had been in a desponding state of mind for some months past, and there was every reasons to believe that she had been driven by her dejection to drown herself. As, however, there was no evidence of the fact, the Jury, at the Inquest held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned." Deceased was a respectable woman in her station, and had formerly lived for many years in the service of Josias Wren, Esq. Her husband, to whom she was married not long since, is described as most affectionate, and is inconsolable at his loss.

Thursday 26 July 1849
SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the Union Workhouse, in this town, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of the male infant child, three days old, of ANNE BALE, of Northmolton, which had been over-laid by his mother. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by Suffocation". The mother is but about 16 years of age.

Thursday 2 August 1849
ILFRACOMBE - Death of a Boy at Sea. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held on the body of WILLIAM CHAPPLE, of Barnstaple, who died on board the schooner 'William,' Capt. Williams, of this port. The vessel left Bristol for Ilfracombe on Tuesday. the lad was taken on board as an apprentice, or intending to become so. He appeared to be in good health when the vessel left Kingroad, and applied himself to assist as he might in the work of the ship. Sea sickness came upon him, which he found to be a worse thing than he expected; yet, resolving not to yield to it, he kept on his legs, and resolutely went on with his work. At length the captain, perceiving his sickness to be very bad, ordered him below; but so powerful was its effect on the poor fellow that he died the next day. This fatality being somewhat uncommon, it was deemed proper to hold an Inquest when the Jury ordered a post mortem examination of the body, which was made by Mr Vye and Mr Tuckett (late surgeon to the Dreadnought hospital ship). There was nothing wrong in the stomach, but the lungs were in a high state of inflammation, which, having been aggravated by the sea sickness, was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical opinion.

Thursday 9 August 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - Much concern was excited in this town on Saturday morning last by the rumour - which enquiry too soon confirmed - that MR WILLIAM SANDERS, tanner, had died the preceding night, after an illness of about 12 or 14 hours' duration. From the peculiarity of the symptoms, the Coroner for the Borough, Alfred Drake, Esq., after consulting with the medical gentlemen who had been in attendance on the deceased, determined to hold an Inquisition into the causes of death; which accordingly took place on Saturday afternoon, at four o'clock, at deceased's residence (late Miss Dene's), Rackfield cottage, Boutport-street. The Jury consisted of Mr John W. Tatham, foreman; Mr Philip Carter, Mr Henry Fleming, Mr Thomas Hodge, Mr John Woollacott, Mr William Carter, Mr Byron Aldham, Mr John Thorne, Mr James Parminter, Mr Thomas Cornish, Mr William Gibbings, and Mr William Stribling.
Having been sworn, the Jury retired upstairs to view the body, the appearance of which presented nothing remarkable. The first witness was Catherine Clarke, housekeeper to deceased, who deposed as follows:- My last master was in very good health yesterday morning; he breakfasted about eight o'clock, his usual time, and ate a hearty breakfast; he went out into the tanyard about nine o'clock, and returned soon after, complaining of great pain in his bowels; he grated a little rhubarb and took it in some brandy, which seemed to relieve him; I went out between 9 and 10 o'clock to go to the market, and left my master in the garden; I returned at half-past 11, when I found him sitting in his easy chair in the parlour; he complained of great pain, and asked me to get him some milk and water, which I gave him; at his orders I went for Mr March, who came immediately; I was in the house the whole day until he died. He took his usual breakfast in the morning - fried back, potatoes and tea. He had been out in the tanyard before breakfast as well as after. He did not complain at all the day before: his dinner the day before was lamb and a rice pudding.
Elizabeth White, wife of one of the deceased's workmen, was called in between one and two o'clock, and remained until death took place. He was in bed; was very sick; complained of pain in his bowels and side; witness rubbed his legs and feet by order of the medical gentlemen; he drank cold water only, complained much of cramp; witness had known him complain of cramp often times before yesterday, particularly in his feet.
Mr James Colley March:- I was the usual medical attendant of the deceased; yesterday, at about ½ past 11 in the forenoon, I was sent for by his servant, who desired me to come immediately, for that her master was very ill; I instantly attended him and found him sitting in his easy chair; he complained that his bowels had been very much relaxed - that he went into the yard on some business, and that he there felt unwell; he said this was soon after he had his breakfast, and that it was as much as he could do to get into the garden to his easement. I asked him how many evacuations he supposed he had had, and he said he believed twenty. I enquired if he felt at all sick, or had been so; and he said he had not, but while I remained with him he complained of sickness soon after; he vomited copiously in a basin that I brought to him; it was his breakfast which his stomach then ejected; he complained presently of deafness, and then fell back into his chair and fainted; at that moment a quantity of matter was thrown up from his stomach, which remained in his throat, and would have suffocated him, had I not been there to lift him forward, which relieved him; he recovered shortly after, and I left him as soon as I was able, both to get him some medicines, and to direct one of his men to fetch Dr Bignell; it might have been nearly an hour before the Dr. arrived; I had got him upstairs with difficulty before Dr Bignell came; he continued perfectly sensible, and was so to the last; when he came upstairs, he got upon the night-box, where he evacuated copiously; immediately that deceased fainted downstairs, I saw that the case was different from any I had ever seen before, and I suspected the disease, which made me so anxious to get Dr Bignell; from the time the Dr came we never left him, except for a few minutes, until his death; there was no pulsation in the wrist; we got him into bed, where he continued to complain of thirst and heat, while the whole of his body, and extremities particularly, were icy cold to the touch; he was extremely restless, and constantly threw off the bed-clothes; I do not think he suffered much pain; the medicines that had been given him relieved the cramp; the stools were almost perfectly liquid, and contained no feculent matter; his strength gradually failed, and about two hours before his death he was unable to swallow; I have no hesitation in saying that he died from cholera; I have never seen a case resembling this; the rapid prostration of strength, the loss of pulse, and the liquid evacuations, were peculiarities that I have never before seen.
By a Juror: You have, of course, seen cases of English cholera.
Mr March: - Of course I have - many scores of them, as every medical man has; but the features of this case were altogether dissimilar. I never saw a case of Asiatic cholera, and I therefore would not positively pronounce that this was so. There is no discolouration of the body.
Dr Bignell fully concurred in the deposition of Mr March; and wished to add that the deceased had every symptom which is described by the best writers as belonging to the Asiatic cholera. I never saw a case of Asiatic cholera, but, from the knowledge I have acquired of that disease from those who have written upon it, I have no hesitation in saying that this was a case of that disease. The ricy evacuations, the extreme coldness of the tongue, and the restlessness of the patient, mark the disease most unmistakeably.
Mr March - It is generally considered that the body necessarily becomes blue in attacks of Asiatic cholera; but that is not so in all cases. In this case there was a leaden hue perceptible in the hands when I was called in, but it disappeared before death.
The Jury withdrew to an adjoining apartment, and presently returned a verdict - "Died from Cholera." The foreman at the same time conveyed the wish of the Jury, that if any future case of cholera should occur, the Jury should be called to assemble and hear the evidence at the Guildhall, and merely be required to go to the house of deceased for the necessary view of the body.
Deceased's father and brother arrived from the neighbourhood of Exeter while the Inquest was sitting. The interment took place at Magdalen buying-ground the next afternoon.

BARNSTAPLE - Death by Drowning - On the afternoon of Saturday last, an Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner for the County, at the 'Rolle's Quay Inn,' in the parish of Pilton, on view of the body of WILLIAM HENRY HOBBS, a little boy of the age of nine years, son of MR JOHN HOBBS, of Joy-street, in this town, tailor, who had been accidentally drowned that afternoon in the river off Pottington-point. Evidence was given that deceased overtook some other boys on the road towards Pottington going to bathe, and wished to join them, but they declined, and he followed them saying that he would look after their clothes while they were in the water. While they were bathing, the saw deceased undress, and go into the water at some distance from them, where the stream carried him off his legs, and he cried for help, and a young man who was some distance from him ran to his assistance; but many minutes had elapsed before he was taken out of the water. The body was taken home to his disconsolate parents with all speed, where the most persevering endeavours were made to restore animation, but in vain. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Thursday 23 August 1849
PARKHAM - Death from the Kick of a Horse. - An Inquest was held on Monday the 20th instant, at Parkham, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner for the County, and a respectable Jury, on the body of GILES PEARD, a little boy of that parish, about 11 years of age, who died on the preceding Saturday from injuries inflicted by the kick of a horse on the 16th inst. It appeared from the evidence adduced, that deceased was returning from school with his brother, WILLIAM, and in crossing a field belonging to Mr Austin, he began to run after a horse grazing there: in so doing, he received a violent kick, which threw him to the ground, lacerating his face in a frightful manner. Assistance being procured, he was conveyed to a cottage in the neighbourhood; and the services of Mr Eusebius Rouse, surgeon, of West Putford, being put in requisition, the little sufferer received every alleviation which medical skill could afford. It was discovered, however, that concussion of the brain had ensued from the violence of the blow, and on the 18th death put an end to the misery of the unfortunate little fellow. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Thursday 30 August 1849
FREMINGTON - A dreadful accident occurred in this parish on Tuesday, whereby SAMUEL LEWIS, a lad of the age of 17, has met with his death. Deceased was at work in the clay-pits, and was standing between the side of a cart which he was loading and the perpendicular side of the pit, no one being near him at the time, when suddenly a mass of clay fell out upon him and buried him. Every possible exertion was made to extricate him, but five minutes elapsed before that could be accomplished. He was found to be much hurt, and was removed instantly to the North Devon Infirmary; when it was discovered that his back was fearfully crushed, his thigh fractured, and he was otherwise injured, besides suffering from a very copious haemorrhage. His pain was very great, and the case was one which unfortunately permitted not the slightest hope of successful surgical treatment. Death ensued in about six hours. An Inquest was taken the next day before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, when a verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Thursday 13 September 1849
LOXHORE - Lamentable and Fatal Accident. - We regret to have to record the particulars of an accident, by which a highly respectable yeoman has been suddenly hurried into eternity, and a numerous family left in orphanage. On Monday night last, MR JOHN SAUNDERS, the proprietor and occupier of Loxhore Barton, was returning from a large sale of farming stock at Paracombe: it was between 11 and 12 o'clock when he left Paracombe, in company with Mr John Facey, of Chittlehampton, who was returning with him to sleep at his house. they had proceeded about a mile and half, when, just as they had passed the Blackmore toll-gate, Mr Facey being a little a-head, deceased got off his horse (a young and spirited galloway), and on again mounting him, having his left foot in the stirrup, and throwing his right leg over the saddle, the animal suddenly started into a gallop, and deceased, being unable to keep his place, was thrown over on the other side, and pitched with great violence on his head. Mr Facey halted, expecting to see his companion rise, but as he did not move he hastened back to him and found him insensible, the blood flowing copiously from a wound in his head. Mr Facey returned towards Paracombe for assistance, and at a short distance met his father and some others, who were also returning from the sale, by whom a cart was obtained from Mr Tamlyn, of Westland Pound, into which deceased was placed, and conveyed to his home. Meanwhile Mr Facey went to Barnstaple for medical help, and Mr Joce, surgeon (Mr Saunders's near relative) hastened to Loxhore, where he arrived before the deceased was brought home; but within a few minutes the cart drove up, out of which deceased was assisted, having partially recovered his senses. Mr Joce examined him, and found an extensive bruise on the right side of the head, as well as on the upper and back part of it. Towards morning he fell into an apoplectic state, from which he never rallied, and died about three o'clock in the afternoon. An Inquest was held on the body by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Wednesday (yesterday), when the above facts having been deposed to, and Mr Joce having given his evidence that the cause of death were the injuries he had received from the fall, which were concussion and extravasation of blood upon the brain, a verdict to that effect was returned. The event has caused a deep sensation among the yeomanry of this neighbourhood, by whom the deceased was well known and much respected.

Thursday 20 September 1849
ILFRACOMBE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Exeter Inn' on Monday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner for the County, and a respectable Jury, on the body of ELEANOR PEAKE, who died very suddenly the preceding Saturday night, rumour having attributed her decease to an attack of the prevailing epidemic. Jane Turpit deposed that deceased lived under the same roof as herself, but in different apartments. She last saw her alive about ½ past 9 o'clock on Saturday evening, when to all appearance she was in the full enjoyment of health. At 11 o'clock witness heard deceased go to her bed-room, which adjoined the one in witness's occupation, and shortly after this went herself to bed. About 12 o'clock hearing a loud knocking at the wall, witness hastened into deceased's room, and found her sitting on the floor with her head against the side of the bed, apparently lifeless. John Jones, Esq., surgeon, gave evidence that about 12 o'clock on the night in question he was called to see deceased, and found her quite dead. A post mortem examination, which he had subsequently made, satisfactory proved that her death arose from a rupture of a blood vessel of the heart. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

Thursday 4 October 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Misadventure. - A painful case of this kind, in the death of a Sunday scholar from an accidental blow in the head with a strap by his teacher, occurred in this town on Saturday last, and has been a source of much distress to the parents of the child and the teachers and managers of the school, particularly the unfortunate young man who was the unintending cause of the catastrophe. The particulars will be best explained by the evidence which was taken on the Inquest, which was convened on Saturday last, at the 'Currier's Arms,' Derby, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John May, of the Derby lace factory, was foreman. The name f the deceased is JOHN BEADLE, nearly 10 years of age, living at Boden's Row, and employed in the factory.
The Jury, having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, which presented no remarkable appearance, the wound in the head being comparatively small in size, with a slight degree of ulceration perceptible. On their return, the following witnesses were examined.
Philip Gardener:- I am a teacher in the school at Derby, usually called the "Derby Sabbath School." I attended on Sunday the 16th in that capacity, and also as Superintendent in the absence of Mr Howells. I observed the deceased, about three o'clock in the afternoon, in the class which is instructed by William Abbott; and about a quarter of an hour after, on going round to the various classes to see that all was going on well, one of the boys in Abbot's class drew my attention to the deceased's head, by saying "Look here, what Abbott has done," and I then observed a spot of blood on the left side of the back part of the top of the head. I told deceased that he ought not to have disobeyed his teacher, and in reply to a question put by me, as to what the matter was with his head, he said, "Teacher has struck me." I asked him what teacher? and he replied "Abbott." There is only one teacher in the school called Abbott, and he is the prisoner, William Abbott, now present. I touched Abbott on the shoulder, and said, "You should not have done that." I said this in consequence of the rules of the school prohibiting any corporal punishment. The rule is to the following effect:- "That in enforcing obedience, it be done by influence; and the teachers are not, on any pretence, to resort to corporal punishment." Last Saturday I heard that the boy had been taken ill, and on the afternoon of Sunday I went to see him. He was not in bed, but complained of pain in his head. Deceased, in answer to a question put either by me or by the Superintendent of the school, said that his head pained him where his teacher had struck him with a buckled-strap. The strap now produced by Whitefield is precisely similar to those used in the school for buckling the books together. [It was a small leather one, about 24 inches long and ½ inch wide, with a buckle at the end ¾ inch in diameter.] In answer to a question by the foreman, witness stated that after the boy had been struck, he did not observe him crying; he was very unruly, and so far from noticing the blow, he laughed at his teacher.
The Foreman explained that the school was a voluntary one, the teachers giving their services gratuitously. It had at first been called a ragged school; but in consequence of the neat and clean appearance of the children who attended it as scholars, that name had been done away with, and the present one substituted.
Giles Carter. - I am a teacher in the school at Derby, and instructed a class adjoining the one to which the deceased belonged. Last Sunday week, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I observed Abbott strike the deceased on the back part of the head with a buckled strap similar to the one now produced. I have been a teacher in the school three months, and know there is a rule existing that no boy shall be punished by corporal punishment. The boy when struck did not cry out, and Abbott did not strike him as if in a passion. The boy cared so little for the blow that he laughed in his teacher's face. Last Sunday, missing the deceased from the school, I enquired of his brother what had become of him, and was told that "he was ill, in consequence of his teacher having struck him with a buckle strap." I knew that Abbott taught the class to which deceased belonged.
Mr Michael Cooke:- I am a surgeon residing and practising in Barnstaple. On passing up Boden's Row on Sunday last, I was desired by some one to look at a boy (whose name I have since ascertained to be JOHN BEADLE) who was ill. I found him down stairs sitting on a stool or chair; and the mother having expressed wish that I should examine his head, stating that whilst attending school on the previous Sunday he had received a wound there from a buckle-strap, I found a small ulcerated wound, on the left side of the back part of the top of the head, the mouth of which was as large as a good sized pea. It was not a recent wound, and might have been inflicted by the corner of the buckle attached to the strap now produced. On examining the wound, I found the pericranium separated from the bone and exposing it. the blow was in all probability a bruise at first, but from inflammation it had ulcerated in to the bone. Having ordered applications in the way of poultices to the wound, and given him some medicine, I left. On Monday, at noon, I again visited the boy, and found him worse: the wound had increased in size, and the bone denuded to a considerable extent all around it. There was a good deal of matter discharging, attended with irritating fever. The next day he was just the same, but on Wednesday much worse, fever of a typhoid character having come on, and a collection of matter having formed two inches lower down, which I was compelled to lance, and a copious discharge of most offensive matter took place. In the evening, Mr Howells, superintendent of the school, having seen me and requested that I would call in further medical assistance, Mr Winter went with me and saw the boy. Thursday evening and yesterday he gradually got worse, and this morning I heard that he was dead. I consider the boy's death was caused by inflammation arising from the wound, and the ulceration and collection of matter acting on a bad constitution.
In consequence of the Coroner having an important engagement, the Inquest (the Jurymen being bound over duly to appear, and the young man Abbott, who had been taken into custody, admitted to bail) was then adjourned to Monday, at ten o'clock, to be held at the Guildhall.
At the adjourned Inquest the names of the Jurymen having been called over, and the depositions of the three preceding witnesses taken down into writing and deposed to by them, the following witnesses were examined.
Mary Turner, 14 years of age:- I am a scholar in the Derby Sabbath School; and on Sunday the 16th, being in an adjoining class to that instructed by the prisoner Abbott, I observed him ask the deceased two or three times to read, saying, "If you don't, I'll give it to you;" he then struck deceased in the back part of the head with the buckle end of a leather strap similar to the one now produced. He only laughed at his teacher, who did not appear at all excited. It is not generally known amongst the scholars that striking is not allowed, but I have never seen any scholar struck in the school since I have been there, which is between two and three months.
Mr Mortimer, who attended to watch the proceedings on behalf of the prisoner, here, by the permission of the Coroner, asked the witness a few questions, to which she replied:- I was sitting down quite close to the boy, and turning round saw Abbott strike the blow; he had the leathern part of the strap in his hand, and struck with the buckle end; I am quite positive the buckle struck the boy's head, but I did not see any spot of blood. the boy didn't go away, or appear hurt in the slightest degree. He laughed at his teacher.
At the request of prisoner's father, who was in court, the following witnesses were then called.
Mary Rew:- I reside at Boden's Row, Derby, and my house is next to that occupied by the mother and father of deceased. Last Friday week, in the evening, all MRS BEADLE'S children went to the fair, with the exception of deceased, who I heard cry out, and on his mother asking him what was the matter, he said, "You've knocked my head against the wall, mother." ANN BEADLE, mother of deceased, who was sent for at the request of the Jury, deposed that she never in her life struck or corrected the boy. She recollected last Friday week evening very well, for all the children with the exception of deceased (who that day complained for the first time of violent pains in his head) had gone to the fair. Neither on that day nor on the Saturday did she beat him, or knock his head against the wall, nor did he tumble down to her knowledge.
William Bubeer:- Last Wednesday week, I was at the factory, and observed the deceased thee; he was playing with many other boys in the absence of the overseer, and was dragged by some of them up and down a stone floor the whole length of the factory by the legs, his body resting on the ground. He did not complain the slightest degree of any pain in his head, and appeared in as good health as I had ever seen him.
Charles Burgess:- I work at the factory, and deceased was one of the boys under me. He had been so for two years. I never heard him complain of pain in his head. The week before last he worked three days and a half, and left off on Thursday, the same as all the other men and boys, in consequence of the factory being about to be whitewashed. From the preceding Sunday to the Thursday he did his work as usual, often carrying a box of wheels of the weight of 15 pounds on his head, from the lowest to the top story of the factory. On Friday morning, when I paid him his wages, he was lying on the ground outside the factory gate, rolling about, in good spirits, and to all appearance in the enjoyment of perfect health.
Mr Cooke was further examined, and stated that since Saturday he had made a post-mortem examination of the head. The cranium was not fractured, but there was a large collection of matter on the membranes of the brain: inflammation and ulceration caused by the blow on the head, had, no doubt, led to the boy's death.
By the Foreman:- The manner in which he was playing in the factory would accelerate his death, so would the carrying of weights on his head. The boy has been taken care of. When witness was first called in, the boy had a poultice applied to the wound, which was quite proper. Had understood the health of the boy was not good. Heard Mr Winter say that the boy some time since injured his finer, which was six or seven weeks in healing, and this would betray a bad constitution.
This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner summed it up to the Jury, stating that it would be for them to determine what amount of blame attached to the prisoner, and informing them of the difference between the offences of murder and manslaughter.
The Jury retired to consider their verdict, and after an absence of about half an hour, the foreman delivered their unanimous verdict to the following effect:- "That the blow given to the deceased, JOHN BEADLE, by the prisoner, William Abbot, was the primary cause of death; but that had earlier attention been paid to the wound, they believe the result would not have proved fatal. The Jury fully exonerate William Abbott from all intention of injuring the deceased." The Jury presented the fees they were entitled to for their attendance to the mother of the deceased, and the sum was further increased by a handsome donation from the foreman. The prisoner was, of courses, discharged.

BERRNARBOR - Our esteemed correspondent, "A Labourer's Son," in his essay in our last, wrote prettily of this picturesque village, and honourably of the great and good Bishop Jewell, who had his birth in Berrynarbor. During the last week the locality has witnessed an incident which would supply his able pen with a theme of a different kind - one from which, while he might excite a tear by depicting the scene of misery it unfolds, he might also give a lesson on the social duties - the duty which neighbouring wealth owes to indigence - which, in this case, appears to have been lamentably neglected.
Hard by the church of Berrynarbor - whose appearance and approaches, by the bye, would admit of the application of some little of that "pious care" which one loves to see exhibited in country churches - stands the ruin of what was once the poor-house. It is a building of some considerable extent offrontage, one end of which is in decent condition; but the part to which our remarks apply is a pitiable display of dirt and dilapidation. By four stone steps you ascend to what was a door, by which you enter a desolate hovel, whose ground floor is tenantless, because uninhabitable. By an unsafe ladder you may ascend, if you choose to trust yourself, to the upper floor, or garret, where you are landed in what was a room, but which now retains no attribute of such an accommodation except a roof, through which the clouds freely dispense their watery contents, and a few rotten joists on which a floor formerly was laid, but no trace of which remains. There were windows, but they have shared the fate of the floor; and their gaping openings only proclaim the use which once they served. You, gentle reader, would think of venturing across those joists, just as soon as you would of crossing a railway with a train in sight.
And yet such is the strength of nature's desire for shelter, and such the stress of poverty, that across these rickety joists two poor people have long been accustomed to make their daily journeys, for the purpose of securing the asylum of an apartment to which they lead, and which boasts the convenience of two walls, a lath-and-plaster partition, and openings which were once occupied by doors and a window. The apartment, thus perilously reached, was a very meagre one, whose partial flooring just afforded room for a wallet of straw, on which these forlorn creatures were in the habit of seeking their nightly repose. Of course, in persons thus vilely lodged, no one will expect to find the habits of Christians; and it will not surprise, however, much it may disgust, our readers to be told that the inmates of this ruin were a mother and a son - a mother and a grown-up son (from 20 to 30 years old) - who were in the habit of sleeping together on their straw bed! She was a miserable derelict, whom her husband had forsaken, and who eked out a sad existence on a scanty pittance, assisted by the slender earnings of her only child. here she lived, and here she found a release from the pains of life by the friendly hand of death, one day last week, under circumstances which, if too late revealed to be of any use to her, may yet reflect themselves in some salutary improvement in the neighbourhood; for it appeared to us that there was, in the filth and decay of the surrounding cottages opportunity enough for those to whom the duty belongs to offer some atonement, if not to the deceased, yet to society, for the miserable plight in which the woman GILL (for that was her name) was suffered to live and die.
On Tuesday night last this wretched couple went to bed, as well in health as want would let them be. In the course of the night the mother was taken ill. The son did not suspect the character of the attack, but got up, and by the kindness of a neighbour obtained for her a little pepper and some brandy. This administered, she seemed relieved; and at dawn of day or thereabout the son went to his labour. An hour or two after an opposite neighbour visited the sad abode, and called from the foot of the ladder to its dying inmate (she was afraid to mount the steps); but there was no voice. The son came home just in time to see her die! There, amidst this want and woe, with no friend to soothe, no medical aid to assuage the pains of dying, no spiritual comforter to point to the "better land" - all alone and unpitied, this unfortunate creature fell a victim to the ravages of the prevailing epidemic! And this was in a Christian land - within a few paces of the house of prayer - in a parish neither unbeneficed nor without the residence of a rich proprietor.
The Coroner, Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., held an Inquest on the remains on Thursday last, before a respectable Jury, of which Mr William Hicks was foreman, when the following evidence was adduced.
The first witness was the son of deceased, who deposed;- The deceased, ABIGAIL GILL, was my mother, and I lived with her. She had been separated for two years from her husband, THOMAS GILL, but he allowed her the sum of 2s. 6d. a week, the payment of which was continued until within about two or three weeks of her death. My mother lived in the poor house in Berrynarbor, which adjoins the church-yard. She slept upstairs, and the room below having no ceiling, she was compelled to walk on the joists to go to bed. She slept on a sort of bed filled with straw, but the canvass or tick was rotten and in holes. She had no bed clothes, but an old cloak and piece of a sheet to cover her. the deceased has lived there for the last 12 months or rather more. I lived with her, sometimes in the same room, and sometimes blow, but always under the same roof. I slept on straw, but had no bedclothes. Deceased on Tuesday was much as usual, and went out to work returning to bed about 9 o'clock, and did not complain of being ill. I went to bed about the same time, and slept in the same room with deceased, but that night not in the same bed. I slept on straw, which I removed and burnt on Wednesday morning. About three o'clock in the morning deceased called to me and complained that she was very bad - that she had cramps in her arms and her bowels very loose, but she did not complain of cramp in her bowels. The deceased was also sick. I then got up and went to the house of Thomas Leworthy, and told him that my mother was ill. I asked him to give me some pepper and a candle, which he did, and also a drop of brandy. I went back to the deceased, and at her desire put the pepper into the brandy and gave her. She drank it, and appeared relived, but a short time after was again very sick, and complained of cramp in her arms. About 7 o'clock she appeared rather better, and I went to work for Thomas Leworthy, telling him that I thought my mother was better. Some time in the forenoon, I think about 11 o'clock, John Leworthy, son of Thomas Leworthy, came to me where I was at work in the field, and told me that my mother could not speak. I immediately went home and found that she was speechless, but she lifted her arm. I then went to Thomas Leworthy, and said that my mother was dead. Mr Geare and George Beer were present. My mother was in great distress, and I allowed her to receive my wages, which she took out in milk, butter, and potatoes. I earn sixpence a day and my meat.
Thomas Leworthy, of Berrynarbor, blacksmith. I knew the deceased, ABIGAIL GILL. She resided in the old poor house adjoining the church-yard. I live directly opposite. The house in which the deceased resided was in a shocking condition, and totally unfit for human habitation. I have been below stairs - it was perfectly ruinous. there is neither ceiling nor floor, and deceased must have crossed the joists to reach her bed room. I have heard her on several occasions complain that she had no meat. I knew the deceased was separated from her husband. I also know THOMAS GILL, the son of deceased, who resided with his mother. On Wednesday morning last, about ½ past 4 o'clock, he came to my house and said his mother was bad in her stomach, and asked for a candle and some pepper. He was leaving with it, and I called him back and gave him some brandy. I again saw THOMAS GILL about 6 o'clock, as he was coming out of his door, and in reply to my question as to his mother he said, "She is better." About 7 o'clock I went to my wife and told her to go over and see how poor old "ABB" was, meaning the deceased. My wife did go over and called up to her, but received no answer, except a noise from the mouth. I then sent out for THOMAS GILL, who was in my field at work: he shortly after came in, and went up to see how the deceased was, and returned and said his mother was dead. Mr Geare, the overseer, was passing, and I told him that "ABBY GILL" was in great distress, almost dying, and something ought to be done for her by somebody; to which Mr Geare replied that "he had no more authority than I had, and that if he give a shilling he must give it out of his own pocket; but he would send after a doctor." No medical man attended that I am aware of.
Mr Stoneman, of Ilfracombe, surgeon. - I have, in pursuance of a Coroner's warrant, visited the residence of ABIGAIL GILL, who resided in a house called the poor house, in Berrynarbor, which adjoins the church-yard. I found the deceased upstairs lying on what was once a straw bed on the floor, which no covering but an old red cloak and piece of sheet. I had t cross over the joists to get to her bed room. It was from its ruinous condition unsafe for the Jury to view the body there, and I ordered it to be brought down. The house was totally unfit for any human being to live in. I found the contents of her stomach, consisting of undigested potatoe, lying on the floor before her, and the bed saturated with what had passed from her, which appeared to be simply fluid. I proceeded to make a post-mortem examination, and found all the internal organs, both in the chest and abdomen, in a state of perfect health; the intestines and abdomen loaded with fat, and the body in anything but an emaciated state, which I pointed out to the Jury. The intestines full of serous fluid, and the stomach empty, excepting a small quantity of pepper. The lips and hands of a bluish tint; in other respects the appearance of the body healthy. the heart and large vessels full of uncoagulated blood. From the above appearances, I am of opinion that deceased died from Asiatic Cholera.
Upon this evidence the Jury returned the following verdict:- "That the said ABIGAIL GILL, on the 26th day of September, did labour under a grievous disease of body, to wit, Asiatic Cholera, of which she died; and that the said ABIGAIL GILL had been for 12 months last past residing in the poor house at Berrynarbor, a place totally unfit for any human being to occupy."

Thursday 11 October 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - A case of almost sudden death occurred in Davey's lane, in this town, yesterday (Wednesday), to MRS BETTY BIRD, a very respectable female, wife of WILLIAM BIRD, gardener, formerly serjeant of the North Devon Militia. The deceased had partaken of her dinner, having complained of slight indisposition; but soon after dinner she was seized in a fit of apoplexy, and before medical assistance could be obtained she was a corpse. An Inquest was held on the body, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, this (Thursday) morning, by which a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday 18 October 1849
BRAUNTON - Death by Drowning. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, at the 'Mariner's Arms,' on the body of RICHARD HOPKINS, aged 11 years, who unfortunately fell over a boat the day before and was drowned. It appears the deceased boy's father and a neighbour named Watts, who both resided at Vellator, owned the boat, which being down the Pill, Mr Watts requested the deceased (who had often been in the habit of doing it before) to fetch it up. The deceased went for that purpose, taking with him his brother aged seven years, and his cousin JOHN HOPKINS, who deposed that the deceased was sculling the boat up the pill, when he missed his footing and fell overboard: he rose to the surface of the water several times, but the tide running strong took him out of their reach, so that they could render no assistance. This was about two o'clock in the afternoon. The boat drifted to the shore, when they gave alarm. William Petherick, mariner, on haring that a boy was drowned, went to the pill to render assistance about two hours afterwards, and found the body of deceased, who was quite dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Death by Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the 'Newport Inn,' in this borough, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN SOMERVILLE, of Newport, tailor, aged 29, who had died the preceding Saturday evening. The deceased was employed by the Messrs. Harris, in Holland-street, and went to his work on Saturday morning, as usual. After breakfast, about nine o'clock, he went from the workshop down stairs to fetch an iron for use in his work, when, after he had left the shop a minute or two, his shopmates heard the noise of a fall, and on going down stairs to see what it was they found the deceased on his back on the floor and quite senseless, having fallen backwards from the stairs. Assistance was rendered, and Mr Cooke, surgeon, who happened to be passing near, was in attendance in a few minutes, and found that deceased had sustained severe injury in his head from the fall. He rallied sufficiently to be conveyed home, where, however, he died the same evening, having remained insensible almost from the occurrence of the accident. The surgeon's evidence was to the effect that death arose from concussion of the brain caused by his fall from the stairs to the floor; and a verdict to that effect was returned. Deceased was a steady man, had been for some years in the employ of the Messrs. Harris, and has left three children and his wife near her confinement.

Thursday 25 October 1849
DEVONPORT - Suicide by Poison. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the 'Ordnance Arms Inn,' on the body of JANE BELL, resident in Andrew's lane, the widow of a surgeon in the navy, who died about 18 months since. From the evidence it appeared that since the death of her husband she had led a very dissolute life, associating with the lowest of her sex, and her house had been known as one of ill-fame for some time past. For the week preceding her death she had been intoxicated every day, and talked very wildly, saying that she had nothing but devils about her, that her house was all on fire, with similar incoherencies. On Friday she took down a bottle from some pigeon-holes in the wall of her room, and upon being asked by a neighbour what it contained, she said there was rank mercury enough in it to kill 5,000 people. On Monday last she bought a sheet of paper, and said she was about to write to her sister, in Falmouth, and ask her to come up, for she was very unwell. This sheet of paper was afterwards found in her room, with the words - "Devonport. Dear Sister, I have taken" ----. On Monday, deceased not making her appearance as usual, the neighbours apprehended that something was amiss, and having given information to the police the door was broken open. Deceased was then found in an upstairs room in bed, and partially undressed, in a state of insensibility. The stomach pump was applied, but she died soon afterwards. A bottle marked morphia was found in the room, and a jug containing beer. There was no one in the house but the deceased; the articles of furniture were in a confused state; the staircase strewed with clothes, and in the garret were a quantity of ladies' dresses. Under her pillow was a valuable gold watch and guard-chain. A post mortem examination was made of the body by Mr Joseph May, surgeon, who deposed that the deceased's death was caused by the effects of morphia. On hearing the above evidence the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased had died from the effects of a poison called morphia, taken when in a state of Temporary Insanity. Deceased had, it was stated, upwards of £200 in the Savings' Bank.

Thursday 22 November 1849
BARNSTAPLE - Sad and Fatal Accident. - On Monday morning last, a little boy, seven years of age, called JOHN HERNAMAN, son of MR HERNAMAN, who has lately become the occupier of the grist-mills at Bradiford, in this borough, having wandered unperceived into the mill, and ascended to a platform erected over the mill-wheel, the board on which he was standing tilted over with him, and his leg thereby became entangled in the gear of the mill. His situation was noticed by a little girl, who gave the alarm to a man at work near the spot, who lost no time in turning off the water, and thereby stopped the wheel. The poor boy was quickly extricated; but it was found that his leg was dreadfully crushed, having been drawn round the cogs of the wheel. He was removed with all haste to the North Devon Infirmary, where it was seen that the only hope of saving his life lay in the immediate amputation of the limb, which was promptly performed; but the little sufferer lay in an almost lifeless state, having never rallied, and died the following morning. An Inquest was taken on the body the next day by Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, by which a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 20 December 1849
BRAUNTON - Accidental Death. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE ELLIS, aged four years, who was accidentally burnt to death the day previous. The parents of the deceased live at West Hill. The day before they both left to go to work, leaving their child in the care of a sister, aged 14 years. The jury having viewed the body, which was very much burnt, ANN ELLIS, sister of the deceased, was sworn (the Coroner having first informed her of the nature of an oath), and stated that on the day previous, about half-past twelve, her mother left to go to hr work: a short time after she had occasion to fetch some water: she requested the deceased to go with her, but he refused, and she put him outside of the door, and shut the door. The door did not shut close: sometimes the wind blew it open. When she returned, the deceased was lying on the stone in front of the door, with his clothes nearly all burnt off. She was not away ten minutes. She immediately gave an alarm, when a neighbour came to her assistance. The child lived about two hours. In answer to an enquiry, she stated that this was the second that had been burnt to death that had been left under her care. The Coroner severely reprimanded her, after which the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

TAVISTOCK - On Friday morning last, as the bargemen were proceeding in their barges from Tavistock to Morwellham Quay, they found the body of a man in the canal, quite dead. The body being taken out of the water and conveyed to Tavistock, was recognised to be that of SAMUEL HOLE, a wool-comber, aged about 71, and who resided in Lower Back-street, Tavistock. A Coroner's Inquest was held on view of the body on Saturday last, when a verdict of "Found Drowned" was recorded.

Thursday 27 December 1849
BERRYNARBOR - An Inquest was held here on Monday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of a child named THOMAS BRAGG, aged seven years. It seems that early in the morning the deceased was left alone in a room where a fire was burning, and a person standing at the time a short distance from the house saw flames pouring out of the door way: he immediately ran to the house, and saw a blaze of fire on the stairs, which he ascended, and found the deceased with his clothes on fire. The deceased slipped and fell down stairs, and the witness did all he could to put the fire out; but the injuries received were so severe that the child died on the following morning. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

NORTHAM - An Inquest was held here on Thursday the 20th instant, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a child, named PHILIP DENNIS, aged five years, the son of PHILIP DENNIS, labourer. From the evidence adduced, it appears that on the preceding morning the mother of the child left home to go to a field about a quarter of a mile distant, for the purpose of cutting some cabbage, three children being in the house (in which was a very small fire burning), of whom the deceased was the eldest: she told the deceased, before going away, not to go near the fire, and he said he would not. Very shortly afterwards screams were heard issuing from the house by a neighbour, who ran in and found the child's clothes burning. The flames were immediately extinguished by her wrapping her clothes round the child, and a doctor was sent for, but the child was so much burnt that he died the same evening. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

LITTLEHAM - An Inquest was held in this parish, on Tuesday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., on the body of an infant child named MARY ELIZABETH WATERS WESTACOTT, aged three years. Grace Hookaway deposed that on Saturday last she left the child in her house for a few minutes to go to the house of MR WESTACOTT: when she turned round she saw the child running towards her from the house with her clothes on fire: she immediately caught her up, and put out the flames, which had burnt her so severely about the throat and body that she expired on Monday last. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

TORRINGTON: MERTON - Fatal Accident. - Much regret was occasioned in this town on Monday evening last, by the intelligence that MR ELIAS ASHTON, a highly respectable farmer, of the parish of Merton, formerly a draper, had come to an untimely end by being thrown from his horse. The melancholy particulars appear to be the following. MR ASHTON was riding on the road between Torrington and Merton on the afternoon of Monday, and when near to a place called Addlehole, he was seen by a woman named Harriet Stapleton coming towards her at a very furious pace, the horse appearing to have run away. Presently the horse fell into the hedge-row, and deceased was thrown violently to the ground. the woman ran as fast as she could to get assistance, when fortunately Mr Risdon, surgeon, of Dolton, who was riding in his gig in the same direction, came to the spot, where he found the body of deceased lying in the road. He instantly alighted, and placing his ear to the chest found that deceased did not breathe, and his pulse was very feeble and irregular. He then examined his head, but found no external fracture, only a quantity of blood was flowing from his left ear and nostril. Death occurred almost immediately; and the surgeon stated that there could be no doubt it was occasioned by fracture of the base of the skull caused by the violence of the fall. An Inquest was held on the body the next day (the 25th) by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, before which the above facts were deposed to, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was 37 years of age, and unmarried. [A report very generally prevailed that the person killed was MR ASHTON, draper and auctioneer, of this town: that, however, is a mistake: the unfortunate deceased was a brother to that gentleman.]

Thursday 3 January 1850
HATHERLEIGH - On Monday, an Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of JAMES ELLACOTT, of Merton, who was accidentally killed the night previous by a fall from his horse, a short distance from this place, on his way home to Merton. A verdict of "Accidental Death through Intoxication" was returned. It appears he had been to Okehampton on some business, where (although generally a young man of steady habits) he got very drunk; on his way home he called at the 'New Inn,' and requested some drink, but Mr Trace, observing his condition, very humanely and considerately refused him anything but water; not long after leaving his house, he was again brought back in a senseless state, having been thrown from his horse about 100 yards from the town, and received a mortal blow by a concussion of the brain, which proved fatal about two hours after.

NEWTON ABBOT - Melancholy Death. - On Saturday the 15th instant, T. L. PRINCEPS, Esq., of Bishopsteignton, had been to Newton Abbot, on a visit to his relative, the Rev. John Templer, and left at half-past three to return home, by way of Coombe Sellers, intending to cross the river by boat to Bishopsteignton. The boat had a small sail: MR PRINCEPS left to cross, and it is presumed that about midway on the river he was taken in an apoplectic attack, as about nine at night some fishermen, looking after the herring-nets, discovered the boat drifting, and overhauled it, when they found him a lifeless corpse. The body was taken to an inn at Teignmouth, and an Inquest was held by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner for Devon, when, after an Inquiry, a verdict of "Found Dead" was returned. Had not the fishermen discovered the boat, it would have drifted over the bar, and probably swamped, and the end of the respected gentleman would not have been known.

NORTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - On Tuesday last, an Inquiry was instituted by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner into the death of MRS ANN LOCK, of this place, whose death occurred suddenly under the following circumstances. On Monday the 31st, the deceased desired her daughter, about half-past two o'clock, to go to the bakehouse to know if she could bake: she was then in excellent health and spirits, and was engaged in some domestic occupation. On her daughter's return in about three minutes, deceased was lying on her left side upon the ground before the fire. She was spoken to, but made no reply; and on being shook, she gave no indications of life Assistance was immediately called for, on the arrival of which she was found quite dead. Mr Ley, surgeon, who was sent for immediately, hastened to the house, and on examining the body externally stated as his opinion that death was occasioned by apoplexy; and a verdict to that effect was returned.

Thursday 10 January 1850
Committal of a Farmer and his Wife for Wilful Murder.
BIDEFORD, Tuesday. - Fortunately, the register f crimes and offences committed in our neighbourhood is rarely stained by the entry of one of such startling magnitude as murder, and it will be a source of grief to all that the new year should have been ushered in by so lamentable an event as that chronicled below. The lonely farm-house of Gawland, situate about two miles from the village and in the parish of Buckland Brewer, the property of Robert Curtice Bird, and lately occupied by him, his wife, their four children, and a servant girl named MARY ANN PARSONS, has been the locale of a series of brutal treatment scarcely to be surpassed by the tortures of the inquisition, or the demoralizing punishment of the lash, so prevalent at one time in the army; and to aggravate it, this treatment has been inflicted on a female - a poor unprotected girl in a state of comparative orphanage, by her master and mistress who should have been her protectors. The evidence given today before the Magistrates prior to their committal, and reported at length below, will detail the nature of the injuries. The poor girl died on the morning of Friday last; but public attention was not directed to the subject until Saturday, when "rumour with her busy tongue" had whispered of the unfair death of the girl; and in consequence, a Jury was on that day empanelled to Enquire into the facts and give a verdict thereupon. A respectable Jury, composed of yeomen residing in the immediate neighbourhood of Gawland Farm, sat to institute enquiries, aided by the Deputy Coroner for the County, John Henry Toller, Esq.; when, after the examination of several witnesses, they, by the direction of the Coroner, found an open verdict, to the effect that death occurred from congestion of the brain, related by external injuries, but how or by what means such injuries were caused, there was no evidence to show. [Long, detailed account of the Magistrates investigation into the death of Mary Ann Parsons, which resulted in the Magistrates announcing that they had decided on committing both prisoners to take their trial at the ensuing Exeter Assizes for the Wilful Murder of MARY ANN PARSONS.]

Thursday 24 January 1850
MORETONHAMPSTEAD - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Union Inn,' in this town, before -- Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH EARLE, 19 years of age, an apprentice of Mr Moses Woolland, late of Soncombe Farm, in this parish, who poisoned herself the Tuesday previous, by taking corrosive sublimate. Verdict - Temporary Insanity.

LAPFORD - On Friday morning last, the body of a young man, aged 30, named CHALICE, a native of Lapford, was found drowned in the Basin of the Exeter Canal. The water, with the exception of the end where the deceased was found, was frozen over very hard, and his walking stick was on the ice close by; his hat had caught by the edge of the ice, and frozen to it immediately above where the body was found. The deceased had in his pockets a sum of money amounting to £1 4s. 6d., and the duplicates of two pawnbroker's tickets for coats pledged. CHALICE some short time since became possessed of above one hundred pounds, and for some time he had been staying about in the neighbourhood of Crediton, but had been in Exeter for the last week. An Inquest was held on the body the following day, when a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 31 January 1850
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Saturday last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, a woman called JANE ISAAC, aged 53, wife of ABRAHAM ISAAC, in the employ of Messrs. Arter, of this town, left her house in Back-lane, to go out into her yard, being then in her usual health, when she was observed to fall by a neighbour, who ran to her assistance, and conveyed her back to her dwelling. Medical aid was at hand, but she lay insensible until seven o'clock the same evening, when she died. An Inquest was held n the body before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the following Monday, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned; the opinion of the medical gentlemen being that death arose from a disease of the heart.

Thursday 7 February 1850
NORTHTAWTON - An Enquiry of a painful nature took place on Wednesday, before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM SEWARD, 19 years of age, a servant in the employ of Mr Seward, of Bathe, in this parish. It appeared that Mr Seward came home from Copplestone fair, about eight o'clock on Monday night, and found his servants absent, they being at a neighbouring farm. The deceased, whose duty it was to take care of his master's horse, on being remonstrated with, became very insolent, on which he was told to go home to his father, who resided about half-a-mile distant, for the night; this he did not do, but on the following morning, on another servant going into the yard, he was discovered hanging to a tree in front of the house quite dead. After a lengthened examination, the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

TIVERTON - Inquest. - On Monday, before Francis Mackenzie, Esq., an Inquest was held on the body of a male child, named FOWLER, who was found in Coombe's Mill Leat, the Saturday previous. This is the second which has been drowned there within the last four months, through the carelessness of the landlord, Mr Williams. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned" with a request to the Coroner to forward Mr W. a letter on the necessity of erecting a proper fence.

Thursday 14 February 1850
TIVERTON - Sudden Death. - On Tuesday last a striking instance of the uncertainty of life occurred in the sudden death of a young man of the name of JAMES SKINNER, a painter, aged about 24 years, whose death took place in the yard of the 'White Ball Inn,' on the morning of that day. An Inquest was held on Wednesday evening, before Frederick Mackenzie, Esq., and a respectable Jury, when it appeared from the evidence that the deceased had been unwell for a week or two previous, but not seriously so. On the day in question, being market day, he had been assisting his father, who was ostler at the 'White Ball,' and felling suddenly ill, had retired and lay down, and almost instantly expired. At the desire of some of the Jury, the Coroner adjourned the Inquiry in order that a post mortem examination might be made of the body.

WITHERIDGE - A man named SOUTHCOTE, well known as a carrier between Witheridge and Exeter, put a period to his existence on Thursday last. He had loaded his cart ready to leave for Exeter, when some words arose between him and some member of his family; he went directly into the stable, and hung himself. An Inquest was held on Friday, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Thursday 7 March 1850
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Sunday last, a youth named GEORGE BEER, whilst at work at the Anthracite mines, fell into the mouth of the shaft to the bottom, a depth of about 200 feet. He was missed directly afterwards: his hat was seen going down the shaft by a workman from the adit level, and directly afterwards the boy was seen following: he was found at the bottom of the shaft quite dead. Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body on Monday, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death". It was stated by the captain of the mines that it was necessary for the safety of the mines that the water should be cleared therefrom to a certain extent on Sundays as well as other days, and that the boy's duty was to attend the horse in drawing such water, and it was supposed he went to the mouth of the shaft to inform the men below the time of the day when he slipped in.

Thursday 21 March 1850
PLYMOUTH - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Stonehouse, on the body of MR GUY BURTON, a superannuated excise officer, aged 65 years. From the evidence it appeared that the unfortunate man had for many years been addicted to intemperance, and it was clear his mind was disordered. On the evening of Saturday last, whilst some members of the family with whom he resided were in the kitchen adjoining the court, they heard a great noise, described by one of the witnesses "as if part of the house had fallen." On their proceeding into the court to ascertain the cause, they discovered the deceased lying across a large tub which he had overset in his descent from the garret window, from which he had precipitated himself. Dr Sheppard was instantly sent for, but human efforts were of no avail, as he died immediately after the fall. On close examination of the body it was found that no bones were broken, though the height from which he fell is about 30 feet. The Coroner summed up, and the very respectable Jury, Mr Thomas Blackwell being foreman, returned a verdict - "That JONATHAN GUY BURTON came by his death in consequence of throwing himself out of the garret window of the house No. 75 Union-street, Stonehouse, and that the said JONATHAN GUY BURTON was of Unsound Mind when he committed the fatal act."

Thursday 28 March 1850
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday morning last, MRS JANE BALE, aged 46, wife of MR WILLIAM BALE, joiner and bellhanger, of Holland-street, in this town, died after an illness of but a few days. In consequence of reports which came to the ears of the Coroner, Alfred Drake, Esq., he thought it his duty to hold an Inquiry into the cause of death, and a respectable Jury was therefore empannelled, of which Mr Walkingame Tatham was foreman, which sat upon the body on Tuesday afternoon, at the 'Golden Anchor' Inn.
Evidence was given that deceased was seized with what was thought to be an epileptic fit on Thursday morning, from which after a while she appeared to rally; but convulsions came on at a later period of the day, which recurred frequently and with additional violence up to the time of her death. Mr Robert Oatway, tailor, an opposite neighbour of deceased, gave evidence that she was at his house on Wednesday, when she said that her husband and she had quarrelled, and that he had struck her a blow in the head, in which she complained of much pain. The wife of the last witness, who happened to be at the house of deceased when the misunderstanding with her husband occurred, on being told by the Coroner that it was her bounden duty to tell all she knew about the matter, stated that deceased was sitting on a chair by the fire at the time, with a baby in her arms. Her husband struck her thrice; once with each hand on each side of the head, and once on the shoulders. Deceased immediately ejaculated, "My God! my God!" and desired witness to hold the child, when, taking up a poker, she flung it at her husband, and ran upstairs. MR BALE was about to follow, but witness held him back, and the quarrel ended. Witness thought the blows were rather severe. Should not like to speak positively as to whether it was with the fist or open hand that the blows were struck, but was inclined to think with the latter. Witness had attended MRS BALE from the time of her being unwell at first to her death, with some short intermissions. She complained of pain in her head. She made use of no food, and the convulsions were violent and succeeded each other rapidly. Dr Newbolt had at first attended deceased, but on Saturday and Sunday Mr Cooke had visited her.
At the request of the Jury Mr Cooke was sent for, and gave it as his opinion that deceased died of convulsions; but the Jury considering it necessary that a post mortem examination should be made of the body, the Inquest was adjourned for that purpose to the next day.
On Wednesday morning at ten o'clock the Jury re-assembled, when Mr Cooke gave evidence to the following effect:
"In the presence of Mr Parker, surgeon, I have made a post mortem examination of the body of JANE BALE. I found no external marks of injury on the head of deceased. The scalp was perfectly healthy; and there was no fracture of the skull. On moving the skull I found a great congestion of the surface of the brain, and on opening the membranes a large effusion of blood on the left hemisphere of the brain forming a coagulum of upwards of four inches in extent. This coagulum produced great compression on the brain. The substance of the brain was perfectly healthy. The effusion of blood on the brain produced convulsions, and was the cause of death."
By Mr Aldham, one of the Jury: The coagulum measured four inches longitudinally, but it was rather more than three inches in breadth. The rupture of a vessel of the brain might be caused by a blow, and yet it is possible that there would be no external marks: if the vessels were congested, a blow would be more likely to cause a rupture.
Examination continued: I cannot say whether the blow in the head given by MR BALE to deceased caused the effusion; it might, and might not.
By Mr Arnold: Persons dying from apoplexy would have an effusion of blood on the brain, but not, in general, to the extent of the present case. This was a case of convulsions, not of apoplexy; if the latter had been the cause f death, the effusion would have been more circumscribed; in this instance the effusion was very extensive.
By Mr Aldham: The skull was unusually thick; it would have taken a very hard blow to have fractured it; but if the skull resisted a blow, concussion was most likely to be the consequence.
Mr Parker corroborated Mr Cooke's evidence.
A neighbour voluntarily came forward and said that deceased, in conversation with her, alluded to the assault by her husband, but said it had not hurt her. The Jury returned an Open Verdict, to the effect that death had resulted from convulsions caused by a compression on the brain. The Jurymen desired their Foreman to present the fees to which they were entitled to the children of deceased. [Perhaps it is due to her husband to say that the habits of deceased were unfortunately such as very much to extenuate any violence towards her to which he might have been provoked.]

Thursday 4 April 1850
DEVONPORT - Crime and Suicide. - An Inquest was held last week, at Devonport, on the body of a naval pensioner, named THOMAS WEDLOCK; who committed suicide under very shocking circumstances. the deceased resided with his wife in a house in Mount-street, with several other families; and on Wednesday a woman named Pearn, one of the lodgers, hearing a child cry out, proceeded to the deceased's bed-room. She knocked for admittance but was refused, and on her threatening to break open the door he opened it. A little girl, named Harriet Halls, aged twelve, then came out, with her face dreadfully swollen and blackened, the result of tying a towel on her mouth. The child was then examined, and from appearances it was evident that the deceased had made a criminal attempt on the child. A policeman was sent for, but before his arrival the deceased had completely severed his windpipe with a razor, and was quite dead. the Jury returned a verdict of Felo de Se.

Thursday 25 April 1850
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquests. - An Inquest was held at one o'clock on Saturday last, at the Litchdon Almshouses, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, (Mr Byron Aldham, foreman,) on the body of ELIZABETH GREEN, an inmate of those "Pleasant seats for the reduced and old, A merchant's gift," who had numbered three score and ten years, and had suddenly expired at an early hour in the morning of that day. Mrs Mary Harvey, living in the same house with deceased, deposed that for some time she had been ailing, but that on Sunday she was well enough to go to the fish-market for the purpose of purchasing a mackerel for her dinner: on her return she complained that the "smell of fish had quite turned her stomach," and seemed very much indisposed; but on Monday, a neighbour having purchased a mackerel for her, she ate a portion of it, and was again worse. She continued ill throughout the week, but on Friday, to all appearance, was much better, and went to bed at an early hour of the evening in excellent spirits. The bed in which witness slept was in the same room, and very near to that occupied by deceased. About one o'clock the next (Saturday) morning, witness heard deceased making a strange noise. She had been in the habit of doing this before, and witness had been accustomed on such occasions to put her hand out and awaken deceased from her sleep. On this occasion she took hold of deceased's hand, but finding she could not awaken her she became alarmed, and procured assistance, when it was found that deceased had expired. Mrs Sally Griffiths and Priscilla Hamlyn deposed to a similar effect, and the Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

BARNSTAPLE - At five o'clock in the afternoon of the same day, an Enquiry was instituted at the 'Bee-hive' public-house, in Green-lane, by Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John Evans was foreman, into the circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH MARCH, aged 53, who had expired somewhat suddenly about eleven o'clock that day. The deceased was well known in the town and neighbourhood as an itinerant vendor of earthenware; was unfortunately in the habit of taking "a drop too much"; but was, nevertheless, a quiet, inoffensive man. The evidence of the different witnesses showed the following facts. Deceased had set out into the country in the early part of the week before last, to pursue his wonted avocation, and returned about two o'clock in the afternoon of Sunday the 14th, rather the worse for liquor: he complained of illness, brought on (as he supposed) by an exposure of two or three nights to the open air; but in consequence of his having failed to bring home any money, a quarrel ensued between him and his wife, which ended , if not in blows, in throwing missiles at each other, much damage being sustained in the affray by the "crockery" of the house. On the following days deceased got worse, took certain powders prescribed for him, and on the morning of Saturday, after being carried from the downstair to the upstair room, expired in ten minutes after his removal. The deceased's wife and son, the only inmates of the house, deposed to these facts, while other witnesses detailed the high words and noise heard on Sunday afternoon, and described the frequent and violent quarrels between deceased and his wife, often ending in blows. Under these circumstances, the Jury were unanimously of opinion that a post mortem examination of the body should take place; and the Coroner having promised that it should be made forthwith, the Jury adjourned to the following Monday morning. Mr Thomas Sheppard Law, surgeon, gave the following evidence:- "By order of the Borough Coroner, and assisted by Mr Morgan, from the North Devon Infirmary, I proceeded yesterday to make a post mortem examination of the body of JOSEPH MARCH. The external appearance of the body was as usual, after the period which had elapsed from the death of deceased. On opening the chest, I found the left lung inflamed, and the right one excessively so; the latter was passing into a stage of abscess. The heart and blood-vessels were healthy, the liver engorged, and the stomach slightly congested. For the satisfaction of the Jury I applied several tests to the contents of the stomach, but found nothing deleterious. Death unquestionably ensued from inflammation of the lungs." This evidence immediately set all doubts at rest, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Inflammation of the Lungs."

Thursday 2 May 1850
BUCKLAND BREWER - Melancholy Death. - On Tuesday the 23rd April, as MR WM. JOHNS, butcher, of Tythecott, and his wife, were preparing to go to Bideford Market, they missed their son, a little boy about four or five years of age, whom they intended to take with them, but supposing that he had gone on the road before them they proceeded to Bideford. Not having overtaken him on the road, nor found him in Bideford, they then supposed that he had gone to some neighbour's house at Tythecott, and not being at all uneasy respecting him they remained at Bideford for the night, and returned to Tythecott the following morning, when, upon making inquiries for, but obtaining no intelligence of their missing child, their fears respecting his fate were for the first time aroused. After making diligent search at the neighbours' houses, and in the neighbourhood, without effect, it occurred to some to search among the ruins of a wall which had been thrown down by masons at Tythecott mill on the previous day; where, after a short search, they succeeded in extricating the mangled remains of the poor child. It is supposed that being near the spot while the workmen were inside the wall endeavouring to push it down, and hearing the noise, the poor boy was induced to go up to the spot at the moment the wall was falling, and there met with the fatal accident unperceived and unheard. An Enquiry into the circumstances took place on the 25th inst., before John Henry Toller Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, Mr Thos. Glass, foreman, when a verdict in accordance with the above facts was immediately returned.

FILLEIGH - Inquest. - A case of sudden death, it is to be feared from drunkenness, occurred in this parish on Saturday night last, to a man named JOHN STAPLETON, a married man, but without family, who was employed as a labourer on the farm at Castle Hill. Deceased had been at a public-house at Leary on Saturday evening, and did not return home at night. Next morning (Sunday) his body was found lying upon its face in a ditch, about eight feet deep, and containing six or eight inches of mud and water, situate at a corner of the road which deceased would have to pass on his way home, by Winslade Quarry-pit. His hook, with which he had been employed in cutting wood, was lying by the edge of the pit. He had been met about a quarter of a mile from the quarry on Saturday night, between eight and nine, and at that time, in the opinion of the witness, was quite sober. Mr Parker, of Barnstaple, was called in, by direction of the Coroner, to make a post mortem examination of the body, and pronounced the cause of death to have been effusion of blood on the brain, and, in the absence of any evidence as to how he came into the pit, a verdict to that effect was returned by the Jury which sat on the body on Monday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner.

Thursday 9 May 1850
SOUTHMOLTON - Death by Burning. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of MARY ANN GREENSLADE, aged 11 years, who, being in a house by herself the same morning, about eight o'clock, accidentally caught her clothes on fire, and ran into the adjoining house enveloped in flames. The whole of her clothes were burnt to a cinder, and, before the flames could be extinguished, the sufferer was burnt in so dreadful a manner that she survived but eight hours. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 16 May 1850
SWIMBRIDGE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury (of which Mr Wm. Chapple was foreman) on the body of MR THOMAS COURTENAY, farmer, aged 55, who had died suddenly the day before, while he was driving his horse and cart in the road near Denniton, in this parish. No one was with him at the time; but a man called Robert Muxworthy, who was on his way home from work, found him lying in the road quite dead, with the horse and cart by his side. Mr Joce, of Barnstaple, surgeon, gave evidence before the Jury, that he had attended deceased in an attack of apoplexy, from which he had never fully recovered; and a post mortem examination had satisfied him that his death had resulted from a recurrence of that disease. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 23 May 1850
LANDKEY - Fatal Mail Accident. - On Saturday morning last, as the mail coach was on its way to this town, on passing through the village of Landkey Newland, a child ran out into the road just before the horses. Some persons who were standing by, and saw the little creature's danger, called out to him, as did also the coachman, who was not driving above his usual rate, and who tried to pull up his horses, but ineffectually - they knocked him down, and the off-wheel passed over him. The guard instantly dismounted and picked up the child, but he had sustained such severe injuries that he survived but a minute or two. The little fellow's name was JOHN COTTLE, son of a labourer of that name in the village, and his age was four years. An Inquest was held on the body the same day before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable jury, of which Mr Thomas Gould was foreman. Evidence of the accident was given, particularly by Mr George Westacott, who witnessed the whole of it, and who altogether acquitted the coachman of blame. Indeed, any one who knows the steadiness as well as the kindness of heart which belongs to Mr Thomas Westcombe (the well known driver of the mail) will need no proof that the occurrence was the result of an accident which no want of care on his part precipitated, and which no exertion of his could prevent, and that no person can regret so much as himself that he should be the unintentional cause of so sad a calamity. The Jury were perfectly satisfied on the point; and returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The case was peculiarly afflictive to the child's parents, who have lost no less than three children within the last two months from scarlet fever, and a fifth not many months ago by accidental burning; so that they are now left with but one out of a family of six children.

BRADWORTHY - Death by Burning. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held in this parish, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of SARAH GARRY, aged 4 ¾ years, daughter of a labourer, who, being in the house of her grandmother the Monday before, went with her to milk Mr Tremeer's cows; but while her grandmother was so employed, she missed the child, and presently was alarmed by her screams, and saw her coming out of the house with her clothes in a blaze. She extinguished the flames; but the little sufferer was so severely burnt that she survived but 24 hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 30 May 1850
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday the 29th inst., an Inquest was held at the 'Torridge Inn,' in this town, before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of JOHN BRANCH, who had met an untimely end on the day previous, while working in a quarry about half a mile from the town, the property of Mr E. M. White, builder. It appeared that on the day of the fatal occurrence the deceased, who was a labourer in the employ of Mr White, was digging stones in the Quarry alluded to, when a large stone fell from its side suddenly and knocked him down, and before he could rise again a great quantity of stones and earth (loosened, it is believed, by the late heavy rains) gave way, and falling to the ground with a tremendous crash completely buried him. A woman named Sarah Robins, who was in a wood adjoining the quarry, saw the accident; and assistance having been obtained the body of the unfortunate man was dug out. Two medical men, Thomas M. Smith, Esq., and Charles C. Turner, Esq., were promptly in attendance; but life was quite extinct. the Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from suffocation. Poor BRANCH has left a wife and one child to mourn their loss. Mr White, who observed BRANCH the same morning digging near the projecting mass, warned him of his danger.

POWDERHAM - Fatal Accident at Powderham Saw Mills. - On Thursday last, during the temporary absence of the workmen engaged at the above mills, in the occupation of Mr Wolland, a little boy, nine years of age, named ROBERT STADDON, took up a hook and placed it against the grindstone, which is worked by a water-wheel, when, unfortunately, his apron became entangled in the shaft, and in one minute he was a mangled corpse. On Friday an Inquest was held on the body before Frederick Leigh, Esq., Coroner, at the 'Devon Arms,' Kenton, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. No blame whatever is attached to Mr Wolland, the proprietor of the mills, who has adopted the suggestion of the Coroner, and had the grindstone fenced round, whereby a repetition of such an unfortunate occurrence is prevented.

Thursday 6 June 1850
APPLEDORE - On Monday afternoon, during the absence of his mother, who had just left him to go into the garden, a little boy, a year and half old, son of a labourer named SAMUEL MOUNCE, residing at Five Elms, near this place, fell into a well, and was drowned. The Coroner at the Inquest found great fault with the proprietor of the well for its dangerous state, and ordered it to be made secure.

ST MARY'S CLIST - Fatal Accident by Drowning. - On Sunday morning two of the sons of MR PIDSLEY, farmer, of St. Mary's Clist, accompanied by a servant man, left home for the purpose of bathing. The three had been in the water near Newcourt, and were dressing to return home, when the younger of the two PIDSLEYS, a youth about 14 years of age, returned for "another dip." He had not been in long when getting out of his depth he called for help, but his companions thinking he was joking unfortunately took no notice, and in a very short time the poor boy sank to rise no more. An Inquest was held on Monday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 4 July 1850
PLYMOUTH - Awfully Sudden Death. - Mr Edmonds held an Inquest on Thursday at the Guildhall; upon the body of a young woman, named CHARLOTTE LEWIS, who met with her death in a very singular manner. It appeared from the evidence of a woman, living in the same house with the deceased, in Richmond-street, that on the forenoon of Saturday last she went into the court-yard, and accidentally fell; when she arose she felt sick, and her eye was blackened from a blow which she received in her fall; she was taken into the witness's room, and, after a while, seemed to recover a little, and was able to take a cup of coffee; she then lay down on a bed in the room, and in a short time sat suddenly up, uttered a piercing scream, and fell back upon the bed. She never spoke again, but died instantly, and before any surgical assistance could be procured.

Thursday 11 July 1850
MESHAW - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of LEAH ALLEN, daughter of RICHARD ALLEN, labourer, of the parish of Meshaw. The deceased was one of twins, six months old, and slept with an older sister, who got up on Sunday morning, leaving the infant in bed: some time after she went upstairs, and took up the child's hand and kissed it; but, observing an unusual appearance about her countenance, she called her father, who found the child was dead. On examination of the body, one side of it was found much discoloured, which led to the conclusion that the sister had overlaid it, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

Thursday 18 July 1850
SWYMBRIDGE - A Father Accidentally Killed by his Child. - On the evening of Saturday last, as a man called WILLIAM YEO, who followed the occupation of a ratcatcher, and resided at Yolland, in this parish, had just returned with his gun, having been shooting small birds, and had arrived near to his own house, where he stood talking with Mr John Yeo, (brother to Mrs Eastman, of Yolland House,) his little boy, who is blind, and aged about nine years, came to the spot where his father was standing, and began feeling about as blind persons often do, which MR YEO perceived, and told him once or twice to go away; but the poor little fellow did not regard the order, but continued feeling about, and at last, while his father and his friend were in conversation, and not heeding what the boy was doing, he got hold of the gun, which had been incautiously left cocked, and which the father was leaning upon and holding it by the muzzle, and having felt about by the trigger he pulled it, and the piece discharged, lodging its contents in the father's head, demolishing the frontal bone, and causing some portion of the brain to protrude. The poor fellow fell to the ground, and Mr Yeo ran immediately to procure assistance, Mr Hurden, surgeon, arrived very shortly, and the deceased was conveyed home, but with faint signs of life. He breathed once or twice after Mr Hurden's arrival, but never spoke, and died within half an hour of the occurrence. He was aged 53. The poor child, who was the unintending cause f the sad casualty, was, of course, greatly distressed at what he had done, which has deprived him and several other children of their earthly support, and left them and a widow in very destitute circumstances. An Inquest was held on the body before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of "Death by Misadventure" returned.

BRIXHAM - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the 'London Hotel,' in this town, on the body of JOHN ARTHUR. From the evidence adduced, it appeared that on Thursday, about half past eight o'clock in the morning, the deceased was in the New-road, with another man, by the name of Elliot, with whom he was walking towards the Quay. Hearing a horse and cart coming behind them at a very rapid rate, they turned very quickly round and perceived that there was no driver, and that the horse had apparently run away. Elliot and deceased then attempted to stop the horse by waiving their hats, but failing in this the deceased ran towards the vehicle to catch hold of the horse, but was loudly called to be Elliot not to attempt it; regardless, however, of the friendly warning, he seized the horse's head, but not being able to retain his hold, the horse continuing to dash forward, and the front of the cart striking him violently, he was knocked a distance of several feet, and fell heavily on the ground. Elliot immediately went to his assistance, when deceased breathed hardly, and on being lifted up said that "the wind had been knocked out of him," and called for a chair, and asked for a drop of spirit, saying he should get better again shortly. His face was much cut, and he lost much blood from the wound. He soon afterwards appeared to faint, and was carried home and died in about ten minutes.

EXETER - Melancholy Occurrence. - MR WILLIAM POWNING was missed from his residence in South-street, on Tuesday, which greatly alarmed his friends: search was made for him, but without effect, till Saturday afternoon, when his body was found in Duck's Leat, near Salmon Pool. An Inquest was held, at the 'Black Lion Inn,' the same evening, before Mr Warren, the City Coroner, which was adjourned till Monday morning, in consequence of the non-attendance of material witnesses. The result was a verdict of "Found Drowned," there being no evidence to prove to the Jury by what means the body came into the water. The deceased was about 52 years of age, a very inoffensive person; but he had, for a long period, been subject to melancholy, and was of rather eccentric habits.

Thursday 1 August 1850
EXETER - Dreadful Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Biggs's 'Ship Inn,' Heavitree, on Wednesday evening last, on the body of HENRY BULL, a labourer employed on the parish roads, who was found dead in a room in his cottage, at Wonford, on Tuesday, about one o'clock. He was lying on his back with a most frightful gash across his throat, nearly severing the head from the body: there was a bloody razor on the ledge of the window, near a looking glass. It appeared, from the evidence, that the deceased was last seen alive on Monday, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, and that, from his not being observed to go out on Tuesday morning suspicion was excited, when the door was forced open by a neighbour, and the horrid spectacle presented itself; he had attempted to commit a similar act 13 years since, and had from that time been sullen, reserved, and dejected, but attended to his work regularly; he had been unwell for two or three weeks, and had been taking much medicine, but he appeared on Monday just as usual, and on Sunday evening, had a quart of cider at the public-house, in the village, which he took home; he lived alone, being a widower, with six children grown up, who had not resided with him for a long period. the Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict, "that HENRY BULL destroyed himself, being at the time in a state of Temporary Insanity."

CREDITON - Death by Drowning. - On Monday morning, at Sandford, near this town, the wife of MR EDWARD MILMAN was found drowned in Sandford Town Mill Pond. It appears that she had not lived on very friendly terms with her husband. She was about 55 years old, and he was much younger. When he married her she was widow of the late MR PICKETT, who used to keep the 'Lamb Inn,' in Sandford. On Monday she got out of bed about five o'clock in the morning, and her husband thought she was about to get him a cup of tea, but soon afterwards, a labourer was passing the mill pond, which is very near the town, and saw a woman's bonnet and shawl lying on the bank; he immediately gave an alarm, and the body of the unfortunate woman was taken out of the water. She has left no children. An Inquest was held on the body on Tuesday, and the Jury returned a verdict of 'Found Drowned.'

Thursday 22 August 1850
BURRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - On Friday a shocking accident occurred to a lad named JAMES TURNER, about 15 or 16 years of age, farm servant to Mr John Cole, West Ellscott, Burrington. As the poor fellow was returning from Bideford, with a cart load of lime, drawn by one horse, in company with his master's son and another lad, the former driving a waggon and two horses and the latter a cart and one horse, also laden with lime, the lad TURNER being between them, on descending the steep hill near Huntshaw water, part of his horse's harness broke, and the cart was impelled forward on the horse, which had thus been deprived of the support of a most essential part in descending with a load, and stepping on the heel of the lad, who was walking by his side, threw him down on his face. The wheel passed over his back and head, which was literally crushed, the brain being forced through his ears, and causing instant death. The remains of the unfortunate lad presented a shocking spectacle. An Inquest was held next day, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Sunday last, a little boy named SAMUEL RICHARDS, aged nine years, son of PHILIP RICHARDS, boatman, was found drowned lying in our river, between a barge and the wharf near Mr Water's shipbuilding-yard on the east side. He left his father's house in the afternoon, but not returning at his usual time, immediate search was made for him, which resulted in his discover, about 10 p.m., in the position before described. As the part f the river in which the unfortunate boy lay could not have been above his depth at the time of the accident, it is conjectured that in jumping from the quay to the boat he fell, stunned himself, and was drowned. This opinion was confirmed by the appearance of a bruise on his forehead. An Inquest was held on the following day before Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict was given in accordance with the above facts.

Thursday 5 September 1850
UPLYME - A Child Poisoned by its Mother by Mistake. - An Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the 26th ult., at Uplyme, on a female child, aged five weeks, daughter of ROBERT FOWLER, and RHODA, his wife, who died on the 24th inst., from the effects of narcotic poison having been administered to it by its mother, on Friday last. By the evidence adduced at the Inquest it appeared that on the evening of Friday, the 23rd August, about five o'clock, the deceased child being very restless, and having a rash on its body, the mother went into the garden and picked two poppy-heads, and having boiled them in water, with some flowers of the marigold, she gave the child nearly a tablespoon full of the liquid, with the view of putting it to sleep. An hour after, the child did fall asleep, and slept until 8 o'clock, when it woke up and appeared in a fit. Being alarmed, she called in a neighbour, and they put the child's feet into warm water, and bathed its face, but not getting any better about 11 o'clock at night, medical assistance was procured, but not until the liquid had been absorbed into the system, and consequently the child died early on Saturday morning. The Jury, after a lengthened enquiry, returned a verdict that the deceased had died from narcotic poison, administered by the mother, but of the fatal quality of which she was ignorant. From the enquiries made by the Coroner, it appeared that this decoction of poppyheads is in much repute among the inhabitants of Uplyme. The Coroner reprehended the use of such a poisonous liquid, and intimated that if any further deaths occurred from its use ignorance of its destructive qualities would not avail the parties administering it, with so fatal an example before their eyes.

Thursday 19 September 1850
STOCKLEIGH POMEROY - An awful instance of sudden death occurred at Stockleigh Pomeroy on Friday last. It appears that while MR WEBBER, a farmer of that parish, was going over his grounds to examine his flock of sheep, he fell suddenly to the ground and expired. The deceased was much respected, and his sudden death has caused great regret. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God," was returned at the Coroner's Inquest.

MARWOOD - An Inquest was held on Monday last at Guineaford Pool, in the parish of Marwood, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner for the county, on the body of ANN HILL, an aged woman, who had been accidentally burnt to death on the preceding Saturday. The daughter-in-law of deceased had called at her house about seven o'clock in the evening of that day, found her sitting by the fire, and after a stay of a few minutes left her there, apparently in her usual health. In about half an hour deceased's son, CHARLES HILL, went to see her, and on arriving at the kitchen door found deceased on her knees in front of the grate, with her head resting on the top bar. Her clothes were on fire, and her face was much burnt. On examination she was found to be quite dead. The inference was that she had been seized by a fit, and had fallen into the fire; but in the absence of any conclusive evidence, the Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death by Burning."

Thursday 26 September 1850
BRAUNTON - Sudden Death. - On Tuesday last a court of Enquiry was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ANN PERRIN, wife of JOHN PERRIN, labourer. On the previous evening the deceased had just entered her house from the garden, had partaken of some broth from a bason, and was proceeding across the room for the purpose (as she expressed herself to a person named Ann Parker, who was present) of getting her husband's supper, when she fell down insensible. She was immediately raised up, and medical assistance sent for: some time elapsed before its arrival, when it was found the vital spark had fled. Mr Pick, surgeon, gave his opinion that deceased died of an attack of apoplexy.

Thursday 3 October 1850
SHILLINGFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday, an Inquest was held at Shillingford, near Exeter, before Frederick Leigh, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS PAUL, a labourer. The case was a very unfortunate one. The deceased was a servant to Mr William Lear, of that parish, and was sent to Starcross soon after eleven o'clock on Monday with a load of cider, and to bring back some empty hogsheads. He was not seen by any one of the family till Monday afternoon, and then Mr Richard Lear saw a cart pass the field in which he was working, and on coming out to leave work, saw the cart in the road. It had been upset, and the deceased was lying near the cart dead. An empty cask, weighing 60 or 70 lbs., was lying on his breast. The road where the accident happened was very hilly. The deceased has left a widow and three young children to lament their loss. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Inquests at Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the 'Sawyer's Arms,' Preston Street, on Friday, before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, on a child, aged five months, the daughter of a person named STATT, who was found dead by its mother's side that morning. Mr Kempe, surgeon, had attended it for diarrhoea, but thought it was getting better. He could not account for its death. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

EXETER - An Inquest was held on Saturday at the Valiant Soldier, Magdalen-street, before the same gentleman, on the body of JOHN GODFREY, a lad aged 15, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital between nine and ten that morning. He was an errand boy in the employ of Mr Moxey, boot and shoe maker, New Bridge-street, and on the 7th inst., whilst running down Fore-street Hill, with a carving knife in his hand, he fell, and in trying to save himself divided one of the principal arteries in his right leg. The haemorrhage was excessive; he was taken to the Hospital, where Mr Delagarde attended him, and with great skill took up the divided vessel, but mortification subsequently struck to it, and resulted in his death. Mr Delagarde said that had the boy lost even a wine-glassful more blood, he would have died on the spot where he received the injury. The Jury returned a Verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Death by Drowning at Exeter. - An Inquest will be held today (Wednesday), at Powsland's 'Haven Banks Inn,' on the body of CAPTAIN COARK, of the brig 'John Peat,' now lying in the basin. We gather the following particulars respecting the melancholy occurrence:- It appears that on Monday the vessel was moored just below the first draw-bridge of the Canal; in the evening about eight o'clock, the Captain took tea with his wife, who was on board, shortly after which the unfortunate man said he should go ashore for half an hour, and accordingly went. On leaving the ship, it is supposed he proceeded to the public-house hard by in safety; but on arriving there he found the door closed, and immediately retraced his steps towards the vessel, which, alas! he never again reached. The night was dark; and from the fact of there being no light, nor a proper protection, it is conjectured that the poor fellow, instead of crossing the bridge, walked directly over the pier into the canal. This was between nine and ten o'clock. An alarm was instantly raised, and, notwithstanding that assistance was speedily rendered, the body of the ill-fated man was not recovered until nearly twelve o'clock that night.

Thursday 17 October 1850
LYNTON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held here on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of MARY VENN, aged 17, parish apprentice in the family of Mr William Crook, of the 'Crown' Hotel, who had died under rather remarkable circumstances. For a week prior to her death she had been the only servant in the house. She had lately had scarlet fever, for which she was attended by Mr Clarke. From this she recovered about a fortnight since, and immediately resumed her out-door work, milking cows in the open fields twice a day. She made no great complaint except that of being very weak, until the night before her death. On that night (Thursday last) she went to bed, apparently in good health, at nine o'clock. At 10 she called her mistress, and complained of being very ill. Mrs Crook thought that she had eaten something that had disagreed with her, and gave her some salts and senna: she continued to get worse, and at two o'clock on Friday morning Mr Clarke was fetched. He gave her some medicine, and left more to be taken every two or three hours. Mr and Mrs Crook went to bed, and left the girl, and on visiting her again at half past three they found her dead! The surgeon (Mr Clarke) being unable to determine what was the cause of death, the Coroner directed a post mortem examination, which disclosed that the girl had died from dropsy of the chest, and a verdict of "Natural Death" was returned. It is to be feared that death was accelerated by exposure during the convalescence of scarlatina.

Thursday 7 November 1850
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury of which Mr Aldham was foreman, at one of the almshouses in Church-lane, on the body of MARY HARDING, an inmate, aged 60. Deceased had complained of indisposition for a long period, but on the day of her death appeared to be in the enjoyment of excellent health - so much so as t excite the observation of her neighbours. About four o'clock in the afternoon, being alone in her house, she was found sitting in her chair with her head resting on the table in a state of insensibility, and before she could be removed upstairs she expired. A verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

BARNSTAPLE - A Child Killed by an Overdose of Narcotic Poison. - We regret to have to record an instance of the fatal effects - on the one hand, of druggists not exercising sufficient care in dispensing and vending drugs of a deleterious nature, and on the other, of the dreadful and dangerous practice, so prevalent among the working classes, of mothers accustoming their offspring to noxious doses, for the purpose of quieting them to rest, and thereby permitting their parents to be free for other engagements - a practice, we are afraid, exceedingly common, and which, if not often productive of immediately fatal consequences, as in the present instance, must in numerous cases lay the foundation of delicacy in future life, and probably induce premature decline and decay. We trust the records of the following case will have the effect of opening the eyes of mothers to the wickedness of this insidious custom; as well as of inculcating on dealers in these deadly mixtures the necessity of extreme caution in dispensing and supplying them.
On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Union Inn,' Derby, in this town, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John Walkingame Tatham was foreman, on the body of an infant child, six weeks old, son of a shipwright called BRENT, living in Union-street, Derby, who had died that morning from the effect of a narcotic draught administered by his mother the day before. The Jury first proceeded to view the body, which presented no unusual appearance. The mother of deceased having been sworn, and accommodated with a chair, made the following statement:- The deceased, CHARLES EDWARD BRENT, was my child, and was born six weeks ago last Thursday. About half-past seven yesterday evening he was very cross - indeed, there was no peace at all with him; and having previously given him, in doses of three parts of a teaspoonful, two pennyworth of Godfrey's Cordial, which I purchased at Mr Tatham's, I determined to procure some more that he might be quieted. On my way towards the chemist's shop, I called on Mrs Hammett, a neighbour, and Ellen Cawsey was there. The latter is a young married woman, and has one child. I told them I was going to purchase a pennyworth of Godfrey's Cordial, when Ellen Cawsey mentioned that Mr Weeks's stuff was much better than Mr Tatham's - that it was more composing, and quieted the child directly; so, after this recommendation, I went to Mr Weeks's. A lad called Stevens in the shop came to attend me, but Mr Weeks himself gave me the mixture. It was one pennyworth, and was taken from three bottles. Mr Weeks asked the age of the child and I told him. I also asked how much of the mixture I was to give, and he told me, "One small teaspoonful." On returning home I poured out three parts of a spoonful only, mixed it with a little warm water and sugar, and the baby sucked it in readily. This was some time after seven, I think. Soon afterwards I went to a neighbour's house, taking care to wrap the baby up in a thick, warm shawl, and placed him in her cradle, where I left him for an hour and a half, or perhaps two hours. When I came to look at him, he was perspiring profusely, which I considered was caused by covering him up so warmly; but he shortly afterwards made a noise in his throat, which alarmed me again. I said to a neighbour, "Did you ever hear a child make that noise before?" and she said, "Yes, frequently;" but Mary Litchman said the child was certainly ill, and I sent for Dr Cooke. His assistant came, and afterwards Dr Cooke, but the child died early this morning.
By Mr Miller:- I had no other reason for going to Mr Weeks's but that I thought his stuff preferable to Godfrey's Cordial. I think Mr Cooke's young man gave the child medicine to make him sick. The child was naturally very cross, and I had been in the habit of giving him Godfrey's Cordial but only one pennyworth.
The Coroner was about to take Mr Cooke's deposition; but at the suggestion of Mr Cornish, that of Mr Weeks was first heard, which was to the following effect:- Last evening MRS BRENT came to my shop in Joy-street, and complained that the cordial which she had before used had not the desired effect, and she wanted something that would operate stronger. In consequence of the age of the infant, I made up a mixture rather weaker than that which had been used by other parties, and thought no harm could result from its use. The cordial was composed of twenty drops of tincture of opium, one teaspoonful of simple syrup, and the remainder of dill water. The quantity altogether was, I should think, about six small teaspoonsful.
MRS BRENT, in reply to questions addressed to her, reiterated that she had never used but one pennyworth of Godfrey's Cordial, and stated that her age was 234, her husband's 25, and that he was an apprentice to Mr Westacott, shipbuilder. The Jury, having expressed a wish to see the mixture which remained in the bottle, were informed that the father, when aware that it had caused his child's death, had thrown it away in a passion.
Mr Stevens, one of the Jurymen, stated that a report had been circulated that the mixture was administered in a pap-spoon; but the first witness examined contradicted this, saying that it was a common sized spoon, and as she had only one in the house, it could easily be sent for. The Jury wishing to be satisfied on the point, the spoon was sent for, and being produced was found to be of the usual size. Mr Weeks intimated that it was a larger spoon than he expected would have been employed.
The unlabelled phial in which the cordial was sold was also produced; and Mr Weeks having pointed out the space originally occupied by the mixture, water was measured into the bottle by the three-quarter spoonful, and the result showed that five does made up the quantity as it left the chemist's hands, as also that there were four drops of tincture of opium to each dose.
After this Mr Cooke's deposition was taken as follows:- Last evening, about eleven o'clock, having been from home previous to that hour, my assistant told me that he had visited a child at Derby, whom he found insensible from the effects of a narcotic; that he had administered an emetic, (a little ipecach nana,) and that the child was in a dangerous state. On going with him to see the child, I found it insensible and suffering from the effects of narcotic poison. Perceiving that some description of liquid preparation of opium had been given, I endeavoured to excite vomiting by tickling the throat, but this was unavailing. Mustard poultices were also applied, and a warm bath used, but the child continued insensible. I then desired that every effort should be made to excite it, in order that it might be roused from its state of lethargy, but without any hopes of its recovery. These directions were, I believe, obeyed; but the child died at an early hour this morning. I had been apparently healthy up to the time of this occurrence, and died from the effects of an overdose of narcotic poison. The quantity given was sufficient to cause death. I did not smell the child's breath, but observed from the symptoms that it had been poisoned.
By Mr Stoyle:- The child was a fine, well formed one. Children are often cross from flatulency, and cry a great deal, which might have been the case in this instance. I find that people are in the habit of administering Godfrey's Cordial about seven or eight o'clock at night, and the effect produced is a very powerful one, for the child sleeps till five in the morning, and during that lapse of time a healthy child should be fed two or three times. What is commonly called Godfrey's Cordial has a very injurious tendency, but it is much weaker than this, being prepared with one drop only in a drachm.
Mr Tatham:- And that used contained 3 ½ drops to the ounce.
Mr Cooke:- Employing the weaker mixture, the child slept ten consecutive hours, and this was four times as strong.
By a Juryman:- There is nothing to be gained by making a post mortem examination, as the cause of death is very plain to me. One half the children who are thoroughly dosed with "soothing syrup" or "mother's quiet" do not survive one year. Four drops of tincture of opium would kill a young child, and one would sometimes do it.
Mr Weeks:- It might a child that had never been used to it, but I was given to understand that this child had been accustomed to take Godfrey's Cordial, and that something stronger was required.
A Juryman to Mr Weeks:- The mother did it innocently, but you ought to have cautioned her against using the mixture indiscreetly, since it was the same strength as that taken by a child nine months old, who had been accustomed to similar stuff since its birth.
MRS BRENT, by Mr Aldham:- I told Mr Weeks that the child had taken Godfrey's Cordial.
Mr Stevens, one of the Jurymen, thought the faculty had a strong feeling against the use of these cordials.
The summoning officer having said that the evidence adduced was all he had been able to procure, the room was ordered to be cleared. On the re-opening of the court, it was announced that the Jury wished to examine Ellen Cawsey, the young woman who had used a similar mixture. She speedily arrived, and brought with her the last bottle she had purchased. On being sworn, she said:- I am a married woman, and live in Lake-street. I have a child which is six months old, and I occasionally give it, when very cross, a dose of Godfrey's Cordial. In consequence of Mr Weeks's mixture being better than that of Godfrey's Cordial, I have lately had his. When I give my child a dose, it will sleep soundly for three hours - say from ten in the morning to one. The child is not dull or stupid afterwards that I can see. I had this stuff yesterday, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I think. Mr Weeks did not attend to me himself. His two assistants were there, two brothers, and one them gave it to me out of three different bottles.
Mr Weeks having tasted this mixture at once declared that he had never prescribed such a thing in his life for any child. Messrs. Cooke and Tatham, having also examined it by taste and smell, said that it was about one half tincture of opium, and, of course, of a highly dangerous nature.
Mr Weeks explained that he was absent from his shop all day yesterday, and when he went away in the morning left a positive injunction to his assistants to sell no drugs whatever. BRENT said the mixture was the same colour as hers, but not the same smell; it was stronger. Cawsey also thought it was the same colour, but knew nothing about the smell.
The room was again cleared, and after a lengthy deliberation the following verdict was returned:- "The said CHARLES EDWARD BRENT died from the effects of an overdose of anodyne cordial; and the Jury express an opinion that great blame attaches to the party selling such description of medicine without proper labels being attached thereto; and that great blame also attaches to the mother of the deceased for the careless manner in which the medicine was administered." The Coroner having briefly addressed the mother, the proceedings terminated.

BEAFORD - An Inquest was held on Thursday, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of MARY LUXTON, who died on Tuesday last, in consequence of injuries she received by her clothes accidentally taking fire on the previous evening. Her mother had gone out for some water, and on her return, she met the child at the door, in flames.

Thursday 14 November 1850
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - On Tuesday last, the Borough Coroner, Alfred Drake, Esq., and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Thomas Hodge, draper, was foreman, assembled at the house of WILLIAM SHAPCOTT, eating-house keeper, Castle-street, to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of his wife, GRACE SHAPCOTT, aged 64, who expired after a very brief illness, at noon on the preceding day. From the evidence of Mary Gammon, a person residing in the house, Mary Ann Drew, daughter, and Mrs Lord, sister-in-law of deceased, the following facts were gleaned:- On Sunday night deceased retired to rest about half-past nine, without partaking of any supper, and apparently in her usual state of health. Her husband having been out for the evening returned home at two o'clock the following (Monday) morning, when she got out of bed, and lighting a candle, went down stairs and admitted him. Returning upstairs she went into her daughter's bed-room for a second candle, and while there was seized with a fit which prostrated her. Medical and other assistance was promptly procured, but she never rallied, and died about 12 o'clock the same day. She had previously enjoyed good health, but on this occasion complained after seizure of violent stabs in the head. The Coroner and Jurymen were particular in examining each witness narrowly, but nothing differing in effect from the above was elicited. The Coroner stated that Mr Winter, the medical man who attended deceased, was absent, but previous to leaving the town had assured him that the cause of death was apoplexy. A verdict of "Died of an Apoplectic Fit" was unanimously returned.

BRAUNTON - Awful Death. - An Inquest has been held this day (Wednesday), at Fullbrook Barton, in this parish, before Mr Toller, Deputy Coroner, on the body of a man, named JOHN SLOCOMBE, who was found dead in a hay-loft, the property of Mr Andrews, yeoman. The servants having for several days experienced a most intolerable stench issuing from the loft, proceeded yesterday to make a search, when the body of the unfortunate man was found in a very advanced stage of decomposition. It appears the deceased about 14 days ago called at the house and asked for some refreshment, which was given him. He then asked if he might be allowed to sleep in the hay-loft, and leave was granted him, and one of the servants engaged to call him in the morning, which he did, when the deceased, he thought, answered him. Nothing more was thought about him, as it was considered he had left, until the day above mentioned, when he was found dead. A post mortem examination having been made, nothing was discovered which could account for his death. It having been ascertained that deceased had for many years suffered from fits, it was considered that while in a fit he must have fallen into the hay, and thereby have suffocated himself. A verdict accordingly was therefore returned.

ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - On Monday an Inquest was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARGARET ELLEN HUXTABLE, infant daughter of MRS JANE HUXTABLE, widow of the late MR JOHN HUXTABLE, draper, whom her mother found dead in the bed by her side on Sunday morning. The verdict, "Accidental Death by Suffocation". The afflicted mother of this unfortunate child was married about four years ago, and since then has lost her husband and three children - this last born after its father's death.

Thursday 28 November 1850
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday evening last, MARGARET NUTT, of Derby, aged 64, visited the town for the purpose of witnessing the Anti-Papal Demonstration, and in Boutport-street was seized with a fit, which prostrated her. She was accompanied by her daughter and another female, who, with assistance, removed her to Back-lane, where she remained in a senseless state for a short time, and then expired. An Inquest was held on the body on Friday, at the 'Currier's Arms,' Derby, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, and a Jury of which Mr John Stoyle was foreman, when a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was unanimously returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Mysterious Death of a Female. - On Monday morning last, the body of a middle-aged woman was discovered on the beach outside the North Devon Infirmary, where it had been deposited by the receding tide. After notification had been given of the circumstance by the crier, with a description of the appearance and dress of the deceased, the body was identified in the course of the afternoon to be that of JANE MOON, aged 57, an inmate of one of the almshouses erected by Charles Roberts, Esq., in Back-lane. An Inquest was held on the body the following day at the 'Exeter Inn,' before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, when the following facts were elicited:- Deceased occupied an almshouse with a woman named Shapcott, who was imbecile, and for attending to whom deceased had 9d. per week from Shapcott's friends. On the preceding day deceased went to church in the afternoon, leaving a woman named Baker to look after her charge: on her return from church she was in her usual health, and between four and five o'clock Mrs Baker left her, and she does not seem to have been seen alive afterwards. A light was seen in her room by a neighbouring inmate between eight and nine o'clock, which was unusual, but excited no further attention. The body was found by two men called James Colmer and John Holland as they were going to work on Monday morning: there were no marks of violence upon it, nor did the pockets appear to have been searched. Mr Lionel Bencraft attended the Inquest for the purpose of stating that he knew the deceased, who had formerly been in respectable service, but, having exhausted her little savings, was in a destitute state. A few weeks ago, two ladies, relatives of his, who had known her in service, called upon her and relieved her, and they afterwards mentioned to him that she appeared in extreme indigence, having no parish relief: she formerly had 1s. 6d. per week, but on the death of an old man some time ago she came into the bequest of a sovereign, which he left her because of her kindness to him, on which her pay was stopped, and she had since been getting only 9d. per week to subsist upon. The presumption, however, of her abject poverty, and of her having been led by destitution to destroy herself, was removed by a fact which was admitted by two of her sisters after a great deal of prevarication, viz., that above 30s. belonging to her was found in a drawer in her house after her decease, as well as a quantity of pudding and bread. There being no evidence to show how deceased came into the water, the Jury delivered an open verdict of "Found Drowned." The probability is, that deceased, having gone to the beach to gather sticks, was seized with a fit (to which she was subject) and fell into the river, and so came to her untimely end; for there was no evidence whatever to show that she had ever threatened or contemplated suicide.

Thursday 5 December 1850
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - An accident occurred on Thursday last, which was fatal to a man named GEORGE CANN, a workmen in the employ of William Thorne, Esq., of Barnstaple, by whom he was much valued for his honesty and trustworthiness. Deceased was sent, with a fellow workman named John Skinner, on the morning of the day in question, from this town to Combmartin, with a waggon and two horses, with which they were to bring home some pumps from the works of the mines there. they had returned in safety, heavily laden, as far as Whitefield-hill, in the parish of Marwood, about four miles from Barnstaple, in descending which - it being a long and steep declivity - they detached the fore horse, and Skinner walked on with him, while deceased followed with the laden waggon, (the wheel being locked,) walking by the side of his horse. They had not proceeded far, when the horse in the waggon quickened his pace, and the deceased called out to Skinner to move on faster, which he did, but still the waggon gained upon him, until its speed increased so much as to induce Skinner to conclude that the horse could not keep back the load, and he therefore consulted his own safety by throwing the halter over the neck of the horse he was leading, and allowing him to gallop off, and precipitating himself into the hedge to be out of the way of the waggon, which passed him at a rapid rate, and had not gone on far before he heard a crash, and on coming up he found that the horse had fallen with the load and had thrown the deceased down with it. He turned the poor fellow up on his back, and found that blood was issuing from his nose; but he was able to speak, and told his comrade not to alarm himself. Skinner laid him in the hedge, went on and caught his horse, and hurried into the village of Muddiford for assistance, and some of the villagers hastened to the spot, and found the deceased still sensible, but evidently sinking: they removed him on a gate to the village, but before he reached it, he had expired. Mr Dickinson, of Pilton, surgeon, whom Skinner had fetched, was promptly on the spot, but found that life was extinct. On examination he found that no bones were broken, but that death had arisen from concussion of the brain caused by the fall. A Coroner's Jury on the following day held an Inquest on the body at the house of William Glover, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, and returned a verdict of "Accidental death." The horse was not seriously injured.

PETROCKSTOW - Death By Burning. - The first case of the annual "slaughter of the innocents" in this district, which every winter calls upon us to record as the result of the want of due care on the part of parents in leaving their children alone in rooms with a fire burning, occurred on Saturday last at Petrockstow, to ANN WILLIS, aged two years, daughter of a labourer of that parish, who was left by her mother with a brother, four years old, and whose clothes caught fire: a neighbour saw the smoke, hastened to the house, and plunged the child in water, by which the flames were extinguished: and Mr Rudall, surgeon, was quickly in attendance to dress the wounds; but the injuries proved fatal within a few hours. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, by which a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death."

HARTLAND - Sudden Death. - On Friday last, an old man of this parish, called JOHN BRAUNTON, aged 68, who lived alone in a miserable hovel, in circumstances of great penury, was observed by a neighbour who was passing along to be lying in his bed apparently in a fit, and, on going n, he found him on the article of death. Other neighbours came in, but before Mr Vine, the surgeon, could arrive, he had expired. From the wretched way in which deceased was living, reports were spread that he had died from want: that, however, was not the case, as plenty of provisions were found in his house after his decease. A post mortem examination showed that death resulted from apoplexy. An Inquest was held on the body the next day before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, which returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 12 December 1850
BERRYNARBOR - Another Case of Child Burning. - An Inquest was taken on Wednesday the 4th, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of ELLEN HICKS, aged 4 years, daughter of GEORGE HICKS, a labourer residing in the village of Berrynarbor, who had been accidentally burnt on Saturday the 1st, from which she died the next morning. The mother was upstairs ill in bed, and hearing her child cry out, she came down in her bed clothes, and found the poor child at the door in flames. An uncle, called ROBERT SCAMP, who lived opposite, saw the accident and immediately ran and extinguished the flames and sent for Mr Vidal, of Ilfracombe, surgeon, who attended, but his efforts were fruitless - the little sufferer only survived a few hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BISHOPS NYMPTON - Suspected Infanticide, and Concealment of Birth. - A miserable case of this kind, followed by the decease of the wretched mother, has just taken place at Gorton Hill, in the parish of Bishopsnympton, where an Inquest was held on Tuesday, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on view of the body of a male infant child, which had been discovered the preceding day secreted in a chest in the cottage of a widow named ELLEN NOTT. NOTT was a middle aged woman, (45), and her husband had been dead for some years, leaving her with five children, three of whom lived with her at Gorton Hill. She had been ill for several days, and some of her neighbours were not without suspicion that she was in a state of pregnancy. Mr Flexman, of Southmolton, surgeon, had attended her, and had given her a plaister to apply to her hip for some rheumatic pains that she complained of. She became worse on Monday, and Mr Flexman was sent for to visit her, who came immediately, and found her suffering under a high fever. From symptoms which he perceived, and certain discoveries which some women who were with her had made, he suspected that she had lately been delivered of a child, and charged her with it, but she stoutly denied it. He, however, satisfied himself from examination that such was the fact; and she, finding that her guilt could not be hid, made a confession of it to a woman named Bowden who was attending her, and told her she had deposited the body in a chest in the adjoining room, where it was afterwards found. A bruise was observed on the head of the corpse, which was in an advanced state of decomposition; but a post mortem examination satisfied the surgeon that the skull was not at all fractured, and that the bruise must have arisen from natural causes; and, moreover, that the lungs had never been inflated, and that the child must therefore have been still-born, to which effect the jury returned their verdict. The mother, of course, was liable to the charge of concealing the birth; but the authorities are spared the trouble of instituting it, for she is gone before a higher tribunal, death having overtaken her the same evening.

BARNSTAPLE - Discovery of the Body of LILLYCRAP the Assassin. - It will be in the recollection of our readers that, in the month of February last, the coachman of William A. Yeo, Esq., of Fremington, near this town, (High Sheriff for the county,) was shot in his master's yard by a man who had been his fellow servant, but who had been discharged for his excesses. Providentially, by the timely help of Dr Yeo in staunching the haemorrhage from the shot wound, and the subsequent attention of the medical gentlemen at the Infirmary, the wounded man recovered. Of the murderer nothing whatever was seen or known from the moment of the dreadful act. It was generally believed, however, that he had immediately hurried to the river Taw, which flows very near the spot and aggravated his crime by suicide. That conjecture turns out to have been correct; for, although the body has lain undiscovered for nearly 10 months, the late heavy freshes in all probability, by dislodging the sand in which it had become imbedded, has brought it to light. The headless corpse was seen first lying on the beach on Wednesday (yesterday) by Capt. Marsack, of this town, who was shooting in Yelland Marsh in the parish of Fremington; and he gave information to the constable at Fremington, who at once caused search to be made for it, but without success that evening. this morning, however, the search was resumed, and the body was found - of course, in a horrible state of putrefaction and dreadfully mutilated. Identity, however, is ascertained by the unhappy man's watch being found upon him, as well as the money he was known to have had on his person at the time he was last seen. An Inquest was held on the remains this afternoon before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner which resulted in the open verdict of "Found Drowned," there being no legal proof of the means by which the deceased got into the water, although there could be no moral doubt of it being his own rash act. It is worthy of remark that the watch of the deceased was found to have stopped at 20 minutes past 11 o'clock: and, as it was a few minutes before 11 that the shot was fired, the inference is strengthened by this circumstance that he went immediately and precipitated himself into the water.

Thursday 19 December 1850
LANDKEY - Accident. - On Friday last an accident occurred at Venn Quarry in this parish, to a little boy 10 years of age, named SAMUEL MUXWORTHY, which proved fatal. During his dinner hour he was amusing himself with a playmate and another person in floating pieces of wood in the stream which is contiguous to the quarry, and which propels some of the pumping machinery; while thus engaged, one of the pieces of wood got near the wheel attached to the pump, and in striving to reach it he was caught by the crank, carried round, and fell on his head, the crank in making subsequent evolutions continually pressing on his body. Immediate assistance was rendered, but he had been killed on the spot. An Inquest was held the same day before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the county, when not the slightest blame being attributable to any one, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

Thursday 2 January 1851
PLYMOUTH - Suicide of a Military Officer at Plymouth. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall on Monday, at three o'clock, on the body of GEORGE DUNN, Esq., paymaster of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, and a Jury of 16 gentlemen. From the evidence it appeared that for some time past deceased had been suffering by an overflow of blood to the head, which had brought on fits of insanity. On the morning of Monday, while alone in his bed-room, his servant having left him for a few minutes, he contrived to hang himself with his handkerchief to the bed-post. In this situation he was shortly discovered by MRS DUNN and a female servant. The Jury almost immediately returned a verdict of "Died by hanging himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind."

KNOWSTONE - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., on the body of a labouring man named JOSEPH STEER, aged 62. Deceased had lived with his brother (both single men) in Knowstone village, and had been unwell for some months past: the brother, being about to be absent on Thursday on a Christmas holiday, desired a neighbour to look in upon the deceased to see how he did: she did so, and left him as well as usual about 12 o'clock at noon, sitting by the fire: shortly afterwards an old man called at the house to return some article the absent brother had lent him, when he saw the deceased on his hands and knees before the fire, and the room full of smoke, but as he was very deaf, he could not say whether the deceased replied to him when he spoke, or not: after another hour or so the woman with whom the brother had left the deceased in charge sent her little boy to see how he was, who returned in a minute or two in great haste to his mother, and said the deceased was burnt to death, which, on running to the spot, she found to be the case. The body was dreadfully burnt, about the head especially, and life appeared to have been extinct some time. It was remarkable that such a thing could happen in the midst of a village, and attract the attention of none of the neighbours. The probability was that deceased fell into the fire in a fit; but there being no evidence to prove it, the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Burnt."

Thursday 9 January 1851
PILTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held this morning, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of MARY JONES, aged 70, for a great many years an inmate of the Pilton workhouse, having suffered from a bad leg for the whole period (nearly 40 years, a fellow inmate said). Deceased retired last evening as well as usual; and this morning, at half-past six, she was found dead in her bed. There was no other evidence to be adduced, and the Jury gave a verdict of -"Died by the Visitation of God."

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held this (Thursday) morning, at the 'Bremridge Arms', in the North Walk, in this town, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of WILLIAM FEWINGS, of Swimbridge, aged 72, who had died suddenly in the 'Bremridge Arms,' yesterday afternoon. Evidence was given that the deceased had come into the town to meet a complaint preferred against him before the bench of county magistrates (the particulars of which are given in our report of the magistrates meeting). Deceased's son deposed that his father had been for some time suffering from dropsy, but was as well as usual when he came into the town yesterday: witness accompanied him before the magistrates, where deceased was told he must pay 1s. per week to the parish towards his wife's maintenance, or that he would be sent to gaol: at these words, the witness said, his father was much affected, and went downstairs from the magistrates' office and across to the public-house (which was opposite), where he complained of being unwell, and the landlord offered him a little beer, and afterwards some water, but he could not make use of either, and his son hastened off to fetch a little gin, but in his absence he got rapidly worse, and died on the chair in the landlord's presence, by the fire side, before the son's return. The interval from his leaving the office to his death was only a very few minutes. Dr Newbolt was sent for, but pronounced the vital spark fled. The verdict of the Jury was - "That the deceased died suddenly, and at the time of his death was suffering from dropsy; and that from the evidence now produced the Jury are of opinion that his death was accelerated by a certain expression used at the county magistrates' office yesterday, to the following effect - 'You must pay a shilling a week, or go to gaol."

Thursday 16 January 1851
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - On Saturday last, Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary on the body of WILLIAM HEADON, aged 40, a labouring man, who had died from the effects of burns received on the Pottington lime kilns. Deceased had been occasionally employed at the kilns, and had led rather a disorderly life, having slept every since last harvest on and about the limekilns, although he had a wife and children residing at Litchdon. About a fortnight ago he was found by a servant-girl of Mr Lauder, lying in a pigstye underneath the limekiln, when he requested her not to say anything about his being there, and she left him, not knowing at the time that he was at all injured. Some time in the course of the afternoon, Mr Summerwill went to the pigstye with a pick for the purpose of taking out some straw, but did not see the deceased until, fearing he should be struck with the pick, he cried out, and complained that he had been burnt. Mr Summerwill immediately got a cart and conveyed him to the Infirmary, when it was found that his lower extremities were dreadfully burnt; and he accounted for it by saying that he had been asleep on the kiln with his legs hanging into it. There was little hope of his recovery from the first, and tetanus supervening within a few days of his admission, he died on Friday. Verdict, "Died from lock-jaw, caused by severe burning."

WEAR GIFFORD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on the 3rd inst., at Wear Gifford, by John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a labouring man named THOMAS BEER, in the employ of Mr Balsdon, Wear Barton, who was taken ill while at work in a barn the day before, and died. A post mortem examination of the body was made by Messrs. Rouse and Owen, surgeons, of this town, whose opinion was that death resulted from natural causes, and a verdict was returned accordingly. The deceased has left a wife, but no children.

Thursday 30 January 1851
BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - A remarkable instance of the uncertainty of life occurred in this town on Wednesday the 22nd instant, in the sudden death of MR WILLIAM EDMONDS SWEET, painter. On the day previous to his death he was in his usual health; on the Wednesday morning he complained of headache, and lay in bed, but not so ill as to cause any apprehension of danger. In the afternoon he expressed a wish to see a surgeon, and as his wife was preparing to send for one, his breathing appeared to stop suddenly. She immediately went to his bed side, when she found that life was extinct. The deceased was only 41 years of age, and has left a wife and seven children to lament their sudden bereavement. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the following morning, when a verdict was given "that the deceased died by the Visitation of God in a natural way." It is supposed that apoplexy was the immediate cause of his melancholy death.

TORRINGTON - Inquest. - On Monday, an Inquest was held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of a male child, son of THOMAS WRIGHT, shoemaker, of this town, who died in the night of Friday last from the effects of burning. It appeared by the evidence, that on Friday morning the father left the house about the space of an hour, the wife being ill in bed, leaving the deceased in care of a little girl about 7 ½ years old, when, according to the statement of the latter, the child, in lighting a straw, set its clothes on fire, when the girl ran immediately into a neighbour's house and told the circumstance, and a young woman of the name of Jane Green instantly came and found him enveloped in flames, and most shockingly burnt, so that in about 12 hours after, death put an end to its sufferings. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Coroner at the same time charged the father as to the necessity of his adopting better precautionary measures for his children's safety.

Thursday 6 February 1851
TOTNES - Fatal Gun Accident. - An Inquest was held at Bunker's Hill, Littlehempston, on Monday, touching the death of THOMAS BEER, aged 16 years, who died on Sunday from a gun-shot wound. Deceased was a labourer in the employ of Mr Turpin, yeoman, of West, Berry Pomeroy. On Sunday morning last he left his master's house to go to Bunker's Hill, where his parents reside, taking with him a gun, which he concealed on his way thither at a spot about two hundred yards distant from his father's house. It appeared that on leaving there a short time after, he was accompanied by his brother, and they both went to the place where the gun was hid. Deceased pulled it out of the hedge with the muzzle towards him: it was loaded, and by some means the trigger was moved, and the contents were lodged in the boy's abdomen. He was taken back to his father's, and Mr Gillard, surgeon, was quickly in attendance. The poor fellow lingered in great agony for five hours, when death put a period to his sufferings. The Jury found that "the deceased Accidentally Shot Himself."

Thursday 13 February 1851
EXETER - Fatal Accident at Exeter. - A carter, named JOHN CROCKER, servant to Mr Matthews, paper manufacturer, of Huxham, met with a fatal accident on Friday afternoon, beyond Elmfield gate, o the North road. He had been riding on the shaft of the cart, when the horse trotted on at an unusual rate, upon which he jumped off for the purpose of taking the horse by the head, when he fell, and the wheel passing over part of his breast and the neck, he was killed on the spot. He was a very steady man, having been in the employ of his late master nearly twenty years, and he has left a wife and six children. An Inquest was held on Saturday on the body, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 27 February 1851
SHIRWELL - Fatal Accident from the Kick of a Heifer. - An Inquest was taken on Tuesday se'nnight, at Sloley Barton, in this parish, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on view of the body of HENRY STEVENS, a little boy four years of age, son of MR JOHN STEVENS, farmer, at that place. On the Sunday afternoon previous, deceased was in his father's farm yard, in company with another little boy called John Johns. The latter, in play, took off the deceased's hat and threw it into a linhay which was close by; and the deceased, in going to fetch it, had to pass by a heifer which was standing near, which kicked him in the stomach, and he fell, but was able to get up again, although he cried and complained of pain. He was taken in to his sister by an elder brother, and put into the cradle. His father was not at home at the time, but the next morning, finding the little fellow in much pain, he sent for Mr Hiern, surgeon, of Barnstaple, who came immediately and found the stomach much swollen, and gave his opinion that the child would die, which he did in the course of the night. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Monday last, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, an Inquest was taken on the body of MRS ISABELLA JONES, aged 62, who had died suddenly that same morning at the house of her brother-in-law and sister, at Nadder Cottage, near this town. Deceased was getting up in the morning, and in the act of putting on her clothes, when she fell suddenly down and instantly expired. The evidence of William Flexman, Esq., surgeon, showed that death had in all probability resulted from spasms of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by Visitation of God."

BISHOPSNYMPTON - Inquest. - On Tuesday last an Inquest was taken before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a newly-born female child, daughter of JANE WEBBER, who lived in the house of her father, NICHOLAS WEBBER, labourer, of Bishopsnympton. JANE WEBBER is in her 19th year, and had been living in the service of a farmer at Roseash, from whence she returned to her father's about a fortnight ago, complaining of being unwell in a cold, but there was no suspicion at the time that she was pregnant. On Sunday night she went to bed, and slept as usual in another bed in the same room with her parents. In the course of the night she complained of pain in her stomach, and her mother got up and gave her a cup of tea, when she said she felt easier. She continued to complain of pain in her stomach, and when her mother took her up her breakfast between seven and eight o'clock, the girl burst into tears, and said, "Oh, mother, there's something here. I have been calling for you." On lifting up the bed clothes, the mother found the body of a child, of which her daughter had been delivered. The daughter said she had no idea that she was so near her confinement, but had prepared a little baby linen since her return home. Assistance was obtained, and Mr Flexman, of Southmolton, surgeon, was sent for, who pronounced, after examination, that the child was still born. Verdict accordingly.

BISHOPSNYMPTON - Suicide. - An Inquest was held in the parish of Bishopsnympton, on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN DART, aged 60, late a farmer of that parish, who committed suicide on the Saturday preceding. About Christmas last a distress was levied on the goods of deceased, and his embarrassed circumstances depressed his mind, and induced a state of despondency from which his friends entertained the worst apprehensions. He complained of being ill on Friday evening when he went to bed, but next morning got up much better, and went downstairs for the purpose of lighting the fire. He was heard to go out of doors, for some wood, it was supposed; but not returning in a few minutes, his son went in quest of him, but could not meet with him, nor was any trace heard of him until about noon, when his lifeless body was found in about six feet of water in the river Nymph, which flows near the house. As there was no evidence to prove how he came into the water, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

TOTNES - Melancholy Suicide. - On Sunday morning MRS FOSS, the wife of MR FOSS, a farmer living at Larkeham, in the parish of Diptford, near Totnes, committed suicide by hanging herself. For a long time past she has been in a low desponding way, and often has attempted self-destruction, which has been frustrated until Sunday morning, when she arose earlier than usual, with the excuse that butter was required to be made to be sent to Diptford. Having procured a cord and fastened the kitchen door on the inside, she hung herself with a pocket handkerchief to a crook in the ceiling. One of her little children wanted to go into the kitchen, but finding himself debarred made so much noise, that it brought the father down stairs, when he discovered his wife hanging and quite lifeless. She has left a young family of eight children. A Coroner's Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity".

Thursday 6 March 1851
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death at the Union Workhouse. - On Sunday evening last, some persons were passing a linhay in Forthill, adjoining this town, when they saw a man there, who appeared to be suffering from illness, and they humanely took him to the Union-house, which was close at hand. Arrived there, he was taken in, removed to the sick ward, put into a warm bed, and had a little gruel; and the surgeon being sent for, he came soon after, and administered medicine to him. The next morning deceased had his breakfast taken up to him, of which he partook; and while leaning on his elbow, slightly raised in bed, he suddenly gave a sigh or two, and expired. A post mortem examination by Mr Law shewed that he was in the last stage of consumption, his lungs being filled with tubercles and abscesses, one of which had burst, and which, in all probability, had caused the suddenness of the death. He appeared to be a man of about 40 years of age, had been seen about the town for a month past, and from a pocket book found upon him, it was ascertained that his name was AHIJAH HARE, and that he was a saw sharpener from Sheffield. An Inquest was held on the body on Tuesday, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict was returned, "Died from Disease of the lungs."

SOUTHMOLTON - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at Southmolton, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the borough, on the body of MARY PALFREYMAN, aged 50, the wife of SAMUEL PALFREYMAN, an artillery pensioner. The deceased fell down the preceding evening and immediately expired. Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 20 March 1851
EXETER - Suicide. - A man, named SAMUEL BAKER, who has for some time past been engaged as the conductor of the baking business of the late Mr George Buckland, in Exeter, put a period to his existence on Saturday morning. He was discovered suspended in the back part of the premises about 7 o'clock: assistance was called, and he was cut down by a policeman. An Inquest was held at one o'clock, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned. It appeared the poor fellow had been much affected for some time past with the prospect of losing his situation by the closing of the business consequent upon Mr Buckland's death.

BRIXTON - Mysterious Murder. - Considerable excitement has prevailed in the neighbourhood of Brixton, a small village about six miles east of Plymouth, in consequence of a rumour having gone abroad that a boy, found on Friday se'nnight hanging to a tree in an orchard, had been murdered by the son of his master, a respectable farmer named Henry Rowe. The name of the deceased was JOHN BUNKER. The Coroner of the district, Mr Bone, has instituted an Inquiry, which opened on Saturday, and was resumed on Tuesday morning, at the 'Foxhound Inn,' Brixton. The suspected man, William Rowe, who was apprehended on Saturday, was in attendance during the investigation. The suspicious circumstances connected with the case will be gathered from the following portion of the evidence adduced at the Inquest.
John Lavers, a lad in the employ of Mr Henry Rowe, was examined on Saturday, and deposed to the effect that deceased was also a servant of Mr Henry Rowe, of Holwell, in the parish of Brixton. On Friday morning, at a quarter past six o'clock, witness saw deceased leave the courtyard of the farmhouse, having charge of two horses attached to a cart. He appeared to be well and in good spirits. He was in a great hurry. He had a whip, but no rope in his hand. Between 11 and 12 o'clock the same morning Mr Henry Rowe left his work in one of his fields, having heard that something had happened to deceased.
Thomas Froude, a police-constable of Plympton St. Mary, said, that on Tuesday he received information that there was a charge against William Rowe, the son of Henry, that he had been guilty of a nameless crime on a man, and on Saturday he received such information as led to the apprehension of the man, on the double charge of having committed a brutal crime and with being the murderer of JOHN BUNKER. The prisoner denied all knowledge of the acts with which he was charged, and said that the boy had fetched the rope that was found round his neck from the house with his own hand. Witness saw the deceased on a bed in the house of prisoner's father. There were marks of coagulated blood on the back of the right hand and the left. There was a scratch on the left temple, and blood coming from the nose and mouth. That around the mouth was of fresher appearance than the rest. Witness afterwards went to the orchard where the deceased was found, and he there discovered footmarks that corresponded with the boots taken from the prisoner's feet. Witness obtained the clothes worn by the prisoner, on the day that deceased was found. They consisted of a coat, waistcoat, breeches, leggings, and a handkerchief. There were marks of blood on the handkerchief and coat. Some of them appeared to be fresh spots. There were also in the waistcoat pocket five bullets. The prisoner said he used the bullets to kill rabbits, as a matter of fancy.
The clothes were produced, and the spots of blood pointed out to the Jury.
Mr William Pattison Mould, surgeon, was examined. On the night of Friday last, between nine and 10 o'clock, Mr John Rowe, brother of the prisoner, called on witness to go and see the body of deceased. On examining the body, witness saw on the back of the knuckle of the middle finger of the right hand a small streak of dry blood, about an inch in length, and on the back of the left wrist, just over the bone, three or four spots of blood. The marks were such as might have been produced by chaps in the hands. The boy had been "to lime," as it was called, and the whole of the backs of the hands were in a bad state. There was an appearance of a blow on the left temple, about one inch above the eyebrow. The clothes were on the body, and witness could not examine it closely. There was a mark of blood under the septum, or division of the nostril, on the upper lip, and a streak of blood on the side of the mouth. It extended about an inch and a half down the cheek. The knees of the trowsers were soiled as if with mud. Witness was shown a piece of rope about the size of a common halter. On Saturday evening, by the Coroner's direction, made a more minute examination externally. The body was stripped, and all the hair was taken from the head. No external marks of violence were perceptible, other than those already described, with one exception only - namely, a slight mark of blood under the right ear, exactly where the ear joins the skin of the face, which proceeded from a small chap, and the lobe of the ear was bruised. There had been no effusion of blood from the ears; and, on wiping away the spots of blood from the upper lip and the mouth, there were no wounds visible, but the blood had evidently escaped from the nose and mouth, and had dried on the skin. The upper parts of the cheeks were slightly swollen. There were no indentations on the lips, as of the teeth. The eyes were not suffused with blood.
Ann Couch, a servant girl in the employ of Mr Henry Rowe, said that deceased appeared to be poorly, pale, and wished, on the morning of Friday, before he left the farm to "go to lime," the meaning of the expression being, to fetch lime from the kiln for agricultural purposes.
Two or three witnesses deposed to hearing screams in the direction of the wood, and to proceeding in the direction of the screams, but saw nothing.
Mr Mould, on being re-called, said the wound on the forehead might have been produced by a stick.
Samuel Nicholls said he saw the body in the orchard, lying on the ground. The rope was still round deceased's neck, and his hands were spotted with blood. His mouth was full of blood. There were marks of mud on the knees of his trousers. It was not quite dry.
James Ellis had had a conversation with deceased on Wednesday as to the nameless crime that had been laid to the prisoner's charge. Deceased said there was no doubt about the truth of it, and that he had been offered money not to say what he knew concerning it.
Thomas Barber saw the deceased hanging in the orchard as he passed along the road. He took the body from the tree and put it on the ground. It was afterwards taken in a cart to the house of Mr Henry Rowe.
Several other witnesses were examined, but their testimony did not go to prove any fact of an important character that would affect the case in any way.
The Coroner having summed up at great length, the Jury, after consulting together for two hours, brought in a verdict that "Deceased died from strangulation, and that he was wilfully murdered by some party of parties unknown." The effect of this decision will be, a rigid investigation before the Magistrates. The prisoner underwent an examination on Friday and Saturday before the magistrates at Ridgway. A great deal of additional evidence was given in relation to the charge of murder, and one of the witnesses swore that he had, by the direction of the prisoner, given testimony at the Coroner's Inquest, as to what he had seen, which was not true. The nurse who laid out the body of the deceased described the marks upon it as quite different from those stated by the surgeon at the Inquest. The examination which was most protracted, was adjourned till Monday next (the 24th) and in the meantime the body of the deceased is to be exhumed, in order that its condition at the time of death may, as far as possible, be ascertained.
Meanwhile William Rowe, the suspected person, has been sent to Exeter for better security. A summons has been issued by Mr G. W. Soltau, county magistrate, for the apprehension of the father of William Rowe, in consequence, it is alleged, of his having beaten the boy, Richard Vincent, for giving some parts of his evidence at the Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday 27 March 1851
EXETER - Dreadful Occurrence. - On Thursday afternoon, a man aged fifty-one, named CHARLES BROOKES, who was employed in Mr Worthy's woollen factory, in the Exe Island, got entangled in the belt that works the large machine called a scribbler: the poor fellow was drawn round the drum and crushed in a most dreadful manner between it and the ceiling, by which the machine was stopped. He was taken down and conveyed to the Hospital, where it was found that one of his thighs was broken, his chest was dreadfully crushed, with other injuries external and internal. there was not the slightest probability of his surviving, and he died in about an hour. He was a trustworthy, well conducted servant, and had been in the employ of the Worthy firm for more than forty years. An Inquest was held on the body at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on Friday, by John Warren, Esq., City Coroner, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 April 1851
BARNSTAPLE - Strange Suicide of a Boy. - A singular and inexplicable act of suicide by a boy of 15 years of age was committed in the afternoon of Sunday last, the circumstances of which will be found explained in the following report of the Inquest, which was held on the body on the afternoon of the next day (Monday), at the 'Rolle Arms Inn,' Bear-street, before Alfred Drake, Esq. Coroner for the Borough.
The Jury consisted of Mr John Copeland, foreman; Messrs. John Thornby, Michael Burgess, John Evans, Wm. Arnold, John Curtice, Henry Weeden, John Snell, Wm. Gabriel, Arthur Riddeford, Wm. Jones, and Henry Gabriel.
The name of the deceased was WILLIAM OATWAY, (son of the late WM. OATWAY,) who lived with his widowed mother in Gaydon street, and was an apprentice to Mr Thomas Curtice, mason.
The first business of the Jury was to view the body, which lay at the house of deceased's mother. On their return to the room, the following evidence was taken.
Thomas Courtice, the boy's master, deposed that the deceased was his apprentice, having served him for about two years: he was a very industrious boy, and gave him entire satisfaction: he was now in the receipt of 4s. per week: had never remarked anything very particular in his manner, but he was reserved, and was particularly saving with his money, always taking care of every penny, for the purpose of taking it home to his widowed mother: he was the last witness paid on Saturday night, and he was talking outside the door with one of the men, and seemed to be in very good spirits: he bade witness and his wife "Good night," and on his leaving said he should be at his work on Monday morning at Barbican.
John Ireland, Chelsea pensioner:- I have known the deceased three months, and was an uncle to him, being a brother to his mother: yesterday afternoon I called at the house and remained there for an hour: I was sitting at the table reading the bible: his mother and sister left the house to go to Newport: I remained a few minutes after, and as I left he desired me to let the latch down, which I did. As I came to the door a young woman called Down, came to enquire for his sister, and he told her where she was gone. He was dressing at the time, having his trowsers on, and was preparing to go out: I did not notice anything unusual in his manner: he did not say much: he washed himself and cleaned his boots while I was in the house: he had been making out a bill in the forenoon, but did nothing to it while I was there.
Elizabeth Down:- I live in Bear-street: Mrs OATWAY and my mother are first cousins, and I have been very intimate with the deceased's sister ever since I have been in the town: yesterday afternoon, at half-past three, I called at the house just as the last witness came out, and asked for his sister. Deceased came to me, dressed only in his trousers and shoes: he was washing at the time: he told me his sister was gone to Newport to her aunt's with her mother, and that if I followed them through Back-lane I should overtake them: I observed nothing remarkable in the manner of deceased: he was just as cheerful as usual: I pulled the door after me when I left the house, which I did without staying a minute.
William Minor:- I live in Gaydon-street: yesterday afternoon I heard a great alarm in the house of deceased: I ran in and saw MRS OATWAY and others in great fright: they told me to run into the kitchen, which I did, and there I saw the deceased hanging from a crook by a rope: I lifted him up and called for assistance, and Jones came and tried to untie the rope, but could not, and then we cut it: he had his clean shirt on and a pair of stockings, but no other clothes: there was a pair of candlesticks tied to each of his legs, which hung about 10 inches or a foot from the floor: they were tied together with great care, end to end, in a way which must have taken many minutes to do: the body was dead, but not quite cold: we removed him upstairs: there was a pair of small steps under him: around his neck, besides the cord by which he was hung, there was a small piece of twine, with a piece of candle attached to it, which hung in front of him from his neck.
John Jones, brickmaker:- I heard an alarm yesterday afternoon, while I was in my house, which is four doors from that of MRS OATWAY, and I ran out, and there saw the sister of deceased, who told me there was some one hanging in the kitchen: I went in, and there saw the last witness holding up the body: I tried to slip the knot of the cord by which he was suspended, but could not, and then we cut it: the candlesticks spoken of by the last witness were tied to the insteps of deceased, and were close to his feet: he might have fallen off either from the steps or the table.
The Coroner asked if there was any relative of the deceased present who could give any information whatever which could give any clue to the state of mind of the deceased when he committed the act.
The constable said his mother and sister were at home in great affliction; but they could give no further evidence.
The candle and rope spoken to by the witness Minor were produced to the Jury. The purpose for which the deceased used or wanted the candle could not be conjectured, unless it was to grease the rope, of which some of the Jury thought there were some marks upon it.
Mrs Land, who was in the relation of first cousin to the father of deceased, and was on very intimate terms with the family, stated that one of deceased's brothers died 12 months ago on Sunday, and his father three weeks afterwards, and another brother some few months before, the father and two sons having all died within four months. His mother had kept a little shop, and his father was a mason. During the last week the mother had received the surgeon's bill for his attendance during all these afflictions, which amounted to £14. The boy appeared to be much distressed about it, and did not know how his mother could pay it. He was an exceedingly steady and careful boy, and was always anxious for the comfort of his mother and family. He named the circumstance of the surgeon's bill several times on Saturday to his master's wife (who was also his aunt), saying that doctor's bills were very heavy, and that he could not think how his mother would raise £14 to pay. During the forenoon of yesterday (Sunday) he was employed in making out a bill his mother had to set off against the surgeon's bill, which he intended to take to the surgeon this day (Monday), and to come to a settlement of it. (The bill was produced, and appeared to be written with much care, in a plain school boy's hand.) He was in the habit of allowing his mother all his wages, except 1d. per day, which he kept to find himself clothes. Witness had not seen him for a week before his death. The family had had a great deal of affliction, but she did not know they had any mental malady. Deceased was generally a cheerful boy, but witness had no doubt that the circumstance of the surgeon's bill weighed heavily on his mind.
Elizabeth Down was recalled, and stated that she returned to the house with the mother and sister of deceased between five and six o'clock yesterday: they tied to open the front door, but could not: they stood there knocking for nearly half an hour, but no one came, and at last they went to the back of the premises, where they lifted a younger brother of deceased over the wall, and he went into the house, and called out to them that it was all right - that the key was in the door, and that if they would go round to the front he would let them in, which they accordingly did. On going into the house they found the deceased hanging in the kitchen, at which they were dreadfully alarmed, and screamed out for assistance, and the neighbours quickly came in.
Medical aid was sent for, and Mr Joce, surgeon, was on the spot in a few minutes, and at his suggestion a galvanic apparatus was fetched from Mr Brutton, of High-street, which was applied to the body to satisfy the wishes of the friends, but, of course, without any effect, for, in the opinion of the medical man, life had been extinct for above two hours. It would appear that, after his uncle left the house, deceased must have gone upstairs, put on his linen, and taken off his trowsers (which were found lying in his bedroom), and then come at once downstairs and committed the rash act.
This being all the evidence, the Jury withdrew, some of them expressing an opinion that it would have been more satisfactory if the surgeon had been in attendance, but the Coroner did not think his presence necessary, and he was not sent for.
The Jury withdrew and consulted for nearly half an hour; when they returned with a verdict - "That the deceased, WILLIAM OATWAY, committed suicide by hanging himself; but in what state of mind he was at the time there was no evidence before them to shew."
The case is a very melancholy one, especially in its aspect towards the bereaved widow, to whom the attentions of the deceased appear to have been most assiduous, and who is thus deprived of her chief earthly stay and hope in her widowed state.
The Jury, in consideration of the needy circumstances of the afflicted mother, gave the fees which had been allowed them by the Coroner to a relative towards paying the funeral expenses of the deceased. [Lest the allusion above to the Surgeon's bill should create an unjust impression, we think it right to say that we have learnt from the best authority that the account was a most moderate one, and had been accumulating during several years, in the course of which the gentleman in question had paid the late father of deceased more than four times the amount of it for work done for him in his trade of mason, without asking a single shilling to be kept back towards payment of his own set-off.]

Thursday 17 April 1851
BRAUNTON - Sudden Death. - On Friday last a Court of Inquiry was held by John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR RICHARD PEARD. It appears the deceased, who has some years retired from business, resided in Silver-street, his daughter and sister living with him. He had been complaining of being unwell for several days; and on Thursday evening, finding him still unwell, his daughter called in Mr Pick, surgeon, who sent him some medicine. In the morning, thinking himself a little better, he wished to go out into the garden: his daughter endeavoured to induce him not to do so, but he urged that he wanted some fresh air: she therefore accompanied him. On getting some way up the garden, she left him for a moment to return for her bonnet; but before reaching the bottom of the garden she heard him call out, and she immediately returned, and found the deceased had fallen on his knees. She at once screamed, when, seeing her agitated, he begged her to be calm, as he was only a little faint. Assistance was immediately at hand, and he was removed into the house, but the vital spark had fled. Verdict, "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 24 April 1851
FREMINGTON - Loss of Life in a Weir. - On Saturday last a fatal accident occurred to RICHARD HOLLAND, aged 40, of Yelland, in this parish, a well-conducted and industrious man, occupying a small farm, and renting also the fisher of Bassett's weir, on the river Taw. The deceased was employed, in conjunction with another man called Richard Heale, about four o'clock in the afternoon, in repairing the wing of the weir, when in crossing from the river towards the beach, his foot suddenly slipped, and he fell into deep water. His companion looked round, and saw him struggling in the tide, but before he could reach him from a few yards distance, the deceased was carried down by the current, which was strong at the time. Heale saw the deceased rise once again to the surface, but he was too remote from him to admit of his rendering him help. He watched for a few minutes, and then hastened to John Roulstone, a pilot, who happened to be near in the river in his boat, and who came immediately, and together they pronged the pits near in the hope of finding the body, but unsuccessfully. The search was resumed the next day (Sunday) by Roulstone, and by many other persons: and in the afternoon, about three o'clock, the body was found by Roulstone at a place called Strand Head, about three quarters of a mile further up the river than Bassett's weir, having been deposited and left there by the receding tide. There was an Inquest held on the body on Monday, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased, who was a very fine fellow, has left a wife and family of five or six children, in circumstances that strongly demand sympathy.

Thursday 15 May 1851
DEVONPORT - Manslaughter at Devonport. - We regret to record another of those painful circumstances, the occurrence of which almost induces the belief that the boasted civilization of the age is after all, a mere sham. On Thursday afternoon a fight took place between two men in the neighbouring borough, which resulted a few hours afterwards in the death of one of the combatants. The parties engaged in this brutal encounter, were WILLIAM DYER and Isaac Axworthy, both of whom are said to be porters; and it appears that whilst the former was employed on Thursday afternoon, in unloading a vessel at Tamar Quay, Morice Town, a quarrel arose between him and Axworthy, which was followed by a challenge to fight. For this purpose an adjournment took place to a field on the Salt-ash road, known as "Giant's Cave," and here it is said that the parties fought not less than 40 rounds, hounded on, as they were, by a number of fellows of the baser sort, who accompanied them to the spot. At length DYER fell, bloody and exhausted, to the ground, whence he was removed to the 'Sportsman's Arms,' and eventually taken thence in a cab to his home in William-street, Morice-town, where he expired at four o'clock on Friday morning. As soon as the police received intelligence of what had occurred, Axworthy was taken into custody, and now awaits the result of the Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday 12 June 1851
BRATTON FLEMING - A fatal accident happened in this parish on Saturday last, about 11 o'clock in the forenoon, to a little boy called JOHN RIDD, eight years of age, son of a widow who occupies Narracott Farm. It appeared that the deceased accompanied his elder brother, WILLIAM RIDD, in an empty butt, drawn by one horse, to a field on the estate called Furzehill, where, at the gateway at the entrance, the wheel of the butt came in contact with the gatepost, by which the vehicle was upset, and the two boys thrown out. The elder brother fell with his leg under the cart, and the deceased fell under the horse, which lay on its back on the ground, with its feet in the air. WILLIAM RIDD called for help as he lay, as loud as he could, and his cries attracted to the spot Mr Thomas Yendell, a neighbouring farmer, and his servant man, John Yeo, who came to the poor boy's assistance, and having first removed the cart from off his leg, and rescued him, they proceeded to get up the horse under which was the deceased, who was all but dead when they took him up, and breathed his last almost immediately afterwards. The brother's leg was much hurt, but no bone was fractured. The body of the deceased was conveyed home to his widowed mother, and Mr Cooke, surgeon, of Barnstaple, was sent for, who pronounced that death had resulted from fracture of the skull. There were marks of a large effusion of blood at the gateway. The elder brother's account of the accident was that they were driving slowly at the time, and that the horse inclined too much to one side, which brought the wheel against the gate, and induced the horse and cart to turn over. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, by which a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

ILFRACOMBE - Fatal Accident. - On Monday, three boys named REED, Litson, and Hallett, strolled off from their homes and employments, about the middle of the day, and proceeded to the cliffs just beyond the Torr's walks, to range about for bird's nests, gull's eggs, or what else might come to hand. The rains had increased the peril of such adventures by rendering their footing more than usually uncertain. After clambering down the face of the cliff some little distance, these naturally [?] urchins became apprehensive for their safety, and determined to return. In doing so the first of them took a direction different from the others - turned an angle of the cliff that separated him from their company and their view, and on arriving up the top there was no appearance of their unfortunate companion. They stayed about, it is stated, for a considerable time calling for him, but obtaining no answer they returned home expecting that he had given them the slip. Evening drawing on, and the boy having been absent from home so long, his parents began to be concerned for him, and finding with whom he had been in company the former part of the day, went to one of the boys and made enquiry for their son, and ascertained from them under what circumstances they last saw him. One of the boys accompanied the father to the spot, near which they found his hat, and on descending to the bottom of the cliff the father found the body of his unfortunate boy in an awfully mangled condition, having fallen, it is supposed, between 150 and 200 feet. It is needless to add that life was extinct - very likely before he reached the bottom. With the assistance of neighbours the body was carried to his parents, and an Inquest was held on Tuesday before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. WILLIAM REED, this unhappy victim of his folly, was about 14 or 15 years of age.

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - The poor boy HOYLE, who, as we stated last week, had been burnt by the ignition of a coil of hemp which he had around his waist, has since died. The burn was far more severe than was at first supposed. An Inquest was held before T. L. Pridham, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was given.

EXETER - Melancholy Suicide. - On Tuesday, about mid-day, the inhabitants of the lower part of Paris-street, Exeter, were painfully excited by the fact that MR LASKEY, baker, &c., had committed suicide by cutting his throat. Dr Shapter, who happened to be passing at the time, and Mr Elliott, who was sent for, rendered all the assistance in their power to save the life of the unfortunate man, but so effectually had he perpetrated the act that he died almost immediately. The deceased has, we understand, of late been in a very desponding state of mind, and fears were entertained by his friends that he would destroy himself, having attempted it by poison but last week; but in order to prevent such a catastrophe, a relative had that day gone to one of the Lunatic Asylums to make arrangements for his admission into it as a patient. In the evening an Inquest was held on the body before John Warren, Esq., Coroner, when it was proved clearly to the Jury that the deceased was in an unsound state of mind, and that his despondency appeared to be a dread of becoming an inmate of the workhouse, but of which there was no present prospect, he being in what might be considered easy circumstances, with the probability of doing very well. The deceased cut his throat with a dinner knife. The Jury returned a verdict of "Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Instance of Suicide. - On Wednesday last, a lad, named WILLIAM CROCKER, aged about 19, in the employ of Mr Lake, dairyman, of Mutley, near Plymouth, put an end to his existence, by hanging himself. His master missed him, and on making a search, his body was found suspended in the linhay. It appears that the deceased was very much affected by the painful circumstance which occurred in his neighbourhood, a month of two since - the suicide by hanging of a lad with whom he was well acquainted. He had been repeatedly in a desponding state, and had several times stated that "he should be the next." An Inquest was held on his body on Thursday, and evidence being given as to the state of his mind for some time past, a verdict was returned of Insanity.

Thursday 26 June 1851
EXETER - Fatal Accident to a Drover. - On Wednesday evening last, a poor man named BABB, a drover, was conducting a drove of bullocks through the Fore-street, Exeter, and just as the animals passed the crossing of North-street, one of them attempted to get upon one near, when he struck it with his stick; the bullock in regaining its legs slipped and fell upon BABB, crushing his legs between its body and the curb of the flag-pavement so completely that the splintered bone protruded through his clothes several inches. He was immediately taken to the Hospital, where it was found that the amputation of the limb must immediately take place. The operation was skilfully performed, but the poor fellow expired on Saturday. An Inquest has been held, and a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 July 1851
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - A case of rather sudden death, under circumstances which induced the rumour that the event had been hastened by the administration of improper medicine, took place on Thursday last, in Myrtle-place, in this town. The name of the deceased was JAMES POPHAM, his age 47, and he was well known in the town as one of the public scavengers, and scarcely less known as a most inveterate tippler - a habit to which, as the issue proved, his untimely end was attributable. In consequence of rumours which reached the Borough Coroner, Alfred Drake, Esq., he considered it right to hold an Inquest on the body; and a respectable Jury was consequently impannelled at Blight's 'Railway Hotel' on Thursday afternoon, which, after viewing the corpse, adjourned to the next day in order to permit a post mortem examination to be made. On Friday evening the Jury (of which Mr James S. Souch was foreman) again assembled, and the evidence of Mr Morgan, who had made the examination, with the assistance of Mr Cooke, proved that death had resulted from delirium tremens. Deceased had been at the races the week before, and had hardly been sober from that time, eating very little, and drinking all he could get. He had complained of being ill, and at the public-house of Mr Seldon, the 'Horse and Groom', the day before his death, a person saw him, who happened to be an itinerant quack-doctor, and observing that he looked very ill he humanely went out to the shop of Messrs. Collins and Petter, where he purchased a few grains of nitre, which was administered to him in two does, and his death in a state of madness, soon after he had taken the last dose, gave rise to the suspicion and the sinister rumours we have mentioned. The post mortem examination, however, dissipated this suspicion, for it showed that the stomach was free from any irritant poison - was, in fact, almost empty, with great congestion of the vessels: his liver was also congested, and he suffered from pneumonia in the right lung. the Jury returned a verdict that death arose from delirium tremens. Mr Morgan stated that prompt medical treatment might have saved life.

MARTINHOE - An Inquest was taken on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of an aged female, named RADFORD, belonging to the parish of Marwood, who had died under the following circumstances. Deceased was on a visit in this parish, and went out on Tuesday to a neighbouring wood for the purpose of gathering a few sticks. She did not return at night, and the next day a man was employed to search in the wood for her, and there he found her lying dead, with a bundle of sticks tied at her back, and the handkerchief which bound it around her neck. It was supposed that she must have fallen backwards from the weight of the faggot, and been suffocated; but a post mortem examination made by Mr Marsack proved that death resulted from disease of the heart, in conformity with which a verdict was returned.

Thursday 10 July 1851
SWYMBRIDGE - Child Burning. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM TAYLOR, four years of age, son of WILLIAM TAYLOR, labourer, residing in Swymbridge Newland. The child was left alone in the house in the absence of his parents, when, on the mother's return in about four minutes, she found him in the hands of a neighbour, who had met the poor little sufferer running out at the front door in flames. Mr Bencraft, surgeon, of Swymbridge, was instantly called in, but so dreadful were the injuries - extending to almost every part of the body except the lower extremities - that relief was hopeless, and the poor child died in about three hours. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 24 July 1851
PLYMOUTH - Charge of Murder at Plymouth. - At three o'clock on Thursday afternoon information was received at the police station of a Peruvian, named Frederick de Bezon, having murdered an old naval pensioner, named COSTELLO, a shoemaker. It appeared that the deceased last night had been out drinking, and his home being in Devonport, he repaired to Stillman-street, where the prisoner was residing. He attempted to get in, but was unable. He afterwards went away, and returned about one o'clock this afternoon, when he again presented himself at the house in a state of intoxication. He was desired to leave, but refused, and the prisoner, who was sober, went down to him to put him out forcibly. Still refusing to leave, he took hold of him by the shoulders, and knocked him down in the middle of the street - his head coming with great violence to the paving-stones. He lay senseless for a few minutes on the ground, and was afterwards taken into the house, when he was found to be dead. The prisoner has been in the town only a few weeks, and appears to be on tramp. He was immediately taken into custody and conveyed to the station-house, where he now awaits the verdict of a Coroner's Inquest. The poor old man is above 60 years of age, and was well known in the neighbourhood.

PLYMOUTH - Extraordinary Suicide at Stonehouse. - On Sunday night, or rather early on Monday morning, one of the most singular and distressing acts of suicide was committed by a young girl aged 17 years, the daughter of a highly respectable baker named BURT, residing in Edgcumbe-street, Stonehouse. An Inquest on the body was held on Monday evening, at the 'Queen's Arms' public house, Stonehouse. The Jury having been sworn, they proceeded to view the body of the deceased, which presented all the appearances of death having ensued from drowning. The limbs were remarkably livid, and every spark of colour had totally left the cheeks. The deceased appeared to have been extremely delicate, and to have suffered from bad health; the arms, &c., being emaciated, and the hip bones protruding. the body was that of a person the opposite of robust. There is a water tank, or well, sunk in MR BURT'S yard, and this is guarded by an iron trap, which is invariably placed over the entrance hole to the well every night. The hole itself is not wider than 12 inches, nor longer than 15, so that it would be a matter of some difficulty for a person to enter the well there. this, however, the deceased had done unperceived. The Jury having returned from viewing the body, and hearing the statement of several witnesses relative to the cause of death, consulted together and ultimately returned a verdict, "that the deceased drowned herself while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Another Shocking Suicide. - Another act of self-destruction was committed on Wednesday morning in this neighbourhood. A man named THEODORE PARKER, who rents a house in Clarence-street, Plymouth, had been in a desponding state of health for some little time past, it was observed, in consequence of pecuniary embarrassments. Not the least apprehension was entertained, however, on this account, and his friends, although sympathising with him, did not for a moment conceive that the poor fellow's reason was in any way affected. He was bordering on 62, and had previously enjoyed tolerably robust health. On Wednesday morning the unhappy man arose about seven o'clock, and went down stairs as he had been in the habit of doing. Shortly afterwards his wife followed, when, on entering the kitchen, to her horror, she saw her unfortunate husband hanging by a piece of rope to a hook in the wall. She immediately cut him down, raised an alarm, and several neighbours were shortly in attendance to render every assistance in their power. Mr Harper, the surgeon, was called in, but life appeared to be already extinct, every effort to restore animation being utterly unavailing. In the evening, John Edmunds, Esq., Coroner, held an Inquest on the body, at the house of the deceased, when the above facts were proved, and a very respectable Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

ATHERINGTON - An Inquest was held at the 'Bell Inn,' in this parish, on Saturday the 19thinst., before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a man, named unknown, but presumed to be called WILLIAM SMITH. From evidence adduced it appears that the deceased slept on Wednesday last in one of Mr Eastman's outhouses in this neighbourhood, after having drank a pint of beer at his house. On the following morning he entered the house again, and complained of being poorly, saying he thought he should never reach his home, which he stated was Nottingham. He appeared to be a tramp. On the Thursday evening, he went to the 'Bell Inn,' where he ate part of a cake, and drank half a pint of beer. Several persons were in the kitchen while he was there, and they thought him to be tipsy. About 11 o'clock the deceased went to bed, and on his walking upstairs seemed rather feeble, and was obliged to hold for support, but he did not complain of being ill. The next morning, about 10 o'clock the daughter of the landlord, having occasion to go upstairs, looked into the room where deceased had slept, and saw him sitting by the bedside partly dressed. About half past 12, on her again going upstairs, she opened the bedroom door, and saw deceased lying on his side on the floor. On procuring assistance it was discovered he was dead. From the evidence of Dr Jones, of High Bickington, who made a post mortem examination of the body, it appeared that death was occasioned by disease of the lungs, liver and intestines, produced probably by free drinking. Verdict accordingly.

ROBOROUGH - Death by Accidentally Falling from a Hayrick. - On Friday last the Deputy Coroner, John Henry Toller, Esq., held an Inquest in this parish, on the body of WILLIAM NEWCOMBE, thatcher, aged 65 years, who had died the preceding day from injuries received by falling from a hay-rick. It appeared by evidence that the deceased was employed on the Wednesday before in thatching a hayrick for the rector, the Rev. Mr Gurney, and while on the rick, in attempting to move a ladder near which he was standing, he unfortunately fell to the ground, a depth of from 20 to 30 feet. He was taken up insensible, and was carried home, where the surgeon, Mr Risdon, from Dolton, was soon in attendance upon him, who stated that he had received concussion of the brain, and that his recovery was doubtful. He died the next morning, without any interval of consciousness. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

MESHAW - An Inquest was taken on Thursday last, in this parish, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of FRANCIS COCKRAM, aged three years, son of JOHN COCKRAM, mason. The deceased had been delicate from his birth until some few months ago, when he became stronger and his health appeared confirmed. A fortnight ago he was afflicted with a sore head, for which his mother made some simple applications, but as the part did not get better she sent on Saturday se'nnight for a woman called Cornall, residing in the neighbouring parish of Mariansleigh, who had the reputation of being skilled in the treatment of cutaneous affections. The woman came on the following Monday, and said she could soon cure the child's head, to which she applied with a feather a few drops of a liquid she had with her. After she left the child appeared more comfortable, and slept soundly and well. The next morning, however, he suddenly complained of being worse, and said his head smarted. A neighbour came in and nursed the child, who became very sick, vomited a good deal, and died a few minutes afterwards. The facts induced suspicion that death had been hastened by some noxious ingredient in the medicine applied to the head of deceased by the woman Cornall; and on that account the Coroner ordered a post mortem examination, which was made by Mr Robert Furse, of Southmolton, surgeon, and which established that death resulted from the rupture of a vessel in the brain, wholly unconnected with the ailment of the scalp, or the liniment applied to heal it. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 31 July 1851
BARNSTAPLE - Inquests. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Wednesday (yesterday), before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., as deputy for Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN PHILLIPS, aged 30, late postboy at the 'Golden Lion.' Deceased had retired to rest on Monday night in his usual health, but about midnight he awoke his wife, complaining that he felt ill. Deceased had been accustomed to fits, and his wife rightly conjectured that he was about to be afflicted in that way; and he shortly afterwards was seized with a fit, which was followed by a succession of similar attacks until about half-past two o'clock, when he died, not having been conscious after he was first taken. Mr Winter, surgeon, was sent for, but on his arrival he was dead. There was no doubt that apoplexy was the cause of his death, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was accordingly returned. Deceased has left a widow, but no family.

BARNSTAPLE - On the same day, another Inquest was held before Mr Bencraft, in Gaydon-street, in this town, on view of the body of ANN GALLIFORD, aged 36, a respectable servant who had been a short time out of place, and was living with her aunt, Dorothy Badcock, in Gaydon-street. Her aunt stated that she left deceased in bed on the morning of Tuesday, at six o'clock, when she (the aunt) went out to her work. Deceased was then in perfect health. She did not return until three o'clock in the afternoon, when she went upstairs, and found the deceased on her knees at the side of the bed, with her mouth open, and in the attitude of prayer. Finding that she did not move, the aunt went over to her, and was shocked to find her dead, and almost cold! Deceased had been seen by the neighbours so late as 12 o'clock, apparently in her usual health. She had been afflicted with goitre in the neck, and it was the opinion of Mr Hiern, who lives near, and who was called in to see her on her aunt finding her as above described, that the tumour in her neck had broken, and the discharge from it suffocated the deceased. This opinion was confirmed by the appearance of considerable discoloration in the neck when she was found. Deceased was a person of deeply religious habits, and there is no doubt that finding herself very ill, she had knelt down to commend her soul to God, and in the act her spirit took its flight. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident, at Ridd, near Bideford. - On Saturday morning, whilst JOHN BENNETT, aged 18 years, in the employ of Mr Ridaway, of Buckland Filleigh, was driving a waggon and team to the limekiln at Annery, and was in the act of passing two other waggons on the road, he carelessly ran over a heap of stones that projected about eight feet into the road, the fatal consequence of which was that he was thrown from the shaft on which he was standing, and the heel of his boot getting entangled in the rail of the cart, his head was dashed to pieces against the wheel, and he was dragged upwards of four landyards, when his boot being unlaced, allowed his foot to slip out, but when one of the parties went back to his help he was found to be dead. On Monday, an Inquest was held over the remains by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" the Jury at the same time condemning in very strong terms the dangerous practice of lodging stones on that spot, as the road was widened some time ago in consequence of a coach accident that took place there.

SOUTHMOLTON - A Brother Accidentally Shot. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of GEORGE CHAPPLE, aged 10, son of WILLIAM CHAPPLE, wheelwright, who was shot through the abdomen the preceding evening by his brother, GEORGE CHAPPLE, aged 17, the effects of which he survived but a few hours. It appeared that the elder brother took a gun, which his father had recently newly-stocked, to a field of Mr Deagon's, accompanied by the deceased and three other boys, for the purpose of trying it. From the evidence of the three boys the gun was fired three times, and again loaded the fourth time, the deceased standing close to the gun in front of his brother to witness the placing on the cap, when the gun went off, at half-cock, and shot him in the bowels. He instantly cried out, "Oh dear! oh dear!" The brother conveyed him home, and Mr Flexman, sen., was promptly in attendance, but the injury was too much for human skill. The wound appeared about the size to admit a marble; but from the evidence of Mr Flexman, the colon was shot through, and the other internal parts much shattered, but no shot or wadding could be found in the body, and the boys state that no wadding was put on the shot, and it is supposed the shot must have fallen out before the gun went off. The verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMPTON ST. MARY - We are pained to have to record the death, by suicide, of a respectable yeoman, MR GEORGE WHITE, who has for some time occupied the farm of Smithaleigh, in the parish of Plympton St. Mary. Deceased hanged himself at his estate on Wednesday last; he has left a widow and three young children. He was the son of MR GEORGE WHITE, who for many years kept the 'George Inn' at Ridgway, a house of considerable celebrity in the time of the Quicksilver Mail. An Inquest on his remains has been held, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Thursday 7 August 1851
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - We gave in our last the particulars of a sad catastrophe which befell a pleasure party, belonging to this town, on their return from Clovelly on the night of the 24th, and expressed our apprehensions that it would prove fatal to one of them who was the most severely injured, viz., MRS WATERS, wife of MR WATERS, East-the-water. Our fears unhappily were fulfilled, for the lamented lady died on Thursday night at the 'Swan Inn,' Fairy Cross, six miles from this town, where she was removed after the accident, which occurred not far from that house. An Inquest was held on the body the next day before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner and a respectable Jury. Evidence of the facts was given by Mr Jesse Martin, who was of the party, and who proved that they left Clovelly in their phaeton about nine o'clock in the night of the 24th, all perfectly sober (Capt. Lakey, who drove, being a teetotaller), and proceeded safely as far as Fairy Cross hill, where, in the darkness which prevailed, their phaeton, which they were driving a steady trot, came in contact with one of the bond-stones at the road-side, and the collision was so violent as greatly to damage one of the wheels, and, after proceeding perhaps a hundred feet, the vehicle overturned, and all were thrown out. All were more or less injured, but the deceased the most severely. She was removed to the 'Swan Inn,' where medical attendance was quickly procured, and she lingered until Thursday night, when she expired. The Coroner asked this witness if in his opinion the accident would have happened if it had not been for the bond-stone projecting into the road; and he replied decidedly in the negative. Capt. Jones, the brother-in-law of deceased, who was of the party, gave similar evidence. Mr Thomson, surgeon, who had been attending the deceased, gave evidence that she died from concussion of the brain, the result of the accident. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death," accompanying it with a strong censure on the practice of the trustees of the roads in placing these bond-stones by the road-side. Mr Vidal, and Mr Goldie Harding, two of the trustees, who were present, promised that they should be immediately removed. Much sorrow is felt at the untimely decease of MRS WATERS, who was greatly respected in the several relations of life. We are happy to hear that Mrs Martin and Captain Lakey, who were of the party, and were also injured, are recovering.

TEIGNMOUTH - Suspected Suicide of a Young Lady. - Much excitement has prevailed in this neighbourhood for several weeks past in consequence of the mysterious death of a young lady, MISS ANNE WYSE, aged 19 years, an orphan, living with her uncle and aunt, the Rev. Mr and Mrs Hele, at Bishopsteignton. Her death occurred on the 12th May under the following circumstances. She had been on that day attending a fashionable archery meeting, and returned home in the evening at an early hour. She retired to her room, and, when tea was ready at seven o'clock, the servant was sent to invite her attendance in the drawing room: the servant, however, returned, saying that MISS WYSE was not in her room; but Mrs Hele replied that she must be, for that she had seen her but a little before go upstairs, and was sure she had not since come down. The servant, therefore, was again dispatched to the young lady's room, and there was horrified to find her lying by the bedside, with her arm reaching behind to her shoulder, and quite dead! She instantly gave the alarm, and a medical man was called in, but the case was beyond his skill, and he gave it as his opinion that she had died from apoplexy, and furnished the necessary certificate to that effect, so that the interment took place without the interposition of a Coroner's Inquest. The Coroner, indeed, heard of the case, and went to the house, but deferred to the wish of the family not to have an Inquisition or post mortem examination. Some days afterwards in the young lady's writing desk was found a small phial, which had contained essential oil of bitter almonds, and in which was a quill as if the contents of the phial had been partly emptied by its means. This fact obtained currency, and reached the ears of another uncle of the young lady, a major in the army, living at a distance, who came down, obtained possession of the phial, and took it to Mr Herepath, of Bristol, the celebrated chemist, who at once pronounced that its contents were a deadly poison. With this information, and in order to arrest certain sinister reports that had got into circulation, the Major caused a Coroner's Inquest to be held, which was opened on the morning of Tuesday the 29th ultimo, before a most respectable Jury, of which Captain Rhodes was foreman. The body was exhumed, and the contents of the stomach were taken by Mr Herepath for analysis, and the Inquest was adjourned to the 14th August, to await the result of his examination. There are a variety of rumours prevalent, to which, in the present state of the affair, it would be improper further to allude.

PLYMOUTH - Melancholy Accident at Plymouth. - On Saturday last, as a gardener named LUXMORE, an industrious man of excellent character, was employed in collecting fossils, on the quarry of the Western Hoe, for ornamenting the garden of Mr Samuel Stanbury, of Athenaeum-street, a large mass of rock, weighing, it is said, about half a ton, fell on him, and injured him so severely that he died before he could be removed. An Inquest was held on his body on Monday, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death." The poor man has left a wife and six children totally unprovided for.

Thursday 14 August 1851
Inquest:- On Monday last an Inquest was held before Henry A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of the illegitimate child of MARY ANN SMALLACOMBE, at Bridestowne. This case caused very great excitement in the neighbourhood, in consequence of carious reports being in circulation tending to create strong suspicion that the child (six months old) had died from violence from the father. The body had been privately interred a fortnight, and was exhumed by order of the Coroner, for the inspection of himself and Jury. Dr Budd, of Northtawton, was summoned, and made a most careful post mortem examination, and afterwards gave so decided and clear testimony, that the Jury, after a long investigation, the Coroner having summoned a number of witnesses, found that the child's death was not caused by the violence suspected, but that the cause of death, so long after interment, could not be satisfactorily ascertained: it was a very suspicious case. The resident magistrate, Mr Hamlyn, attended the Inquest and was thanked by the Coroner for his valuable assistance.

GEORGENYMPTON - Inquest at Georgenympton, on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., on the body of MICHAEL WESTACOTT, of that parish, labourer, aged 62, who was riding on the rail of a cart the preceding day, accidentally fell back, and in the fall broke his neck. He survived but a short time. Mr Furse, surgeon, was promptly in attendance, but without avail. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 21 August 1851
ILFRACOMBE - Death by Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday (yesterday), before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, at Watermouth Gardens, in the parish of Ilfracombe, on the body of SARAH ANN DELBRIDGE, 2 ½ years old, daughter of WILLIAM DELBRIDGE, who is hind to Arthur Davie Bassett, Esq., of Watermouth. The deceased was at play the day before in the yard of her father's house with her little brother, a year or two her senior, their mother being indoors; when, hearing a noise, she went out, and found the deceased head foremost in a tank or well about a foot deep in water, which, however, covered her person except one leg and foot which were entangled in the frame work of the tank. On taking her out, although she could not have been in the water, according to the mother's apprehension, more than two minutes, she but moved slightly, never spoke, and died almost immediately. Medical aid was sent for, and Mr Stoneham, of Ilfracombe, was quickly in attendance, but life was past restoration. There appeared to be no cover to the tank; but the idea of danger from it does not seem to have presented itself until suggested by this sad accident. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Mr and Mrs Bassett were quickly at the house, to condole with and assist the afflicted parents.

HARTLAND - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was taken on the 15th inst., at Lower Roosdon, in the parish of Hartland, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of SARAH BAILEY, aged 22 years, wife of MR RICHARD BAILEY, of that place, yeoman. On the preceding Wednesday night the deceased and her husband retired to bed about nine o'clock, the deceased being at the time in good health and in more than her usual spirits. About two o'clock in the morning, however, she called her husband, and complained of being ill, and desired him to get a candle: he went downstairs for the purpose, while she sat up in the bed, but before he had time to get upstairs again with the candle, he heard deceased call again, and say, "Take care of my dear child." He hurried upstairs when deceased appeared to apprehend that her end was near, for she said to him, "Kiss me, my dear; I am gone - I am gone," the blood at the time rushing out of her mouth. He sent off to his sister-in-law and for a neighbour, as well as to Hartland village for Mr Vine, the surgeon, but before his arrival deceased had expired. He gave it as his opinion that the cause f death was suffocation produced by blood and pus filling the bronchial tube. In consequence of reports that were in circulation, both the husband and the surgeon (who had both attended her in March last) stated that she never had complained of want. The Jury returned a verdict in conformity with the opinion of the medical man.

SWIMBRIDGE - Fatal Accident By A Fall From A Horse. - On the evening of Tuesday last a fatal accident occurred to MR WALTER WESTACOTT, aged 41, a respectable farmer residing at Coombe, in the parish of Swymbridge, who was returning from Bratton Fleming Fair, when, near Chelfham bridge, he was thrown with great violence from his horse under circumstances which will be found explained in the report of the Inquest underneath, by which he received such severe injuries as issued in his death at the North Devon Infirmary on the following (Wednesday) morning. A Coroner's Jury was summoned to sit on the body the same afternoon, at the Infirmary, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner. The Jury chose Mr Philip Jones for their foreman, and having retired to view the body, the following evidence was given on their return.
Mr Wm. Parkin, farmer, occupying a farm near the deceased in the parish of Swymbridge:- I was returning from Bratton fair last evening in company with the deceased. We left Bratton a little before six o'clock. We were both on horseback. We were riding at a fast pace, I being a little a-head. We had just got at the foot of the hill by Chelfham-bridge, when deceased said, "We will just see which horse will go the fastest." We had been riding an easy pace down the hill, but then we put our horses into a gallop. I took the lead by a few yards, when, just after I had passed the bridge, I heard the horse of deceased suddenly fall. I immediately turned back, just in time to see the horse rising again, and found the deceased lying in the middle of the road. He appeared to be quite dead, and did not speak or move. I saw that his head was injured and a quantity of blood was flowing from his ears. Deceased was lying on his right side, and the saddle was near him, the girth having broke. The horse seemed to be injured, but not very much. I do not think the deceased or the horse had gone against the parapet of the bridge. The horse seemed to have slipped up all fours as the deceased was turning the slight bend in the turnpike-road. I do not believe the horse shied, nor did I see any timber there lying in the road. I got off and held up his head, and within two minutes Mr White of the 'White Horse,' Barnstaple, came by in his light cart, into which we placed the deceased, and took him on to Barnstaple and to the Infirmary. I did not stay many minutes there, but went to give information to his friends of what had happened.
By the Foreman:- Deceased was not in the slightest degree intoxicated. He was a particularly sober man.
Mr John Dennis Jones, of Landkey, yeoman:- I had come on from Bratton in company with deceased and the last witness. They had gone on a few yards before me, say 20 land-yards, and I had lost sight of them as they turned the corner to go out into the turnpike and over Chelfham-bridge. I heard the horse of deceased fall, and came up immediately afterwards. He was lying in the road as described by the last witness. There was a good deal of blood about the road, but none over the bridge. I do not believe that either the horse or the deceased went against the bridge. His hat was off and his saddle was by his side.
In answer to Mr Cotton, Mr Jones said they had come down the old road from Bratton, because it was rather nearer.
Mr Forester, house surgeon at the Infirmary, gave evidence to the fact of deceased having been brought into the Infirmary the previous evening. He had symptoms of compression of the brain, and he appeared to have sustained a fracture of the base of the skull. He was in a perfectly comatose state when he came in, and so continued until his death, which took place about three o'clock that morning. Witness was in the house when deceased was brought in, and the whole of the medical staff - Dr Budd, Mr Curry, and Mr Law - were in immediate attendance upon him. Everything was done for him that could be done, but from the first the case was seen to be a hopeless one.
This was all the evidence, and the Jury unhesitatingly returned a verdict of "Accidentally Killed by a Fall from a Horse."
Deceased did not appear to have been dragged at all, so that death resulted altogether from the blow in his fall. It is conjectured that the stirrup broke, and that the pulling of deceased on one side in consequence, the horse at the time at full speed and turning rather a sharp curve, brought the animal off his legs. Deceased was unmarried, and was one of a large and respectable family. He had been in America for several years where he had invested some property, and was now farming a small estate as an agreeable occupation of his time. His untimely end is a source of great grief to a numerous family circle.

Thursday 28 August 1851
NORTH TAWTON - On Wednesday last, as some labourers were employed in saving wheat on Solland Barton, in the parish of Sampford Courtenay, a little boy 10 years old, son of one of the labourers named PENGELLY, was placed on the cart on a load of corn, and on its way to the rick it is supposed he fell asleep, it being dark at the time; on arriving at the rick yard a person who was on the rick (not knowing any one was on the cart) threw a pitch fork on the load and unfortunately ran into the boy's head just above the ear: the poor boy lingered in great agony for three hours, when death put a period to his sufferings. An Inquest was held by H. A. Vallack, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 4 September 1851
NORTHMOLTON - Accidental Death from a Fall. - On Monday last, an Inquest was taken in this parish, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner for the county, on the body of JOHN TAPP, mason, aged 59 years, who had died the previous Saturday from an accidental fall, under the following circumstances. The deceased was in his house on Friday afternoon, when he went upstairs to fetch his gaiters, and on coming to the top of the stairs fell headlong to the bottom, a height of about 12 feet: his wife was in the house, and came to his assistance, but he was insensible and speechless and so continued until his death: he had been subject to fits for many years, and the probability is that he was seized with a fit when he fell over the stairs. Mr Ley, of Northmolton, surgeon, was called in to see him, and came immediately, when he found him bleeding from the ears and nose, and suffering from a severe bruise of the head. The deceased died the next morning. The opinion of the surgeon was, that death resulted from a fracture of the base of the skull caused by the fall, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Thursday 11 September 1851
BICKINGTON - Fatal Accident. - An accident, which issued fatally, occurred on Friday evening last to MR J. N. TYTE, aged 27, a young gentleman who has for some time past been residing at Bickington, in the parish of Fremington, being a cripple, and in other respects a great invalid. On the afternoon of Friday, between two and three o'clock, he drove himself out, as was his custom, in a bath chair drawn by a donkey; and after a ride of about two hours, he returned to the village, and was turning the corner of a lane near his house, when by some accident the chair came in contact with the wall and upset, throwing the deceased with some violence to the ground. He was immediately taken up, and conveyed to his house, and in reply to questions stated that he had hurt his head - that he was turning the corner too sharp and upset. He remained perfectly conscious for about an hour, but was very sick, and after that time he became insensible, and died about two hours and a half after the accident. Mr Joce, surgeon, was sent for, but life was extinct before his arrival. An Inquest was held on the body the following day before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. It is considered that deceased died less from injury inflicted by the accident than from excessive fright acting upon his debilitated constitution.

Thursday 18 September 1851
EXETER - Sudden Death at Exeter. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Tuesday morning, on the body of a young female named CROKER, residing at York-street, St. Sidwell's. The deceased was in the habit of attending a stall, in High-street, for the sale of coffee, &c., early in the morning; on Monday, during the day, she complained of very violent head-ache, and went to bed early in the evening; about two o'clock in the morning, her father went to her bed room and found her leaning over the side of the bed, seemingly very poorly; he took her and placed her back in the bed, and left her, and again visited her about four o'clock, when, after being a very short time with her, she expired. Nothing further was elicited, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

DUNSFORD - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Royal Oak', Dunsford, on the body of MR RICHARD ASH, of Langley Farm, Dunsford, who met with his death on the Friday night previous, by the upsetting of his horse and cart as he was returning from Exeter market. The deceased was found by Mr Crispin, wheelwright, lying in the road, between the front of the cart and the horse, quite dead, near the late Mr Froom's residence, at the top of Dunsford town. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Thursday 25 September 1851
HARTLAND - An Inquest was held in this parish, on the 12th instant, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of the infant daughter of a single woman called MARY ANN PENGELLY. The mother had been a servant in the family of Mr Vine, of Hall, in this parish, up to Lady-day last, when she left in consequence of her being in the family-way, and returned to her mother's house, where the deceased was born on the 27th July last. The child did very well until the Friday before her death, when she had a convulsive fit, which was followed by others on the Sunday and Tuesday after, in the last of which she died. There having been no medical man in attendance, and from rumours which were afloat, it was thought necessary to hold an Inquest, but a post mortem examination, made by Mr Vine, surgeon, by direction of the Coroner, ascertained that death was from natural causes, and a verdict accordingly was returned.

BEAFORD - Death by Accidental Poisoning. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the body of HENRY HOOPER, aged 23 years, son of MR JOHN HOOPER, of Ramscliffe farm, in this parish, a respectable yeoman, whose death occurred under the following melancholy circumstances. Deceased had been in the field to work on Friday last, the 19th instant, and came in with his servant man to dinner. He had gathered some wild sage, which he laid upon the dresser; and while standing there, he said he saw a mouse run into a hole in the wall, which he endeavoured to bring out by piercing the wall with an augur, and in doing so he discovered a paper containing a white powder, which he appeared to have mistaken for an effervescing powder, and made a draught of it, which he drank. He followed the servant to the field after dinner, but there became ill and returned home, when his sister attended on him, and he expressed his fears that he had taken poison. She sent off for Mr Rouse, surgeon, who administered an emetic, but the fatal dose had taken too fast hold of his system, and deceased died the same night in great agony. From an analysis of part of the powder which deceased had spilled on the table, it turned out to be arsenic, which his father had some years ago for the purpose of killing rats, and had put away for safety in this hole in the wall. There were some singular circumstances in the case; but the Jury were satisfied that the death of deceased was by misadventure, and returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 2 October 1851
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary on Monday last, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of THOMAS LAKE, aged 22 years, a farm-servant in the family of Mr Wm. B. Fisher, of Pottington, in the parish of Pilton. We stated in our last that the deceased, on the Wednesday preceding, was about mounting a horse which his master had purchased at the late fair, when the animal reared before the man was firmly seated, whereby the deceased was thrown off with some violence to the ground. He was removed to the Infirmary, when it was at first considered that he had sustained only a severe bruise; but dislocation of the hip was afterwards discovered, and most violent inflammation of the lungs set in, which the utmost skill of the medical staff of that institution was unable to check, and deceased expired on Sunday. The verdict of the Jury was "Died from Inflammation of the lungs," in conformity with the opinion of the medical men on a post mortem examination. Deceased was a fine young fellow, and much respected by his employer and his family.

Thursday 6 November 1851
APPLEDORE - Child-burning. - A little girl called CAROLINE CLARKE, daughter of a mariner living at West Appledore, being left on Tuesday last in charge of her sister only five years old, caught her clothes on fire, and was so much burnt that, although she had every assistance from Dr Pratt, she died on the following Thursday. An Inquest was taken before Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on the next day, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

DEVONPORT - A melancholy case of self-destruction took place on Saturday last in one of the cells of the Devonport prisons. The unfortunate victim is a married woman of about 44 years of age, the wife of a shipwright in Her Majesty's Dockyard, named JOHN BARRY. On Saturday she got up as usual, and had breakfast with her husband, who left shortly before seven for the Dockyard. At about half-past eight o'clock it appears she went to the 'Lord Hood' public-house, in King street, Devonport, at no great distance from her residence, partaking of two glasses, or a half-pint of 4d. beer; in the course of the afternoon she was there again and had another glass of beer, and before leaving, she was observed to come from the direction of a meat safe, apparently with something under her shawl. On quitting the house, a female servant whose suspicions had been aroused, went to the safe and found that a piece of roasted pork, stuffed with sage and onions had been taken from it. The servant acquainted her master and mistress - Mr Frost and his wife - who at once sent for a police officer, and in the course of the day she was taken into custody, and when put in charge of the police she appeared distressed, mostly because her "poor husband would know it." She was taken before the Mayor and remanded till Monday. After having been in the cell about half an hour, her children, aged respectively 10 and 12, came with some tea for her. The tea was taken to the door by Policeman Tozer, who, as she did not answer when called, put his face to the grating in the door to see where she was; and on so doing he was not a little startled to find the face of the woman close to his own. She had taken off a scarf which she had on inside her dress when placed in the cell, and having placed one end of it round one of the bars of the grating, and the other with half a tie round her neck, had in some extraordinary way contrived to hang herself: the place where the scarf was attached to the grating, being about four feet two from the ground, and her body from her feet to her neck measuring four feet four inches. The scarf was fastened to the upper part of the bar by simply placing the end under the part where the strain would come on the bar, and around her neck a simple half tie, and as she hung her chin rested on the ledge at the bottom of the grating, the face being turned as though looking through the grating. From the position in which she was found it is evidence that after adjusting the scarf she must have voluntarily drawn up her feet so as to perpetrate the fatal deed. She was at once cut down when discovered, and Mr De La Rue, surgeon, called in; but she was quite dead. From the evidence adduced at the Inquest on Monday and Tuesday, it appeared that the husband is an abstainer from all intoxicating drinks, and that during the last six or seven years he had never any article of that sort in his house - that the woman, although she was known to take glasses of beer now and then, was never known to be what is termed drunk - that when accused of drinking by her husband her manner was excited and flighty. It was also stated that she was the daughter of MR MARKS, formerly a foreman in the storehouse in the Dockyard, but who, after his superannuation, went to reside at Barnstaple, where he became insane and so continued for months, but subsequently got better, and died at the age of 58. The Inquest was adjourned on Monday to the next day, in order to hear the evidence of the persons residing in the house as to the habits and state of mind of the deceased. After a patient and protracted Enquiry and an elaborate summing up by the Coroner, the Jury, of which Mr Peter Jessep Down was the foreman, found that the deceased had destroyed herself in a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 13 November 1851
BARNSTAPLE - Suicide by a Mother. - On Saturday evening last, about six o'clock, the village of Pilton, in this borough, was thrown into a state of great excitement by the rumour that MRS MARY ANN LEE, wife of MR JOHN LEE, of Bradiford Mills, turner, had committed suicide by throwing herself over the bridge of the Yeo at the bottom of Pilton. The rumour turned out to be too true, and the following were the facts of the case as elicited at the Coroner's Inquest held on the body at the house of her husband, on the Monday morning following, before Alfred Drake, Esq.
The deceased had been for six months past in a very desponding state of mind, ever since the birth of her last child; and it was only a few days since that she made an attempt to destroy two of her children by cutting their throats with her husband's razor, which his timely interference providentially prevented. A bottle of poison was also taken from her very lately, which, it is inferred, she had obtained for some deadly purpose. On Saturday afternoon she left her house to go to Barnstaple on some errands, which she had executed, and it was on her returning home that she committed the rash act of precipitating herself over the bridge, which she had to pass in her way. It was just getting dark, and no one seems to have noticed her get on the parapet of the bridge; but a woman called Ann Marchant passed just as the unfortunate deceased was in the act of dropping off into the water. Hearing the plunge, she called out, and a number of persons soon collected on the spot. The tide was very high at the time, and was just ebbing. Strange to say, none of those who collected was able to swim, or the poor woman might probably have been got out alive. But a man called John Heard, with praiseworthy promptitude, hastened to the Dispensary, from whence he procured the grappling irons, with which he succeeded in recovering the body very near the spot at which she fell in; but, having been immersed in the water above half an hour, of course, life was quite extinct. The body was removed to Mrs Grigg's, the 'Reform Inn,' in Pilton-street, and Mr Dickinson and Dr Budd were in instant attendance, but any attempt at reanimation was wholly hopeless. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."
The deceased was only 32 years of age, and was the mother of five children. The distress of her husband at the event is intense. Until her late affliction nothing could exceed her affection for her children; nor was any stronger proof required of her mental aberration than the continual attempts she had evidently contemplated on their lives.

BIDEFORD - Child Burning. - On Friday the 7th, at six o'clock in the evening, an Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., at the 'Union Inn,' in Bideford, on the body of a child, aged six and a half years, the son of a mariner named EVANS. The grandmother deposed:- I am grandmother to the child, and wife of CORNELIUS GEFFERY. The deceased and his sister, aged four and a half years, were placed with me by their father, RICHARD EVANS, on Tuesday week last. He had lately taken them from the Bideford Union, where they had been some months, having been placed there by their mother, in consequence of her inability to maintain them, as the father had left England for America without allowing her his half pay. He promised me 5s. per week, but I have not had any money yet. Yesterday, about 12 o'clock, I left the two children on the step of the door, with but little fire in the house, to go into the town on some errands. As I was returning I met a man who told me to run, as one of the children was burnt to death. The child told me he had lighted a stick and caught his pinafore. He died soon after two o'clock. The child's mother lives at Barnstaple, and gets her living by gloving. Wm. Shaxton deposed:- I was working in the yard of Mr Long, tanner, at Westcome, and heard a child cry in the garden above, belonging to Mr Geffery. I looked in the way of the sound, and saw smoke, and heard a child crying for its grandmother. I ran to the garden door, found it locked, returned through my master's yard, and on going over the hedge found the child kneeling in the path with his clothes burnt off except round the waist. I wrapped by apron round him, and carried him into the house before his grandmother returned. - A verdict of "Accidental Death," but in doing so the Jury desired to express their abhorrence of the apparent neglect that had been manifested towards the children, both by the father and the mother.

Thursday 27 November 1851
BIDEFORD - Shocking and Fatal Accident. - An accident of a very alarming nature occurred on Friday the 21st inst., at Woolfardisworthy, in this neighbourhood. It appears that on the morning of that day MR WM. TRICK, Millwright, and brother to MR CHARLES TRICK, of this town, left his home to go to Clovelly, leaving his wife in charge of a cornmill during his absence. On returning home he proceeded to the mill, when, to his indescribable horror, he beheld his beloved wife entangled in the works of the crushing machine. He at once stopped its working, but the ill-fated woman, on being released, was found to have received very severe injury, and only survived seven hours. An Inquest by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 December 1851
BARNSTABLE - Melancholy Suicide of a Young Woman, and Inquest upon the Body. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held on the body of MARY BAKER, aged 22 years, at the 'Rose and Crown' public house at Newport, in this borough, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Thomas Seldon was foreman. It appeared, according to the evidence as stated before the Jury, that on Wednesday morning the 3rd inst., Mrs John Law, who resides in the Square, sent for Mr Aldham, the Superintendent of Police, and informed him that she had reason to believe that one of her servants, viz., the unfortunate MARY BAKER, deceased (who had been in her service only two or three weeks), had been robbing her, and requested Mr A. to remain in her house until she had made an examination of her plate, &c. Mrs Law at that time missed only a few trifling articles, which were found in MARY BAKER'S box; and from motives of humanity, as Mrs Law did not feel disposed to prosecute, Mr Aldham did not interfere in the matter, and the young woman was immediately discharged from Mrs Law's service. About an hour afterwards Mrs Law again sent for Mr Aldham, to inform him that two small silver articles were lost, upon which she set a great value, and was very desirous to recover them. At this time the young woman, MARY BAKER, passed through the Square, and Mr Aldham immediately followed with the view of seeing whether she might pawn the articles, or of following her to her mother's house, which is situated on the Tawton road, near to Orchard Terrace. Mr Aldham followed her at a considerable distance through the back lanes, Trinity-street, and on to Cooney bridge upon reaching that point he lost sight of her, but upon looking down the turning by the 'Newport Inn,' he saw her standing by Mr Shapland's limekilns: He then walked towards her, and she immediately ran away round the limekilns. Considering that she was gone up the lane which leads direct to her mother's house, Mr A. went for a considerable distance up the lane, but not seeing anything of the young woman in that direction, he returned to the limekilns again, and there seeing a boy called Hartnoll, who was coming from the river, he enquired of him if he had seen a young woman pass that way towards Pill, he said he had seen a young woman ass, walking very fast, and by that time she must be as far on as Pill-house. Mr A. then went direct to her mother's house, thinking that the young woman would go round by the Tawton road: he remained with the mother for some time, but the deceased did not come there, and he then returned to Mrs Law's house, when he found that she had obtained from the Mayor a warrant to search the mother's house. Mr A. again went to Newport with Mrs Law's daughter and the governess, and on searching the young woman's box several articles of small value were found and recognised as the property of Mrs Law. The next morning the two silver articles were found on the roof of Mrs Law's house, immediately outside the window of the room in which the unfortunate young woman slept. Day after day passed away, until Saturday morning the 6th inst., and the young woman not being heard of, the distracted mother requested a man called Wm. Harris to drag the river: he accordingly went with Thomas Hartnoll, and in a very short time with the grappling irons found the body in a deep part of the river between the limekilns and Pill. The body was removed to the mother's house, and presented so extraordinary fair an appearance that one might readily have believed that the poor creature was only asleep, and not really in the arms of death. The Jury sat the same afternoon, and returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

BRAUNTON - Sudden Death. - On Saturday last a Court of Inquiry was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR ROBERT PONTING, pensioner, who died very suddenly the previous morning. the deceased some years since carried on the occupation of a rope maker, increased infirmity having compelled him to relinquish it, he has since lived on his pension in a house in Silver-street: an elderly woman lived with him, and a person beside lodged in the house. The deceased had been rather unwell for several days, during which time Mr Lane, surgeon, had prescribed for him. No alarming symptom manifested itself, but the day previous to his death he remained in bed all day, which was nothing unusual. The woman who slept in the same room was awoke at an early hour in the morning by a singular sound proceeding from the deceased, and on going to ascertain what was the matter, she found him dead. Mr Lane having certified that he died from Natural Causes, a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 25 December 1851
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was taken on Monday last, at one o'clock, before Alfred Drake, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, at the North Devon Infirmary, on the body of a young man named THOMAS WIDDEN, of Trentishoe, aged 20, who had died in that institution on the preceding Friday, from the result of the accidental discharging of a gun on the 22nd ult., as reported in this 'Journal' at the time.
The Jury was most respectable, and consisted of John W. Tatham, Esq., foreman;, Messrs. Thomas L. Willshire, John Willis, Robert Arnoll, Thomas Cornish, Benjamin Manning, Thomas Hodge, George Hearson, William Brewer, John E. Vellacott, John Kay, and John Norrington. Mr Willshire, before the Jury was sworn, enquired on what ground an Inquest was to be held, as the cause of death was sufficiently known. The Coroner replied, in effect, that death having been accidental, and especially as reports were abroad affecting the conduct of a medical man in the case, he had felt it his duty to summon an Inquest.
Mr Willshire thought, if an Inquest was to be held, it should have been held before. The death took place on Friday morning early, and it surely should not have been left until Monday afternoon to hold an Inquest on the body. The Coroner said he wished to give opportunity to the medical man, who lived at a distance, to be present. Further remarks were made, from which it was elicited that notice of the death was sent the Coroner on Friday morning; and the medical gentleman referred to (who was present at the Inquest said that he could have much more conveniently attended on Saturday, if he had been apprised of the circumstance. Mr Willis very earnestly protested against the Jury being exposed to the disagreeable and dangerous duty of going into the dead room, where two corpses lay, so long after death had taken place. He thought it most improper. The Jury might have been summoned to view the body on Friday or Saturday, and then adjourned, if necessary, for evidence to a future day. This preliminary discussion over, the Jury was sworn, and retired to view the body. On their return, the following evidence was taken:-
WILLIAM WIDDEN:- I am brother of the deceased: on the 22nd of last month, which was a Saturday, he and I were together at work in a field in the parish of Parracombe digging potatoes: I believe deceased had a gun with him: I did not know this until the accident occurred: it was about four or half-past four o'clock in the afternoon that I heard the report of a gun: I was then at a little distance from my brother in another field: there was a low bank or hedge between us: within a minute that I heard the report, my brother sprung up on the hedge, and cried to me, "Oh Bill, I've killed myself!" I ran to his assistance, and found his arm all on fire: I put out the fire as well as I could, but he complained much of the pain occasioned by my doing so: the arm was bleeding a good deal; he did not fall down, nor faint: I understood that he had lodged the gun in a bush, and was drawing it out with the muzzle towards him, when the piece discharged, and lodged its contents in his arm, but I do not know that he told me this: I asked him where I should take him, and he said he would go to my house which was at no great distance: there was another workman at work with him, but he was in an adjoining field at the time: I took him home - he walked all the way, but was in great pain: my wife was at work at the Parsonage, and I ran to fetch her: I then went away to Lynton after Mr Clarke: when I came, there was no one in the house that I could make hear: I knocked and went away again, but afterwards found Mr Clarke's servant, who went into the house and found his master, and came out and told me to go into the house to him: I fastened up my pony and went in and saw Mr Clarke: he asked me what was the matter, and I told him that my brother had met with a bad accident and had shot his arm, and I asked him to come over immediately: this was between six and seven o'clock: it is about five or five miles and a half from my house to Mr Clarke's: it took me some time, because, after the accident happened at half-past four, I had to take my brother home, then to go and fetch my wife at the Parsonage, and then to catch my horse in the field before I could set off. I asked Mr Clarke to come over, but he said he could do no good to come. I told him that it would be a great satisfaction to my brother to see him, but he replied that it would be no satisfaction at all - that he could do him no good any more than any other body: he told me to keep the arm bathed with cold water and that he would be over to see my brother in the morning: I returned home, and the next morning met the doctor on the Common at some little distance from my house: it was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning that he came: he said that my brother ought to e taken to the Infirmary directly: he recommended a spring cart for the purpose: we had not got one, and I went about to borrow one: I got one lent me by the exciseman who lives in Parracombe village, about half a mile from our house: it took some time to get the cart, and we did not arrive at the Infirmary until four o'clock: Mr Clarke said nothing about his being taken to the Infirmary on the Saturday night when I first saw him.
A Juror (Mr Willshire):- Did you give Mr Clarke to understand that it was a serious wound?
The Witness:- Yes, I told him that the arm was much hurt.
Mr Willshire:- Was there any great discharge of blood?
The Witness:- There was at first, but the bleeding had stopped by the time he got to my house. I had tied up the wound as well as I could.
Mr Willshire:- Did Mr Clarke complain to you at the time that he was ill, and could not go to see your brother?
Witness:- No, he said nothing whatever of the kind that I understood - nothing at all that I apprehended to be of that meaning. I did not hear him complain or say a word about being ill.
Mr Hearson (another juror):- You are quite sure Mr Clarke did not say anything about his being ill?
Witness:- Yes, I did not apprehend that he said anything of the kind whatever.
Mr Tatham(the foreman):- Did you tell Mr Clarke that the wound had been bleeding very much?
Witness:- He did not ask me anything about that.
Mr Willshire:- But you did give him to understand that it was a serious accident?
Witness:- Yes, I did.
Mr Arnoll (another Juror):- You did not go to any other medical man?
Witness:- No, my brother told me that it was of no use to go to Mr Cooper, for that he was gone out of the town, as he saw him riding away.
Did you tell Mr Pyke (the clergyman) of the accident?
Witness:- No, his wife was very ill, and he was upstairs with her at the time, and I did not like to disturb him. I was greatly hurried when I went there to fetch my wife.
Was it necessary that you should be so long in going for the doctor?
Witness:- By the time I had got my horse I could not be quicker.
Mr Hodge (another juror):- When Mr Clarke came in the morning, and saw your brother, he said he was very ill?
Witness:- Yes, and he said he must be taken directly to the Infirmary.
Mr Tatham:- Is Mr Clarke your medical man? Does he attend your family?
Witness:- Yes, sir, always.
Mr Tatham:- And it was on that account you went for him?
Witness:- Yes, sir.
Mr Hearson:- Mr Clarke is not the medical man for the Union, I believe?
Witness:- I believe not.
Mr Curry, one of the surgeons at the Infirmary, deposed that it was on the 23rd of November last, the day after the accident, about half past four in the afternoon, that he was summoned by the nurse to come to the Infirmary: he was at his own house at the time, and went immediately to the Infirmary, where he found the deceased had been just brought in: he had received a gun-shot wound in the arm: he was pretty free from pain at the time: on examination I found that the charge had entered at the under part of the arm, and had lodged in the elbow joint: a medical consultation was held on the case as soon as possible, when it was decided that the only chance of prolonging the man's life was by immediate amputation of the joint: the operation was performed, under chloroform, without any loss of time: we amputated the arm near up to the shoulder joint: we thought it prudent to go as far up as possible to avoid ulterior consequences: gangrene was evident in the part when the poor man came in: the next day the gangrene was still apparent about the stump, and had defined no limit, but the third day after the operation there seemed to be a limit to it: there was a good deal of sloughing, but contrary to all our expectations, the patient began to get better: he was a remarkably fine fellow, and his constitution must have been very good. On the 16th day after the operation he was doing so well that he sat up in the bed in tolerable comfort: but on that day a casualty took place which you are always liable to with gun-shot wounds - one of the arteries gave way, and there was profuse haemorrhage from it: the House Surgeon was immediately with him, and having restrained the haemorrhage by mechanical means until my arrival, he afterwards remained with him during the night: on the following morning it was resolved to tie the sub clavian artery, as the only chance of saving the man's life: this was done, and for three days afterwards he appeared to be doing well: on the fourth day he complained of great pain in his chest, which continued until his death: he died on the eighth day after the second operation.
By the Jury:- If amputation had taken place earlier after the accident, might his life have been spared?
Witness:- I think he would have lived. He was a man of extremely firm constitution.
Mr Willshire:- Then he died from secondary causes?
Witness:- He did.
Mr Willshire:- Was there much shot in the arm?
Witness:- Yes, a good deal: the wound was full of shot.
Mr Cornish (another juryman):- If amputation had been performed sooner after the accident, would there have been the same liability to the subsequent rupture of the artery, and the haemorrhage?
Witness:- I should say there might. There was very great sloughing of the part, up to the shoulder and the armpit.
Mr Willshire:- Some men slough more readily than others.
Witness:- Yes, but that was not the case with him: he was of a remarkably firm constitution.
Mr Willis (another juryman):- Had mortification appeared before the operation was performed?
Witness:- It had, around the wound.
Mr Willshire:- At what hour was the operation performed?
Witness:- It was on the Sunday night about half-past 7, three hours after the patient was brought in.
Mr Willshire:- Then it was a case in which mortification must have been extremely rapid?
Witness:- It was so: the man was, as I have said, of a very strong constitution, and required to have been attended to immediately.
This being all the evidence, and Mr Clarke being present, the Coroner asked him if he wished to ask any questions of the witnesses or to say anything to the Jury.
Mr Clarke expressed his desire to do so, and proceeded to ask the first witness, WIDDEN (Brother of the deceased), as follows:- At the time you came to me on Saturday evening, after I had ascertained from you the nature of the accident, do you not recollect my telling you, explicitly and decidedly, that I was very ill, and was going at once to bed?
Witness:- No, sir, I never heard you say one word about your going to bed or being ill at all.
Mr Clarke:- Then I did say so. the fact was, I had been attending a funeral, and sitting in the damp church, and I felt myself very ill - so much so that I came home and took some tea, and thought it right to go to bed immediately.
Mr Willshire interrupted Mr Clarke by asking the Coroner if this was evidence? If it was, would it not be better to put Mr Clarke upon his oath?
The Coroner said he could not require Mr Clarke to be sworn. The Jury might receive his statement.
Mr Willshire considered it desirable, for the purposes of the Inquest, that Mr Clarke should be called in evidence, and he therefore moved that he be sworn.
Mr Hearson seconded.
The Coroner said that if Mr Clarke volunteered himself as a witness, he might be sworn; and he was sworn accordingly.
Mr Willshire:- Did you tell the brother of deceased, when he came to you, that you were ill, and could not go with him that night?
Mr Clarke:- I did so.
Mr Willshire:- And were you so ill that you felt that you would be incurring a greater risk to your own health than, as a medical man, you felt called upon to expose yourself to, if you had gone?
Witness:- I was. I was very likely to have got fever, and it might have cost me my life.
Mr Clarke proceeded to say that, when the brother came to him, he asked him the nature of the accident. He informed him that the gun had gone off into his brother's arm. He asked if he appeared to be in much pain; and he answered that he seemed tolerably easy when he (the brother) left. He asked whether the part appeared much swollen, and he replied that it was not much. His impression was at the time certainly that the gun could not have been loaded with shot, for if it had been something more would have been seen than the brother described. He said that he was ill and could not go that night, but that if they wished it he would go over in the morning, and if not, they should let him know to the contrary. He told him that the best thing they could do was to keep the part supplied with wet cloths. His impression at the time was that the gun was not charged with shot. He considered from the brother's description of it, that it was a slight wound, and that it was not a case in which he was in the least bound to go at the risk of his own health. If he had gone, he was not likely to have been paid for it, and as he was not the Union surgeon he did not feel called upon to attend.
The father of the deceased (interrupting Mr Clarke):- Why did you think you were not likely to be paid?
Mr Clarke:- Because I did not think you were capable of paying me.
The Father:- How so? I have always paid you. The last time you came to me it was to see my wife, and I then told you, if you were afraid of my paying you, I would give you an order on my tenant and he should pay you.
Mr Clarke resumed:- It must have been nearly 8 o'clock when the brother left. He (witness) went soon after to bed; and the next morning, according to his promise, not having heard to the contrary, he went over to Parracombe, and there found that it was a case of very serious accident. He met the brother on the common, who told him the patient was lying at his house, otherwise he should have gone down to Parracombe mill. It was between nine and ten o'clock when he came to the house, and he certainly was astonished at seeing the nature of the accident, and recommended his immediate removal to the Infirmary.
Mr Hodge:- You had heard from the first witness that the whole of the charge had entered the poor man's arm. Did you not know, as a medical man, that to leave a person with such an injury for 14 or 16 hours without professional assistance must be perilous to his life?
Mr Clarke:- I was ill at the time, and could not go.
Mr Willshire:- But did you decline the case?
Mr Clarke:- I did so.
Mr Willshire:- And yet you went the next morning to visit the man?
Mr Hodge:- Aye, it is plain enough the life of a poor man is but of little value.
Mr Hearson (to the witness WIDDEN):- Why did you not go to the other doctor at Lynton? You knew there was another.
The Witness:- My brother told me he was not home.
Mr Manning (to Mr Clarke):- Did not the man tell you that the charge had lodged in his brother's arm?
Mr Clarke:- Yes, but he could not tell me whether the gun was loaded or not: and my belief was, from there being so little haemorrhage, that it was not.
Mr Willshire:- If you had known it was a serious case, would you have gone, or should you have considered it too great a risk to your own life to run?
Mr Clarke:- I should have looked at it as too serious a risk to my own health, or even life. If I had thought it a serious case, I should have recommended him to go and get an order for the medical man of the union.
Mr Willshire:- For which he would have had to go back to the parish officer at Parracombe.
After a few further remarks of no importance to the case, the court was cleared.
The Jury, after some minutes' deliberation, recalled Mr Clarke; and Mr Willshire asked him if he was out of his house at all, or visited any other patient, that same evening after he had declined to go to Parracombe to the deceased. To which he replied that he was not out of the house at all - that he had his tea, took a warm bath, and went to bed very ill.
The court was again cleared; and, after a consultation of nearly half an hour, the Jury came to the following unanimous verdict;_ "We find that the said THOMAS WIDDEN died in the said borough on the 19th day of December instant, and that his death was caused by a gun-shot would in his left arm, inflicted by himself in the parish of Parracombe on the 22nd day of November last. The Jury regret that Mr Clarke, the medical man applied to, did not afford more prompt assistance to the case."
The Jury gave their trifling fees to the father of the deceased.

Thursday 1 January 1852
KINGSBRIDGE - On Thursday last, the inhabitants of Dodbrooke were horrified at hearing that MRS GAY, the wife of a respectable inhabitant, had put an end to her existence, by hanging herself in her bed-room. Her husband was absent, and on his return from his employment was alarmed at finding a dead silence in his house - on going up stairs he found his wife quite dead. No cause can be assigned for this rash act, as the deceased and her husband lived happily together, and were in comfortable circumstances. An Inquest was held on Saturday, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned. the remains of the unfortunate woman were interred on Sunday morning.

BERRYNARBOR - Distressing Case of Destitution. - An Inquiry was instituted on Tuesday, the 23rd instant, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner into the circumstances attending the death of a poor man of this parish, of about middle age, called WILLIAM DENNICOMBE. The deceased rented an acre or two of ground, to the total value of £5 per year, and was therefore what is called a small farmer. Besides the culture of his little spot of land, he was accustomed to work - as his strength would permit him - for Mr Bowden, limeburner, of Lee, in that parish, who, although the deceased was far from an able bodied man, yet from compassion to his poverty gave him employment at 1s. a day. Deceased a year or two ago, from the effects of continued illness and the pressing claims of a young family of five children, was obliged to solicit aid from the parish, and for some considerable time was recipient of 3s. per week, which was afterwards reduced to 2s. 6d., but for more than a year past it has ceased altogether. The deceased was able to work only three days a week, and his slender earnings hardly sufficed to "keep body and soul together." He was at his employment on the beach on Monday, accompanied by his wife, and when in the act of loading some dung-pots, (his debilitated frame, in all likelihood, being unequal to that or any other manual labour,) he was suddenly taken ill: the issuing of blood from his nose and mouth proclaimed that a blood vessel had given way: he was conveyed home, the assistance of Mr Dickenson, the surgeon of Combmartin, was sent for, but deceased expired almost immediately as he reached his home. The post mortem view of the surgeon confirmed the presumption that death had resulted from the rupture of a blood vessel. The condition of the dwelling disclosed one of the most touching scenes of wretchedness that human eye ever lighted upon. There was literally not an article of furniture, nor an article of bedding. The corpse of the deceased was covered, it was true, with a decent sheet, but - it was borrowed! The bed was of sedge and straw - such was the nightly accommodation of this father and mother. And for the four little children - they nestled together in their day clothes by night (for want of bedding) in the body of an old donkey cart or butt, deposited for the purpose in the kitchen. The store of this family of six consisted of a sixpenny loaf, and a quarter of a pound of suet, to which the charity of a neighbour had added a half pound of bacon. Surely this is the place where "silent want retired to die!" Is there no neighbour whose bowels of compassion might have prompted enquiry into the state of this poor man, who has died, in all probability, as much from sheer hunger as ever did any one of the famished Irish perish in 1847? Ye who are inaccessible to any other instinct than that of self interest, say, is it politic to starve a man to death, and let his widow and fatherless children fall on the parish funds - those funds from which a trifling dole, or the help of charity, might have preserved to that wife a fond husband, and to those children an affectionate father? This economy is short-sighted: this cruelty and neglect is an expensive indulgence.

LIFTON - An instance of the uncertainty of human life was afforded on Friday, the 19th instant, by the death of WILLIAM OSBORNE, a labourer, who was found dead by his employer, Henry Blagrove, Esq., in a field near Lifton Park, where the deceased had been at work during the morning, in company with other men. In the course of the day the unfortunate man was left alone to finish some work on which he was engaged and was afterwards found lying on the ground in a lifeless state. On the following day an Inquest was held at the 'Arundell Arms' inn, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, on the body of deceased; and from the evidence adduced, there is no doubt that death arose from Natural Causes; as, however, no surgeon was examined, the Jury returned the following verdict: - "Found dead; but how the deceased came by his death, there is no evidence to show."

Thursday 8 January 1852
CULLOMPTON - Fatal Accident. - On Friday last a party, consisting of Messrs. J. Pearce, James Webber, Mark Farrant, jun., and W. E. PARSONS, left Mr Farrant's house at Growen, near Cullompton, to shoot rabbits on the farm. Mr Farrant had taken every precaution against an accident, by dividing them into two parties, Mr Pearce being with MR PARSONS and Mr Webber, with Mr Farrant, jun. About 12 o'clock, MR PARSONS having fired at a rabbit, ran after it, in advance of Mr Pearce's gun, which was resting against his thigh, Mr Pearce having no intention of firing at the rabbit, when at that moment the gun accidentally went off, and the whole charge entered the head of MR PARSONS, who instantly fell dead without a struggle! Mr Webber and Mr Farrant ran to the spot, and the horror and distress of the party at this shocking occurrence cannot be depicted. An Inquest was held on Saturday, before Mr Cross, the Deputy Coroner, when the evidence of two of the youths, who were of the party, but without guns, was taken, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned. The unfortunate young man thus so calamitously lost to his friends and society, was second son of MR ROBERT PARSONS, of Taunton, and was much esteemed.

Thursday 15 January 1852
SWIMBRIDGE - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Swymbridge Newland, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of an infant named MATILDA KEAL, aged 11 months, who was severely scalded by the upsetting of a pot of boiling groats. Medical assistance was promptly rendered, but the little sufferer lingered hopelessly till Saturday, when she expired. - Verdict: 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 29 January 1852
BIDEFORD - Melancholy and Fatal Occurrence. We regret that the painful duty devolves upon us this week of recording a case of a very distressing nature, which took place in this town, on Sunday the 25th inst., namely that of an amiable young lady, named EMMA STONEMAN, whose body was discovered in a well, situated in a garden of Mr Richard Thorne, gardener, Meddon-street, with whom she had been residing during the last six weeks.
It appears that the deceased was a native of Torrington, and for a long period has suffered from a state of great mental depression arising partly from family circumstances of a very afflictive nature, and partly on account of severe fits to which sad disease she has been a melancholy victim, and which rendered it necessary during her residence in Torrington that she should have constant medical treatment, and during her short stay here, we understand she has been the subject of great nervous excitement for which she has been treated by Mr W. H. Acland.
Mr Thorne, being the first who discovered the deceased, immediately despatched messengers for medical assistance, and Mr Thompson and Mr Kingdon were immediately on the spot: Mr Ackland arrived shortly after; but their efforts proved unavailing - the vital spark had fled.
On Monday the 26th inst., an Inquest was held on the body, at the 'Torridge Inn,' before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when the following evidence was adduced.
Richard Thorne sworn: I live in Meddon-street, Bideford, and knew the deceased, EMMA STONEMAN; she was about 23 years of age. She has been residing in my house for the last six weeks. She has a mother and other friends living at Torrington. Deceased came to my house for the benefit of her health. Has had several fits since she came. Deceased looked very wild sometimes after them: her hands would be clenched, and her person very rigid. After the fits were over she was extremely childish. She had a fit on Saturday evening. They usually lasted for two hours. She did not appear reasonable after a fit until half an hour had elapsed. I never knew her threaten the destruction of her life. On the 25th she left our house by the front door about quarter after one, and at the time appeared pretty well. She had just eaten her dinner. Six or seven minutes after I saw her by the frames. [Here the witness referred to some garden frames which were placed at one end of the garden before the house; where was a pathway leading to another garden considerably lower than the first mentioned and separated by a wall eight or ten feet high, in the centre of which the well is situated where the deceased was found. We would also mention that the well was about two feet nine inches in diameter, protected by a wall of about three feet high and covered on the top leaving an aperture of eighteen inches or two feet for obtaining water.] Twenty minutes after I went to take a walk with her in the garden, and found her missing. I looked n the direction of Mr Sanders's garden; but seeing no footsteps, in that direction, I turned round and saw her shawl lying on the stone of the well; I ran to the well called for assistance, and got her out as soon as possible. There were no marks on her person. I held her up to see if water would come from her mouth. When found, she was lying in the water with her face downwards, and her feet against the back of the well. There is nine or 10 feet of water there. Medical assistance was immediately sent for, and Messrs. Thompson, Kingdon and Ackland were shortly in attendance. I think it was her own act, and that she went in with her feet foremost.
By a Juryman:- I never heard of her making any attempt on her life.
By the Coroner:- Never saw her by the well before. Don't know whether she knew there was a well there. I used to look after her because she was accustomed to have fits. Never had any hint from her friends relative to the state of her mind.
Mr Thomas Wills sworn: I reside in Torrington, and am uncle to the deceased. She has been ill for some time. I have seen her many times after her fits. She was removed because of her mother's illness, who was fast sinking on her account. Never thought her a fit subject for the Lunatic Asylum. She was depressed very much, and sometimes for a day after has fits, she would keep to her room. I never thought she would commit suicide. Her father drowned himself some years ago in the Torridge which was the cause of her illness. A certificate was read from Mr Cowdry, surgeon, of Torrington, who had attended her for the last three years, and which stated the deceased at times to be in an unsound state of mind.
The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, declared it as his opinion that there was no evidence to prove that the deceased had destroyed her life by precipitating herself into the well; and that, as she was found to have gone down feet foremost, she might have fallen in whilst in a fit, the deceased having just before appeared in good spirits and had eaten a good dinner.
The Jury having remained together a short time returned a verdict. - "That the deceased, whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity, put an end to her existence by drowning herself."

Thursday 19 February 1852
BRIXHAM - Early on Saturday morning last, MRS CREWS of Overgany, left her house and committed suicide by precipitating herself into the water from Furzeham Common; the body has been recovered and is waiting a Coroner's Inquest. The deceased has been in a desponding state for some time past.

TOTNES - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the county of Devon, and a respectable Jury, on the body of JOHANNA DODDRIDGE, who was found drowned on the 10th instant, in the mill-leat, a short distance from the Totnes town mills. The following particulars were elicited at the Inquest. The deceased was 84 years of age, was a woman of very happy disposition, and had lived in the family of the Rev. F. H. Hele above 60 years, and for the last two years had resided with the rev. gentleman at the parsonage at Littlehempston, which is but a short distance from the river Dart, and on being missed, not having taken her breakfast as usual, search and inquiry was immediately made for her, but of no avail, and she having lately talked of going to Ashburton, a fellow female servant was dispatched to Totnes in search of her, when on her arrival there she found that she had been taken out of the mill leat quite dead and taken to the 'Oxford Arms Inn,' where the Inquest was held and the Jury returned a verdict that she was found drowned in the mill leat. She was first discovered in the water by Mr Evens, of the 'Town Arms Inn,' in Totnes, and he having alarmed the men working at the mill, they soon took her from the water.

BRAUNTON - Sudden Death. - An instance of the uncertainty of human life occurred here on Tuesday evening last. MRS REED, wife of MR JOHN REED, boot and shoe maker, had been engaged with one of her relatives, when on rising from the table she left the house to go to the adjoining stream for a pitcher of water - on her way thither she stopped at the house of a neighbour named Hartnoll, and entered into conversation with her, and while so engaged, without any premonitory warning, she fell toward Mrs Hartnoll who caught her, and called to a neighbour for assistance. A messenger was at once dispatched for Mr Lane, surgeon, who was promptly in attendance, but the vital spark had fled, death had been instantaneous. The deceased had complained on the day preceding of a pain in her head; but it appears to have passed away as nothing more was heard of it. The opinion of the surgeon was that death resulted from an affection of the heart, she having for several years suffered from palpitation of the heart. An Inquest was held on Wednesday afternoon before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of 'Died by the Visitation of God!'

Thursday 11 March 1852
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held by Mr Drake, the Borough Coroner, on Friday evening, at the house of Mr John Copp, wheelwright, on the body of JOHN DAVEY, aged 65, who had died suddenly on the previous evening. He had been working in the shop only half an hour before he was found dead in a privy, in the back premises. Mr Winter, surgeon, deposed that the deceased had formerly been subject to a bleeding from the nose, which had only been stopped by plugging. It was now some months since this haemorrhage had occurred, and witness was of opinion that death had ensued from apoplexy. The Jury returned that as their verdict.
[Note: The original report had the name as John Taylor, but a later edition of 18 March corrected it to John Davey.]

BIDEFORD - Suffocation on a Limekiln. - On Sunday last, a man named JOHN SHUTE, was found dead on a limekiln, at Landcross. From information that we have received, it appears that the deceased, who was a mason belonging to the parish of Littleham, had gone home late on the night preceding, and being much intoxicated, an altercation took place between him and his wife. Deceased went away and nothing more was seen or heard of him until the following morning, when he was discovered on the kiln upon his hands and knees, quite dead. On Monday, an Inquest was held on the body, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BIDEFORD - Melancholy Suicide. - On Thursday, an aged man, named JOHN GLOVER, was found suspended by the neck in his bedroom and quite dead. It appears that his daughter, with whom he has been living, a very affectionate creature, went to the foot of the stairs and called her father, as she was accustomed to do, but upon getting no answer she went up stairs, when, on entering his bedroom she discovered him hanging from the bedpost; the fright was too much for her, and, after calling a Mr Holman, who lived on the other side of the passage, she fainted. Upon Mr Holman going to her assistance, and finding the poor old man suspended, he cut him down, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held at the 'Lamb Inn,' on the following day, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when evidence was elicited, showing that the deceased had been for a long time the subject of mental derangement. - Verdict - "Temporary Insanity."

HATHERLEIGH - Fire. - A melancholy accident happened on Friday evening last, at a small farm in this parish, called Pressland Down, which destroyed the dwelling house, barn, and linhay, and, awful to relate, burnt to death two children and two pigs, belonging to a labourer of the name of SLADE. How the fire originated no one can day, but by the evidence of the mother and others on the Inquest on Saturday evening, it was supposed that it was done by the children; the mother going to an adjoining field to gather a few sticks, left the children in the house by themselves for a quarter of an hour, when she saw that her house was in flames. Her first concern was for her children; she went in search of them, and found the eldest boy, three years and three quarters old, in the orchard, dead; his clothes were all burnt to a cinder, except his stockings and shoes. After some time the people present found the youngest boy, one year and three quarters old, in the barn under the rubbish, burnt to a scroll, the lower extremities being all burnt off, which presented a shocking spectacle.

Thursday 18 March 1852
TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, between 7 and 8 o'clock in the evening, MR PHILIP FRY, veterinary surgeon, of this town, was returning from Ash farm, Petrockstow, where he had been attending a sale. Mr Maunder and Mr Bonifant, who were riding in advance, heard a horse coming towards them at a furious rate; and, on its passing them, they hailed the rider, who was a gentleman's livery servant. Soon after he had passed them they heard another horse following at a rapid pace to overtake them. This proved to be the horse which MR FRY rode. Suspecting an accident, they rode back, and found the livery servant in the act of raising MR FRY, who had fallen from his horse. Medical aid was instantly procured, but life was found to be extinct. An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased, and adjourned till a warrant for apprehending the servant could be executed.

DEVONPORT - The Late Fatal Accident at Devonport. - We gave the particulars in our last week's paper of the distressing accident which led to the death of MR HERMAN, clerk to Messrs Chafe and Distin, iron founders, Devonport. On Friday, an Inquest was held on his remains, by A. B. Bone, Esq., and after the facts had been detailed, the Coroner said the circumstances were very simple as regarded the cause of death, a piece of iron struck him in the head, and from the injury he received, death ensued. The only question was as to the degree of manifest danger there was in permitting such a machine to be in operation so near the office in which persons were at work. There was no screen between the breaker, and the office, and the desks were immediately inside the window. One question, therefore, for them would be, was it manifestly dangerous that such a machine should be at work, so near the office window? There must be some trades in which there was more than ordinary danger, and no man could be punished in such a case for want of extreme caution, but only in case of gross negligence, if anything fatal occurred. If there was gross negligence, the parties permitting the machine to work would be liable to punishment. But if there was no evidence of gross negligence, then they might return a verdict of 'Accidental Death,' and the foreman, Mr Down, in announcing it, said - the Jury believed the office and the smiths' shop were not sufficiently protected, and hoped some means would be taken to render them more safe, when the casting breaker was at work. - The remains of the deceased were interred in the burial-ground of the Ebenezer Methodist Chapel, on Monday, and were followed to the grave by Mr Chafe, one of his employers, the whole of the persons engaged on the Foundry, and a large party of private friends. The funeral cortege both as regarded the number who attended, and their sympathising appearance, was a tribute to his memory which showed his character was much and deservedly appreciated.

Thursday 25 March 1852
PETERS MARLAND - Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held in the parish of Peters Marland, on the body of the late MR PHILIP FRY, Veterinary Surgeon, of Great Torrington, aged 48, whose death by a sudden accident on the 15th inst., was recorded in our last. It will be remembered that the deceased, on his way home from a sale, was knocked off his horse by collision with another horseman. The accident happened from Geo. Steers, of Petrockstow, who was riding at hard speed on that occasion, and came accidentally and by misfortune against the deceased, who was thrown from his horse, and then and there received a mortal concussion of the brain. After long inquiry this was the verdict of the Jury.

BIDEFORD - Sudden Death of an Infant. - On the morning of the 17th inst., the wife of MR RICHARD PICKARD, shipwright, of this town, was greatly alarmed on finding her infant child almost lifeless by her side, and the tide of life fast ebbing away. On the following day an Inquest was held before the Coroner, T. L. Pridham, Esq.; when a verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God," was returned; no suspicion whatever attaching to any party.

Thursday 1 April 1852
MORTHOE - At Morthoe, on the 26th ult., a little boy named RICHARD LOVERING, aged 15 months, came by his death through his clothes taking fire. The mother had gone out to work, and left the child in the care of a little sister when the accident happened. The child was much burnt, and an old woman was called into treat the case. The child died the same night. - An Inquest was held on the following day, by the J. H. Toller, Esq.. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

WEST ANSTEY - An Inquest was yesterday held by the same Deputy Coroner, at West Anstey, on the body of BENJAMIN COLLEY, aged 61, who was taken ill in a wood in the neighbourhood of the above place, and subsequently died under the following circumstances. He was at work in the wood with Richard Escott, being employed in charcoal burning, and they lived in the wood near their work. He was taken ill on Saturday the 20th March, and was removed by Escott on the following Wednesday, to West Anstey, and an order for medical relief obtained from the overseer. He was allowed shelter in a loft over a henhouse at the 'Partridge Arms' there, and attended by Mr Wm. Trevor, surgeon, and medical officer of the Union, and also by a nurse. Mr Trevor being dissatisfied with the drafty loft in which the patient was bed-ridden, and suffering under pneumonia, daily recommended his removal to the Southmolton Union House, nine miles distant, where he would have better accommodation and attention. This advice was not attempted to be followed till last Saturday, when during the removal he died upon the road. A post mortem examination by Mr Trevor confirmed his diagnosis of pneumonia of the right lung, and notwithstanding the catastrophe, he held to his opinion that the removal presented the only chance of recovery; and Mr Morgan, surgeon, of Barnstaple, on hearing his statement concurred in that opinion. The Jury found a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Friday last, two wagons, laden with guano, and belonging to Mr Graddon, of Brightleigh Barton, were on their way from Barnstaple Market, and had proceeded some little distance beyond the New Bridge, when the driver of the hindmost, a man named BEER, being at the time under the influence of liquor, was allowed to pass the other wagon, which he had made several previous attempts to do. He was shortly after overtaken, however, by the other driver, who discovered his lifeless body on the roadside: he had been thrown down, and killed on the spot. A Coroner's Inquest resulted in a verdict of ' Accidental Death.'

Thursday 8 April 1852
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday last, as a man named PHILIP MORRISH, in the employ of Messrs. Pridham and [?] coach and van proprietors, of this town, was employed on the Quay in unloading a piano from a wagon to a cart, the latter moved off just at the moment that it should have received the burden, and the piano fell upon the poor fellow's chest, crushing him beneath its weight. He was immediately conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary, where every assistance that skill and kindness could afford was in instant acquisition, but he lingered hopelessly till the evening, when death put a period to his sufferings. The unfortunate man has left a wife and six small children to mourn their bereavement, the destitute condition of whom, deprived of their parental guardian, powerfully appeals to the sympathies of the benevolent public. An Inquest held this day, before Alfred Drake, Esq., the Borough Coroner, resulted in a verdict of 'Accidental Death.' We understand that the occurrence was purely accidental, and that no blame is attributable to any one.

Thursday 8 April 1852
NORTHAM - Fatal Accident. - On the 27th ultimo, a little child, named JOSIAH MILLS, aged 1 year and 8 months, and son of MR JOHN MILLS, of Northam, fell into a pan of boiling water, sustaining very severe injuries, and after lingering until the following Tuesday, expired. It appears the little creature had just left the lap of its mother, and was about to show a new pair of boots to its brother, who had just come into the house, when the accident occurred to the great grief of its excellent parents. On Saturday an Inquest was held over the remains, when a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned.

NORTH MOLTON - Inquest - Awfully Sudden Death. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at Northmolton, before J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM HOWE, a shoemaker and barber who was found dead in bed on Monday morning. It appeared that the deceased went to bed rather late on Sunday night, being very much intoxicated, having drunk a great quantity of whiskey. A post mortem examination took place by Richard Ley, Esq., surgeon, and a verdict was returned of 'Died from drinking an over quantity of ardent spirits.'

Thursday 15 April 1852
BEAFORD - Inquest. - Before the Deputy Coroner, John Toller, Esq. - An Inquest was held at Beaford on the 12th inst., on the body of WILLIAM VODDEN, aged about 60, whose death took place on Saturday the 10th, under the following remarkable circumstances:- On that day the old man was at work with his wife in a field at Brinscombe-farm, picking up stones. William Gilbert, carpenter, was also present, and about 10 o'clock in the forenoon, heard him go into the Mowstead. About two minutes later the deceased called to witness, who went to him, and he said he had set all the place on fire. His smock frock was burning, but the fire from the other parts was up all over his head. Witness called for assistance, and the wife of the deceased and one Roger Passmore came. Witness tried to put out the fire, but could not; he burnt his finger; went for a surgeon. MARY VODDEN, wife of the deceased, on being called, looked towards the Mowstead, and saw the smoke rising up: she ran and wrapped her apron round the deceased; in about ten minutes the fire was put out. He died about eleven o'clock on the same forenoon.. He was a great smoker. No pipe was, however, found upon him or near him. The Jury returned as their verdict, that the "Deceased was found burning, from the effects of which he died; but how the burning took place did not appear to the Jury."

Thursday 22 April 1852
BARNSTAPLE - Death of LOUISA STONEMAN And The Inquest On The Body. - This poor girl, whose distressing accident from fire was recorded in our last, expired on Friday forenoon. An Inquest was held on the body in the afternoon, by Mr Drake, the Borough Coroner. The Jury being called upon to be sworn the foreman, Mr Hearson, said, the last time he had served on a Jury an opinion had been expressed that the case was one that did not call for any Inquest. He really thought this was a case in which none was required, for everybody knew how the poor girl came by her death. Coroner: "I don't know how she came by her death. I know nothing about it." The foreman merely wished to express his own opinion on the subject, as there had lately been some comment at the County Sessions, on the custom of holding unnecessary Inquests. In expressing his own opinion, he wished to do so with all respect. If the Coroner considered this a proper case for an Inquest, he (the foreman) was ready to take the oath. Coroner: "If you please, Sir." The Jury were then sworn, and after they had viewed the body, the following witnesses were examined:-
Miss Elizabeth Doble: I was in my mother's room at the time the accident happened; my mother was ill and I was giving her her medicine; the deceased was in the kitchen below; I heard her scream; went to see what was the matter; others came in at the front door; my little sister was in the kitchen when the accident happened, but she ran away; the deceased's clothes were all in flames; the house was full of people. I had not time to do anything. I had been in the kitchen just before, and had said to her, "LOUISA, make haste and blow up the fire, as my mother ought to have had her poultice on before this." That is all I know about it. - A man named Chapple was the next witness. He was at work in Boutport-street on Wednesday, about half-past three in the afternoon; heard a scream, which caused him to look across the street; saw the flame; ran across; saw the deceased, who was returning, but fell at the passage door upon her face and hands; at first could see nothing of her, she was enveloped in flames. - Mr Forester, house surgeon of the Infirmary, deposed that deceased was brought there about four o'clock on Wednesday afternoon; she had been extensively burnt; measures were taken for her relief; the absolute cause of death was effusion on the brain; she died this (Friday) morning, about 10 o'clock; had no doubt that she died in consequence of the burn.
Mrs Greenway: I went to the house of Mr Doble, and found the deceased lying flat on her face in the passage. I said to the people about her, "Why don't you take her up?" She herself said, "I can get up if they will stand to one side." She got up, and went up several stairs, and, turning round, said, "You see there is nothing the matter with me; tell my mother I am not hurt." She did not wish her mother to see her; she went up-stairs, threw herself on the bed, and said she thought she should die. She afterwards told me how she thought it happened; she said she was blowing the fire, and had pushed a stick into the grate; that she turned round to speak to the little girl; and in that time her clothes had taken fire behind, either by a spark or the stick falling out upon her frock; but she was sure that her clothes had caught fire behind; everything she had on was nearly consumed by the fire. The Jury delivered as their verdict "That the said LOUISA STONEMAN had died from the effects of the burning, which had been caused by accident."

MOLLAND - Inquest at Molland. - On Monday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a miner named SLEE, who was killed on the Saturday previous by a quantity of deads falling on him. Verdict - 'Accidental Death.'

MOLLAND - On Tuesday, before the same Coroner, to enquire into the cause of death of THOMAS DELBRIDGE, of that parish, who died the same morning from the effects of the burns received by his lying on the fire on the 10th inst. (an account of which we gave last week). A similar verdict was given.

Thursday 29 April 1852
EXETER - An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on Monday, at one o'clock before Mr Warren, on the body of GEORGE VIGERS, a miller, of Ottery St. Mary. The deceased met his death in the following manner. He was employed on the 2nd April, by John Greenslade to take some malt to Exeter in his own cart. John Greenslade came as far at the 'Crown and Sceptre,' and appointed to meet him again to go home. They met accordingly, between eight and nine p.m., and both were rather the worse for liquor, and, when they were between Exeter and Heavitree, the deceased who was driving, fell suddenly out. He was picked up by a flyman named Price, who states that he was lying on his belly with his head under his chest. He was quite insensible. Greenslade was in the cart and did not render any assistance, deceased was put in the cart again and a police constable took them both in the cart to the station house, not aware that deceased had fallen out, but supposing both to be drunk. Mr Steel, not aware that deceased had received any injury, ordered them both to be kept in the station house and not to be removed to the cells, the only thing he could learn from the deceased being that he came to Exeter without any breakfast, and had been drinking. When it was known that the deceased had fallen from the cart, Mr Warren, surgeon, was sent for, who found the deceased at the station house lying on his back; the whole of his body was paralysed; he said he felt a slight pain in the back, he was removed to the 'Turk's Head,' and on the 5th April to the hospital, where he died on the 25th, about 10 minutes before 7 o'clock; he was insensible up to the last day. It was found, by a post mortem examination of the body, that one of the bones of the spinal column was dislocated backwards, which was quite sufficient to cause death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

TORRINGTON - Great excitement has been felt in this town by the sudden death of a young man named GEORGE STACEY, a blacksmith, on Tuesday last, occasioned by drinking clear brandy to great excess. Certain other of his companions who had also been drinking with him were seriously ill from the effects f liquor, but recovered. The deceased, however, whose health has been for some time past impaired, died a few hours after he had been taken to his home. An Inquest is about to be held on the body.

Thursday 20 May 1852
CHULMLEIGH - Fatal Accident. - On Friday last, WILLIAM HARRIS, labourer, of Chulmleigh, came by his death in the following manner. He was assisting to roll over a hedge a piece of timber from the turnpike road. Two horses were attached to the timber by means of an iron chain. The chain breaking, the timber fell upon his body and head, knocked him down, and he did not speak afterwards, and breathed with great difficulty. He was carried to his dwelling, and put to bed. Mr John Adams Tidbould, surgeon, attended him, but he died in about an hour and a half after Mr Tidbould had seen him, the injuries being of too extensive and severe a character to afford any chance of his life. At an Inquest held on Saturday by the Coroner of this district, Richard Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Mr Richard Webber, in whose employ the deceased was working when the accident occurred, described the facts, and Mr Tidbould, surgeon, gave evidence as to the injuries it occasioned. The deceased, when this witness saw him, was breathing with difficulty; blood oozed from the right ear, which was much lacerated; blood also came from the left side of the chest; there was a fracture of the right thigh, a considerable laceration of the left hand, and extravasation of blood throughout the right side of the body. From the breathing, witness inferred that there was a rupture of some large vessels on the brain, and in the chest, which was a sufficient cause of death. Verdict, "Accidentally Killed by a piece of timber."

SPREYTON - An Inquest was held in this parish, by H. A. Vallack, Esq., the Coroner, on the body of GEORGE COUSINS, aged 15, a lad in the employ of the Rev. R. Holland, the vicar. The deceased, on Wednesday, was accidentally thrown from a pony, and his feet getting entangled in the stirrups, the pony dragged him at full speed for nearly half a mile along the road. He was taken up senseless, and lived but a few hours after he was brought home. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 June 1852
WOODBURY SALTERTON - Mr Aberdein held an Inquest in this village, on Wednesday last, on the body of MR JOHN WARE, jun., a farmer's son, who had been missing from his home since Sunday the 23rd of May, and was found on Monday the 31st, in the river Clyst, near Clyst Bridge, about 2 ½ miles above Topsham, by George Glanville, a fisherman of Exeter. It was taken to his father's house, and upon examination, it was found that there was no mark of violence upon it, that the clothes were not torn or injured in any way, and that deceased was dressed precisely as he had been when he left home, with the exception of his hat and neckerchief. He had his prayer book in one pocket and a collection of Bickersteith's hymns, such as are used at Woodbury Salterton Church, in another; and he had also a watch, two keys, and one penny in money. It appeared that when he left home he had told his brother he should go to Topsham, and that he did go to Topsham, where he attended the evening service at a Wesleyan Meeting-house, after which he walked up towards Exeter, as far as the Country House Inn. After that he was not distinctly traced. There was no evidence that he had been drinking, and he was generally a sober well conducted man; but a day or two before he was missed, he expressed some apprehension that an attempt was being made to get him placed in an asylum, and his determination not to go. In the absence of any evidence as to how he got into the water, the Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

COLYTON - An Inquest was held here, on Tuesday, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN LOCKYER, a lad of eleven years of age, in the service of Clifford Shirreff, Esq., of Yardbury House. the dece3ased was employed in looking after the farm horses, and on Friday week, while cleaning one of them, it kicked him severely; he was removed into the house, where every attention was paid to him, and, ultimately, at his parents' request, was taken home. It was evident, however, that he had sustained severe internal injury; and, after lingering in great agony until the Sunday, he expired. The Jury found a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 17 June 1852
TIVERTON - On Wednesday week an Inquest was held at Little Bradley, in this parish, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN GILL, labourer. From the evidence adduced it appeared that about a week previous to the Inquiry the deceased went out with a gun for the purpose of rook-shooting. He put the gun in a hedge, got over it himself, and in drawing the gun after him it exploded; the contents lodging in his right arm. Medical assistance was promptly secured, but without avail, as inflammation and mortification quickly supervened, followed by death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

DEVONPORT - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, at the 'Portsmouth Passage House Inn,' Cornwall-street, Devonport, on the body of JOHN VOSPER, a labourer in H.M. Dockyard. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was a few weeks since promoted, by being made a sawyer instead of a labourer, but finding the work too heavy for him, he returned to his former position. Upon this his companions - and amongst them a labourer called Friend - took several opportunities to ridicule him, and the deceased unfortunately became much depressed in spirits in consequence. About five week since, he made an attempt on his life, which was discovered and prevented; but on Monday he succeeded in strangling himself by a stair rope, at the house of his father in Cornwall street. It was rumoured that the deceased was a pecuniary defaulter, but this was disproved at the Inquest. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity." The deceased was a very sober and steady young man, and has left a wife and two children; and what still adds to the distressing circumstance, his widow is far advanced in pregnancy.

Thursday 24 June 1852
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. Inquest on the Body. On Monday evening, an Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, by the Borough Coroner, Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on view of the body of JAMES HILL deceased, lately in the service of Captain Hughes, of the Castle-house, in this town. A respectable Jury was summoned, of which Mr Tatham was chosen foreman.
Susan Blackmore deposed, that she lives as servant at the Castle-house, and knew the deceased: he was a boy assisting in her master's stables; her master is Captain Hughes. The deceased had got the garden ladder in the stable on Wednesday morning, and was on it; witness was washing in the wash-house adjoining the stable; heard a noise, and the little boy came running out of the stable with his hand on his eye, and said he had fallen off the ladder, and that he was sure he must die; he said his eye was knocked in, and that he should be blind for ever; witness called the gardener; we took him into the wash-house, and washed it; the wound looked like one cut on the top of the cheek-bone; tied a handkerchief about it: there was no one else but the boy in the stable at the time when the accident happened; the gardener took him home.
Mr Jones, the uncle of the deceased wished to ask witness if, at the time of the accident, the horse was in the same stall as he saw it to-day? Witness replied no, it was in the third stall from that. There was an iron spike in the ladder, but it was not sharp.
Robert Westacott, gardener, deposed that on Wednesday morning he was in the garden of Captain Hughes, at the Castle-house, and was called by Susan Blackmore; when he came into the court, saw the boy lying on the ground by the stable-door, holding his hand to his left eye, which was bleeding; took him up, and took him into the wash-house, and washed his eye- the girl lent her apron for the purpose; they bound up his eye, and he then took him to his mother's house, at a short distance in Castle-court; his mother not being there, he took him upstairs, laid him on the bed, and ran for Mr Cooke, the surgeon, who was from home; was advised to take him to the Infirmary, which he did, and delivered him into the care of Mr Forester, the house-surgeon, who said, when the swelling was abated, they would be able to tell what ailed him; deceased told witness that the prong of the ladder had gone into his eye; the ladder having slipped away with him when he was on it, brushing the wall.
By the Foreman:- When I came back from the Infirmary I went into the stable: the horse was not near the ladder by 15 feet; the ladder was on the ground, with the prong upwards; there was no blood on it, nor on the ladder, that he observed, but he did not look very particularly; the prong was about 5 or 6 inches long, and from three-quarters of an inch to an inch in diameter, but it tapered smaller towards the point. There had been two prongs, to bear the ladder off the fruit-trees, when placed against a wall, but one of the prongs had been broken off.
By a Juror:- The horse was usually near the place where the accident happened; but the boy had removed it, and tied it up in another stall, before he began his work.
Mr Forester, house-surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, deposed that the deceased was admitted on Wednesday morning, with an injury of the eye, the extent of which he could not at first tell, on account of the swelling; there had since been a post mortem examination, the result of which was that he had discovered a perforated wound of the brain; there was no wound apparent when the deceased was brought there, because the prong must have gone between the eye-lids; witness took him into the house immediately; saw the case was likely to prove a dangerous one; the deceased continued to get gradually worse; he had constant fomentation; witness was not present at his death, but immediately afterwards; it took place yesterday (Sunday) morning; had seen him a little before his death; Mr Carry had also seen him in the morning. The instrument had perforated the superior orbital plate; it had not wounded the globe of the eye; it had passed between the lids ,taking an upward oblique direction, and perforated the upper wall of roof of the orbit; considered the wound a certain cause of death; it was a wonder the deceased had lived so long after receiving it; the instrument described by the last witness was likely to cause such a wound with its point; the diameter of the wound was about a quarter of an inch; there was also a bad bruise on the back of the head; there was another perforating wound on the cheek-bone, oblique and passing upwards, which had denuded that bone; there was also a fracture on the top of the head, but confined to the external plate of the skull, and not penetrating the skull. These were all recent injuries.
Mr Jones, the uncle of the deceased, expressed his inability to account for the wound from the situation in which the ladder was found after the accident, with the prong upwards.
Mr Forester, re-examined by the Coroner - Of course, the ladder with the prong fixed in the boy's eye could not remove itself, if it had fallen upon him. The boy gave me the same account of the accident as he gave the witness, Westacott.
The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, said he had no difficulty in supposing that the situation of the ladder, as seen by Mr Jones and others after the accident, may have been different from that in which the accident was caused; for the boy in escaping from beneath it, if it fell upon him, would naturally push it away from him. They need not, however, be in any doubt as to the accidental cause of the principal injury, for they had the account of it as given by the deceased himself, on testimony perfectly admissible under the circumstances; and they had heard the evidence of the house-surgeon that death was a certain consequence of that injury.
The Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," from the cause aforesaid, and requested the Coroner to present the amount of their fees to the widowed mother of the deceased, which he kindly undertook to do.

Thursday 1 July 1852
WOOLFARDISWORTHY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Monday last, at Woolfardisworthy, on the body of JOHN DUNN, and a verdict returned of Found Drowned.

MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Charge of Manslaughter. - We regret to record a distressing event, resulting in the death of JONAS GALE, a toll-keeper, at Moreton. It appears that GALE kept the Eastern Toll Gate at that place. On Saturday last, about five in the afternoon, Mr Henry Hooper, of Yolland Farm, Ashburton, passed the gate with a horse and cart, laden with bark. GALE demanded a toll of 6d., which it is said is the usual sum. Mr Hooper demurred, and refused to pay more than 4d., which was accepted. He returned between twelve and one o'clock on Sunday morning, when GALE again demanded 6d. Hooper again refused to pay, and offered 4d., on which GALE opened the gate. Mr Hooper then whipped the horse, which started off, knocked down GALE and the cart passing over his body; he was mangled in a shocking manner. His wife heard his groans, but was unable to lift him from the ground, until she got assistance from Moreton, Hooper appearing to have driven away in a most inhuman and reckless manner. The poor fellow, who was 60 years of age, lingering until Monday, when he died. An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before W. A. Cockey, the Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, which resulted in a verdict of Manslaughter against Hooper. Bail was accepted, himself in £500, and two sureties in £250 each, for the appearance of the accused at the forthcoming assizes.

Thursday 15 July 1852
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Drowning. - One of those fatal accidents, which too commonly occur in our river at this season of the year, happened on Saturday evening last, to a little boy, named EDWIN MILLMAN, aged 13, son of WILLIAM MILLMAN, a well-known pilot of this port. The little fellow was bathing on the Barnstaple side of the river, near the fatal 'Black Rock' when he was seized with cramp, and sunk in the ebbing tide. He was speedily taken up by the exertions of a fisherman, named William Wilkey, and conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary, but every attempt to restore animation proved unsuccessful, the body having been submerged for nearly half an hour. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the following Tuesday, at the 'Red Lion Inn,' by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Joseph Wilmetts was foreman, when a verdict was returned of - "Drowned accidentally, while bathing in the river Taw." We are informed that this is the third child of the afflicted parents that has come to the same untimely end.

WEAR GIFFORD - Caution to Parents. - On the 5th inst., as a little boy, the son of MR JOHN BATES, of Weargifford, was in the hay-field at work, he partook pretty freely of some cider, which had been sent out for the workmen, and became almost intoxicated. In this state he attempted to climb a tree that was near, and fell off, striking his head very violently. It appears after this he became very stupid, and, at last, appeared very unwell, when medical assistance was procured, but the poor little fellow, after lingering about twelve hours from the time of the accident, expired. A post mortem examination was made of the body by Mr Cowdry, of Torrington, and an Inquest was held on the body on the Tuesday following, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when it was ascertained that deceased came by his death through the rupture of a blood vessel in the head, occasioned by the fall, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

SOUTHMOLTON - Accidental Death. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of a little boy, aged two and half years, son of MR JAMES RADLEY, draper, who left home on the preceding afternoon and wandered into a garden in search of his grandfather, in which was a dangerous soil pit with about two feet of water, into which he accidentally fell. He was taken out by his grandfather, after having been in the water an hour. Verdict - "Died by Suffocation by accidentally falling into a soil pit."

LANGTREE - Fatal Accident by Drowning. - On Sunday afternoon a young man named ROBER VICARY, of Torrington, about 18 years of age, who was living as farm servant with Mr G. H. Hackwill, East Collacott, in Langtree, went into a pond to bathe, which was about ten feet deep in water, with several other youngsters, who, like himself, were unable to swim, and most of them shortly afterwards sank, but they were all rescued alive except VICARY, who sank instantly, and on being taken out half-an-hour afterwards life was found to be extinct. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the following day, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 22 July 1852
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Clappery Mill, in the parish of Chittlehampton, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of THOMAS KNIGHT, wheelwright and machine maker, who, in endeavouring to rescue his little girl about three years old, who had fallen into the river Bray, near his house, was unfortunately drowned. The child was saved. Verdict ' Accidental Death'. The deceased has left a widow and six young children to mourn their bereavement: the widow is in an advanced state of pregnancy.

Thursday 29 July 1852
EXETER - Death by Drowning. - An Inquest was held at the 'Lamb Inn,' in the parish of St. Thomas, on the 21st instant, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELI WAY, who was accidentally drowned whilst bathing in the river Exe, on the 20th instant. Verdict - "Accidentally Drowned."

EXETER - An Inquest was held at the 'Anchor Inn,' in the Exe Island, on Wednesday, on the body of a boy, aged about seven years, named WILLIAM BAXTER. It appeared from the mother's evidence that she last saw him about four o'clock on Tuesday. He then went into the water from the Bonhay banks, but being unable to swim he got out of his depth. A boy named Kelly, who noticed his struggle from the other side of the river, took off his clothes and swam over. The deceased, however, had sunk, and Kelly diving after him, caught him by the arm and brought him to the surface. The poor fellow was not quite dead, but expired immediately afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidentally Drowned, and at the same time expressed an opinion that the boy Kelly was deserving of a reward from the Humane Society.

EXETER - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on Friday at 11 o'clock, before J. Warren, Esq., on the body of JAMES COSWAY, who came by his death under the following circumstances. It appears that deceased lived at Pinhoe, and came to the 'Poltimore Inn,' on Wednesday afternoon, to look for work; while he was there, he saw friend loading some grains, who asked him to help; deceased did so, and when he was up in the cart he sat down upon the grains for the purpose of pulling off his jacket, and while he was doing so, the grains being higher than the cart, he fell out over and broke his neck. He was immediately taken to the Hospital, but he died on Thursday evening. Verdict - "Accidental Death." - Deceased has left a wife and seven children.

BIDEFORD - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held before our Borough Coroner, T. L. Pridham, Esq., on the body of an infant child named ANN AQUILLA START, who was found drowned on the previous day. It appears that deceased, who is the infant daughter of MR GEORGE START, of Eastwood farm, was in the habit of going out with her brother to play in the road, garden, and grounds in the vicinity of the house. On the day in question she was seen alive by her parents about 11 o'clock in the forenoon, and no fears were entertained for her safety until half-an-hour had elapsed, when she was found missing: a search was immediately commenced by the parents, when the father descried her in a pond. As may be supposed he took her out as soon as possible, but life was found to be extinct. By this time the mother had arrived at the fatal spot, and her feelings may be better imagined than described. Every means that maternal tenderness could suggest was tried to restore animation but in vain. The Jury, having viewed the body and examined the pond, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." The pond in which the body was found, contained water only about of 18 inches depth, but is certainly very dangerous, especially for young children. The Jury unanimously expressed themselves to this effect, and that the parish ought to secure it by a dwarf wall. The Coroner engaged that their views should be represented in the proper quarter.

Thursday 5 August 1852
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Rodney Inn,' Ilfracombe, on Friday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for this division of the county, on view of the body of DANIEL PEAKE, aged 5, found dead in his bed on the previous day. The evidence of the stepmother described the deceased as a sickly deformed child, for which she was receiving parish relief. It further stated that she had recently applied to the usual questions respecting the child, that it was "sickly," but "hearty" - that up to the Tuesday before its death it took its food as usual - on Wednesday it slept and continued in that state up to the period of its death. Reports of ill-usage and privation of food rendered the Inquest necessary. The medical testimony described the body in a most emaciated state, mesenteric disease of the bowels, which was perfectly consistent with the stepmother's language ("sickly," emaciated, "hearty," ravenous of food), and also with the manner of the termination of life. The verdict of the Jury was, - "Died naturally from the effects of the said disease."

Thursday 19 August 1852
STOKE - Fatal Accident at Stoke. - An Inquest was held on Monday, on the body of RICHARD JACKSON, a gunner and driver in the Royal Artillery, who met his death while exercising a horse on the Devonport road. He was first seen with his foot caught in the stirrup and unable to extricate himself, while in that position the horse broke away, and he was so injured as to die in the course of a couple of hours. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

TAWSTOCK - Frightful Suicide at Tawstock. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held on the body of ROBERT SOMER JOCE, a farmer at Tawstock, who committed suicide the day before, by cutting his throat with a razor. The deceased had been in a desponding state for some time, and latterly very eccentric. He had been working in the hayfield, but was missed in the course of the morning, and afterwards found lying in another field with his throat cut. A verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 26 August 1852
KENTISBURY - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday evening last, as MR THOMAS RICHARDS, yeoman, of Seven Ash farm, in the parish of Kentisbury, was returning from Bratton fair, when about a mile from his own house he had occasion to dismount, and, having pulled his horse to a bank on the roadside, was in the act of re-mounting, when he fell over the horse on the off side and dislocated his neck. Some of his neighbours came up at the moment, but death was instantaneous. The deceased was 73 years of age. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on the following day, and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' returned.

BIDEFORD - Melancholy Case of Drowning. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held by Thomas L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of THOMAS BRANCH, who was found drowned, on the beach, outside the timber yard of Mr Robert Taylor, on the Torrington road. It appears that deceased had been in the habit of bathing in the river, at that spot, three or four times a week, and, on the day in question, having taken his dinner, he left his house, contiguous to the quarry of Mr E. M. White, and repaired to the beach. Nothing was seen of him from that time until, search having been made for him, his clothes were discovered on the beach, and his lifeless body picked up at about 20 yards from the place where he is supposed to have gone into the water. At that place there had been till lately a large sandbank running out into the river, but, owing to the late heavy freshets, the bank had been washed away, and, instead of deceased going gradually out, as he had been accustomed to do, to any depth he chose, he was suddenly plunged into 9 or 10 feet of water, and, not being able to swim, it is supposed that he was drawn under by the current and drowned. It is a remarkable coincidence that the father of the deceased was killed, about two years since, within fifty yards of the fatal spot by the falling of a large quantity of the super incumbent earth in a quarry. Verdict, "Accidental death by Drowning."

EXETER - Death by Drowning. - A lad, named MADRICK, about 11 years old, was accidentally drowned whilst bathing, on Wednesday, in the river Exe. It appeared that the unfortunate lad, on coming out of school, had gone across the temporary bridge, at Head Weir, and ventured into the river, which was much swollen by the late rains. He was driven off by the current, and sunk before assistance could be afforded. An Inquest was held before J. Crosse, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the 'Union Inn,' and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Fire at Plymouth. - At half-past two, on Thursday morning, a fire broke out in a house situate in Vauxhall-place, Vauxhall-street, which caused the loss f three lives. It appears that MR BLAGDON, the occupier of the house, who is a brick maker, was at work at some distance; his wife went to bed leaving the candle burning, and it is supposed the candle by some accident set fire to the bed clothes. MRS BLAGDON and her two children (a boy and a girl) were in bed together, and a policeman seeing the flame got into the room, and found the woman lying partly out of the bed, as if she had made an effort to get out of the room, and the smoke overcoming her strength, she fell back suffocated. She was 33 years of age, the boy three years old, and the infant twelve months. The West of England engine was soon on the spot to render the necessary assistance in extinguishing the flames, but it was more than half an hour after it arrived before any water could be procured. the Mayor, A. Rooker, Esq., was present, rendering his valuable aid. The unfortunate sufferers were not much burnt, so that it would appear that suffocation was the cause of their death. An Inquest has resulted in a verdict to that effect.

DAWLISH - Melancholy Accident at Dawlish. - On Friday morning, a preventive officer, named KNOWLES, stationed at Dawlish, was found in the first tunnel on the Teignmouth side of Dawlish, quite dead, and frightfully mutilated. It appears that his beat lay through the tunnel, and he left shortly before the arrival of the luggage train to relieve another officer - that officer, after the passing of the train, was walking through the tunnel, and stumbled over something; he struck a light, and, to his horror, found it to be the corpse of a brother officer. He instantly procured assistance, and the deceased was taken to the Station, and found to be quite dead. He was a very steady man and a good officer: he had been sailing a boat at the regatta, and was probably fatigued, as it appeared probable, from the marks on the ground, that he had sat down near the rail to rest himself. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Saturday, and a verdict of "Found Dead in the Tunnel" was returned. The deceased has left a wife, who, on hearing of the death of her husband, was so affected that she lost her senses, and we regret to say, is still quite insane. The deceased was buried on Monday, and was followed to the grave by his brother officers and a great many of the townspeople.

Thursday 2 September 1852
PLYMOUTH - Distressing Occurrence at Plymouth. - For some time past the state of health of MISS HARRIET HINE, daughter of the REV. T. C. HINE, of this town, has been such as to cause much anxiety among her friends, and symptoms of temporary derangement manifested themselves, which resulted in her wandering from home on Thursday evening, and although inquiries were made in every direction, no tidings were heard of her until the following morning, when she was found by a labourer suspended to a tree in a field near Weston Mills. Several religious tracts were in her pocket. The remains of the unfortunate lady were removed to a house in the neighbourhood, where an Inquest was held and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts stated.

Thursday 9 September 1852
TOPSHAM - Death by Drowning at Topsham. - On Saturday evening a boat, containing three men, was capsized in the river behind Mr Hamilton's, near Topsham. On poor fellow, SIMON WILSON, was drowned. Mr Henry Hamilton rendered prompt assistance; and, whilst search was being made for the missing man, he had hot baths prepared, and two medical men were in attendance. The body of WILSON, however, was not picked up for four hours after the accident. An Inquest was held on Monday, and a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal and Deplorable Accident. - We deeply regret to have to record a catastrophe which has deprived of one of its most promising members, and involved in the keenest distress, a large family circle in this locality, than which none is more estimable or respected. The young person who has found a premature and unlooked-for grave is MR SAMUEL COTTON, third son of JOHN KNILL COTTON, Esq., alderman and magistrate for Barnstaple. The deceased had been for some time in the office of a leading wine house in London, from which he came down, on Saturday se'nnight, for a brief sojourn with his family and friends. Some of his relations were staying on the sea-shore at Croyde, in the parish of Georgeham, where the deceased joined them on the following Monday. He had bathed several times during the week in company with a young friend, Mr Prole, with whom on Saturday morning he repaired to the rocks for the purpose of a final bathe, prior to his intended return to Barnstaple in the afternoon. Unfortunately for him, it proved to be his last bathe in a sense he had little dreamed of. Mr Prole was the better swimmer of the two, and was first in the briny element, into which the deceased quickly followed him, jumping from a slight eminence into deep water. Mr Prole spoke to him after he ascended from his first plunge, and then struck out towards the sea. What subsequently happened was not observed; but, in about ten minutes, returning to the shore, Mr Prole was surprised not to see his companion. Finding him missing, he called out his name, and swam into the neighbouring creeks to trace him, if it were possible; when, unable to descry him, he ascended one of the precipitous rocks which bound the coast in that part, and cast a look on all sides, but without any satisfactory result. The painful truth forced itself on the mind of the survivor, who hastened for help to an adjoining field, from which a labourer came to the shore quickly followed by others, with whose assistance Mr Prole made every effort to find the body; but, from the depth of the water and difficulty of access to it, they did not succeed until almost an hour and half after the occurrence, when the tide had sufficiently receded to permit them to walk through the water in the search; and, at a depth of about three feet, they found the lifeless corpse. From the appearance of a blow in the forehead and right temple, it is conjectured that deceased, probably in attempting to land, was brought by the force of the swell into contact with the edge of a rock, by which he was stunned, and in that state sank to rise no more. Efforts were made, fruitless enough, but yet satisfactory to the survivors, to restore animation, and a medical man was sent for with all speed, but the length of time during which the body had been submerged, forbad the indulgence of any hope of recovery. The remains were removed to the lodgings of the bereaved relatives, and intelligence communicated to the family at Barnstaple, whose affliction it would be gratuitous to attempt to depict. Nothing could exceed the high elation of the youth at his prospects in London, or the flow of health and spirits with which he had regained his paternal home after an interval of separation; and that that form, so full of buoyancy, and hope, and vigour, should now be strangely and suddenly silenced and subdued in death, was a reality which was scarcely to be credited, so full of misery was it and so little calculated on. An Inquest was held on the body on the following Monday, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when the Jury, after hearing the facts, returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned while Bathing." The corpse was removed the same day to the parental house of mourning, from which it was conveyed this morning to its last long home in Pilton churchyard, whither it was attended by a large family circle, and a number of sympathising friends, of whom many came to evince their appreciation of the amiable qualities of the departed, and more to shew their respect for the sorrowing survivors. The service was impressively read by the curate, Rev. Mr Shelton.

Thursday 23 September 1852
PLYMOUTH - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday, by J. Edmonds, Esqr., on the body of a labourer lately employed on the works at Millbay, named LEY, who, it appeared, was struck on the head by a stone, on the Saturday preceding, while the rocks were being blasted, and was so severely injured, that he died on Monday following at the South Devon Hospital, where he had been removed. Verdict - Accidental Death.

PLYMOUTH - On the following day, by the same officer, on the body of JOHANN CHRISTIAN LUDWIG NEHM, late a seaman on board the Danish bark 'Achilles,' and who fell between a boat and Millbay-pier, on Monday evening, while attempting to land, was unfortunately drowned. His body was not picked up till the following morning. Verdict - Accidental Death.

Suicide - On Saturday the inhabitants of Tor were thrown into a state of excitement by a report that MR PYLE, tinner, had committed suicide. On the above morning MR PYLE arose at his usual hour, and lighted the fire, after which he went into the workshop and spoke to his apprentice. He left the shop and proceeded to the privy, the door of which he fastened, and suspended himself by the neck with a handkerchief from a staple over the door. He was soon discovered and cut down, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held on Sunday, at the 'Globe Inn,' before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

EXMOUTH - Fatal Accident at Exmouth. - A little boy, son of MR FILLMAN, sexton of the parish of Littleham, met his death on Saturday week, under the following melancholy circumstances. It appears the father was about with his horse and cart to bring home some potatoes, and put several of his children in the cart by way of giving them a ride, among them the deceased. Recollecting he had forgotten his firkin of elder, he went into the house for the purpose of filling it, when the deceased got out of the cart and got on to the horse which started throwing him off, when the wheels passed over his body killing him on the spot. An Inquest was held at the School-room, at Littleham, on Monday, before Mr Aberdein, Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

SWIMBRIDGE - Fatal Accident at Swimbridge. - An Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' Swimbridge, on the body of LUCY HARDING, aged 2 ¾ years, labourer's daughter, who died on that day from the effects of injuries received in the afternoon of the day preceding. The child was left with two other children, aged 8 years and 3 years, the mother being absent at work. Two of the children were engaged in lighting straws at the fire, when the clothes of deceased ignited, and before the neighbours arrived, being called by one of the other children, she was so much burnt as to render recovery quite out of the question. Mr H. Bencraft, surgeon, was soon on the spot, and administered appropriate remedies, but the poor child lingered in great agony until 4 o'clock in the morning of that day, when death put a period to its sufferings. - Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

ILFRACOMBE - Fatal Accident. - The accident to MR BAMENT, of Shelfin Farm, which we imperfectly reported last week, has, we are sorry to record, resulted in his death. On Tuesday week he attended a sale, in the parish of Marwood, accompanied by his son, which place they left rather late in the evening. The unfortunate man rode a spirited young horse, of difficult management, which appears to have been the more ungovernable from running in company with the horse rode by the son. So much was this the case, that the father called to the son to keep back his horse, which he did, and thus parted company with him, the son of course concluding that the horse would now be under his command, and that he would proceed on his usual road home. To his dismay, however, when he reached home, he found that his father had not arrived there. He immediately aroused the family, and proceeded in company with the servant, to look for him. As he had not turned off in the proper direction for home, the conclusion was, that he must have gone on the road to this town, through the Two-pots turnpike. Pursuing that track, they at length found him in the road, as when thrown off his horse. He was in a deplorable state, - insensible, and drenched with rain, that had fallen heavily during the two hours that he must have lain there. They took him up, and carried him to the farm house at Frances, where he received every attention that circumstances would permit, but by the time MRS BAMENT and the medical man had been brought to the scene of distress, it was near six o'clock in the morning. Mr Stoneham found, on reaching the patient, that, from the length of time that had elapsed since the accident, and the chill occasioned by the lying as long in the road, in the rain, those means of restoration that might have availed, immediately on the accident occurring could not now be employed. The external injuries were not great, but there was, it would appear, concussion of the brain, under the effects of which, the unfortunate man lingered until Sunday evening, when death put a period to his sufferings. An Inquest was held at the farm, on Monday noon, by R. Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner for the district, when evidence supporting the above statement was given, and a verdict in accordance therewith, was returned. The horse had returned back upon the same road they had come, and was found the next morning not far from Half-way house. A widow and seven children are left to deplore the untimely end of the husband and father.

Thursday 30 September 1852
BIDEFORD - Death from Drowning. - An Inquest was held at the 'Torridge Inn,' on the 22nd inst., before T. L. Pridham, Esq., on the body of a little boy, named WILLIAM WESTACOTT, who met with his death under the following melancholy circumstances. It appears that deceased, who is the son of MR WM. WESTACOTT, fishmonger, was accustomed to go to a well known as "Burridge well," for the purpose of fetching water. On the day in question he was seen, on his way thither, by a little girl named Sarah Burridge, going on a similar errand, and who deposed that she went into the dwelling house of a Mrs Baker, situate in the locality of the well, and remained there ten minutes. Upon leaving the house she saw the pitcher of deceased at the mouth of the well, and searched about to see whether the little fellow was in any of the outhouses near, and not seeing him she went to dip up her water when she saw him at the bottom of the well. John Smith Hobbs stated that about one o'clock he heard an alarm, and procured a forked stick with which he endeavoured to take out the body; that he got it to the surface, when it sunk again. When his father-in-law, Mr Baker, arrived, and they ultimately succeeded in getting deceased out. Deceased was black in the face at the time. Verdict - "Accidental Death." The well is very broad, seven feet in depth, with steps leading into it, and is certainly dangerous, especially for children so young (only 6 years of age) as the unfortunate child who has thus met an untimely end. We hope this will prove a warning to parents, and prevent their sending children of so tender an age on such dangerous errands.

MANATON - Shocking Accident at Manaton - On Monday, a young man, named THOMAS CORNOW, 22 years old, accompanied by two of his comrades, each with guns, went into the forest in pursuit of rabbits. In the afternoon a shower of rain fell, and they repaired to a hedge for shelter; while here, they lit their pipes, and held the mouths of their guns, which were loaded, towards the ground, one of the guns accidentally went off, and the whole contents entered the calf of the leg of CORNOW; he bled profusely, and, after much suffering, he expired the same evening. He was a very steady young man, and much respected by his brother workmen at the Head Land Tin Mines. A verdict of "Accidentally Shot" was returned at the Inquest, which was held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., on Wednesday.

TORQUAY - Fatal Accident at Torquay. - On Saturday, an Inquest was held at the 'Union Hotel,' before A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS MEARS, aged 38, who met his death on the previous Wednesday, under the following circumstances:- The deceased was in the employ of the Local Board of Health as lamp-lighter, and on the Wednesday previous to the Inquest went to Higher-terrace for the purpose of cleaning the gas meter. Having taken off the stone slab which covers the cavity in the ground, which contains the meter, deceased lay down and put his head and one arm into the aperture, where he remained about a minute, and then got up and walked away. This was witnessed by the Rev. E. W. Wilkinson, of No. 5, Higher-terrace, who, half-an-hour afterwards, again saw deceased from his window in the same position. Mr Wilkinson remarked to his wife that deceased was very still, but his position was so very natural that he did not suspect any danger. On looking out of the window, however, about five or ten minutes afterwards, and observing deceased in the same position, he became alarmed, and went out, when, on shaking him by the arm, he found him insensible. With the assistance of two men, Mr Wilkinson conveyed him to the door of his lodgings, but it was with great difficulty, the head and shoulders being wedged into a cavity. Mr Wilkinson then got some brandy and attempted to administer it to him, but without success, and then bathed his head with cold water. On the arrival of Mr Paul, surgeon, he pronounced the unfortunate man to be dead. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Suffocated."

Thursday 7 October 1852
PLYMOUTH - Singular Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Jubilee Inn,' Jubilee-street, Plymouth, on Monday, the 27th inst., before John Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN HOCKIN, aged 18 years, who came to his death under circumstances which will be understood by the evidence of James Burman, who said: I am captain of the brig 'Eleanor and Grace,' of Plymouth, the deceased was a native of St. Blazey, in Cornwall. He shipped with me 17 days ago; on Saturday, the 25th inst., the brig was laying on Mr Shilson's graving beach, in Sutton Pool; between five and six on the morning of that day fires were lighted in the hold of the vessel with charcoal, sulphur, pepper, and canvas, for the purpose of finding out a leak, the hatchways were clayed down, to keep in the smoke; The deceased must have gone into the cabin from the hold of the vessel, for a candle, and was there suffocated. Verdict - Died from Suffocation.

INSTOW - Suicide. - Yesterday a suicide of a most distressing kind was committed by a man named WEST, a tailor, who has left a wife and two children. When he left home, in the morning, he was apparently in tolerable spirits, and spoke kindly to his wife and children; but it is supposed he went immediately and precipitated himself into a quarry pit, containing water. Here he was discovered by Mr Alexander Pedler, but too late to render any effort to recover him of any avail. It has been noticed for some time that he was rather low spirited, but from what cause it was not known, as he was in good employ, and he exhibited every affection for his wife and family. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body.

BRATTON FLEMING - Accidental Death. - On Thursday evening last, WILLIAM THOMAS, labourer, was found dead in a quarry where he had been employed in raising stones. Not arriving home at his usual time in the evening, his family became alarmed, and sent off persons in search of him to the quarry where he had been at work; there they found him partially covered with stones and rubbish, but quite dead. It is supposed the accident must have occurred about dinner time as provisions lay beside a stone on which he had been apparently sitting at the time the accident occurred. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the following day, and a verdict returned, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 14 October 1852
EXETER - Death by Fire at Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Valiant Soldier,' before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM NICHOLLS POLLARD, aged five years and four months, who came by his death under the following circumstances. Deceased's father and mother keep a clothes shop in Coombe-street, and also rent a cellar adjoining. On the 23rd of September last, about seven o'clock in the morning, she had occasion to go to the cellar, and left him in a room behind the shop, in which was a fire, with nothing but his night clothes on, with his brother, aged two years, telling deceased to go into the shop and put on his boots. She had scarcely reached the cellar before she heard him cry out; she immediately ran back and met him in the shop with his clothes in a blaze. As soon as the flames were extinguished, he was taken to the hospital, where he died on Monday morning.

Thursday 21 October 1852
PLYMOUTH - Awfully Sudden Death At Plymouth. - On Tuesday evening, whilst GEORGE HILL, a porter in the establishment of Messrs. Balkwill, chemists, was at work on the premises of his employers, he was seized with sudden illness, and before he could be removed to his home, he was a corpse. An Inquest was subsequently held, and a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" returned. The deceased was 50 years of age, and had insured his life in the Plymouth Branch of the Western Provident Association, of which he had been a member only for about two years. The widow, who, is in very needy circumstances, will receive £40 in consequence.

NEWTON ABBOTT - Coroner's Inquest at Newton Abbott. - An Inquest was held at the Union House, on Saturday, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Deputy Coroner, for Plymouth, to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of ELIZA LAKE. It appeared that deceased, belonging to the parish of Ashburton, came into the house pregnant on the 30th of September last, and was placed in the confinement room. On Friday morning at half-past three o'clock, Nurse Wotton, who attends all the cases of midwifery in the house, was called to attend her. The child was born at six o'clock. Everything went on well for about twenty minutes, when the deceased fainted, and the nurse then called another woman to her assistance, and shortly after the matron - the latter advised that the doctor be sent for immediately, which was done and he promptly attended to her. His evidence went to show that he found the woman dying, and pulsation had almost ceased, and he tried but could produce no reaction. She died at a quarter before eleven the same morning. The deceased should have been bandaged, but it had been neglected, as he believed, from the forgetfulness of the nurse. The immediate cause of death was flooding. The Jury, after deliberating for about twenty minutes, returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God," and handed in the following recommendation:- "The Jury strongly recommend to the Guardians of this Union, that a surgeon should attend all midwifery cases in the house, instead of employing nurses as midwives; but, should the Guardians insist on continuing the present system, the Jury suggest, that the nurses acting as midwives should have more assistance. The Jury consider, from the evidence adduced, that nurse Wotton is an experienced and good nurse, and deserving the favourable opinion of the Guardians."

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, a lad named WILLIAM MARTIN, son of THOMAS MARTIN, of Derby, in this town, was playing with some children outside his father's house. He had a sweeping brush in his hand, and with the brush-end on the ground and the handle resting against his person he ran after two children. While doing so the brush hitched against a stone and the handle was forced against his abdomen. He fell down and remained groaning for some minutes. Shortly afterwards he got up and went into the house. He at once went to bed, and remained ill until Monday, when his mother took him to the Dispensary, and obtained medicine there for him. The following day he became much worse, and Mr Cooke, surgeon, was sent for. The boy died about noon. An Inquest on the body was held yesterday. There were no external marks of violence.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held in this town, yesterday, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of SUSAN LOVERING, an aged domestic residing with Miss Servante, in Cross-street, who died the same morning. A person named Elizabeth Buckingham came as usual to the house in the morning, and knocked, when she heard the deceased come down stairs to the door, and just in the passage she heard her suddenly fall down and breathe very loud twice. Then all was still, and she could get no answer. Some men then got into the house by means of the window and found the poor woman lying on her back just inside the door, quite dead. Mr Winter, surgeon, was of opinion that deceased died of apoplexy. A verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 28 October 1852
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - This morning an Inquest was held before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS HIERN. The case was a singular one, the evidence tending to show that deceased must have suffered much from poverty, if not have died from sheer exhaustion. The full particulars will be given next week.

TORRINGTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at Shebbear, on Saturday, before R. Bremridge, Esq., M.P., Coroner, on view of the body of MR JOHN LEY, a respectable yeoman, of Durpley, in that parish, who was found dead in his bed on Thursday evening. He had complained of pain in his stomach, and partook of some tea previous to retiring to rest, saying if he felt worse he would ring; and shortly afterwards, on his daughter going to his room, she was greatly alarmed at finding her father a corpse. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Messrs. Cowdry and Holmes, the medical gentlemen who had made a post mortem examination of the body, returned a verdict of "Died from eruption caused by ulceration in the stomach."

Thursday 4 November 1852
Sudden Death. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held at Bovey, on the body of JOHN BROWN, who had been a carrier between Newton and that town for a number of years. It appears that the unfortunate man had reached home on Tuesday morning, and was soon after picked up in the kitchen. The verdict was "Died by the Visitation of God."

DENBURY - Sudden Death at Denbury. - An Inquest was held at Denbury, on Saturday, before J. Edmonds, Esq., Deputy Coroner for Plymouth, at the 'Church House Inn,' on the body of JAMES BROCK, aged 72, who had retired to bed on the previous Tuesday night quite well, but was found dead in bed the following morning. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER - Death by Burning at Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the 'Valiant Soldier inn,' before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a young woman, named MARY ELIZABETH EVANS. The deceased, who was subject to fits, was living with her mother, at Ottery St. Mary, and on Friday, the 10th instant, both rose at an early hour; deceased went into the dairy with a lighted candle in her hand, leaving her mother in the room adjoining; the mother, a short time after, heard her in a fit, and immediately went to her; she found her in a fit, on the floor, and her clothes in a flame; she extinguished the flames, and she was taken to the Hospital, where she died on Thursday. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOS. HIERN. The facts of the case will be gathered from the following deposition of Sarah Thomas, with whom deceased had lodged for many years: The deceased has lodged with me for about seventeen years, he was I believe upwards of seventy years of age. He rose from his bed yesterday morning about half-past nine o'clock, his usual time for getting up. He did not have any breakfast, he never used to take any. He prepared his dinner, which consisted of cabbage, turnips, and two potatoes, all stewed together by putting it over the fire, and when it was ready he took it up stairs with him, as he always ate his meals up stairs; after he had been up stairs for about an hour he came down for his saucepan, and remained in my kitchen about half an hour, talking with me and saying amongst other things that his jaws ached very much, and he had a cold on his chest. He returned to his bedroom. About half-past one o'clock I sent my little girl Sarah up stairs for a saucer, and she returned immediately, apparently frightened, and saying "Oh, mother, MR HIERN is looking so pale, and his lips are so blue, I have shaken him but can't wake him." I hastened up stairs and found the deceased on his bed, on his side, with his arms crossed and quite dead. I then sent for MR CHARLES HIERN, who is I believe a relation of the deceased. MR HIERN came immediately afterwards. The deceased was a person of weak intellect, but quiet and inoffensive in his habits. He has told me that he had ten pounds a year to live on, which he received once a year, at Barnstaple fair; the money came through the post. He had many relations, I have heard, in this town, but no one ever came to see him. He has often complained that he had not enough to eat, and I believe if I had not given him meat sometimes, he would have starved. He never had more than two meals a day, his dinner and his tea. His tea usually consisted of bread with butter and lard mixed and spread on it, and a little tea or coffee, but in very small quantities. He had a 10 ½ d. loaf a week, and sometimes he would buy a cake. I often gave him some of my bread. He used to pay me what he could for his lodgings; when he first came with me he paid me 2s. a week, but lately he could not pay me so much. He was very badly off for clothes. He did not go out much lately. His body is very thin. I assisted in laying him out. He lately never had animal food more than once a year.

BISHOPS NYMPTON - Inquest at Bealey Head, Bishopsnympton. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM WESTACOTT, aged 13, servant, to Mr Venner, of Park farm, in that parish. It appeared that the deceased was driving a cart from Southmolton, and when near that town drew his cart in to allow another to pass, and the wheel having "gathered" in the hedge, upset, whereby the shaft struck the back part of his head, inflicting injuries from which he almost instantly expired. Mr Flexman, surgeon, was promptly in attendance, but his services were of no avail. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 November 1852
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, as JOHN ELLIS was cleansing a gutter, on Skillworth Barton, Tavistock, a large body of earth gave way ,and the poor fellow was so crushed, that he died on Wednesday. An Inquest was held, and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' returned. The deceased has left a wife and four small children.

Thursday 18 November 1852
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, as a poor fellow named JAMES HOOKWAY, in the employment of Mr John How, merchant, of this town, was engaged in storing away a cargo of coals in a cellar at Wooder Wharf, he accidentally fell from a pile of coals five feet in height, receiving injuries which he only survived about half an hour. An Inquest was held at 'Lane's Hotel,' on the following evening, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when evidence of the nature of the injuries which were the immediate cause of death having been given, viz., injury of the vertebra and of the neck, the Jury returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.' - Deceased was a steady man, and has left a wife and family to mourn their bereavement.

BUCKLAND MONOCHORUM - The Late Murder at Milton. - On Saturday, the adjourned Inquiry was held at Milton, in the parish of Buckland Monochorum, touching the death of MRS MARY WHITE, who was murdered on the 29th of October, in her bed. Several witnesses were examined, but nothing was elicited to implicate any one. At the first examination, it was proved that the murder was committed by some heavy sharp instrument; and, in consequence, nearly every house in the village has been searched, but nothing has been found. The Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown.

COLYTON - Dreadful Accident at Colyton. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last by R. H. Aberdein, Esq., at the Globe Inn, on the body of a man named RABJOHNS, who was smashed to death by getting entangled among the machinery, at the paper mills the day previously. The deceased was engaged in unclogging a portion of the machinery, the mill being stopped for that purpose and was kneeling in front of a large wheel, when, owing to the hatch not being perfectly closed a small quantity of water got through, causing a slight movement in the machinery, when one of the arms of the large wheel caught him by the legs, and the next by the body, crushing him to death in an instant, forcing his body between the wheel and the wall, a distance of not more than eight inches. No blame is attached to any person, the unfortunate man having stopped the mill himself. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Fatal Mine Accident. - FRANCIS RICHARDS 13 years of age, was killed on Wednesday last, whilst working at East Wheal Russell Mine, by a quantity of earth falling upon him, and breaking his back and one of his legs. An Inquest was held on the body on Friday, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 2 December 1852
TAVISTOCK - Fatal Gun Accident at Tavistock. - On Thursday last, several young men of this town went a little way into the country shooting, and on one of them, JOHN SECCOMBE, son of MR J. SECCOMBE, auctioneer, getting over a hedge, by some means the gun went off, lodging its contents in his breast. Medical aid was soon got, and every thing which human skill could devise was tried, but without avail as the poor fellow gradually sank, and in about three hours after the accident he was a corpse. The deceased, who was 19 years of age, was an assistant in Mr C. H. Daw's Draper's shop, and was universally esteemed. An Inquest has been held before A. B. Bone, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned; the Coroner and Jury at the same time severely cautioning the young men who were with him against using destructive weapons.

EXETER - Mysterious Death by Drowning at Exeter. - A good deal of painful excitement was produced in this city, on the morning of Friday last, by a report that MR WILLIAM WREFORD, of Clannaborough, had been drowned in the Exeter Basin, on the preceding day, under circumstances which raised a strong suspicion that he had been murdered. Those circumstances have since been minutely investigated; and all that the police and the Coroner, (with the assistance of the very able professional gentleman who is instructed by the relatives of the deceased,) have been able to elicit, will be found detailed in the evidence given below. It seems scarcely to be open to doubt that the death was purely accidental - and that the deceased, on a dark and stormy evening, not been well acquainted with the path which he was taking, walked into the Basin, at a point where it is exposed and unprotected, and where more than one similar accident is known to have occurred before. He was met in the immediate neighbourhood, and was warned that he was taking the wrong road, and it was stated in evidence before the Coroner that if he continued to walk onward, in the direction he was then taking, his falling in the water was inevitable. But although these circumstances, coupled with the fact that not the slightest mark of violence appears upon the body, presumption, almost amounting to a certainty, that the death was accidental, there are some parts of the transaction still involved in what appears to be almost impenetrable mystery. MR WREFORD had returned from Taunton, with his son in the course of Thursday afternoon; and had intimated his intention to remain in Exeter, while his son returned to Clannaborough; he is known to have had 87l. in money and a cheque, at that time in his purse; he subsequently paid 24l. into the West of England and South Wales District Bank; still latter, he visited the shop of Mr Osment, a working jeweller, in the Mint, and there produced a purse with a quantity of money in it; at six o'clock, or thereabout, he met, in the Lower Market, a young woman named Slee, with whom he had been previously acquainted, and who was brought there, at his request, communicated in a note to her mother; he arranged with her that they should go to the 'haven Banks Inn', and immediately set off in that direction, desiring her to follow; they are seen, by some men returning from the gas works, in the immediate neighbourhood of the Basin - he a little in advance, the girl evidently following; presently a woman's screams are heard, and the deceased is found to be in the water; as quickly as possible the body is taken out, and removed to the 'haven Banks' Inn, but it is found to be quite dead. The girl, it is distinctly sworn, represents the deceased to be her uncle, and hangs over him, for some time, in great apparent agony, calling him by that name; at length she is called out by the landlady, and appears no more upon the scene, until she is taken into custody, at noon, on the following day, at the public house at which she was employed. Why she went, and where she went, and what she did, in the interval, is unexplained, except by her own evidence before the Coroner and that account is unfortunately contradicted, in several material particulars. All that is clear is, that by the time the surgeon (Mr Lyddon) came, the money of the deceased had disappeared, and his pockets had evidently been turned out. MR WREFORD was 71 years of age, and a person of considerable property. The woman has been set at liberty.

Thursday 16 December 1852
PLYMOUTH - Inquest at Plymouth. - John Edmonds, Esq., held an Inquest at the Guildhall, on Wednesday, on the body of W. LEE, aged about 40, who came by his death on the preceding day, by the injuries he received in the explosion of some rock which had been recently fired at Devonport. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased has left a wife and five children.

PLYMOUTH - At the same time and place an Inquest was held on the body of JOHN KEMBLE, aged 30 years. The deceased accidentally broke his leg at Oreston, on the 18th of August last, in a quarry where he had been working. He was taken to the Devon and Cornwall Hospital about six weeks ago, and it was thought necessary to amputate the poor fellow's leg, but he never rallied, and he died on Monday last. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased has left a wife and three children.

Thursday 23 December 1852
BIDEFORD - Melancholy Death. - On Friday evening, an aged person, named RICHARD WOOD, coach builder, was engaged by Mr Chalk to repair an omnibus. the vehicle being required the next morning, the poor man repaired, in the evening, to the premises where the 'bus is kept, and commenced his task. The following morning, on going to see how the work was done, Mr Chalk was surprised to find him lying on his side in a state of great exhaustion. He immediately secured assistance, and lifted him from the ground. Mr Pridham, surgeon, was in immediate attendance, but he at once pronounced him past recovery. After lingering a short time he expired. It appears that the poor fellow's wife waited up for him until three in the morning; when, finding he did not come home, she concluded he was staying at Mr Chalk's to finish his work. An Inquest was held at the 'Cornish Arms,' on Monday, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes," was returned.

NORTH MOLTON - Suicide. - An Inquest was held this day (Tuesday) by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN AVERY, of the 'Poltimore Arms' inn, who, it appeared, had been labouring under mental derangement for some months. On Saturday last he went to Southmolton, and purchased three ounces of oil of vitriol of Mr A. H. Attwater, who labelled the bottle "Oil of vitriol - poison;" he returned home, drank the contents of the bottle, and died the next day. Before is decease, he alleged, as the cause of the rash act, "that he had too much business on his head, more than he could bear." Verdict, "Killed himself by drinking vitriol, being at the time labouring under Temporary Insanity." Deceased was 68 years old.

Thursday 6 January 1853
TAWSTOCK - Fatal Accident. - An accident, attended by fatal consequences, happened on Thursday last, to a man named WILLIAM TAYLOR, a farmer, of Hiscott, in the parish of Tawstock. Deceased had gone to Westleigh on the day in question to settle his lime account with Mr Richard Balsdon, and was returning to his home by a pathway which led through some fields, and is supposed to have mistaken a fence erected around a quarry pit for a gate or stile, and to have got over it and fallen down a depth of between 20 and 30 feet. His not returning to his house did not alarm his wife, as she concluded that he had gone to spend the night with his relatives at Fremington, they being both natives of that parish; but, as he continued absent on the Saturday morning following, and no intelligence had been received concerning him, a diligent search was instituted, and in the course of the day the lifeless body was discovered at the bottom of the quarry pit lying on his face and hands. His death must have been occasioned by the fall, as there was no water in the pit, but whether it was instantaneous is not known. Deceased was a man of about sixty years of age. The body was conveyed to Fremington village, to await the Coroner's Inquest, which resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 January 1853
TEIGNMOUTH - Suicide at Teignmouth. - An old man named BICKLEY, living in Frogmarsh, hanged himself to a nail in the chimney-piece of his kitchen, one day last week. He was of eccentric habits, and his mind has been much disturbed from, it is supposed, a vexatious law-suit, in which he had been engaged. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Thursday, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 20 January 1853
NEWTON - Mysterious Death at Newton. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held on the body of WILLIAM ELLIS, 49 years of age, who was killed whilst driving a horse and cart into Newton after a load of oats, on Thursday. His body was picked up by two labourers, who were working in the carriage road, midway between Lower Bradley House and Higher Bradley House, and the horse and cart, which had run away, were brought in from Newton. According to the evidence of the medical man, Mr Gillard, death was caused by a kick from the horse, as the fore-part of deceased's head was fractured, and his nose and right eye were also knocked in. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - An accident, attended with fatal results, happened on Thursday evening last, to a young man named SAMUEL LUXTON, son of MR JOHN LUXTON, machine maker, of Hatherleigh. Deceased had left Hatherleigh for Barnstaple, early on the morning of the day, in company with two men named George Westlake and William Ellacott, having a horse and cart in which they were conveying a winnowing machine. They pursued their journey in safety until the evening of the day, when about four miles from this town, between the turnpike gate and New-bridge, on the Exeter road, when deceased who had been walking in the rear of the cart, (which was at the time driven by Ellacott, who was seated on the off side,) attempted to get up on the near side. the horse was trotting at the time, and, after placing his knee on the shaft, the deceased was jerked off by the oscillation of the vehicle, fell to the ground, and the wheel passed over him at about the centre of his body. He immediately got upon his knees, and, after remarking that he was glad there was not a heavier load in the cart, he fainted. Westlake caught him in his arms and held him till he revived, when he was assisted to the cart, and brought on to the 'Angel Inn,' in this town; where he was put to bed, and Mr Law, surgeon, speedily sent for. The medical gentleman found him in a state of collapse. He related the circumstances of the accident as above narrated; and, although his ribs were broken and his lungs punctured, he somewhat rallied on the following day, but on Saturday gradually sank until he expired. An Inquest was held on the body on the following Monday, at the 'Angel Inn' aforesaid before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and the above facts having been adduced in evidence, a verdict was returned of 'Accidental Death.' The men were perfectly sober at the time of the occurrence, and no blame whatever is attached to the driver.

Thursday 27 January 1853
BIDEFORD - Melancholy and Fatal Occurrence. - On Saturday afternoon, as Mr Alfred Perry, of Birmingham, and MR JOHN STAPLETON TURNER, son of MR RICHARD TURNER, of Abbotsham, were cruising in the river Torridge, off Cross Parks, the boat in which they were seated upset, precipitating them into the water, drowning poor TURNER, who has left a large number of friends to bewail his untimely end. Deceased and Mr Perry were engaged as clerks in the National Provincial Bank, and had gone out in the afternoon to take a cruise. They had been down the river and were about to make a tack near Cross Parks, where they were seen by Mr Wm. Hammett, who was standing on the Quay at the time. Mr Hammett took no more notice of the boat until a few minutes after, when his attention was attracted by something on the water which he supposed to be a porpoise. A short time sufficed to convince him that it was the boat which he had just seen sailing along so gaily lying bottom uttermost. He seized a boat lying near, and was joined by Mr Richard Martin, harbour master, who made a desperate leap to reach the boat, which by this time had pushed off to some distance. Another boat manned by sailors also put off to the rescue, as did also a person named Lake in a little punt. The two former succeeded in reaching the spot at the same time, and in a few moments Perry, much exhausted, was safely landed, and every means taken for his restoration. But poor TURNER had sunk in deep water, and, although every effort was made for the recovery of the body, it was without success until Sunday night, nine o'clock, when it was found on the sand ridge near Cross Parks, by two little boys named Henry Sweet and Thomas Hoare. On Monday, an Inquest was held at the 'New London Inn,' before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when the Jury, after hearing the evidence of the survivor, returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.' - We are happy to say that Mr Perry is doing well.

Thursday 3 February 1853
PENZANCE - Sudden Death at Penzance. - A lady named MISS GRIFFITH, formerly of Bideford and Barnstaple, (and sister of MR GRIFFITH, bookseller, Bideford,) then residing at No. 2, Clarence Terrace, Penzance, on Monday afternoon took her accustomed walk for two hours, and on her return complained of feeling chilly. She took tea, and retired to rest about eight o'clock. She was advised to have medical aid, but preferred prescribing for herself, as she said she knew her own ailments. The next morning, finding she did not get up, the servant went into her room, and found her dead. An Inquest will be held on the body. It will be gratifying to her numerous friends to know that death did not find her unprepared, as she was an experienced and constant christian.

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Unicorn Inn,' in this borough, on Wednesday last, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MR THOMAS CORNISH, butcher, of Ilfracombe, which was discovered on the Barnstaple turnpike road leading to that town, on the night preceding. The deceased (who was one of the unfortunate victims of the arch swindler, whose pranks we reported last week) had been to this town on business, and left the 'Golden Fleece' at about ten o'clock, on horseback, and perfectly sober. Shortly after eleven o'clock he was discovered lying on his face in the middle f the road, a few yards from the first mile-post and near the Playford paper mills, by Wm. Venning, who was riding as postillion to Sir Arthur Chichester, Bart., (who, with Lady Chichester, was returning in a carriage from Tawstock to his seat at Youlston.) The off horse shied and was pulled up, or the wheel would probably have gone over the body. William Cook, footman to Sir Arthur, who was seated on the box, dismounted, and removed the body to the hedge by the roadside; he breathed stentoriously, and both men supposed him to be a person intoxicated. The carriage passed on, and on Venning's return he saw him still lying in the same spot. Other persons appear to have passed on the way to Barnstaple, but to have rendered no assistance. But a man, named John Evans Warren, a paper maker, residing at Blatchford, in the parish of Shirwell, in returning to his home at about twelve o'clock, saw the deceased, and went to the adjacent cottages and procured assistance and a light; life now appeared to be quite extinct. Information was immediately given to Policeman Chanter, of this town, who promptly caused the body to be removed to the 'Unicorn Inn', where it was identified as that of MR CORNISH. It was now two o'clock in the morning, and Mr Cooke, surgeon, having arrived found the corpse still warm in some parts, but with no external marks of injuries from which death could have resulted. The surgeon having expressed an opinion that a post mortem examination was necessary, the Inquest was adjourned to this evening, for the verdict. We learn that no trace of any internal disease or rupture to cause death has been discovered, and that, in the opinion of Mr Cooke, the deceased was suffocated by the mud getting into his mouth after he had fallen from his horse. MR CORNISH was a fine athletic man, of about fifty-five years of age, of sober and industrious habits, and generally respected in Ilfracombe, where he resided. He has left a wife and several children to mourn their melancholy bereavement. It will be difficult for those who read the above statement of facts to acquit some of the parties concerned of the most culpable neglect. Had assistance been rendered to the unfortunate man when first discovered he might in all probability have been restored, and his family preserved from the irreparable loss they have now sustained. The verdict will, doubtless, be in accordance with the surgical testimony.

ASHREIGNEY - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday, on the body of RICHARD FORD, of Ashreigney, a lady of 14 years of age, who met his death by being buried in the ruins of a linhay, which was blown down upon him whilst at work in it. The body was much bruised, part of the roof timber having fallen upon it. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

SHOBROOK - Death by Fire. - An Inquest was held before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the 'Red Lion' inn, Shobrook, near Crediton, on the body of MARY FINNING, an old woman aged 86 years, who was burnt to death. It appeared that she was left alone, and going too near the fire, her clothes caught, and she was so dreadfully burnt that she survived but a few hours. Verdict, - Accidental Death.

Thursday 10 February 1853
The Inquest on the Late MR CORNISH. - As we stated last week the adjourned Inquest on this most unfortunate man was resumed on Thursday evening, when Mr Cooke gave the result of the post mortem examination. There was a bruise on the forehead and an abrasion of the skin on the nose; but internally the body presented all the appearances of a person in perfect health, save that a small spot of blood on the brain answered to the external bruise. The lungs were gorged with blood, which proved the correctness of the surgeon's assumption that death was occasioned by suffocation; the deceased having fallen or been thrown from his horse into the mud with his mouth downward, and having been left in a similar position by the man who removed him to the road side, as reported last week. Our Ilfracombe correspondent justly remarks that the valuable life of a worthy citizen has been literally "thrown away;" and the conduct of the parties who might have rendered timely succour, but who exhibited such callous indifference to the calls of humanity cannot be too severely reprehended. We do not wonder, therefore, that the Jury expressed their sentiments in this respect in the following addenda to their verdict:- "The Jury, after having given their verdict, requested the Coroner to record their unanimous opinion, that if Sir Arthur Chichester and his servants had, when they discovered the body, rendered proper assistance, the man's life might in all probability have been saved. - I Bencraft, Coroner."

ASHBURTON - Inquest at Ashburton. - An Inquest was held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., District Coroner, on Wednesday last, at Bow Bridge, Ashprington, on the body of THOMAS PHILIPS, aged 42 years, who was found drowned on the previous day at Tuckenhay Quay. Verdict - "Found Drowned." This road, for near half-a-mile, by night is extremely dangerous, and probably the poor fellow fell into the water accidentally; and as this is not the first instance of human life being lost at this spot, it is hoped that the resident landowners will adopt some means to prevent such melancholy occurrences in future.

Another Inquest was held by the same gentleman on Thursday, at the 'Waterman's Arms, near Buckfastleigh, on the body of THOMAS SAMUEL GILL, aged 52. Deceased slept at this inn on Monday, and was found dead the following morning, and under his pillow was a bottle marked "laudanum." Deceased was a native of Dartmouth.

Thursday 17 February 1853
TAVISTOCK - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday last, MR J. PAULL, mine agent, (well known as CAPT. PAULL), of Tavistock, while on his road from Tavistock to Gunnis Lake works, fell down and instantly expired. He was seen to stagger and fall by some one a short distance behind him. Medical aid was soon had, but was of no avail; his death appeared to have been instantaneous. The medical man gave it as his opinion, that he was dead before his body reached the ground - apoplexy was the cause. An Inquest was held upon the body, and a verdict of "Died by an overflow of blood to the head," was returned. The deceased was universally respected.

EXETER - Inquest at Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the 'Barnstaple Inn,' at 11 o'clock, on the body of a child named WALTER JAMES KNAPMAN, who came by his death in the following manner:- On the 19th January, the child was standing at his aunt's door, in Lower Northernhay-street; a miller's wagon, with two horses abreast, was coming down over the hill at the time, at a very slow pace, driven by a man named Charles Bridle. The child, it appears, ran out in the road, and was knocked down by one of the horses, and the front wheel of the wagon grazed the side of his head. A woman who was standing near, and saw the child's head grazed by the wheel, took it from under the wagon and carried it to the Dispensary. It was subsequently taken to the Hospital, where it remained until the 10th inst., when it was removed to its father's house by the father's request, but without the sanction of Mr Edye, who attended it while in the hospital. It died about six o'clock on Saturday evening. From the evidence of a woman who first saw the accident, it appears that the driver had the reins in his hand, and pulled up as soon as he was able; and from the evidence of Inspector Ellicombe and the child's aunt, it appears that the man had no reins in his hand at all, but they were fastened to the top of the wagon. The Coroner told the Jury that the question for them to consider was, whether or not the driver acted with sufficient caution. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

WIDDICOMBE-IN-THE-MOOR - Fatal Mine Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., at Challacombe, in the parish of Widdicombe-in-the-Moor, on the body of ROBERT HEXT, who was unfortunately killed at Videford Tin Mines, on the previous Saturday. It appears that deceased was going down the shaft, carrying a couple of picks on his shoulder, and, by some means, lost his hold, and fell down many fathoms. When taken up, he was quite dead. Verdict, "Accidentally Killed." The Coroner kindly raised a small subscription towards alleviating the distress of the poor widow, who is left with nine little children, living in a hut, on Dartmoor, quite unprovided for, and in much distress. HEXT was a very steady man, and was respected by all on the mine.

Thursday 24 February 1853
BARNSTAPLE - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at Penrose's Almshouses, Litchdon, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of an aged inmate, SARAH STEVENS, formerly a confectioner, in this town, who was found dead in her bed in the forenoon of the day preceding. From the evidence of Elizabeth Drew, who resided in the same house with the deceased, it appeared that MRS STEVENS had been ill since Christmas last, and was supposed to be dropsical, but she had refused to call in medical assistance, and had taken no other medicine than a preparation of parsley roots in gin, administered by her daughter-in-law. On the Friday morning witness gave deceased a cup of tea, and at ten o'clock left her in bed, while she went to market, instructing her not to get up until she returned. On her return, in about half an hour, she found her dead, but still warm, as though she had only expired a few minutes previously. Mr Forester, house surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, was passing the almshouse on the morning in question, when he was called in to see the deceased. She was lying in bed. He examined the body and found no marks of violence on it. The extremities were swollen, the hands slightly discoloured, and the surface of the body presented the appearance of a person who had died from disease of the heart. The decoction of parsley and gin would act on the kidneys, but would not be prejudicial to life. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was also held on Monday last, by Mr Bencraft, at the North Devon Infirmary, on the body of MR JAMES RADLEY, draper and grocer, of Southmolton, but who itinerated with goods from place to place, and employed others in the same vocation. Deceased, in company with William Wakely, mason, of Morthoe, and Charles Mackie, who travelled with him, set out on Thursday morning from Wakely's house at Morthoe, for a few hours' shooting, each being furnished with a gun. On their return RADLEY was walking about eighteen feet in advance of Mackie, when the gun of the latter, which he carried half-cocked on his arm, went off, and the charge lodged in RADLEY'S thigh. The wound bled very much, and Mackie immediately set off for a surgeon, while Wakely and some persons from Morthoe placed the unfortunate man upon a hurdle and removed him to the village. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, arrived shortly afterwards and examined the wound, and, at his suggestion, a conveyance was procured and the injured man removed to the North Devon Infirmary, where he arrived at five o'clock the same evening. Mackie and Wakely deposed to these facts: the occurrence, as will be seen, was purely accidental. The innocent cause of the calamity it is said has suffered most acutely in his mind in consequence. Mr Forester, house surgeon at the Infirmary, deposed that on Thursday evening the deceased was brought to that institution suffering from a gunshot wound in his left thigh. The charge appeared to have entered in an oblique direction behind the thigh bone, and to have lodged just below the groin, about half an inch from the surface. He remained under the charge of Mr Law and witness until Monday morning, at half-past six o'clock, when he died. His death was occasioned by mortification consequent on the wound in his thigh. The deceased fully exculpated Mackie from blame in the matter - they were on the most friendly terms. RADLEY was a very respectable man, and has left a widow and one child to mourn their loss. What adds to the distressing features of the case is that the widow is in daily expectation of her confinement. The verdict, of course, was in accordance with the above evidence.

BARNSTAPLE - The learned coroner held a third Inquest on Wednesday morning last, on the body of THOMAS NORMAN, mason, in Trinity-street, who died on the day preceding from injuries received by a fall on Saturday the 19th instant. It appears that the deceased was employed in cleaning the windows in the front of his dwelling house, when the ladder on which he was standing gave way, and precipitated him to the ground inflicting severe internal and external injuries which terminated fatally. Mr Cooke, surgeon, who had been called in to attend the deceased, deposed that on Saturday last, between the hours of one and two o'clock, he was sent for, and on arriving at his house found him in the kitchen supported on a chair, insensible and speechless. the principal injury he had received appeared to be a severe blow on the left temple, inflicting a wound over the eye, and which had produced concussion of the brain. Two of his fingers were dislocated, and his wrist fractured, and he had also received serious internal injuries and vomited a large quantity of blood. Mr Cooke had him removed to bed and continued to visit him frequently until his decease. He became partially conscious on the Sunday, but not sufficiently so to describe how the accident occurred. He died on Tuesday, about twelve o'clock at noon. Death was, in the opinion of the surgeon, occasioned by concussion of the brain. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BIDEFORD - Death by Burning. - The little girl, named MOASE, of Abbotsham, died on the 16th instant, from the injuries which she sustained some time since by burning. An Inquest was held on the body, on Monday last, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 10 March 1853
EXETER - Death by Fire at Exeter. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before John Gidley, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the 'Valiant Soldier,' on SARAH WOLLAND, a widow, who has for some time resided in Russell-street, St. Sidwell's. It appears that the deceased accidentally caught her clothes on fire last week, and sustained severe injuries in consequence. She was removed to the Hospital, where she lingered until Monday, and then expired. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 17 March 1853
ALPHINGTON - An Inquest was held yesterday, at the 'Bell Inn,' at three o'clock in the afternoon, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., on the body of a man named JOHN HILL. Deceased was a labourer, in the employ of Mr George Turner, of Barton. On Saturday night, about half-past ten o'clock, he was returning from Ide with a wagon, a boy was in the wagon, and deceased was walking on the path. When between Ide and Alphington the boy heard a groan, and not seeing HILL walking by the side of the wagon, he stopped the horses and got down. He found the deceased lying in the path, he spoke to him, but obtained no answer, upon which he ran for assistance, and deceased was taken to the 'Bell Inn,' but he was quite dead. Verdict, - "Found dead, but how he came by his death there was no evidence to show."

EXETER - Melancholy Death. - A poor man, named WILLIAM EBBLES, 63 years of age, who, when the woollen trade was flourishing in Exeter, was employed as a "millman," died almost suddenly, on Friday, under the following melancholy circumstances. - He was at work in or near his own house, in Ewings'-lane, when his leg suddenly burst out bleeding; and, after ineffectual attempts to stop it, he set out to go to the Dispensary. He was only able to reach as far as Stepcote-hill, his leg bleeding profusely the whole way, and there went into a public-house kept by Mrs Radall, while surgical assistance was sent for. Mr Lyddon speedily arrived, and by his direction the poor fellow was immediately taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. He was promptly attended to there by the medical officers of the institution, but it was too late to render him effectual aid; he had literally bled to death by the bursting of a varicose vein; and at the Inquest, held on Saturday before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, the Jury found a verdict to that effect.

BIDEFORD - Distressing and Fatal Occurrence. - It is our painful duty this week to record one of the most distressing accidents that ever fell under our notice. The facts are these:- On the 10th inst., an interesting little boy, named CHARLES MANNING, aged two years, and son of MR GEORGE MANNING, East-the-Water, was walking on the quay, in company with an elder brother. At the same time a horse and cart, heavily laden, and driven by a man in the employ of Mr Lee, of Salterns, happening to be passing, the little boy, CHARLES, from some cause unexplained, swerved a little from the chains which are placed along the quay for a defence, and in another moment was struck down by the horse and thrown under the cart. What makes it more distressing is, that the mother, who was near at the time, saw the accident, and was the first to lay hold of her child in the endeavour to rescue it. The wheels of the vehicle had, however, passed over its chest, and the frantic mother was doomed to look upon her child, but a moment before full animation, a lifeless corpse. On the following morning an Inquest was held at the 'Swan Inn,' East-the-Water, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when it was proved that there was no fault whatever in the driver of the cart, who was on his right side and driving very steady at the time. - Verdict, 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 24 March 1853
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - A Coroner's Inquest was held at the 'Rolle's Quay Inn,' on Wednesday evening last, on the body of ROSALIE DREW, the infant daughter of MARY ANNE DREW, residing on Rolle's Quay. It appeared that the child had been sickly from its birth; that on the Tuesday night no particular change had been perceptible in its appearance, that the mother and child retired to rest at an early hour, but at three o'clock on the following morning the child had been found dead and cold. A post mortem examination of the body disclosed the fact that death had resulted from Natural Causes, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

BIDEFORD - Melancholy Suicide. - On Friday last, the inmates of Moreton-house, the seat of Lewis Wm. Buck, Esq., M.P., were thrown into a state of much excitement, occasioned by the discovery of the dead body of MR JOHN BEER, the under gardener, suspended by the neck, in one of the greenhouses. The deceased was immediately cut down, but the vital spark had fled. An Inquest was held the same day before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when evidence was adduced proving that BEER had been for some time past in a very desponding state of mind, and at times exhibited manifest signs of mental derangement. Verdict, 'Temporary Insanity.' - Deceased was 58 years of age, had been in the service of Mr Buck for upwards of 30 years, and was much respected by his master and all who knew him. He leaves a widow and family to mourn their loss.

Thursday 31 March 1853
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last as JOHN JOLLY, a lad about seventeen years of age, in the employ of Mr Smale, machine maker, of Buckland Brewer, was driving a horse in a cart laden with furniture to this town, he halted when near Yelland, in the parish of Fremington, to rest his horse, and took off the head collar that it might feed with the more ease. The eye-blinds being thus removed it is supposed that some articles of bedding wrapped in a white sheet which were packed in the cart, caused the animal to take fright, and it immediately dashed off at a furious rate, throwing down the poor lad and crushing his chest beneath one of the wheels, causing instant death. Mrs Stapleton, wife of Mr Josiah Stapleton, of Buckland, and her child, who were in the cart, were also thrown out, but with the exception of a slight sprain no other injury was sustained. Mr Stapleton had the poor lad conveyed to Fremington village, and sent for medical aid, which, however, was of no avail. An Inquest held on the following day, resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 April 1853
EXETER - Suicide at Exeter. - On Wednesday, the parish of Saint Sidwell was thrown into a state of excitement, in consequence of a man having been found in the yard of a slaughter-house, at the back of St. Sidwell's Church, with his throat cut. The body was taken to Lisson's 'Acland Arms,' where it remained for some time without any person being able to identify it. It was ultimately found to be the body of a carpenter, named WILLIAM LEE, who had lived in Wood's Court, Cumberland-street. The wound had been inflicted by his pocket-knife. It appears that, for some time past, he has laboured under a disease of the heart and dropsy, for which Mr James S. Perkins, surgeon, had attended him. About nine weeks since he fell and broke a rib, since which slight symptoms of mental derangement have been manifested. He was also in the receipt of parochial relief, and he was under the apprehension that that would cease, and that he should be compelled to enter the Workhouse. On Wednesday morning he went to his razor-box, but his wife had prudently placed the razors beyond his reach. About one o'clock in the afternoon he was standing against a wall in Summerland-street, and in about half an hour afterwards he was found lying on his back in the slaughter-house-yard, with his windpipe severed. An Inquest was held at Lisson's 'Acland Arms' on Friday, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 14 April 1853
YARNSCOMBE - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, on the body of ISAAC PETHEBRIDGE, of this place, who was found dead in his bed the previous day. He rose in the morning and went to his work, but returned in the forenoon complaining of violent pain in his stomach, and went to bed, where he was shortly after discovered dead. PETHEBRIDGE was an old man, and it appeared lived unhappily with his wife and son, which gave rise to a report that he was poisoned. Messrs. Cowdry and Jones, of Torrington, made a post mortem examination of the body, but could trace no poison; whereupon the Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 28 April 1853
SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - This morning (Wednesday) MR GEORGE CRISPIN, of this town, a carpenter, aged about 70, left his home in perfect health, for the purpose of working at a farm at some distance, accompanied by a young man who works with him, but who for some cause was detained on the road for about five minutes. When, however, the young man came up to CRISPIN, at Rock Hill, on the old Exeter road, he was lying by the hedge quite dead. He was a short man and of full habit. Apoplexy is supposed to have been the cause of death. Mr Ley, surgeon, was quickly on the spot, but too late to render any assistance. The body was conveyed to Ley Farm to await the Coroner's Inquest.

BERRYNARBOR - Fatal Accident. - Early this morning the body of MR KEAN, of Lee, in the parish of Berrynarbor, was found lying in the road between Loxhore and Arlington quite dead. It appears that he had been on a visit yesterday, (Wednesday) to Mr Clarke's, at Riddle, in the parish of Loxhore, and in the course of the evening he left for home. His friends waited up for him till one o'clock, expecting his return, and at length concluded he had remained the night at Mr Clarke's. Very early this morning he was found lying dead in the spot above-named by some persons, who having identified his body conveyed it to the house of his nephew, Mr Bowden, of Lee, with whom the deceased had resided. The cause of his death has not yet transpired, and the horse on which he rode had not been found at the time our informant left. A Coroner's Inquest will be held on his body, the particulars of which will remain for our next number. MR KEAN was very generally known and respected, and has left a large circle of friends to lament his loss.

Thursday 5 May 1853
Inquest. - The Coroner's Inquisition held on the body of MR KEAN, of Berrynarbour, whose lifeless body was discovered on the road between Loxhore and Arlington on Thursday morning last, (as reported,) resulted in a verdict of "Died from Apoplexy.

SOUTHMOLTON - An Inquest was held on the 27th ult., at Ley-farm, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner for the Borough, on the body of GEORGE CRISPIN, whose death was noticed last week, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

Thursday 19 May 1853
BARNSTAPLE - Death from Excessive Drinking. - One of the most disgusting occurrences, attended by fatal results, which it has ever fallen to our lot to record, happened in this town on Thursday last.
It appears that on that evening a number of persons (including several operatives of the lace factory) assembled at the 'Newington Inn,' Derby, kept by Robert Seldon, and a dispute having arisen between two of the company as to which could drink the most, one of them, named HENRY DUNSFORD, engaged to drink half-a-gallon of beer in eight minutes. A person present supplied the beer; another engaged to give him 8d. if he accomplished the feat; the landlord lent his watch to keep time; and the beer having been placed before him in a large jug the poor wretch in two or three turns accomplished the task in seven minutes and half. This was shortly afterwards followed by stupor, and in a state of insensibility the inebriate was conveyed to his home by two of his companions and placed in the stairs, where he was discovered on the following morning by his own son (a little boy eleven years of age) a lifeless corpse!
These facts having become known, naturally created an intense sensation (especially in the locality where the deceased resided, and where the circumstances transpired); and on the evening of the following day, Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, held an Inquest on the body at the 'Currier's Arms,' at half-past six. The Jury having been impanelled, proceeded with their foreman (Mr Tatham), and the Coroner to view the body, which was lying in the upper room of a small cottage in Union-street. The house appeared to be denuded of every comfort, and the family in a state of wretchedness, such as may be conceived better than described. The body had the usual appearances of one whose death had resulted from apoplexy, but bore no mark of violence or ill-usage.
having returned to the inn the Jury proceeded to hear the evidence of the parties present at the 'Newington' public-house on the fatal occasion. The first witness called was James Gardiner, a currier's apprentice, residing in Higher Maudlin-street: who deposed that he was at the 'Newington Inn,' on Thursday evening; went there between seven and eight o'clock; went into the skittle alley and continued there till dusk; saw HENRY DUNSFORD there; the persons playing had out half a gallon of beer of which he partook. When it became dark they all went into the public house, where they had more beer. Heard a conversation between deceased and William Fry, butcher, as to who could drink most. DUNSFORD asked Fry if he could drink half-a-gallon of beer in five minutes; Fry said he could not. DUNSFORD then said he could to it; and if Fry would order in half-a-gallon, he would do the same, and the person who took the longest time in drinking his should pay for both. Fry would not agree to this proposal, but said he would pay for the beer if deceased would drink it in ten minutes; an offer which he subsequently withdrew. John Davies, butcher, who was also present, then said he would pay for the half gallon if DUNSFORD would drink it in eight minutes; and Fry engaged to give him a penny for every half-pint he drunk, 8d. in all, if he completed the task in the given time. After some hesitation, Fry put out the money and William Symon took it up. The wife of the landlord then brought in the beer in a large jug. On learning the purpose for which it was ordered she carried it away; but, at deceased's solicitations, she returned with it, but endeavoured to dissuade him from drinking it. DUNSFORD then took up the jug, and drank the contents in seven minutes and half. Wm. Symons kept the time, holding a watch in his hand. After he had drunk the beer he was handed a seat, he then became sick, and fell off his chair to the floor. This was just before eleven. Two young men present (Charles China and William Hooper) then took him home. After falling on the floor he appeared almost insensible.
By a Juror: - The landlady appeared to be unwilling that he should drink it. The company present consisted of Fry, Davies, Symons, Robert Seldon (the landlord) and others. I left at about half past eleven.
William Symons examined: I am a smith, living at Derby; was at the 'Newington Inn,' last night. West there between seven and eight o'clock. DUNSFORD came in about an hour after, and had something to drink. At about ten o'clock heard a conversation about drinking beer. The parties at length came to an engagement that DUNSFORD should drink half-a-gallon in eight minutes, for which he was to have 8d. and the beer. Davies was to pay for the beer, and Fry said he would give the 8d. Fry took out the money and placed it in my hands. Mrs Seldon, the landlady, then brought in the beer, and Fry blew off the froth and said the jug was not full. The landlady was not willing that DUNSFORD should drink it, and carried it away, but brought it back at his request. Seldon, the landlord, produced his watch, and I held it. Deceased then commenced drinking and completed the task in seven minutes and half. I declared that he had done it within the time. Shortly after he had drunk the beer he became sick; he did not fall, to my knowledge; he was rather insensible. I did not hear him say anything. He then left the house. I left about a quarter of an hour after; it was then from twenty minutes to half-past eleven o'clock.
By a Juror: There was no row in the house; some hard talking, but no blows or threats.
Robert Seldon sworn: I am the keeper of the 'Newington Inn;' was at home last evening; saw HENRY DUNSFORD there; he came in just after seven o'clock. Do not know what he drank during the evening. [Witness then gave a similar statement of the revolting transaction to that given by Symons.] Did not think any harm would happen from it. He was a little elevated before he began to drink the half-gallon; he might have drunk three or four half pints previously. For a minute or two after he had swallowed the beer he appeared cheerful: he then became sick. Fry and Davies were there on business - the purchasing of pigs.
John Davies sworn: This witness's evidence differed in some respects from that of the other persons examined. He said that being at the 'Newington Inn,' on the evening before, he had been annoyed by the deceased making a great noise and interrupting him in his dealing with Seldon for the purchase of some pigs, and gave him half-a-gallon of ale to induce him to be silent. Saw him drink the ale in seven minutes and three-quarters; was not aware that it was brought in to be drunk in any specified time; he (witness) wished him not to drink it. Had offered him the half-gallon solely to purchase his silence before the betting commenced. It was Fry who said he would give him 8d. if he would drink it in eight minutes. The question was repeated as to the motive which induced Davies to order the half-gallon of beer, but he adhered to his statement that he did it without reference to the time in which it should be drunk, and for the purpose he had named.
William Fry examined: Am a butcher, living at Derby; was at the 'Newington Inn' last night. The deceased, HENRY DUNSFORD, said he would drink half-a-gallon of beer in eight minutes, and Davies said, if he would do so, he would pay for the beer. The landlord's wife objected to bring it; and DUNSFORD said, "Never mind 'missus;' I can drink that, and 'wallop' Fry after." I offered him 8d. if he would drink it in the time. He drank half of it at one draught. He was particularly noisy before the beer was brought in. Davies ordered the beer that DUNSFORD might try the feat.
Charles China sworn: I live in Boden's-row, Derby; went to the 'Newington Inn' last night, just before eight o'clock. Went into the skittle alley till dusk, when the company - eight or ten in all - went into the public house, where we stayed till after eleven o'clock. Saw DUNSFORD drunk the half-gallon of ale. He was induced to do so by the offer of Davies to pay for the beer, and of Fry to give him 8d. in money if he would do it in eight minutes. When the half-gallon jug was brought in, Fry blew off the froth, and said it was not full. Deceased drank of the beer in seven minutes and half. He presently became sick, and appeared stupid, and fell off his seat. I took him up, and, assisted by William Hooper, carried him home. When we arrived at DUNSFORD'S house, we found the door unlocked and a chair placed behind it. His wife called from upstairs "Who is there?" We answered that we had brought home HARRY, and that he was very drunk. She said, "Put him in the stairs." We said, "You had better come down to him;" and she replied, "Never mind; sit him in the stairs, and he will come up by and bye." I returned to the 'Newington Inn,' and finally let at about half-past eleven. When DUNSFORD commenced drinking the beer it was five minutes to eleven by the landlord's watch, which he said was ten minutes behind the proper time. DUNSFORD was neither drunk nor sober.
By a Juror: Davies ordered the beer that DUNSFORD might try the task of drinking it in eight minutes. Deceased was not noisy during the evening. If he had not drunk the beer within the eight minutes Davies would not have paid for it.
A Juror having expressed a wish to know how far the landlord was implicated in the disgraceful transaction.
Robert Seldon was recalled: I was aware when the beer was ordered for what purpose it was brought in - that DUNSFORD might drink it in eight minutes. I lent my watch to keep time. [Witness here pulled out his watch, and described the manner in which Symons held it during the performance of the feat.] Did not hear Davies order the beer to keep DUNSFORD quiet; he was not at all noisy. If he had not drunk the beer in the time Davies would not have paid for it. I believe they all spent a comfortable evening, and enjoyed themselves for aught that I know to the contrary. DUNSFORD was a very avaricious man for drink.
William Hooper sworn: Was at the 'Newington Inn' last night. Saw DUNSFORD there. When he came in at eight o'clock heard him say that he had already drunk ten or twelve half-pints. [This witness's evidence was similar in effect to that given by China, and need not, therefore, be given in detail. Had seen DUNSFORD before last evening drink half-a-gallon in a few minutes. Davies said he would pay for the beer if drunk in the time, and Fry promised him 8d. I added, "And a pound of tripe;" to which Fry assented. DUNSFORD lost the use of his legs before we had gone far from the house; and we were, therefore, obliged to carry him. He did not speak after we got outside.
MARY DUNSFORD, widow of the deceased, who appeared greatly distressed, was the next witness examined. Recollect hearing the persons call last night. I was between sleeping and waking; had two children ill in the hooping cough, and had been up in attendance upon them for two nights previously; having had no rest, I was weary. The persons who brought home my husband told me they had brought home HARRY. When they were gone I went down, and tried to rouse him, but could not get him up. He appeared very tipsy; I have often seen him the worse for liquor but never so bad as last night. Heard him snoring after I went upstairs. Fell asleep, and did not awake till six o'clock this morning, when I went down and shook him, but he did not move; he felt cold, and I said to my sister who lives with me, "I fear HARRY is dead." Went in haste to Mr Cooke, who was speedily in attendance. My sister and myself carried the corpse upstairs. I have been married nearly 12 years, but never knew my husband remain in the stairs all night before.
Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, sworn: I was called shortly after six this morning to attend HENRY DUNSFORD; went immediately; found him cold and stiff; he had apparently been dead for several hours. Examined the body, but could discover no marks of violence on it. From the evidence I have heard to-night, I am of opinion that death was caused by excessive drinking, which probably produced apoplexy.
By a Juror: There was no fracture of the neck. He might have breathed stentoriously for some time before death. Swallowing so large a quantity of beer in so short a time, would cause such distension of the stomach as to produce compression of the brain and issue in apoplexy. I do not think that medical assistance would have been of any avail if called shortly after the large quantity of beer was drunk.
This completed the evidence. The Coroner shortly, and with some emotion, addressed the Jury. The case was the most repulsive and disgraceful to the parties concerned in it, that had come before him in his official capacity. Here was a man suddenly taken off in a state and under circumstances which were most harrowing to the feelings; and upon some parts of the facts which had come out in this Inquiry he could not trust himself to remark. Their duty was to ascertain the cause of death - whether by violence or by the deceased's own act. If the parties to this transaction had used force - if deceased had been induced to swallow the large quantity of beer which had been stated, by any coercion practised upon him, then the parties so doing would be guilty of Manslaughter. It appeared, however, that the act was voluntary. Nevertheless the persons present were highly culpable, especially the landlord and landlady of the house, who had permitted the unhappy man to drink so much beer in such a manner. There was a marked discrepancy between the evidence of Mr Davies and the other witnesses. He was, no doubt, naturally anxious to exonerate himself from blame, by representing that the beer was given for another purpose than that which had been clearly proved; but he (the Coroner) was sorry to see a person who appeared to be a respectable man, occupying such a position, and trusted this lamentable case would be a warning to him and to others. It would be for the Jury to consider whether it did not become them to append to their verdict some expression of censure in respect to the chief actors in this painful affair.
The Jury shortly consulted, and returned a verdict of "Died from Excessive Drinking."
A conversation then ensued as to the terms of the censure that should be appended to the verdict. Several of the Jurymen were of opinion that the landlord was the most culpable, as he was charged with the maintenance of good order in his house, and yet had permitted the disgraceful proceedings which the evidence had disclosed, even assisting therein by lending his watch to keep time. Others thought the conduct of Fry and Davies the most censurable. It was at length resolved to adopt the following:- "The Jury beg to express their opinion that the conduct of all parties concerned in this most painful and discreditable affair is highly censurable."
The Jury also requested that their fees might be handed over to the widow; and the Coroner, in acceding to this request, said he should have pleasure in adding thereto a portion of his own fees.
A great crowd of persons surrounded the inn during the Inquiry (which occupied more than three hours), who were loud in their denunciations of the persons who had induced the poor besotted creature to drink the deadly draught, which had deprived a wife of her husband and thrown six young and helpless children fatherless upon the world.
DUNSFORD was in the 33rd year of his age, and had for a great many years been in the employ of John Miller, Esq., at the Derby lace factory. The body was interred on Sunday last, in the churchyard of St. Mary Magdalene, a large company attending the funeral. The piercing wail of the bereaved widow and her offspring rose above the solemn service for the dead, and affected every heart, and drew a tear from every eye.
It should be mentioned to his honour, that Mr Garland, mason, of Derby, has offered to take the eldest boy and maintain and bring him up to his business. We trust the example will not be lost upon others. The destitution of the family, deprived of their natural guardian, appeals powerfully to the sympathies of the humane.

Thursday 2 June 1853
TIVERTON - Dreadful Death at Tiverton. - An Inquest was held at the Guildhall on Monday, last week, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS KELLY, who came by his death under the following circumstances. On the previous evening the deceased and a youth named James Boyce, proceeded to the lime-kilns adjoining the Canal, for the purpose of passing the night. About two o'clock in the morning Boyce was aroused from his slumbers by the deceased, who told him that his (deceased's) clothes were on fire. He used every effort to extinguish the flames, but in vain. Ultimately, however, the screams of the poor fellows were heard by Mr Smith, the principal manager of the Grand Western Canal, who, with one of his workmen, hastened to their assistance. The deceased was conveyed into the town, and medical aid was promptly procured, but the unfortunate man was so shockingly burnt that he was beyond the reach of human skill, and he lingered in excruciating agony until five o'clock a.m., when he died. The body presented a horrifying spectacle, every particle of his clothing being reduced to a cinder. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death caused by Accidental Burning."

Thursday 9 June 1853
Accidental Death. - On Wednesday afternoon last, a fatal accident happened to a young man named WILLIAM MARSH, a navvy, who was employed on the North Devon Railway. The poor fellow had charge of a number of trucks on the line near Wearmarsh, in the parish of Atherington, and his foot having been caught by a hook while they were in motion he was thrown down and crushed between two trucks, the injuries he received causing instant death. Deceased was about 28 years of age, and was unmarried. A Coroner's Inquest held on the following day, resulted in a verdict of 'Accidental Death.'

Thursday 23 June 1853
Fatal Accident on the North Devon Railway. - A young man named NORTHCOTT, aged about 19 years, was accidentally killed on the North Devon Railway on Wednesday last. It appears he was working on the line between the Crediton station and Uford, for Mr Davidge, one of the contractors; that he and a man called William Balsdon had the charge of two horses and four trucks in removing earth or soil; that NORTHCOTT was leading the front horse and Balsdon the hinder one, with the loaded trucks; that as they were running on, NORTHCOTT slipped his foot and fell across the rail, and the whole of the four loaded trucks immediately passed over the poor fellow's body, and killed him on the spot. He was, in fact, nearly cut in two pieces. An Inquest was held on Thursday at the 'White Hart Inn,' before R. R. Crosse, Esq., when the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

SIDBURY - Suicide at Sidbury. - An Inquest was held here, on Thursday, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES SALTER, a farm servant, who had been found in a pond, on the day preceding, in a very exhausted state, and who, although not dead when taken out of the water, expired within two hours afterwards. The poor fellow was 42 years of age and the father of three children. The eldest of the children is about eight years of age, and is living with a former mistress of the deceased, who has taken charge of it; the younger is an infant of two months. His wife and he had been fellow servants, on the same farm, for upwards of 11 years, and they were very much attached to each other. She had died, however, after a short illness, and he had buried her on Tuesday. The event seriously affected him, and having packed up a sum of £27 10s., which he had saved in service, and arranged for its being sent to his old mistress, for the benefit of his children, he had gone to the pond, with the undoubted intention of committing self-destruction. The Jury returned a verdict of 'Temporary Insanity.'

Thursday 30 June 1853
CLOVELLY - An Inquest was held on the 25th inst., at Clovelly, on the body of the late MRS LOWTHER, whose death occurred under the following painful circumstances:- Harriet Spearman, a servant of the deceased stated that her mistress had been extremely ill for some time past, and Mr Ackland, of Bideford, had attended her. She remembered on the 16th inst. Mr Ackland leaving a small bottle, which she believed contained laudanum, with CAPTAIN LOWTHER, husband of the deceased, requesting him, if circumstances required it, to give her mistress ten or fifteen drops in a little cold water. The bottle was kept on a chest of drawers in the bed room; not any of the medicine was given. On the 22nd the deceased was much worse and at times quite bereft of reason, complaining of painful sensations in her head, and great difficulty of breathing. In the evening of the same day (Wednesday), about seven o'clock, a horse and gig fell into the lake near the house, when MRS LOWTHER desired Mrs Falkener, the deceased's sister, to step out and see what was the matter; she did so, but told witness to go to her mistress. On entering the room witness saw the deceased sitting on the side of the bed, holding in her hand the bottle which was all but empty; its contents had not been spilled either on the room or bed clothes. Shortly after, the deceased became drowsy and insensible, and in that state she remained until half-past ten, p.m., when she died. Mr W. H. Ackland, surgeon, of Bideford, deposed that he had attended the late MRS LOWTHER since the 19th of March last, she being the subject if very severe disease of the heart and lungs. He last saw her alive on the 16th June. She was then dangerously ill; and objected to the further employment of remedial measures, believing her case to be hopeless. Deeming it expedient and desirable, he left with her husband the small bottle now produced, containing about half an ounce of a preparation of opium, commonly called "black drop," with special directions for its use in the event of circumstances requiring it. From the evidence given, as well as a knowledge of the history of the case, the surgeon was of opinion that by reason of advanced disease, and consequent irregularity of circulation, the deceased, at the time she took the poison, was suffering from mental aberration, and that death was accelerated by her swallowing upwards of three drachms of "Black drop," which was more than equivalent to thirty grains of crude opium. The Jury immediately returned a verdict to the effect that the immediate cause of death was occasioned by opium taken during a fit of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 14 July 1853
DUSFORD - Distressing Suicide. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held on MR GEORGE MAY, farmer, of Dunsford, who shot himself with a gun on the previous day. It appeared that the deceased had been in a desponding state for the last fortnight, and from the evidence of Mr Nosworthy, surgeon, and Mr S. Day, Culver House, there could be no doubt that the deceased was insane at the time he committed the act. It appeared that, at eight o'clock in the morning, the sister of deceased, being upstairs, was alarmed by the report of a gun. She called to a servant girl in the yard, who went into the kitchen, and found her master lying on the floor, weltering in his blood - the upper part of his skull being completely blown off. The gun was loaded with powder only.

Thursday 21 July 1853
NEWTON ABBOTT - Railway Accident. - On Wednesday an Inquest was held at Hamly's 'South Devon Inn,' in this town, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM TAYLOR, of Bishopsteignton, mason, a workman on the South Devon Railway, at Stoneycombe, who was killed by a train running from Torquay to this town, at about 4.45 p.m. on the previous day, whilst the deceased was walking up the line on his way to Bishopsteignton, for tools. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, unanimously found that the death was accidental, but expressed a strong opinion that the South Devon Railway Company should take steps for giving more effectual notice than at present of the times of the passing of the trains.

Thursday 4 August 1853
BARNSTAPLE - A Child Drowned at Rawleigh. - An Inquest was held at Rawleigh, in this borough on Friday morning inst., at ten o'clock, by Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child named HENRY STEVENS, who was found drowned in the Rawleigh stream the previous day. The Jury having been sworn, the father of the child, SAMUEL STEVENS, weaver, was called upon(which is so painfully frequent in such cases) to give evidence touching his death. He was in the mill at work, as usual on Thursday morning, and at about eleven o'clock in the forenoon he went home to his house but did not find the child there. He thought no more of it until about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock, when a messenger was sent from his wife to say that HENRY was missing. When he came home he found that his wife had been looking for him everywhere among the neighbours. Immediately he thought of the water, and went in search of him along the stream by the road leading to Pitt, and found the poor little fellow a short distance on in the middle of the stream, with his clothes over his back. The body was stopped there by some posts in the stream, near Ellis's, the dairyman. He brought the child home himself, and was sure life was quite extinct. Mr May had sent for Mr Morgan, surgeon, who said it was quite dead, but had not been long in the water. Witness did not see the child after he went to work in the morning until he found him in the water dead. He saw him in the back kitchen before he went to work. "Then," said the father, with much emotion, "the poor little fellow held up his face for me to kiss, a thing he had not done for weeks before."
Jane Creedy, a poor woman in the neighbourhood, gave evidence of having seen him about 11 o'clock; but no one, it appeared, saw him fall into the stream.
The Coroner said there could be no doubt from the evidence that it was an accidental death. The state of the bank bordering on the stream where the accident had happened was a very proper subject for the attention of the Jury. They had been with him before the Inquest commenced and inspected it for some distance, and had found the bank in a dangerous and unprotected state. The re-opening of the factory had drawn a considerable number of poor people to reside there with their families. Had the village been inhabited by the rich no doubt the stream would have been carefully fenced. But the children of the poor were as dear to them as the children of the rich, and it would be their duty, through him, to represent the case to the proper authorities that such fences might be set up as should prevent the recurrence of similar accidents. If it were a parish road it would be the duty of the parish to attend to it; and if a private road, the owners of the property should construct such a fence as would render it secure.
A verdict was returned to the effect that the child, HENRY STEVENS, while playing near the Rawleigh stream, was accidentally drowned by falling into the said stream; the Jury expressing their desire that the Coroner should represent the insecure state of the bank in the proper quarter and require it to be properly remedied. They also pointed out the necessity for similar attention to another part of the stream on the path between Rawleigh and Derby. The Jury, at the suggestion of their foreman, Mr A. P. Stevens, very kindly and promptly presented the fees usually given them on those occasions, to the poor bereaved parents.

EXETER - Suicide. - On Monday evening, an Inquest was held at the 'Anchor Inn,' in Exeter, before J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM POSTMAN TRUMP, a shoemaker, who had committed suicide that morning by cutting his throat with a knife. From the evidence of the witnesses who were examined, it appeared that the deceased took his supper with his family, as usual, on Sunday night, and retired to bed about ten o'clock. Nothing took place during the night, but at a quarter past seven on the following morning, one of his daughters went to his room, for a mattress, when, seeing blood on the floor, she ran down for her mother; they then both returned to the room, and found the deceased sitting on the floor with his throat cut. His wife endeavoured to stop the bleeding by placing a quantity of linen in the wound, but without success, and he gradually sank. There was no doubt that his mind had been affected; and on one occasion he evinced symptoms, which induced his friends to have him removed to the Asylum, in St. Thomas. The Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 11 August 1853
EXETER - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on Saturday afternoon, at five o'clock, before J. Warren, Esq., on the body of JAMES STONE, who met with an accident on the 25th of July, which partially caused his death. Deceased was hind to Mr Palmer, of Newton St. Cyres, and on the day in question they were carrying hay. Being short of hands, deceased, who was 58 years of age, got upon the top of the wagon of hay. The horse moved suddenly and jerked the deceased off, and he fell upon his head and shoulders. He was taken to the hospital, where he died on Friday afternoon, from delirium tremens, caused by his previous habits of life. Two bones of the spinal column were dislocated, but that was not sufficient of itself to cause death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 18 August 1853
TEIGNMOUTH - Death by Drowning. - THOMAS BULLEY, aged ten years, went out to bathe in the river on Saturday evening week, with other lads of his own age. When he first plunged into the water he said he would see how far he could go, and shortly afterwards he called out for help, and a boy named William Foote, seeing him in danger, swam to him, and caught him by his hands, but the tide, running out very fast, prevented Foote from retaining his hold, and the unfortunate lad sunk to rise no more. The body was found on Sunday, just inside the Bar, and an Inquest was held on Monday, at Gasking's Inn, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner. Verdict "Accidentally Drowned."

Fatal Accident. - A labourer on the works of the North Devon Railway, at Coleford, named WILLIAM BROWN, whilst driving a truck of soil on a temporary railway, on Monday afternoon, accidentally stumbled and fell across the line, and the wheels of the truck passed over his thighs crushing them in a frightful manner. A medical man who happened to be in the village, was called and he administered some stimulants, after which he ordered him to be taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died three quarters of an hour after his arrival. An Inquest was held upon the body on the following day, at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' by J. Warren, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned.

Thursday 1 September 1853
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday evening, at the North Devon Infirmary, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., the Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN RAWLE, a lad about 14 years of age, who was killed on the morning of that day by a fall from the scaffolding in front of a house in Cross-street. The Jury having viewed the body, which was lying in the dead house.
John Knill, one of the workmen employed on the building, deposed: I am a mason living at Pilton. I was working this morning at Mr Charles Gribble's building in Cross-street; the lad JOHN RAWLE was working there also, carrying building materials to the workmen. About half-past nine o'clock this witness had occasion to descend from the third storey of the building, leaving deceased behind. He had but just descended, when he heard a short cry, and running out, deceased fell just by his heels. Witness went to lift him up, but found blood gushing from both sides of his head, defying all his efforts to stop it. A surgeon was sent for, but not coming instantly, he and four other men carried him to the Infirmary, witness holding his head all the way. He could not tell whether deceased was then alive or not. The height from which he fell was about 28 feet. Charles Knill, brother of the last witness, deposed, that he went to the top scaffold of the building between nine and ten o'clock, and, whilst there, deceased endeavoured to pass from the joist floor of the third story on to the scaffold. Deceased stood on the window sill, and placing his arms on the scaffold, which was about four feet higher than the sill, he swung himself off and losing his hold on the scaffold, fell between it and the front of the house on to a heap of gravel beneath.
Mr Forester, house surgeon of the Infirmary, deposed that the deceased, JOHN RAWLE, was brought there at 27 minutes to ten o'clock that morning, in a dying state. He found two distinct fractures of the skull, a longitudinal one on the right temple, the other a transverse fracture over the crown of the head. The lateral fracture had a large external wound. The injuries would cause death. Pulsation had almost ceased when he was received into the institution; he died in about four minutes after. The Coroner said, after what they had heard, the Jury could have no doubt but that the cause of death was purely accidental. - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 6 October 1853
MERTON - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, before the Coroner, on view of the body of MRS ANN FORD, between 50 and 60 years of age, the wife of MR JOHN FORD, of Ford farm, in this parish, who died the previous Sunday. From the evidence, it appeared that the deceased was ill in bed the preceding Wednesday, and desired her daughter, a girl about 17 years of age, to mix some medicine for her; when the girl mixed a powder called sublimate, in mistake, which the deceased took, and shortly after found that she had taken poison. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Arthur Owen, Esq., surgeon, Black Torrington, the medical attendant of the family, returned a verdict "That the deceased died of diseased lungs, her death being accelerated by taking poison."

Thursday 3 November 1853
BISHOP'S TAWTON - Appalling Accident With Loss of Life. - An accident of a most afflictive character, occurred near this village on Wednesday last, by which MRS FAIRCHILD, the wife of MR GEORGE FAIRCHILD, of West Buckland, was killed on the spot and her daughter, aged about 13 years, seriously injured. It appears that MRS FAIRCHILD and left West Buckland that morning, accompanied by her daughter, in a cart driven by herself, which was borrowed of Mr Rendle of that place, and was purposing a visit to the house of her brother, MR MOORE, of Week Farm, in the parish of Tawstock. She had, it appears, recently received a letter from her son, who had emigrated to America, and is now carrying on business at Quebec, in Canada. As this letter contained some reference to a younger son, who was residing with MR MOORE, his uncle, and who also contemplated emigrating to the same place, she was intending to consult with him on the subject when thus painfully arrested in her object. She had proceeded on her journey till the road descended from Coddon Hill towards Tawton village, when the horse suddenly took fright. The cause of this has not been clearly ascertained, but her daughter, who is partially recovered, states that it was occasioned by a covey of birds crossing the road. The animal proceeded at considerable speed down the hill, which is rather steep, till it got near the bottom, when the wheel of the vehicle turned into the watercourse, and came with a terrible crash against a large stone, which guarded an iron grating placed on the side of the road. The concussion broke off one side of the wheel, turned the cart over on its side, and precipitated the riders into the middle of the road with such tremendous violence as to cause the distressing accident which it is now our painful duty to record. MRS FAIRCHILD fell with great force on her head, which broke her neck and caused instant death, and the daughter lay insensible by her side. In the meanwhile, the shafts having been also broken off, the horse bounded to the bottom of the hill, turned toward this village, and ultimately found his way to Bableigh Farm, where it was secured. The alarm being given, many persons were speedily on the spot to render assistance. The first who arrived was John Bower, who had been working near the spot during the morning and had gone into his cottage, at a few landyards distance, but a few moments before. On his arrival he endeavoured to lift the deceased, but found that she was quite dead, the daughter had recovered just sufficiently to raise herself on her knees, and on receiving intelligence of her mother's death, sunk down again in a swoon. She has since recovered her consciousness, but appears to be ignorant of the fact of her mother's death which it is prudent at present to withhold from her. The body of MRS FAIRCHILD was conveyed to the 'Three Pigeons' Inn, to await the Coroner's Inquest, and the daughter was taken to the house of a villager, residing near the Inn, and under the skilful treatment of Mr T. S. Law, it is hoped she may speedily recover from the bruises and severe concussion she has received. MRS FAIRCHILD, who is 50 years of age, was a remarkably fine woman, of estimable character, and kind and amiable disposition, and was highly respected by a large circle of friends, by whom, as well as her bereaved husband and numerous family, her loss will be most severely felt. An Inquest was held the same evening before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when these several facts were detailed in evidence, and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death." - The deceased had been a consistent member of the Wesleyan Methodist Society for many years.

PLYMOUTH - Distressing Circumstance. - On Saturday, MR G. MICHELMORE, confidential clerk to Jonathan Luxmore, Esq., was found lying dead in a field, near the Weston Mill Lake. On Tuesday an Inquest was held on his remains by A. B. Bone, Esq., at the 'Camel's Head' Inn, when the following evidence was given:- Mr Wm. Bradford sworn: I am a farmer in this parish. On Saturday last, about two o'clock, I and my son-in-law were walking over my farm, for the purpose of seeing the crops, and came into a meadow called Spartow Meadow, near a field called Nine Acres. From the further field I saw the body of a man in the other field in a stream of water which flowed through that field. On going over I saw a coat neatly folded lying on one side of the stream, close to an oak tree, and on the other side a hat on some brambles. The coat was folded as neatly as any one would put it in a chest, and was perfectly clean; as was also the hat. I then approached the body, the head of which was under a kind of cascade, or fall of water. The fall was about three feet. The body was lying on its back, and rather inclined to the left side towards the near part of the field. The stream is about two feet wide at the fall, and proceeds about six feet before it turns. The head of the body was in a kind of pool, and the whole of the head and face as far as the pit of the stomach were in the water. The entrance to the field is through a gateway, and is about seventy cloth yards from the stream which flows into Keyham Creek. For several yards round the stream it is quite a bog, and a person on Saturday last in going into the fall in that stream must have got wet feet. The gate of the field was kept locked. On the deceased I found a pocket-book, a silver watch and chain, a purse containing a half sovereign, some silver, and pence, a bunch of keys, silver pencil-case, and a pair of black gloves. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned," but they were unanimously of opinion that the deceased never entertained an idea of destroying himself. The deceased, who has left a wife and two children, was much respected in his walk of life, and particularly by Mr Luxmore, in whose service he had been for nearly 18 years.

Thursday 17 November 1853
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - On Friday morning last, a boy about fourteen years old, named HENRY GILLARD, met with an accident, which proved fatal to him. He was riding a horse, belonging to Messrs. Rookes, up Paris-street, Exeter, and, on coming to the top of the street the horse turned the corner sharply, and threw the boy off, and he was killed on the spot. An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on Saturday morning, before J. Gidley, Esq., and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' returned.

Thursday 1 December 1853
DEVONPORT - A Child Burnt. - Three children of a gunner in the Royal Artillery, named PHILLIPS, aged respectively eleven, four and two, residing in Cumberland-street, Devonport, were left by their mother alone, in an upstair room, on Saturday morning last, while she was absent from the house for about 20 minutes. A coke fire was burning in the room. During the mother's absence, the eldest, a girl, had occasion to leave the room, when the second, also a girl, in thrusting sticks into the grate, caught her clothes on fire. The screams of the child called some women residing in the house to her assistance, but the fire was not extinguished till she was so severely burnt that she died on the following day. On Monday a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body, before A. Bone, Esq., when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Loss of Life by an Explosion. - An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn' on Friday afternoon, before J. Gidley, Esq., on the body of a man, named JESSE TURNER, who had been working on the North Devon Line. On the 7th instant he was working in a blacksmith's shop, at Down St. Mary, where about 230lbs. of gunpowder was kept, for the purpose of blasting rocks on the North Devon line. A few days previous to that there had been 400lbs. of gunpowder in the shop, but 150lbs. had been removed. It is supposed that, in removing it, some of the powder fell on the floor of the shop, forming a kind of train from the 250lbs. On the day in question a spark from the forge alighted on the train, which immediately communicated with the 250lbs., which exploded, and the man was blown up. He was brought to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died a day or two previous to the Inquest. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 8 December 1853
TORRINGTON - Singular and Fatal Accident. - On Friday night last, a most singular and melancholy accident happened at Wear Gifford toll gate to a young man named EDMUND BASTARD, of Torrington, who was found dead the next morning.
It appears that his brother, MR JOHN BASTARD, had lost his boat, and deceased had been in search of it.
The above gate is kept to demand toll from any one passing over a bridge built across the Torridge, and is the private property of Earl Fortescue. The deceased paid his toll about twelve o'clock at noon, on Friday, which entitled him to pass in the evening free. According to evidence adduced on the Inquest he left Bideford about 10 o'clock at night, but the toll collector had locked up the gate, except the large gate, which was only shut, and retired to bed just about that time. Deceased, it appears, on coming to the gate, not liking the disturb the gate keeper, tried to get through between the shuttles of the side gate. He got his body through but by some accidental means or other he lost his hold and was caught under the chin in the upper shuttle, which broke his neck. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday the 5th inst., when the following evidence was given:-
John Arnoll said:- I am a boatman, and reside at Monkleigh. About four o'clock on Saturday morning last, I was going to Wear Dock, in the parish of Wear Gifford, to work; on arriving at the turnpike gate, I found deceased hanging in the gate with his body one side and his head the other. I did not know who it was, but called the collector, who was in bed, and told him that some one had hung himself in the gate. As soon as he came we took the body out, and then I discovered that it was EDMUND BASTARD. The body was quite dead.
The Toll Collector corroborated this evidence.
John Hartnoll deposed:- I am a shipwright, of Bideford. On Friday night last I was in company with the deceased at the 'Castle Inn,' in Bideford. He left there about 10 o'clock, he was merry and cheerful, but quite capable of taking care of himself.
Mr J. O. Rouse deposed that he was desired by Policeman Cole, on Saturday morning last, to attend the deceased. On arriving at Wear Gifford gate I found deceased lying on two chairs. He was then conveyed to Torrington in a wagon, and the next day I examined the body, and found a slight bruise under the chin, and pressure on the back, so that it had become discoloured; the vertebrae of the neck was broken, which might have been the cause of his death.
Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 December 1853
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held in this town, on Friday last, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of a lad named HENRY BROWNING, son of a widow, who had died on the day preceding. The deceased was an apprentice to Mr Edwin Petter, saddler and harness maker, and went to his work on the Thursday morning. He then appeared to be in his usual state of health; but shortly after ten o'clock he was seen by his master to come from the shop into a courtlage behind and heard to groan. The men and apprentices came out and found him lying on the ground, and carried him into the shop. He appeared as if in a fainting fit, and insensible. When he regained his consciousness he became very sick, and some brandy was given him, which had the effect of reviving him a little. He was then assisted to his home.
Mr Frederick Petter, chemist, stated, that at about eleven o'clock on the Thursday morning, the deceased's mother came to him, and stated that her son had been taken ill and brought home from his work. She described his symptoms, and he then gave her an aperient, composed of a little rhubarb with chalk and mercury, and told her to apply hot cloths to his stomach. At about one o'clock the mother came again to his shop, and said her son was much better, and he gave her an aperient pill to give him. The witness heard nothing further until the evening, when he was informed that the lad was dead.
MARGARET BROWNING, mother of the deceased, corroborated the evidence of the last witness. Towards evening her son appeared to get worse; his heart palpitated very much, and she sent for a doctor, but at about half-past six o'clock he died in her arms. Mr Torr, surgeon, arrived a few minutes after he was dead.
Mr Thomas Berry Torr stated that on going to MRS BROWNING'S he found the deceased lying on his back in bed, quite dead. He examined his body: the chest was much deformed and flattened on the right side, and enlarged on the left side. The medicines given by Mr Petter were of a proper description, and might with safety have been given to a child. He was of opinion that the cause of death was disease of the heart. The Coroner having read over the depositions, the Jury returned a verdict of - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 22 December 1853
HEANTON PUNCHARDON - Distressing Suicide. - On Tuesday morning, MRS MARTIN, the wife of MR JAMES MARTIN, yeoman, of Heanton Court, committed suicide by throwing herself into the river Taw. For a long period the deceased had been labouring under that most distressing kind of mental aberration which takes the form of an ever-haunting and over-mastering impulse to commit self-destruction. She had been consequently narrowly watched, yet with all the vigilance observed, the more watchful eye of insanity found an opportunity to perpetrate the woeful deed. The deceased was sleeping on the night in question, in a room with two other persons, one of them, the nurse, having particular charge of her. She contrived, however, to get out of the house between the hours of three and five in the morning of Tuesday, while the parties in the room were asleep, as the nurse on awaking at five found her gone. The thought of the river and what was likely to have happened immediately rushed into their minds, and they proceeded at once to search for the unhappy fugitive. They found she had left with nothing on but her nightclothes, the front door was open, and the conclusion was felt a certainty that she had gone to the river. In that fatal stream her body was found at about 10 o'clock, having been carried by the receding tide to opposite Chivinor. There the further progress of the body had been arrested by the clothes hitching in some stakes at a weir. In the course of her passage to the river, she must have sprung over a ditch seven feet wide. An Inquest was held at three o'clock in the afternoon, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, when a verdict of "Found Drowned," was returned.

BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - An awful instance of the uncertainty of human life, occurred in this town on the 19th inst. The victim selected by the fell destroyer was a young man named JOHN PRUST GILBERT, aged 21. The particulars of his death were given in the following evidence, taken before the Borough Coroner, T. L. Pridham, Esq., at an Inquest held at the 'new Ring of Bells' on the 20th inst. John Hartnoll deposed:- I knew the deceased well. Saw him at the 'Castle Inn' on Saturday last. Recollect hearing him complain of pain in his head. Did not drink with him on that occasion. Knew he was in the habit of taking drugs in consequence of excess, and that he was accustomed to drink freely. James Scowans deposed that he was at work with the deceased on the 19th inst., at the shop of Mr Lock, cabinet maker. Deceased was seized at three o'clock in the afternoon, with violent pain in his head and eyes. I helped him home, deceased groaning heavily as we went along. He told me repeatedly he knew he should die. He was taken sick after he got home. I saw him go up stairs, and heard him say, "I know I am going up to die." Mr Thompson, surgeon, stated that he was called upon to attend deceased between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, on Monday the 19th inst. He was stated to be dying. He found him perfectly insensible. Deceased died whilst he was present. Saw nothing whatever to indicate that he came to his end by other than natural causes. His opinion was that he died from apoplexy. the mother of deceased was present, and detailed amid much weeping, the previous indisposition of her son, stating that he ate a hearty dinner on the day of his death, and that on going up stairs, her poor child said, "Oh, my dear mother I have heard a sound from heaven, telling me that I shall die." The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, said, that although he had no doubt whatever that the deceased died from natural causes, still there was a great deal of mystery about the case; no symptoms of paralysis having been manifested to connect the death of deceased with disease of the brain. For the sake of science, he would advise a post mortem examination. The Jury decided that as no suspicion existed as to the cause of death, the ends of justice did not require it. - Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes." - The Crooner took occasion very kindly to remind the witness, Hartnoll, that it was very extraordinary that in so short a space of time he should be called upon to give evidence on the sudden death of two of his companions (referring to the case of poor Bastard), and beseeched him to abandon the public house and look to himself in future, lest it should be his turn next. The poor fellow appeared deeply affected with the advice so kindly given, and thanked the worthy Coroner. We hope it will have the desired effect.

Thursday 29 December 1853
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquests. - We announced in our last that a dreadful accident had occurred, just at the time of our going to press, by which two poor men, named JOHN HUXTABLE, and SAMUEL MITCHELL, who had been employed near the site of the proposed station of the North Devon Railway, at the bottom of Sticklepath-hill, in blowing up the rocks in the vicinity, from the premature ignition of the gunpowder, had received such serious injuries as placed their lives in imminent peril. The worst fears were realized on the following morning, when both sunk and expired.
On Saturday, an Inquest was held at the Infirmary, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, when the following evidence was adduced.
Francis Naylor, overlooker to Messrs Brassey and Ogilvie, railway contractors, deposed:- The deceased, JOHN HUXTABLE and SAMUEL MITCHELL, were employed on Thursday last in blowing down the rock at the station yard, at Sticklepath, near this town. I was at the same place superintending the men at work there. At about one o'clock I heard a loud report, caused by gunpowder, and on turning round saw SAMUEL MITCHELL falling down from the rock, in front of me; he was bleeding, and his clothes were on fire. I ran over and caught him, and pulled off his clothes to extinguish the fire. He appeared insensible, and did not speak. While I was getting off MITCHELL'S clothes, I saw HUXTABLE lying on the ground, about four yards from me, he appeared insensible; several persons were raising him up. I procured some straw and two doors, and had the two men conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary immediately. I had seen them boring a hole in the rock, about thirty feet above the station ground, about ten minutes before I heard the explosion. They were working with the usual boring tools, a jumper, a scraper, and a stamping bar (which was made of iron), and they had the proper fusee or match for firing the charge. The deceased had been engaged for two months in blasting these rocks. It is not my duty to examine the holes previous to the charge being put in; my overlooking consists chiefly in seeing that the men mind their work. I have examined the hole, since the accident, and can find no trace of straw near it; and I do not think they used any, as they should have done, in stopping down the powder. If no straw was used, an accident would I think, be very likely to happen.
John Curtis, of Pilton, carpenter, who was employed at the works at the time of the accident, gave similar evidence.
George Price, foreman of Messrs. Brassey and Co., deposed, that he had personally no knowledge of the accident, as he was at Fremington Pill at the time it happened. I live at the Barnstaple station, and furnish the men on the works there with the necessary blasting tools. I have also charge of the gunpowder used in blasting. The tools are made at the smiths' shop on the premises, and the witness, Naylor, obtains them there as he wants them. Two men, named Pow and Pavey are authorised by me to get what powder is required for the works. The key of the room in which it is kept is hung up in my office, and these men fetch it from a room upstairs. I keep about one hundred weight in store in casks. the tools are generally made of one pattern.
Robert Taylor, labourer, gave similar evidence to that afforded by Naylor.
Mr Henry Forester, house surgeon of the Infirmary, deposed:- On Thursday last, at about half-past one o'clock, the deceased JOHN HUXTABLE, was brought to this institution in a state of insensibility; his face was much blackened, and he appeared to be suffering from an explosion of gunpowder. His head was lacerated, but not fractured, and his symptoms were those of compression of the brain. He appeared to be dying, and expired yesterday morning at about ten minutes past two o'clock. He was insensible from the time of his admission until his death. I have since made a post mortem examination of the body, and found a large vessel on the brain ruptured, which must have been the cause of death. Several of his ribs, and the small bone of his left arm were broken. About ten minutes after the admission of HUXTABLE, SAMUEL MITCHELL was also brought in. He was partially sensible, but in a state of collapse; his face was very much charred, and his hands and arms burnt. He sank gradually, getting weaker and weaker, and died yesterday morning at about half-past eleven o'clock. I made a post mortem examination of his body this morning, and found the rectus muscle ruptured, and great inflammation in the intestines; the right kidney was also ruptured. These injuries caused his death.
John James, a labourer on the works of the railway, said he had often charged holes using the iron only, and without straw, but he thought it dangerous to do so.
The Jury returned a verdict in each case of "Accidental Death;" and added the following recommendation. - "We recommend that the workmen employed by the Railway Contractors in blasting rocks, should in future be supplied by their employers with wooden ramrods, for pushing in the straw or wadding on the powder previously to stopping it down."

BARNSTAPLE - On the same day, the learned Coroner held an Inquest at the 'Unicorn Inn,' Pilton, on the body of ELIZABETH WORTH, wife of WILLIAM WORTH, a shoemaker, who had died that morning from the rupture of a blood vessel. The following evidence was taken:-
MARY ANN WORTH, daughter of the deceased, deposed:- I was with my mother this morning, at about half-past eight o'clock, in the kitchen of our house. My four little brothers were also present. My mother was standing near the fire-place, and on looking down found that blood was running from her leg. She cried out that a blood vessel had broken, and then sat down in a chair. I ran directly to fetch Mrs Darch, our next door neighbour, who came in and looked at her leg, and then went for a doctor. I ran into Barnstaple to my father, who was at work at Mr Hodge's, in Joy-street. When I returned, I found my mother quite dead, and the house full of people. I was absent about half-an-hour. About an hour after my return Mr Turner, of the Dispensary, came, and shortly after Mr Torr, surgeon. My mother had a wound in her leg, just below the calf, which had of late greatly enlarged.
Betsey Darch corroborated the evidence of the last witness.
Mr Thomas Berry Torr, surgeon, sworn:- I was called by WILLIAM WORTH, the husband of the deceased, at about a quarter past nine o'clock this morning, to go to his wife, who, he feared, was bleeding to death. I gave him a restorative, to be administered, and followed him about ten minutes afterwards. I found, on my arrival at WORTH'S house, that the deceased was quite dead; she was upstairs on a bed. I examined her right leg, and found two small ulcers at the lower and inner parts of the leg. The blood had proceeded from the upper ulcer, and there was the appearance of a varicose vein having burst. The vein had probably been eaten into or destroyed by the ulcer, and the effusion of blood was, in my opinion, the cause of death. The ulcers appeared to have been of long standing: there were no other marks or injuries on the leg.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 12 January 1854
CHUDLEIGH - Charcoal - Death by Suffocation. - A labourer named RICHARD BICKFORD, residing in Chudleigh, met his death under the following melancholy circumstances:- The deceased was in the employ of Mr J. Oldham, and, in the absence of the family, was requested to sleep in a room over the coach-house, in order that he might be on the spot if assistance was required. Previous to retiring he was cautioned by the gardener as to the danger of burning charcoal in the bedroom, and was told that it might cause suffocation. From what subsequently occurred, however, it appeared that he took no notice of the caution. On the following morning, not finding him up, the servants knocked at the door. Receiving no answer, they forced it open, when they found BICKFORD quite dead. From the appearance of the room it seemed that he must have been suffocated shortly after he went into bed. His lantern and a box of lucifer matches were near the head of the bed on the floor; while on the opposite corner of the room was an iron fire-basket, used for burning charcoal, which contained a quantity of ashes. Two medical gentlemen were called in, but life was extinct; and at the Coroner's Inquest, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 19 January 1854
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the North Devon Infirmary, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of ROBERT BLAKE, who was brought to the institution on the previous Friday evening, suffering from severe injuries supposed to have been caused by the wheels of a wagon passing over him. The following evidence was adduced:-
Mr Henry Forester, house surgeon, deposed:- On the night of Friday last, the deceased, ROBERT BLAKE, was brought to the Infirmary, at about half-past ten o'clock. He appeared to be very much intoxicated, and in a state of collapse. I examined his body and head, particularly the latter, as I was informed that a wagon had, it was supposed, passed over him. I found no fracture of any kind, nor had he any symptoms that might not have been produced by excessive drinking. He appeared to be in pain, and there was a small abrasion on the left shoulder. I gave him an emetic, which cleared his stomach of about three pints of fluid, apparently beer, and I then administered other medicines to him. About one o'clock he appeared to indicate that he had pain in the left side of his chest, his breathing became gradually more oppressed, and I discovered that he had suffusion of blood in his chest. He continued to get worse until about half-past nine o'clock yesterday morning, when he expired. He told me that he believed he fell off when attempting to get into his wagon, and that one of the wheels of the vehicle passed over him - the other wheel he lifted over himself. I have made a post mortem examination of the body, and found the left side of the chest to contain a quantity of blood, which had been recently effused from a slight rupture of the left lung, which was itself highly inflamed and ruptured. There was also a coagulum of blood just above the rupture, and on removing this, I found three ribs had been displaced at their juncture with the spine, and this must have ruptured the lung. He had, in my opinion received a violent blow on the left side, near the spinal column. I found no mark as of a wheel having passed over the body.
The next witness was Sarah Aston, wife of Thomas Ashton, mason, of the parish of Bishop's Tawton. She stated that on Friday night last, as she was passing through Newport, at about half-past eight o'clock, on her way to her home, she saw a loaded wagon, drawn by one horse, start from the 'Hollow Tree' public house door. The weather was wet and foggy, and I could not see whether any person was riding or driving. I saw a dog cart, containing a gentleman and two ladies, with one umbrella up, pass the wagon when it was just opposite the residence of Major Lewis. The driver of the dog cart called out for the wagon to pull in, and I saw it move in accordingly, and the former passed on the right side of the road. On coming further up the road I saw the deceased lying on the ground, nearly opposite Slimy-lane. He was endeavouring to get up, but was unable to do so. He could hardly speak, and groaned a good deal. I procured assistance, and he was taken to my house, at the end of Rumsam-lane, where the wagon had been brought up; and he was put into it and taken away toward Tawton village. I think it was Mr Banks's dog cart that passed the wagon, but I cannot swear to that.
John Ratcliffe, tailor, corroborated the testimony of the last witness. He was one of those who assisted in the removal of the unfortunate man to Mrs Ashton's house.
Francis Ford, carpenter, of Bishop's Tawton, sworn:- The deceased, ROBERT BLAKE, was my mother's servant. My mother (Mary Ford) keeps a mill at Bishop's Tawton. On Friday night, at about twenty minutes to nine o'clock, I found deceased drinking at the 'Hollow Tree' public house, in New port; his wagon was standing outside the door. I told him it was time that he was home, and he left the house and drove off. I heard the wagon start when he spoke to the horse. Deceased was rather intoxicated, but he was able to walk. It was a moonlit night, but rather misty. About five minutes after I was informed that the deceased was lying in the road, and on going up found him as described. I assisted to remove him to Mrs Ashton's, and afterwards helped him into the wagon, and took him nearly to my mother's house. He was insensible at the time; and, as he appeared to get worse, he was taken in a spring cart to the North Devon Infirmary. A little blood issued from his mouth, and he groaned a great deal. The wagon contained between 20 and 30 bushels of wheat. The deceased was unable to tell me how the accident happened.
At this stage of the proceedings the Coroner adjourned the Inquest to the Wednesday evening following, that proper inquiries might in the meantime be made as to the party who drove past the deceased in the dog cart, as described by Mrs Ashton; that such person might be examined.
On the re-assembling of the Jury, on Wednesday evening, at six o'clock, - Mr James Friend Banks, of Bishop's Tawton, gentleman, deposed as follows:- On Friday evening last, the 13th inst., I left Barnstaple for my house at about a quarter to eight o'clock. I started from the 'Exeter Inn', and drove a dog cart drawn by one horse. I had with me my wife and Miss Ellen Stevens. It was moonlight, but rainy, and I believe the ladies had their umbrellas up. I do not recollect passing any wagon at Newport, or calling to any one in the road to move out of the way. I arrived at my house at about half-past eight o'clock. My residence is three miles and a quarter from Barnstaple. I drove at a moderate trot all the way.
This formed the entire of the evidence. The learned Coroner suitably addressed the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Accidental Death, but how or by what means the deceased received the injury in his back which caused his death, there is no evidence to show."

Thursday 2 February 1854
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Monday last, by J. Edmonds, Esq., on the body of ROBERT BRAME, aged 17 years, who died in the South Devon and East Cornwall hospital, on the day preceding, from injuries he received from falling, on the 22nd November last, from the rigging to the deck of the barque 'John,' of Plymouth, to which he belonged. His left arm was broken between the elbow and shoulder, in addition to other injuries, and after lingering till Monday, he sank. - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 9 February 1854
EXETER - Melancholy Suicide. - JANE, the wife of MR WM. SKINNER, of Burrough, Drewsteignton, died at the residence of Mr Jarvis, St. David's-hill, Exeter, on Sunday. Her sudden and melancholy death, caused by her own act, was the result of temporary insanity. For the last three months she has suffered much from mental depression: she selected the hour of midnight for leaving the house: while the family were asleep, and although sleeping in a double-bedded room, the servant, who slept in the other bed by her (MRS SKINNER'S) own desire, did not find her missing until daybreak, when the consternation of the family can be better imagined than described. An Inquest was held on the remains of the deceased yesterday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner for this city, when evidence in accordance with the above was tendered, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned. The deceased we may add, was in her 61st year.

Thursday 30 March 1854
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JANE BASSETT, the infant child of JOHN BASSETT, postboy, residing in Belle-alley, in this town. It appeared that some time in the forenoon the mother, having suckled the child, laid it on a bed in an upper room, and on going up at about one o'clock found it lying on its face, which was much discoloured. She had recourse to a warm bath to restore animation, but without effect - the child was dead. Dr Bignell was called in, and gave it as his opinion that death was the result of suffocation. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 6 April 1854
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held this morning at eleven o'clock, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the house of Mr John Gaydon, silversmith, High-street, on the body of MRS MARY ALDHAM, wife of MR BYRON ALDHAM, Superintendent of Police, who died suddenly last night or early this morning. She retired to bed about nine o'clock, in her usually good health and spirits; about half-past nine MR ALDHAM went to the bed-room before going out on duty, and found her endeavouring to unfasten her dress, which he assisted her in doing; and then bade her good-night, promising to return as early as possible; to which she replied, "Mind you do; God bless you." On returning; about one o'clock, he proceeded again to the bedroom, but found something on the inside which prevented his opening the door. On forcing it open sufficiently to look in, he saw MRS ALDHAM lying on her back on the floor, with her head against the door. On lifting her up he soon became aware of the dreadful fact that life was hopelessly extinct. He called up Mr Gaydon who presently fetched Mr Michael Cooke, surgeon, when the awful character of the visitation was put beyond doubt. A most respectable Jury, of which Mr Gilbert Knill Cotton was foreman, returned, in conformity with the evidence, a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God." Great sympathy is felt for the worthy superintendent, who has been thus suddenly bereaved.

MODBURY - Melancholy Suicide. - On Tuesday last, HENRY REDWOOD, of this place, marine store dealer, was found hung at a place called Shilston Barn, in this parish. It appears for the last week or ten days before the fatal event took place, the deceased had been unusually depressed. He had attempted the Saturday previous to commit the crime of which he had been guilty, but was prevented by the breaking of the rope. No particular reason can be assigned for the commission of the rash act. Several rumours are afloat, but it is impossible to warrant either being correct. He was a very industrious man, and bore a good character, and it is supposed was doing well in his humble line of life. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Thursday last. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Death by Drowning. - An Inquest was held a few days ago, at the 'West Hoe Inn,' before J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES HESTER, a seaman, aged 21, who was drowned at Millbay. The deceased belonged to the brigantine 'Albion', lying off the dam at Millbay, and on Monday evening week he went on shore with another of the crew, and got some money of the captain of the vessel. He and his companion proceeded to a public-house in the neighbourhood of the railway station, where they remained imbibing a couple of pots of beer, till between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. The deceased left at that hour to go on board his vessel. About half-past one o'clock the following morning he was heard hailing the 'Albion,' which was about 40 feet from the dam. The mate answered his hails, when the deceased exclaimed he was drowning, and on the mate running forward he saw the deceased in the water, and threw him a rope, but the deceased shortly after sank. About ten o'clock the body was found near where the accident occurred. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 April 1854
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the North Devon Infirmary, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN PUGSLEY, a labouring man of the parish of Fremington. Deceased had gone to Fremington Pill on the night of the 3rd instant, in company with four other persons, to assist in getting off a vessel belonging to Captain Tucker, then lying at the quay. Some of the parties got from the shore to the vessel over a ladder, but, as the deceased was attempting to do so, the ladder slipped, and he fell into the water, a depth of eight feet. He was immediately got out, and assisted to his house in Fremington village, and from thence was ultimately removed to the Infirmary, where he died on Saturday morning. The evidence of the House Surgeon (Mr Forester), and the result of a post mortem examination of the body made by him, proved that death was occasioned by inflammation of the lungs, which had been previously diseased. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 20 April 1854
EXETER - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on the 13th inst., before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the 'Pack Horse Inn,' St. David's-hill, on the body of JANE RIPLEY, aged 65 years, who was run over in Queen-street, on the 22nd of March, by a four-wheel carriage, driven by a boy. It appears from the evidence that the deceased died on the 11th instant, from the injuries received on that occasion. The Jury took the opportunity of condemning the too frequent practice of allowing incompetent youths to drive flys and other carriages through the streets, and we understand that an application will be made to the Town Council that the Bye Laws may be revised in order to prevent carriages being driven by inexperienced persons, and the Jury returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.'

Accidental Death. - Another Inquest was held on the body of an infant named GEORGE BRAILEY, the son of a person living in James's-street, by the above gentleman, on the 15th inst., at the 'White Hart Inn,' South Street, who, it appeared came to his death by being accidentally overlaid on the night of the 12th inst., by the mother. the Jury returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death.'

KINGSKERSWELL - Fatal Accident. - On Monday, ROBERT STANCOMBE went out for the purpose of shooting wood pigeons, but not meeting with success, he took the loaded barrel of the gun from the stock, put the stock into one of his pockets, and was putting the barrel into the other, when the nipple struck in a stone. The charge consequently exploded, and the shots lodged in his abdomen. He was taken to the Torquay Infirmary, where he died the following Wednesday. An Inquest was held on Friday, and a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned.

Thursday 27 April 1854
EXETER - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named JOHN MORRISH, aged 63, labourer, of Sanford, who came to his death by injuries received on the 7th of April, whilst blowing up the roots of trees, which injuries brought on lock-jaw, from which he died at the Hospital, on Sunday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 May 1854
APPLEDORE - Fatal Accident. - On the evening of the 3rd instant, SALLY EDGAR, a poor old blind woman, 88 years of age, fell from the top of the stairs to the bottom. She lingered to the middle of next day, and then expired. She was slightly bruised about the side of the head and upper lip. Death was the effect of the shock sustained by her aged frame. An Inquest was held, and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts stated.

Thursday 1 June 1854
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the 'Lamb Inn,' in this town, on Monday last, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John W. Tatham was foreman, on the body of MR WM. JONES, a respectable farmer, of Stoodleigh, in the parish of West Buckland, whose death resulted from injuries received under the circumstances detailed by the witnesses examined.
Maria Ward deposed, that she was a servant of the deceased; that on Friday morning last she left home, at seven o'clock in the morning, in her master's spring market cart, in which were also MR and MRS JONES, the former driving, and they proceeded on their way to Barnstaple market; that when near Mr Incledon's Lodge, at Yeotown, on the road between Barnstaple and Goodleigh, they met a timber wagon, at which their horse shied, and deceased struck it, which caused the animal to run back, and one wheel of the cart ran up over the hedge on the opposite side to that on which he was sitting. I did not see MR JONES fall out of the cart: the first thing I saw amiss was, the reins under the mare's feet. I called to her, and she stopped; and I went back, when I saw deceased supported in the arms of two men. He complained of being very much hurt. the timber wagon was on the proper side of the road; our mare was six years old, and was rather fresh.
By a Juror: - There were only two panniers in the cart, with my master and mistress, and myself: it was a spring cart.
William Redmore sworn:- I am a labourer, living at Yeotown-lodge, in this parish. On Friday morning last, I went down the road after a timber wagon, laden with balk, in which were two horses. When about four-score yards from the lodge, I saw MR JONES advancing in his cart to meet the wagon. When abreast of the wagon his horse shied to the opposite side of the road; the "near" wheel of the cart ran up the hedge, and MR JONES, who was sitting on the "off" side, driving, fell out, and the wheel passed over his body just below the arm pits. The horse started off, and I ran over and picked up the deceased, whom I found lying on his hands and face in the road; he was bleeding from a wound in his head. He appeared to be greatly injured, and in very much pain. I assisted in taking him to the lodge; and in about half an hour after Dr Budd arrived, and deceased was removed to the 'Lamb Inn,' in his own cart. I led the horse to the 'Lamb' door: it was very quiet.
Dr Budd, of this town, deposed:- I was sent for on Friday last, at nine o'clock in the morning, to Mr Incledon's lodge, on the Goodleigh-road. I there saw deceased sitting on a chair in a room in Redmore's house, supported on either side by his servant, Maria Ward, and William Redmore, the last witness. Deceased appeared to be in a state of great suffering, and complained of an agonising pain in the back and chest, and of great difficulty in breathing. He was very faint his face and lips perfectly pallid. I examined him, and found that he had several ribs broken on both sides of the chest; and he had also an extensive scalp wound on the right side of the head. I enquired whether he could be accommodated with a room in the house, and finding he could not, had him placed on a bed, and removed in his own cart to this house; as I believed that here he would be better attended to, if any thing could be done for him, though I thought badly of the case from the first. I attended him until his death, which took place last night, at eleven o'clock. I saw him last at nine o'clock. He never rallied. He was delirious at intervals, but knew every body. He attributed the accident to the freshness of the mare. I have known the deceased for 20 years past; and should think he was 60 years of age. I have no doubt that the accident I have heard described was the cause of death. He died from suffocation - a total inability to expand the chest. I have examined his body since his death, and found that nearly all the ribs on both sides of the chest were broken - those on the left side, in one place only: those on the right, in two places.
The Coroner summed up the evidence, and briefly addressed the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."
The deceased was well known in this district as an agriculturist of some substance, and his untimely death will be deeply regretted by a large circle of acquaintances, by whom he was greatly respected. What makes his decease the more distressing is, that his wife has been for some considerable time past suffering from mental aberration. The remains were removed to Stoodleigh in the course of the day, to await interment.

Thursday 8 June 1854
THE MURDER AT TORRINGTON - Inquest on the body of MARY RICHARDS. - It will be recollected that on Monday, the 26th ult., the prisoner Harvey was committed by the magistrates, at Torrington, to the county gaol, for the "attempted" murder of the unfortunate young woman, MARY RICHARDS, - that on the day following she breathed her last, at about three o'clock in the afternoon; her poor mangled body presenting a sight that might move the hardest heart. It then became necessary for those whose duty it is to protect the rights of the subject, and promote the ends of justice, to summon that ancient officer the County Coroner, to hold his court, for the purpose of inquiring by what means the deceased came to her death. Accordingly, on Thursday, the 1st inst., the Coroner for the district repaired to Torrington, and opened an Inquest at the Board-room, in the Union Workhouse, where the body was lying. A Jury of the most respectable tradesmen of the town was impanelled for the occasion, as will be seen by the following names:- Mr H. H. Pidgeon (foreman), R. Adams, Charles Veysey, William Mallett, Charles Heale, James Tanton, Henry Medland Burridge, Charles Doe, Henry Fowler, William Gould, George Toms, George Walkey, and William Grant.
After the Jury had all answered to their names, the Coroner stated the course he intended to pursue. He said that for the last three weeks he had been in London, and, consequently, had heard little or nothing of the case. He understood from the police-officer of the place, that a person supposed to be implicated in the murder of the deceased, MARY RICHARDS, had been, previously to her death, brought before the magistrates and committed for the attempt to murder. Before proceeding with the investigation, he wished to look over the evidence brought against the prisoner before the magistrates, together with his statement, in order to ascertain if it would be necessary to apply to the Court of queen's Bench for a writ of Habeas Corpus to bring the prisoner back again to be present at the Inquest. He (the Coroner) had been prevented from examining the depositions, in consequence of the absence from home of Mr Vallack, the magistrates' clerk. He would, therefore, propose to the Jury that they should view the body, in order that it might be interred, and that the Inquest be adjourned to Thursday, the 8th inst., which was accordingly done, and the Jury bound over to appear at the time specified.
A question was raised by some of the Jurors as to the desirableness of a post mortem examination. There was a difference of opinion respecting it, some thinking that it would introduce a species of evidence scarcely necessary or desirable, which was also the view of the Coroner; but others believing that the Inquiry would not be complete without it, it was eventually decided that a post mortem examination should be made which was committed to the able hands of Mr J. O. Rouse, son of the medical officer of the Union.
As the Inquest will be proceeding at Torrington, while we are going to press, in Barnstaple, it will not be possible to give any report of it this week.
On Friday last the mangled remains - mangled indeed, first by the hammer of the assassin, and then by the knife of the surgeon - were carried for interment from the Union Workhouse, in Torrington, to the Baptist burying ground in the parish of Langtree. She was carried by bearers that long distance, a large number of people from Langtree (the parish in which she resided), and the surrounding neighbourhood were in attendance. On leaving the Workhouse, the assembled people sang a hymn, which before her death she had desired should be done. That day will not soon be forgotten, death in its ordinary visitations solemnizes the most thoughtless, but the consideration of how death had come to this poor creature, seemed to make people involuntarily drop their ordinary employments and forget their common wants, at the thought of the complicated crimes by which that monster among murderers had brought her to an untimely grave; and that priceless peace and hope which had sustained the departed soul during the last painful days and nights that it occupied its ruined tabernacle.
With respect to the murderer and the state of the evidence, but little new or additional has come to our knowledge during the week. Report, says, that another witness has appeared in an old woman named Elliott, of Gribble, in the parish of Little Torrington, who on the day, and at the hour of the murder was passing over Cross Hill, and who, report says, saw and spoke to Harvey immediately at the part of the road where the fell deed was committed, and where he denies ever to have been. If this should turn out to be a good witness to the fact stated, it will add another important link to the chain by which the person of the present prisoner is bound to the terrible crime.

EXETER - Inquests:- An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, of Exeter, on the body of a man named RICHARD DOCKITT, aged 32, of Lapford, who came to his death by fracturing the lower part of his back, on the 9th of May, whilst at work on the North Devon Line, from which he died on Saturday, May 31st. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - An Inquest was also held at the 'Barnstaple Inn,' North-street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH LANDRAY, aged 78 years, living in Northernhay-street, who died suddenly, on Friday morning last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER - Fatal Accident. - A shocking accident occurred on Thursday afternoon, to a lad named JAMES TAPSON, aged thirteen, which resulted in instantaneous death. It appeared that two large cases of glass, weighing together more than two tons, which had arrived at the Red Cow Station, were placed in a wagon belonging to Messrs. Hitchcock, for delivery at Messrs. Thoms, and Co's., High-street, and the deceased was sitting on the side of the wagon, at the end of one of the cases. On turning the corner which leads into the New North Road, one of the cases jolted against the other, which turned the wagon over, and the cases, with the boy underneath, were thrown with great violence to the ground. The mutilated body of the boy was taken from under the cases, and a sad spectacle presented itself. An Inquest was held on Friday on the remains, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, on Thursday evening last, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable jury, on the body of WILLIAM BLACKMORE, of Wrafton, in the parish of Heanton Punchardon, labourer, whose death was occasioned by wounds in the throat inflicted by himself in a rash attempt at self-destruction, committed on the morning of that day.
The first witness called was Ann Tucker, who deposed as follows:- I am the wife of James Tucker, of Wrafton, labourer. The deceased, WILLIAM BLACKMORE, has resided with us between seven and eight months; he was a labourer, and 79 years of age. For several weeks past he has appeared in very low spirits, and in an excited state, which has lately increased. He was past work, and was maintained partly by his son, and partly by the parish. He went to bed last night about eight o'clock. I gave him his supper in bed: he ate very hearty. I saw him again at twelve o'clock; he was then fast asleep. Shortly after I was in bed in the next room, when he spoke to me, and promised to call my husband at half-past five. He appeared then to be more comfortable than he had been for a long time. At half past three the next morning I was awoke by some noise and heard my husband call out from the next room, "What have you done, grandfather?" I jumped out of bed, and saw the deceased coming out of his room dressed, and blood dropping from him on the floor. I ran across the road to call his son. He has been for some weeks past labouring under the idea that he was going to be carried away, but he did not know where. I think he has at times been quite out of his mind.
The evidence of James Tucker, husband of the last witness, was, that he awakened about three o'clock, by a noise proceeding from the room of the deceased, and on going in saw him standing by the bedside working his throat with his hand, from which blood was issuing. His attention was drawn to his wife for a moment, who was rushing into the room, and on turning again to the old man he found him cutting his throat with a pen-knife. He snatched it from him, and sent for Mr Pick, surgeon, who recommended his being taken to the Infirmary. He was not aware the deceased had a pen-knife.
Henry Forester, Esq., house surgeon to the Infirmary, in his evidence said:- The deceased was brought to this institution about seven o'clock this morning. I examined him and found he had an incised wound in his throat; the trachea was divided, and also the pharynx partially. He wounded no large vessel or artery. He was unable to speak, and I saw he was dying. He died two hours and fifty minutes after his admission, in my presence. I am of opinion that the wound in his throat was the cause of death, and was one that might have been inflicted by himself with his right hand.
The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect "That the deceased died from wounds in the throat inflicted by himself, while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 15 June 1854
UFFCULME - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Uffculme, on Monday week, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of THOMAS SOUTHEY, aged eight years, who was drowned on the 3rd inst., in the river Culm. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

EXETER - Accidental Drowning. - On Saturday last, about five o'clock, a distressing accident occurred to a young gentleman, named JOHN TUCKER, a pupil at the Exeter Grammar School, by drowning, in the Canal, at Salmon-pool-bridge. It appeared from evidence given at the Inquest that he was engaged (at the request of one of the crew), with three of his schoolfellows, in trying to shut the drawbridge after a Portuguese vessel had gone through, and while in the act of so doing, lost his footing, fell in, and was drowned, owing, it is supposed, to his having struck his head in falling against the end of the bridge, and thereby being partially stunned.

SIDMOUTH - Death by Drowning. - On Wednesday, the 7th instant, an Inquest was held in this town, before Robert Henry Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM TAYLOR, aged twenty-four, mate of the collier 'Sarah Ann,' who was drowned on the previous day in the Bay, in front of this town. Deceased was in a boat, and employed in fastening a rope to a buoy, when the hawser, by some means, drew him overboard. He sank immediately, and, although means were resorted to for the purpose, his body was not recovered for some considerable time. The body was removed to the baths, and everything done that could be thought of in order to restore animation, but without effect. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

THE MURDER AT TORRINGTON - The Adjourned Inquest.
The most important and comprehensive of the two Inquiries which have been instituted regarding this fearful crime is the Coroner's Inquest which resulted last Saturday night in a verdict of Wilful Murder against Llewellyn Garrett Talmadge Harvey. It will be recollected that the Coroner opened his court for the investigation two days after the death of the victim, and having impanelled the Jury the Inquest was adjourned for a week, to give time for some preliminary enquiries. As the murderer had already been committed, the law allowed a writ of Habeas Corpus to issue, if the Coroner thought his presence necessary at the hearing, or it was competent to the prisoner to demand to be present if he desired it. It resulted, however, in the writ not being taken out, and the prisoner not being present. the adjourned Inquest commenced on Thursday last, and did not terminate until Saturday night. With the evidence given before the magistrates the reader is fully acquainted, but will no doubt be anxious to see what further light is thrown on the woeful transaction by the Coroner's Inquest. Further evidence was furnished by MARY RICHARD'S mother.
BETTY RICHARDS, who said: I had many conversations with my daughter while at the Union. I asked her who struck her? She said, "Harvey knocked me down in the road, and then dragged me into the field." This statement she made to me after Harvey had been brought before her. She said, Harvey was sitting on the bank by the firs, and she believed he was waiting for her. I asked her if she ever saw the man before? She said never before she saw him on the bridge. I had many conversations with her, but she always stated the same, and said, "Mother what I have stated to you about Harvey is true," but she could not bear to hear his name mentioned.
The next witness is Mary Allen, the young woman Harvey himself was so anxious to call as a witness on his own behalf. She deposed: I was at Torrington, on the 16th of May. I came into town about 11 o'clock, with gloves to Miss Wills's. At the bottom of Castle Hill I saw Harvey sitting on the bank of the canal, near the smith's shop; he spoke to me and said "Mary, you are come to Torrington this morning," I replied "Yes; and you are here, I see, sweep." He said "Yes, I am." He asked if I had walked here. I replied, "No;" I had left my pony at Holmes' Waters (about two miles out). He said, "How long are you going to stay?" I told him that was uncertain. I wished him good morning; he did the same; but he rose up and followed me, and said he would wait at the top of the hill to go back with me, to Stibb Cross, for company. I then said it would be uncertain what time I should leave, as I was late in. He passed some remark on the fine basket of work I had. He said, "You will get well paid today, Mary!" I said, I do not know much about that - nothing particular. I saw the handle of something in his pocket, which I thought might be a knife, and which made me afraid. He said, "I will wait for you;" but I determined not to go back that way, as I was afraid of him. I stayed in town till near two o'clock, and then went out by the way of Mill-street to avoid Castle Hill. I received for work £1 5s. 4 ½d., but I saw nothing of Harvey. Of William Sargent, who is a saddler, working at Mr Holwill's, he made very particular inquiries on the morning of the murder about the distance and way to Portsmouth.
Mary Quance, the wife of William Jeffrey Quance, who lives next door to Harvey, at Thornhill Head, testifies to the fact of his coming home to his house on the night of the murder; that he went to mill the next morning, returning about eight o'clock, and at twelve came into her house to see what o'clock it was, at about a quarter before twelve, as he was going to Torrington. Her clock being too fast: she had not seen him since. As he had been gardening, he changed his clothes before he left. He had on corded trousers. He told me, on Wednesday, that he had been to Bideford on the Tuesday, but said nothing about being at Torrington. He said he had forgot some tea, and went back a mile and a half to fetch it again - that as he was going back, a gentleman was thrown from his horse, that he caught it, and the gentleman came "lopping" up, and gave him half a crown, and would have given him more if he had more silver. I was in Harvey's house on Wednesday, and saw his wife making cakes in which currants and saffron were used.
Elizabeth Balkwill deposed:- I am an apprentice and assistant to Mr Mallett, grocer. On Tuesday, the 16th of May, I received a written order from Mrs Tucker, of Langtree; it was delivered to me by a woman, but I don't recollect who the woman was. The order was for 2 lbs. of currants, 1 ½lbs. of sugar, and 1 dram of saffron. I believe the currants were in 1 lb. bags, of dark-blue paper. I delivered the goods to the person who gave me the order now produced.
George Henry Sellick, master of the Torrington Union Workhouse, said, on the 17th of May, MARY RICHARDS was brought to the Union-house. I saw her frequently, sometimes three or four times a day. I saw her on Friday night, the 19th of May. She sent for me after I was in bed; I immediately went to her, and asked her what she wanted to see me for? She said, "I wish for you to take down in writing what I can remember about the man Harvey," when she made the following statement, which I wrote down in her presence:-
"I remember the man Harvey (that was brought before me yesterday) sitting by the side of the hedge, in the hill above Taddiport. When I passed by him, he caught hold of me, and dragged me inside the hedge. He took away the two baskets from me, and then threw me down on the ground, and tried to take advantage of me: and, because I would not give up to him, he struck me on the head with a stick. I am not sure if I have seen the man before." When I had written it down, and asked her if it was all true, she replied, "Yes." On my leaving, she said, "Good night, master," and "thank you." I was in the room that day previously, and heard her talking to her mother about her funeral, and whom she would have for her bearers.
James Goodenough, Harvey's brother-in-law, detailed in evidence his meeting with Harvey in Bideford, at six o'clock on the evening of the murder. He says; When I first saw Harvey he said, "I have been looking for you all the day," and said he had been in the town since a little after 10 o'clock in the morning. He told a similar story about the gentleman's horse having run away, and getting a half-crown from him. After detailing several important circumstances, he says, I recollect asking Mr Cole, if the girl RICHARDS had any groceries in her basket when found. My reason for asking was, that Harvey's wife, on Wednesday, the 17th, had baked some cakes and put currants in them. I saw some currants in a paper bag at Harvey's, on the 18th, when the policemen were searching the house; they were in a lightish blue paper bag with a bit torn off. The same bag was brought to my house by Harvey's wife on the 20th, with a few currants in it for my little girl. I kept the bag, because I had heard that the girl RICHARDS had some groceries with her. I determined to keep it until I saw Mr Cole. I never mentioned it to any one until this morning, when I gave it to him.
Agness Dell, is the sister of Harvey's wife. Was at Harvey's house on the 17th, to send him with some gloving to Miss Wills, at Torrington. I waited there till five o'clock, expecting him back, but he never came at all. Harvey's wife baked some cakes with currants, saffron and butter in them. Harvey told me before he left that morning that he bought the currants in Bideford, and found the saffron in the street the day before. I think they were in a blue paper or bag similar to the one now produced. He told me he bought half a pound and gave 10d. per pound for them. After detailing a journey to Torrington with Harvey's wife, she says. On my return to Buckland Brewer, having some suspicion of Harvey, I searched about, and found a hammer in the ash-house. Mrs Harvey came to the ash-house at the time, and said she wondered how it came there. I replied, "One of you must have put it there." She took it and put it upstairs; it was not concealed.
Mary Ann Tucker, wife of Thomas Tucker, of Langtree, yeoman, said, the note now produced, directed to Mrs Mallett, was written for me by my husband. I delivered it to MARY RICHARDS on Monday, the 15th of May, and requested her to bring back the goods ordered therein. The basket now produced is the one I sent by her, but the handle or bow is gone. I never received the currants or saffron, nor any of the articles ordered.
Mary Allen and Agnes Dell were recalled and examined in reference to the hammer produced. The first believed it to be the instrument she saw in Harvey's pocket, the latter, that it is similar to the one found in the ash-house.
Many of the additional facts came out by cross-questioning by the Jury. The protracted Inquiry was terminated on Saturday, after three days' sitting from nine in the morning until dark. The Coroner summed up the evidence with great care, thanking the Jury, in conclusion, for their punctual attendance throughout the important and painful Inquiry, more particularly the foreman (Mr H. H. Pidgeon, who had, since its commencement, suffered a severe domestic bereavement) with whom he expressed his sympathy. At the conclusion of the summing up, the Jury retired for about ten minutes, and returned the verdict already stated. In addition to the numerous witnesses examined before the magistrates, eight others were produced on the Inquest, and more than thirty were bound over to give evidence at the next Assizes. No new features were disclosed by the post mortem examination.

Thursday 6 July 1854
EXETER - Melancholy Gun Accident. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' before H. W. Hooper Esq., Coroner, on the body of a girl named LANG, of Coleridge, about thirteen years of age, who died at the Hospital on the previous day, from the effects of an accident which happened on the 9th inst. It appears that a gun had been placed in a corner of a room where the deceased was, loaded with a marble. By some accident the gun fell and exploded, and the marble, was lodged in her foot, causing a wound, which resulted in her death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 July 1854
DRINK - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at two o'clock, before A. Cockey, Esq., at Davey's 'Railway Hotel,' on the body of JAMES HOBBS, aged 39, the guard of the Torquay train, who died on Wednesday, from the passing of a van over his leg, on Friday evening last. The Jury having proceeded to view the body, the following witnesses were called:- William Steer, labourer on the line, was on the platform of the Newton station, when the Torquay goods train came in, at nine o'clock. Saw deceased get out of the carriage, and attempt to reach the ground, holding on by the handle. He ran a few yards with the train, when the step caught his leg and spun him round. He fell on his back, his legs were thrown into the air, and the left one caught the last wheel of the van, which went over it. The train was going about five miles an hour. Had frequently seen deceased get out in that manner. He considered the accident entirely his own fault. - Charles Kibbe, another labourer, corroborated the evidence of the last witness. Mr Frederic Leman, surgeon at the Teignmouth Infirmary, described the injuries the deceased had met with. He had a severe lacerated wound in the left leg, both bones were broken - the large one was crushed into five or six loose pieces - extensive laceration of the foot, and fracture of several of its bones. Deceased had been drinking: and, although amputation was immediately necessary, he was obliged to defer it till next day on that account. Deceased was a good deal depressed from the shock, and had lost a quantity of blood. He amputated the leg the next day, and had attended him till his death, at three o'clock on Wednesday morning He had known the deceased two or three years, and was aware of his intemperate habits. Had attended the deceased for a mild case of delirium tremens before, and had warned him of its consequences. He died of delirium tremens, occasioned by the accident. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury and summoning officer gave their fees for the benefit of his widow and five children, and the Coroner also contributed. Subscriptions have also been made at Newton for the same object.

BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - The first news that mingled itself with the anticipated pleasures of yesterday was the sudden death of the mother of eight children, in Cross-street. MRS HODGE, the wife of MR WM. HODGE, went out about half-past six o'clock in the morning, accompanied by the servant, for the purpose of getting some corn ground, carrying the infant with her. On returning to her house a few minutes before seven, she complained of a pain in her heart; a surgeon was immediately sent for, and within a few minutes Mr Bencraft was in attendance, but he immediately pronounced the unfortunate woman dead. An Inquest was held on the body today before the Borough Coroner, I. Bencraft, Esq., which resulted in a verdict of "Death from Apoplexy." The deceased was forty years of age, and her youngest child an infant.

Thursday 27 July 1854
ILFRACOMBE - Death by Lightning. - On Monday morning last, this town was visited by a tremendous storm of thunder, lightning, and rain, which commenced shortly after seven o'clock, and continued for an hour, without intermission. At about ten o'clock a person entered the town with the intelligence that a woman had been killed by the electric fluid at a short distance from the town. On inquiry, we ascertained that this was too true. The unfortunate sufferer was a poor woman, the wife of a cottager named GREEK, who, with three children, resided in a tenement belonging to Sir James Meek, at a farm named "Little Shelfin," in this parish. She was sitting at her breakfast table when the accident occurred. The electricity appears to have struck the south-east corner of the chimney, and then to have divided itself into two streams - the one going down the gable end of the dwelling, which was slated, and in its course gouging out the slates in three directions, and scattering them about for several yards; the other appears to have descended the chimney, and to have entered the room in which the poor woman sat, at about two feet above the mantel-piece. She appears to have been struck on the back of the head, and the fluid passed down her side and entered her shoe, the quarter of which was torn out in a jagged form. She fell prostrate along the front of the fire-place, and her infant of four months' old, which was on her lap at the time of the accident, fell under the table unhurt. When the poor creature was discovered life was extinct, and a large brick, which had fallen down the chimney, was on her side. An Inquest, held on the following day, resulted in a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 10 August 1854
BARNSTAPLE - Death by Drowning. - On Tuesday morning last, an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, at Pilton, in this borough, on the body of EDWARD LERWILL TURNER, a little boy, four years of age, who was found drowned in the river near Pilton Quay. No evidence was given as to how he got into the water, and an open verdict was returned. For some yards the ground adjoining the water is unprotected by any fence, and the marvel is that such accidents are not of more frequent occurrence.

Thursday 24 August 1854
COLYTON - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, at the Commercial Hotel, in this town, on the body of RICHARD PRINCE, a labourer, aged 61 years. The deceased had been ailing for more than twelve months, and during that time had been attended by Mr Snook, surgeon, except for a short period, while in the Exeter Hospital. On Tuesday morning, when his wife got up, about six o'clock, she stated she thought her husband was dying, and wished him to take something, but he refused. Afterwards she went to him, and read to him some of the church prayers for the sick from the Common Prayer Book, and went away for about ten minutes with a child to school, leaving her husband in bed. On her return she prepared his breakfast, and was about to take it upstairs to him, but on opening the staircase door his body swung out towards her. She instantly gave an alarm, and two neighbours went to her assistance, who discovered the deceased hanging by a rope from the stair rail, which had been taken from the bedstead. When cut down the body was quite warm and pliant, and the deceased could not have committed the rash act many minutes before he was discovered. The deceased had suffered from a cancer in the stomach, and had been in a very low and weak state of mind for a long time. He had been frequently heard to say he was a lost man. A week before his death the curate of the parish had been to see him, since which time he had been very much distressed in mind, in consequence, as it was stated at the Inquest, of the rev. gentleman having told him he could do nothing for his soul. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased had hanged himself while in a fit of Temporary Insanity.

EXETER - Inquest, Extraordinary Case. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the 'Greyhound Inn,' Paris-street, Exeter, before Henry Wilcocks Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of an infant of which a young woman named ELIZABETH PAYNTER was the mother. It appeared that PAYNTER had lived as a servant with Mrs Pizey, at Regent Park, Heavitree; and on the previous (Wednesday) morning had been confined. She shortly after mentioned the circumstance to her mistress, and said she should like to see a doctor, when Mrs Pizey paid her her wages and she walked the whole of the distance from Heavitree to Paris-street, carrying a basket containing the dead body of the child of which she had been confined. She went to the house of a friend in that street, and was quickly afterwards visited by Mr Warren and Mr Webb, surgeons. She was in a most delicate state from having walked so far, the distance being upwards of a mile, and, fearing lest any danger might result from her removal, they arranged that she should remain in her friend's house. The child was then taken from the basket, and appeared to be in a healthy condition, though it was impossible to say whether it had been born alive. Both the medical men also stated that there was no apparent cause of death. On being questioned by Mr Warren, PAYNTER told him that she felt ill all the previous night, and got up at seven o'clock in the morning, intending to get some tea, but was too unwell to do so. She then went up to her bed-room and was confined of a child, but she did not hear it breathe or cry. Her mistress, when she became acquainted with it, told her to throw the after-birth into the fire or down the water closet. Mrs Caroline Matilda Pizey, in her examination, stated she was a widow, living at 2, Regent Park. ELIZABETH PAYNTER was her servant, and on coming down on the previous morning she found her in the kitchen complaining of being unwell; she was then toasting bread for breakfast. Witness asked her what was the matter, and she replied that she was poorly, and should like to see a doctor, as she had a pain in her side. Witness advised her to do so, and she went to put on her shawl and get ready. Witness had suspected that labour was coming on, and advised her to go to a person's house in Paris-street, but did not know that she had been confined. When she came down stairs with her basket and shawl in readiness to go, witness asked her if she had anything to say to her, when she said she had had a miscarriage in the night; she then asked her what it was, and she pointed to something in a "bucket," which she thought might have been a miscarriage of a month or so; witness told her to put it away and she believed she did so; she then left at witness's request, and she paid her her wages; she carried a basket on her arm, but witness did not know the contents of it; she had been in witness's service about three months and a half, and she had given her a month's notice to leave the day previously; when she left to go for a doctor witness did not intend her to return.
John Stone, a page to Mrs Pizey, stated that he walked in with PAYNTER from Heavitree to Paris-street; she had told him two months before that she was in the family-way. The Coroner remarked on the unfeeling conduct of Mrs Pizey, in letting the girl walk all the distance from Heavitree immediately after she had told her she had been confined, and adverted to the awkward position in which she would have been placed if she had died on the road. The Jury, who entirely concurred in the remarks of the Coroner, returned a verdict of "Found Dead."

Thursday 31 August 1854
BISHOPSNYMPTON - Distressing and Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday, a fatal accident happened to a boy about nine years of age, the son of a labouring man named TUCKER, living at Newton. It appears that the boy was riding a donkey near Bishopsnympton, which some way or other threw him off, his clothes unfortunately catching in the saddle. In this condition he was dragged some distance; his skull was fractured, and the brain laid open. John Lethbridge, the postman to Southmolton, happening to pass by at the time, he took him up and attempted to convey him to Poole, the nearest place; but so deadly were his injuries, that before he could get him there, the poor fellow expired. A surgeon was immediately sent for, and Mr Flexman of Southmolton, was soon on the spot, but it was of no avail. An Inquest will be held on the body.

Thursday 7 September 1854
TIVERTON - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Friday last, Yearlstone Farm, near Tiverton, the residence of MR DUNN, was the scene of a dreadful catastrophe. Two children, one three years old and the other 18 months, were left to their juvenile play after being dressed in the morning, and without being perceived strayed about 100 yards from the house, where a well was exposed for watering the cattle. It appears the little urchins unfortunately wended their way to the well, where there was about 5 feet of water, and by some unforeseen accident both fell in and were drowned. An Inquest was held on the following day, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

BOVEY TRACEY - Extraordinary Case of Alleged Poisoning. - The town of Bovey Tracey has this week been much excited by widely-spread rumours, to the effect that one of the labourers at the Pottery had met with his death by poisoning. It appeared that about three weeks or a month ago, JOHN HEATH, a man of about 32 years of age, died suddenly. He had worked all day on Saturday in the pits at the Pottery; he complained of illness just before leaving work in the evening, and was shortly afterwards taken home to his house dangerously ill. He was attended by Mr Haydon, surgeon, who treated him for inflammation of the stomach and bowels; but the disease baffled the skill of the medical attendant, and the man died on the following Monday and was buried two days afterwards. Rumours of "foul play" were then whispered about in the town, and a suspicion was raised against his wife. It was stated that the deceased and his wife had lived unhappily together, and that neither of the parties had been faithful to the marriage vow. The case having become known to Mr W. A. Cockey, the Coroner for the district, that gentleman immediately visited the town on two occasions, and instituted inquiries. He then forwarded a statement of the facts to the Secretary of State, who thought it a case for further inquiry; and the body was therefore exhumed, and a post mortem examination made by Mr Hele, surgeon, of Ashburton. An Inquest was held at the 'Union Inn,' Mr Burnard, analytical chemist of Plymouth, was present, besides the medical men. It seemed to be the opinion of the medical men that the deceased must have taken some offensive food, or have drunk cold water whilst in a state of great heat. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 14 September 1854
EXETER - Inquest. - Mr H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner of Exeter, held an Inquest on Thursday last, on the body of a lad, named LEAR, who was drowned in a tan pit on the previous day. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

HONITON - Fatal Accident. - A fatal accident occurred to a young man named HENRY PYNE, of Honiton, on the morning of the first inst., whilst bathing in the river Otter. He was suddenly heard to cry for help, and then sank. A lad who was in the water with him, swam towards him, and tried to help him, but was grasped by the throat so that they both sunk; fortunately for the latter, however, he got out of the dying grasp, and escaped with the marks of it on his throat. On the accident becoming known, numbers proceeded to the spot, and several persons dived for the unfortunate young man, who was at length brought up. Means were at once resorted to to bring him to life, by Drs. Jerrard, jun., and Burd, but without success, deceased having been in the water nearly an hour. An Inquest was held on Saturday, when a verdict of "Accidental Drowning" was returned. His funeral, which took place on Tuesday, was attended by the children and a great many of the congregation of the Independent Chapel, to which he belonged.

Thursday 28 September 1854
Death of THOS. PARMINTER, ESQ. - Seldom has a more extensive circle of friends and acquaintances, being made to feel the uncertainty of human life with deeper emotion, than that of MR THOMAS PARMINTER, of Brightleycot, by his sudden and melancholy death. The deceased gentleman was found dead in New Barn Wood, near Youlston Old Park, on Tuesday morning. MR PARMINTER left his house on horseback, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, on the preceding day (Monday), and proceeded, first of all to the Shirwell postoffice with a letter, and then to Youlston Old Park, as was his custom, to look at some cattle he had there, where he was seen and spoken to by the herdsman's wife, who lives in a cottage within the Park. In exchanging the customary civilities, the woman asked him, How he did? When he told her that he did not feel himself very well. This is the last person he is known to have spoken to. Being exceedingly regular in his habits, it awakened some concern in his family to find that he did not return at five o'clock, the usual hour for tea. Supposing that he might have called upon some one of his friends in the course of his ride, the time passed on until his usual early hour of retiring to rest was passed. They then became alarmed, and enquired for him among his friends, but he was no where to be found, nor any intelligence of him to be obtained. The neighbourhood partook of the feelings of the family, and Messrs. Fry and Yeo, with some twenty or thirty persons commenced a search in the locality, not knowing what casualty might have befallen him. They had the first sad intimation of his fate about midnight, when the searching party found his horse returning home without his rider, the saddle upon his back, but no bridle. The pursuit was then prosecuted with redoubled diligence, but for many hours without success. His son, MR JOHN PARMINTER, of Fullaford, who had been sent for, arrived between three and four o'clock in the morning, and added filial anxiety to the common concern; but, though every imaginable lane and nook, field and hedge was scoured, it was not until nearly eleven o'clock in the forenoon, that the first sight of the body was obtained by MR JOHN PARMINTER in the wood alluded to, a few yards from one of the hunting paths. The unfortunate gentleman was lying on the ground like a person asleep. He had taken off his coat, carefully folded it up, and placed it under his head as a pillow. His hat was drawn over his eyes, as if to protect him from the sun; his neck-cloth was loosened, as also his waistcoat, &c., as if to relieve some sudden expansion of his body, and his left hand was resting on his chest. there was no appearance of the slightest injury, no mark of any kind, neither the complexion nor the ordinary expression of the countenance was changed. From the circumstances in which the body was found, it may be inferred, that finding himself too unwell to keep his seat on his horse, he alighted, and feeling faint, loosened his clothing and lay down, in the hope that he might soon revive so as to be able to proceed to his home. There he fell into a sleep from which he will not awaken until "the heavens shall be no more." The bridle was found a few yards from the body, and appears to have been pulled from the horse's head by his treading on the reins. While the mournful preparations were being made for conveying the body to Brightleycot, a messenger was despatched for Dr Budd, the family physician, who on his arrival only confirmed what was too surely felt before, that life was hopelessly extinct. An Inquest was held on the afternoon of the same day, before R. Bremridge, Esq., and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts. The deceased was a fine specimen of the old English yeoman. His portly person, his noble bearing, his frank and generous spirit were well calculated to win the affection of his friends, and the respect of all that came within his influence. He commenced life as a farmer at Aylescott, in the parish of Westdown, and, by the judicious management of an extensive business, he was able some twelve or fourteen years ago to retire from its turmoil and enjoy the fruit of his labours. He was an affectionate parent, a faithful friend, a good neighbour, and an honest man. In matters of business, there were few men whose judgment commanded more unqualified respect, and his name as a successful agriculturist of long standing, was held in high reputation throughout an extensive district.

Thursday 2 November 1854
TEIGNMOUTH - An Inquest was held last week, before A. Cockey, Esq., at Davey's 'Railway Hotel,' on the body of NICHOLAS CHUBB, who died at the Infirmary, from injuries received at the Newton Station. It appeared from the evidence of Samuel Devonshire, who was passing the station on the 11th inst., that deceased was coupling carriages at the Newton Station. The carriage he was coupling was quite still, but the one he was fastening to it was struck by the engine, causing it to rebound, and as deceased was passing out, the buffers caught him above the hip. He was immediately removed to the Infirmary, where he lingered till Saturday, when he died. The Jury, in passing a verdict of Accidental Death, drew the attention of Mr Cockshot (who appeared for the Company), to the regulation of the company which directed that no coupling should take place till the carriages were perfectly still, which that gentleman promised to see strictly enforced. Deceased had been removed from Teignmouth to Newton but a few weeks, and was a steady man, greatly respected by all. He has left a wife (near her confinement) and four children totally unprovided for. The Jurymen generously gave up their fees for the family of the deceased; and it is hoped that the attention of the benevolent may be drawn to this case, as one which strongly calls for their assistance. Subscriptions will be received at any station on the South Devon Railway.

Thursday 16 November 1854
EXETER - Inquest. - On Friday morning last, an Inquest was held at the 'King Alfred Inn,' before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child named GILL, living in King-street, aged four years, who came to his death by falling on a grating. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Another Inquest was held yesterday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the 'Poltimore Inn,' on the body of a woman named MARY WOTTON, aged 73, who was found dead in her chair. A verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God," was returned.

Thursday 23 November 1854
BERRY POMEROY - Distressing Suicide. - WILLIAM FORD, second son of the late MR GEORGE FORD, of Afton Farm, Berry Pomeroy, came to an untimely end last Tuesday morning. He was a fine intelligent young man, a little more than 21 years of age, and carried on the business of the farm in partnership with his elder brother. It appears that lately something peculiar has been observed in his manner, and for the last few days before his death his friends had vague suspicions that he might lay violent hands upon himself. Consequently he was humoured in every possible way, and everything that a mother and brother's love could devise was done to rouse and cheer him. At the same time he was closely watched, unknown to himself. Soon after five o'clock on Friday morning, he got up, and his brother, who had slept with him, did so as well - noticing that WILLIAM had not prayed for God's ;protection throughout the day, which h was in the habit of doing. The two brothers, on going down stairs, arranged what each should do, as was their custom of a morning. WILLIAM went into the dairy to cream the milk, and a few minutes after his brother was horrified at hearing the discharge of a gun. On going into a store room near the dairy, he found WILLIAM in a dying state, with a double-barrel gun beside him His sufferings were only momentary, however, for the charge had entered his left breast and gone through his body, coming out under his right shoulder bone, a few inches lower than it went in. The feelings of his mother and brother may be imagined, but cannot be described. An Inquest was held on the body on the following day, before W. A. Cockey, the Coroner, and a highly respectable Jury, when a verdict was returned that the deceased had committed suicide whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity. He was interred in Berry churchyard on Tuesday, a large number of relatives and friends following him to his last resting place.

Thursday 30 November 1854
PLYMOUTH - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Plymouth, by J. Edmonds, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR DODD, late landlord of the 'No Place Inn,' Eldad, who, on the same day, while labouring under mental delusion, unfortunately put an end to his existence, by hanging himself. It appeared, from the evidence adduced, that the deceased had, up to a recent period, kept the 'No Place Inn,' of which house he was the owner. Within the last few months he had retired from business, having given it up to his son, and had resided with his wife at a short distance from their former residence. On Saturday morning, about eight o'clock, he was seen to leave the house, and was not heard of again until one o'clock the same day, when his grand daughter, a little girl, on looking through the window of a back house saw him hanging from a beam. She immediately gave the alarm, and his son was soon on the spot, and immediately cut him down, but life was found to be extinct. It appeared that for some little time past the deceased had been in low spirits, and expressed fears that he should die in the workhouse; this, however, must have been a fancy peculiar to the disease, as there was no cause for such apprehension. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 7 December 1854
ASHBURTON - Distressing and Fatal Occurrence. - An Inquest was held at the 'Angel Town Arms' inn, Ashburton, on Tuesday evening, before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, touching the death of a poor old woman named SARAH CATER, above 80 years of age, who had been found dead in her room in Cad-lane. Mr Mathew Beck, druggist, stated that his errand boy, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, told him that the deceased was dead and burnt to a cinder. He proceeded to the house, and saw the poor woman lying on the floor, and the fire then consuming her dress; he immediately procured some water and threw it over the remains. Life was quite extinct, and her face and arms were literally roasted. She was infirm, and much deformed in the back, and it is supposed she must have been attacked with a fit of apoplexy, or while asleep fallen into the fireplace, as there was no noise whatever heard by the neighbours or persons passing the street. She was attended daily by a person, and every care and attention were paid her. She was seen a short time previous, and appeared in her usual health. A verdict of Accidentally Burnt to Death was returned.

Thursday 14 December 1854
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Pilton, in this borough, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GRACE QUICK, whose clothes accidentally caught fire in her house, on the day preceding, occasioning such severe injuries to her person as to cause her death within a few hours. After hearing the evidence of Jane Fry, a neighbour, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

HORRABRIDGE - Burnt to Death. - An Inquest was held at Horrabridge, on Thursday, before A. B. Bone, Esq., on the body of a young girl, sixteen years of age, named MARY ELIZABETH GAWDEN, the daughter of a miner, who was accidentally burnt to death by her dress catching fire, in the absence of her mother. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

DEVONPORT - On Friday last, MR BOON, of the 'White Horse Inn,' Fore-street, Devonport, committed suicide by hanging himself while labouring under a fit of despondency. An Inquest was held on his body the following day, and a verdict returned of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 28 December 1854
EXETER - Inquest. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a boy, named HENRY HILL, aged 12 years. The deceased had lived at a place called Barley Plantation, St. Thomas, and had come to his death by a fall from a horse on Thursday week. The deceased had broken the shin bone of his leg, and death ensued. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

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