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Inquests Taken Into Suspicious Or Unexplained Deaths

For the County of Devon

1855-1864

Articles taken from North Devon Journal

Inquests

Coroner's Inquests were usually held within the space of 48 hours following a death that appeared to be of a suspicious or unexplained nature. They were usually held in a local public-house, ale house, municipal building, or parish workhouse, but sometimes in the building where the death occurred. The Coroner usually came from a legal or medical background and more often than not, appointed for life by the respective County. The Coroner and a Jury of between 12 and 24 persons, usually men of substantial standing, were empanelled to examine the body, hear witnesses, and the Jury then to come to a Verdict as to Cause of Death. The account of the Inquest appearing in local newspapers, included the name of the deceased, where they died, and how they died. Sometimes, age, occupation, parish or address, and other relatives' names can be found. In later years when Hospitals appear, people can be dying away from their parish after having been admitted to that institution, and the Inquest is therefore conducted where the death occurred, rather than where the person was living.

Provided by Lindsey Withers

[No's in brackets indicate the number of times that name occurs]

Names Included:- Adams(3); Aggett; Allen; Andrews(2); Arbery; Arbuary; Arden; Arter; Ash; Ashton; Austin(2); Avery; Aze; Baker; Bale(2); Ball; Ballment; Balsh; Balson; Bament; Barker; Barnes; Barrow; Baskervile; Baskerville; Bassett; Bate; Bater; Bazley; Beer(2); Belben; Benmore; Bennetts; Berry; Bickell; Bidder; Bidgeway(2); Blackford; Blackmore(4); Blake(3); Blight; Bovey; Bowden(4); Bracher; Brailey; Brend; Bright(4); Brimmacombe; Brook; Brooks; Brown(2); Brownscombe; Buckingham; Burden; Burgess; Burnell; Butler; Cade; Callicott; Cann(2); Cardeux; Carlisle; Carpenter; Carter(2); Caurige; Chamberlain(2); Chanter; Chapple(2); Chope; Chugg; Clark; Clarke(4); Cleverdon; Coates(2); Cobley; Cockram; Cole(2); Coleman; Coles; Colley; Colwell; Colwill(2); Comins; Conolly; Coombes; Copp; Corber; Corker; Cottle; Courtney; Cox(2); Crawley; Crealock; Creedy; Crews; Crocker; Croft; Crook; Cunningham; Dadds; Dannell; Davey; Davis; Davment; Deane; Delve; Dennis; Devenish; Dewe; Dicker; Dormer; Dowdle; Down(3); Drew; Dunn(2); Dunning; Durke; Dyer; Dymond; Easterbrook; Edwards(2); Edworthy; Elston; Elsworthy; Elworthy; Endicott; Essery; Evans; Farley; Fear; Featherstone(2); Ferris; Fisher; Fishley; Fleming; Flood; Folland; Foote; Ford(2); Fowles; Foxford; Fraine; Francis; French(2); Fry; Furze; Gale; Gardiner; Gay; Gaydon; Gent; Geohegan; Gerry; Gibbs; Gill; Gillard; Glanvill; Gliddon; Glover(3); Gore; Gorrell; Gould(2); Greenslade; Gregory(2); Grendon; Gribble(3); Groves; Guard(2); Guscott; Guy; Hallett; Halse; Hambling; Hamlyn; Hancock(3); Handford; Hannaford; Harding; Harris(9); Hart; Hartnoll; Harvey; Hayman; Hazel; Heal; Heale; Hearne; Heddon; Hemborough; Hernaman; Hewett; Hews; Heywood(2); Hickey; Hill(4); Hinde; Hobbs; Hockin(2); Holland(2); Holman; Holmes(2); Honeywell; Honeywill; Hookway; Hooper(6); Hopper; Hoskings; Howard(3); Howell; Hunt(2); Hurson; Hutchings(2); Huxtable(2); Irwin; Isaac; Jago; James(2); Jarvis(2); Jefford; Jenkins(2); Jenkyns; Jewel; Jewell(5); Joce; Johns(2); Jollow; Jones(3); Joslin(2); Karslake(2); King(2); Kingdon(2); Kivell(2); Lake; Lancey(2); Lane(2); Lang; Larkworthy; Latham; Lawner; Lawrence; Lee(2); Lemon; Leonard; Lerwill(2); Lethaby; Lewis(3); Ley(2); Lippet; List; Liverton; Lock(4); Loftus; Longman; Loosemore(2); Lovering; Luard; Luscombe; Lythaby; Mackay; Maddocks; Madge(2); Mann; Marchant; Marlow(2); Marsh; Marshall; Martin(4); Mason(2); Matthews; May; Mayne; McAndrew; Meers; Menhinick; Miller; Millward; Mitchell; Moase; Mock; Mole; Monk; Moor; Moore(2); Morgan; Morris; Morrish(4); Moss(2); Mugford; Mullen; Muxworthy; Newcombe(2); Nichcolls; Nix; Oke; Oliver; Parker; Parkin; Parr; Passmore(4); Patterson; Paul; Pavey(2); Peake; Pearce; Pedlar; Pedler; Pennington; Perrin; Perryman; Phillips; Pile(3); Pink; Poett; Poolley; Popham; Powlesland; Powning; Prance; Priest; Priscott(2); Prouse(2); Prout; Pullen(2); Puncher; Ratcliffe; Redcliffe; Redmore; Redwood; Reeves; Rendell(2); Rennels; Rice; Richards; Robbins; Robins(2); Rockey(2); Rodgeman; Rogers(2); Row; Rowe(3); Rowland(2); Rows; Rudd; Sage; Salter; Sanders(4); Sandford; Saunders; Searle; Seldon(2); Selway; Sercombe; Shaddick; Shapland; Shepperd; Sheriff; Shilston; Shobrook; Slade; Smallacombe; Smalldon; Smallridge; Smith(6); Smyth; Snell; Spurling; Squance; Stephens; Stephenson; Steward; Stone(3); Stoyle; Street; Strong; Sussex; Sylvester; Taylor(3); Teesdale; Tepper; Terrell; Thomas(3); Thorne; Tibbets; Totterdell; Tracey; Trawin(2); Tuke; Turner(3); Tutes; Verney; Vicary(3); Vinson; Vound; Vye; Wadland(2); Walter; Watts; Webber(3); Welland(2); Werry; Westacott(3); Westcott; Westlake; Wheaton; White(3); Whitefield; Wilkey(2); Williams(9); Wilmetts; Winsor; Winter; Wodehouse; Woolridge; Wreford; Yates; Yelverton; Yeo

Thursday 11 January 1855
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest at Newport. - The sympathies of the inhabitants in this part of the borough, were deeply moved on Tuesday afternoon, by the melancholy fall of another victim to youthful carelessness in the use of the gun. The unfortunate subject of the fatal accident was CHARLES WILLOUGHBY LEWIS, the son of MAJOR LEWIS, an amiable and promising youth of little more than 15 years of age, who, as we understood, shortly expected a commission in the service of the East India Company. He was, it appears, extremely fond of shooting, and was, as a witness on the Inquest expressed it, "always at it." On Tuesday afternoon he was out on his favourite exercise, in company with Mr James Prendergast, a young man somewhat older than himself, when the distressing event occurred which deprived him of life, and plunged his friends into the deepest sorrow.
An Inquest was held on the body of the deceased youth, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, before a respectable Jury, at the house of MAJOR LEWIS, yesterday, at twelve o'clock. On the Jury being impanelled, they chose Major Munro as their foreman. By direction of the Coroner, the Jury were accompanied in their view of the body, by Mr Charles Gamble, surgeon. On their return, the first witness called was James Henry Prendergast, who, on being sworn, said:- I was out shooting yesterday (Tuesday) afternoon, with the deceased, CHARLES WILLOUGHBY LEWIS, and about half-past three was in Slimy-lane, behind Mrs Davie's. He and I had each a gun; we both proceeded to cross over the hedge, from the lane into the field. I went at another part of the hedge at a little distance from the deceased. When going over I heard him say, "Take care," and immediately the gun went off. I said, "What is the matter?" He cried out, "I am shot." I instantly went to him and caught him in my arms, when he said, "Go for a doctor." I then opened his waistcoat, and discovered a wound on his right side under the arm-pit. I placed my handkerchief on the wound, and tried to remove him, but finding that I could not, I laid him down and ran for help. At the head of the lane I met Mr Cutcliffe. I told him what had happened, and he went where deceased was lying. I then went to Mrs Davie, as I thought she would be best able to break the sad news to the friends f the deceased. He was in the habit of carrying his gun with the hammer on the cap. When I saw the gun it was against the hedge, he must have pulled it in after him.
John Cutcliffe, gentleman, deposed to finding the deceased lying on the ground in an almost lifeless state; he could only just perceive that he was breathing. Deceased could not speak; with the assistance at hand, he conveyed the dying youth to his father's house.
Charles H. Gamble, surgeon, said I was sent for yesterday a little before four o'clock in the afternoon, to go to MAJOR LEWIS'S house. On arriving I found the deceased lying on the bed; and, on examining the body, discovered a gun shot under the right arm-pit. I found that the contents of the gun had entered the chest, the ribs were broken, the right lung destroyed, and a large blood vessel penetrated, occasioning great internal haemorrhage. The wound I have described was sufficient to cause death. I found deceased in a state of collapse, and death took place in about ten minutes after I first saw him.
The Coroner, in summing up, made a few appropriate remarks on the distressing casualty which has so suddenly deprived a life a youth at his age, and with his expectations. The deceased was one more added to the numerous victims of carelessness in the carrying of loaded guns, and which no amount of disaster was sufficient to correct. From the incautious manner in which these weapons were frequently handled the wonder was that accidents were not more frequent.
The verdict was "Accidental Death." At the suggestion of the Coroner, the Jury very readily gave their fees to the poor box, to form a small fund for the relief of those distressing cases from accident or sudden death so frequently occurring among the poor.

OTTERY ST. MARY - Fatal Accident. - A melancholy and fatal accident has befallen MR JAMES YELVERTON, of Netcombe, near Ottery. It appears that on the 1st instant, he was preparing to go shooting, and went into the garden before the door to discharge his gun, as it had been loaded several days, and in bringing the butt end with some force on the ground previously to withdrawing the shot, the concussion caused one of the barrels to explode. The charge took the side of the face, and passed quite through the head, when death must have been instantaneous. The sudden and distressing event has fallen very heavily of MR YELVERTON, of Venn Ottery (his brother), and all his relations and friends. A sad gloom hangs over the neighbourhood, and among his distant and numerous acquaintances by whom he was much beloved and respected. An Inquest has been held on the body before a highly respectable Jury, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 18 January 1855
HONITON - On Wednesday, the 10th instant, an Inquest was held at the Union Workhouse, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of DAVID BLAKE, an infant, aged ten months, who was brought to the Union House dead by the mother on the previous Friday morning. It appears that the mother had been travelling about the country for some time past, and a few days ago, was at Exmouth, where she applied to Mr Land, the surgeon, for advice, the child being very ill. Mr Land gave it some assistance, and told her to take care of the child, as it had got the hooping cough. She, however, appears to have left Exmouth on the Thursday, and walked all night, passing through Budleigh Salterton and Sidmouth, on her way to Honiton. About a mile and a half from the latter place, she sat down by the roadside, when the child became convulsed, and died almost immediately. A post mortem examination of the body having been made, the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death." The mother stated, in her evidence before the Jury, that she was a native of Swansea in Wales: and that, when at Okehampton, the child was very ill, and that there she was recommended to obtain some hair from the cross (shoulders) of a donkey, and put it round the child's neck - that she did so, but it did it no good although she kept it there until the child died!

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident on the "Extension." - On Friday last, as a labourer, named CHRISTOPHER GORRELL, was engaged in working the horses used for drawing the trucks on the railway employed in removing the "deads" from the excavations to the "trip," he met with an accident which cost him his life. Contrary to the orders he had received in the morning, as a new hand, he went between his own waggon and the one waiting to be tripped, and was caught between the two, by which he received such an injury in the spine as produced immediate paralysis of the lower extremities. The poor fellow lingered on for two days and then death put a period to his sufferings. An Inquest was held on his remains at the 'Torridge Inn,' on Monday last, before T. L.. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when the Jury returned of "Accidental Death." Deceased was 53 years of age.

Thursday 25 January 1855
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - It will be remembered that last week we recorded the fact of the little daughter of MR R. MATTHEWS, of the 'Red Cow Inn,' having accidentally caught her clothes on fire, and being so grievously burnt that her life was despaired of. It is a matter rather of gratitude than grief, that, after living on in great suffering until Friday, death then put a period to her misery. On Saturday an Inquest was held on the body by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, before a respectable Jury of whom Mr Wm. Glanfield, painter, was foreman. After view of the body and hearing the brief evidence adduced, it was remarked that no blame or neglect attached to the parents of the child, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 1 February 1855
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquests. - An Inquest was held at the gaol, on Saturday last, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., borough Coroner, on the body of SARAH FEAR, the infant child of MARY FEAR, the prisoner who was recently convicted of felony at our General Quarter Sessions. The child had been weakly from its birth, and died from natural debility or inanition. Evidence to this effect was given by the mother, and the surgeon (Mr Cooke) and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was also held at Pilton, on Monday last, on the body of an aged female named MARY CARPENTER. The facts of the case are given in the evidence of PHILIP PILE, a son of the deceased, who deposed as follows:- "The deceased, MARY CARPENTER, was my mother, and was aged about seventy-two years. She resided in Back-lane, Pilton, in the next house but one to where I reside myself. The deceased resided by herself; she received parochial relief amounting to two shillings and sixpence per week. I went into the deceased's house yesterday morning, about eight o'clock; I lit her fire for her, and remained with her from that time until about twelve o'clock. She complained very much of the cold, but there did not appear to be anything else the matter with her. A little before one o'clock I returned to the house of the deceased, having been absent about three-quarters of an hour. I saw the house was full of smoke, and, on unhanging the hatch of the door and going in, I found two chairs very much burnt, and I heard groans; as soon as the smoke cleared off, I found the deceased lying on her back in front of the fire, she was very much burnt, particularly in the lower parts of her body. I procured assistance, and removed her upstairs; Mr Law, the surgeon, came within ten minutes after I found her, and told me to give her some brandy, if she could take it. The deceased did not speak to me at all; she was insensible, but groaned two or three times. A few minutes after we had taken her upstairs she expired." The Coroner suitably addressed the Jury, who immediately returned a verdict of - "Accidentally Burnt to Death."

Melancholy Accident. - The following facts relating to the death of a seaman, belonging to the Brilliant, of Bideford, have been forwarded to us from Cardiff. On Monday last, the body of a seaman named HENRY HART, belonging to the Brilliant, of Bideford was found in the Bute Canal, in such a state of decomposition, that it was identified only by the clothes he wore, and by a garter which he had in a moment of hilarity taken from a friend, undoubtedly little dreaming that it would be one of the means whereby he might afterwards be recognised. From the evidence taken at the Coroner's Inquest held on the following day, before R. L. Reece, Esq., it transpired that so far back as the 26th of December, the unfortunate deceased had been spending the evening with some friends, named Morgan, residing in Peel-street, Cardiff, whom he left between 11 and 12 o'clock on that evening, with the promise that he would see them again the following day. Not, however, making his appearance then, nor for several days afterwards, and nothing being received of his whereabouts, his friends naturally became uneasy, and properly gave information at the station house of his being missed. As already stated, his body was discovered floating in the Bute Dock on Monday, by Mr David Johns, an officer of Customs, who called the assistance of a police constable, and who, singularly enough, happened to be the same man to whom information had been previously given. He, suspecting from the dress that deceased was the same person about whom Mrs Morgan had been so anxious, called upon her; and the result was that Miss Morgan identified the body by the means above described. The Jury, in the absence of any testimony as to how deceased came into the canal, returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 8 February 1855
NORTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - Yesterday (Wednesday) as an aged woman, named BETTY BLACKFORD, was feeding her hen at the back part of her house she suddenly dropped down dead. A Coroner's Inquest is to be held.

Thursday 15 February 1855
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the Union Workhouse, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of ANN BUTLER, who died on the previous Tuesday, in consequence of burns received on the 27th ult. The child was an orphan of about five years of age, belonging to the parish of Georgeham, and was lodged in the fever ward on account of disease of the head. About three o'clock in the afternoon of the day named, the woman who had charge of the children having gone out of the room for a few minutes, another witness who was employed sweeping the stairs thought she smelt something burning, and on going into the room found the child "all in flames - her dress all in a blaze." She instantly extinguished the fire by wrapping her frock round her, but the poor child was found to be very badly burnt about the neck, chest, arms and lower part of the face. The child was immediately placed in the hands of the nurse, and the surgeon sent for, who dressed the wounds. In his opinion the child died partly from exhaustion, and partly from the inflammation of the throat caused by the burns. A verdict was returned of "Accidentally Burnt." It came out in the evidence that no guard was placed before the fire place to protect the children from such a misfortune; the Jury, therefore, with very proper feelings expressed their surprise and regret that no sufficient guard or fence was kept round the fire-place in the fever ward where the children are placed. The Master of the workhouse informed the Court that since the above accident took place, a proper guard had been provided for the fever ward, and placed round the fire-place.

SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - The accident to MR JOHN EDWORTHY of Frenstone, (his being entangled in a thrashing machine and shockingly bruised and mangled was reported last week), terminated fatally on the Wednesday evening following. He was unable to take any nourishing food from the time the misfortune occurred; he consequently gradually sank under his injuries and died from exhaustion. An Inquest was held on the remains at Little Frenstone in this parish on Thursday last, before James Flexman, Esq., borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury of which Mr John White was foreman. After hearing the evidence of the surgeon and two other witnesses, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 22 February 1855
LIFTON - Inquest. - On the 6th inst., a most disastrous accident happened to JOSEPH DEANE, labourer, as he was working in a quarry at Lifton. A quantity of earth fell upon him, by which he was miserably crushed, both of his legs were broken, one arm, and severe injuries were sustained in the lower parts of his body. He lingered until the 9th, when death put a period to his sufferings. An Inquest was held on his remains on Monday of last week, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Death from Cold and Starvation. - On Thursday morning last, an Inquest was held at the 'Black Horse Inn,' Longbrook-street, Exeter, before W. H. Hooper, Esq., as to the death of a man named WILLIAM ALLEN, 63 years of age, a shoemaker by trade, and living in Waterloo-place. The deceased lodged with his son, also a shoemaker, but, in consequence of the severity of the weather, he had not been able to do much work for the last three weeks, and had not earned enough to maintain himself during that period, or to pay for his lodgings. His son had repeatedly advised him to go into the Workhouse, but this he refused to do. On Saturday night last he did a little work, and took it home, but did not get paid for it as he expected. Consequently he had nothing to maintain himself with on Sunday; but his son gave him his meals, and he sat by his fire the greater part of the day, at the same time complaining very much of the cold. On Monday he was paid a shilling, which he expected to have received for the work on the previous Saturday, but in what manner he disposed of it, or how he lived on that day and the following Tuesday is not known. The last time he was seen alive was on the Tuesday evening, when he borrowed some water of a neighbour, saying he should drink half a pint and then go to bed. His bed consisted of a board placed between two chairs, and he slept on a mattress, with a sheet, a rug, and some of his own clothes to cover him. He usually had a hot brick to his feet on going to bed, and this he appears to have had on Tuesday night. On Wednesday morning he did not get up at his ordinary time, and his son, being alarmed at receiving no reply when he called to him, obtained assistance and broke open his bed-room door, when he was found dead on the floor covered in the bed clothes. Mr J. S. Perkins, one of the surgeons to the Corporation of the Poor, was immediately called in; and that gentleman found the deceased had been sleeping in a small recess scarcely large enough for a man to turn in, and very badly ventilated. From the appearance of the body he had no doubt the deceased had had an apoplectic fit, of which he had died, his death being probably hastened by extreme cold and want of sufficient nourishment. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

THELBRIDGE - Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held, at the 'Labour in Vain,' in the scattered parish of Thelbridge, on the body of JOHN COLE, aged 60, better known as "JAMES JACK," of Bishopsnympton, who was found dead near the above place (where he lodged), the same morning. It appeared that he had been to a timber sale at Mount Pleasant, in the above named parish, and where, as was oft his custom, he got intoxicated. In that state it is supposed he fell, and, being unable to get to his feet again, the terrible frosts of these cold nights laid hold of him, and prevented him from every rising more. He was found dead, and frozen quite stiff. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Exposure to Cold."

Thursday 1 March 1855
STONEHOUSE - Fatal Accident. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Monday, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Stonehouse, on the body of HENRY BICKELL, who died on Saturday, from injuries received a few days previous. It appears that the deceased was employed as bread-weigher at the Royal William Victualling yard, and fell through the trap-hatches, a distance of between forty and fifty feet. He was conveyed to the hospital, where he expired as above stated. The deceased was much respected by his officers, who have memorialised the Admiralty to grant a pension to his widow, whom he has left with three children.

BLACKAWTON - Melancholy Death of a Farmer. - A lime feast was held last week near the village of Blackawton, and, after the business was concluded, the company sat down to partake of grog. In the evening a farmer named FERRIS, about sixty years of age, left the room, went into the stable, and mounting a neighbour's horse, rode away. The owner of the horse having discovered what had taken place, immediately followed and overtook MR FERRIS, who was almost asleep on the horse, and in a stupefied state. Having caused MR FERRIS to dismount, he took his place and rode off. MR FERRIS not arriving at his own house during the night, his friends became alarmed, and a search was immediately made for him, which continued during the whole of that and the following day, but without success. On the third day he was found in a field quite dead, lying on his back, his coat and waistcoat unbuttoned, his hat under his arm, and his face, particularly his nose and eyes, very much eaten, either by birds or some kind of vermin. There was 7s. 6d. in his pocket, and his lime receipt. it is supposed that, having taken too much grog, he missed his way, and the night being very cold, was frozen to death. An Inquest was held before W. A. Cockey, Esq., at Dittisham, on Saturday last, when a verdict was returned accordingly.

TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, on the body of a labourer, named JAMES FRENCH. The deceased with several others, was felling timber on an estate belonging to A. Brewer, Esq., when a lofty tree fell on him, and killed him on the spot. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 15 March 1855
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on Monday morning last, at the 'Red Lion' inn, on the Quay, in this town, touching the death of MR JOSEPH DAVIS ROSSELL WILMETTS, there lying dead.
The Jury having been sworn, (Mr John Walkingame Tatham, foreman) proceeded to view the body; and, on their return, the following witnesses were examined:-
Mr Edward Hooper, landlord of the 'Red Lion Inn,' sworn:- The deceased had been lodging in and out at my house for three or four months past; his wife and family reside at Bath. He had not complained of illness, but I thought he was unwell, and persuaded him to have a medical man. He would not consent. He was out of door on Friday last, and on the Saturday he did not get up till between nine and ten o'clock. He was not in health, but did not complain of illness. He went up to lie down on the bed three or four times during the day. In the evening he retired to rest at about nine o'clock. I did not see him again till the next morning, at about four o'clock, when he came to my bedroom, and said, - "Mrs Hooper: for God's sake give me a little gin and water!" I got up, and got it for him, and took it to his bedroom. He complained of tightness on the chest. I asked if I should go for his mother. He said "No! go for John;" meaning his brother-in-law (Mr Clarke). I did so, and he came back with me. When Mr Clarke came, I told him to go upstairs, which he did. He then began to call me, and said - "My good God! he's dead!" I went up immediately, and saw him lying on his back; he appeared to be dead. He had on his clothes, excepting his coat. I went for Mr Morgan, surgeon, who came as fast as possible. Mr Morgan went directly upstairs on his arrival.
By a Juror:- When he came to our bedroom door, and asked for gin-and-water, he said he was ill. He asked for a crust of bread, as well, which I gave him. He looked horribly ill. He said he had been to the water closet ten or a dozen times during the night; and thought the medicine he had taken had had a great effect upon him.
By the Coroner:- He did not say it was too strong for him.
Betsey Hooper sworn:- I am wife of the last witness. The deceased has lately been lodging occasionally at our house. I have not observed anything amiss with him until Saturday, when he complained of illness. On the Friday he was pretty well, and slept at our house that night. On the Saturday, when he complained, he went up again to bed, and at about 12 o'clock I gave him some broth. He came down at about three o'clock, and took tea. On Saturday evening, at seven o'clock, I sent for his mother. She came, and remained with him for three quarters of an hour. He was in bed, but not undressed - he had on all his clothes, except his coat. Before MRS WILMETTS left, she requested me to give him one of Hunt's antibilious pills, in gruel, with a little brandy. A little after twelve o'clock, I went up to see him, and advised him to send for a doctor. He asked for tea, which I gave him; he was bad on his breath; but refused to allow me to call any one, saying if he was not better by the morning, he would call in medical aid. I left him at one o'clock; but heard him come down to the water closet several times during the night. At four o'clock he came to our room, and asked if I would give him a little gin and water, which my husband got, and then went to call his brother (Mr Clarke). During his absence I heard a heavy fall of something. My husband and brother then came to the door, and went to his room, and found him on the floor, dead. I dressed myself and went up to them.
Mr John Snow Clarke gave evidence of a similar nature to the preceding witnesses. Saw the deceased alive last on the Friday evening, at the 'Fortescue Arms.' I saw nothing particularly amiss - he had evidently been failing for some time. I was called by Mr Hooper, on the Sunday morning, as already stated; and on going to the bed-room of the deceased found him on the floor - life was extinct.
Mr Charles R. Morgan, surgeon:- On Sunday morning last, between five and six o'clock, I was called to attend the deceased, JOSEPH WILMETTS, at the 'Red Lion' inn. I asked what was the matter, and Mr Hooper said he thought it was nearly over with him. I went to his bedroom, and found him lying on the floor on his back, stretched out, quite dead. The body was warm, but there was no action of the heart. I made an examination of the body - the pupils of the eyes, &c. - but could not say from the appearance of the body what was the cause of death. I have since, by your direction, made a post mortem examination of the body - yesterday afternoon. On the external parts of the body, I found no marks of violence or unnatural appearance. I then examined the thorax. On the left side, the lung was quite adherent to the thorax, the effects of old pleurisy. the right lung in a state of active inflammation, together with extensive pleurisy - the pleural was highly inflamed. The heart was in health. I then opened the abdomen. The liver was enormously enlarged, occupying considerably more than its proper space; there was an unhealthy appearance. The inner membranes of the stomach were in a state of chronic inflammation. There was a small quantity of gruel in the stomach - there was also the smell of spirit. there was nothing deleterious in the stomach. the bowels were completely empty - the mucous membrane of the bowels greatly irritated. From these appearances, I attribute his death to the diseased state of the organs - death being accelerated by the violent purging. A single pill would not be too much for a person 25 years of age, if he had been a person in health, and in the habit of taking proper nourishment.
By a Juror:- The fact that the deceased had vomited would not affect my opinion as to the cause of death.
The Coroner addressed the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."
The deceased was well known and respected in the town, and his early and sudden demise is deeply regretted.

TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday se'nnight, JAMES ISAAC, a poor labouring man, working at Mr Goss's, Peacombe Farm, St. Giles, was returning home after his day's work, climbed a high tree, for the purpose of cutting off a branch, when his hold slipped, and he fell to the ground. He was so much injured that he was unable to move from the spot where he fell. His wife, being alarmed at his not coming home, went in search of him, and, going to the farmhouse to make inquiries, was informed, by a boy, that he had seen him up in a certain tree. She went to the spot, and there found him on the ground, in a helpless condition. Assistance was procured, and at about one o'clock in the morning he was conveyed to his house. Medical aid was obtained, but it proved unavailing, as the poor fellow expired on Monday morning. An Inquest was held on the next day (Tuesday), when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

PLYMOUTH - An Unaccounted For Death. - On Monday week, an Inquest was held at the 'Military Hospital Inn,' Stoke, before A. B. Bone, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRY WILLIAMS, a serjeant in the South Devon Militia, who died under the following circumstances:- On the 19th ult. the serjeant received permission to remain out all night, and at half-past one on the following morning he met a Mrs Mary Carr, wife of a private in the Coldstream Guards, from whom she had been separated, with whom he went to a dissolute house, No. 10, Central-street. They went to bed, and Carr extinguished the candle. The serjeant wished the light to be kept burning, and got out of bed to light it again. Immediately after, Carr heard a heavy fall on the floor and a couple of groans, and she rose directly and lit the candle. She then saw the serjeant lying on the floor extended on his back apparently insensible, and making no attempt to move. She thought he was intoxicated, and endeavoured to get him up, but was unable to do so. With the assistance of a person named Yelland, who, she believed, was a second master in the navy, and a female lodger named Mary Brown, she got him into bed, when he said he was very ill. He had been lying on the floor half-an-hour, and was very cold. Carr subsequently stated that they behaved by no means rough to him, and that they all believed he was intoxicated. In the morning some tea was given him, and Dr Tripe and Mr Pearce, medical men, were sent for. He was also seen by Mr Tucker, surgeon of the South Devon Militia, who performed an operation, which gave him relief, and he was subsequently removed to the military hospital at Stoke. Mr Tucker had no hope of his recovery and asked him how the accident occurred, as there were various rumours afloat. He wept very much, and replied, "I cannot;" by which the surgeon understood that he felt degraded in being in such a situation, and did not like to divulge the circumstances. He lingered till the 28th February, when he died. Mr Tucker made a post mortem examination in the presence of other medical men, and found, as he suspected, a separation of the fourth from the fifth vertebrae; the spinal marrow was torn across, and effusion of blood within and without the spinal canal; there was no external appearance of injury corresponding with the internal; the deceased was bald, but the head exhibited no marks of violence. John Williams, orderly of the hospital, deposed that the deceased had stated that he had been ill-used by three persons, and had inquired if the savage was taken. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 5 April 1855
EXETER - Extraordinary Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the 'Coach and Horses,' St. Sidwells, Exeter, on Wednesday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARIA FOOTE, aged 48. The deceased had been for many years in the employ of Mr Blatch, a gentleman recently deceased. At his death he left her £50; and a fellow servant, who had gone into his service only a few days before, £150. this disparity in the two legacies produced great impression upon her, and she became much depressed. She then went into the service of the Misses White, of Mount Radford, where she remained but two days; and on Monday she came to Mrs Fulford, who resides in Twiggs's Court, St. Sidwells, complained of illness, and said she must leave her situation. She accordingly sent Mr Fulford for her boxes, and took lodgings in his house. It was arranged that she should sleep in the same room with Mr Fulford's mother, who is blind. She was sitting by the fire at half-past ten o'clock, when the family went to bed, and Mrs Fulford's little girl saw that she was taking from her neck a silk handkerchief, as though preparing to go to bed, With that handkerchief she hanged herself to a brass nail, immediately opposite and close to the bed where the old blind woman was lying. Mrs Fulford was alarmed by her mother-in-law calling out - "Cook is not yet come to bed;" whereupon she came down, and was horrified at seeing deceased suspended to the nail. She rushed from the house, and asked a neighbour, named Trapnell, to come in. He did so, and was so frightened that he ran for a policeman. A supernumerary officer came back with him, but his nerves did not seem equal to the task of "cutting down" the deceased, and he immediately ran for Mr S. S. Perkins, who quickly arrived, and instantly cut the handkerchief, but the poor woman was dead. Probably if the deceased had been cut down when she was first seen her life might have been spared. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 3 May 1855
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held last evening at the 'Bear Inn,' in Green-lane, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of a male infant, the child of WILLIAM WILKEY, "hobbler," residing in that locality. Mr Wm. Arnold was foreman of the Jury. The evidence offered to the Jury, first, by their own senses on view of the body and then by the witnesses, was chiefly remarkable by the disclosures made of the destitute condition of the parents, and their apparent incapacity to help themselves out of it. the infant, it appeared , was born about three weeks ago at Myrtle-place, and at the time of the mother's confinement, they had not even a substitute for a bed, the neighbours took pity on them and gave them what they call a mattress, which consists of a couple of old bags, one filled with straw and the other with chaff. These were spread on the floor, with a sheet and an old quilt to cover them - of blankets we hear nothing. The rest of the old rubbish, and but little of that, commonly called furniture must find some other name to be rightly designated. It was there, and in such circumstances, without a single comfort, even a spoonful of the leaf to make a cup of tea, that the little heir of misery made its entrance into this cold world. On Tuesday, WILKEY found it necessary to quite Myrtle-place: the rent was in arrear, and the "baileys" were sent to sell what was not saleable, therefore the landlord let them have their bed, broken crockery, and half-a-dozen sticks, on condition of quitting the house, which was done. Lodgings were taken at the house of James Miller, dealer in lucifer matches, in Green-lane, who let them the upstair room without a fire-place, while the tradesman occupied the basement story with a front and back kitchen, small and low - contrived a double debt to pay, a dormitory for husband, wife and three children by night, and everything else by day. They made to these new quarters about noon on Tuesday, but ELIZABETH WILKEY, the mother was much "flittered up" with the "baileys" , the changing, and had little to eat. the child was washed in the morning about 10 o'clock, thought it then looked rather blue, but it fed heartily, and got better; the blueness went away. Went to bed about 11 o'clock, after a supper on some dry bread and warm water; the baby had a "cripsey," which "WILL" beat up fine that it might be done "properly," with some water and sugar. The mother went to sleep with the baby on her left arm, was awakened at two o'clock by its violent crying, which she stilled by the breast and other soothing means, and then went to sleep again. On awaking, about daylight, she was startled to find her baby on her arm still, but cold, and - dead! Mr Cooke, surgeon, was fetched, but life was extinct; there were no evidences of violence, nor that it had been over-laid, nor had died from suffocation. It was thought with some probability, that it died of a convulsion fit. the Jury returned a verdict, "Died from Natural Causes." Neither of the witnesses could write their names, except the doctor. The Jury presented their thanks to Mr Cooke, for the prompt manner in which he attended the call of the distressed mother, on Tuesday morning, an act of humanity that does him honour, and which is but the last of many similar. They were now as much distressed for the means to put their dead under ground as to keep themselves alive above it; the child had not been christened, for WILL said he had had nothing to do scarcely for the last three weeks, and he had not "the wherewith to get the child christened;" therefore the relieving officer would give him nothing, and the Coroner could not make him an order!

Thursday 10 May 1855
BARNSTAPLE - A Child Drowned. - Inquest. - On Monday evening, at six o'clock, an Inquest was held at the 'Union Inn,' Prince's-street, Derby, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of GEORGE COCKRAM, a child four years of age, son of JOHN COCKRAM, lace-twister. A Jury was impanelled, of which Mr John Rude, currier, Higher Maudlin-street, was foreman. Eliza Webster, a girl fourteen years of age, said she was going to the infant-school on Sunday, about two o'clock, when her attention was attracted by some clothes floating on the water in the pit at the bottom of Prince's-street. Thinking it belonged to one of the neighbours, she went to see if she could get it up, when she saw the arm and part of the head of a child. She ran for a man named Ellis, living opposite the pit, who ran to the spot, jumped over the rail, brought out the body, and carried it to the house of the parents. She thought it groaned once after being taken out of the water, had heard of other children falling into the same pit. LOVEDAY COCKRAM, the mother of the child, saw him last at about twenty minutes to two o'clock. She was at a neighbour's house next door, when the child came to her to know if he should have on his new hat and frock, and go to Sunday-school. Permission being given, he went away rejoicing. Stayed talking and watching Mrs Jenning's clock, to see when the time would be up, remained there seven minutes, when she was told that her child was in the water. Ran out of the house, and met the man with her drowned child in his arms, and knew nothing about it afterwards. (The mother appeared in deep affliction; "I idolized him," she said, in great bitterness, "as I saw him pass along in his new clothes." He was a very fine boy, whose life was lost by that ten minutes' gossip and a disgraceful nuisance.) Charles Ellis, tobacco-pipe maker, said, that the first witness came and called into his passage that there was a child in the water, when he ran out, and jumped over the rail, but his foot slipping, he fell into the water; quickly recovering himself, he brought out the child. Did not think it was alive, but fancied he heard some sort of gurgling in its throat. Was told to hold its head downward, to let the water run out, and did so.-
Coroner:- That was not the thing to do. - Witness:- I did as some one told me to. The pit in which the child was drowned was made there a year ago last March. Clay had been taken from it to make bricks. Towards autumn it got filled with water. It was a very great nuisance; the smell was sometimes enough to suffocate them. "One of my own children fell into it last week, and have heard of others falling in. Mr Miller, I understand, is the owner of the garden in which the pit is situated. I have never made any complaint to the authorities about it. There was a rail round it, about two feet four inches high, a short of hurdle. Lime has been thrown into the water since the morning, to make it sweet, and the rails have been coal-tarred by one of Mr Miller's men, called Quick."
Mr Matthew Moran, superintendent of police, and borough inspector of nuisances, said, that complaints having been made to him of the bad smells arising from a pit of stagnant water at the bottom of Prince's-street, he called on the owner, Mr Miller, about a fortnight ago, and represented to him the dangerous and offensive state of the pit. He (witness) asked Mr Miller if it could not be filled in, when he replied, that he should want to use it again. He then recommended him to throw lime into it, to purify the water. A man present said there was a bad smell there the previous night, but it was worse a little while ago, when there was a dead dog in it. Another person testified to the pit being a great nuisance, emitting bad smells, the water green, and the railing of the pit altogether insufficient to prevent children from falling into it. Had spoken to Mr Miller about it. The Jury were unanimous in the opinion that it was a very improper place to be left in such a putrid and unprotected state. There being no doubt about the cause of the death of the poor child, a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned" was returned. The Jury having delivered their verdict concerning the victim of this carelessness, addressed themselves to the duty of protecting the living, who have the misfortune to reside near the pest-breeding basin.

Thursday 17 May 1855
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary, yesterday (Wednesday) at 11 o'clock in the forenoon, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury of which Mr John Evans was foreman, on the body of JAMES MOORE, a labourer, who had died in that institution on Tuesday morning. the poor man was brought to the Infirmary on Saturday, from Wear Gifford, in consequence of injuries he had that morning sustained from a tree falling on him while at his work. From the evidence of Emanuel Hammond and John Burden, two men who were at work with him when the accident happened, it appeared that on Saturday morning, about half-past nine o'clock, the first named witness and another man named Clarke, were engaged in felling an oak tree in Roach Wood, on the property of the Earl Fortescue, in the above-named parish, while the second-named witness and the deceased were ripping bark a few yards below. the tree they were felling happened to be hollow in the root and went off quicker than was expected. Finding the tree going, Hammond called to the men who were ripping to get out of the way. The deceased looked up, and said the tree would not reach him. As the tree was descending, however, he endeavoured to move out of the way of danger, but instead of going to one side, he went down the slope in the direction the tree was falling. As the ground was very shelving the tree drove downwards some six or seven feet from the place where it stood, and the unfortunate man being crippled, the branches struck him in their descent on the back part of the head and shoulders, inflicting severe injuries there, and also fracturing his right leg. His fellow workman, who stepped aside in time, and the others present, hastened to his assistance and drew his mangled body from under the branches of the tree, when they found him bleeding at the mouth, and his leg dreadfully fractured. Some brandy was procured at a farm-house near, and after taking a small quantity he recovered a little, and was able to speak, when he requested to be taken at once to the Barnstaple Infirmary. In about half-an-hour a cart was obtained, and his wishes carried out. Mr Forester, surgeon to the Infirmary, said that he found the deceased in a collapsed state when admitted, the result of the serious injuries received some hours previously. He was suffering from a severe compound fracture of the right leg, a lacerated and contused wound of the scalp, with denudation of the skull and severe general contusions of the whole body. The posterior tibial artery of the broken leg was divided and in consequence soon began to mortify. The deceased never rallied to any extent from the time he was brought in to his death, which took place on Tuesday morning at half-past six o'clock. Verdict, "Accidental Death." There was no blame attaching to the parties engaged in felling the tree; warning was given, but with that indifference which familiarity with danger begets, it was disregarded. Deceased was upwards of 60 years of age, and had been a great sufferer from accidents in his lifetime, having had his left leg broken twice and his right leg once before, by accidents in quarries and by the kick of a horse.

Thursday 24 May 1855
BIDEFORD - A Young Lad Drowned. - Little did those thousands who witnessed the launch of the 'Sarah Newman,' on the 15th inst., think as they returned to their homes that another launch was about to take place - the launch of an immortal soul on the ocean of eternity. On that river that their eyes had lately gazed upon with such intense delight, two young lads, named HUTCHINGS and Holman, from the village of Northam, had hired a little punt, and, it seems, after witnesses the launch above named, pulled for the other side of the river, and, it is reported, went up to the village of Westleigh, from whence, after drinking two pints of beer, they returned to the boat, intending to cross over to Northam. It seems they had not proceeded far when, from some fatal cause or other, HUTCINGS, while in the act of pulling, fell back, and the boat, being very crank, dropped on her side, and the poor fellow fell into the water, dragging his companion with him. Holman clung on to the boat, but poor HUTCHINGS soon sank to rise no more. A bargeman named Kivill, pursuing his avocation near, heard a cry of distress in the dusk of the evening, and making towards the sound, he reached Holman in a state of great exhaustion, and rescued him. The body of HUTCHINGS has been found and an Inquest held thereon, before R. Bremridge, Esq. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Distressing Death of a Young Woman. - ELEANOR COSWAY CLARKE, a single woman, who resided with her mother in Waterloo-place, St. David's died on Tuesday se'nnight, under circumstances of a distressing nature. It appeared that deceased was aged about 23, and was confined of an illegitimate child on Sunday, the parents having called in a midwife, named Wescott, to attend her. After her confinement she was very ill, and the midwife advised her father to send for a medical man, but he refused to do so, and then Mrs Wescott gave her some castor oil, and applied other remedies. She continued to get worse, and on Tuesday morning she expired, her last words being - "Oh! the murderous brutes, they have murdered me!" She appeared to have been delirious at this time. Mr J. S. Perkins made a post mortem examination of the body, and stated that the girl had died from inflammation of the bowels, which had commenced some time before her confinement. These facts were elicited at an Inquest held at the 'Black Horse Inn,' Longbrook-street, on Wednesday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., and the Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death." It came out in the course of the investigation that the midwife who attended the deceased was not in the habit of informing the registrar of any children "till-born," but the Coroner and Jury censured this practice, inasmuch as in some cases there might be suspicious circumstances, which it was desirable should be made known.

Thursday 7 June 1855
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday evening last, an Inquest was held at the 'Stafford Arms,' Trinity-street, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of GEORGE SELDON, aged 51, who was an ostler in the employ of Mr Marsh, of the 'Golden Lion Hotel,' and who came by his death under the following circumstances. It appears that on the night preceding, at about nine o'clock, the deceased was engaged in grooming a pony belonging to his master, when, for some cause unexplained, the animal incurred his displeasure, and he (SELDON) inflicted upon it several heavy blows with the staff of a pike, which induced the poor brute to kick him in self-defence. Edward Lewis, an under-ostler, was present when the deceased came up to him holding his side with both his hands and apparently in great pain. He said, "The pony has given me a kick in the side, and I must go to the Infirmary." The witness laid him down upon some straw, and sent for medical assistance. Mr W. A. Dene, surgeon, was soon in attendance. He found the deceased in a state of collapse. He endeavoured to administer some brandy to him, which he could not swallow, and in about ten minutes he expired. Witness had since examined the body externally, and could discover no bruise, nor was any rib fractured. In his opinion, death was caused by the rupture of one of the large blood vessels of the heart, occasioned by a violent blow. the Coroner addressed the Jury (of which Mr John Evans was foreman), and remarked on the sad consequence which in this case had attended the ill-treatment of an animal which had never before been known to kick, or to be addicted to any vice; hoping that the fatal result would operate as a warning to persons entrusted with the care of horses. the Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The unfortunate man was interred on Wednesday, at Sherwill, and Mr Marsh, his late employer, with the kindness of heart which generally characterises him, sent a hearse and pair to convey the remains to their destination.

Thursday 21 June 1855
EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Turks' Head Inn,' High-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN SERCOMBE, brewer , aged 53, residing in Pancras-lane, in that city. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased partook of a hearty supper on Sunday evening, and was in the act of smoking his pipe, when the pipe was observed to drop from his mouth, and the deceased fell back in his chair. Mr F. H. Warren, surgeon, who was at once sent for, stated that the deceased died almost instantly on his arrival, from disease of the heart. The Jury, therefore, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 5 July 1855
TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday, the 27th ult., Mr Roucliffe, of Merton, and his servant boy, WILLIAM BALSON, aged 17 years, were returning home with a load of lime each. The boy was in advance of his master. On going down the road, after passing the beech tree behind Cross House, Little Torrington, it is supposed that the horse became unmanageable, and that the boy took the animal by the head, and pulled him towards the hedge. the poor fellow fell, and the wheel passed over his right arm, and fractured it in three places, broke in his chest, and the back part of his skull. The horse and load were turned over in the road. The master was horrified when he came in sight: he found the poor boy quite dead. He was taken to his master's house, and an Inquest held on Friday, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 12 July 1855
WEAR GIFFORD - The little boy, PARR, who was drowned a short time since by falling into the river at that village, was not picked up until the 3rd inst. The body was found near "Addipool," and was first seen by some lightermen, who conveyed him to his bereaved parents. In the evening an Inquest was held on the body by the Deputy Coroner, J. H. Toller, Esq., of Barnstaple, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 19 July 1855
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Sunday morning, about six o'clock, as two men, named Lewis Shute and Thomas Moultan, were walking along the quay, when just opposite the Assembly Rooms, they saw in the water the head of a human being. The police were immediately communicated with, and measures at once taken to get the body out of the water, which was at once recognised as that of PHILIP GUY, better known as CAPT. GUY, formerly of Appledore. The deceased was found floating in a bending position, with the crown of his head just above the water, and on being taken up was conveyed to the 'London Inn,' where, on the following morning, at eight o'clock, an Inquest was held before T. L. Pridham, Esq., the Borough Coroner. Shute and Moultan having deposed to the finding of the body, Mrs Balch, landlady of the 'White Hart,' in her examination, stated that the deceased came to her house on Saturday night about ten o'clock; that he remained there until 12 o'clock; that he drank one quart of beer, and on his leaving the house she followed him as far as the Assembly Rooms, and asked him where he was going to sleep for the night. Deceased replied, that he was all right, as his vessel, the Alert, was alongside the Betsy by the quay, and that he was going to sleep on board. He did not appear to be drunk, and she wished him good night. Superintendent Tyrrell deposed, that he was on duty, and called in at the 'White Hart' about half-past 11 on Saturday. He saw GUY there, who talked very reasonable and did not appear to be drunk. He left before the deceased. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Dead." It was not stated that he was drowned, as there was not sufficient proof to warrant such a verdict: the probability is, that on reaching forward to find the ladder by the side of the Betsy (which was lying nearest the quay), in order to cross to the Alert on the other side of her, he either tripped his foot in some broken pavement hard by, or, as it was very dark, walked right over the quay, and the space being very narrow between the 'Betsy' and the former, was stunned in the descent, as he had marks of a blow on his head. The tide was out at the time, and his body remained where it fell until its return, when it floated in the position named. There is a narrow bank of mud by the side of the quay, on which there remained an impression of his body, and the very wove-marks of the manufacture of his trousers. But for the drink, PHILIP GUY might not have been there, and if there had been any one near to have rendered assistance, he might not have died as he did. The deceased was a harmless and inoffensive man, for many years connected with the trade of this port.

Thursday 9 August 1855
NORTHAM - Dreadful Murder of a Wife by her Husband at Northam. - About one o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday last, the peaceable village of Northam was thrilled with horror, at the intelligence, that a poor woman, named PHILIPPA HANCOCK, had been found in her bed, barbarously murdered - her head beaten in with a hammer, her throat cut, and the bed clothes saturated with blood. there was no second thought as to whose hand had perpetrated the bloody deed. Her husband, ROBERT HANCOCK, under the influence of a feeling of jealousy, had long threatened to take this extreme vengeance upon her, and he had now turned his fearful words into a still more fearful fact. this man and his wife occupied a little cottage, one or two or three similar ones standing together in the village, with a very small kitchen downstairs and a miserably small bedroom above. They are poor labouring people, the parents of two children - the eldest, a daughter of about fifteen, the other a boy of about twelve years of age, both living out in service.
[Column detailing the murder]
The first action of the law of the land in the sad case, was by an Inquest on the body of the murdered woman held at the 'Swan Inn,' in the village of Northam, on Friday at 12 o'clock, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner for the county. In accordance with his special directions a very respectable and intelligent Jury was summoned, consisting of the following persons:- Mr John Mugford, foreman; Messrs. Henry Cawsey, Thomas Williams, John Pickard, Richard Moore, Robert Causey, Anthony Paddon, Edward Lake, Wm. Davis, Henry Williams, Thomas Cooke, Philip Lane, John Gould. James Gould, Esq., of Knapp, E. U. Vidal, Esq., of Cornborough, magistrates, and Mr Harvie, clerk to the Bench were also present throughout the greater part of the Inquiry.
After being sworn, and before proceeding to view the body, the Coroner addressed the Jury on the solemn and painful Inquiry on which they were about to enter, pointing out to them the nature of the duties they had to perform, charging them to divest their minds of all they might have heard, and to deliver a true verdict according to the evidence that might be brought before them. They would be assisted in their view of the body by two experienced surgeons, whom he had thought it his duty to call upon to give evidence in the case.
Mr T. L. Pridham, surgeon, of Bideford, and Mr C. E. Pratt, surgeon, of Appledore, were then sworn and accompanied the Jury to a view of the body. The Jury will not soon forget the ghastly and revolting sight they there beheld. If the melancholy sight of sin and death in its grimmest form would leave room for another thought, the comfortless poverty and smallness of the room in which the body was lying would suggest it as a fit meeting-place for misery and crime. There was no bedstead, and if they had possessed one there was scarcely room to set it up and turn round afterwards.
On returning to the Inquest room, the Coroner very kindly allowed the Jury a space for refreshment, and, on assembling again at a quarter before two o'clock, the examination of witnesses was commenced. It had been the intention of the Coroner to commence with the surgeons, but it appeared that they were not yet ready; he, therefore, called upon
John Parkhouse, who deposed as follows:- I am a labourer, residing at Willow Farm, in this parish, belonging to Mr Clapp. This morning I went to see the cattle on Knapp Farm; there is a barn on the farm into which I went, and on looking up to the entrance to a tallet which adjoins the barn, I saw a man lying there apparently asleep. I went to called William Patt to go back with me to see who it was lying there, but by the time we came back he was gone. I did not see him go out. By that time Mr Henry Cawsey and Robert Cawsey came looking for a man who had committed a murder in Northam. I went with them, and we traced him through a barley field adjoining the linhay, believing he had gone that way; and also through a wheat field where the wheat had been beaten down. While we were in the field, Robert Cawsey saw a man pass over the bank through the marsh; he asked a man near who it was, who said, it was ROBERT HANCOCK. We went down to the marsh, and some men in a boat on the river said the man was gone into Mr Irwin's wheat field. I then went with the others up Windmill-=road, by the wheat field, and went into Mr Partridge's lea-field where we met Philip Dennis and others in pursuit of him. I came back and stood on the wheat-field hedge; I then saw ROBERT HANCOCK going up through the copse towards Philip Dennis. When I came up I saw it was the same man I had seen in the linhay. I heard HANCOCK say he was not sorry he had killed his wife. While standing together, Mr Philip Dennis asked him when he killed her? HANCOCK replied, "On Wednesday night." Philip Dennis then said, "At what time?" "Between eleven and twelve o'clock in the evening." He did not produce any razor in my presence. I then went on to Northam with Philip Dennis, ROBERT HANCOCK and the Cawseys, where ROBERT HANCOCK was given into the hands of Thomas Braund, the constable.
Philip Dennis, brother of the murdered woman, on being sworn, gave the following important evidence:- I am a labourer, residing in Northam. I know both HANCOCK and his wife - the deceased is my sister. I was in Northam town yesterday, about two o'clock, when I was informed by James Saltern that my sister was dead; he said, "ROBERT has killed her - he has cut her throat." I then went to my sister's house and went upstairs; I found her in a gore of blood with a hammer lying in front of her forehead on the pillow. There were several people in the room, but I was too much hurried to be able to tell who they were. Shortly after I came, Mr Pridham, surgeon, of Bideford, came and looked over the body, giving orders that nothing should be touched. Mr Mills, at Mr Pridham's request, then sent for Mr Pratt, who came in about half-an-hour, and examined the body. No one touched or meddled with the hammer while I was there. I then went about in search of ROBERT HANCOCK, the husband of the deceased, but did not find him. This morning I was at Knapp, working for Mr Gould, cutting a pleasure-ground, when I saw three persons cross the wheat field. I watched them to see where they were going, and shortly after saw a man running over the bank and three men following him. I then began to run too, and when I came to the bank a boatman on the river called out, "Run ahead; he's gone up the bottom." I immediately sent up, and saw a mason or navvie, who said, "There's a man on the hedge." I then went back, and shortly after found ROBERT HANCOCK, whom I took further up, where I met Parkhouse. I said to HANCOCK, "Oh ROBERT, what have you done?" When he replied, "Oh, Philip, I've killed your sister; wait before I come up and I'll tell you all about it." He then came up and laid hold of my hand, and said, "Oh, Philip, it is that rogue; it is Puncher that caused me to do it." Then I said, "ROBERT, what did you do it with?" He replied, "I done it with a hammer and a razor." I said, "ROBERT, where is the razor?" He said, "In my pocket." I said, "Just give it to me, will you?" He replied, "I won't give it to you, because it is bloody." I then joined the company of the persons in search of him, and we proceeded to Northam town, talking about different things where we met Thomas Braund, the constable, who took HANCOCK into custody. The constable said, "Fie upon you, ROBERT, how came you to do it?" HANCOCK said, "I can't tell you, I've a done it, and here is the razor I done it with," which he delivered to the constable. No one said anything to induce him to make these confessions. He was then taken to the lock-up where he now is. After he was in the lock-up, Thomas Braund said to ROBERT HANCOCK, "Were you at Appledore yesterday (Thursday) morning?" He replied, "No, I was not." Braund then said, "John Tucker said, you were there at six o'clock, with an umbrella in your hand." HANCOCK replied, "On Wednesday morning I was at Appledore with my wife; then I had the umbrella in my hand. I went down with my wife to buy a few things for my daughter, which is now home in a paper in a box not made up, which I wish my daughter to have, for I love my daughter and she loves me." I said, "How can you say you love her, when the other day she was home, you said, ELIZABETH, you are come home to see your mother once more alive; when you come home again, you'll come home to her funeral." "Yes, Philip," he said, "I did say so, and now it is so." Thomas Braund then said, "Hancock, you were at Mr Clifferden's yesterday morning, at 9 o'clock for some tobacco." He replied, "No; I was not, he is mistaken; it was Wednesday night, at 9 o'clock. I met a little girl coming out with a loaf of bread; I went in and asked Mr Clifferden for half an ounce of tobacco; I felled my pipe in his house and went towards home. I went and smoked it with Thomas Harris at the corner of the chapel. When I had finished my pipe I went home. I took the hammer and razor up with me." I then said, "Was she asleep then?" He said; "No she was not asleep; I asked her if I should come into bed." She replied, "No." He then struck her lightly in the head with the hammer. He then said that his wife cried out, "Oh, ROBERT, don't hurt me, I will not do it again." He then said, "I rose my hand and struck her very lusty, when the blood gushed out, I throwed the hammer down, and cut her throat; I thought I would put her out of misery as soon as I could. I then remained in the house until eleven. (HANCOCK had previously told this witness that he committed the murder between 9 and 10 o'clock). I then went up Beach-lane, and met three men at the coroner of Borough." Witness replied to him, "That is all right; you were met there." He (HANCOCK) continued, "I went nigh Cleaveland's, across Thomas Bellew's field, and came out to Cross, went down over Mr Partridge's fields and came out by Hollywell. I then crossed Mr Partridge's field again, towards Lewishill, to come across to see you, to tell you what I had done, but my heart failed me, so that I could not. I crossed Parkins' grass field into his turnip field; I got out over the gate, and then I thought I would come to you again, but could not. I then went into my own house, and lighted a candle, and looked on my poor wife whom I had killed; then I felt very sorry. (These were the very words he used.) I then blew out the candle, closed the door, and left the house. I then went to Mrs Balsdon's court, and waited there for Mary Heal until she returned from "heaving," to tell her what I had done. Mary Heal came up and Thomas Wilkey with her. I did not tell her because Wilkey was with her. I then went on the road to the barn where Parkhouse saw me. Just as I entered the barn I heard the Church clock strike two. I saw no one from this time. I meant this morning to give myself up to you at nine o'clock." I said to him, that he ought not to have done it. He replied, "There you have me; I have rushed her into hell, and I suppose I shall soon follow."
By a Juror:- As HANCOCK said to his wife, "Shall I come into bed now," have you any reason to suppose there had been any quarrel before?
Witness:- I think there had been a slight quarrel in the course of the day.
Coroner;- When he gave as a reason for not giving the razor to you, that it was bloody, did he give any reason why he had it in his pocket?
Witness:- In the course of the conversation, HANCOCK said, "I took the razor to cut my own throat, but I could not do it until I had seen you or Mary Heal, to request you to take care of my children. If I could have seen you just as I had done it, to tell you to take care of my children and divide the clothes, I should have done it that night." He further said to me, "Philip, give them a home, being your own sister's."
Thomas Braund, being sworn, said:- I am the parish constable of Northam; I know the deceased PHILIPPA HANCOCK. I first heard that ROBERT HANCOCK had killed his wife about half-0past two yesterday afternoon. I immediately came to Northam as fast as I could, went to the house of the deceased, and went upstairs where I saw Mr Pratt and his son examining the body. Mr Pratt gave me a hammer to take charge of. I examined the hammer and found a little blood on the handle. (The hammer was produced - it was such a one as is used by blacksmiths in making hob nails. there was a little blood upon the handle, and also on the small side of the head.)
Examination continued:- I remained in the house in charge of the body; I allowed no one to go up but the magistrates and gentlemen with them. On hearing this morning about 7 o'clock that ROBERT HANCOCK was gone "fore" the street, I immediately left the house and ran as fast as I could up the street and found him in company with Philip Dennis and several other persons, when I took him into custody. The first words I said, were, "Oh, ROBERT!" and he replied, "I've done it." I said, "Have you any knife about you?" He replied, "No." I said, "Where is the razor that you done it with?" He said, "Here in my pocket." I said, "Give it to me, will you?" when he took it out of his pocket and gave me the razor which I now produce. (It was a white handled razor, the blade and handle covered with the blood that had dried upon it.) I at once took him to the lock-up house, where he has remained under charge. Philip Dennis asked ROBERT HANCOCK in my presence when he did it? HANCOCK replied, "On Wednesday evening or night." I asked him whether he was not at Appledore yesterday morning? He replied, "No." I then said to him, "John Tucker said you were there." He replied, "It was on Wednesday morning I was there."
This witness repeated HANCOCK'S denial of purchasing any tobacco at Clifferdon's, on Thursday morning; stated that it was on Wednesday evening. Witness did not recollect HANCOCK'S saying any thing about the child coming in for bread or filling his pipe in Clifferdon's shop, but thought that he said something about Thomas Harris being the last man he saw in Northam.
Examination continued:- HANCOCK said he went to bed, and a quarrel arose about the jealousy, when he got up again, and said he would go out and have a pipe of tobacco.
This witness corroborated the evidence of the last witness with respect to the conversation held by him with the prisoner on the circumstances of the murder; adding, that HANCOCK said, "When I saw the blood I thought I might as well do it as not;" and he then cut her throat with a razor. (The Coroner had considerable difficulty with this witness in getting out of him any satisfactory account of matters that had passed under his own eye and within his hearing, with regard to the prisoner, in the course f the day. He excused himself by saying that he was in and out of the lock-up, and was not present through the whole of the conversation respecting which his testimony was required.)
Mr Thomas Lawrence Pridham, surgeon, said, I was in Northam yesterday, and left the house I had been visiting about half-past one o'clock, when my servant told me a murder had been committed in the village. I ordered my servant to drive me to the house; and, on arriving, I went upstairs, and saw the deceased lying on the bed with a large quantity of blood saturating her clothes about her head and neck. I took hold of deceased's arm, and found the body was cold and stiff. I then ascertained that the blood had principally proceeded from a gaping wound in the throat The deceased was lying partially on her right side, the right arm extending across the bed, whilst the left was lying on her chest much besmeared with blood, as if a struggle had ensued, and the hand of some one had besmeared the arm with blood. I saw lying on the right side of her head, a short handled heavy hammer, which appeared to have little or no blood on it. The constable, Mr Mills, who was present, said to me, "This is a bad case," and asked my advice as to the best mode of proceeding. Seeing a great deal of poverty in the house, I advised him at once to go to Dr Pratt, the surgeon of the district, and also to go to the County Coroner, and apprise him of the case.
Coroner:- Have you, in pursuance of my warrant, made a post mortem examination of the body?
Witness said he had been present, and had assisted at the post mortem, but it had been principally conducted by Mr Pratt and his son, who is a legally qualified surgeon.
The Coroner, who was justly very earnest on the point, had especially directed the constable by his warrant on the subject. He was, therefore, not now satisfied to find, that Mr Pridham had not engaged as a principal in the examination of the body. It was his intention, that Mr Pridham and Mr Pratt, senior, should have jointly conducted the examination. Aware of the rigid demands of the assize court for the most perfect medical evidence, he was anxious to avoid the mortification experienced on a late celebrated trial.
Mr Pridham (who it was understood had received neither warrant nor order to make the post mortem), pleaded respect for the etiquette observed among medical men, which makes them feel great delicacy in interfering with what might be regarded as the professional duty of another. He considered the case as Mr Pratt's, and with that understanding had assisted only at the examination.
The Coroner considered this a false delicacy where the ends of justice were concerned, and might be endangered. Mr Pridham did not think that in the present case the ends of justice would be at all endangered. He was prepared to give evidence as having witnessed and assisted at the post mortem examination.
Witness resumed his evidence;- I have assisted today in a post mortem examination of the body of PHILIPPA HANCOCK. On examining the head of the deceased, after the hair had been removed, I found a scalp wound, one inch in length, above and anterior to the left ear. On removing the scalp, there was a considerable quantity of blood effused between it and the pericranium or membrane immediately covering the skull on the left side of the head. On dissecting off the temporal muscle there appeared two distinct injuries inflicted, fracturing the temporal bone, apparently caused by a blunt instrument, one of the injuries corresponding with the external wound. On removing the upper part of the skull, I found a considerable extravasation of blood between the membranes and the brain, and a laceration of the substance of the brain corresponding with the external wound about one inch and a half in depth. On further examination of the body, I found a transverse incision in the anterior part of the throat situated about three inches below the chin. This incision was about three inches in length, dividing the skin, the thyroid gland, the trachea or windpipe, penetrating the intravertebral substance between the bodies of the cervicle vertebrae to the depth of half an inch. The instrument by which this wound had been inflicted did not penetrate the oesophagus or gullet. The carotid arteries were not wounded, nor were the jugular veins cut, but the blood-vessels supplying the thyroid gland were divided. The body in other respects appeared in a healthy condition.
Coroner:- Are you of opinion that either of the wounds you have described would have caused death?
Witness:- I believe the wound in the neck was not sufficient of itself to cause death. I have known persons wounded more severely in the throat, and yet recover. I am of opinion that the blow or injury in the head was the immediate cause of death. I believe life was extinct before the throat was cut.
On Mr Charles Edward Pratt, surgeon, of Appledore, being called upon for his evidence, the Coroner asked him whether he had made a post mortem examination of the body? Mr Pratt replied that he had assisted at the post mortem, but that the manual part of the examination had been performed by his son. The Coroner again expressed his strong disapprobation of the course that had been taken, and said that if the examination had been conducted by the son, then he must have him as a witness. Mr Pratt said, that both himself and Mr Pridham had been present and had assisted during the whole of the post mortem, and he was prepared to give evidence accordingly. He also suggested a difficulty with respect to his son's appearing on the trial at the assizes which would not take place until March next, and before that time he might have joined the Baltic fleet. The Coroner, however, decided that as Mr Pratt, jun., was the person who had actually operated in the case, he must have him as a witness.
Mr William Thomas Cassal Pratt was then sworn, who said he had assisted his father in making a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, PHILIPPA HANCOCK. He then gave, from a document that had been jointly drawn up by them, evidence precisely similar to that which had been previously given by Mr Pridham.
The evidence already taken being deemed sufficient for the purposes of the Inquest, the prisoner, ROBERT HANCOCK, was ordered to be brought into the Court. He was fetched from the lock-up by the constables, a crowd of the villagers gathering round. There was, however, no commotion, no savage yellings, no popular demonstrations as sometimes take place in large towns; there was a feeling of terror at the enormity of the crime, and the rest was expressed by one voice above the rest saying, "There's law for everything," and so leaving the criminal to the legal tribunals. The prisoner was a plain, unremarkable sort of man, of middle height, with dark hair and fresh coloured complexion, and dressed in decent labourer's fustian clothes. There was nothing about his appearance to indicate the murderer, scarcely a man of his class wearing a less repulsive countenance. He sat on the bench among the jurymen, and wept as he listened to the depositions, particularly at that part of the evidence where his own statement of having gone back to the house and lighted a candle to take a last sorrowful look at his murdered wife is mentioned. After sobbing awhile, he appeared to listen attentively to the evidence to the conclusion.
The Coroner summed up the evidence in an able and impressive manner, which went to show the Jury that there was but one conclusion to which they could come:- that the deceased had come to her death by violence, which she could not have inflicted on herself, and that those injuries were caused by the hand of ROBERT HANCOCK, who, as her husband, was bound to succour and protect her.
The Jury were then left to themselves for a few minutes, when they returned as their verdict, "That the deceased came to her death by violent means; and that the prisoner, ROBERT HANCOCK, was guilty of the WILFUL MURDER of his wife."
Before the retirement of the Jury, the prisoner had been removed in safe custody to a small room in the inn, and, immediately on the verdict being returned, the Coroner's warrant for his commitment was handed to the constable.
The Inquest being over, the Rev. Mr Edwards applied to the Coroner for the necessary authority to inter the mangled remains of the unfortunate woman; which took place that same evening, in Northam churchyard, at nine o'clock. It was a solemn spectacle to see the mournful procession as it slowly moved along in the twilight, the body borne by those who had been the companions in labour of the murdered and the murderer, followed by a large number of the villagers. The chief mourners were the two orphans, the brothers of the deceased, and a sister of HANCOCK. The scene at the grave was of the most heartrending description, the poor daughter piteously implored to be buried with her parent, and the neighbours of the deceased expressed their sympathy and grief in floods of tears, choking sobs, and heavy sighs.

BUDLEIGH SALTERTON - Charge of Manslaughter. - On Saturday last a very distressing occurrence took place in this town. A person, named SARAH MANN, very much respected in this neighbourhood, and who was engaged as assistant servant in Capt. Reed's house, was at work there as usual on that day. In the house was also a servant girl, named Eliza Moggridge, who was then a little the worse for liquor, and had in consequence quarrelled with the other servants. Not very sure, perhaps, what she was doing, and thinking she observed SARAH MANN laughing at her, she struck her a blow in the side, which laid her insensible on the floor, and from the effects of which she died on Monday. A post mortem examination of the body was made on Monday evening, and an Inquest was held on Wednesday, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., and a most respectable Jury, which resulted in a verdict of Manslaughter against Moggridge, and she was taken into custody.

Thursday 16 August 1855
EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday, at the 'Honiton Inn,' Paris-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of EDITH HARRIS, an unmarried woman, aged 63 years. It appeared that the deceased left her home in the evening of the 1st of August, about half-past seven or eight o'clock, to go to Mr Colling's, a baker, to fetch some bread. Whilst there she was seized with a paralytic fit, and became speechless. Mr Perkins, a surgeon, was immediately sent for; and, after administering some reviving stimulants, she was taken home, but died in a few hours afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

TEIGNMOUTH - Melancholy Death of Two Children. - On Wednesday morning a dreadful accident happened in the station-yard, which caused the death of the two youngest sons of MR CALEB SALTER, provision dealer. It appears that since the commencement of the new chapels in the cemetery the contractor has landed large blocks of Bath stone in the station-yard, and his workmen cut them into smaller pieces previous to their being taken up the hill. On Wednesday morning one of these blocks, weighing two-and-half tons, was left placed on a very narrow piece of wood, and the two unfortunate children, with others, were playing (as it has been their custom) near the stone, when suddenly the ponderous weight fell, and crushed them to death. A terrified playmate conveyed the melancholy intelligence to the officials, who, with the greatest alacrity, raised the fatal block from the mangled corpses that but an instant before romped with all the buoyant hilarity of childhood. This sudden bereavement is said to have made the mother a maniac, and has thrown a gloom over the whole town. A Coroner's Inquest was held on Friday, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

Thursday 6 September 1855
RATTERY - Death by Drowning. - On Friday, the 24th ult., the body of a young man, about 20 years of age, was picked up in the Dart, near Austin's Bridge, in the parish of Rattery. From the appearance of the body, which was much decomposed, it must have been in the water several days. The clothes worn by the young man were a blue striped shirt, a round jacket, fustian trousers and navvy boots, and on his person were a watch and five shillings. The body was removed to the belfry of Rattery Church, where it was viewed by the Coroner and a Jury, but as no evidence was offered the Inquiry was adjourned until today (Saturday). The body was obliged to be buried, but the watch and clothes have since been identified by his father, WILLIAM BOVEY, a carter in the employ of Lady Carew, at Marley, and it appears that the deceased left his house in search of work some days previously, and had not since been heard of.

Thursday 13 September 1855
STOKE CANON - Frightful Railway Accident. - On Friday last an accident resulting in instantaneous death, happened to a woman named BETTY COOMBES, aged 85 years, as she was crossing the Railway at Stoke Canon, to a garden which she occupied on the opposite side. It appeared the deceased was a widow woman, living with her son, and that she was knocked to the ground, and cut to pieces by the express-down-train, as she was standing watching the progress of the up-train, which had just passed. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, at the 'King's Arms,' Stoke Canon, when the following evidence was adduced:- SARAH COOMBES, grand daughter of the deceased, stated that on Friday, just before the express train passed down, the deceased left her house. Witness asked her where she was going, and she replied, "just here." In a few minutes, witness heard the whistle of the express train, and thinking it was unusually loud, she immediately ran to see what was the matter, and found the upper part of the deceased's body in the ditch, by the side of the railway, and the lower part on the rails. The legs and feet were also severed from the body, and the entrails were protruding. There were some packers near, who assisted in bringing the remains into the house. the deceased was only slightly deaf, and could hear a person converse in a moderately loud tone of voice, but she had become very childish. There was a crossing over the railway within twenty yards of where deceased lived, for carriages and horses, but it only led t certain fields belonging to farmers, and some gardens on the opposite side of the line. The gates were frequently left open, which rendered the crossway dangerous. George Westlake, fireman, stated that on Friday he was on the engine of the express train, and as it approached the crossing at Stoke, he saw a woman about a couple of yards off the line. The train was going at the rate of about fifty miles an hour, which was not faster than usual. The driver of the engine shut off the steam, and gave the usual signal, but finding the deceased took no notice, the break whistle was put on. It was, however, impossible to have stopped the train. Witness saw the buffer strike the deceased, and she was thrown into the air and fell into the ditch, on the near side of the down-line. The train was brought up about a quarter of a mile below where the accident happened. Richard Vickery, travelling-porter, confirmed the statement of the last witness. The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

ILFRACOMBE - Death by Drowning. - On the afternoon of Friday last, SUSAN COATES, a single woman, a native of Westdown, was added to the great multitude whose spark of life has been quenched in the waters of the sea - her lifeless body being found near the beach, under Hillsborough. The deceased had generally lived as a domestic servant and was so engaged up to a recent period when she became subject to depression of spirits which induced her sister to take her under her special care. It has been observed that her mind had something of a superstitions cast, she was fond of being alone, and would dream strange dreams. Recently, her melancholy appeared to have gone off, and she had exhibited considerable hilarity, there was, therefore, nothing in her previous conduct to intimate that she meditated self-destruction - the strange situation in which she was last seen alive may, however, be otherwise interpreted. At the Inquest which was held on Monday, at the 'George and Dragon,' the principal evidence given to the Jury was by Mr James Scamp of Meridian-place, who was that afternoon taking out a party in his boat. He stated that on nearing the shores on the eastern side of Hillsborough, he saw the deceased sitting on the rocks with a basket in her hand, the tide was rising at the time and gradually closing around her. He apprized her of her situation, and offered to take her off, but she refused his assistance. This was about half-past four in the afternoon, and there being no imminent danger if she remained as the tide would not rise so high as to render her escape difficult, he passed on with his boat. About two hours after, when passing the spot again, he saw the bonnet of the deceased floating on the water, and her basket lying on the rock: these circumstances exciting his apprehensions he hastened to ascertain from her friends whether she had been home since he first saw her on the rock. Finding she had not returned, he obtained assistance and proceeded once more to the spot, when the first object which caught their attention was the basket, and then in shallow water they discovered the body of the unfortunate woman. When taken up her head and face appeared entangled in her shawl, and her clothes thrown completely over her head. While all the circumstances were marked by a peculiarity, there was nothing sufficiently definite to lead to the conclusion that her death was otherwise than accidental. The Jury, therefore, returned the open verdict of "Found Drowned". It is said the deceased entertained some delusive matrimonial notions, but nothing has transpired to shew that she contemplated self-destruction.

Thursday 20 September 1855
CHAGFORD - Frightful Accident. - A few days since a young man named ENDICOTT, a wheelwright, was engaged in repairing a water-wheel belonging to Mr Collings, miller. He had occasion to mix some tar and grease together, and, in order to keep his clothes clean, he tied a quantity of old rags around him. These rags during the day were besmeared with tar and grease, and whilst he was engaged in kindling a fire they ignited and in a few moments the poor fellow was enveloped in flames. Assistance was immediately rendered by persons attracted to the spot by the young man's cries, but it was with great difficulty the flames were extinguished, and the poor fellow died on the following day. An Inquest was held on the body and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - On Friday last, a bargeman, of this town, named WILLIAM COLWILL, engaged to assist Captain Elliott, of the Cleaner, in getting some clay on board at Fremington Pill. It appears that after they had done their work, they proceeded together as far as the village to get some refreshment, and that the captain and his little boy, in company with COLWILL, left a little before eleven o'clock, COLWILL going a little way with Elliott, to show him his path to the beach. Having done so, to Elliott's satisfaction, COLWILL left him, and was in the act of returning to the village, when it is supposed that, hearing some cries, which proceeded from Elliott's little boy - who, with his father, had by some mistake, got into the deepest part of the stream they had to cross in their way to the vessel - he returned to their help, and whilst crossing the railway bridge, fell through an opening into the water, and was drowned. The poor fellow was a quiet and industrious man, and had been for many years letter-carrier from this town to Clovelly and Hartland. He has left a wife and four children to lament their loss, and she, poor soul, ready to add another to their number. The body has been recovered, and was interred at Abbotsham on Tuesday, attended by a large number of weeping friends, by whom deceased was much respected. The body of this unfortunate man has been the subject of two Inquests, the first was held on Saturday, when the Jury returned the open verdict of "Found Drowned". Dr Yeo, magistrate in the village of Fremington, was not satisfied that all the evidence had been taken that was available, and appeared doubtful if the bruises found on the body were all the result of accident. Another Inquest was consequently held on Tuesday evening, but it does not appear that any evidence has been obtained materially to respect the former decision.

Thursday 4 October 1855
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before H. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' Exeter, on the body of a man, named HUGH OKE, aged 54. The deceased was a carrier from Bradworthy to Exeter, and was a widower. He was in the habit of visiting a widow, named Maria Pearse, who resides in Snell's Buildings, Waterbeer-street; and who frequently accompanied him some distance on the road to Bradworthy. On Tuesday, deceased left the city with a waggon and two horses, in company with Mrs Pearse, and when near Mr Buller's Lodge, on the Crediton road, and whilst in the act of stepping out of the wagon, he slipped his foot and fell under the wheels. Mrs Pearse said "she felt the wagon go over his body," and was much alarmed. He was taken into Mr Buller's Lodge, where he received every attention. Mr Buller shortly afterwards arrived in his carriage, and placed OKE therein, he ordered his coachman to drive him immediately to the railway station, from thence to be conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. On his arrival there he was assiduously attended to by Mr Biggs, who found that he had broken two ribs, and there was a broad black mark on his body, indicating that the vehicle had passed over him. The deceased lingered until Wednesday evening, when he died. Mr Biggs said that the external injuries were not sufficient to cause death, and as the deceased was constantly thirsty, and evinced other peculiar symptoms, he believed that he had sustained some serious internal injury. The Inquest was then adjourned for the purpose of making a post mortem examination, when it appeared that one of the broken ribs had entered the kidneys, which Mr Biggs considered was the cause of death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 18 October 1855
INSTOW - Fatal Railway Accident. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at Instow on the body of a man named DENIS MULLEN, whose death resulted from carelessness rather than misfortune. On the preceding day the deceased was engaged with a locomotive on the Bideford Extension line: the engine arrived at Instow, where it was detained whilst some ballast was being removed from the trucks. During the interval MULLEN repaired to a public-house in the vicinity to procure some refreshment, and on his return found the engine just moving off. He, however, soon overtook it; but in an endeavour to get to his place was thrown under the wheels of the tender, which passed over his chest. The result need not be told. The deceased was perfectly sober at the time; and no blame whatever is attached to the engine driver, who, whilst gradually stopping the locomotive, cautioned the unfortunate fellow against the reckless attempt which he hazarded. The verdict was in accordance with these facts.

TORRINGTON - A Sad End. - MR THOMAS ELSWORTHY, schoolmaster, of this town, died on Tuesday morning last week, under circumstances which originated a report that there had been gross negligence on the part of his wife. An Inquest was consequently held on the body, on the day following, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, when a respectable Jury was impanelled, of which Mr T. H. Lake was the foreman. After viewing the body, the following evidence was taken:- William Cole, police officer, said;- On Monday evening, about six o'clock, I was sent for to come directly to the 'New Inn,' where I found the deceased lying in the corner of a settle on his right side. I asked how long he had been in that state, when the landlady replied six hours, and that she had sent for his wife and son, but neither of them had come. I immediately had him removed to his house, assisted him upstairs and undressed him, but he did not speak or move. His wife did come upstairs while I was there. I sent for a medical man, and Mr Tapley came. I went to the beside twice during the night, but his wife was not there. Mary Fowler, wife of Thomas Fowler, of the 'New Inn', deposed:- On Monday last, between twelve and one o'clock, deceased came into my house and called for a glass of beer; I drew it, and he drank a part of it. I asked him if he would have some dinner, he replied, no, but he ate a little water-cress. He then went and sat down, and after some time I said to my husband, "MR ELSWORTHY is ill;" he replied "No, he has been drinking let him sleep a bit, and he will be all right." He remained in that state and never spoke or moved for hours. Then I thought he must be ill, and I sent for his wife, but she sent back to say, I might send for his sister; she should not come. I waited for some time, and none of his friends coming, I sent for Mr Cole, who had him taken home.
Mr T. K. Tapley, surgeon, said he was called in to see the deceased on Monday evening, and found him suffering from effusion of blood on the brain; he died about one o'clock on Tuesday evening. This being the whole of the evidence, the Coroner summed up and cautioned Mrs Fowler against drawing beer for those persons, who she knew, had already been drinking, and hoped this case would be a warning to her for the future. He also remarked on the conduct of deceased's friends in not going to his assistance when sent for. The Jury, without retiring, returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. The deceased was a very intelligent man, and greatly respected.

EXETER - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, Mr William Lewis, the landlord of the 'Turf Inn,' observed the body of a female floating in the locks, and on dragging it out it was found to be the body of MRS LARKWORTHY, a widow, who formerly resided at Kenton, and who received parish pay. It appeared she was in the habit of passing Turf on her way to Exeter market on Friday evenings, and it is supposed that in consequence of the darkness of the night she mistook her path across the locks and walked into the water. There were no cries heard by the inmates of the 'Turf Inn' during the night, and no marks of violence were found either on the clothes or body of deceased. At an Inquest held on Tuesday, before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., a verdict of Accidental Death was passed.

Thursday 1 November 1855
BIDEFORD - Death by Drowning. - Among the thousands who visited Bideford on Monday last, light of heart, and bent upon a day's enjoyment, was MR JAMES SLADE, a man about fifty years of age, hind to the Rev. J. L. Harding, of Littleham. How little did he think when he left his home that fine morning that the following fatality awaited him, and that he would return no more to it alive. Between the hours of seven and eight on Monday night he was seen by a person named Chas. Hookway, to leave the house of Mr Beard, innkeeper, in Allhalland-street, and go down Conduit-lane, towards the quay. The next person who saw him was John Griffiths, workman to Miss Incledon, Fordlands, who bade him beware or he would walk over the quay. He was then crossing the road near the 'Newfoundland Inn,' and, as the fence chain, at the particular part, was unhung at the time, he walked clear over, and fell into the water. Griffiths heard the splash and ran towards the spot; he heard the unhappy mortal gurgling in the water, and raised a cry for help - a boat came, but the poor fellow soon disappeared. The Superintendent of Police was soon on the spot with the grapnels, and tried long to recover him, but without success. At about a quarter to twelve o'clock, Mr Geo. Whitaker and a man named John Bowman made another search, and succeeded in recovering the body, but it was all too late. An Inquest was held on Tuesday evening before the Borough Coroner, T. L. Pridham, Esq., when Mr Whitaker stated that, not only were the chains down, but the gas-lights were very dim. A verdict of Accidental Death was returned by the Jury, who requested the Coroner to write to the authorities and remonstrate with them upon keeping such a fence up, as it was more dangerous with a chain than without one if things were conducted as at present.

Thursday 8 November 1855
TORRINGTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, the 1st inst., at the 'Hunter's Inn', in this town, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN BROWN, butcher, aged 71, who dropped down and suddenly expired in a field the day before. On the day of his death the deceased ate a hearty dinner and appeared to be in his usual health; having a cow unwell in a field about a mile from his house, he carried her some hay, and then fetched some water for her from a pool in the field. A glove-cutter in a shop of Mr Bangham's, in New-street, was looking through a telescope; and happening to glance at the very spot where the deceased was carrying the bucket of water, saw him fall on his back; and not seeing him move, ran with two others to the spot, when they found him quite dead. Verdict, "Found Dead."

Thursday 15 November 1855
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death of a Young Woman. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning, at the 'Rose and Crown Inn,' Newport, in this borough, before the Coroner, R. I. Bencraft, Esq., on the body of ELIZABETH JARVIS, a young woman twenty-three years of age, who was found dead in her bed on Sunday morning. From the evidence given before the Jury by her mother, JOHANNA JARVIS, and her brother, JAMES JARVIS, (Tailor), it appeared that deceased complained of being poorly on Saturday night about nine o'clock, shortly after which she took a "family pill," and went to bed. Her mother slept with her in the same bed, and when she arose in the morning about eight o'clock, deceased complained of being rather sick, when her mother requested her to stay in bed, and she would bring her up a cup of tea. Returning in little more than half an hour, and finding deceased did not answer when spoke to, her mother went to the bed, and found her lying on her side, with her mouth pressing on the pillow, and, as it subsequently proved - dead. Deceased, it appeared, had been subject to hysterical attacks, but her mother did not recollect her to have had one for the last nine months. Mr C. H. Gamble, surgeon, was called in, who gave it as his opinion that the deceased might have had a kind of hysterical cataleptic fit, and whilst in that state, and unable to move, as she would be unconscious, and the limbs rigid, she might have been suffocated by her mouth and nose being pressed on the pillow. He had no doubt but that she died from Natural Causes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

EXETER - Death From Burning. - On Thursday, an Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn', before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH CROFT, aged 56. It appeared from the evidence of JOHN CROFT, the husband of the deceased, that he was a labourer, and resided at End Oak, in the parish of Collumpton. His wife was subject to fits, and on the 7th of April, while he was at work he was fetched by a man named Edward Tucker, who told him that while taking her breakfast she had fallen into the fire in a fit, and was almost burned to death. The injuries the deceased had sustained being of a serious nature she was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she died after great suffering, on Wednesday last. the Jury, after hearing medical and other evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 22 November 1855
BIDEFORD - A Picture of Wretchedness. - An Inquest was held by T. L. Pridham, Esq., on the body of an aged man, named HENRY BALL, who dropped down as he was passing through Mill-street, and expired in a very few minutes. A lad named Valentine Langbridge, on being examined, stated, that about four o'clock that afternoon, he was called out of his work by Mary Ann Martin, to assist a man who was on the opposite side of the street. On going to his assistance, he saw deceased resting on his knees against the house of Mr John Powe. He was not dead, and he and Mr Powe removed him inside, where he expired in about ten minutes. Mr John Powe corroborated the evidence of Langbridge. The Coroner remarked that his daughter-in-law (a woman named FULLER, and who has been before the bench more than once for ill-treating the poor old man) made the remark, "Oh, you have been starved to death!" He wished that some means should be taken to ascertain whether there were any grounds for such a statement, and Superintendent Gifford was despatched to see whether FULLER was in a fit state to give evidence. On repairing to this miserable den of wretchedness, he found four bare walls, and the poor degraded, drunken and staggering creature in company with another female, who made an ap9ology for the poor wretch by saying that the Superintendent must excuse the woman FULLER, as "she was rather excited." It was ascertained that HENRY BALL had two shillings per week from the parish, and, although there were times when he suffered much privation, still he was the recipient of much charity, he having been an old tradesman and much respected. The intemperate habits of the daughter-in-law, no doubt, drained off a great deal of what should have gone to the support of poor HENRY BALL; but it is thought he died of apoplexy, as it is said he had suffered before from that malady. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 29 November 1855
EXETER - Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the Valiant Soldier Inn, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY JANE BASKERVILLE, aged four years and a half, who died in the Devon and Exeter Hospital the previous day, from the effects of burns. It appeared, from the evidence, that the little girl was left on Wednesday forenoon, by her mother, in a room in Frog-lane, where they lived, there being no fire in the grate; in the absence of the mother, the deceased went into a neighbour's room to play with a little boy, three years of age, which she was frequently in the habit of doing. In the afternoon, the child ran out to the door enveloped in flames, and the neighbours, after some time, extinguished the fire, when the child was taken to the Hospital. Mr Biggs, the house surgeon, immediately attended to her, and on examination found that her face was very much burnt, all over; both shoulders and both arms and hands, were burnt; she was also slightly burnt over the left side of the chest, and the back was very much scorched. Wine was administered, as the child was very low at the time, and she was put to bed and the burns dressed. She died on Thursday morning, just before four o'clock, from the effects of the burns and the shock to the nervous system. No account could be obtained as to how the occurrence took place, but it is supposed that, in play, the children got too near the fire, and the clothes of the deceased ignited. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 December 1855
TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last week at the house of Mr William Martin, miller, New Mills, in this parish, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JAMES DYMOND, a lad aged 16 years. The deceased was a servant to Mr Martin, and was sent as usual on the previous Tuesday with a cart-load of grists to the farmers' houses in Little Torrington. He was going from a farm called Woodland and had to descend Shortridge Hill, at the bottom of which there is a short turn. He was driving the cart very fast down the declivity, and when it came to the turn the wheel ran up the side of the hedge and the cart with its load upset. the poor boy was thrown under the load, and when found, a bag of flour was on his head, another on his legs, and the rail of the cart on his side, and he quite dead. A few minutes before the fatal disaster he was heard merrily singing on his cart, when thus sadly ended his song and his life. The verdict was "Accidentally killed by the upsetting of a cart."

Thursday 20 December 1855
EXMOUTH - An Inquest has been held on the body of MR EDWARD HARRIS, who was found dead in his house with a deep wound in his throat. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased had been in a low desponding way for several weeks, and the Jury returned a verdict that he destroyed himself when labouring under a fit of insanity.

Thursday 27 December 1855
EXETER - DETERMINED SUICIDE BY A FARMER - We stated last week that a farmer, named JOSIAS ROWE GUSCOTT, of Cheriton Bishop, well-known in this city and neighbourhood, had been apprehended at Plymouth on a charge of stealing sheep. Whilst in custody he made two attempts on his life, which were ineffectual. On Saturday last, he was being conveyed to Exeter for examination by the magistrates, per the South Devon line. When between the Starcross and St. Thomas's Station, he made another desperate attempt on his life, by suddenly jumping through the window of the railway carriage, in which he was riding. The constable caught him by the leg, and held him by it - his body being suspended from the window - until they arrived at St. Thomas's, from whence he was conveyed to the Devon County Gaol. Yesterday (Thursday) he was to have been brought up for examination at the Castle of Exeter, but he put an end to his life in a most determined manner n the day previous. Our Reporter attended the County Gaol yesterday, where an Inquest was held on the body, and applied for admission. The worthy Governor (Mr Rose) very courteously informed him that he could not be admitted, inasmuch as he had no opportunity of consulting the visiting Justices on the subject of admitting the Press. It is very desirable, however, that the justices should give the Governor the power to admit Reporters to Inquests held within the precincts of the Gaol, as that is the most satisfactory mode of obtaining accurate information for the public. The facts, however, appear to be these:- On Wednesday forenoon, the head warder, Mr Churchward, carried the prisoner his daily allowance of beer, and in a half-an-hour the cell was again visited, when the prisoner was found suspended to a bell-handle, about three or four feet from the ground, by his neckerchief, and he was quite dead. He had taken a pillow from his head, knelt upon it, and having tied the neckerchief tightly round his neck, he had thrown his body backwards, and had thus strangled himself. The prisoner, we are informed, was vigilantly watched by the officers of the Gaol, and his clothes were removed at night. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 3 January 1856
SHUTE - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Beagle Inn,' in the parish of Shute, before Robert Henry Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SIMON SELWAY, an infant aged between two and three years, whose death was caused under the following circumstances:- The mother of the deceased, the wife of a labourer, who resides in a cottage adjoining the lodge of Sir John Pole's park, having occasion to go to Axminster on Thursday week, left her three children at home (the eldest between five and six years old), having desired a neighbour to look in upon them occasionally until her return. The grandfather of the children having called at the cottage about eleven o'clock the same morning, found the three children crying and suffering from the cold, and he proceeded to light the fire with some sticks he found there. After the children had warmed themselves he left the house to look for more wood, cautioning the eldest child not to put on any more firing. Between one and two o'clock the same day, some labourers who were working near, heard screams proceeding from the cottage; they went towards it and on their way observed flames in an inner room, and on getting nearer, the deceased child ran out of the cottage and met them with his clothes on fire, the greater part of which were consumed. they tore off the remaining portion of the clothes and found the child very much burnt all over his bowels, and on the right side, as well as his neck and face. Surgical aid was promptly at hand, but the child only survived until the next day. From the evidence of the grandfather, it appeared that the sticks he had not used in lighting the fire were missing on his return, and it is supposed that the children must have put them in the fire, and whilst doing so the clothes of the deceased must have ignited. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - Sudden Death. - On Christmas-eve, an Inquest was held before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of HENRY TEESDALE, a gentleman who had resided in Park-place, Exeter. MRS TEESDALE, the widow of the deceased, stated that he was in his 80th year; that on Saturday night he sat up reading and playing at drafts, until twelve o'clock. She made him some treacle-posset, which he enjoyed, and he then went to bed. He awoke about three o'clock in the morning, and said - "My dear, I'm dying; I shan't live till the morning - give me some ether;" he had been in the habit of taking ether for asthma. She gave him half a teaspoonful of ether in a wine glass, half-filled with cold water. It did him no good, and he then asked for a pipe of stramonium, prescribed for him by a medical gentleman in London for asthma. She gave him a pipe, and he smoked about a quarter of it. That did him no good, and witness wanted to send for a medical man, but he would not allow her. Ultimately he consented to have Mr James, and that gentleman was sent for between four and five o'clock, but when he arrived MR TEESDALE was dead. It appeared that deceased had had a paralytic stroke about five years ago, and has never been well since. Mr James said, that when he arrived he found the deceased had expired; his legs were drawn; his mouth was drawn to the right side; the tongue was protruding, and mucous was coming from his mouth. MRS TEESDALE said he had been smoking stramonium, but there was, however, nothing to show it. From all the circumstances of the case he believed that deceased died from an attack of paralysis, which, in all probability, was hastened by the stramonium. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly. In answer to a Juror, Mr James stated that stramonium was not dangerous if taken under ordinary circumstances, but that it had been known to produce symptoms of paralysis in those persons who were subject thereto.

Thursday 17 January 1856
DOWLAND - Melancholy Death. - On Tuesday morning, MR HENRY HOOPER, of Dowland Barton, in the parish of Dowland, near Hatherleigh, left home for Bideford market in his usual health and spirits. At half-past eleven at night, his family were alarmed by the return of his horse without the expected rider. Parties were immediately despatched in search of MR HOOPER, for whose probable fate the worst fears were entertained. The ill-fated man was found in the road by a man who went out in search about two miles from his own house, near Halsdon Court Gate, shortly after midnight, and, sad to say, quite dead. The deceased was a tenant of Sir Stafford Northcote, well known and much respected in the parish and neighbourhood. By his melancholy and untimely death a young and large family is bereaved of a father's care and support. Deceased was about 48 years of age. An Inquest is held today (Thursday) at one o'clock, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner.

Thursday 24 January 1856
EXETER - Sudden Death. - A short time since we reported among our local intelligence an Inquest held at Devonport, on the body of LOUISA MITCHELL, alias HALLETT, who died under circumstances that awakened suspicions against Mr., or, as he was commonly known, DR HALLETT, of that town. The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against this person and was committed to the county gaol, at Exeter, to await his trial at the ensuing assizes. He has, however, gone before a higher tribunal - he died on Monday in the gaol, and on Tuesday an Inquest was held on view of his body, before R. R. Crosse, Esq. the Coroner, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

EXETER - Found Drowned. - On Tuesday afternoon, a Coroner's Inquest was held at the 'Port Royal Inn,' St. Leonard's, before Richard R. Cross, Esq., County Coroner, to ascertain the cause of the death of WILLIAM DORMER, an agricultural labourer. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the deceased had been in employ at Christow, and that he was a single man of about 50 years of age. Having no one but himself to provide for, he was, according to the statement made by his brother before the Jury, in the habit of working until he had collected together a small sum of money, and then he would leave Christow for a day or two, and be off to some other town to spend it. One day last week, he came to Exeter, very probably in search of pleasure. He was seen on Saturday by a man who knew him, and met him in one of the streets of the city; but who could tell nothing further about him. He does not appear to have been recognised alive by any one after that; but on Sunday morning between ten and eleven o'clock, Wm. Plimsaul, a lumper n the quay, saw something floating on the Exe, and he called the attention of Mr Edwards, landlord of the 'Port Royal Inn,' to the object. He borrowed a boat hook of Mr Edwards, and pulled the object to the shore, when they saw it was a man's body, cold and dead. It proved to be that of DORMER. They removed it to the skittle-alley of the inn, and sent for Paine, the constable of St. Leonard's parish. He searched the body, and found a fish-hook, two tobacco pipes, and a half of a pocket handkerchief. He caused Mrs Baystyan, a nurse, to examine the body of the deceased, and she stated there were no marks of violence on his person. She had frequently seen drowned people, and she thought the deceased died from drowning. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned, but how, or by what means he became drowned, there is no evidence to show."

Thursday 7 February 1856
EXETER - Suicide in Exeter Prison. - A most determined suicide was committed in the City prison on Wednesday night. On the evening of that day the Exeter police brought to the prison a young man named CHARLES ROWE, a sailor, whose parents are residents of that city. he was in custody on a charge of stealing a copper funnel from on board a vessel lying in the basin, and was brought to the prison to be lodged for the night, preparatory to being taken before the County Magistrates on the following day. He was received by the gaoler who put him into a cell in what is called a "receiving-ward." This was done between six and seven o'clock, when he was locked up, and was not again seen until yesterday morning when the gaoler, at the usual hour, about day break, visited the cell and found the prisoner had laid violent hands on his own life. The means he had adopted to accomplish his purpose proved the sternness of his resolve. He had faste3ned one end of his comforter to one of the iron bars of his cell window, and secured his neck in a noose with a running knot at the other end, and as, from the window being about only five feet from the floor, he could not suspend himself from the bar, he must have thrown himself backward from the window, and it seems likely caught hold of the bedstead standing in the cell, to increase the strain on the comforter, and tighten the fatal ligature. He was thus strangled. When found the corpse was quite cold, and evidently it had been dead several hours. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body last evening, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., City Coroner, when a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" was returned.

Thursday 14 February 1856
BARNSTAPLE - Melancholy and Fatal Accident. - On Sunday, the 'Darby Allen,' a smack belonging to the port of Exeter, that had loaded from Castle Quay with navy timer for Pembroke Dockyard, set sail and proceeded down the river by the morning tide When about 2 ½ miles down, just off the Strand-house limekilns, the winds being light and the tide running, five or six knots an hour, it became necessary to warp the vessel across to the Pillhead. The captain, whose name is WILLIAM MASON, and a young sailor named Charles Balson, of this place, who had recently joined the vessel, were in the boat for the purpose of throwing out a kedge anchor, as directed by the pilot, when the leg of the former was caught in a coil of the rope, by which he was drawn to the bottom, and unfortunately drowned. The body was recovered about three o'clock in the afternoon, and in the evening brought back to this place and lodged at the 'Salutation Inn'. Poor MASON'S wife was with him until Saturday morning, when she left and returned to Topsham their place of abode; the next intelligence of her husband and the father of her eight children was conveyed by the electric telegraph, announcing to her the terrible fact that she was a widow and that they were fatherless. On Monday morning, an Inquest was held on the body, at the above inn, before the Borough Coroner, Incledon Bencraft, Esq., and a Jury of which Mr Thomas Boyne was the Foreman. It appears that this sad accident would not have occurred if the rope had not caught in the weir stake - if there had been no such obstruction, the man would have had a better chance of clearing himself. In accordance with the evidence adduced, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 6 March 1856
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Railway Accident. - An Inquest was held at the Infirmary on Saturday last, before R. I Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOSEPH WILLIAMS, a clerk at the railway station, who had died the previous night, shortly after being brought to the house, from injuries received that evening on the rail. Stephen Engley, who brought up the mail train from Bideford, in his evidence, said that the deceased came to him when he was on the engine, just below the bridge at Sticklepath, and gave him a time ticket, the engine being then in motion, but going very slowly. After giving him the ticket deceased put his foot on the step of the tender, and endeavoured to get on the engine, when witness saw him fall down and "the first wheel of the tender went over him." The engine was immediately stopped, and Engley went for assistance, and he and another clerk, named Lewis, procured a door, and went to bring him up. They found him lying by the rail, dreadfully injured, and on asking him how it had happened, he said he slipped off the foot plate, and that there was no blame to any one. He was at once carried to the Infirmary, where he arrived about twenty minutes past seven o'clock. The house surgeon, Mr Forester, said, in his evidence, that when he examined deceased upon his arrival at the house, he found him in a state of collapse, but after giving him a little brandy he revived. Deceased had sustained a comminuted fracture of the left knee joint and leg, and a severe lacerated wound on the right foot and fracture of its bones; also a comminuted fracture of the left elbow joint, with a severe contusion of the lower and left part of the abdomen. A post mortem examination revealed other injuries. The unfortunate man never recovered from the state of collapse, and at about ten minutes past eleven o'clock life became extinct. Deceased informed Mr Forester that he was 38 years of age, and wished it to be understood that there was no one to blame but himself, that the accident was entirely the consequence of his own act. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 March 1856
BARNSTAPLE - Awfully Sudden Death. - Seldom have the solemn words of the burial service, "in the midst of life we are in death" been more strikingly verified than on Monday last, in the sudden death of MR JOHN COPP, wheelwright, residing at Castle-lane in this borough. From the evidence given at the Inquest held on Tuesday morning before the Borough Coroner, R. I. Bencraft, Esq., the following facts are gathered. The deceased, although very well off in the world and living alone, assisted the economy of his house-keeping by planting a plot of potatoes in the country. On Monday morning he set out with a neighbour, named Samuel Sanders, a joiner, and two of his family, to a field two miles on the Sherwill road, for the purpose of attending to that duty, where he remained working until 6 o'clock. The deceased appeared to be in his usual health, and on the way out to the field ate some bread and drank a little cider a beverage which he used while at work during the day. About six they left the field to return home, and just as they had passed the stop-gate at Mare-top, Sanders saw the deceased fall on his side against the hedge. His travelling companion took hold of him and supported his head; his eyes appeared to be fixed, and he uttered not a word. A cart coming by at the time the poor man was put into it, and while they were doing so, Mr Torr, surgeon, came up, under whose direction he was taken straight to his house. He never moved after he was put in the cart. Mr Torr, in his evidence, stated that when he first saw him he found there was no pulse, and from the expression of his eye, he concluded it to be an attack of apoplexy which he believed was the cause of death. It would appear that he died immediately that he fell. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

ASHREIGNEY - On Wednesday last, MR WILLIAM FORD, yeoman, of Ashreigney, a very strong, healthy man, had an attack of paralysis and died in a few hours. The Coroner's Inquest resulted in a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 20 March 1856
MONKLEIGH - Distressing Suicide. - On Saturday morning last, about seven o'clock, WILLIAM, eldest son of MR WILLIAM GUARD, residing at Yeo Farm, in this parish, put an end to his existence by hanging himself to the branch of an apple tree in his father's orchard. It appears that the unhappy man was observed crying about the time mentioned on the fatal morning, by the apprentice boy, as if in great distress of mind, and that shortly after he saw him go into the orchard with a rope in his hand. A very short time after this the deceased was inquired for by some one of the family, to whom the boy related the above particulars. On going into the orchard to look for him, they were horrified to find him suspended to a tree. The dreadful spectacle called forth such heartrending cries from the persons making the discovery, that they were heard by Robert Ellis, a labourer on the farm, who ran to the scene of trouble and immediately cut him down. It was, however, too late, the neck was dislocated and life extinct. Mr Smith, surgeon, of Bideford, was sent for with the greatest speed, and that gentleman was soon on the spot, but it was his opinion that if he had been there the moment the rash act had been committed his life could not have been saved. An Inquest was held on the body by R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the evening of the same day, when the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The deceased was 39 years of age, and was the subject of bodily deformities, the result of typhus fever from which he had suffered when a boy. He is described as of moral and industrious habits, of good disposition, and beloved by all. The family is in well-to-do circumstances, and no cause can be shewn why the deceased should have committed the desperate deed, which has brought him to such a melancholy end and them into such deep affliction.

Thursday 27 March 1856
HEANTON PUNCHARDON - Suicide. - On Saturday last the inhabitants of the village of Wrafton, in this parish, were thrown into a state of great excitement by the rumour (which proved to be too well founded) that a young woman of the name of ANNA WATTS had committed suicide by hanging herself. The deceased was residing with her parents, but had recently been living as a domestic servant in the house of a respectable tradesman in High-street, Barnstaple, which she left in disgrace. It appeared that on the afternoon of Saturday she had quarrelled with her mother respecting the contents of a letter she had received, and which she was desirous of concealing from her parents. About two hours after her father had occasion to visit a barn on his farm, and on his entrance was horrified at beholding the lifeless body of his daughter suspended by the neck. The poor man was appalled, sank down in a fit, and has been ill every since. A Coroner's Inquest was held on the body on Monday last, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned. The body was interred the same day.

Thursday 3 April 1856
BARNSTAPLE - Death and Destitution. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Stafford Arms,' before R. I. Bencraft, Esq. Borough Coroner, on the body of ELEANOR HOOPER, an aged woman, who had died suddenly the same morning, at the house of William Gregory, labourer, residing in Bell Meadow, in this town. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was a person whose only means of subsistence was half-a-crown a week from the parish, sixpence of which she had to pay Gregory for her lodgings, or rather, for lodging in his house. She slept in the same room with himself, his wife, and child: her bed, which was placed on the floor, consisting of some straw with a sheet on it, and a single sheet to cover her body. It was not wonderful, under such circumstances, to hear Gregory say, that since she had been with them (about a fortnight) she had not appeared very well. The poor old woman was taken ill between one and two o'clock in the morning, when Gregory and his wife did what they could to help her. While his wife was lighting the fire in the kitchen, he asked her how she did, when she replied by saying, "Lord have mercy upon us," which were the last words she uttered, and before the person arrived who had been called up to render assistance, she expired. The Jury found "That the said ELEANOR HOOPER suddenly died, and that her death was caused by a want of sufficient bedding and by other privations, which at her advanced age, she being upwards of eighty years old, in all probability caused her death." How, indeed, is it possible to keep soul and body together on so miserable a pittance as two shillings per week, less than 3 ½d. per day, if the whole were spent in food? Is it not sad to think of that in such a place as this a poor old soul should be shivering under a single sheet upon a bed of straw, and this very week perish for want?

Thursday 17 April 1856
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of THOMAS DYER, a young man who died on the previous Tuesday from injury sustained by falling back over the rail of his cart on the 26th ult. The hurt which ended so fatally was in the spine of the back, and from the evidence there is reason to infer that the fruitful cause of unnumbered other miseries, drink, had something to do with this. The verdict was "Accidental Death."

Thursday 24 April 1856
TORRINGTON - Suicide of a Soldier. - On Tuesday forenoon a young man was found hanging by the neck and quite dead in a linhay belonging to Mr Riddaway, at Norwood, in this parish, where it is supposed he had been suspended for more than two days. He was found by an old man who had gone into the linhay to rest himself. The body was removed to the 'Barnstaple and Bideford Inn,' where an Inquest was held before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. The unhappy man proves to be WILLIAM WHITEFIELD, of Chittlehampton, labourer, belonging to the 47th Company of Royal Marines, and now a deserter. Eliza Hartnoll, his sweetheart, deposed that the last time she saw him was on Friday, the 11th instant: no one in the neighbourhood is known to have seen him since. Mr Hole, surgeon, was of opinion that the rash act was committed more than two days before he was found. As there was no evidence to prove the state of his mind at the time, the Jury returned an open verdict.

Thursday 8 May 1856
EXETER - Inquest. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the 'Country House Inn,' Catherine-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child eight months old, named HENRIETTA JANE SNELL CHAMBERLAIN, the daughter of MRS HENRIETTA JANE CHAMBERLAIN, who lately resided at No. 4, New North-terrace. On Wednesday last, in consequence of being about to change her residence, MRS CHAMBERLAIN slept at the house of Mr Hearn, her brother-in-law, in High-street. Her servant and the child slept with her. The child was in its usual good health when it went to bed, and was suckled by its mother at five o'clock in the morning, when it also appeared well. After that time MRS CHAMBERLAIN fell asleep, and on awaking at seven o'clock she found the child laying on its face and quite dead. Mr Lionel Roberts, surgeon, was called in and found the child in bed. He was of opinion that the child died from suffocation caused by its turning over on its face and hands, and while so lying he thought it probable it might accidentally have been pressed by the mother, who was lying close to it. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 May 1856
UPLYME - A Child Burnt to Death. - An Inquest was held at Rycombe, in this parish, on Tuesday, the 20th instant, before Robert Henry Aberdein, Esq., on the body of DAVID CHARLES JEFFORD, aged 6 years, son of MATTHEW JEFFORD, a labourer, whose death was caused under the following circumstances:- "On Saturday, the 17th instant, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the deceased and two younger children, were left by their mother, alone in the house, while she went to Uplyme, a distance of about a mile, for some bread; whilst away, the children seated themselves near the fire-place, and by some means the clothes of the deceased caught fire; the boy ran out of the house screaming; a boy, named George Bayley, who was near and heard the deceased calling for assistance, went to him, but by this time, nearly all his clothes were burnt off. Bayley led the poor fellow into the house and ran for assistance. Shortly afterwards the mother returned from Uplyme, and put the deceased to bed; on examining the child, it was found that his arms, face, and body, were severely burnt. Dr Cary was sent for, who attended the deceased, but he died the same night between eleven and twelve. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased was Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 5 June 1856
EXETER - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday afternoon, at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN POWNING, aged 61 years. It appeared that deceased was in the house of Mr Edward Peters, grocer, of South-street (who is a relative of the unfortunate man), about half-past ten on Monday night, and left there all right to go home, in company with a Mr Emery, who fetched him, as he had been in the habit of doing. When deceased left he appeared to be dejected and low in spirits, and he had been more than usually low for the past three weeks or a month. Deceased had one daughter living; and since the death of his wife a change seems to have come over him. On the following morning, the 27th, a girl named Elizabeth Clampett, went as usual to lay the deceased's breakfast things; and on leaving, about nine o'clock she saw him lying against the balustrade of the stairs. The girl was frightened; and went and informed her father and mother, who, on arriving found the deceased suspended by a cord to the "bannisters" of a small flight of stairs leading to the roof.

BARNSTAPLE - Death of an Infant. - An Inquest was held on Friday last at the house of JOHN BLACKMORE, at Hardaway-head, in this town, on the body of his son, JOSEPH BLACKMORE, an infant about three months old, before R. I Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner. It appeared that, on the previous Wednesday, the child's mother placed him in bed about eight o'clock in the morning, nothing being then amiss with him, and let him remain there from that time until half-past four in the afternoon, while engaged in washing. According to her own account, she did not visit his bed until about a quarter before one, when she went to give him suck; and she only saw him once from that time until half-past four, when she found him "all but dead." The doctor was sent for, but not being home at the time, he did not arrive until nine o'clock, hours too late to be of any use. The child was said to have had a cough ever since it was born, but not on the day of its death; and sometimes convulsions, which, in the opinion of the medical witness, after hearing the evidence, was the cause of death. The verdict of the Jury was that "Death resulted from Natural Causes."

EXETER - Fatal Accidents. - On Wednesday, an Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on a youth named WILLIAM ARBUARY. It appeared that deceased who intended to be an apprentice, was working on board the schooner Eliza Jane, which, on the 19th of April last, was lying at anchor at a place called "Bank," in the parishes of Littleham and Exmouth On the morning of the 19th April, deceased had occasion to fetch something from the masthead, which is 38 feet from the deck, when he fell from the top and fractured his right leg. He was immediately removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where a consultation of surgeons was held on the case, and it was considered unnecessary to amputate his leg. He received every care and attention from Mr Kemp, but he died on the 26th ult. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, on the body of WILLIAM HILL, aged 33 years. It appeared that deceased was a labourer, in the employ of a farmer at Dunsford, and was engaged on the 12th of May in leading a cart stallion. Whilst leading the animal near Dunsford, the Rev. W. J. Lee passed in his gig, and the horse became restive. The rev. gentleman then drove on very fast, but, on looking round he saw deceased struggling with the horse, which was trying to break away. On again looking round he saw the man lying in the road, and the horse coming towards him at a furious rate, whereupon he drove into a farm house out of the way. On going to the deceased it was found that he was insensible, and suffering from a severe wound in the head. From his statement it appeared that he had the leading rein wound round his arm, and that on Mr Lee's passing, the horse became restive and dragged him along the road, and trampled upon him. He was forthwith taken to a neighbouring house, where medical aid was sent for, and he was removed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital. The deceased from that time gradually sunk, and died on Saturday last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXETER - On Saturday, an Inquest was held on the body of SAMUEL COX, a boy, aged 12, who died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital. It appeared that on the 9th of April last, deceased was returning from the Charity School to his parents' house, in St. Thomas. On arriving at New Bridge-street, deceased ran towards a horse and cart, which belonged to Mr Reynolds, Creedy Farm, Farringdon, - and in spite of the remonstrances of the driver - a boy named William Harwood - persisted in getting up into the cart. He was on the off shaft when the horse became restive, kicked and plunged violently, and started off at a furious rate down the street. COX held on for short distance, but ultimately fell off and the wheel ran over his right knee, injuring it severely. Mr Wills, butcher, and several other persons, ran to his assistance, and putting him into a cart driven by John Jarman, a carrier of the Commercial-road, sent him to the hospital. Deceased was here promptly attended by Mr Edye, who stated that if he had been an adult, he should have at once amputated his limb; but the patient being a lad (and knowing from experience that in youth extraordinary cures were at times effected) he wished to give him the chance of natural recovery. All went on well till Monday fortnight, when Mr Edye saw a change for the worst - a great discharge from the wound and inflammation having weakened him very much. Mr Edye then obtained a consultation of the surgeons, and all concurred with him that the only chance of saving the patient's life was by taking off his leg. The deceased's friends were brought acquainted with the circumstance, and were told that the boy could not survive unless his leg was amputated. Notwithstanding this the parents refused - the mother asking what they should do with a lame child. By this decision, the medical gentleman were, of course, rendered powerless; and the sufferer lingered till Friday morning, when he died.

Thursday 12 June 1856
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Distressing Accident. - As the eldest son of MR WILLIAM GREENSLADE, a large cattle dealer of Collacott Barton, in this parish, was driving a cart to the Umberleigh Station, laden with dead stock intended for the London market, the horse which he was driving (and which MR GREENSLADE had only recently purchased), is supposed to have 'jibbed,' as the driver unharnessed it; and, to save the train, was riding it home very fast for another, when in turning a corner the horse fell down, throwing off the rider, who received a severe blow upon the side of his head which fractured his skull, and rendered him insensible. Mr Sanders, the foot post from Southmolton, happening to pass soon after, found the poor fellow lying in this state in the road; he quickly procured assistance, when the unfortunate youth was taken to the house of the Rev. R. H. Chichester., Mr Furse, surgeon, of Southmolton was promptly in attendance, and did all he could for him, but human aid was of no avail, and he died in less than two hours from a rupture of a blood-vessel upon the brain. The only time the poor fellow spoke was when they moved him first, when he said, "Oh, don't!" An Inquest was held the same evening before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. He was a very steady and industrious young man, and much respected.

Thursday 19 June 1856
BARNSTAPLE - Death from Lock-Jaw. - An Inquest was held yesterday morning, in Higher Maudlin-street, Derby, in this town, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of HENRY HAZEL, cabinet-maker, who died about noon, on Monday, of that terrible muscular affection of which so much has been heard, in a late celebrated trial, under the name of tetanus. It appeared that the deceased applied to Mr Cooke, surgeon, about a fortnight since, and complained of a disordered stomach, for which he gave him some medicine. A few days afterwards, when at work in his shop, he had the misfortune to inflict a deep cut in the joint of the forefinger of his left hand, which he tied up with a piece of rag, and paid no further attention to it, until last Thursday, when Mr Cooke was called in. Deceased then complained of stiffness about his neck and throat, and that he had a difficulty in swallowing. He was then recommended to take some powders he had procured and to put his feet into warm water: on the next day he had symptoms of tetanus - his neck being very stiff, and his mouth all but closed. On his medical attendant inquiring if he had any wound about him, deceased shewed a semicircular open wound about three parts of inch in length, round the joint of his finger, which was particularly heated. the wound appeared to have been neglected; deceased said, that on receiving the injury he immediately tied it up in a piece of rag, and did not untie it for several days. A poultice was ordered for the finger and some medicine given to relieve the tetanic affection. On Saturday the symptoms of tetanus had increased, the muscles of the back had become rigid, those of the chest much affected, his neck very stiff, and his teeth so set that it was with difficulty a medal could be got between them. His fearful malady continued to get worse until Monday, about twelve o'clock, when he expired. Deceased was described as a highly nervous and excitable person, a man of intemperate habits, and who had lately drank more than usual. The verdict of the Jury was in accordance with the medical evidence, that the deceased died of tetanus or lockjaw, caused by the wound above described.

Thursday 10 July 1856
SOUTHMOLTON - A Shocking Affair. - On Saturday last, as some men were hay making, at West Wood Farm, Bishopsnympton, they were amusing themselves by romping and wrestling, when one man named Snow came behind and caught DANIEL MOORE, one of the workmen, in a very indecent manner, and turned him over. He then fell on him, and immediately the man, MOORE, cried out "I am a dying man." The poor fellow was taken seriously ill and died a few hours after. It is supposed the urethral passage was injured. An Inquest was held on the body on Tuesday evening.

EXETER - Melancholy Accident. - A melancholy and fatal accident, happened on Sunday last, to an old man named JAMES GALE, 99 years of age, who was drowned in the Exeter Canal. The deceased was originally employed by the Town Council to two vessels up and down the Canal, but becoming too old for the work he was pensioned off by that body with 15s. per week and a house to live in. His house was situated on the Haven Banks near the first drawbridge, and on Sunday he was seen at ten minutes past two o'clock standing at his door, and was not seen alive after; but four lads, two of whose names we have only been able to obtain, Charles Ford and John Penneton, were passing about half-an-hour after, when they observed the body of an old man in the water, near deceased's residence. They immediately got into the water and took it out, when it was identified as being the deceased, but life was quite extinct. An Inquest was held on Monday at the 'Welcome Inn,' before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, and evidence corroborative of the above was given. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 31 July 1856
SWIMBRIDGE - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last week, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a youth named KINGDON, a lad about 16 years of age, who was unfortunately killed the previous evening at the Marsh Lime Kilns, belonging to Mr Wm. Hartnoll. The stone used at those kilns is brought up from the mine in wagons on an inclined plane by means of steam power. This lad was employed to tip the wagon when brought to the top, and having done so on this fatal occasion, the engine was put in motion to wind up some slack chain, when the machinery revolving once too often brought the wagon to the pulley-box, where the poor fellow was caught between the two, the lower part of the face and neck receiving a dreadful crush, which caused instant death. No fault was attributable to any one. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 August 1856
BIDEFORD - Melancholy Death by Drowning. - The inhabitants of this town were much moved on Sunday night by the intelligence that a respectable young man, a commercial traveller, had gone to the Northam Burrows from this town in the former part of the day, and in passing from the Middle Ridge to the mainland had been drowned. Like most rumours of evil omen, the report turned out to be too true. The young man who has come to this most untimely and deplorable end is MR HENRY CARDEUX, who was travelling for a linen-house of the same name, at Barnsley, in Yorkshire. He arrived here on Saturday, on his journey of business, and took up his quarters at 'Parramore's Commercial Hotel.' On Sunday morning, having taken breakfast, he intimated his intention of visiting Northam Burrows, and of returning again in the afternoon; he set off accordingly on his fatal trip. When there, he got on the Middle Ridge, where he remained until the tide began to flow. To those unacquainted with the rapid manner in which the vast body of water rushes in through the channels and rises over one sandbank after another, danger is incurred before they are aware. The tide had already begun to flow through the channel between the ridge on which the unhappy man was standing and the "main," and his position was insulated before he was aware of his danger. It may be more easily imagined than described with what feelings the awful discovery came upon him that there was but a step between him and death. A stranger, and consequently ignorant of the best course to be taken, a drowning death before him, with his boots, stockings, and coat off, he plunged into the rapid tide, where, frantically crying for assistance, he was swept, on that beautiful summer afternoon, into the gulf of death. That sad distress there were only a few little boys to witness, who could render no assistance. Had he remained on the ridge, instead of rushing into the water, there would have been ample time to have manned a boat and have taken him from his perilous position, as two hours would have elapsed before the tide reached the top of the ridge. On the melancholy fact becoming known, the mourned event was telegraphed to his friends by the kindness of Mr W. L. Vellacott, draper, of this town, and a reply was received by return, stating that some of his friends would be here, where they arrived by the eleven o'clock train on Tuesday. Every effort was made to recover the body, but it was not found until the middle of the following day, when it was discovered on the "Pullies," at some distance from the spot where he is supposed to have been drowned, by three men of Appledore, named George Lock, John Hockings, and Richard Skeats. The face was wounded and bleeding; the body was carried to Northam to await a Coroner's Inquest, which was held the following day before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the 'King's Head Inn,' when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. The deceased was 24 years of age, and respectably connected; his remains are to be removed to Yorkshire for interment. It may be well to hint that no stranger to the Burrows should go there to bathe without having with him a living guide, which can at all times be obtained for a trifling compensation. Innkeepers and others would d well to volunteer such necessary advice to those who may happen to fall in their way; had this poor fellow taken that precaution, his life would have been preserved beyond all reasonable doubt. In this unhappy case, too, the obvious reflection will press itself upon the mind of the Christian man, that had he spent his Sabbath as Christian people do, he would not have been found on that blessed day on the Middle Ridge of Barnstaple Bar.

Thursday 14 August 1856
EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' Exeter, on Monday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL BENMORE, aged 25 years. From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the deceased was a travelling cutler, and resided in Coombe-street, in the city. That morning he got up in his usual good health and partook a hearty breakfast, after which he left home for the purpose of proceeding with his usual avocations. Shortly after his departure, a man named Henley went to the deceased's wife and told her that her husband had dropped down in the Magdalen-road. she immediately went to him, and found him lying on the ground, partially insensible. He was at once conveyed to the Hospital, where every attention which medical skill could devise was paid him, but he expired about half-an-hour after his admission.

PETROCKSTOW - Coroner's Inquest. - Verdict of "Manslaughter." - On Saturday morning last, intelligence reached this town of the death by violent means of a farm labourer named WILLIAM MITCHELL, residing at the hamlet of Ash, in the parish of Petrockstow, situate about midway between Great Torrington and Hatherleigh. It appears that on the previous Friday evening a company of agricultural labourers were returning to their homes from the neighbouring parish of Sheepwash - that after leaving their work they had indulged themselves in drinking at a public house in that parish, and were rather the worse for liquor - that among the company were two men named WILLIAM MITCHELL and John Horrell, who were connected by family ties, they having married two sisters, between whom an altercation ensued which led to a collision in which each struck and kicked the other, their companions standing by and allowing them to vent their rage until the unfortunate man MITCHELL received a brutal kick from his antagonist in the abdomen, which caused such injuries as proved fatal within twenty-four hours.
Information of the occurrence having been communicated to the County Coroner, Richard Bremridge, Esq., that gentleman appointed one o'clock on the same afternoon for holding an Inquest on the body of the deceased.
The hamlet of Ash is situated about half-a-mile from the village of Petrockstow, and consists of three or four cottages, or, more properly, hovels. In one of these resided the unfortunate man MITCHELL, and that adjoining was occupied by his brutal assailant whose violence has caused his untimely death. Both the exterior and interior of these hovels presented an appearance of extreme wretchedness. The only convenient place near for prosecuting the Inquiry was Ash-farm, in the occupation of Mr Thomas Rockhey, a respectable yeoman, whose best accommodation was readily offered to the Coroner and Jury. The constable having made his return to the precept, an intelligent Jury was impanneled, consisting of Mr John Darke, foreman, Messrs. James Vivian, Richard Summerhays, Philip Tucker, William Shute, Samuel Bird, John Langdon, William Seldon, Thomas Rockhey, Thomas Hooper, William Falconer, Philip Stapledon, and Robert Sanders.
The Coroner briefly instructed them in their duties:- They had been empanelled to inquire into the means by which WILLIAM MITCHELL had come to his death, and their first duty would be to proceed to view the body. They would be accompanied by Mr Rudall (surgeon, of Sheepwash), and they should be particular to note the marks and injuries which the body presented. They would then return to the Jury room and hear the evidence upon which they would form their verdict. If they found that the party inflicting the fatal injuries upon the deceased was actuated by malice - that they would find a verdict of murder; but if there was the absence of these aggravating circumstances, then they would find him guilty of Manslaughter - the difference between which crimes he could, if necessary, explain to them at the close of the Inquiry. Mr Rudall would, in the meantime, proceed to make a post mortem examination of the body, and he (the Coroner) would suggest that he should make notes of the appearances of the body, as he proceeded, that at the trial he might be enabled to refer thereto to refresh his memory.
The Jury having viewed the body, which was lying at the house of the deceased, returned to the farmhouse, and the first witness called was
Thomas Whitlock, who deposed:- I am a labourer, living at Petrockstow. I knew WILLIAM MITCHELL, who was also a labourer, living at Ash, in the same parish. I was at work with him on Thursday last, at New Court, in Sheepwash. John Daw, John Horrell and James Gould were also working at the same farm on the day stated. We left work at six o'clock in the evening, and came on our way to Petrockstow in company. WILLIAM MITCHELL, Daw, and myself left Sheepwash together, and came on to a place called Heale-gate; when we arrived there Horrell came up with us. The deceased and Horrell had an altercation, and MITCHELL left the road and turned up a footpath over a field leading to South Hill. John Daw, Horrell and myself came on the road. MITCHELL then called out to Horrell, saying, "Come here, and I'll fight you." the two had had angry words before they left work, and MITCHELL had challenged Horrell to fight him. When called to from the field Horrell said, "You know I can thrash you with one hand." MITCHELL then said, "Come back and try it." Horrell and Daw then went back to the turn leading into the field. Shortly after I heard a scuffle, and the deceased and Horrell came into the road fighting. I then went back. MITCHELL fell down in the road from a blow given by Horrell with his fist in the side of the head; and as he was falling I saw Horrell kick him in the side, just above the pinbone. I then went up to them, and saw MITCHELL in the act of rising, resting on one knee, and bleeding from the nose. Horrell then asked him to give it up, and offered to shake hands and fight no more. MITCHELL said he would not - he should be up again directly. I then said to Horrell, "Then you take your clothes and go along." As I spoke these words MITCHELL got up and called for Horrell again. They then set to again, striking each other with their fists and kicking. Horrell then fetched deceased a kick in the abdomen or about the testicles. I then said, "Oh, Horrell, that's too bad - that's a bad kick; you ought not to do that again." MITCHELL fell to the ground; Horrell stood by and I said, "You shan't fight any more." [The witness answered the questions put to him in an evasive manner, and the Coroner admonished him of the critical position in which he stood. If he did not give his evidence without equivocation he (the Coroner) would commit him.] MITCHELL then scrambled up and got to the bank by the side of the road. I then went to him and put on his shirt and got him up. Dymond and myself helped him along the road to a place called Magpie, where we washed the blood off his face. We then lifted him on to a place called Patcholl-cross, about 60 land yards from his house, where I left him in the hands of Dymond, having first asked him if he could walk home. I am not aware if deceased answered. I saw Horrell the next day at his work, as usual; and I have seen him again to day, at Ash. [The Coroner vainly endeavoured to elicit anything satisfactory as to the subsequent conduct of Horrell.] Horrell heard of MITCHELL'S death last night, and said he was sorry for it; he did not mean to injure him - it was a bad job. [The Coroner advised Whitlock, if a fight should again occur in his presence to interfere before a man received a death blow. He was in doubt whether he ought not to commit him as a participis criminis.]
John Daw sworn: I live in Petrockstow. I knew the deceased, WILLIAM MITCHELL. I was at work with him on Thursday, at New Court, in Sheepwash, and came home with him in the evening. John Horrell overtook us just by the turn of the road leading to South Hill; MITCHELL left us there and went into the path field.
[Here, a part of the newspaper is very faded and impossible to read.]
MITCHELL then swore out, "I'll have you tonight;" and ran to Horrell and kicked him. Horrell then kicked him oft the ground, and he fell on his face and hands. I again begged Horrell to come away, but he wouldn't, because MITCHELL kept challenging him so. Deceased was then coming again to Horrell, when the latter struck him in the head, and, as he was falling, kicked him as I thought in the thigh. Whitlock and Dymond had then come back, and I left them, and went home.
John Dymond sworn:- I am a labourer, living in Petrockstow. I do not know how my name is spelt, as I never went to school. I am 33 years of age; I know the nature of an oath. I was at work at New Court, on the 7th instant, but not with the deceased. I saw him when he returned from Sheepwash; he appeared to have drank. It was between three and four o'clock. I left work at six o'clock, and overtook MITCHELL, Daw, and Whitlock about half a mile on the road toward Petrockstow; we then came on together as far as Heale-gate, where Horrell overtook us; Horrell and MITCHELL then had angry words. MITCHELL then went over the gate into the path field leading toward South Hill, and after going up the field a few yards he called out, "I'll have you at once," (meaning Horrell.) Horrell immediately went back; I begged him to go home, but he would not. I stopped a few minutes, and then saw deceased and Horrell come out into the main road, fighting. I was about 20 yards from them when I saw Horrell knock MITCHELL down, and, as he was falling, he also kicked him. Whitlock and myself went back to them, and begged of them to part, but MITCHELL refused, and said he would have more of it; they then struck and kicked each other, and Horrell hit MITCHELL with his fist and kicked him near his private parts. He fell to the ground and Whitlock (who had a stick in his hand) said to Horrell, "I'll thrash you with the stick if you kick him again." MITCHELL was lying on the ground: we lifted him up and laid him by the hedge. After a while, we put on his shirt and other clothes and led him on to Patcholl-cross, where Whitlock left us, and I took MITCHELL home. Horrell came along after us - he offered to assist MITCHELL home, but deceased would not let him. After the kick in the privates, MITCHELL complained of great pain. It is my belief that the affray began with MITCHELL, who kept teasing Horrell about his work, and said, "he was not a man." MITCHELL was very sick, and vomited immediately after he received the last kick; which he repeated when about 50 yards from his own house.
Ananias Ware sworn:- I am a labourer, working and residing in Petrockstow. On Thursday evening last, between seven and eight o'clock, I left my master's house at South Hill, and came into the road leading to Ash Cross, where I saw John Dymond and Thomas Whitlock almost carrying along the deceased by strength of arm between them. I thought they were tipsy, and asked if the sun had shone on them today. MITCHELL seemed to have no power over his legs - he was groaning and appeared in great pain. I then saw blood about his face, and Horrell (who was a few steps behind) told me they had been fighting. Horrell held up his fist and said "That's what has made the sun shine upon him. That has given him enough of it. He's always boasting of his manhood, and now I've shewn him which is the best man." He never said he was sorry. I was heavily loaded and could not help the deceased.
Robert Rudall sworn:- I am a surgeon, residing at Sheepwash. I was sent for yesterday, between five and six o'clock in the evening, to attend the deceased. I came instantly, and found that he had been dead half-an-hour. I examined his body, and found about the middle of his right shin a severe contusion. There were also three contusions on the right hip, one or two in the back, and others on different parts of the body. they appeared to have been caused by kicks from a shoe having a toe-plate. The right side of the scrotum and penis were very much discoloured - the discoloration extended over the groin; the same side of the scrotum was distended considerably. On examination, the scrotum appeared to contain some of the abdominal viscera - the testicle on the right side appeared to be crushed. I have since made a post mortem examination of the body. The tumour of the scrotum was formed by a portion of the omentum, and also about five inches of the small intestines. The intestines and omentum were in a state of mortification and the testicle crushed. The peritoneum showed marks of having been subject to very violent inflammation, as were all the other contents of the abdomen, the intestines being literally glued together; this, no doubt, resulted from the injury inflicted by such a kick as I have heard described here. The abdomen contained about two pints of fluid. There was no appearance of any rupture having existed previous to the injuries received on Thursday night. I am of opinion that the man died from peritonitis induced by the injuries received.
This was the whole of the evidence. The Coroner then summed up. From the testimony of the several witnesses it was clear that the deceased had met with his death from injuries inflicted by his fellow-labourer, John Horrell - the evidence of the surgeon left no doubt of that fact; and, as there was the absence of malice in the case, he did not see that they could return any other verdict than that of manslaughter, which they should do in justice to the country, as there could be no justification of so serious an offence.
The Jury having briefly consulted, announced that they had agreed upon a verdict of "Manslaughter against John Horrell."
The Coroner immediately made out his warrant for the apprehension of the prisoner, and for his committal to the County Gaol to take his trial for the offence at the next Assizes; the churchwarden (Mr Darke) being bound in recognizances to appear and prosecute, and the several witnesses to appear and give evidence. The learned gentleman again admonished Whitlock, Daw, and Dymond, in any future case not to stand by and see a fellow-creature receive his death-blow before they interfered in his behalf, or the law and society would hold them responsible.
The Jury very kindly gave their fees to the relief of the bereaved widow and her now fatherless child.
In a short time, the constable returned, and announced that he had duly executed the warrant, and had the prisoner in safe custody. The wretched man had not endeavoured to evade justice, but had lingered near the spot where his victim lay a lifeless corpse; he was described as suffering the most intense agony of mind, and resigned to any punishment, short of death, that the law might inflict. The superinducing cause of this sad catastrophe was strong drink; had the parties not had their evil passions aroused by potent liquors, they would probably have proceeded to their homes without the altercation which terminated so fatally, and the one would have escaped a premature grave and the other a felon's prison.

Thursday 4 September 1856
BRAUNTON - Fatal Accident. - A fatal accident occurred on Sunday last, under circumstances which have made a deep impression on many minds. The weather, as it is well known, was, during last week, very unfavourable for the harvest. Sunday, being a dry day, Mr Bale, of Winsham, in this parish, was induced to employ its hours in "carrying" a field of barley, and putting it into a mow. As its height increased, a ladder became necessary, which appears to have been deficient of three rounds at the top. A man named JAS. HOLMES, who was working on the top of the mow (although warned, it is understood, of the faults of the ladder) in attempting to descend, by some means missed his footing and fell to the ground, by which his neck was broken, and instant death was the awful result. The accident happened about half-past seven o'clock. An Inquest was held on view of the body, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on Monday, when Mr Pick, surgeon, having given his opinion that deceased died from injuries received in the neck, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. Deceased leaves a pregnant wife with five children to deplore their irreparable loss.

Thursday 11 September 1856
SOUTHMOLTON - Uncertainty of Life. - As MR WILLIAM BRIGHT, formerly of the 'Town Arms Inn,' was ascending his stairs to go to bed, on Tuesday evening last, he stepped upon a narrow stair and unfortunately over-balanced himself, and (being crippled) he fell to the bottom of the landing. His daughter, who lived with him, was standing on one of the stairs, near the bottom, at the time, but luckily she moved out of the way; she would otherwise have sustained a serious injury, as her father was a heavy corpulent man. He was immediately raised and Dr Riccard was soon in attendance, when it was found that his neck was dislocated and his skull fractured - his death must have been instantaneous. An Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the following day, when the various facts having been given in evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was much respected as an old inhabitant. The solemn visitation was improved in a sermon, on Sunday afternoon by the Rev. J. C. K. Saunders, who our much respected curate took for his text, Amos iv. 12:- "Prepare to meet thy God."

Thursday 18 September 1856
EXETER - Suicide. - A most determined suicide was committed on Saturday last, at the Devon County Prison, by a man named WILLIAM AGGETT, who hung himself in his cell. The deceased had been committed for trial on a charge of stealing some wood at Prince Town, Dartmoor, and this fact is supposed so to have weighed upon his mind as to cause him to commit the rash act. An Inquest was held on Monday, on the body, before - Lee, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when a verdict that the deceased committed suicide whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity was returned.

Thursday 25 September 1856
LYNMOUTH - Sudden Death. - Another instance of the uncertainty of Life, occurred at this place on Thursday last, by the sudden decease of MR THOMAS TEPPER, formerly of Southmolton. It appears that he had been complaining of internal pains for several days, and of a deadness in his right arm. To relieve his suffering he had taken some of Holloway's Pills, a medicine he was in the habit of using. After smoking a pipe and drinking a glass of brandy and water, he walked towards his house, which was only a few yards distant, but had not proceeded far when he was observed to fall on his back; assistance was immediately rendered, but when raised the previous life had fled. An Inquest was subsequently held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, when a verdict of "Died of Apoplexy" was returned.

ILFRACOMBE - Sudden Death. - On Sunday considerable emotion was experienced by the populace about the quay at the sudden death of an old sailor named THOMAS WILLIAMS, a man well-known to many who are in the habit of going to Swansea. It appears that about noon he was on Lantern-hill looking out for ships, from whence he went to the pier to get a boat to proceed to another that was moored off. The old man and a lad entered a boat, when he asked a boy on the shore to shove her off; as he did so, the old man lost his balance and fell over the gunwale on to the slip, saying, "Mind my legs," - the last words he uttered. He was taken home quite dead; an Inquest was held on Monday before R. Bremridge, Esq., and a Jury of which Mr John Barnes was foreman, whose verdict was that death was caused by the fall.

Thursday 2 October 1856
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, at the 'Salutation Inn,' Castle Quay, before the Borough Coroner, R. I. Bencraft, Esq., and a Jury of whom Capt. Hearson, quay-master, was foreman, on the body of THOMAS KIVELL, a fine young man of about one and twenty years of age, who was drowned in the river, off Blackhead, the evening before, by falling overboard from the deck of the Admiral Vernon lighter. The accident happened about half-past five on Friday evening; the body was picked up the next morning about ten o'clock on Bassett's Ridge, and taken to the above-named inn to await an Inquest. The lighter belongs to Bideford and is employed to take such goods from Barnstaple as are to be sent by the Princess Royal steamer; on the present occasion she was laden with wool and other articles, and sailed from Castle Quay about half-past four o'clock, in charge of Charles Lee, his son (a lad of about 16 years of age), and the deceased, THOMAS KIVELL, brother of the owner. Charles Lee, in his evidence, said:- I am a bargeman, I sailed from Castle Quay for Bideford last evening about half-past four o'clock - deceased and my own little boy were with me. THOMAS KIVELL steered the barge until we got to Blackhead; he then said to me, "Come back here and take the helm, I want to go down and light my pipe." He went down and lighted his pipe; I had to haul the boat closer to the wind, and while I had the main sheet in my hand, my little boy cried out, "TOM KIVELL is overboard." I looked over the stern of the barge, and I just saw him throw up his hands as he was struggling in the water about twice the length of the boat behind, when he sank, and I saw him no more. I did not hear him speak a word. I did not see him fall over; he was behind me. The boom could not have thrown him over as he was on the wrong side. He might have "drinked" a little: I have seen him worse. - By a Juror:- I wore the vessel round and stood up a little while, but I never saw him at all after he sank. There was a vessel going down, and they sent a boat to us, and one of the men went to Bideford with us. He had been having a pint or two of beer, with some Bideford chaps; he might have been a little the worse, but he wasn't drunk. I drank two or three glasses with him in the day, but he was away with the Bideford chaps. I think it would have happened if he had not been drinking. I observed the cut over his eyes, but I can't tell how it came. I can give no account of the cause of his falling overboard, he was smoking his pipe when I saw him. there are no bulwarks to the barge to prevent any one falling over. - The Foreman:- Was he dancing on the deck? Witness:- I did not see him dancing, my little boy says he was. Charles Lee, son of the former witness, who had been down in the cuddy to light the fire, said:- When I came on deck, as KIVELL was walking by the edge of the boat towards the stern, he said, "This is the place to dance;" he began to dance, and when he had given a few steps he fell overboard. Father was turning the helm, and pulling the mainsail. I am sure he said, "This is the place for dance," and he moved his foot once or twice and fell out over. He slipped down by the side, and when he was in the water he tried to catch hold of the lighter. I did not see him strike himself in falling. When he was in the water "he hollied out, Charles! Charles!" and then went down. That was all he said. John Lake, a young sailor, who was one of the party that picked up the body, said he was drinking with the deceased the day before at the 'Salutation' - drank two or three half-pints with him, and saw him go away; he had been "drinking" a little, but was sober enough. Charles Lee was also drinking with him. Joseph Stribling, pilot, was going down with the Mary Jane: saw Charles Lee with his hands out over singing out "a man overboard;" he was fallen on the deck, but witness could not tell whether he was frightened or drunk. Mary Milman said;- I saw the deceased leave yesterday; there did not appear to be anything amiss with him, the other man I thought was tipsy. There was a wound over the eye-brows of the deceased and blood was coming from the eyes, but there was no evidence to shew how it was inflicted; it was thought possible he might have been struck in falling over the side.
The Coroner in summing up said, there could be but one opinion as to the cause of death - that it was the result of an accident, for which the deceased had no one to blame but himself. While deploring the casualty by which a fine young man had come to his end, they could not shut their eyes to the fact that the deceased had been drinking more than he ought to have done; and, though it was a difficulty to define when a man might be said to be drunk, yet it was certain that after parties had been drinking as the deceased had been, they did many things they would not do when sober. The man Lee, it appeared, was tipsy also, and, if the Jury wishes it, he would call him in and address to him any remonstrance they might think the occasion called for, although it appeared, that had he (Lee) been ever so sober, it would have been impossible for him to have saved the deceased with the wind blowing as it was. The Jury expressed no wish to have anything said to Lee on the subject referred to, but proceeded to return their verdict, which was to the effect, "That the deceased, THOMAS KIVELL, was drowned in the river Taw, by accidentally falling out of a barge."

MERTON - Death By Poison. - A serious and fatal case of poisoning took place on Wednesday last, at Merton, of three children belonging to THOMAS ROCKEY, carpenter, residing at Potheridge Gate, in that parish. The mother gave the children some bears'-foot to expel worms. She not knowing what quantity to give, nor the quality of the plant she was dealing with gave them an over-dose. The children became alarmingly ill, and in a few hours one was dead! Messrs. J. O. Rouse and Tapley, surgeons, of Torrington, were soon on the spot, and by their judicious treatment the other two have recovered. An Inquest was held on the deceased child, by R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, who returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The poor mother is overwhelmed with grief.

Thursday 9 October 1856
STOKE CANON - Distressing Suicide at Stoke Canon. - An Inquest was held in this parish on Tuesday last, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM HILL, aged 69, who hung himself. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was in a field, digging, on Saturday, the 27th inst., and about two o'clock in the afternoon he went home and complained of being unwell. In about a quarter of an hour after he went out, his daughter went in search of him, and found him in an outhouse hanging by the neck from a beam in the roof, by a trace rope. She screamed for assistance, and the rope was at once untied. Deceased was not then quite dead, but speechless, neither did he recover his senses to the time of his death, which took place on Sunday last. Deceased seems to have been in a desponding state all through the last summer, having been in the habit of talking to himself and shewing other symptoms of depression. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide by hanging, deceased being in a state of Temporary Insanity."

FILLEIGH - Suicide. - On Tuesday evening, HUGH PASSMORE, a tailor dwelling in this parish, was found hanging by the neck in a linhay, at Higher Beer. It is needless to add that he was dead, and it is thought he must have been suspended there nearly a week; he left his lodgings about a week ago, and had not been seen until discovered in the awful predicament stated. His absence created no alarm, as he was in the habit of going out to work at farm houses, and would be away some times for a week together. He is a single man, and has, it is thought, saved up some hundreds of pounds. Deceased was of eccentric habits, but considered to be a very inoffensive person. What could have induced him to commit so rash an act no one can tell. The body awaits the Inquest which will take place today (Wednesday).

Thursday 16 October 1856
EXETER, Oct. 13. - An Inquest was held at the 'Acland Arms,' St Sidwell's, Exeter, on Saturday, before Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner, on the body of a gentleman, who, from certain documents found in his possession, and other circumstances, appears to be the HON. BERTRAM WODEHOUSE, uncle of Lord Wodehouse, the English ambassador at the Court of Russia. The facts, as detailed in evidence, are of an exceedingly painful character.
It appeared that the deceased, who was described as a tall gentleman, wearing a moustache, and having the appearance of a military man, arrived in Exeter on Thursday evening, the 3rd inst., by train, and went to the 'New London Inn.' He was then under the influence of drink. He slept there for several nights, and during the whole time he was at the inn he was intoxicated. In consequence of this, the landlord, Mr Pratt, sent him his bill, and suggested the propriety of his taking private lodgings. On the Sunday evening previous to this he entered the Free Church in a state of intoxication, and was turned out by the sexton. On leaving the 'London Inn,' he hired John Richards, one of the porters, to convey his luggage to another hotel, but when he arrived at the door he refused to enter, and ultimately agreed with Richards to take lodgings at his house. He went there on Tuesday last. He was then drunk, and during the same night he consumed a quantity of pale brandy. The following day he ordered a bottle of brandy, and drank about a pint of it. Richards, "fearing that he was killing himself," took away the brandy, and put it in a drawer, but he insisted on having it again, and asked Mrs Richards "how she dared" to remove it. He drank some more that night, and the next day he ordered six bottles (quarts) of Allsopp's bitter ale, the whole of which he drank, together with the brandy which was left on the previous night, and a small quantity more from another bottle, which he ordered to be fetched on that day. On each evening he took "composing draughts" and effervescent powders, which were procured for him at a druggist's shop in the neighbourhood. He kept his bed all the time, and only ate two basins of soup and some arrow-root. On Friday, at one o'clock in the morning, deceased called Richards, and on going into his bedroom he saw him stagger from the door and fall over a chair. He immediately got up again, and when Richards asked if he should assist him, the deceased said, "No, it's all right. I'm not hurt." Richards then gave him some water, and about an hour and a-half afterwards deceased called again and requested to be supplied with a basin of tea. It was procured for him, and he then commenced retching; Richards asked if he should call in a medical man, to which deceased replied, "No, I will not have a doctor; I don't like doctors - any thing but that." At seven o'clock the same morning he had some more tea, and at half-past nine sent for another half dozen bottles of bitter ale, and drank a portion of one bottle. About ten minutes after this Mrs Richards went to deceased again, when he appeared very faint. He asked for some carbonate of soda, and when she was getting it he fell back on the pillow, cast up his eyes, and opened his mouth. Mrs Richards then sent for Mr Hunt, a surgeon.
During the progress of the Inquiry the Coroner read the following note, which was found in deceased's pocket:- "T. H. Wodehouse presents his compliments to the Hon. Bertram Wodehouse, and begs to hand him £45, as requested. Messrs. C. and Co. have received £88 16s. 8d. only from Lord Wodehouse, and that there will be a draught less than £15 due in the last month of the quarter. - 29, Cornhill, Sept. 4, 1856." - In reply to a telegraphic communication which Richards sent to the Honourable Henry Wodehouse, Upper Brook-street, Grosvenor-square, London, apprising him of the death of the deceased, the following arrived during the Inquest: - "Procure a shell; some one will come down on Monday. Write full particulars to R.C. - From Raikes Currie, Hythe, Kent."
Mr Hunt, surgeon, stated that he was called to the deceased about one o'clock on Friday. He was then in bed, with a bottle of ale, partly drunk, in his hand, of which he occasionally partook. Deceased was not unconscious. Witness attempted to take the bottle from him; but he would not give it up. Deceased was pulseless; his legs and arms were quite cold, and he was evidently in a dying state. When witness told him he would in all probability die, he exclaimed, "Oh, no; not so bad as that!" He applied a mustard poultice over the heart, and tried other means, but deceased never rallied. He continually asked for bitter beer, brandy, and soda. Witness succeeded in taking the bottle from deceased, and the last thing he did was to raise himself on his elbow and ask for cold water. Witness gave him a little and he then fell back and died. Witness considered that deceased died from exhaustion, consequent upon excessive drinking and his not taking any animal food.
The Coroner, in summing up, said there could be no doubt that deceased was the HONOURABLE BERTRAM WODEHOUSE, the uncle of the present Lord Wodehouse, our Ambassador at the Court of Russia. In tracing the peerage he found that the HON BERTRAM WODEHOUSE was described as a military officer; that he was born in April, 1813, and was consequently forty-three years old. Deceased would appear to be the fourth son of John Wodehouse, the second baronet, and uncle of the present Lord Wodehouse. It would also appear from the letter before him that his lordship had been in the habit of making deceased a half-yearly allowance, which, however, seemed to have been paid him quarterly by Mr Wodehouse, of London, who was, he understood, an army agent. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Exhaustion, consequent on Excessive Drinking.

Thursday 13 November 1856
BIDEFORD - That striking sentence in the Burial Service, "in the midst of life we are in death," was never more impressively verified than in the sudden death on Monday evening, in this town of MR JOSEPH ESSERY, of Torrington. This good man had come over to this place to pay a visit to Mr Charles Blackwell, schoolmaster, a relative of his, who is extremely ill. After conversing and praying with his afflicted relative, whom he could hardly hope to see again, he went to the house of Mr Wickham, on the Quay, for the purpose of returning to Torrington by the seven o'clock 'bus. Finding he was too late, his friend had no sooner invited him to remain at his house for the nine o'clock conveyance, when, without the slightest premonition, the vital functions ceased in an instant - one moment a living, acting, talking man, the next a corpse. Mr Smith, surgeon, hastened to the house, but life was extinct. Deceased was a tailor by trade, a pious man, a bachelor, and about 67 years of age. The body was removed to the 'London Inn,' for convenience of room to hold the Inquest.

Thursday 27 November 1856
OTTERY ST. MARY. - Suicide By a Lunatic. - Last Tuesday an Inquest was held before R. H. Aberdein, Esq., Coroner, at Cadhay Farm, in this parish, on the body of THOS. MARSHALL, a farm bailiff, aged 42 years. It appeared that about twelve months ago the deceased had lived with Dr Hine, of Culm Pine, but lately he had resided at Cadhay Farm with his brother. The deceased and two or three of the workmen slept at the dairy house, and on Tuesday morning the men got up about five o'clock, leaving the deceased in bed. About half-past six o'clock that morning, a nephew of the deceased, aged about 13 years, was in an orchard near the dairy house, and whilst there, heard the sound of a gun, the report of which appeared to proceed from the house. The boy, however, did not at the time take much notice of this circumstance, and no one appears to have entered the house until an hour afterwards, when MR JAS. MARSHALL, of Cadhay Farm, went to call the deceased, and finding he did not answer him, he proceeded to the bedroom, where he found his brother lying on his back in bed, and his face covered with blood. Being much alarmed, and supposing the deceased had cut his throat, he ran out of the house and procured assistance. Shortly afterwards some persons arrived, and went up stairs, when they discovered a gun lying on the bed by the left side of the deceased, and the room smelt strongly of gunpowder, as if a gun had lately been discharged, and on examining the body it felt quite warm, so that deceased could not have been dead much more than an hour. The deceased is supposed to have placed the muzzle of the gun to his left eye, and whilst lying on his back by some means discharged it, as the contents of the gun appear to have passed through the head board of the bed. The whole of the deceased's scalp was blown away, and the brain scattered over the wall of the room. At the Inquest it was stated that the deceased had been much depressed in his mind, that he laboured under a delusion that he had committed a great sin, and that God was angry with him for having lived so many years (nearly 20), in the situation he has lately quitted, and latterly, when he heard the birds singing, he fancied they were calling him from this world into eternity. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased shot himself being a Lunatic. A few week's since deceased underwent a medical examination, with a view to his being removed to the Lunatic Asylum at Exeter.

Thursday 11 December 1856
TORRINGTON - Sudden Death. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Exeter Inn,' in this town, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of ROBERT CLARK, a man of weak intellect, better known in this place and neighbourhood by the sobriquet of "Shilling Bob." On Tuesday (the day of his death) deceased was in his usual health, and went to Torrington Wood, gathering sticks. In the afternoon, about three o'clock he returned, with a bundle to his mother's house, and partook of some tea and bread, when she requested him to fetch her a couple of pitchers of water, at a well in Goose-green. He had not been absent above two minutes, when a woman came to the window, and cried out, "Run, run, for BOB has fallen down in a fit." James Hearn, a neighbour, was instantly on the spot, where he found the deceased on his knees, with his face in a pool of water. He was quite dead, and never moved nor spoke. He was taken to his mother's house, and Mr Hole, surgeon, passing at the time, saw the body, and gave it as his opinion to the Jury, that the deceased was seized with an epileptic fit, and died instantly from pressure of the brain. The verdict was in accordance with the medical opinion.

Thursday 18 December 1856
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Tuesday evening last, at the 'Curriers Arms', at Derby, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of SARAH HOOPER, an infant three years of age, daughter of a lace twister, residing in Boden's-row, who died on the day preceding from injuries sustained on the 2nd instant from its clothes accidentally catching fire. Verdict accordingly.

APPLEDORE - Fatal Catastrophe. - Four Men Drowned. On Saturday afternoon last there occurred here one of those distressing events with which the memories of the natives are but too sadly familiar. At the period stated, the beautiful new American-built barque, Intended, the property of the Messrs. Heard, merchants, Bideford, arrived in the bay, from Prince Edward's Island, to their great joy all safe, after the late heavy gales. Here, as in some other ports similarly situated, there is a rivalry among the pilots, the boats or pilot gigs as they are called, in which they put to sea for the purpose of boarding vessels being attached to certain inns, the keepers of which have an interest in maintaining the competition. On the present occasion, although there was a heavy ground sea, the wind, too, blowing strong from the N.N.W., two six-oared boats, manned by seven men each, pulled off from the watch-house, the residence of W. C. Burt, Esq., to contend for the prize before them, as the first that boarded her would have the privilege of piloting the vessel into port. The Recovery, belonging to Mr Joseph Cox, the Trinity buoy agent, taking the lead a length or two a-head of the Teaser, a boat owned by MR DAVID NICHOLLS, innkeeper and pilot, who commanded his own boat; the former was under the orders of the owner's son. The men pulled away with all their might until they reached the bar buoy, where a heavy swell passed the Recovery, and then curled its awful head and broke on the Teaser, which capsized her and threw all the crew into the surf. The crew consisted of DAVID NICHOLLS, the owner, Wm. Nicholls (only son of the former), THOS. LOCK and JOHN LOCK (two brothers), WILLIAM JEWELL, William Hare, and John Williams. At the appalling sight, part of the crew of the Recovery, it is said, were so panic-stricken that four of them crossed their oars and lay down in the bottom of the boat. From this ignoble state Robert Hare, whose son was one of the hapless men in the water, tried to arouse them, by vociferating against their cowardice, and calling upon them to get up and not lose life in that way, but there they lay; and he and the other two, who manfully stood to their post, backed the boat head-to-sea, and succeeded first in picking up Hare's son. By this time the other four had recovered their senses and aroused themselves from their prostrate condition, and the next picked up was William Nicholls, who had but just extricated himself from the death grasp of his poor father, who had hold of his son's foot. He then sank to rise no more - a heart-rending reflection to the survivor. The next saved was John Williams, an intrepid young man, who five times swam and brought back his bosom friend, JEWELL, to the boat's side, who was as many times washed off again, until at last JEWELL seized his friend with a death grasp by the hair of his head. Then ensued a dreadful struggle, apparently a violent fight in the midst of the boiling waves, for had not young Williams cleared him from his hold they must have gone down together. The other four poor fellows then disappeared, and with the three whom they had rescued, the Recovery returned safely to Appledore. The scene which took place here is not to be described, hundreds of excited people were congregated - wives, sweethearts, friends, relatives - eager to know the particulars of the awful calamity. The cries and groans of the bereaved were distressing in the extreme. John Williams, who strove so hard to save JEWELL, could hardly be persuaded to leave the beach until his friend was picked up, and young Nicholls's lamentations were agonizing at the loss of his father in such a way - wishing he had gone down with him. JOHN LOCK and WM. JEWELL were picked up about ten o'clock on Sunday morning, by Frank Courtice, at the back of Northam Burrows; DAVID NICHOLLS and THOS. LOCK were picked up about two o'clock on Monday morning, by Mr Burdon, of Northam. After a careful investigation of the facts, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The names of those lost were DAVID NICHOLLS, aged 46, married; THOMAS LOCK, 35, married, with two children, leaving a wife in a state of pregnancy; WILLIAM JEWELL, 21, single; and JOHN LOCK, 24, single, brother to the aforementioned THOMAS LOCK. The men saved were William Nicholls (son of DAVID NICHOLLS); John Williams, and William Hare. The foreman of the Jury, influenced by humane feeling at the distressing condition in which the widow of THOMAS LOCK was left, proposed presenting to her the Inquest fees, which was accordingly done. This is a case well deserving the attention of the benevolent. The whole of these unfortunate men are, it is understood to be buried on Thursday (today) in the cemetery of St Mary's Church, Appledore.

Thursday 25 December 1856
SWIMBRIDGE - Awfully Sudden Death. - Another instance in proof of the brief and uncertain tenure of human life has been afforded in the sudden death of MRS VERNEY, wife of MR JOHN VERNEY, of Burch, in the parish of Swimbridge. On Sunday evening last, the deceased paid a visit to her father, MR JOHN YEO, of Stone-farm, with whom she supped, after which she was returning home on horseback accompanied by her husband: when passing over Hutchardon-down she suddenly complained of illness, and requested MR VERNEY to take her off the horse; he did so, and she then became worse, and in a few minutes expired in his arms. The afflicted husband laid the corpse on the grass, and ran to the nearest farm0house (Mr Richards's) for assistance, which was readily rendered, but the vital spark had fled, and the body was conveyed to Burch the same evening in a cart. This awful visitation has bereaved an affectionate husband of the partner of his joys and griefs, and three young children (one but ten months old) of the solicitude and care of a fond mother. An Inquest on the body was held on the following day, at Burch, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, when a verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

CHITTLEHAMPTON - Death by Drowning. - On the 14th, a little boy about six years of age, named WILLIAM DREW, son of MR GEORGE DREW, of New Barn, in the parish of Chittlehampton, was accidentally drowned by falling into a stream near the river Taw. It appears that the little fellow accompanied another boy who was sent to field with the bows, and while out, they went to the side of the stream to look at the fish in the water. The unfortunate boy who was drowned, wishing to emulate the other in getting to some dangerous point to look into the stream, over-balanced himself and fell in. The water at that particular place was deep, and from the recent fall of rain, the current rapid, which drew him altogether out of the reach of his distressed companion on the shore. Although every search was made, nothing more was seen or heard of him until last Friday, when the body was found about a mile from the spot at which he fell in. An Inquest was held on Saturday, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. The mother of the ill-fated child is literally distracted; the paroxysms of her grief are so violent as to require two or three persons to hold her.

Thursday 1 January 1857
TORRINGTON - Coroner's Inquests. - In consequence of the severe illness of H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, he has appointed George Doe, Esq., solicitor, as his deputy. That gentleman held his first Inquest on Wednesday, last week, at Northlew, on the body of WILLIAM SHOBROOK, son of MR JOHN SHOBROOK, farmer of that parish. It appears the lad had gone to a neighbouring farm in search of his cat, and for that purpose went to the house where the thrashing machine was at work. Unfortunately, the poor fellow was caught between the arm of the machine and the wall, and was so crushed, that he expired shortly afterwards. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

On Monday, Mr Doe held an Inquest at Werrington, on the body of MR NOAH LANE, tailor. He was last seen on Friday evening when he was in perfect health, but not returning home for the night, search was made for him the next morning, when his body was discovered in a field, and it is believed, he must have been dead, at least twelve hours. As no suspicion appeared to attach to the case, the Jury returned an Open verdict of "Found Dead."

WOOLFARDISWORTHY - Horrible Deaths of Two Boys. - In the course of last week, and within a day or two or each other, two fatal accidents, within the boundaries of the above parish, happened to two unfortunate boys. One of them, a boy named ANDREWS, had gone into a linhay or shed, for the purpose it is supposed, of gathering eggs. In prosecution of his design, it is conjectured, he was climbing up by means of a pair of harrows which were placed together against the wall. The harrows fell, with the poor boy under, the whole weight resting upon his crushed body. Who shall tell what distressful agonies he endured before all was closed in death? When found he was quite dead.

The other, whose name was PROUSE, was literally ground to death. The little fellow, in company with some others, had entered the place where a thrashing machine was at work, and by some means or other got entangled with the "arm" to which the horses are attached as the moving power, and was soon in a helpless condition between the ground and the rod, thus meeting with a frightful death. There appears to be a most dangerous indulgence permitted to the playful propensities of children, by allowing them to ride on this lever as it traverses its rounds. Shortly before the present disaster, a little girl was engaged in the perilous sport, when her apron was being gradually wound round the fatal bar, but happily, the little thing had the presence of mind to untie the dreadful attachment, and thus saved her life.
Inquests were held on the bodies of the two unfortunates above-mentioned, and verdicts of "Accidental Death" returned. The Jury, on the first-named fatality, gave melancholy proof that the "schoolmaster" has not been "abroad" in the parish of Woolfardisworthy, for eleven out of the round dozen, were, one after the other, when called upon to sign the verdict, driven to say, "I can't write," and so compelled to make their "mark!" At this time of day this is a very humiliating, and we fear, far from a solitary fact; but are the children of these neglected, and we must say, neglectful men (for they certainly might have acquired the art if they would) - are their children to be brought up in the same helpless ignorance? Let the clergyman of the parish, or any who have the power of remedying it look well to the matter.

Thursday 8 January 1857
BARNSTAPLE - On Monday morning last, an Inquest was held at the 'White Lion Inn,' in Silver-street, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of THOS. WHITE, aged 72, who had died suddenly on the day preceding, at the house of his cousin, William Gammon. The deceased was formerly resident in Pilton, and possessed of considerable property, which, however, he had settled on his wife previous to marriage, and she at her death bequeathed to him an annuity of £30, and to other surviving relatives various legacies. As is too common, the legatees disagreed - a Chancery suit ensued, and nearly £1,500 has melted away, poor TOM WHITE'S legacy having been suspended for four years. His misfortunes preyed upon his mind and impaired his health, and precipitated his death. The cousin and Mr Cooke, surgeon, having given evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

BIDEFORD - Fatal Casualty. - At the launch of the fine ship, Bucton Castle, on Thursday last, elsewhere described, an accident occurred which resulted in the death of a poor little boy who came to witness the event. It was thus that the new year was inaugurated in the river; while the ship, a proud monument of human science and skill, was grandly moving into the fickle element where it was to display its fair proportions - the twitch of a cord ruined the outward tabernacle of a being "made in the similitude of God," and sent an immortal soul into eternity. The unfortunate child who met his death was a boy of about ten years of age, named JAMES HARVEY SMALLRIDGE, grandson, of "SALLY SMALLRIDGE," the well-known ferry-woman, who for many years has pulled the oar between this place and Appledore. On the morning named the little fellow came up with Sally in her boat to see the launch. Full of boyish glee, as soon as they reached the ship-yard, he leaped ashore and quickly presenting himself at the edge of the "quay", gaily telling his "Granny" that "there was no admittance except on business," that being the notice exhibited from the side of the ship. He then stood still, happy, no doubt, in the expectation of seeing the giant bulk move from the stocks, and ready with cap in hand to raise his young voice in hearty cheers as she plunged into the foaming tide. Alas! no sooner did the ship move than it lurched over, a suddenly tightened rope caught the hapless youth by the upper part of his body and flung him into the water, - dashing his head with fatal violence against the quay. He was quickly rescued and taken to the nearest cottage, but he never recovered his consciousness; and, at about half-past ten, expired. An Inquest was held on the body before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on Saturday, when the following evidence was taken. - The Rev. Abram-Kerr Thompson, D.D., principal of the Bideford Grammar School, said:- I attended the launch of the Bucton Castle, on Thursday last, about nine o'clock. I saw the deceased there, but cannot say whether he was on the quay or in the boat at the time of the accident. Shortly after the vessel went off I heard a cry, and on looking round I saw something resembling a bundle of rags on the water, but did not then know it was the deceased. I saw a boy in the boat lift it up, when I assisted in getting the body out of the water. Deceased did not speak, but appeared perfectly senseless, so that I thought him dead. I supported him a short time and then handed him over to a man standing by. (The rev. witness had made a small but perfect plan of the spot which he placed before the Coroner.) - SALLY SMALLRIDGE, grandmother of the deceased said:- I came up with two little boys from Appledore to see the launch. Deceased took his place on the quay. the ship made a lurch over when she started, and tightened the line which was made fast from her to the yard; I stopped down, and so did the little boy that was in the boat with me, and the rope passed directly over our heads, but when I looked round I instantly saw the deceased was gone from the quay. I "screeched" out, "where is my dear child?" I never heard him speak after. He died at twenty minutes after 10 the same night. Robert Sanders, a shipwright, saw the rope sweep the deceased off the quay into the water, and Mr W. H. Acland, surgeon, who happened to be on the spot, examined the body and found a recent wound in the head, 1 ½ inches long, and penetrating to the skull. Although he could not discover a fracture, it was his belief that the skull was fractured at its base. As there did not appear to be any blame attaching to any one, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Fracture of the base of the Skull occasioned by Accident." The 5s., given as a fee to Dr Thompson for his attendance, was handed by that gentleman to Mr Ackland for the Bideford Dispensary.

EXETER - Suicide By A Young Girl. - An Inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, at the 'Fireman's Arms Inn,' Preston-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of a girl named MARY ANN CRAWLEY, aged 16 years, who drowned herself in the river Exe, on the previous night. The deceased was a bootbinder, and had been following her trade under the instruction of a Mrs Hill, who resided in Preston-street. Here she formed an acquaintance with Mrs Hill's son, a youth of about 16, with whom she "kept company" up to Michaelmas last. From that time until Christmas they had been estranged: but about Christmas time the friendship was renewed. On Friday evening, deceased went into the 'Custom House Inn,' where she saw Mrs Hill's son with another young woman. This appeared to displease her and she went away, and later in the evening went into the 'Jolly Sailor' public house. A girl named Skinner and a youth of the name of Leatt were there, whom the deceased asked to accompany her to the Quay as she wanted to speak to them. Leatt refused to go, but Skinner went with her. After they were gone Leatt followed, and on reaching the Quay he called out to the deceased, when she replied "If you want to speak to me, you must jump into the water after me," and almost at the same instant she sprang in. Leatt called for assistance, which soon arrived, but ere the body was recovered life was extinct. After the law had been explained by the Coroner, the Jury unanimously returned a verdict of Felo de Se. The body was accordingly buried in the unconsecrated portion of the cemetery, at midnight, by the parish authorities without funeral rites, having been drawn to the ground in a hand cart.

Thursday 15 January 1857
TORRINGTON - Child Burnt to Death. - On Friday, an Inquest was held at the 'Exeter Inn,' in this town, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of CHAS. HENRY PASSMORE, a child three years of age, the illegitimate offspring of MARY ANN PASSMORE, a woman living in Calf-street. It appeared that on the Monday previous the mother was working at her gloving in a neighbour's house, having her two illegitimate children with her - the deceased and a younger one. About five o'clock in the afternoon, she went to her own house, taking her children with her, where she lighted the fire, in order to get the tea Having done so, she went out to fetch some water, and while she was away, a neighbour hearing a child scream, ran in to see what was the matter, when she found the deceased enveloped in a flame. The poor thing was so badly burnt, that it lingered until Wednesday morning, when death terminated its sufferings. It was pleasing to hear the mother spoken of as being very tender and affectionate to her children, and, as no blame attached to any one, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died by being Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 5 February 1857
FREMINGTON - Death By Drowning. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held at Fremington, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of CHARLES PAVEY, which had been discovered at about mid-day, under the Pill-bridge. The deceased had been employed by the Lessees of the Railway, was a steady man and generally esteemed. It is supposed that in the darkness of the preceding night he had walked into the water; but, as no evidence of this fact or any other, save the finding of the body as described, was adduced, the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 12 February 1857
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Tuesday last, the Borough Coroner (Incledon Bencraft, Esq.) held an Inquest on the body of MICHAEL BURGESS, a man who had been employed by Mr Maunder (the Mayor) in the cultivation of his garden and the care of his horse and cow, but who occasionally worked at his master's warehouse, in Tuly-street, in this town. On Monday, he was at the latter place engaged in sorting wool, when he fell down and suddenly expired. He had previously complained of palpitation of the heart. Mr Morgan, surgeon, was sent for, and arrived in about 20 minutes, but death had already claimed his victim. The medical evidence was to the effect that the deceased died of disease of the heart, which produced syncope. Verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday, the 2nd instant, an Inquest was held at the Barnstaple Union Workhouse, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on view of the body of ELIZABETH COLWELL, aged 12 years, a pauper chargeable to the parish of Sherwill, who had died on the evening preceding. The witnesses examined stated that the deceased appeared in her usual health in the early part of the day - that she ate her breakfast, attended Divine service in the chapel, and afterwards went into the school-room and repeated her lessons, when she suddenly complained of pains in the head and stomach. She was put to bed, when vomiting and convulsions ensued, and in the evening, between five and six o'clock, when the surgeon (Mr Gamble) arrived, she was unconscious, her limbs were rigid, her face flushed, her eyes heavy and blood-shot and the pupils much dilated, and a frothy fluid was issuing from the mouth and nostrils; at the end of three-quarters of an hour, she expired in the surgeon's presence. A post mortem examination disclosed the fact that the poor child had died from congestion of the brain, but as there was nothing in the stomach the surgeon could not give any opinion as to the cause of that congestion. Verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God."

LANGTREE - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday last week, MR JOHN LEY, who had recently been living as hind to his aunt, Miss Tucker, on Rivaton Farm, Langtree, was instantaneously killed by the falling of a tree. Deceased had gone out with a carpenter, on the day named, to fell an ash tree. When the trunk was nearly sawn through, the latter drove in a wedge to upset it: the deceased perceiving that the tree was falling in the wrong direction, tried to push it over the way intended. The tree fell, and deceased was struck to the ground and instantly crushed to death by one of the branches. An Inquest was held on the following day, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Monday), at the 'Windsor Castle Inn,' Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a woman named MARY WILLIAMS, aged 52 years, who resided in Codrington-street, Newtown, and died suddenly on Saturday. The deceased was a woman unusually stout and of a very full habit of body. She was unmarried, but had a daughter about 14 years of age who lived with her. Since Christmas she had been very unwell but has not had any medical aid for twelve months past. On Friday night she went to bed in her usual health, and on Saturday morning got up and ate a little for her breakfast. She was attended by her daughter and a Mrs Pedrick, and as she appeared low spirited the latter asked whether she should send for a medical man, but she refused to have any one. Shortly afterwards she became unconscious, and Mrs Pedrick applied vinegar to her head, but to no effect. She laid her head on Mrs Pedrick's bosom, coughed once or twice, and expired. In the meantime Mr Webb, surgeon, who had previously attended her, was sent for, but before he arrived she was dead. His opinion was that she died from fatty degeneration, or Hypertrophy of the heart of long standing, which would always terminate in sudden death. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes."

Thursday 19 February 1857
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday an Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on the body of JOHN MAYNE, aged 45, a labourer of St. Sidwell's, Exeter. the deceased was at work on Tuesday, at Mr Salter's sandpit, at Heavitree, with a horse and cart, when a quantity of over-hanging earth and stone gave way, and falling, tipped up the cart which came in contact with the deceased's leg and also caused an injury to his back. He was taken to the Hospital, where it was found that his leg was broken. He died soon after, and upon a post mortem examination, by order of the Jury, Dr Biggs, the house surgeon, found that death was caused by a partial displacement of the vertebrae. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 19 March 1857
TORRINGTON - Doubtful Death of an Infant. - An Inquest was held on Monday, last week, at Stowford, Langtree, before J. H. Toller, Esqr., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a male infant, nine months old, son of JOHN SNELL, of that place. the child being taken alarmingly ill, Mr Rouse, surgeon, of this town, was sent for; before he arrived however, the child was dead, but he was unable to account for the cause of death. A post mortem examination was made of the body by Mr Tapley, surgeon, who gave it as his opinion that the child had died from natural causes. The Jury returned a verdict in agreement with this evidence.

Thursday 9 April 1857
ILFRACOMBE - A Frightful Death. - On Sunday evening, an alarm was spread in the lower part of the town by some boys who reported that they had discovered the dead body of a man lying on the rocks under Compass Hill. Some of the men about the quay took a boat, rowed round to the spot, and brought off the body, which, to their astonishment they found to be the mortal remains of JOHN GROVES, a well-known pilot of this place. He was a man advanced in years and appears to have lived by himself, a female neighbour preparing for him his victuals. Possessing the county franchise he tendered his vote on Friday in due time, and spent the remainder of the day with some friends who came from Lynton; the woman who attends to him finding he did not come home, concluded he had gone to Lynton with them, and therefore made no inquiry about him. An Inquest was held on the body on Tuesday morning before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, but no evidence was produced to shew how the deceased came by his death. It is supposed that returning to his house in the night and having occasion to attend the calls of nature he went out on Compass Hill, the crest of which is used by the washerwoman living in the cottages adjacent as a drying ground, and having proceeded too near the edge of the cliff he grew giddy and fell over. The verdict returned was - "Found Dead, but how he came by his death there was no evidence to shew.

Thursday 16 April 1857
TORRINGTON - Suicide of a Young Woman by Poison. - On Saturday last, a young woman of this town named FANNY BEER, about 21 years of age, very deliberately and effectively took means for putting a period to her existence, and so far as our information goes, from no assignable cause. She is described as a respectable girl, and was employed in the glove business by Mr T. H. Lake, at 8s. a week wages. An Inquest was held on the body on Tuesday, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the house of her father, MICHAEL BEER, at Hatchmoor in this parish, when the following facts came out in evidence:- On Saturday, FANNY BEER went to her work, at Mr Lake's glove factory, as usual, and appeared to be in the enjoyment of good health and spirits. A little before one o'clock, she rose from her seat and asked one of the girls she was working with, whether she had any money in her pocket, and borrowed threepence of her. She then put on her bonnet and cape, and left the work-room, where she returned again in about ten minutes. She had in the meantime gone to the shop of Mr Fowler, and purchased three pennyworth of corrosive sublimate. Deceased then sat down to her work again, and made nearly a glove, conversing with the other young women in the workroom in quite a rational manner. At two o'clock she went home to her father's house, and after eating a hearty dinner, she walked upstairs, shut the room door, and lay down on the bed. Her mother, who was going out to market, went up and looked on her before leaving the house, and thought her asleep. After about an hour's absence, MRS BEER returned, and on entering the house her daughter called out, "Mother, mother, come to me." Her mother went to her instantly, and found her sitting against the bedroom door, which she was kicking with her heels, the floor being covering with the effects of her vomiting. Deceased desired her mother to send for a doctor, as she would be a corpse before ten o'clock. This was not attended to immediately; her mother, thinking she would get better, proceeded to clean the room, which occupied some time. Deceased urged her mother to go by saying, "You don't know what I know." MRS BEER then went to fetch "the doctor;" but, instead of going direct, went where another daughter was at work and sent her, and she herself hastened home again. Deceased's sister found the surgeon at home, but he excused himself from attending immediately as he wanted a little dinner, and also to give his horse a feed of corn. By this time the deceased was in great agony, and sinking fast; the mother ran again to the surgeon, and urged his instant attendance by telling him she thought her daughter had taken something. He then in a few minutes was on the spot, but came too late to do her any good. Deceased first denied that she had taken anything wrong, but afterwards confessed what she had done. She had some conversation with the medical man, which showed that she was perfectly sensible. Other surgeons saw her, and the usual means in such cases were used but all without avail. She lingered until Monday morning, when she expired. As there was no evidence to prove that her mind was in any way affected, no signs of insanity having appeared in her conduct, but on the contrary it was shewn that she had in the purchase of the poison, and before and after taking it, acted with coolness and deliberation, the Jury came unanimously to the following verdict - that "The deceased, FANNY BEER, poisoned herself with corrosive sublimate while in a sound state of mind." - The deceased was interred the same night at 12 o'clock, in the New Cemetery, and hundreds of the inhabitants, principally the young were there, who it is hoped, will learn the lesson such an awful case is calculated to convey.

Thursday 30 April 1857
EXETER - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, at the 'Sawyer's Arms,' Preston-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JOHN WHITE, a stocking weaver, aged 40, who resided with his wife and family in Preston-street. From the evidence of the wife of the deceased, it appeared that she was in the habit of going out to work, and on Tuesday morning last she left her house about half-past six o'clock, her husband being in bed, apparently in his usual health; but some time after a neighbour, who went to the room found he was dead. The Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr J. S. Perkins, surgeon, who was of opinion that death had been caused by the rupture of a blood vessel about the region of the heart, returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Death By Burning. - On Tuesday morning last, an Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of a man named THOMAS SMITH, of Pilton, who had been employed as toll-taker at the Meartop toll bar on the Ilfracombe road, but who had been brought to the institution on the afternoon of the day preceding suffering from extensive burns, which terminated fatally in a few hours. A Jury having been impanneled, of which Mr Samuel Featherstone was foreman, they proceeded to view the body, which was lying in the dead house. The following witnesses were then examined, and from their evidence all the facts will be gleaned that are known respecting the melancholy case.
Charles Perkins sworn:- I am a groom, living with Mr Brown, of Roborough, in the parish of Pilton. I last saw the deceased yesterday afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. I was riding into town on my master's horse. I saw him walking down the road about 20 yards from the Meartop toll bar; he was walking toward me. I saw he was on fire - the skirts of his coat were burning. I said, "You are on fire;" he appeared to take no notice. I again accosted him, but he did not heed. As the mare would not go near him, I rode back to the cottages at Rawleigh, and called two women, who came with me, and one held the mare while I extinguished the fire. I tore his clothes off. He appeared to be in great pain, but insensible. I left deceased in charge of the two women and a man who came up at the time. He groaned but did not speak.
Jane Creedy sworn:- I am a widow, residing in Pilton. I knew the deceased, THOMAS SMITH. I saw him yesterday just after the fire, at about half-past two. He was lying against a bank, with his clothes burnt off. He was about a gunshot from the little gate leading to Westaway. Miss White was with him. I took off my petticoat and put over him, and Miss White sent for a counterpane to cover him. Deceased said, "Oh! Jane, I'm burnt to death; where's my money? - I had 13s. and a watch, but it's gone." I asked him if he had had a fit. He said, "I think I have." He had been subject to fits for many years. We looked about for the money, but could not find it; nor could we see any thing of the watch. We found about 2s. worth of pence in the toll-house, where he stated it to be. Mr Ireland, of the Nursery, sent a cart by his little boy; and, having wrapped the deceased in a counterpane, we put him into the cart, and I came with him to the Infirmary. On the way he spoke of his wife and children - wondering what they would do. On arriving at the Infirmary I delivered him into the care of the House Surgeon.
Jane Delve sworn:- I live at Pilton, and am a worsted spinner. The deceased, THOMAS SMITH, was my brother-in-law, he having married my sister. I have known him for 22 years. He was subject to epileptic fits, which generally lasted half an hour. He kept the toll bar at Meartop. He has had fits at the toll house. About three weeks since he had a fit, while at home in his bed. On Sunday night he was in his usual health: I saw him at half-past nine at the poor house, where he resided. He was then in good health. After the deceased had been brought to the Infirmary, I went with the last witness to the toll house. There was a quantity of straw about, but it was not burnt, and there was but little fire in the grate. I don't think he could have caught fire in the house. He used to smoke tobacco. We did not see any tobacco pipe in the road, but we picked up a comb that had been in his pocket - it was burnt.
Mr John Bake Husband, sworn:- I am house surgeon to this institution. Deceased was brought here at three o'clock yesterday afternoon. I examined him. I found a small piece of a shirt round his neck. The whole of his body from the neck to the knees was completely burnt. I asked him if he had had a fit. He said, when he had fits he was unconscious. He asked repeatedly for his watch and money. He was suffering intense agony and groaning, and was aware that he should not recover. He was immediately rolled up in cotton wool and the usual remedies applied. For an hour and half he appeared conscious, at the expiration of which he sunk into a state of collapse, and died at five minutes to six. Mr Gamble, the visiting surgeon of the week, saw him shortly after he was admitted. It was impossible to do more for him.
By a Juror: - Is it not usual when a case of this kind comes in to send for the visiting surgeon?
Mr Husband:- My duty is to attend to all patients in cases of emergency: I am here for the purpose; and it is a duty the public expects of me. I sent for Mr Gamble as soon as I had attended to the patient, in the present instance - about ten minutes after he had been admitted.
The Coroner remarked that Mr Husband appeared to have done all that was necessary in the case - that he had done his duty to the patient and the public. The Jury concurred in this opinion, and spoke in high terms of the House Surgeon's conduct.
One of the Jurymen observed that if Perkins had rendered assistance to the unfortunate man when he first saw his coat on fire, his life might have been preserved.
The Coroner shortly addressed the Jury. He thought they could have no difficulty in determining the cause of death. It was a sad thing if, as there was reason to fear, the unfortunate deceased had been robbed of his money and his watch; and he hoped that part of the case would be inquired into by the proper authorities.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Burnt."
The deceased has left a wife and seven children in destitute circumstances. The Jury generously gave their fees to relieve the present necessities of the bereaved.

Thursday 21 May 1857
BARNSTAPLE - On Saturday, an Inquest was held at Rawleigh, before the Borough Coroner, R. I. Bencraft, Esq., on the body of FANNY ELIZABETH MILFORD PRISCOTT, a child about two years of age, who was drowned on Friday, about two o'clock in the mill-stream. A man called William Heays, a spinner at the factory, hearing that the child was lost, searched for her along the stream, and at length found the body in the stream, near a willow-bed, with the head under water, and washed to the side of the river - quite dead but not cold. He carried it to its grandmother's house, where every means they could think of were used to restore animation, but in vain. - Verdict, "Found Drowned."

BARNSTAPLE - On Wednesday morning (yesterday), an Inquest was held before the same Coroner, at the North Devon Infirmary, on the body of JAMES JEWELL, journeyman mason, of Lower Loxhore, who died in that institution, on Tuesday morning, from injuries received at his work, on Monday. Deceased was in the employ of Mr John Tucker, mason, of that village; they were both, at the time stated, working at Mr Abraham Pickard's farm, taking down the walls of an old shippen, which was about to be re-built. the wall was of stone, about 10 feet high, 20 feet long, and 20 inches thick, and to keep it from falling there had been at some period certain buttresses built against it. After consulting together as to the best method of taking it down, and being willing to save as much time and get as much money as they could, it was agreed to take down the buttresses first, and then to go inside and tilt it over with iron bars. They proceeded with the work accordingly, and when about three feet of the buttress at which the deceased was working had been removed, the wall, which stood before a good deal out of the perpendicular, was seen by Mr Pickard to be giving way, when he called out to JEWELL, "The wall is falling," and bade him take care of himself. Instead, however, of obeying the warning, he looked very composedly to see whether it really was falling, and thus lost the precious opportunity of saving his life, for while he was making his observations it fell, and he was knocked down on his face and nearly buried with stones. This was about three o'clock. Mr Pickard and his master immediately removed the stones that had fallen upon him, and, finding him much injured, the former carried him the same evening to this invaluable institution for surgical aid, where he arrived at half-past six, and prompt attention was paid to the case by the house surgeon. On examination, it was found that he had sustained a comminuted fracture of the left leg, five of his ribs were fractured, the left shoulder blade and the right arm. The crush appeared to have been on the left side. There were some external bruises about the face from the stones, and a slight internal abrasion of the left lung by the fracture of the ribs. The man being fifty-eight years of age and his health not being previously good, the vital functions were not of sufficient force to enable him to rally after so heavy a crush, and though he was sensible to the last and re-action had at one period apparently set in, yet he expired at 10 o'clock on Tuesday morning, from exhaustion consequent on the shock to his nervous system. Verdict, 'Accidental death." The Jury very considerately gave up their fees to the widow, who it appears is left poor enough.

EXETER - Suicide of a Lady by Poisoning. - An elderly maiden lady named MARTIN, who resided at Heavitree near Exeter, committed suicide by taking essential oil of almonds on Monday. As the deceased did not appear at her usual time in the morning, one of her family went into her room and found her lying on the floor. Dr Madder, surgeon, of Heavitree, was immediately sent for, but on his arrival he found that life was extinct. At a Coroner's Inquest held on Tuesday, evidence was adduced to show that the deceased had for some time been in a low, desponding way, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

PLYMOUTH - Poisoning by Mistake. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, on the body of GILES TUPMAN MOSS, master of the brig Mary, of Exeter, lying in Sutton Pool. The deceased was found by the mate of the vessel lying in his berth in a state of insensibility, with a bottle of laudanum at his side, which it was supposed he had taken from the medicine chest, to relieve himself of pain. A verdict was returned of "Died from ignorantly administering to himself an over-dose of laudanum." MR MOSS was a native of Exmouth, and leaves a widow and a large circle of friends.

Thursday 28 May 1857
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held yesterday (Wednesday) on the body of a little boy, named WILLIAM CLEMENTS DADDS, son of JAMES DADDS, carrier, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, it having been reported that his death had been occasioned by a blow in the head from one of the monitors at the National School A post mortem examination of the body was made by Mr P. Stoneham, surgeon, who, on opening the head, discovered that the immediate cause of death was water on the brain. The verdict was in accordance with this evidence. It appeared, however, that the boy had complained to his mother of having been struck on the head in the manner reported; the Coroner, therefore ordered that the sticks so used should be put away from the school.

Thursday 25 June 1857
TORRINGTON - Drowned in the Canal. - THOMAS SMITH, an aged man of Halls Pill, in the parish of Wear Gifford, in the employ of G. Braginton, Esq., as lighterman, was drowned on Friday last in the basin of the Rolle's Canal, in the parish of Landcross. The deceased had been home to supper and was returned to the lighter with a basket containing his food for the next day. On his approach to the edge of the water he asked his fellow boatman if he were going to turn in which was answered in the affirmative. The latter was in the cuddy preparing his bed of straw on which to rest his bones to await the flow of the tide, when he heard a splash in the water; he listened a moment, and all being still again he proceeded to occupy his berth, when he heard a second splash. He went up instantly, and saw, to his alarm, a hat and basket floating on the water. He aroused the men in the other boats lying in the basin, and after a search of an hour, found the body but life was extinct. It is supposed that his boat being laden with clay, and much rain having fallen upon it, he preferred walking on the gunwale when his foot slipping he fell into the water. An Inquest was held before R. Bremridge, Esq., at Hall's Pill, when a verdict of "Accidental Death," was returned. Deceased was 63 years of age.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident at Plymouth. - On Tuesday last, a shoal of porpoises having gone up beyond the Earl of Morley's bridge, which crosses the estuary of the Laira, above Catwater, Plymouth, were attacked by a number of men in boats, and several of large dimensions were destroyed. The unusual sport attracted many spectators, and unfortunately a shot from one of the rifles appears to have hit the head of a porpoise, and flying up, wounded the arm of a young man named Poppleton, and passed through the body of JONATHAN CORKER, a shipwright, who died shortly after his admission to the South Devon Hospital. At the Inquest, held before Mr Edmonds, on Friday, it was found impossible to identify the person who fired the fatal bullet, and an open verdict was accordingly returned.

Fatal Accident On The North Devon Railway. - An accident which terminated fatally occurred on Sunday morning last, to a poor man named JOSEPH MONK, of Coleford, who had occasionally been employed as platelayer on the North Devon Railway. It appears that the dece3ased and a man named James Kelly, had been out all night drinking; in the morning, at ten minutes before five, they called at the station at Yeoford, in a state of intoxication, and it is supposed that they then walked up the line to the place where the accident occurred, and that having seated themselves on the bank by the side of the rail they fell asleep- that in that state the deceased fell forward with one of his hands across the metals, as several of his fingers were cut off - that on the passing down of the first train, the wheel having caught his hand, he involuntarily raised his head, which came into contact with the step, whereby he was thrown to a considerable distance. The train had rounded a curve on passing out of the tunnel, just before coming to the spot, the driver could not, therefore, see MONK lying on the rail for any distance, or prevent the accident, which had occurred before he was aware. The danger signal was immediately sounded and assistance sent from Copplestone. the unfortunate man was discovered with his forehead frightfully fractured, and the fingers of one hand cut off. Everything was done for him that the case admitted, but all was unavailing, for he expired in about two hours and half. An Inquest was held at Coleford, on the following day, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., of Cullompton, Coroner for the district, when, a report having gone abroad that the driver had not used proper efforts to stop the engine, the lessees of the line sent up Mr I. Bencraft, of this town, to elicit all possible evidence on the subject during the investigation, both for the satisfaction and protection of the public. The evidence of Mark West, the engineer, which was confirmed by the stoker and James Parkin, the guard, proved, as above stated, that the deceased was not seen in time to stop the train soon enough to save his life, but that the train was stopped within about 120 yards. When it was ascertained the man was injured, he was left in the care of Kelly, who was now fully awake, while the train was driven on with all speed to Copplestone, from whence assistance was sent up. Kelly knew nothing of the train coming until he saw his mutilated friend by his side. The man from the engine who first saw the head of the deceased by the rail thought it a rough terrier dog crouched down by the line. The Coroner said he was satisfied that all had been done by the railway servants, and that no blame attached to any of them. It was quite clear that the deceased had lost by his own folly and his fearful end offered another illustration of the terrible effects of drunkenness. Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased was about 30 years of age and leaves a wife and four children.

Thursday 16 July 1857
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Monday at the 'White Lion Hotel,' in this town, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL GREGORY, a native of Fremington, and a serjeant on the permanent staff of the First Devon Militia, who had been unfortunately drowned in the river Taw, on Thursday last, under the circumstances detailed in the evidence of his father. The body was not recovered until the following Sunday, when it was picked up by John Roulstone, a hobbler, who towed it up the river at the stern of his boat, and landed it at the Castle Quay; it was then taken to the 'White Lion' to await the Coroner's Inquest. The evidence given by SAMUEL GREGORY, the father, was as follows:- On Thursday last, the 9th inst., about half past one o'clock, I went in a boat, from Fremington Pill, into the river Taw, at a place called Keat's Cellar; the deceased, SAMUEL GREGORY, who was my son, three of my children, and two persons called Symons and West, went with me. At Keat's Cellar I landed the deceased and all the others, except my son WILLIAM, who remained with me in the boat. We anchored about twenty landyards from the shore, and commenced taking mussels. Shortly afterwards I saw my son SAMUEL, the deceased, in the water swimming towards our boat. I called to him, and asked if I should meet him with the boat; he said, "No." A few seconds afterwards I asked him again, and he seemed to assent. I then raised the anchors of the boat as quickly as possible, and whilst doing so, I saw him sink and rise again; but on going towards the place where we last saw him, he sank and did not rise again. I saw a body last evening, at this public house, and I believe it to be his body. I am quite certain it is. - The Coroner, in his address to the Jury, read the following tribute to the character of the unfortunate soldier, which had been addressed to Richard Bremridge, Esq., the County Coroner, by Capt. Pitman, the adjutant of the First Devon Militia:- "Militia Depot, Exeter, 10th July. - My dear Sir, - I have this morning heard of the death, by accidental drowning, in the river near Fremington, of Serjeant SAMUEL GREGORY, of the permanent staff of the First Devon Militia. As you will be called on to hold an Inquest on the unfortunate young man's body, should it be recovered, I have deemed it right to inform you that Serjeant GREGORY left the depot, at Exeter, on Tuesday last, the 7th, to visit his father at Fremington. Serjeant GREGORY had been nearly five years in the First Devon, and bore an irreproachable character; he had filled situations of great trust both under Captain Holman and myself, and he was much respected by the whole of the Staff. - Believe me, dear Sir, very faithfully yours, Edmund Pitman, Captain and Adjutant of the First Devon Militia. R. Bremridge, Esq., Barnstaple." - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

BARNSTAPLE - Another Inquest was held on Wednesday (yesterday), at the 'White Lion,' before Mr Bencraft, and a respectable Jury on the body of JOHN PILE, aged 30, a labourer in the employ of Mr George Brown, who died on the day preceding, from the effects of injuries received while working a circular steam saw, at the Navy-yard. From the evidence of William Darch and William Rumsum, who were in the same employ, it appeared that the deceased was engaged on Tuesday morning, at the above yard in feeding the saw, when a crooked piece of wood rebounded and struck the poor fellow in the pit of the stomach. He fell to the ground, and on being raised, said, "Oh, my God, I am killed." He was carried groaning to his house, in Castle Court, and medical assistance called in. Mr C. R. Morgan, surgeon, was in attendance on the deceased within a quarter of an hour of the accident; he found him in great pain, breathing with difficulty; the surface of the body generally cold; his pulse weak and fluttering. On examination, a slight mark was discovered over the pit of the stomach. Hot fomentations were applied to his stomach and bowels, and a jar of hot water to his feet; and medicine administered shortly after. The surgeon visited him five times during the day. In the afternoon he stated that he was much relieved, but at nine o'clock he appeared to be sinking rapidly. At eleven Mr Morgan again visited him, accompanied by Mr Forester; and he died at 12 o'clock. The medical opinion was, that the blow deceased received had ruptured some important organ in the abdomen, and that he died from internal haemorrhage. Verdict, "Accidental Death." The Jury accompanied their verdict with a recommendation that the pad used to defend the chest should be cased with a plate of iron, as a protection against any similar casualty.

Thursday 23 July 1857
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at Lake, in the parish of Tawstock, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of GEORGE SMYTH, shoemaker, of Pilton, in this borough, whose body, partially clothed, was discovered on Wednesday evening lying on the south bank of the river Taw, near the Railway-bridge, where it had been left by the receding tide; from whence it was removed to an unoccupied house at Lake. The evidence adduced at the Inquest shewed that the deceased had been a man of exceedingly drunken and dissipated habits, and there was reason to fear that he had drowned himself; of this, however, there was no proof, and the Jury, at the suggestion of the Coroner, returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 30 July 1857
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM BASSETT, there lying dead. The deceased was employed on Thursday, the 16th, in removing a heavy piece of machinery from a railway truck to Mr Avery's wagon, when a piece fell over upon his leg and occasioned injuries which resulted in death. Mr Husband, the house surgeon, stated that the deceased was brought to the Infirmary on the day named, by the last witness - that, in conjunction with Mr Gamble, he examined him and found that he was suffering from a fracture of the lower end of the tibia, that there was a large amount of swelling round the injured parts, with extravasation of blood. He set the leg and the patient went on well until the Sunday following when the wound began to slough, and on Thursday the patient shewed the first symptoms of tetanus, which continued to increase until the Friday following when the muscles of the back and abdomen became contracted; on Saturday morning paroxysms came on, and he died from suffocation the same evening. A medical consultation had been held upon this case, but the entire medical staff could suggest no remedy for the horrible disease. - Verdict. "Died from Tetanus."

ILFRACOMBE - Mysterious Death. - On Saturday, an Inquest was held at Western Shelfin, in this parish, a hamlet on the top of the top of the hill towards Westdown, a short distance from the line of the Braunton turnpike road, on the body of ANN CHUGG, daughter of JOHN CHUGG, labourer, of Westdown, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. The deceased was in the service of Mrs Snow, who resides at Shelfin, and was about 14 ½ years of age. Her mistress in her evidence said that she observed the deceased was, on Thursday evening, when she came to go to bed, apparently, in considerable distress of mind - the cause of which was not well explained. She slept in the same room with her mistress, who called her to go to bed about 9 o'clock. When they were got upstairs, Mrs Snow, remembering that the front door was not fastened, sent her down to lock it; she was absent a minute or two and then returned, all that was observed being that she sobbed as she was coming up again to the room. Deceased then undressed and went into bed as usual, her mistress woke once or twice in the course of the night and heard her snoring as though in a deep sleep. When the usual time arrived for getting up, Mrs Snow found the girl was not awake, she endeavoured to awaken her but could not succeed, yet, though she thought it strange, she did not consider it to be aught more than the heaviness of sleep. At last, however, she called in a woman living at a neighbouring cottage, who on looking on her said, "She is like my sister, in an epileptic fit," adding, "Let her bide a bit, and I'll go and get some water hot for a cup of tea." She did so; but on returning to her again shortly after, she found that all was ended in the sleep of death. Deceased expired a little after eight o'clock. Mr P. Stoneham, surgeon, of this town, was sent for, who was there as promptly as possible, but only to confirm the sad fact that she was past all recovery. By this time it was discovered that a bottle containing eighteen pennyworth of laudanum, which the girl had been sent after by her mistress about a week before, and which was placed in a glass on a shelf in the kitchen, was missing. The thought naturally occurred - Had the girl taken the laudanum and so poisoned herself? In the opinion of the medical man death had been caused by apoplexy, and that might have arisen from taking laudanum as well as from other causes. These matters being stated at the Inquest, the Coroner ordered a post mortem examination of the body to be made, which was undertaken by Mr Stoneham The head, stomach, and abdomen were carefully inspected, but no trace of laudanum was discoverable. The stomach was found in a healthy condition, and in the opinion of the surgeon, if the dangerous narcotic had been taken, in a subject like the deceased, where the powers of digestion are so active, it might, in the time that had elapsed have all passed out of the stomach and been absorbed into the system. Strict search was made for the bottle, but it was nowhere to be found, and there was no proof that the bottle was there at all on the evening previous to the girl's death. If taken at all, or if not, what had become of the bottle? To this there was no answer. A report having gone about that an old man living in part of the house had ill-used the girl, and a summons having been taken out against him by the girl at the instance of her father to bring him before the magistrate to answer the charge of assault, the Coroner deemed it right to bring him before the Jury. John Walter was consequently put on his oath to say what he knew touching the death of the deceased, ANN CHUGG. He said the last time he saw her was about eight o'clock on the evening before her death; that he was crossing the court to shut up the ducks for the night, when she was in the room upstairs and tapped the window to him, that he said to her, "Then you have had a summons for me," when she replied, that it was not her fault but her father's. The charge on the summons, it was understood, related to some affair which transpired about three weeks ago, and which the court of Inquest thought it not expedient to investigate. There was a mystery about the case which no evidence brought before the Jury was sufficient to dispel; they could, therefore, see no way to any other than an open verdict of "Found Dead," but how caused there was no evidence to shew. The intelligent Jury, which was chiefly from this town, had for its foreman, Mr T. D. Wivell.

Thursday 3 September 1857
BARNSTAPLE - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of THOS. ROBBINS, of Braunton, who had died that morning from the effects of injuries received while working with horses on the tramway at Horsey, in that parish, on the 17th of August. The deposition of the house surgeon (Mr Husband) was as follows:- "On this day fortnight the deceased was brought to this Infirmary between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. I examined him, and found his right leg much lacerated from an inch below the knee to an inch above the ankle, on the outside. The bone was exposed on the inside, from about three to four inches. No bones were fractured, nor was any artery or nerve divided. Mr Gamble, the surgeon for the week, was sent for, and attended immediately; the deceased was placed under his care, and all the medical staff of the Infirmary saw him subsequently. He appeared to progress favourably until the Saturday last, when extensive gangrene set in, and he sank gradually until this morning, at about half-past six o'clock, when he died. Every attention was paid him, and he had wine and every other necessary stimulant administered. I am of opinion that he died from gangrene or mortification, which exhausted his powers of vitality." - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 September 1857
ASHFORD - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the 'Ashford Hotel,' in the parish of Ashford, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of a young man named GEORGE COLES, a farm servant in the employ of Mr Badcock, who was unfortunately drowned while bathing in the Taw, on the evening preceding. Another youth who accompanied deceased had a narrow escape, having been rescued by a young man named Hodge, at great personal risk. Poor COLES bore a good character for honesty and sobriety, and his untimely fate is much lamented. - Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned while Bathing."

TAVISTOCK - Alleged Child Murder. - On Thursday last, A. B. Bone, Esq., held an Inquest in the Board-room, Tavistock, into the cause of death of ELIZABETH HOWARD, a child six weeks old and the illegitimate offspring of MARY HOWARD, a widow, who was in the custody of the police on the charge of causing its death by violence. Emily Nankivell, a girl of loose character, stated that on the night of Monday last she slept in HOWARD'S house. The witness, although not then quite sober, remembered going to bed about midnight in a room adjoining that in which HOWARD was sleeping. Witness was awoke on the following morning, about 9 o'clock, by HOWARD screaming out "My child is dead." A nurse was fetched, but the latter declined to have anything to do with the infant until a surgeon attended. Mary Jane Shears, who is also a girl of loose character, and who slept with the last witness, corroborated her evidence, adding that she observed blood flowing from the child's nostrils. This latter circumstance was also noticed by Mary White, the nurse. Mr Richard Sleman, surgeon, who was examined at much length, gave it as his opinion that the child died from suffocation, brought on by external pressure. The Jury embodied this opinion in their verdict, but considered that there was not sufficient evidence to prove by what means the pressure was caused. Mr J. V. Bridgman, solicitor, then applied to have the woman at once dismissed from custody, but the Coroner held that, as she was not in his custody or in the custody of the Jury, he (the Coroner) had no power to order her discharge, and a charge could still be prepared against HOWARD before the magistrates. The police detained HOWARD in custody, and on Friday she was brought up at the Guildhall, by Sergeant Connell, of the county constabulary, and charged before J. H. Gill and W. P. Michell, Esq.

Thursday 1 October 1857
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, in this town, on Saturday last, before R. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of a boy named WILLIAM VICARY, son of a currier, formerly of this place. the facts will be gathered from the evidence of Samuel Jones, of Tawstock, who on his oath stated as follows:- "Yesterday (Friday) afternoon, as I was walking through the North Walk, in this town, at about half-past 3 o'clock, I saw the deceased driving a horse and cart towards me. When he arrived at the entrance to the Castle-house, I saw the horse kicking; the deceased then fell from the cart, first on the shaft and then on the ground, by the side of the horse; he pitched on his head and the cart went over him - over his bowels. He cried out several times, "Do save me." I ran over to him and picked him up; a person who was passing, brought back the cart at my request. I put the boy into it, and myself and the man who brought back the cart, took him directly to the Infirmary. The blood was flowing from his ears. He said his name was VICARY, and that he had the horse from the 'Nag's Head' public-house. He was taken up to the ward as soon as we arrived at the Infirmary, and given in the charge of the house surgeon, Mr Husband. Mr Husband, house surgeon of the institution, deposed that the deceased was instantly attended to, on his being brought to the Infirmary, by himself and Mr Cooke, one of the visiting surgeons; that there were no marks of external injury on his person, but a slight abrasion near the left hip. He continued sensible till a short time before his death, which occurred at about seven o'clock on the Saturday morning. From the appearances, Mr H. was of opinion that deceased had sustained a fracture of the skull, and that death resulted from extravasation of blood in the head. Verdict - "Accidental Death." - The Jury expressed a strong opinion condemnatory of the very improper but very common practice of ostlers, at the various inns of the town, allowing young boys to drive horses and carts about the town, which have been placed in their charge; and after the sad accident which had occasioned the Inquest, they trusted that measures would be taken to put a stop to the dangerous practice.

SHEBBEAR - Suicide. - On Saturday, a woman advanced in years, named ANN CALLICOTT, residing at this village, put an end to her existence by hanging herself. She had, it appears, been for some time in a deranged state of mind, but at the time no apprehensions were entertained of her committing so rash an act. She had not been absent from the observation of those she lived with above twenty minutes when she was discovered suspended by a handkerchief, one end attached to the joists through the ceiling above her, the other round her throat. An Inquest was held on the body before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on Tuesday afternoon, when a verdict in accordance with the facts was returned. This parish is somewhat distinguished for the number of suicides that have occurred in it during the last few years.

Thursday 8 October 1857
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Friday se'nnight, as a little boy, named JOSEPH AUSTIN, was at play, near Mr Turner's lime kiln, East-the-Water, he was knocked down by a horse and cart passing and his head cut which terminated in lock-jaw from which he died on Saturday last. As his death was attributed to the blow, an Inquest was held on the body before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, on Monday, at the 'Blacksmith's Arms,' East-the-Water. After hearing the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." No blame was attached to the driver of the cart.

Thursday 22 October 1857
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday last, a man named THOMAS HAMLYN, while working at the anthracite mine, East-the-Water, met with an injury which was followed on Sunday night, by the poor fellow's death. It appears that while engaged with another man in his underground employment, a stone of three or four hundred weight was loosened, which came down on the unfortunate deceased and fractured his leg. He was immediately removed from the mine and taken to his home, where surgical aid was soon obtained. He went on very favourably until Friday evening, when tetanus or locked-jaw suddenly set in, which terminated his existence. An Inquest was held on Monday afternoon, at the 'London Inn,' East-the-Water, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, which resulted in a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased was 32 years of age, and has left a wife and three children. The Jury very kindly gave their fees to the poor widow.

Thursday 29 October 1857
BIDEFORD - Death In The Street. - On Sunday night, between eight and nine o'clock, an aged woman, well-known here as NURSE FARLEY, dropped down and expired in the street, near the 'Union Inn.' She had been looking after a neighbour's children until the return of their father, when she had supper and left to return to her home. She had left the house but a few minutes, when death overtook her. A woman looking out of her door saw what was thought to be a drunken man lying on the pavement; a man went to see who it was and finding it was a woman he lifted her up, when she respired two or three times and all was over. Mr Acland, surgeon, was soon on the spot, who pronounced life to be extinct. An Inquest was held on the body on Monday, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, when a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God" was returned.

BIDEFORD - Inquest At The Workhouse. - It will be remembered that about 3 weeks since, as a poor man named WM. WESTLAKE, in the employ of Mr J. Norman, of Parkham, was returning from Fremington, with a horse and cart, the horse took fright opposite the Bideford Railway Station, by which he was thrown down, and the wheel passing over him broke his leg and inflicted other severe injuries. He was carried to the Union Workhouse, where every attention was paid to him, surgical and otherwise; but being a man advanced in years the vital powers were overmastered, and after enduring much suffering, he died on Thursday evening last. An Inquest was held at the house, on Friday evening, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, and an intelligent Jury, of which Mr W. W. Cole, printer, was foreman. Mr J. B. Hays, station-master, stated that he was on the platform on the evening of Tuesday, the 6th inst., when he saw the deceased proceeding on the turnpike road with a horse and cart (on which he was riding). He first saw the cart on the side of the goods shed, nearest Instow: when it came in sight again on the side nearest the station, he observed that deceased was out of the cart, and trying to hold the horse which was very restive. The animal reared up and appeared to throw out his fore-legs - he should say that deceased was struck down by the horse, and that the wheel then went over his leg. The train being in motion at the time he (witness) could not immediately go to deceased, but, as soon as the train was gone, he went out and found him much hurt, and bleeding at the mouth. The engine was coming out of the goods shed at the time, and it was his impression that the horse was frightened by it. Witness directed deceased to be conveyed to the Union Workhouse. Mr Stevenson, master of the Union, stated that deceased was brought to the house on a cart on the 6th inst. Surgical assistance was procured, and it was found that deceased had sustained a severe fracture of the collar bone, the leg was broken, and some severe bruises. Inflammation came on about the third day and an abscess was formed in the thigh. This was followed by erysipelas, which terminated in mortification. Death took place on Thursday morning. should think deceased was about 63 years of age. Witness further stated that he heard deceased say that the engine was puffing at the time, which caused the horse to become restive, and that a number of females who were there, on seeing the horse so restive began to scream, which made it unmanageable - but for that, the accident would not have happened. In his opinion death was decidedly the result of the accident. Mr Parsons, one of the Jurors, thought that a screen in the shape of a wall, ought to be erected to hide the sight of the engine from horses on the road. Mr Chalk, another Juror, said he was afraid of the place when with horses; and mentioned a circumstance that came under his own notice in which a horse with a boy on its back being frightened by the train was on the point of leaping over the rails into the adjoining marsh which in all probability would have been fatal to both. As the evidence went to show that had the railway been properly screened from the Turnpike-road this fatal accident would not have happened, the Jury in returning a verdict of "Accidental Death," accompanied it with a request to eh Coroner, that he would write to the Railway Company requesting them to consider the propriety of erecting a proper fence, as a screen from the goods-shed at the Bideford Station, to the plantation at the other extremity of the curve. The recommendation of the Jury has been attended to.

Thursday 5 November 1857
EASTDOWN - Attempted Murder and Suicide at Eastdown. - The inhabitants of this scattered parish were greatly excited last week as the news flew about that an attempt had been made by a late servant at Wigmore farm to shoot the female domestics by discharging a pistol through the kitchen window, and that the intended homicide had then committed suicide by hanging himself to a tree in a neighbouring wood. No such fearful combination of crime had ever before in the memory of the oldest inhabitant startled or disgraced the neighbourhood, and the man who had now committed it was one of the last who would have been thought capable of perpetrating such fatal deeds. HENRY FEATHERSTONE, the unhappy man involved in these crimes, had been living as a farm servant with Mr Richard Passmore, on the above-named farm, for the last five years and a half, and was reputed to be a very "quiet and inoffensive person." Recently, however, he took it into his head that the housekeeper and another female servant had treated him very ill, towards whom, in consequence, he indulged such a feeling of hatred that one morning, to the great surprise of his master, he demanded his wages, and payment being refused, he abruptly left the house. About a week afterwards, on the evening of Wednesday, the 29th ult., as the servants were sitting at the kitchen table, they were suddenly alarmed by the discharge of a pistol against the window, happily a small part of the charge only going through it, but evidently intended to do mortal injury to those within. Mr Passmore, who happened to be just returned from Northmolton fair, had some friends with him; they rushed out, but saw no one. Having procured a light, they found a coat a few yards from the window, known to belong to the deceased, and on examining the window it was discovered that three or four panes of glass had been pierced by shot, but that the greater portion of the charge had been received by the sill and on the wall below. Had the aim been as true as the intention was murderous, some one within would doubtless have fallen a victim. On the following morning a pistol was found on the ground, dropped, apparently, just where and when it was discharged. Nothing, however, was to be seen of the guilty man; the police were set in motion, the locality was scoured in all directions until Saturday, about -- o'clock, when Mr Tamlyn, being out rabbit shooting, saw the body of a man hanging to the branch of an oak in Knowle wood, on the estate adjoining Wigmore, and which was found to be that of HENRY FEATHERSTONE.
The body, on being taken down, was carried to Henscott, a farm house belonging to Mr Charles Smith, and in the occupation of Henry Manning, to await an Inquest, which was held on Monday morning, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner. the feelings of all parties were greatly shocked on entering the kitchen at Henscott, on Monday, on finding the body of the deceased laid out in the corner of the kitchen, where this poor man and his family, it was understood, had to cook and take their meals - that the dismal incumbrance had been thrust upon them by the police, to the terror of the children and the disgust of their parents. The Coroner very properly expressed, in strong terms, his disapprobation of the steps that had been taken, stating that the proper course would have been to have applied to the overseer and to have required him to procure a suitable place where to deposit a body found in that state, and not to thrust so unwelcome a burden upon a private family; in fact, that it was the duty of every parish to have a room near the church for such a purpose. It was said that such a lock-up did exist at Eastdown, but it did not appear to be known to the police.
The Jury being sworn, and the body viewed, the remainder of the Inquest was conducted at Wigmore, Mr Passmore having kindly offered the use of his hall for the purpose. The Jury consisted of Mr Thomas Watts, foreman, Messrs. George Curtis, Wm. Challacombe, Wm. Hopkins, Wm. Burgess, Wm. Charley, Wm. Fry, Wm. Delve, Wm. Pugsley, Wm. Manning, Rd. Gear, and Wm. Gammon. The first witness called was
Mr Richard Passmore, who said:- I knew the deceased, HENRY FEATHERSTONE; he has been for five years and a half a farm servant in my employ. He left on the 22nd of October. He came to my bed-room door about daylight, and asked what I wanted of him. I replied, 'When you go for the cows, drive the two sheep into the court, and then put them into a field called Longcloses.' Deceased then said, 'I shall take home no more sheep nor cows either for you.' I said, 'What's the matter now? what is that for?' His answer was, 'Last evening they (meaning the servants, or Miss Rodd) would not let me have any supper, and I was obliged to go to James Mayne's for a loaf f bread.' I said to him, 'I can't make that out; how is it you have not got your supper as well as your fellow-servant? There is nothing locked from you, and you have lived here too long to need to act in this way.' He said, 'They had given the other man a bottle of beer and made him drunk by the time he came back - a statement I knew to be untrue, as I had the key in my own pocket. I told him if there was any unpleasantness between him and his fellow-servants, he could work a month longer, and if he suited himself, he could then leave. To which deceased replied, 'I shall leave directly;' he then went and put up his clothes and left the house. Between eight and nine o'clock I saw him at the stable door, where he had removed his box of clothes, when addressing me he said, 'Will you pay me my wages?' I said, Your wages previous to Ladyday are at your command, but the wages since then I refuse to pay you, as you are about to leave me in this way. He replied, 'I shall not take one part without the whole,' and then took up his box and went on towards Longclose gate. I said, Where are you going? He replied, 'What is that to you? That is my business.' I then said, It is my business, too, and as you are leaving me in this manner, I shall get a summons, and have you before the magistrates for leaving my service in this way. He said, 'They can only put me to Bridewell for a month; that's all they or you can do to me, and I shall be clear of all of you; then it will be my turn to have a game with you.' He then went away. All this was spoken in such an austere manner as he had never spoken to me all the years he had been in my service. I saw him in Barnstaple the following Friday, but he did not speak to me nor I to him. I was informed by my servant, Elizabeth Rodd, when in my bed-room shaving on the 24th, that deceased came to my house to see me; I sent down to tell him I would see him presently, but by the time I came down he was gone. I saw no more of him then until the Tuesday following, when he came to the door about nine o'clock, and I asked him in, and he took a chair and sat down in the kitchen. I asked him what his business was? When he replied, 'I am come to settle my wages, if you please.' I told him I was prepared to settle his wages to Ladyday; I then paid him £32 2s., which he received and left the house; I did not see him afterward until I saw him hanging to the tree. Deceased uttered no threatenings.
Coroner:- In what state of mind did you think him to be?
Witness:- I saw nothing particular about him. I consider he was quite rational.
Coroner:- In consequence of any thing that occurred did you go to a magistrate for a warrant to apprehend him?
Witness:- I got both a summons and a warrant; I procured a summons on Saturday, the 24th, for leaving my service, which was to have been returned today at Combmartin. I settled with him after the summons was taken out. I went to Northmolton fair on the 28th of October, and after my return, about a quarter past seven o'clock, as I was sitting in this hall, I heard the report of a gun or pistol fired at the kitchen window. Mr Richards, of Northcott, was with me; I immediately got up and went out to ascertain what it was, but could see nobody. On procuring a candle and lantern, and making a search, we found a velvet jacket (produced), which I identified as the property of the deceased. In the pockets I found a tin flask of powder, a quantity of loose shot, and a box of percussion caps, all which I produce. On the following morning there was picked up in my presence, about 13 feet from the kitchen window, the pistol now produced. (It was a heavily constructed weapon, apparently over a foot long, the barrel rusty from being exposed to moisture during the night.) Four panes of glass in the kitchen window were broken, and a roll of paper inside the window as pierced by the shot. On finding the coat, I was led to suspect deceased, and on the following morning went to Mr Vye, the magistrate at Ilfracombe, and procured a warrant for his apprehension. About half-past three on Saturday afternoon, Mr William Tamlyn called to me and said he had seen a man hanging on a tree in Knowle Wood, which he suspected was my late servant. I immediately sent off a message to the police at Ilfracombe, and then accompanied Mr Tamlyn and Mr King to the wood and identified the body as that of HENRY FEATHERSTONE.
(Mr Passmore, on finding the name of Mr Frayne, of Barnstaple, on the pistol, made inquiries at his shop respecting it. It appeared that a man answering the description of deceased purchased a pistol and ammunition there on the Tuesday afternoon, the day before the attack on the kitchen window. Deceased told Mr Frayne he was one of Dunster, and that himself and a brother being about to emigrate, he wished to purchase a gun; that in the course of his inquiry about guns he came in a round-about sort of way to say he would look at a pistol. He did so, and took the one produced, with the proviso that if he did not like it he might exchange it for a gun.)
John Williams, cordwainer, of Berrydown-cross, said:- I knew the deceased, HENRY FEATHERSTONE; it is his body I have seen. The last time I saw him alive was between six and seven o'clock on the night the pistol was fired. He came to lodge with me on the 22nd, the same day he left Mr Passmore's. When he came he asked if I could let him have lodgings for a few days? I said, 'Have you left, then, HENRY?' He replied, 'Yes.' I endeavoured to prevail on him to go back, but he said he would not. On the day after he went to Barnstaple, and on Sunday, the 25th, he went to his brother's, at Dunster, and came back again on Monday. He rode my horse. I did not observe any thing particular about him. On Tuesday morning he stated that he was going to Mr Passmore's, where I suppose he went I saw him again at eleven o'clock; he told me he had been to Mr Passmore's. He said Mr Passmore had paid him up to last Ladyday - that he had paid him £42.
Mr Passmore:- that's false; I paid him £32 2s.; a part of it was money that I had put out for him on a note of hand.
(It appeared that deceased had told several that he had been paid £42, which Mr Passmore proved, by producing deceased's own receipt, was only £32 2s.)
Examination continued:- He said he had not received his wages to Michaelmas; he supposed he must wait till Monday to see the result of the summons before the magistrates.
Coroner:- How did he appear when making these statements?
Witness:- His manner at that time appeared much as usual. He uttered no threats. Deceased spoke against the servants at Wigmore; he said he could live with his master very well, and could end his days with him, but the servants he mortally hated. He mentioned the housekeeper, and another female servant he thought as bad. He said the living was very bad, and he could not stand it; he made use of no threats towards them. Deceased left my house between one and two o'clock on the Tuesday, stating that he was going to Barnstaple. He returned between eight and nine o'clock, took supper and shortly after went to bed. He made no observations, and there was nothing particular to be noticed in his conduct. I saw nothing of any pistol in his possession; he did not say he had bought a pistol; he had not that coat on then. The day following deceased went to the field with me after breakfast, to assist in digging potatoes. We left the field together about five o'clock; deceased said he wanted to go to James Mayne's to see if there was a letter for him, but would be back shortly, and desired me to say if Mr Sharp, the police constable came, he would be home in a few minutes. He returned in about a quarter of an hour. Shortly after he got up to put the pony to field; my wife told him not to stay long, as she wanted to give the others who had been hacking potatoes their supper. He went away, and I never saw him alive after. As he did not come, I thought he was gone to Mr Gammon's, as it was said he was keeping company with a young woman there. She said he was, but I don't know whether he was or no. The jacket produced belonged to deceased. All his things were at my house when he left; they have been taken possession of by Policeman Yole, by the magistrate's order. (Inventory of things produced. Among the things were six £5 notes, paid deceased by Mr Passmore, and his watch.)
Anne Williams, wife of the last witness, gave similar evidence. Had never heard deceased utter any threats against Mr Passmore's servants; had not seen any rope in his possession, except that with which his box was corded - the one produced as that with which he hung himself she had never seen. (The rope appeared to have been a new one, and it was thought likely to have been bought for the purpose at Barnstaple at the same time with the other articles, the pistol, &c.) Witness believed HENRY FEATHERSTONE'S father was an aged man between eighty and ninety years of age, and that he was maintained by the joint efforts of his children. Had known deceased for the last twelve years; had never observed any eccentricities about him, nor known any of the family insane. Had no reason to believe he was out of his mind.
Joseph Huxtable, landlord of the 'Smith's Arms,' at Berrydown-cross, said:- I saw deceased on Thursday, the 22nd, with his box to his back, going into Williams's house. I said to him, What's up now? He replied, 'Ladyday's come, isn't it?' I said, No; Michaelmas is but just past. He did not appear in an excited state at all - was just the same as ever he was. Never saw anything about him to indicate that he was out of his mind. On Tuesday, the 27th, he came into my house between seven and eight o'clock; he said he had had his money of Mr Passmore, and that he (Mr Passmore) had paid him £42, including £2 towards the present year's wages.
Mr Passmore:- That is incorrect.
Witness:- Well, that is what he said, and several others heard him. He said he had received £42 from Mr Passmore; that he had been to Barnstaple, and that he had something else in his pocket which would master some of them. I thought he meant that he had a summons for some one. He did not appear excited, nor to have drunk anything. He drank a share of two or three pints of beer with James Beer and Wm. Jewell, staying about half an hour.
Mr William Tamlyn, of Churchill, said he was sporting, between three and four o'clock on Saturday, near Knowle Wood, on Indicott estate, when he saw the body of a man hanging from the branch of an oak-tree in the wood. He immediately gave information of the fact to Mr Passmore, who sent to Ilfracombe for the police, and when the policeman came the body was cut down. The body being dead and cold, they thought it might as well stay until the policeman came. He believed it to be Mr Passmore's late servant; he could not see his face, as he had a comforter drawn over his head and face like a cap. (Deceased's hat had not been found at the time of the Inquest; he was in his shirt sleeves.) Witness had said to one of Mr Passmore's servants, called Brooks, that a man could not be guilty of such deeds as those when in a sound state of mind. The man replied, that deceased had been much disturbed in mind for the last six weeks, and they had said one to another that they thought FEATHERSTONE was "getting mazed."
William Brooks, fellow servant with the deceased, described him as a quiet and inoffensive man, as good a servant as he would ever wish to live with. He had never seen anything out of the way with him. He had since Barnstaple fair seemed as if under trouble and disturbed in mind, but deceased had never said anything to him about it. Witness understood that deceased had asked his master to let him go to Dunster to see his brother, and had been denied, and that he had felt disappointed at not being allowed to go.
Mr Passmore said that deceased had never at any time asked him to be allowed to go to see his brother, and therefore could not have been refused. Mr Passmore also wished to clear himself from the stigma that had been cast upon him by the reference to the living in his house; deceased having, it was said left on account of it. He could appeal to servants that had lived years with him, and after they had left were willing to return to his service again, in proof that there was no truth in the statement.
The brother of the deceased who was present, stated that he visited his father and himself at Dunster, on Sunday, the 25th ult., that there appeared nothing unusual in his behaviour. He did not know much of his brother, as he had seen him only at long intervals, as they seldom went home having no mother. He had written to them since his return and informed his father that he had received £42 and was about to leave.
Mr Passmore produced his receipt and showed the amount paid was £32 2s.
The Coroner interrogated each witness particularly as to the state of mind of the deceased before committing these deeds of violence, but none appeared to be able to give any facts that could be construed into evidence of insanity or mental derangement. The consequence of a verdict of self-murder would be that the body would be denied the rites of Christian burial, and would be interred between the hours of nine and twelve o'clock at night. Moreover whatever he died possessed of would be forfeited to the Crown.
In summing up the evidence to the Jury, the Coroner felt himself bound to say, whatever his private opinions might be on the subject, that no evidence had been given to shew that the deceased was in any other than his usual state of mind when last seen. That he destroyed himself by his own hand there was no positive proof, but of that there could be no reasonable doubt. As a Jury they were bound to return a verdict according to the evidence; they had not the making of the laws, and in finding their verdict, they must have no regard to its consequences. It would be for them to say whether the deceased was or was not "lunatic and distracted" and knew not what he did when he put an end to his existence.
The Coroner having recapitulated the evidence, the Jury retired for about ten minutes and returned a verdict that deceased died by his own hand, he not being at the time, in the words of the foreman, "in his right senses," or according to the forma verdict, he not being "sound in mind, memory, and understanding."
The deceased's box, containing his worldly goods having been placed in the hands of the police by order of the magistrate, who had nailed down the cover and sealed it, and committed it to the keeping of Mr Passmore, it became a question as to whom, and under what authority the said box should be given up. The Coroner on being applied to, said, as the deceased died without wife or children, the things would go to his father, but before the parties who now held them could give the box up with legal safety, the father must administer to the effects, for until then he would not be in a position to give Mr Passmore a legal receipt.

Thursday 24 December 1857
LYNTON - Murder At Lynton. Committal Of The Murderer. - On Wednesday evening last, a shocking murder was committed at the above fashionable watering-place. the murderer was a young man, named John Barwick, a sort of jobbing-labourer in the town, and his victim a young woman with whom he had for some months kept company, named MARIA BLACKMORE, formerly a dressmaker in Lynton, but who, more recently, and until within the last few weeks, had been living as servant at the 'Valley of the Rocks Hotel,' and was at the period of her untimely death living under her mother's roof in the town. On the evening in question she sent a messenger to Barwick, desiring to speak with him. He at once went to the deceased, as requested, and remained in conversation with her for some time in the passage leading to her mother's residence. What the nature of that conversation was is not known, but immediately following, the poor girl rushed into the room of a neighbour's house covered with blood, and exclaiming, "I am bleeding!" She instantly fell on the floor and died. It is pretty certain that the man Barwick struck the deceased in the neck with his clasp knife, which he had sharpened the same morning, completely severing the arteries, which, there can be no doubt, was the immediate cause of death. After inflicting a death-blow upon the poor girl, Barwick would appear to have returned to his home directly, on reaching which he threatened to commit sui9cide, and it is said informed his sister that he had "murdered MARIA." Of course an alarm had in the meantime been given, Mr Clarke, surgeon, was called in, and pronounced the poor girl beyond all surgical aid, and in less than an hour Barwick was in custody, charged with the murder. It is stated that the prisoner had been drinking and fighting in the early part of the day; but he was apparently sober at the time of the tragical occurrence narrated above.
This foul murder was committed, as we have said, on Wednesday evening; but, though a regular medical practitioner was called in at the instant, who examined the body, and ascertained the cause of death - though the deceased had just had time to articulate the name of the murderer - though one of the county constabulary was passing through the village at the time of the sad occurrence, and within an hour had the murderer in custody, who made no secret of his guilt; yet up to Thursday evening no one had felt it to be a duty which he owed to society, to the constituted authorities, to justice itself to make any communication to the Coroner (Richard Bremridge, Esq.), who received his first information on a subject which so intimately concerned his important office from ourselves, who merely heard of it as a flying rumour. A thousand unforeseen occurrences might have defeated the ends of justice for aught the appointed conservators of the peace at Lynton either knew or cared. But this was not all: on a former occasion the Coroner found it necessary to remark in strong terms on the conduct of the constabulary, in invading the sanctity of a poor man's domicile at Eastdown, and compelling him to receive the body of a man who had committed suicide into the only room in which his wife and children lived and cooked and ate their victuals, to their extreme annoyance and terror. The constable at Lynton seems to have been as ignorant or neglectful as his brother of Eastdown; for will it be believed that the body of the poor murdered girl was kept in a small room in which a poor man, his wife, and family, slept for three nights - from Wednesday to Saturday - before the Coroner received the necessary intimation which brought him to the spot to hold an Inquest? These men are adepts at picking up the honest yeomanry of the neighbourhood if they happen to have a cart on which their name is not inscribed, or rustics who may ride without reins, but in the more serious and, happily, less frequent crime of murder, three days can be suffered to elapse before the Coroner is called to inquire into the facts and to send the criminal to answer for his crime against the laws of humanity and his country. We are glad to hear that Mr Bremridge has felt it to be his duty to represent the facts to Capt. Hamilton, the chief of the County Constabulary, who will, we doubt not, take means to prevent a recurrence of such flagrant neglect.
On Friday afternoon the learned Coroner started for Lynton, where he was scarcely expected, and where nothing had been done to facilitate the object of his mission; and on the following morning proceeded to hold his Inquest. The Inquest was held at the 'Castle Hotel.' The following were sworn on the Jury:- Mr John Crook, foreman; Messrs. Charles Fry, John Southwood, William Richards, Thomas Prideaux, Richard Huxtable, David Burnell, Thomas Baker, William Crook, William Taylor, David Hill, Robert Jones, and John Crick.
The Jury having viewed the body, proceeded to hear the following evidence:-
Hannah Mogridge sworn:- I am a domestic servant with Mr David Crocombe, of North Cliff Cottage. I knew the deceased, MARIA BLACKMORE. On Wednesday evening last, the 16th December, I left my master's house at about 20 minutes before eight o'clock, to go to the baker's and other places. On getting up by the 'Valley of Rocks' Hotel, I met the deceased, MARIA BLACKMORE. She said to me, "There has been fine works at the 'Globe' today." I asked her what. She replied, that "Barwick and Lithaby had been fighting," and said she should like to see Barwick, for she dared say they had marked him. She then asked me if I would go to his mother's house and call him out. I said I did not like to do so. She again asked me to do so, and I went. I knocked at Mrs Barwick's door and Ann Turpitt answered the knock. I asked if John Barwick's sister was in. Mrs Turpitt said, "Yes;" and called her. On the sister coming out, I asked if her brother was in; she said, "Yes;" and called out, "John, you are wanted." John Barwick came out, and I told him that MARIA (meaning MARIA BLACKMORE) wanted to speak with him. He came out with me to her. He had no hat on. On coming up to MARIA BLACKMORE, she said to John Barwick, "You have been drinking today." Barwick replied, "No, I have not." MARIA BLACKMORE then said, "You have, for I have been told you have been there all the day." Barwick replied, "If God should strike me dead, I have not." She said, "I hear you have been fighting," and he replied, "I have." I then went to fetch my milk at Mr Clarke's, and I went back to near the spot where I had left MARIA BLACKMORE and John Barwick, and I asked her whether she was going, and she replied, "Not for a few minutes." I then wished her good night, and have never seen her alive since.
Agnes Bromham sworn:- I knew the deceased. She lived with her mother, who had a house in the same passage with mine. On Wednesday night, the 16th December, between nine and ten o'clock, MARIA BLACKMORE, the deceased, opened my door and came into the kitchen, She said, "Oh, Mrs Bromham, I am bleeding!" I ran towards her, and saw she was covered with blood. I asked her who had done it. MARIA BLACKMORE replied, "Barwick." I seated her on the chair and she fell along. I immediately called for assistance. Richard Norman, James Ridge, and Ann Ridge shortly came in. Richard Norman went immediately to inform MARIA BLACKMORE'S mother of what had happened. She was in bed, but she got up, and came immediately, but MARIA BLACKMORE was dead before her mother came in. Mr Norman also ran off for Mr Clarke, the surgeon, who came immediately, but MARIA BLACKMORE was dead before he arrived.
Richard Norman sworn:- I reside the next door to Agnes Bromham. On Wednesday, the 16th of December, I was in the house, between 9 and 10 o'clock. About a quarter before 10 I heard a scream, and at the same moment I heard some person run down the road. I went out to see what it was, and went into Mrs Bromham's kitchen. I there saw deceased, MARIA BLACKMORE, on the kitchen floor covered with blood. Mrs Bromham desired me to call MARIA BLACKMORE'S mother. I did so; she was in bed, but immediately came down. James Ridge and Ann Ridge by this time had come in, and James Ridge and myself went to fetch Mr Clarke, the surgeon; and Mrs Bromham told me, when in her kitchen, that MARIA BLACKMORE had said that John Barwick had done it.
James Ridge sworn:- On Wednesday last, the 16th of December, I went to Barnstaple with the cart. I returned to Linton to the stable door about 20 minutes before 10 o'clock. I found it locked. I went down towards the village to find William Winsor, who had the key. In passing the entrance to BLACKMORE'S I saw deceased and John Barwick standing. I spoke to them, and said, "I will tell your mothers of it tomorrow." I passed on, and met the man with the key, and returned again to the stable. MARIA BLACKMORE and John Barwick were still at the doorway. I got the horses into the stable, and was doing them up. A few minutes after my wife, Ann Ridge, came in; while there she heard a scream, and asked what that was. In consequence of the noise, I ran down to see what it was: I ran directly into Mrs Bromham's kitchen and saw MARIA BLACKMORE lying on the floor covered in blood. I stated to the police the same night that I saw John Barwick and MARIA BLACKMORE standing by the passage entrance a few minutes before.
Ann Ridge sworn:- I knew the deceased, MARIA BLACKMORE; I also knew John Barwick. On Wednesday night last, 16th December, between the hours of 9 and 10 o'clock, I was going to the stables to see if my husband was returned from Barnstaple. On going to the stables I passed the passage leading into the house where MARIA BLACKMORE lived. I saw the deceased and John Barwick standing by the passage doorway. I went on to the stables and found my husband there. I remained there about five minutes when I heard a scream. I said to my husband, "What is that?" A man, who was in the stable said it was some one passing singing. I replied, "No, it is not," and shortly after heard another scream. My husband ran out, and I followed him to Mrs Bromham's passage. MARIA BLACKMORE'S mother pulled me into Mrs Bromham's kitchen. I there saw the deceased covered with blood, lying on the floor, but quite dead. I told Mr Allin, the parish constable, the same night, that I had seen MARIA BLACKMORE and John Barwick standing by the passage as I went to the stables. I went to the 'Globe' public house the same night, about half an hour afterwards, and saw John Barwick in custody of the police, and I am certain he was the person I saw standing with MARIA BLACKMSORE at the passage entrance.
John Clarke sworn:- I am a surgeon, residing at Lynton. On Wednesday, the 16th day of December instant, about ten minutes before 10 o'clock, I was sent for by Richard Norman and James Ridge, to attend immediately, as MARIA BLACKMORE'S throat had been cut, and was at Mrs Bromham's house. I went immediately and found MARIA BLACKMORE lying on the floor in the kitchen; her clothes saturated with blood, a large pool of blood on the floor. She was quite dead on my arrival. I had the body removed to her mother's house, her clothes taken off, and examined the body; and discovered a wound in the throat, of about one inch and half in length and the same in depth, in the direction of the internal jugular vein and common carotid artery. The wound appeared to have been made by a knife. The dividing the arteries caused immediate death.
John Wooddrow sworn:- I am police constable for the parish of Lynton. On Wednesday night, the 16th of December, about 10 o'clock, I was passing through the village of Lynton, and I met a woman whom I afterwards learnt was John Barwick's sister, who said that John Barwick had cut his throat. I immediately went to Barwick's house, and asked him what he had been doing of. He replied, "If you had not come when you did, you would not have found me alive. While I was there James Ridge and R. Norman came in, and Richard Norman said, "She is dead." I then asked Norman who was dead. He replied "MARIA BLACKMORE." I asked Norman who did it, and Norman said, "Barwick." I then told John Barwick I should take him in charge for the murder of MARIA BLACKMORE. I then searched him, and found in his pocket two knives and a razor, which I now produce. The large knife had a quantity of blood upon it - the blood was apparently fresh, but in other respects the knives and razor are in the same condition as when taken from him. There were spots of blood on John Barwick's hands when I took him into custody. I cautioned him that if he said anything it would be given in evidence against him, and after that caution he said, "that she told him that she should break off all correspondence with him that night, and that caused it."
The Coroner summed up the evidence, and suitably addressed the Jury, who, after a short deliberation returned a Verdict of Wilful Murder; whereupon the prisoner John Barwick was committed upon the Coroner's warrant to take his trial for the capital offence at the next Assizes for the County. The prisoner is a simple-looking young man whose countenance betrays nothing of ferocity, and whom no one would suppose to be capable of such a diabolical crime as that for which he now awaits his doom.

Thursday 31 December 1857
SOUTH MOLTON - Fatal Accident. - One of the many accidents to which flesh is heir, and which terminated fatally, occurred to a carpenter named WESTACOTT, on Saturday morning last. The deceased was at work in felling a tree in a field near the Mole Bridge, when it unexpectedly fell on the wrong side, and the deceased, not having time to get out of the way, was knocked down and crushed beneath its weight. He died almost instantly. An Inquest was held on the body the same evening, before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury, of whom Mr Humphrey Nutt was foreman. The following evidence was adduced:- Charles Knill sworn:- I am a sawyer, residing in Southmolton. This morning I was at work with the deceased, felling an elm tree, which was growing in a field adjoining Mill-lane, at the bottom of the hill, near the pond. The deceased was engaged in driving the wedge, the tree being nearly cut through; the tree, in falling, took a direction quite the opposite of that which we expected it to do. I saw the tree falling, and called to the deceased to take care, as it was in the direction where he was standing. I jumped over the hedge, and on returning again into the field, saw the deceased lying under the tree; his legs and thigh were under, but his body had escaped. Deceased sighed once and then expired. Mr T. K. Metters gave similar evidence. He saw the accident from his garden. The Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Wednesday 7 January 1858
BIDEFORD - Another Victim of Strong Drink. - On Tuesday night last week this great destroyer added another to the myriads who have descended to a hopeless and untimely grave by the senseless use of intoxicating drinks. HENRY COLLEY, a farm servant, of the parish of Parkham, came into this town on that day for a day's Christmas pleasure - the pleasure, according to custom, to consist chiefly in drinking. He drank freely of grog and other such deleterious liquids, the last public-house he visited being the 'Cornish Arms Inn,' kept by Mr George Giddy. He left that house about half-past five in the afternoon, and the landlord, not feeling exactly satisfied as to which way he had taken, went with a lantern and candle in search of him - a female having informed him that he had gone in the direction of a well, into which it was possible he might have tumbled; he was not, however, there. It subsequently appeared that he had gone on the road from Bideford about a quarter of a mile, when he was taken up by a kind farmer's wife, who saw he had been drinking, in her market cart, in which he proceeded as far as Ford. There the owner of the cart had an occasion to call for some things, when COLLEY said he was cold, that he would walk up the hill and ride again when they came further on. Instead, however, of walking up the hill he went into the Ford public-house, called for a glass of beer, drank it, and called for another, when the landlady said, "HENRY, you have had enough, and I shall not bring you any more." He then challenged a man named Ching, who was there drinking, to toss with him for a quart of beer, when the latter said he would not drink it there, but would have it when they came to Parkham town. There they went into a public-house kept by Mr E. Andrew, but drank nothing, and after sitting for a few minutes deceased left by himself. Nothing more was heard of him until about seven o'clock the following morning, when the son of the last named landlord passing near Melberry, as he was going for some pigeons, saw COLLEY lying in the road on his face and hands. The lad, thinking he was asleep, got off his horse to arouse him, when, to his dismay, he found that the miserable man was dead. The youth went immediately to the father of the deceased, who lives in the parish of Putford, about a mile and half from where the body was found, and told him the dismal sight he had seen. The dead body was soon conveyed to the father's house, where on the same day (Wednesday) an Inquest was held before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, and a verdict returned of - "Died from Excessive Drinking."

Thursday 14 January 1858
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - Inquest. An Inquest was held yesterday morning (Wednesday), at the North Devon Infirmary, before the Borough Coroner, Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the body of THOMAS COURTNEY, a labourer, of the parish of Landkey. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased was in the employ of Mr Thomas Buckingham, of that parish, proprietor of the Venn quarry and lime kilns. A steam engine is used at this quarry for the purpose of pumping the water up from the stone mine and other uses; of this engine deceased was the driver. Yesterday afternoon COURTNEY and another man named Down were engaged in repairing one of the pumps outside the engine house, the engine being at work at the same time. About four o'clock, whilst they were so engaged, the unfortunate deceased got jammed between a part of the machinery connected with engine, called a triangle, and a post. Down ran immediately and stopped the engine, while another man named Lockyer promptly extricated him from the grasp of his mortal foe. The poor fellow said to him, "Oh, Tom! I am a dying man." He was then placed upon a door and taken to his house near the works, and from thence conveyed in his master's cart to the North Devon Infirmary, where he arrived about five o'clock. On being examined by the surgeon, it was found that the lower portion of his backbone was beaten into a pulp, the abdomen distended and groins swollen and extravasated. A little brandy was given him, when he rallied just sufficient to say that he felt himself to be "a dying man." The poor fellow appeared to be in great agony, which death relieved him from in about twenty-five minutes from the time of his arrival. - Verdict, "Accidental Death." - [The deceased has left a wife and three children. He had been in Mr Buckingham's employ for 30 years and was much respected. The poor fellow has paid the sad penalty of his life to his own imprudence in attempting to repair the engine while it was in motion.]

BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - A poor boy, about thirteen years of age, named GEORGE GRIBBLE, lost his life on Friday, by a fall at Mr Cox's ship-yard. He was in the employ of the master caulker, and the men being obliged to leave their work in consequence of the wet on the afternoon of the day named, this little boy went back in their absence and climbed up to the stage at the side of the large vessel on which they were working, and his foot slipping, he fell headlong some thirty feet on a piece of timber beneath. His brother found him in a deplorable state under the stage, and carried him to his father's house, where he was attended by Mr Acland, surgeon, but in about six hours death ended his sufferings. An Inquest was held before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BIDEFORD - Suspected Murder of a Child. - Yesterday morning (Wednesday), a report spread through the town that a child had been murdered. When the excitement had a little subsided, it was found that the report referred to the death of ELIZABETH ANN ROBINS, an infant, about twenty months old, the illegitimate daughter of MARY JANE OSBORNE, wife of THOMAS OSBORNE, sailor, living in Meddon street. The husband, it should be understood, is not the father of the child, but had married the child's mother about seven months ago. It appears that the mother left the house in the morning about a quarter before seven, to go to work as a charwoman. Returning about an hour and a-half afterwards, to attend to her own domestic concerns, she found her husband taking his breakfast, and supposing the child to be asleep, which was in the cradle in another room, on the same floor, proceeded to prepare the breakfast for a dressmaker, who had come to her house to work about five minutes before she entered. After she and this young person had finished their breakfast she took the child's clothes up and went into the other room to dress it. On turning down the counterpane, which she found over the child's head different from the state in which she left it, she was horror struck at the child's appearance. She immediately ran through the outer room in which her husband was sitting, exclaiming, "You have murdered the child." She immediately called in a neighbour, Mrs Bartholomew, who took up the child and found it to be really dead. She put the deceased child again into the cradle and sent for Mr Pridham, surgeon, who is the Borough Coroner, and the medical man for the parish. In consequence of the exclamation and accusations of the wife, the husband was taken into custody on suspicion of at least knowing something about the child's death, and to await the result of an Inquest.
The Inquest commenced last evening, at eight o'clock, at the 'Torridge Inn,' it being thought necessary to make a post mortem examination of the body which occupied the professional gentleman engaged in it (Mr Thompson, surgeon), for several hours. The following gentlemen composed the very respectable Jury that sat on the case:- Mr Edward Dingle, foreman, Messrs. S. C. Willcock, W. P. Saunders, C. Pedler, W. Tardrew, G. Boyles, J. Williams, W. Cadd, T. Trewin, T. Pridham, T. Isaac, W. Lee, and G. Braund. After the most patient and searching investigation, which lasted until half-past one this morning, the Jury after an hour's deliberation, decided that there was no evidence upon which to charge Osborne with the child's death; they, therefore, returned an open verdict of - "Found Dead," the medical man having declared that he could discover no specific cause of death, he having found the body generally healthy. Want of time prevents our giving the evidence in extenso. The inn was crowded during the Inquest, larger numbers desiring to be present than could find room.

Thursday 21 January 1858
SWYMBRIDGE - Fatal Accident. - Another of those fatal accidents that frequently occur in stone-quarrying happened yesterday (Wednesday), to a labourer named THOMAS DOWN, who was employed at the Marsh lime works, in this parish, belonging to Mr William Hartnoll, of Hannaford. He was engaged in blasting a hole, about nine o'clock in the morning, when, having inserted the charge and lighted the fusee, he and the man at work with him retired some eight or nine yards from the hole, what they considered a safe distance, to await the explosion. The explosion took place when a fragment of rock projected by it to a considerable height in the air, fell on the unfortunate deceased, struck him in the breast, and killed him on the spot. He was a man between fifty and sixty years of age, and leaves a wife and three or four children - the latter happily grown up. An Inquest was held on the body last evening, and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts.

Thursday 11 February 1858
LEW-TRENCHARD - A Miserable End. - On Thursday last week, an Inquest was held at the above village, on the body of WILLIAM SMALLACOMBE, labourer, of Bridestowe, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner. The body of the wretched man was found on a lime-kiln, with one arm and one leg burnt off, and the trunk burnt through at the side. In fact, it was thought, that had no one visited the kiln for an hour or two more the corpse would have been entirely consumed. It is supposed that the poor fellow, who was a sort of wandering labourer, must have laid himself down on the kiln for the sake of the warmth, and having fallen asleep was suffocated by the gas from the combustion beneath. He was seen going towards the place in the evening, and was then sober. The verdict was in accordance with the above facts.

EXETER - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the 'Blue Boar' Inn, Magdalen-street, on Saturday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of RICHARD CARLISLE. The deceased was in the employ of Mr Taylor, the contractor for the works of the Yeovil railway, and now in progress in this city. He was at work at the Lion's Holt, on the 9th of January, loading a barrow near a well, when the water issuing from the well caused the ground over which the deceased was at work to give way, which fell on its back as he was in the act of stooping. He was soon extricated, and taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was found he had received a severe injury of the spine; and, notwithstanding the attention paid to him, the poor fellow died on Thursday afternoon last. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Deceased was an unmarried man, a native of Cornwall, and was about 29 years of age.

EXETER - Melancholy Death of a Child. - An Inquest was held at the 'Blue Boar' Inn, on Saturday last, before the City Coroner, on the body of a child named MARY GLANVILL, aged two years and four months. It appeared that on the 3rd instant the mother of the deceased, who resides on Stepcote-hill, in this city, left the child alone in an upper apartment, but soon after she had left the room, she heard a scream. On going there, it was evidence that the child had been drinking boiling water from the tea kettle. She examined her mouth, but did not see any bladders; and the child soon becoming cheerful again, no further notice was taken of it. About an hour afterwards, however, the child appeared ill, and the mother took her to Mr Tozer's, chemist, who recommended her being taken to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where she was examined by Dr Biggs, the house surgeon, who prescribed for her, and she became an out-patient. In the evening the child became worse, and was again taken to the Hospital, when it was found that she had great difficulty in breathing. A consultation of surgeons took place, and an operation was performed. She continued to get worse, and died on Friday, the 5th. Death was attributed to inflammation of the throat, caused by drinking boiling water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 18 February 1858
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday evening, an Inquest was held at the 'Newington Inn,' Derby, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of THOMAS FRAINE, gardener, of Rawleigh, in the parish of Pilton, who had been found dead that morning, under the circumstances stated in the evidence.
The following persons composed the Jury:- Mr John Walkingame Tatham, foreman, Messrs. William Trawin, Arthur Riddeford, John Tucker Green, James Ford, John D. Thorne, John Garland, William Turner, Joseph Blackmore, John Jennings, Samuel Geen, and Thomas Baker. The Jury having viewed the body returned to the Jury-room, when the following evidence was taken:
Thomas Lee, of Wester Lilly-farm, in Goodleigh sworn:- I knew the deceased, THOMAS FRAINE. I saw him last evening, at about six o'clock, in the pathway leading from Mr Hancock's (Easter Lilly) on his road homeward. I spoke to him; he said he was unwell, and that Mrs Hancock had given him a little ginger tea and a drop of the best brandy. I asked him if he felt better, and he said he could hardly say he did. He then walked away rather fast. At about 20 minutes past seven this morning Mr Bryant's man (of Pitt) came to my house inquiring for the deceased, who, he said, had not been home for the night. I then went on to the path leading to Derby, and in one of Mr Skinner's fields (Gribble-hills) discovered the body lying in the foot-track, on his face and hands, quite dead. This was about eight o'clock. I remained by the body until it was removed to this house.
Susan Hancock (wife of Mr John Hancock, yeoman, of Goodleigh) sworn:- I have known the deceased for eighteen months; he was in the habit of pruning the trees in our garden. He was working for us yesterday. He came into the house to dinner, at half-past one - he dined with our family, and ate heartily of pigs' fry. He left with our servants and resumed his work. At half-past six he came in again and complained of being unwell, and asked me to make him a little ginger tea. I did so and he drank it. He complained of pain in his stomach. After drinking the ginger tea, I asked if he felt better; he said No, and I gave him a little brandy and water. He then rose and left, still holding his stomach. I have not seen him since. He wished me good night, and said he should see me again in the morning.
It was stated that deceased was subject to wind in the stomach. When found he had 4s. 6d. in money and a handkerchief in his pockets, together with his snuff box and pruning knives.
The Coroner shortly addressed the Jury, who returned a verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."
It should be a grateful reflection to the surviving friends, that the deceased was a pious man who had for many years lived in the enjoyment of religion.

Thursday 25 February 1858
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, and an intelligent Jury, on the body of MR RICHARD HARDING, late master of the schooner Tryphena, of this place. At the usual time of public service, on Sunday evening last, his wife and one of his sons left their residence, in Regent-place, to attend the lecture at the church, while another son remained at home with his father. From the evidence of the latter, it appeared that after their departure the deceased had manifested great distress of mind, and made a short of noise as if he was crying. He shortly after left the room in which he was sitting, when the son hearing a noise in another part of the room, traced the sound to the closet, where, to his great distress, he found his father, with his head leaning over the closet, in a dying state. He then placed him to lean against the door, ran for assistance, and also sent for a medical man. Mr R. H. Moon, surgeon, was called in, but his aid was unavailing and a fatal issue ensued at the expiration of an hour. The deceased had been in a low and desponding state for some weeks past, and had complained frequently of pains in his head and heart. Verdict accordingly. A respectable family has been plunged into the deepest distress at this unexpected occurrence.

EXETER - Melancholy Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the 'Poltimore Inn,' St Sidwell's, Exeter, on Thursday, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ALBERT STANLEY WELLAND. The deceased, who was about twenty-one years of age, had been a lieutenant in the 67th Regiment of Foot, now stationed at Plymouth. He had served at St. Lucia and Trinidad, in the West Indies, but sold out last July; and for the last two months had lodged at No. 8, Park-place, St. Sidwell's. Since he left the army he had been endeavouring to obtain a Government appointment, but had not succeeded. On Monday he went to the house of his mother, on the Friars, where he said he was cold, and asked form some brandy and water. He appeared greatly excited. He went to Plymouth the same day and did not return until Wednesday, when he again visited his mother and sisters on the Friars. On leaving his mother's house he shook hands with his mother, wished her good bye, and said she would never see him again. About four o'clock that afternoon his sisters went to his lodgings to look after him, in consequence of the observations he made to his mother, and of his excited state. He was then up stairs, and in the same state of mind. They communicated their suspicions to Mrs Richards, his landlady, and begged her to watch him. She promised to do so, and to look after him. In about a quarter of an hour after they left she heard a noise like a "crack" issuing from his room. She ran up-stairs, and saw him lying in the drawing-room, upon which she screamed and ran for Mr Webb, a clergyman, who resides at No. 3. On returning she heard him moan; she lifted up his head, and he breathed. There was a pool of blood by his side. Mr S. S. Perkins, surgeon, was instantly sent for; but on his arrival the deceased was dead. He found his face and shirt covered with blood. His right temporal bone had a compound fracture in it just above the ear, from which were issuing blood and brains. On examining the wound he found a hole in the bone large enough to admit his little finger. The corresponding temporal bone had a comminuted fracture, being broken into several fragments; and underneath the skin, which was not broken; was a round hard substance like a bullet. About a foot from the pool of blood was lying an unloaded pistol with the cap discharged. In the evening, Mr Perkins again visited the house; and in the chest of drawers in the deceased's bedroom he found two leaden balls, and on the mantel piece in the drawing-room were eleven percussion caps and a paper of gunpowder. The breadth of the wound in the head was half-an-inch, and the depth above nine inches across. One of the deceased's sisters stated that he was paying his addresses to a person at Plymouth, who was not a lady. The Jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 11 March 1858
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday last, a boy named SAMUEL DANNELL, son of a sawyer, living East-the-Water, was accidentally drowned by the capsizing of a boat in the river. The deceased had been employed, in conjunction with three other boys named Brooks, Burridge, and Passmore, in removing timber from below the Railway station to Mr Waters' ship-building yard; they had two sunken logs lashed one on each side of their boat, and were thus coming up with the tide, when the rope by which one of the pieces was attached snapped and the weight of the other log capsized the boat, throwing the four boys into the water. Two of them were rescued by timely assistance, one swam ashore, but poor DANNELL was drowned. The body was recovered when the tide receded, and an Inquest was held on the body on Friday afternoon, by T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner for the Borough. The verdict was, of course "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 18 March 1858
EXETER - Distressing Case of Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Axminster Inn,' Paris-street, on Thursday last, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of REBECCA HELEN POETT, who died suddenly on Sunday evening. It appeared that on the 13th ult. the deceased, who was the wife of MAJOR POETT, of Summerland-place, and was about 42 years of age, had a severe miscarriage. She remained in bed about four days afterwards, and did not leave her room until the 26th. On Friday last she walked out, and on Sunday morning attended service at the Catholic chapel, in the Mint. On her return from chapel she complained of being cold, and at dinner-time she seemed somewhat irritable, and her face was suffused with blood. In the evening, however, she rallied and was in her usual spirits, but whilst undressing in her bedroom, at eleven o'clock, she suddenly reeled, and before Major POETT could render any assistance she fell upon the floor. He immediately called the servants, and knowing that she fainted on one occasion after a miscarriage in India, he applied the usual restoratives for fainting, and dispatched a messenger for Mr Harris, surgeon. On that gentleman's arrival, however, shortly afterwards, she had expired. It was stated by Mr Harris, at the Inquest that the deceased had had several miscarriages, which had exhausted her physical powers, and that she died from an apoplectic seizure. The Coroner thought the case an exceedingly distressing one, because the deceased and her husband (the latter was much affected in giving evidence) had always lived on the most affectionate terms. The Jury returned a verdict of "Natural Death."

Thursday 1 April 1858
DAWLISH - Extraordinary Marriage, and Sudden Death of the Bride. - A highly-respectable tradesman of Dawlish, named OLIVER, dies some years since, leaving to his widow by will a considerable property, with the proviso, however, that in the event of her re-marrying, the whole should revert to the children. During her widowhood, MRS OLIVER, it appears, became surety to the amount of £400, for a son-in-law, who had obtained some responsible situation in a large metropolitan brewery establishment. The young man misbehaving himself, the bond was forfeited, and the mother-in-law was called on to pay the money. To evade this loss to her family, the poor woman (acting no doubt upon advice) adopted a course as misguided as it was repugnant to every sentiment of morality and decency. A dissipated youth, about twenty years of age, named CREWS, who was residing at Torquay, and gaining a livelihood as a builder's labourer, was induced to marry the widow, who was fifty-eight years of age, upon the understanding that he should receive £30 for the "job" and start off at once for Australia, where he is said to have friends residing. The impious ceremony took place at the Registry-office, Newton Abbott; the bridegroom received his money, signed some deeds, of the nature of which he professed to be totally ignorant, and set off for Plymouth, whence he was to have sailed; and the bride returned to Dawlish with her friends. The young man, however, soon altered his determination, for very few hours afterwards saw him once more at Torquay, where, with boon companions, he proceeded, as long as the money lasted, to give full vent to his drunken propensities. His return was, of course, a source of great anxiety to the parties concerned, not the least so, it may well be imagined, to his wife. Last Wednesday, Mr F. W. Carter, son of Mr F. R. Carter, solicitor, Torquay, who had, it seems, acted professionally throughout the transactions, proceeded to Dawlish to obtain the signature of MRS CREWS to an affidavit relating to the property. She had returned from the residence of the Commissioner (before whom she had sworn to the truth of its contents) to her own house, in company with Mr Carter, jun., and was in the set of searching for some paper in which to wrap the document, when she fell down and expired! At the Inquest, Mr John F. Knighton, surgeon, showed that her death arose from natural causes "produced by the excitement and terror she was subject to." The Jury in returning that verdict severely censured the parties who had been concerned in the transactions.

Thursday 29 April 1858
TORRINGTON - On Tuesday, the 20th inst., JOHN TUKE, of Coombe, in the parish of Lifton, was engaged in taking down a wall, when it fell upon him, and caused such severe injuries that he died the following evening. An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 6 May 1858
SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - On Friday last, a death of a painfully sudden character occurred, which has cut off an interesting young man from the circle of his family, and deprived the community generally of one who commanded general respect. On the above day, MR ROBERT FURZE, jun., son of ROBERT FURZE, Esq., surgeon, of this town, was proceeding with the execution of his duty as medical officer for the Chittlehampton district, and when nearing the latter village, after having visited his patients at a hamlet called Furze, was seized suddenly with illness, which proved to be a rupture of a blood vessel in the lungs. He immediately attempted to reach Lerwill farm house, near by, and on arriving at the court, he dismounted and walked to the garden gate, which leads to the house. He was in the act of undoing the fastenings, when, through the loss of blood, his strength failed him. He felt himself sinking, and gently descended to the ground, where he was seen by Mr Buckingham, who raised him in his arms. His life was found to be fast ebbing. On attempting to speak, his mouth at each effort filled with blood, and before he could be got into the house the vital spark had fled. A messenger was instantly despatched with the sad intelligence to his family, whom he left in the morning in better spirits than usual, and their feelings on hearing of the sad event may be better imagined than described. MR and MRS FURSE, with MR EDWIN FURSE, a younger brother, were soon on the spot. the Deputy Coroner, J. H. Toller, Esq., held an Inquest the same evening before a respectable Jury, who, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict accordingly. The body of the deceased was at once conveyed home. MR FURSE, who gave promise of eminence in his profession, had only just completed his twenty-second year: he was appointed medical officer to the district of Chittlehampton at Christmas last. He was much beloved and respected by all who knew him, and by none more so than the poor under his medical charge, who shewed their regard for him by shedding tears at the Inquest. With his bereaved family much sympathy is felt, as within a few years the relentless hand of death has taken off three sons, each of whom had just returned home after taking full degrees.

Thursday 13 May 1858
SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest at Northmolton. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Poltimore Arms,' Northmolton, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MR SAMUEL GILLARD, of Southmolton, whose death on the preceding day was occasioned by his falling into the river, near the bottom of Northmolton town. It appeared in evidence that MR GILLARD left his home in the morning in perfect health, in company with a young gentleman from London, named Nash, his wife's nephew, for the purpose of enjoying a day's fishing. As the day advanced, the deceased remarked to his nephew, "I will have another throw and then we will have some refreshment." Just then Mr Nash heard his uncle call out; he ran to him and found that he had fallen off the bank into the river. At the spot named the bank is rather high and the river shallow, consequently the force of the fall was very great, causing such a concussion of the brain that he survived only three hours. He was immediately raised out of the water by his nephew, to whom he remarked, "I have escaped by a narrow chance." He continued, however, to get worse, and had the appearance of being very sleepy, and no one being at hand, his friend continued by him for two hours, when a man passed by and rendered his assistance. A cart was procured, and after a little further delay, the deceased was conveyed to the house of Mr Spicer, surgeon, but before any medical assistance could be afforded, life was almost, if not quite, extinct. Mr Spicer gave evidence that he considered he died from a congestion of the brain caused by submersion in the water. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 20 May 1858
SOUTHMOLTON - Infanticide. - On Saturday last, the inhabitants of this place were horrified at the report of a new-born female infant having been found murdered that morning in the privy of the 'Barnstaple Brewery Tap,' in King-street, kept by William May, and that the supposed mother and murderer had been apprehended and conveyed to the station-house.
On the same evening, at seven o'clock, an Inquest was held at the Town Hall, before James Flexman, Esq., the Borough Coroner, assisted by his deputy, J. T. Shapland, Esq. A respectable Jury was impanneled, consisting of the following gentlemen:- Messrs. R. J. Bickell (foreman), John White, Robert Chant, William Deagon, Mr Huxtable, William Cole, John Warren, Humphrey Nutt, Geo. Davey, James Thomas, Richard Sheppard, John T. Widgery, John Blackford, Wm. Thomas, James Moore, John Thomas, William Kingdom, James Kingsland, James Chapple, Henry Moore, Thomas Huxtable, John Nutt, John Chapple, and William Nutt.
William May stated:- I am keeper of the beer-house, in King-street, in this town, known as the 'Brewery Tap.' About 6 o'clock this morning, I got up for the purpose of throwing water into the privy, which I am accustomed to do every two or three weeks. On throwing in a couple of pails of water, I put in a stick to assist in cleansing the receptacle, when I felt something heavy. I procured a candle, and saw something white. I immediately went and informed my wife that there was something there which ought not to be; and my father-in-law, George Vernon, coming in at the same time. I told him the same. The latter said, You had better send for Mr Fisher, the superintendent of police; and he immediately set out for him. Before his arrival, my wife went to the front door and saw Mr William Huxtable, one of the borough constables, and calling to him, related the circumstance. He went to the spot and first applied a pair of tongs, but finding them ineffectual for the purpose, he took off his coat, thrust down his arm, and took up the body of a female infant child, which we washed in the pump trough, for the purpose of cleansing it. We have had lodging with us for more than a fortnight, a young woman named ELIZABETH, whom I fancied to be in the family way, and communicated my suspicion to my wife, but have seen no change in her during the time she has been living with us. I am from home by day, but come home in the evening; she had always had her supper with me and my wife and at no time failed, but I had seen no change in her, nor heard any noise to lead me to the belief that she had been delivered of a child, although her sleeping room adjoins ours.
William Huxtable, a constable of this borough, gave corroborative evidence, corresponding with the former witness, and further stated:- I asked Mr and Mrs May if they had a lodger in the house, when they informed me they had a young woman upstairs, who had been with them for nearly three weeks, named ELIZABETH. Almost immediately after, a young woman came down the stairs, when I asked her name, which she said was ELIZABETH GARDINER, when I informed her that she must consider herself in my custody, for concealing the birth of a child.
William Henry Fisher, superintendent of police, deposed:- This morning, a person came to my house named Vernon, saying that I was required at the 'Brewery Tap;' and on repairing thither, I was shewn the body of a female child, now produced. I also saw a young woman in custody of Mr Huxtable, who gave the name of ELIZABETH GARDINER, and said she came from Ninford, near Dulverton. I then proceeded upstairs with the landlady, Mrs May, who shewed me into the bed-room which had been occupied by the said person. I examined the room, which gave unquestionable evidence of a recent confinement. I sent for Mr Gardner, surgeon, and after showing him the body of the child, requested him to examine the female, whether she was in a fit state to be removed to the station-house. With his approval, I took her under my custody, as well as the corpse, &c., which had been taken out of the cess-pit.
Sarah May, the wife of the beer-house keeper, was called, but being in a fainting state, she was unable to undergo examination.
Frederick Gardner, surgeon, deposed that he was sent for this morning to the 'Brewery Tap,' where he discovered the body of the female infant child now before them. But his attention was more particularly directed to ELIZABETH GARDINER, a young woman in the custody of Mr Fisher, whether she was in a fit state to be removed to the station. On examining her he found that she had been recently confined, but that she was sufficiently recovered to be removed thither.
It being now past 9 o'clock, the body was handed over to Mr Gardner to make a post mortem examination, and the Inquest was adjourned to Monday.
On Monday morning at 10 o'clock, the Coroner, the Deputy Coroner, and Jury assembled. Sarah May, the wife of William May, of the beer-house, now gave her evidence; she stated:- ELIZABETH GARDINER had lodged in her house from last Wednesday fortnight, out of which she had been twice, in her company - once only alone. She had taxed her with being in the family way, but she had seen no difference in her. She ate her food with good appetite, and witness was not aware that anything had taken place, and never suspected it. this witness was more than two hours under examination, and gave her evidence in a very satisfactory manner.
Frederick Gardner gave evidence that he had made a post mortem examination of the body. He found the child to be mature and well formed; the umbilical cord was torn or cut with a blunt instrument. The body was slightly decomposed, and the face congested; and there were five punctured wounds in different parts of the body. A piece of unbleached rag, about one inch wide and two feet long, was partly thrust into the mouth, depressing the tongue, and forcing in the under lip. The lungs were of a light colour, filled the cavity of the chest, and had a healthy appearance; the heart was rather large, and much stained with blood; the liver appeared to be congested; the stomach and intestines were healthy; the spleen was congested; the scalp was extravasated with blood; and the vessels of the surface of the brain were much gorged, but the substance of the brain was healthy. From the aforenamed facts, he came to the conclusion that the child breathed freely, and that its death was caused by suffocation, but considered that its death might have been caused before it was fully born. The child was, however, born alive. The punctured wounds were made after death and not before; they might have been made in forcing the body down in the dirt; The child had been born about a week; and he had no hesitation in saying that ELIZABETH GARDINER had been recently confined. The rag in the mouth of the child was not sufficient of itself to cause its suffocation without the nose being held.
At the suggestion of the Coroner, Mr Gardner was requested to examine the nose, whether there was any mark of its being held, which took about half-an-hour, during which time the Coroner and Jury went and examined the premises where the body was found, as well as the room of the prisoner. On their return, Mr Gardner reported that he could perceive no mark in the nose, and the Coroner being a medical man, recommended that another surgeon should be called in, as he was not exactly satisfied with the statements respecting the time of the birth of the child. The Jury, however, stated that they were quite satisfied with Mr Gardner's evidence.
The Coroner briefly addressed the Jury, informing them that they must find a verdict as to whether the child was born alive or not; and if born alive, how it came by its death. The Jury retired for a few minutes, and came to the unanimous conclusion that the child was born alive, and that it came to its death by violent strangulation, and returned a verdict accordingly.
Coroner:- That is tantamount to a verdict of "Wilful Murder."
The Jury again retired, and in a very short time returned with a verdict to the effect that ELIZABETH GARDINER was the mother of the child, and that she caused its death by violent strangulation.
The prisoner was then brought up, and in an impressive manner informed by the Coroner that the Jury had found a verdict that she was the mother of the child, of which she had violently caused the death, and that it was his painful duty to commit her for trial to the county gaol. She received the announcement of the verdict with little emotion. She is a poor simple looking girl, about 20 years of age. Her father and mother were in the Court during the whole of the day on Monday, the investigation lasting from ten o'clock to half-past six in the evening.

Thursday 27 May 1858
EXETER - Sudden Death of a Military Officer. - An Inquest was held on Friday, before Mr H. W. Hooper, Coroner, at Exeter, on the body of MR GEORGE ARDEN, late colonel in the East India service. The deceased, who was 74 years of age, was returning from his club about 12 o'clock on the previous night, in company with two other gentlemen, and while conversing with them on the Indian war, he suddenly fell down in the road near his own house and immediately expired. Death was attributed by the surgeon who was called in to the rupture of a blood-vessel near the heart, and a verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

Thursday 24 June 1858
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning. - On Monday evening, at eight o'clock, as a little boy, named RICHARD LEWIS, aged twelve years, son of RICHARD LEWIS, who keeps a bakehouse, in Silver-street, was bathing in the Taw, opposite Black-rock, on the Tawstock side of the river, he unfortunately got out of his depth in one of the numerous pits which abound at that fatal spot, and, before assistance could be rendered him he sank to rise no more. Efforts were made for the recovery of the body, which, however, were unsuccessful until the middle of the next day, when it was picked up by two men named William Wilkey and Thomas Hartnoll. An Inquest held on the body on Tuesday evening, before the Borough Coroner, (R. I. Bencraft, Esq.) and a respectable Jury, of which Governor Trawin was foreman; which resulted in a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 1 July 1858
CLISTHYDON - Suspected Murder At Clisthydon. - On Friday last, the mutilated body of a child was found on the premises of the Rev. J. Huyshe, rector of Clishydon. An Inquest was held on the following day by R. Aberdein, Esq., when it appeared from the evidence that one of the servants having occasion to go to the larder, smelt something offensive; and on lifting the cover of a vessel he was horrified at seeing the remains of a child, which had been cut in pieces. Suspicion immediately fell on SARAH BAZLEY, the cook, who is a widow, with two children. On the day the body was found, she had accompanied her master and mistress to Exeter, and on a messenger being despatched to inform the rev. gentleman of the circumstance, BAZLEY was given into custody, and remained in the hands of the police until the following day, when she was taken to the Inquest. The Jury returned the verdict "that the child was born alive of the body of SARAH BAZLEY, and had been wilfully murdered, but by whom the murder was committed, no evidence appeared to the Jury."

TORRINGTON - Inquest. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Torridge Inn,' in this town, before R. Bremridge, Esq., on the body of JAMES VICARY, found dead on the Commons on the previous Monday, as reported in the Journal of last week. The evidence went to shew that deceased left his work, at about a quarter past four in the afternoon, in his usual health, and passed a man about a mile from where he was found dead, who had some conversation with him. He did not then complain of being ill, and had on his shoulder a pickaxe and shovel and passed on. These tools have not as yet been found. It was the opinion of Dr Jones, that on coming to Coverdale-well he was attacked with an apoplectic fit, and, resting on his stick, fell over the precipice of 15 feet, when his head coming against a sharp stone, caused a concussion of the brain. Verdict accordingly.
[At the time of the agitation of the Corn Laws, the deceased went to London to represent the agricultural labourers of the North of Devon to the committee of the "Anti-Corn League" then sitting in London. He was a fine specimen of hard-working men; he has been married twice and has brought up a large family on small wages. It was stated on that occasion that he had had but one pair of small-clothes from the time of his first marriage to the time of his going to London, and they had been so mended and patched by his diligent wives that the original was lost, and no trace could be found in the numberless patches of the once perfect pair, so that at the time referred to they weighed 40 lbs. Mr Toms, glove manufacturer, of this town, replaced them with a pair of new ones, when the former were sent to London, which were exhibited to the no small amusement of thousands, not only there, but also in Manchester and other large towns. The deceased possessed a good share of common sense; he was a minute observer of passing events, which made him a fit and proper person to give information on the state of the working classes.]

Thursday 8 July 1858
BARNSTAPLE - On Monday last, an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MARY MARCHANT, aged 77 years, who was found dead in her bed, at the house of her brother, JAMES VENNER, in Gaydon-street, in this town, on Sunday morning. When found, blood was oozing from her mouth. The deceased had been ailing for some time, and the opinion of the surgeon, Mr Cooke, was that death had resulted from a rupture of a blood vessel. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 15 July 1858
CLOVELLY - Terrific Thunderstorm - Loss of Life and Property. - On Thursday evening last, at between eight and nine o'clock, a violent thunderstorm visited this neighbourhood, and left fearful traces in the hamlet of Buscott, about half-a-mile from Clovelly, on the road to Barnstaple. As the calamity was attended with fatal consequences - the death of a poor woman named SUSAN GLOVER, wife of a labouring man - an Inquest was held on Friday, on the body of the victim, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner. The deceased, with her husband and their family, occupied one of four cottages belonging to Sir James H. Williams, Bart., of Clovelly Court - two being covered with slates and the others thatched; in one of these the casualty occurred, and the electric fluid caused the total destruction of the houses which were covered with the inflammable material. Further particulars will be best learnt by the following depositions taken at the Inquest:- JAMES GLOVER deposed:- The deceased was my wife. On Thursday, the 8th day of July, the deceased was in my bedroom, at about eight o'clock in the evening. I had come home from work and was poorly, and had gone to bed. On my wife's return home, she came to my room; at about five or ten minutes after, there was a most vivid flash of lightning, accompanied with thunder; the lightning was so vivid that the room appeared to be on fire. My wife was in the act of making up the children's bed, which was in the same room, when she exclaimed, "Oh!" and fell forward on the bed. I called out for assistance, and Mary Ann Harris came up; she moved up the body of deceased. The house adjoining was on fire, and she got deceased on the floor; she was dead almost instantly. The body was taken out of the house, fearing the house would take fire, and removed to the house of William Ashton.
Mary Ann Harris, wife of Richard Harris, carpenter, deposed:- On Thursday last, at about eight o'clock, I went into the house of James Glover. I was in the kitchen. MRS GLOVER had gone upstairs with a cup of tea to her husband, who was ill. While deceased was upstairs, there was a tremendous flash of lightning and thunder. The houses adjoining were set on fire. JAMES GLOVER called to me to come up. I went up, and saw deceased lying on her face and hands on the children's bed. I heard persons calling out that the houses adjoining were on fire, and I lifted up deceased and laid her on the floor. Deceased said, as far as I could understand her, "Lift me up." I washed her face with cold water, and put a drop to her mouth, but she died almost instantly. There was a mark on the chest of about the size over of my hand, as if she had been scalded.
The Coroner summed up, and the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally killed by Lightning."
The deceased had been confined only some six weeks since, and leaves behind, to lament her untimely end, a sick husband and five small children; and, to add to the widower's embarrassments, the great bulk of his goods and chattels were destroyed in the efforts that were made to save the burning buildings. The poor woman had been to work at Clovelly Court on the day of the calamity. The characters of both husband and wife were unimpeachable, while their industry and honesty were remarkable. Sir James Williams sent the widower £5, the rector of the parish (the Rev. James Chichester) also sent a sovereign, and other relief has been forwarded to the bereaved and distressed family, who have thus suddenly lost their dearest earthly friend.

Thursday 22 July 1858
BISHOP'S TAWTON - Suicide. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at Venn, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, on the body of MR WILLIAM JOCE, yeoman, who had on the day preceding put an end to his earthly existence by hanging himself. A Jury having been impanneled, proceeded with the Coroner (Richard Bremridge, Esq.) to view the body, after which the following evidence was taken:- Mary Muxworthy, household servant of the deceased, sworn:- I lived with deceased two years, as servant. My mistress went to Barnstaple market, yesterday. My master was at home in the afternoon; he went out at about four o'clock; when he had been out a short time, I went to look for him. (I had always been obliged to do so, if he went out.) I went down the road, and could see nothing of him. I returned again to the house, and, finding deceased had not returned, I went out a second time. I looked into the workshop, and there saw the deceased hanging. I then ran for assistance. I saw Catherine Shapland, and told her what I had seen; I then saw William Buckingham, and he went with William Woollacott to the shop where deceased was hanging. - William Buckingham, of Landkey, labourer, deposed:- I reside about half a mile from deceased, and have known him for many years. For the last year he has been in a desponding state of mind On Friday, 12th of July (yesterday), about half-past seven o'clock, Mary Muxworthy came to me, at Hill, crying, and said, "Master is dead." I asked her where he was dead. She replied in the shop, hanging up. I went immediately to the shop, accompanied by William Woollacott, and there found deceased hanging to a rope, one end of which was fastened to a pig stock, and thrown over the beam of the shop, the other fastened round the neck of deceased. The body was quite dead when we took it down.
William Arundell Dene, deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside in Barnstaple. Last evening I was sent for to see deceased. I found him quite dead, and, from the appearance of the body, life must have been extinct for two hours. I examined the neck and head of deceased, and found a black mark round the neck, which must have been caused during life; it had such an appearance as would be presented if a rope had been drawn tightly round the throat, and I am of opinion that deceased died from strangulation. I produce the certificate of William Curry, Esq., Surgeon. I know the handwriting of Mr Curry: the certificate is in his handwriting. I called on Mr Curry this morning: he is ill, and unable to attend the Inquest. He had attended deceased for many years: he considered him of weak intellect, and of late suffering from derangement of mind. - "I certify that I have attended MR JOCE many years; from a fit he was rendered almost speechless, and he afterwards fell into a low, desponding state. He was of eccentric habits, and I have long considered him in an unsound state of mind." - W. Curry, Barnstaple." The Jury having consulted, returned a verdict "That the deceased hanged himself, being at the time lunatic and of unsound mind." The deceased was 80 years of age, and in easy circumstances.

Thursday 29 July 1858
ILFRACOMBE - The Lately Drowned. - It will be recollected that on the 12th inst., three lives were unfortunately lost off this harbour by the upsetting of a small sailing boat. Nothing had been seen of any of the bodies until Monday, just a fortnight after the sad event, when one of them, the little boy, named BUCKINGHAM, was picked up at Sandy Bay, near Combmartin, and carried in there. the body was greatly mutilated, and could not have been identified except by the clothes. An Inquest was held on the remains by R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the same day, and a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned. The boat was picked up a few days after the mournful occurrence by a pilot skiff.

BARNSTAPLE - Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Stafford Arms,' in Trinity-street, before R. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of BARTHOLOMEW KING, mariner, who died in his bed that morning, after a few hours' previous illness. The evidence of his widow and son shewed that nothing had occurred to excite their apprehensions up to a few minutes before his decease; and, after the surgeon (Mr Gamble) who examined the body had given his testimony that it exhibited no bruises or marks of violence, and that it was probable that death resulted from the rupture of some large blood vessel, the Jury returned as their verdict - "That the deceased died suddenly by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 19 August 1858
CLOVELLY AND HARTLAND - A Man Drowned While Drunk. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL PENNINGTON, who was drowned on the day preceding off Clovelly Quay. The only facts known were disclosed in the evidence adduced. - Jeremiah Gale, deposed as follows:- Yesterday afternoon I happened to be by the side of the Quay, in Clovelly. A boy named Philip Hopgood told me there was a man in the water. I immediately went out to him, and, whilst he was in the act of sinking, I caught hold of him and swam to a boat with him. He was dead when I got to him. I am informed the man's name was SAMUEL PENNINGTON. I held on to the boat with one hand and with the other supported the man until a boat came, when he was put on board and taken to the shore. I got out to the deceased in less than a minute after the alarm was given, but found him quite dead. Philip Hopgood deposed:- Yesterday afternoon I happened to be on Clovelly Quay, and saw the deceased, who was tipsy, waving his hat. I afterwards saw him go into the water with his clothes on. He went out a little way and came in again, and then went out again; he appeared to be making for a boat. When he got out in the water to about five or six feet in depth, he began splashing; when, thinking he was sinking, I called to Jeremiah Gale, who went to him. Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned."

FATAL RESULT OF FURIOUS RIDING - The learned coroner also held an Inquest on the body of JOHN HOWARD, of Hartland, who met with his death under the following circumstances:- James Adams deposed:- I knew the deceased; he was about 13 years of age. Yesterday morning, being at Hartland town, I met him He had come to the Post-office, and had left his pony in a field to eat some vetches. I was also riding a pony, and waited whilst the deceased went into the field for his pony. We then rode on together towards the Abbey. We galloped our ponies - he was before and I was behind. When we came to Bow-bridge, HOWARD said he could not hold his pony in, and I said, "If you are going to race, let us have fair play." I urged my pony forward, and got before the deceased. There was a bullock crossing the road at the time. I got clear of the bullock, but, fearing the deceased would not, I looked back and saw his pony just rising and the deceased lying in the road. I got off and ran to him and shook and spoke to him, but could get no answer. I then rode off to Hartland Mills for assistance, and Mrs Pickard and a boy came, and the deceased was removed to his deceased's father's house, at Stoke, in Hartland. - Eliza Pickard said:- I live at Hartland Mill, and am the wife of Thomas Pickard. Between ten and eleven o'clock yesterday morning, James Adams came to me and said, "Do come over here, JOHNNY HOWARD has fallen from the pony, and is dead in the road." I accordingly went, and found him lying in the road on his face and hands. I took him up and placed him beside the hedge and sent to James Adams for assistance. I remained by him until assistance came, when he was taken to his father's house. I had seen the two boys riding - trotting very fast - just before the last witness came to me. Adams was a butcher's boy. William Vine deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Hartland. About eleven o'clock yesterday morning I was sent for to attend on the deceased. On the road I overtook the persons who were carrying the body on a plank, and accompanied them to his father's house I examined the deceased and found a bruise over the right eye and a mark a little higher up. There was a swelling in his left arm, but no bones broken. I considered that he had sustained a concussion of the brain., I prescribed the usual remedies. I considered that a blood-vessel had been ruptured on the brain. I saw him again last evening, and this morning, when I was there, at about half-past eight o'clock, I found he had been dead about three minutes. Death was caused by a rupture of a blood-vessel on the brain. - Verdict, "Accidentally Killed by being Thrown from a Pony." The Coroner suitably admonished the boy Adams (who was in the 12th year of his age, and who appeared acutely to feel his situation) on the impropriety of riding so fast with his late unfortunate companion, and expressed his hope that the sad event which had happened would operate as a warning to him for the future.

Thursday 9 September 1858
BRATTON FLEMING - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held by Richard Bremridge, County Coroner, on the body of MR RD. HUNT, who had put a period to his existence on the day preceding. The circumstances of this sad event will appear from the following depositions of the witnesses. Mr James Tucker:- I saw him on Wednesday last, about three or four o'clock in the afternoon in a field adjoining Twitchen wood, in the parish of Arlington; I had some conversation with him; he spoke of the weather; I thought he appeared in a low desponding state, and did not take his eyes from the ground; on going home I remarked that he was much altered and appeared very low spirited. MR JOHN HUNT deposed:- Deceased was my uncle; he had been living at Haxton up to the 18th August, but then he came to reside at Bratton Town; a fire took place at Haxton on the 8th of August and some of the outbuildings were burnt down and farm produce destroyed. The fire and the loss he sustained, and being obliged to leave his house appeared to have depressed his spirits; he has been in a desponding state ever since; yesterday morning my aunt came to my house and told me he had not been home for the night, and wished me to go and search for him. She told me he had left home to go to Mr Gill's, at Arlington. I went to my father's at Rudge, and to Mr Dennis's at Arlington; Mr Dennis told me he had been there on Wednesday, but left about two o'clock. I then went to Twitchen to inquire if he had been there, and was informed that Mr Tucker had seen him passing through the corn-field the day before; I then searched Twitchen wood, and found deceased in the lower part of the wood, hanging to an oak tree by a cord. He was quite dead. Mr George Dennis also gave evidence in confirmation of the preceding statements. - Verdict, "Temporary Insanity." The deceased was a man well known and respected in the neighbourhood. He had been for a great many years secretary to the Bratton Friendly Societies, and had held several parochial offices, the duties of which he faithfully and efficiently performed. He practised as a farrier, and was generally known by the sobriquet of "Dr Hunt."

Thursday 16 September 1858
BIDEFORD - Melancholy Accident. - On Monday last, three young men, pupil teachers at the National School, in this town, went, after the labours of the day, to refresh themselves by bathing in the river, near Chircombe. The tide at the time was at its lowest ebb, and no danger was in the least apprehended. Before, however, they had been long in the water, LEWIS WERRY was discovered to be in distress, when Trott (another of the party) swam to his assistance, but the former laid hold of him so firmly, that he was obliged to disengage himself. The deceased immediately sank to rise no more. As he could swim, it is supposed he must have been seized with cramp, and was thus deprived of all power to save himself. Means to recover his body were immediately resorted to, but he was not found till all hopes of his restoration were past. The deceased was the son of MR W. WERRY, cooper, at the Apps Brewery; he was a promising youth man, of 18 years of age, and was pursuing his studies with much credit under Mr Oliver, the master of the National School, by whom he was much respected, and his loss is severely felt by his family, and all who knew him. On Tuesday, an Inquest was held on his remains, by T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of 'Accidental Death' was returned.

Thursday 30 September 1858
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Saturday, at the 'Exeter Inn,' in this town, by R. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GRACE WILKEY, aged 62, who was found dead, and lying on the floor of her house, on the night preceding, at between ten and eleven o'clock. Several witnesses were examined, who stated that the deceased was apparently in her usual state of health but a short period previous to her death; and, as she had had some dispute with other members of the family respecting the right to certain property, and the body on being examined by the Jury discovered a mark on the head which was not satisfactorily accounted for, the Inquest was adjourned for a post mortem examination, which was made by Mr Cooke, surgeon. In the evening the evidence of the medical gentleman left no doubt as to the cause of death being a disease of the heart - a fatal issue being accelerated by the deceased's habitual and inordinate use of ardent spirits. A verdict to that effect was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Another Inquest was held by the Borough Coroner, on Wednesday (yesterday) evening, on the body of ELIZABETH JONES, of Northam. A respectable Jury was impanneled, of which Mr John Barry was foreman, and from the Inquiry, which took place at the 'Barley Mow' public house, the following facts were elicited: viz., that the deceased, who lived as housekeeper with Mr Balson, of Northam, and had been ailing for five weeks past, on Tuesday morning left her master's house and proceeded to Barnstaple by train, on her way to Bratton Fleming, where her daughter resides. She was next noticed by Mr Cornish, bookseller, sitting on a wheel-barrow on the platform of the Barnstaple Station, in an exhausted state and scarcely able to articulate. Mr C. instantly rendered her all the help in his power - got a 'bus and had her removed to the house of a friend; sent for a medical man, and visited her at intervals during the day; but she gradually sank, and in the evening expired. It was stated by a witness from Northam, that deceased refused to allow any one to accompany her to Barnstaple, and that she was most anxious to reach her daughter's house. Mr Cooke, surgeon, thought the cause of death to be disease of the heart; and the Jury returned the following verdict - "That the deceased died from Natural Causes, but that her death was accelerated by the journey she was improperly allowed to take from Northam to Barnstaple, on the morning of the day she died." Too much praise cannot be given to Mr Cornish and the railway officials, for their kind attentions to the unfortunate woman.

CHITTLEHAMPTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at Clappery Mills, in the parish of Chittlehampton, on the body of a little boy, three years old, son of MR MOLE, miller, who accidentally fell into the river on the previous evening, and was drowned. The child was carried down the stream about half-a-mile Verdict accordingly.

KENN - Fatal Accident. - A fatal accident occurred on Monday evening last, at the farm of Mr James Baker, in the parish of Kenn. It appeared that WILLIAM BLACKMORE, the deceased, was working the garden behind the house, belonging to Mr Baker, in company with two other men named Heard and Lucas, when, at the conclusion of their work, they were asked by Mr Baker to take a cup of cider. Accordingly they went to the cellar, where they partook of a little cider, when Mr Baker took up his gun that was lying across two cider casks, and handed it to a boy named Clarke to clean, considering it was unloaded. Shortly afterwards he took it from the boy and blew into the barrel, and considering it was not quite clear he put on a cap, and as he was pressing the cap down with his thumb, the gun went off, and lodged the contents in the side of BLACKMORE. Messengers were speedily despatched for Mr Collins, surgeon, residing with Sir Lawrence Palk, at Haldon, and Mr Pycroft, of Kenton. Mr Collins soon after arrived, and after examining the wound, advised them to take the wounded man to the hospital, where he died about one o'clock on the Tuesday morning. An Inquest was held on Wednesday, at two o'clock in the afternoon, at the 'Blue Boar Inn,' Magdalen street, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, when Dr Biggs, the house surgeon at the hospital gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from the severe shock and prostration of the nervous powers arising from the injuries received. The Jury thereupon returned a verdict of "Homicide, by misadventure." The deceased leaves a wife and three children to lament his untimely end.

Thursday 7 October 1858
BISHOPSNYMPTON - An Inquest was held at the 'Lion Inn,' on Tuesday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, to inquire into the cause of the death of JOHN CHANTER, the illegitimate son of JANE CHANTER, of the above parish. It had been reported through the village that the child had been allowed to waste away, and that it had not received proper nourishment and care from the mother. Mrs Hayes, who had attended the mother as midwife in her confinement, stated that it was a very fine child at its birth, but shortly after it began to pine away, but she did not think it was necessary to have any doctor to it. It was born on the 31st of August, 1858; on the 16th September she took it to Mr Thorne's the clergyman of the parish, to have it privately baptized; and she did not see anything more of the child after that until Sunday morning last, when the mother sent for her to see the child as she thought it was getting worse, but when she came the child was dead. She had always, on the several occasions she visited the mother and child, seen the mother feeding it, and she appeared to shew a mother's affection for it. Mr Flexman, surgeon, who made a post mortem examination, gave evidence that death proceeded from Natural Causes, and not from lack of food. The Jury unanimously gave their verdict that the child died from "Natural Causes."

TORRINGTON - Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at Kinscott, in the parish of St. Giles, before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a little boy, the son of GEORGE FOLLAND, carpenter, who was found drowned in a well on the previous evening. The deceased had been at school in the morning of the day, and after dinner was ordered again to go by his mother, but objecting to do so, he was allowed to remain away. He was preparing to pick black-berries, and after taking a can from the back premises, it is supposed he went to the well in the garden for the purpose of washing it out, and fell into the well. The evening advancing without any intelligence of the child, the parents became alarmed, and persons were dispatched in all directions in search of him, but without success. At length the well was thought of, and on its being examined, the hate of the child was discovered floating on the water, and soon the body was found at the bottom. It appears that the mother and a neighbour had both been to draw water from the well in the course of the afternoon, but had not perceived the cap of the child or the body.

Thursday 21 October 1858
EXETER - Awful Fire. Mother and Four Children Burnt to Death. - On Wednesday evening, a fire broke out in the parish of St. Thomas's, Exeter, and was attended with the most shocking and harrowing results. It seems that about a quarter to seven o'clock, an alarm was given that a fire was raging at a house in the occupation of Mr Moxey, adjoining the Vicarage. Messengers were despatched to the city, and the West of England, Norwich Union, and Sun Engines were speedily on the spot. There was a plentiful supply of water; and the engines were all in full play at about twenty minutes past seven. By this time, however, the insignificant flame which was at first seen had spread like wild fire; and the whole premises were soon enveloped. A line was formed to the entrance of the premises by a company of the East Devon; only those who really had any business inside were admitted; and this greatly facilitated the operations of the firemen. In about an hour after the occurrence vast multitudes of people from Exeter poured to the scene of conflagration; many hundreds having taken up their position in the Cowick Fields, where a good view of the fire was obtained. An incessant stream of water was poured on the burning pile; but so much headway had the devouring element made, that but little impression could be brought to bear, and the whole neighbourhood was completely illuminated. The roof of the premises was thatched; and just about eight o'clock the beams gave way, the roof fell in, and sent a dense mass of flaming sparks and ignited pieces of wood into the air. the wind was blowing south-west; and fears were entertained as to the safety of the house occupied by the vicar, the Rev. W. H. Howard; and also for the thatched houses - Southwood's Buildings - on the opposite side of the road. The vicarage house, however, had a slated roof: and the occupants, of the houses in Southwood's Buildings wisely mounted on the roofs, and as soon as a spark was seen to fall upon it, it was immediately extinguished. After the roof of the premises had fallen in, great fears were entertained as to the safety of the occupiers of some of the apartments, inasmuch as it was stated by many persons that they had heard faint cries of "murder" proceeding from the rooms occupied by a family, named JOSLIN. The other occupants had all been seen - most of them being engaged in attempting to save what furniture was dragged out from the burning building, but no person could remember having seen anything of the JOSLINS. Fears grew worse, and an effort was made by the men of the different fire brigades to get into the room in which the family usually lived; but the fire was of such a terrific nature, that all attempts were fruitless. One man, it is said, succeeded in putting his hand through the window, and had actually got hold of MRS JOSLIN by the hair of her head, but the heat became so intense that he was reluctantly compelled to relinquish his grasp. This left no doubt in the minds of those present, that the poor woman and her children were enclosed in the room - the very place in which the fire seemed to have concentrated, - and as soon as it became known, a thrill of terror ran through the multitude. the premises continued burning till nearly twelve o'clock; and the engines having been directed to the spot in which the family were supposed to have been, an immense quantity of water was thrown on that part, and at last the firemen were enabled to approach it, lift up the pieces of fallen debris, and to dig in search of the bodies. After digging for some considerable time, a head of a child was found. The scene amongst the friends of the family at this moment was truly heartrending and indescribable. The child's head was eagerly caught at, and was recognised as one of the JOSLIN family. Even up to this time there were those who had been, as it were - "hoping against hope," but now their worst fears were realised. The firemen proceeded with their task and quickly found the lower extremities of a child; then the trunk of the unfortunate woman was picked up; and afterwards parts of the other two children were also dug out. Not above one half of the four bodies was found; the rest must have been literally burnt. the remains of the bodies were taken to Mr Jennings, 'Saddler's Arms,' to await the Coroner's Inquest. The mother, ANN JOSLIN, was about thirty-two years of age; the children burnt were:- EMILY, six years old; AMELIA, five years, JAMES, three and half years, and an infant, ELIZA, aged about nine months. The other child, ELIZABETH, has been for some time in delicate health, and slept out every night with her aunt, and she was providentially fetched from the house by the aunt about ten minutes before the fire broke out. The premises were a sort of old fashioned double-house, the entrance to which is through a large gate into a garden. Mr Moxey, the sexton of St. Thomas's Church, and a man, named Stone (the vicar's coachman) occupied the front part of the premises; and the JOSLINS and a Mrs Callender resided in the back part. Moxey and Stone, as soon as the alarm was raised, escaped with their families. The unfortunate woman JOSLIN, it seems, had been cooking her husband's supper, who is a joiner, and was shortly expected to arrive home. It is believed she or her children must have had occasion to go to a closet near the stair-case, in which shavings were kept, and thus some of them became ignited; because the fire was there strongest, and prevented the unfortunate people from making their escape. There is no doubt, we believe, that that was the origin of the fire.

Thursday 28 October 1858
ILFRACOMBE - A Child Mortally Burnt. - On Friday, an Inquest was held, at Berrydown Cross, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of EMILY JEWELL, a girl between seven and eight years of age, the daughter of JAMES JEWELL, a labourer, residing in that hamlet. It appeared that on Wednesday morning, the father and mother left the house, the former to go to his work and the latter to the mill to get her grist ground, leaving the deceased and a younger child to take care of themselves as best they could. After the mother was gone, the children fastened the door by pushing something over the latch to prevent other children entering the house. In the course of the morning the neighbours perceived the smell of fire, and soon ascertained that it proceeded from JEWELL'S house. As the door was fastened they had to force it open; and, on doing so, found the elder girl burnt in a miserable manner. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of this town was sent for, and on his arrival, pronounced the case to be hopeless. the poor child lingered until the next morning, when death put a period to her sufferings. The verdict of the Jury was in accordance with the facts, but the Coroner thought it his duty to address the parents in strong terms of censure for their carelessness in leaving children so young in the house by themselves. It appeared that about eight years ago they had a child, of about the same age, burnt to death under similar circumstances, and a third had since suffered from a like casualty, though the injuries had not proved mortal.

Thursday 25 November 1858
FREMINGTON - Accidental Death. - A melancholy and fatal accident occurred on Monday evening last, to MR WILLIAM DENNIS, a respectable yeoman, of Kennacott, in the parish of Fremington. MR DENNIS, as honorary secretary to the Mid-Barnstaple and Torrington Ploughing Society, had been doing business at Mr Shapland's, at Hele, in the parish of Tawstock, and was returning toward his home on horseback, accompanied by Mr Joshua Downing, of Horwood; when near the village of St. John's Chapel, he was thrown from his horse and received such injuries in his head as to cause his death on the following Wednesday (yesterday) morning. An Inquest was held last evening, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr A. L. Crocker was foreman, when the following evidence was adduced:-
Dr Budd deposed:- Between twelve and one o'clock yesterday morning I was sent for to attend the deceased, WILLIAM DENNIS. When I came, I found him in the front of a fire in a cottage, at Saint John's Chapel, in the parish of Tawstock. His head was supported by Mr Downing and Mr Somer. He was perfectly sensible, and his limbs were exceedingly rigid. Blood was flowing copiously from his right ear. The pupil of the right eye was dilated and insensible to light. The pupil of the left was contracted to a point. His breathing was stertorous and his whole body extremely cold and in a state of collapse. There was a very slight cut, with some abrasion around the cut. there were no other marks of violence on the body. He vomited immediately on my arrival, and had been sick before I saw him. the cause of his death was effusion of blood on the brain, the result of the blow upon his head.
Mr Joshua Downing deposed:- I am a yeoman, and reside at Horwood. I knew the deceased, WILLIAM DENNIS. He resided at Fremington, and was a yeoman. The evening before last, I was in company with the deceased, at Mr Shapland's, at Hele Farm, in the parish of Tawstock. We left his house about a quarter after eleven, on horseback, to return to our respective homes. When about thirty land-yards from Saint John's Chapel, being a little in advance of the deceased, I heard a noise as if his horse had fallen, and presently the horse came towards me. I got off my horse, and led the two a little back, and called to the deceased, but he did not answer. Finding he did not speak, I went for assistance, and Mr Pristacott came. We went to the body, and Mr Pristacott raised it in a sitting posture. He did not speak and was quite insensible. His stick was by his side. Mr Pristacott went for further assistance, whilst I remained with the deceased. Wm. Lewis came, and we put the deceased upon a gate and carried him to a cottage near, when Dr Budd was immediately sent for, and I was with the deceased when the doctor came. I am informed he died about twenty minutes before eleven o'clock this morning, and that he was twenty-seven years of age. The road was very slippery, as it was freezing. His horse was a quiet animal, and the deceased was perfectly sober.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." - Deceased was a young man of respectable family, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. The horse had an abrasion on the near side, and the blow which proved fatal to the deceased was on the left side of his head. Dr Budd made a suggestion in the course of his evidence that parties when riding would do wisely if they wore hats instead of caps.

Thursday 2 December 1858
CHITTLEHAMPTON - A Man Killed In a Quarry. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, in the parish of Chittlehampton, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the County, on the body of a labourer, named JOHN DOWN, there lying dead. From the evidence adduced, it appeared that DOWN was employed in Collacott Quarry, in that parish, on the previous Saturday, when a large quantity of rubbish fell; the deceased and his companions endeavoured to get out of the way, but the former stumbled, and at that moment a large stone, weighing 30 lbs., dislodged from the top, came into contact with his head, severely fracturing the skull and causing instant death. The body was removed to the house of Mr Cottle; Mr Gardner, surgeon of Southmolton, was called in, but the poor fellow was beyond the reach of medical aid. Verdict - "Accidental Death." - The deceased has left a widow and ten children to mourn their sad and sudden bereavement.

KINGSBRIDGE - Fatal Fight. - On Wednesday evening this town was thrown into a state of consternation by a report that a man was killed at the 'Anchor Hotel.' It appeared that two men called BLAKE, a sawyer, and Lidstone, a tailor, had fought, and that BLAKE had been killed on the spot. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday, before A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when, after hearing the evidence as to the cause of death, the Inquest was adjourned to Monday morning, in order to have a post mortem examination of the body made. On Monday morning the Jury again assembled, and after hearing the evidence of Mr F. S. Cornish, returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against John Lidstone.

Thursday 30 December 1858
TORQUAY - Dreadful Calamity. - Two Persons Killed and Four Seriously Injured. - We are today called upon to record the particulars of a catastrophe involving consequences so calamitous as to be scarcely paralleled by any that has ever before occurred within the neighbourhood of Torquay The scene of the accident - Beacon Terrace - has ever been the favourite resort of invalids and others visiting Torquay. This sad accident occurred at about a quarter to one o'clock on Tuesday morning. A fearful crash disturbed some of the inhabitants of the locality from their slumbers, and on hastening to the spot from which it emanated a scene which will not soon be effaced from their minds presented itself. The back apartments of Nos. 2, 3 and 4, Beacon Terrace - were reduced to a heap of ruins. Each of these were kept as lodging-houses. Mr and Mrs Tanner were sleeping in the back apartments of No. 2, Miss Thomas, a governess, and a little girl four years of age, occupied an adjoining bedroom, and two servants had retired to rest in a room below; and in No. 8, Mr and Mrs Hellier, and in No. 4, MR and MRS HAMBLING were the only occupants of the back apartments. The confusion that at first succeeded the accident was of course very great, but immediately it became evident to those who had been attracted to the spot, that human life was in peril the most strenuous efforts were made to save those who were buried beneath the debris. Melancholy indeed was the reward of those engaged in searching for MR and MRS HAMBLING. Their mangled bodies too plainly proved that the most diligent exertions could not have saved their lives. They were so fearfully crushed and mutilated that death must have been instantaneous. At the adjoining house, No. 3, a more cheering result attended the kind offices of the neighbours. Mr and Mrs Hellier were discovered and rescued in time, we hope, to save life; although the injuries they received are of such a dangerous character that their condition is very precarious at this moment. Mr Hellier sustained a broken thigh, a compound fractured leg, and serious internal hurts. Mrs Hellier's collar bone was broken and her body dreadfully bruised. At No. 2, a still happier result crowned their exertions; for, although with considerable difficulty rescued, Mr and Mrs Tanner were not so seriously injured as to justify unfavourable apprehensions respecting their recovery. The other occupants escaped almost miraculously. The sufferers are receiving every attention that surgical skill can bestow. The bodies of MR and MRS HAMBLING await the Coroner's Inquest.

BRAUNTON - Death Caused By The Kick Of A Horse. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Braunton Abbots' public house, to inquire into the cause and circumstances of the death of HENRY FOWLES, a boy about seven years of age; which took place early in the evening of the previous Sunday. John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the County, presided. The following facts were elicited. It appeared that on Christmas-day, at about one o'clock in the afternoon, as deceased was going through Church-street, two horses belonging to Mr Lovering, a farmer residing in the village, happened to be going to water, in the same direction. On the back of one of these animals was a little boy of about the same age as FOWLES; the other had no rider. When they arrived within about twenty yards of the stream that flows by the Church-yard, the boy, FOWLES, laid hold of the tail of the horse that had no rider, which inflicted a kick from the effects of which the child died on the following day. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts - with a caution to all farmer and others against allowing their horses to go at large through the village without a proper guide. They also expressed a hope that the police would deal with all persons whose cattle should be found unattended in the public roads.

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Military Affray at Plymouth. - For some time past an unpleasant feeling has existed between the 17th Regiment and the 2nd Warwick Militia, both quartered in the Citadel. About 100 of the 17th are recruits from Ireland, and their cause is warmly espoused by the inhabitants of King-street West (formerly Stonehouse-lane), many of whom are Irish. It appears that on Sunday evening Sergeant Clay, No. 2 Company, 2nd Warwick, was on duty there with a picket of eight men, and that in the back room of a beershop, the 'George and Dragon', he found four of the 17th, one of whom told him that none of the Warwicks were there. The sergeant took offence at the man's manner, and threatened that if impertinent he should be taken out. The reply was that he could not do it; on which the sergeant ran out and ordered the picket to draw their bayonets. An inhabitant of the house, Jerry Hyde, went into the passage, and placed his hands against the wall, with the intention of impeding the advance of the picket; but the four 17th men stooped under his arms and went into the street; they found the picket in the road, and all walked on the same way. Shortly after one of the 17th, JOHN LAWNER, was observed with his belt raised in the act of striking the sergeant, who held one arm to defend his head, and with the other made an oblique thrust with his bayonet. The point entered under LAWNER'S heart and penetrated a large artery behind. The wounded man ran back to the beerhouse, sat down, exclaimed "I'm stabbed!" and expired in three minutes; scarcely any blood flowed, as death was caused by internal haemorrhage. He was a native of Ireland, about 20 years old, and a tailor by trade. Sergeant Clay has been suffering from hysterical depression ever since. At the Inquest on the body of LAWNER, a verdict of "Manslaughter" was returned against Sergeant Clay, 2nd Warwick Militia.

Thursday 13 January 1859
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, at the 'Windsor Hotel, Bradiford, in this Borough, on view of the body of JOHN STEWARD, an old inhabitant of that village. It appears that the deceased was returning from Pilton towards his house on the night of Saturday, the 1st instant, between ten and eleven o'clock, and, when near Under Winnow, he fell down, and, being intoxicated at the time and incapable of regaining his feet, lay in the road until a miller's cart passing, a wheel went over his body. He was shortly after discovered by a man named Dennis, and taken to his house; medical assistance was procured, but he died on Monday last from the effects of the injuries received. Verdict - "Accidental Death." The Jury requested the Coroner to report the facts of this case to the lighting Inspectors, and to suggest the necessity of public lamps being placed in the road where the accident happened, as well as at Bradiford, the inhabitants of which village contribute their quota to the lighting rate.

TAUNTON - Frightful Accident In An Express Train. - On Saturday last, an Inquiry was held before W. W. Munckton, Esq., Coroner, at the 'Railway Tap,' adjoining the Taunton Station on the Bristol and Exeter Railway, touching the death of GEORGE BAKER, a youth of 18, son of JOHN BAKER, gas fitter, of Penn-street, Exeter. The father of the deceased identified the body, and stated that his son had lately had 14 days' leave of absence from his ship at Plymouth, and left his house at Bristol on the previous day to travel by express to Plymouth, in company with other lads in the same service. Thomas Prewett deposed:- I am a sailor, and a second-class boy on board H. M. guard ship Impregnable, now in Plymouth harbour. I have been about fifteen months in the service; the deceased was in the same vessel in a similar capacity. We had leave of absence for fourteen days - from 24th December to 6th January. Yesterday myself and the deceased, with Henry Johnson, George Poole, and James Burgess, left Bristol for Plymouth by the express train at 12.53. We travelled in a second-class carriage. Before leaving Bristol we had one quart of beer amongst five of us; and they got into a carriage by themselves. Before the train had proceeded two miles deceased sat up on the window's edge, and put out his head and body as far as he could sitting upright. He rode like this for about a mile. I then pulled him in and gave him a smack on the head. I caught hold of him and threw him on the floor of the carriage. Deceased got up and cried for about ten minutes. He attempted to strike me when I pulled him in. After he had done crying he got up again and sat on the window, as before I pulled him in and put him on the floor again. At the next station where the train stopped a man came into the carriage. Deceased got upon the window again just as we were leaving the station, and the man pulled him down; he then used bad language towards the man and showed fight. The man told deceased he would give him a good shaking and put him out at the next station if he did not behave himself better. He then got up again and opened the window, and the man pulled him back again. The first station we stopped at after this the man got out. For a while, as the train proceeded deceased sat very comfortable, and just before the train reached the Durston station he got up and sat on the edge of the window again. When the train stopped he got down of his own accord; and when the train moved from the station he again got up to the window. I persuaded him to come down, telling him I had heard of many dangers, and he might meet with an accident; he would not get down, and I then went on the other side of the carriage. Just as we passed an arch I heard a scream; and I got up, and Henry Johnson, who had been sitting near the deceased, called out, "Come and help me." I went over to him and saw deceased lying right out of the window, with his head downwards, and Henry Johnson holding him by the right leg. I caught hold of deceased by the waistband of his trousers, and we pulled him in. I found he was quite dead; I saw he had a fracture of the back part of the head and the brain was hanging out there. He had had but one glass of beer and was more up for wickedness than anything else. Deceased was generally a wild kind of boy when on board. When we stopped at Taunton station I got out and reported the accident, and the body was soon afterwards brought to this inn. Deceased was sitting on the right-hand side or north side of the carriage. John Williams:- I am a packer on the Bristol and Exeter railway, and live at West Monkton; I was working yesterday at the Creech "invert," when the down express came along. Just as the train passed I saw a person hanging out of the window of one of the carriages; he was in a leaning posture, but appeared to be straight out, throwing out his hands over his head. This was on the north side of the train. I watched the train, and in passing the Chard canal bridge, I saw the head and shoulders of the person come in contact with the brick pier of the bridge, which is between the two lines of rails; then his body dropped down by the side of the carriage. The train was at its full speed - going at the rate of fifty miles an hour - just at the bottom of the incline both ways. I walked along the line for nearly a quarter of a mile and saw traces of blood; I picked up pieces of a skull. I saw blood flowing from the head of the man on the road between the two lines of rails.
Mr W. Blackmore, the superintendent of the Bristol and Exeter Railway, said:- In consequence of a report from Mr Gibson, the superintendent at the Taunton station, respecting the death of GEORGE BAKER, I came down this morning to make inquiries and investigate the circumstances. I went to the Chard Canal bridge which is in the Creech "invert," and saw the place where the deceased's head must have come in contact. The canal is carried over the railway at that spot by a cast-iron aqueduct supported by a brick wall 29 ft. long, and 2 feet thick, and from 15 to 20 feet high. On the corner of the east end of the wall on the down line side, 7 feet up the wall, there were marks of recent blood and a few hairs. The distance from the outside of the north rail of the down line to this part of the wall is 3 ft. 4in. I have since examined a similar second-class carriage to the one the deceased was said to have travelled in, and found it would project from four to five inches over the rails, leaving a clear space of about 3 feet.
John Walters stated that he lived at Bristol, and yesterday got into the express train at Weston-super-Mare junction on the company's business. He was in a second-class with Prewett, a witness, the deceased, and several other sailors. The deceased constantly looked out of the window of the carriage, and sat on the window ledge on the north side of the train, leaning with his body outside. He cautioned him against the danger of doing so; deceased persisted, and once he (witness) took him in by force. Deceased tried to do it again, and he prevented him, telling him if he did not be quiet, he (Walters) should take him out at the next station. Deceased sat down and was quiet for a bit. Witness soon afterwards got out (at the Highbridge station) and locked the carriage door after him, telling the other lads in the carriage to keep the deceased quiet. There was something the matter with the deceased; he appeared excited. Witness asked his companions if he was tipsy, and they told him the deceased had taken but a glass and a-half or two glasses of beer for the day. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," warmly commending the witness Prewett for his humane conduct and the straightforward way in which he gave his evidence and they added a rider completely exonerating the railway company and their officials from blame in respect of the sad occurrence.

Thursday 20 January 1859
EASTDOWN - Suicide. - Considerable sensation was created in this parish, on Tuesday last, by the intelligence that MR GEORGE SMITH, aged 44, son of MR CHARLES SMITH, of Bowden, had committed suicide. The rumour turned out to be too true, the unfortunate deceased having hung himself in a hayloft on his father's farm, while in a state of mental aberration. An Inquest was held on the body on the following day (yesterday), before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, and a respectable Jury. The following was the only evidence adduced:
Elizabeth Manning deposed;- I am servant to MR CHARLES SMITH, of Bowden. The deceased, GEORGE SMITH, resided with his father. Yesterday, the 18th of January, the deceased was in the kitchen of my master's house, shortly before twelve o'clock. That was the last time I saw him alive. He appeared to be in a low, desponding way. He has been very much altered since Christmas, but worse the last three or four days. He complained of pain in his head. At dinner-time, yesterday, he did not return; and about two o'clock Mary Richards and myself went to look for deceased. We went into the hay-loft, and we there found him hanging to the beam by a rope; one end o the rope being fastened round his neck, and the other round the beam. We immediately called John Richards and Philip Richards to our assistance. I was present when deceased was cut down; he was quite dead. Deceased was in the bed-room yesterday morning, and lay down on his bed, and was very different in his manner.
The Coroner, having shortly addressed the Jury, they returned as their verdict, that the deceased hanged himself, being of Unsound Mind. This sad event has plunged a large and respectable family into deep affliction.

Thursday 27 January 1859
BARNSTAPLE- Suicide. - An Inquest was held at Fremington, on Tuesday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY PARKIN, wife of MR WILLIAM PARKIN, yeoman, of that parish, an aged woman, who, in a fit of mental derangement, cut her throat with a razor, on the morning of that day. The husband of the deceased had been ill and bed-ridden for some time, and the business of the farm devolved upon her. She had, consequently, been subject to great depression and had, without just cause, anticipated being reduced in circumstances so as to compel her to take refuge in the Union Workhouse. As a measure of precaution, MR PARKIN'S razors had been locked away; but she seized an interval during the temporary absence of her daughter, on the morning in question, to cut her throat with an old razor which she had secreted. Mr W. A. Dene, surgeon, of this town, was sent for, and was promptly in attendance. He found a wound in the throat, three inches in length, opening the windpipe in two places. The poor woman was then apparently aware of her danger: she said, "I have done it; let me die." Mr D. strapped and bandaged the wound, but stated that there was no chance of her living but for a short time. She died at eleven o'clock - about three hours after the fatal act. The poor woman had previously made two or three attempts at self-destruction; and when last seen by a neighbouring farmer (on Saturday last) was "in a most excited state, quite wild and distracted." The Jury returned as their verdict, that the deceased destroyed herself whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 3 February 1859
BISHOP'S TAWTON - Death From Exposure. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the 'New Inn,' in the village of Bishop's Tawton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on view of the body of JOHN PILE, then and there lying dead. The following was the only evidence adduced:- Anthony Snell, deposed:- At about half-past 7 o'clock, this morning, as I was going in my donkey cart from the village of Tawton to Hall, to my work at Mr Chichester's, I saw the deceased lying in the water, in the hedge trough, adjoining Bird's Marsh. The water was about six feet wide, and about eighteen inches deep near the Marsh, but about eight inches deep where his head lay. Deceased was quite dead when I found him. Mr Michael Cooke, of Barnstaple, surgeon, deposed:- I have this day seen the body of the deceased, JOHN PILE, which I have carefully examined. There are no marks of violence of any description appearing on the body, which appears soddened, as though it had lain a long time in the water. From the evidence of the last witness and the appearance of the body, I am of opinion that the deceased died from cold, and from lying in the water. The Jury found a verdict of "Found Dead from Exposure to the cold and from Lying in Water."

Thursday 10 February 1859
TORRINGTON - Inquest. - On Thursday evening last, an Inquest was held at Coombe farm, in this parish, on the body of MR JOSEPH WILLIAMS, a respectable yeoman, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. On the previous day the deceased had gone to Yelland farm, in the parish of Saint Giles-in-the-Wood, occupied by Mr Row, for the purpose of hunting a shooting rabbits. A large party had assembled on "Mills Down," on the same farm, and about one o'clock they were in full sport. The deceased fired once, and had again loaded; the rabbit made a round about turn, and the deceased was in the act of turning about to fire, when he fell on his left side, and, being by the side of a hill, turned over. He was heard to breathe twice and then expired. He was taken direct to his home, and Dr Jones was of opinion that he died from a diseased heart and over exertion at the time. Verdict accordingly. the deceased was 48 years of age, and unmarried.

Thursday 17 February 1859
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Burning. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Bickington, near this town, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JOSEPH EVANS, a child of about four years of age, son of MARY EVANS, of that village, there lying dead. The deceased, on the Thursday afternoon previous, had, in the absence of his mother, caught his dress on fire; a neighbour named Harriet Sanders immediately extinguished the flames, and medical aid was in instant requisition, but the little sufferer never rallied, the injuries he received by burns in the neck and shoulders proving fatal on the following Sunday evening. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 March 1859
YARNSCOMBE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held by R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at Rooks, in the parish of Yarnscombe, on the body of JOHANNA KARSLAKE, widow, aged 63, who died on the morning of the day previous, after a very brief illness. The deceased was at Barnstaple market on Friday last, from whence she returned at seven in the evening. She went to bed in her accustomed state of health, but about midnight she started out of bed in alarm, and said she had been dreaming. She was assured that there was nothing the matter, and returned to bed and fell asleep, but shortly afterwards again started up in great fright and remained in an excited state for two hours. She got up at one o'clock on Saturday afternoon, and came down stairs where she remained till six in the evening, when she retired. She slept but little on Saturday night, and on Sunday morning, during the temporary absence of her daughters, she expired. In the early part of the week there had been disputes between the deceased and two of her sons respecting the division of property left by the late MR KARSLAKE; and since that time she had been labouring under great excitement. Sinister rumours had been afloat as to the means by which the poor woman came to her end, but these were disproved by the evidence taken at the Inquest and the Jury returned as their verdict "That death resulted from a rupture of a vessel of the heart, accelerated by excitement."

Thursday 10 March 1859
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - On Tuesday last, an old woman, named MARY RICHARDS, of this place, died rather suddenly. Her age was 70, and her habits had been intemperate. On Monday night she went to bed in her usual health, but at four o'clock the next morning she was heard groaning, when her neighbours came to her assistance, but she was beyond the reach of friendly or medical aid, and very shortly after died in a fit.

Thursday 17 March 1859
SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday last, JAMES CHAPPLE, workman, on Great Hele Barton, aged 50, was spreading manure on the top of a cart, when, by the sudden motion of the horse, he was thrown off, which caused concussion of the brain. Surgical aid was soon obtained, but the poor fellow survived but six hours in great agony. He has left a widow and eight children, some of them very young. An Inquest was held on the body, yesterday, before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a verdict returned of "Accidental death."

Thursday 24 March 1859
BRAUNTON - The Late Shipwreck. Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' Braunton, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of DAVID JENKINS, one of the crew of the unfortunate schooner, Clifton, lately wrecked near Barnstaple Bar. The following is the evidence given by the mate, John Jones, one of the survivors:- "I reside at Aberavon, in Cardigan, and was mate on the schooner, Clifton, of Gloucester. On Thursday, the 10th day of March instant, we sailed from Cardiff, in Wales, for Oporto, laden with iron, tin, and lead. The crew consisted of the master, myself (the mate), two able seamen and two ordinary seamen. It was fine weather when we left Cardiff; but in the afternoon it came on to blow from the south-west. About two o'clock we took in light sails, and about four o'clock we single-reefed all the sails, when we were about 8 miles off Ilfracombe. About 8 o'clock we took in double-reefed sails and stowed the boom jib. The pumps were attended to every two hours, but there was no water. She was 95 tons register. She went by the wind throughout the night. About 9 o'clock on Friday morning we found ourselves about 8 miles to the westward of Lundy, when we bore for Milford and shook out single reefs from the topsail and set the boom jib. About 1 o'clock we double-reefed the topsail and stowed the boom jib, the wind then increasing, the weather very thick, and the sea very high, and the pumps attended to. Between 2 and 3 o'clock in the afternoon we made the land, supposed to be from St. Galvin's Head to the Crow Head, but not certain of our position. We wore ship and stood to the south-east quarter, and close reefed the mainsail, and took in the foresail, and forestaysail. About 6 o'clock she shipped a heavy sea over the starboard side, and staved the lee-bulwarks, and washed the captain off the wheel. We tried the pumps next but no water came. Between 7 and 8 o'clock we took in the topsail and kept her under easy canvass, expecting to make Lundy Island at daylight. About 8 o'clock she shipped another heavy sea over the starboard bow, which carried away the bulwarks, started the boat, and carried all the moveable things overboard; the pumps being attended to - weather still thick and blowing strong. The captain had charge of the deck until about 4 o'clock on Saturday
morning. His name was John Thomas, of Aberavon. At 4 o'clock I came on deck and told the captain I thought we were near land or in shallow water, and he ordered a man up aloft to look for light or land, and ordered the lead to be cast, but no light or land was to be seen. I over-cast the lead and found from 4 to 5 fathoms water, and then the captain gave orders to make sail and wear ship. We got them set, and the man from aloft sung out, "Breakers ahead and to windward!" and I tried the lead and found about 3 fathoms water. The captain ordered up the mainsail to get her on the maintack, but she immediately struck and got unmanageable. The second time the struck she washed the captain from the wheel. The next sea unshipped the rudder and broke the wheel chains, and then he ordered to make sail on the foremast and send a man up the mast head to look for light or land, but none was to be seen. The captain ordered the boat to be cleared, but not to cut the gripes. I got the ensign up, union down, as signal of distress. I saw 2 light-houses which told me we were on Bideford Bar. We launched the boat out and the side was staved in. We then tried to cut away the mainboom and mainsail, but had to leave the deck and take to the fore-rigging. We then cut away the halliards, and shortly after the mainmast was carried away, and the sea got into the mainsail. A life-boat came towards us which missed us about ninety fathoms off to leeward, and then we saw another boat. At this time all hands were up the rigging. She also missed us within about sixty fathoms, and then both made for land. Shortly after the foremast on which we all were went overboard, and we were all precipitated into the water. I and another man named Owen Jones got on the bowsprit and lashed ourselves, but the others got entangled in the rigging which was over the side. One named David Thomas was drowned immediately, and the captain was washed away and I saw nothing more of him. DAVID JENKINS and James Bishop was next washed away and I saw nothing more of them. This was on Saturday the 12th instant, about 10 or 11 o'clock in the morning. About half-past one o'clock Owen Jones and myself were taken off the wreck by one of the life-boats and taken into Appledore. It is my opinion that had the life-boats been properly manned, we should have been all saved." - Verdict - Accidentally Drowned.

Thursday 7 April 1859
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death Of A Drunkard. - Coroner's Inquest. On Thursday last, an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of SARAH GUARD, an aged woman, wife of DAVID GUARD, shoemaker, who was found dead in her bed on the morning of that day. The deceased was an habitual drunkard, and, no doubt, the indulgence of her degrading propensity was the immediate cause of death. The following evidence was adduced at the Inquest:- Mary Geen, wife of Mr George Geen, landlord of the 'White Hart Inn,' deposed:- I have been acquainted for many years with the deceased, SARAH GUARD. She resided in an adjoining house to mine with her husband. Last evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the deceased in a room occupied by a Miss Sarah Waldon, in the same house. She was lying on the floor; Miss Waldon was with her. She (the deceased) appeared to be intoxicated. She could not speak so that I could understand her. With Miss Waldon's assistance I took her up, and we carried her into her own bedroom, which is on the same floor as Miss Waldon's room. We sat her down on the floor and I then left Miss Waldon with her. MR GUARD, the deceased's husband, was in bed in the same room. He said, "I wish you could get her into bed." I have not seen the deceased since. I have once before, about three or four months ago, assisted the deceased into her bedroom, and Miss Waldon and I then undressed her and put her into her bed. She has for some years been a person of intemperate habits, and I have often seen her intoxicated.
Sarah Waldon, single woman, deposed:- I am a single woman, and reside in the same house as the deceased and her husband lived in. I saw the deceased yesterday morning about ten o'clock; she then appeared as if she had been drinking. I did not see her again until near five o'clock in the afternoon, when I looked through the keyhole of her room downstairs, and saw her lying on the floor. The door was locked on the inside; I tried the door, but could not open it. I called to her, and after a short time she opened the door, and I went in. I then assisted her upstairs, and into her bedroom. About an hour afterwards she crawled into my room. She remained in my room some time; she at first sat on a chair, and then fell off on the floor, where she was lying when Mrs Geen came in. She (deceased) sent Mrs Geen's little girl, who was with me, for half a noggin of brandy; she drank about half of it, and spilt the rest; she drank it neat. this was before she fell off the chair. Sarah Geen was there in the room with me. Shortly after she fell off the chair, Mrs Geen came in, and asked me to take the deceased into her bedroom. Mrs Geen and I then undressed her, and put her into bed with her husband. This morning, about seven o'clock, MR GUARD called me into his bedroom, saying he thought SARAH was dead. I went to the bedroom, and looked at the deceased. I pulled over the clothes, and found her legs cold and stiff. I thought she was dead, and on further examining her I found she was dead. Mr Cooke arrived in about a quarter of an hour afterwards. The deceased was addicted to drinking, and was often intoxicated. I put her to bed the night before; she was then intoxicated. Michael Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- About eight o'clock this morning, I was called to the residence of DAVID GUARD, in Anchor-lane. I found the deceased in bed, in the same posture as the Jury have just seen her in. I have examined her body, and from the posture she was lying in, and the external appearances of her body, I am of opinion that her death was caused by apoplexy, which was, I believe, from the evidence I have heard, induced by excessive drinking. The Jury returned the following verdict, "That the deceased died of apoplexy, caused by excessive drinking of ardent spirits."

CHULMLEIGH - J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Chulmleigh, on Saturday, upon the body of ELIZABETH WESTACOTT, who was about 15 years of age. On the preceding Wednesday the deceased appears to have fallen upon the floor and to have severely knocked her head by its coming in contact with a chair. The blow on the head led to her death, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

TAWSTOCK - Mr Bremridge also held an Inquest at Tawstock, on Saturday, upon the body of a little girl named ELIZA BURNELL, who met with her death through her clothes catching fire. The verdict was in accordance therewith. The deceased was the daughter of MR ROBERT BURNELL, of Rowden Farm.

CLOVELLY - A melancholy accident occurred on Friday last, by which two fishermen of this place have unfortunately lost their lives. Their names were JAMES BATE and EMANUEL BEER. It appears that they were out in the Bay trawling, when by some means not accounted for, the boat capsized and both were drowned. The occurrence was witnessed by a man on board the Eliza and Ann, of Bideford, who in about half an hour afterwards discovered the body of BATE, who was then quite dead. An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday last, at the 'New Inn,' Clovelly, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner. the accident appears to have been occasioned by a sudden gust of wind. - Verdict - Accidental Death.

Thursday 28 April 1859
SOUTHMOLTON - On Tuesday last, a lad 13 years old, named HILL, of this place, in the employ of Mr F. J. Cockram, of Fidlake, Mariansleigh, was driving a horse and cart near his master's house, when on turning a corner the cart tipped over and the unfortunate youth was thrown out. The horse fell on him and crushed him so severely as to cause his death almost instantaneously. An Inquest was to be held yesterday (Wednesday).

Thursday 12 May 1859
BIDEFORD - Inquest. - An Inquest was held last week before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, upon the body of WILLIAM MORRISH, alias Splodger. The deceased was shockingly burnt some time since whilst sleeping by the side of one of the lime-kilns, East-the-Water. His life was despaired of from the first moment of the accident. It appeared that deceased was constantly in the habit of sleeping on the kiln. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Bear Inn,' Green-lane, on Friday evening last, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the body of JOHN PATTERSON, a man well known as a jobbing porter on the quay, who died almost suddenly on the day preceding. It appeared from the evidence that deceased had been drinking to excess for several days previous to and during the late borough election - that on the Friday and Saturday of the nomination and polling he was employed as a messenger for Mr Potts' committee, and on both days was labouring under great excitement - that on the Saturday evening, while standing in the Square, he was suddenly seized with illness and went to the shop of Mr Ward, chemist, and got a draught; thence he returned home in a tremor, complaining of a pain in the right breast, and said he should die. He got medicine from Mr Tatham's, and went to bed, but passed a sleepless night. On the Monday morning he got up and went to Mr Potts' committee room, returned home and continued ill - delirium supervened, and Mr Cooke, surgeon, was sent for. At two o'clock on Thursday morning deceased got up, and at a later hour went through the North Walk to the 'Golden Anchor,' where he was supplied with two small quantities of brandy; he returned home and died at half-past eight. The evidence of Mr Cooke left no doubt that PATTERSON died from inflammation of the lungs and delirium tremens, caused by drinking freely a short time previously; and it was that gentleman's opinion that death was accelerated by the deceased's going out and walking about while labouring under indisposition. Verdict accordingly. - The deceased was an athletic man, of about 50 years of age, and had lived an immoral life with a woman of the name of Nutt for the 23 years previous to his death.

Thursday 9 June 1859
BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday (yesterday) at Rawleigh, in this Borough, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ANN AZE, a little child 18 months old, daughter of a spinner, who had that morning fallen into the mill stream at the end of the principal row of cottages, and was dead when discovered and taken from the water. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 23 June 1859
BIDEFORD - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday last week, as a young man named DUNN was bird-nesting on the cliffs in the parish of Abbotsham, the ground on which he was standing gave way under him, and he was precipitated to the beach below. The injuries he received were so severe that he died on the following day. An Inquest was held on Thursday, before R. Bremridge, Esq., and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts.

BIDEFORD - Melancholy Suicide. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the 'New Inn.' Westleigh, on the body of a man named THOMAS HONEYWELL, a journeyman painter, of this town, who was found dead in the coppice called Mount Pleasant, near the Bideford Railway Station. On account of some misgivings on the part of deceased's friends, search was made for him on Thursday last in the above wood, when the lifeless body of the unfortunate man was found, with a large wound in the throat, and a razor lying on the ground near the spot. ELIZABETH HONEYWELL, the wife of the deceased, aged 70 years, in giving her evidence, deposed that her husband left home about half-past eight on the morning of the Tuesday previous, with the expressed intention of visiting the house of a relative. He remained away the whole of Tuesday, when she sent her niece to Barnstaple to search for him. Having subsequently discovered that the razor box had been taken away, the thought struck her that he might have committed suicide; and she, consequently, caused search to be made. She stated that he had been for some time in a nervous and desponding state, which arose from pecuniary difficulties. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." The deceased was 70 years of age, and had resided for several years in Bideford, where he worked for Mr Clarke, painter and glazier, and was esteemed by his neighbours as a man of quiet and inoffensive habits.

Thursday 30 June 1859
BRAUNTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Braunton on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM HEDDON, of that place. It was stated that the deceased had indulged himself very freely in intoxicating liquors, especially during the past five months. On the morning preceding the day of the Inquest, he got up between the hours of four and five o'clock, and when his wife came down stairs, shortly after six, she found her husband drinking. About half-past ten in the morning the deceased returned to bed in a state of intoxication, and between six and seven in the evening he died. He was fifty-one years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Sudden Death, which had been accelerated by Excessive Drinking."

Thursday 14 July 1859
FILLEIGH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the dwelling house of William Crossman, at Filleigh, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JAMES SMITH, of Southmolton, who came by his death in the following shocking manner:- James Kingdon deposed:- I knew the deceased, JAMES SMITH. He was a carpenter, and lived in the parish of Southmolton, and was about forty-four years of age. Between one and two o'clock yesterday afternoon, I was present when the deceased went to repair a small iron wheel, being part of the machinery of some saw mills in the parish of Filleigh. By the small wheel there was a large water wheel. The water wheel was kept motionless by a piece of wood which had been temporarily put there whilst the small wheel was being repaired by the deceased; but from the deceased stepping upon the piece of wood, the large wheel was put in motion, and the body of the deceased was caught between that wheel and the small wheel. I called for assistance, and he was taken out as soon as possible;, but he expired in two or three minutes after being taken out. William Lock deposed:- I am a carpenter, and live in the parish of Chittlehampton. I was yesterday at work with the deceased, at some saw mills in the parish of Filleigh. I placed a piece of wood measuring two inches by three inches, to stop the large water wheel from moving, whilst the small wheel was being repaired; but the deceased, in stepping upon the piece of wood, was caught between the large and the small wheel, and met with his death. I did not think there was any occasion for him to step upon the piece of wood to pass, as he might have passed by without. The Coroner addressed the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased has left a wife and eight children.

Thursday 28 July 1859
BERRYNARBOR - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Berrynarbor, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner for the county, on the body of JOHN GILL, labourer, aged 62 years, who, while assisting to load a cart with furze on the evening of the Monday preceding, was seized with sudden giddiness and fell from the cart to the ground; paralysis supervened, and the injuries received had a fatal termination on the Wednesday morning following. Medical aid was promptly called in after the accident, but it was of no avail. Verdict, "Accidental Death from a Fall from a Cart."

BARNSTAPLE - Death By Drowning. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held by Mr Incledon Bencraft, Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN SANDERS, a boy of eight years of age, son of SAMUEL SANDERS, a joiner, living in Holland-street. The deceased had gone into the river, near the North Walk, to bathe, on the evening preceding, accompanied by a boy named Stribling. They had not been in the water long, before SANDERS began to struggle, and his companion saw him sink. An alarm was given and the body speedily recovered, but life was extinct. - Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned."

BRAUNTON - Suicide. - One f the most painful and unaccountable occurrences of the kind that we have had to record happened at Braunton, on Monday night or early on Tuesday morning; a young girl named ELIZA HARRIS, aged 19 or 20 years, living as a household servant with Mr James Martin, of that place, having put a period to her earthly existence by hanging herself in her master's hay-loft. All the facts that are known connected with the dreadful tragedy were detailed in the evidence taken at the Inquest on the body, held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on Tuesday afternoon, at the 'New Inn,' Braunton.
The first witness called was Mr Martin, who deposed:- The deceased, ELIZA HARRIS, was in my service, and had lived as servant with me since about Lady-day last. I came home with my horse and gig last night, between nine and ten o'clock. Deceased came out, and assisted me in taking out the horse, and she led off the animal to the field. She was absent about fifteen minutes, and returned. I then told deceased I was going to my son-in-law's, where my wife was, and that we might not return until eleven or twelve o'clock; that she was to leave a candle and matches, and go to bed, as she was to get up to wash early in the morning. I then left; we returned a little before twelve o'clock; we found the candle and matches on the table, and went to bed. This morning my wife got up about half-past seven; she went down stairs, and found no fire lighted; she went to deceased's bedroom, and found that the bed had been apparently slept on, but deceased was not there. I was shaving, when my wife told me the servant was gone. As soon as I had shaved and dressed, I went out to see for deceased, and, after looking into the stable and other places, I saw the window of the hay-loft open. On looking in, I saw deceased there hanging. I went out to get assistance, and saw Mr Passmore, and he came in and cut her down. Deceased had given notice to quit my service, and was about to go into the service of Mr Barfitt. She has appeared as usual, and I have seen nothing to attract my attention, or to make me believe that she had anything to complain of.
Mr John Passmore, yeoman, sworn:- This morning, at about half-past eight, Mr Martin came to me in a very excited state, and said, "For God's sake, come in: the maid (meaning deceased) has hanged herself." I went into Mr Martin's house, and got a knife, and then went into the hay-loft. I there found deceased hanging, by a rope round her neck fastened to a cross piece of timber in the roof. Deceased was quite dead when I cut her down; there was a chair close by, but it was broken.
William Hammond, mariner, sworn:- I have known the deceased for about three years. I saw her last night, at about eleven o'clock, in her master's garden. She appeared to me much as usual. She said she was going to bed, to get up to wash early in the morning. I left her about half-past eleven, and have not seen her since alive.
GEORGE HARRIS, of Braunton, labourer, deposed:- The deceased was my daughter, and was living with Mr James Martin. I saw deceased about half-past six yesterday evening. She appeared much as usual; she was going with the meat for the pigs. I said, she had some distance to carry the pigs' meat every day, but she replied she did not mind it. I never heard her complain of her master or mistress in my life.
John Quick, police officer, of Braunton, deposed:- I saw deceased last night about half-past eleven o'clock. She was talking to William Hammond, at the garden-gate. Is aw William Hammond leave her, and deceased went into her master's house.
The Coroner addressed the Jury on the evidence, and, after mature deliberation, they returned the only verdict of which the case was susceptible, viz., Felo de Se.
The learned gentleman thereupon issued his warrant, directing the body to be interred between the hours of nine and twelve. The interment took place accordingly, in the parish churchyard, and without funeral rites. The occurrence has cast a gloom over the village which will not soon be dispelled.

Thursday 4 August 1859
BRAUNTON - Accident. - On Saturday last, a young child, about six years of age, the son of MICHAEL BARNES, labourer, was laying in a field belonging to Mr Lovering of Broadgate farm, and incautiously laid hold of the tail of a horse, which caused the animal to kick. The blow struck the child's head, and broke in the skull scattering a portion of the brains on the ground. The little sufferer died on the following Tuesday, and an Inquest was held on the body the same day. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 25 August 1859
EASTDOWN - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Eastdown, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of an elderly man named JOHN BOWDEN, who terminated his earthly existence on the night preceding by hanging himself in a barn, near his master's residence. The deceased was a labourer, in the employ of the Rev. Thomas F. Arthur, rector of the parish, and, during the absence of the reverend gentleman and his family, had been sleeping at the parsonage. On Friday he went to Barnstaple with the carriage; on his return, at seven o'clock, he attended to his horse and then went into the house and had supper; about half-an-hour after which he retired to rest. Nothing more was heard or seen of him until eight o'clock on the next morning, when the servants found the kitchen door unbolted, and that the cows had not been taken in - a duty which usually devolved on BOWDEN. Shortly after this, Betsey Latham found him in a cart linhay, hanging by the neck to a couple of the building, his feet just touching the ground; he was then dead and cold. No motive could be suggested for the rash act, but several witnesses deposed to the fact that deceased had been for some time past in a low and desponding state of mind, and that on the evening preceding he was remarkably taciturn. The Jury returned a verdict of "Hanged himself, being at the time of Unsound Mind."

MONKLEIGH - Richard Bremridge, Esq., held an Inquest at the 'Hunter Inn,' on Wednesday, upon the body of WILLIAM STONE, the illegitimate son of SOPHIA STONE. the deceased was about two years of age. He was left with Mrs Blight, but on the preceding day the body was found in the Torridge. It seems that a very short time previous to the child's being found in the water he was at play in front of Mrs Blight's house, and it is supposed that he must have fallen into the river. The Jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 1 September 1859
SWIMBRIDGE - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at Swimbridge, by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of HENRY CROCKER, a farmer, upwards of 80 years old, who committed suicide on the day preceding. On that morning deceased went to Landkey Newland Mill for the purpose of getting some corn ground, and after his return he laid his head upon the table. His wife asked him to have some dinner, but he made no reply. She left for a short time, and on returning to the house found her husband in his bedroom - apparently upon the knees, as if in prayer; but on a closer examination she discovered that one end of his neckerchief was fastened round his neck, and the other fixed to the bedstead. The medical testimony went to prove that the poor old man must have been dead when he was discovered upon his knees; but his wife thought the contrary. The deceased was supposed to be labouring under inflammation of the membranes of the brain, which must have caused an excruciating pain. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased hung himself whilst in an Unsound State of Mind.

SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Wednesday (yesterday), an Inquest was held at High-Bray, in this parish, before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of ELIZABETH PASSMORE, aged 69, who was found dead in the road, near Hill, on the same morning. It appeared from the evidence that she had been to the town the preceding day and worked at washing, and was returning home about eight o'clock, when it is supposed she dropped down in the road, where she was found a corpse on Wednesday morning. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

MERTON - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Sunday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at Great Wood, in this parish, on the body of MR THOMAS ASHTON, yeoman, who died on the Friday preceding from the effects of injuries sustained from his being thrown from his horse on Thursday evening, in returning from Hatherleigh, whither he had been on business. It appeared from evidence that the deceased left Hatherleigh, in company, at between five and six o'clock, on his return home - that, when about a mile, from the town his horse took fright and ran off at a furious rate - that having gone about forty yards he was violently thrown, his head coming into contact with the ground, whereby he sustained serious wounds and bruises and a concussion of the brain. Assistance was immediately rendered him - the deceased was placed in a spring cart and conveyed to his residence, where Mr Risdon, surgeon, of Dolton, was promptly in attendance; the wounds were dressed, and every thing done that skill and kindness could suggest, but the unfortunate deceased never rallied; he remained insensible from the time of the accident till his death, which took place on the following (Friday) morning, at half-past eight. The Jury, of course, returned a verdict in accordance with these facts.

HARTLAND - Concealment of Birth. - On Thursday morning the body of a newly-born male child was discovered by the housekeeper at Hartland Abbey - the seat of Sir George Stucley - floating in the soil-pit of a privy. Mr Daniel Carter, surgeon, was immediately called in, and this gentleman, with Mr Thomas, subsequently made a post mortem examination of the body, the result of which led to the conclusion that the lungs had never been inflated, except the upper lobe of the right lung, which had emitted a small portion, but not enough to sustain the functions of life. It was considered that the child might have gasped once or twice, but it had never cried. The medical testimony was wanting in proof as to whether the child was born dead or alive. John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest upon the remains on Saturday, at the 'King's Arms Inn,' Hartland, where the foregoing particulars were elicited. The Jury returned an open verdict. It is presumed that the mother of the child is the scullery-maid (JANE POOLLEY) who has lived at the Abbey about two months. She came from Sir George Stucley's town residence; and, whilst in London, she appears to have gone to a doctor for the purpose of releasing herself from "the little responsibility," but without the desired effect. It was only a fortnight since the house-keeper mentioned her suspicions to POOLLEY, who then denied that she was in the family way. The young woman is still at the Abbey; but, as soon as her recovery justifies the course, she will be handed over to the police, upon the charge of concealing the birth of her child.

EXETER - Shocking Death of a Child From Starvation. - An Inquest was held last Friday at the 'Wellington Inn,' King-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female child, named EMILY COLE, aged eight months, who died the same morning. the facts of the case were of a distressing and revolting character. The mother of the child is a married woman, and has had five children besides the deceased. For some time past, in consequence of her dissolute conduct, she has not lived with her husband. In December last, being pregnant and destitute, she was admitted into the Exeter Workhouse, where the deceased child was born. On the 13th of January the mother became insane (owing, as it was said, to her previous drunken habits), and she was confined in the Exminster Lunatic Asylum. On the 11th of June she was removed from the asylum to the workhouse, and on the 4th of July she demanded her discharge, and since that period she has lived at several places in the back streets of the city with a daughter, aged fifteen, and the deceased child. MRS COLE appears to have partly maintained herself and two children by going out to work, and from the evidence of the daughter it would seem that for some time past the poor child was fed with only a half-pint of milk per day. The result of this deficient supply of food was that the poor child got extremely weak, and about a fortnight ago she was attacked with diarrhoea. A week afterwards the daughter went to Mr Webb, surgeon, but he was not home, and then she obtained some medicine from the dispensary. The mother gave the child the medicine, and it got better, but a relapse ensued, and the poor child died on Friday morning. It was admitted by the daughter that her mother was in the habit of leaving the child in her charge from six o'clock in the morning until eight in the evening; and that on the morning of the child's death the mother was out until nearly two o'clock. Mr A. Cumming, one of the surgeons to the Corporation of the Poor, was called in to see the body, and found it frightfully emaciated. There were marks on the head, which the mother said were the result of abscesses; but was thought desirable that a post mortem examination should be made, and the Inquest was accordingly adjourned to Monday, for that purpose. On the evening of that day the Inquiry was resumed, and Mr Cumming said he had found the head of the child covered with vermin; there was a mark on the right temple underneath which was a quantity of extravasated blood. This mark might or might not have been the result of a blow, but was sufficient in itself to have caused death. The stomach was empty. Several neighbours then stated that the poor child had often been left locked into the room for hours together, whilst the mother and daughter were in the streets, and that they had frequently heard it wailing and crying piteously. The Coroner having explained the law of the case, and directed the Jury that there was quite evidence enough to commit MRS COLE, the mother, on a charge of murder or manslaughter, the Jury, after 20 minutes deliberation, returned a verdict of Manslaughter - fifteen being in favour of that verdict, and two for murder. The prisoner was then committed for trial at the Coroner's warrant. She was taken to the Guildhall in custody of two police-officers, and was followed by a crowd of women and children, who hooted her through the streets. It would have been far more discreet if the officers had conveyed the woman to gaol in a vehicle - a course which we have reason to know would have been followed by Superintendent Steel, if he had been consulted.

Thursday 15 September 1859
WESTDOWN - Fatal Accident. - R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest on Friday last, at Westdown, on the body of MR ROBERT COATES, yeoman, 42 years of age, whose death took place at his residence, Deane Farm, on the previous day. It appeared that about nine o'clock on the evening of Friday week, Mr George Avery met the deceased at the 'New Inn,' Braunton. MR COATES was returning on horseback from Barnstaple market; he had one glass of gin-and-water at the inn, and seemed rather excited. Mr Avery accompanied him as far as Stoney Bridge, when deceased appeared better, and told him he was never better able to go home in his life; Mr Avery left him about half-past 12, when the deceased was proceeding homewards. About 5 o'clock the following morning, George Keift, a labourer, in the service of MR COATES, was coming on the road from Braunton to Heddon Mill, when he found his master lying, apparently in a sound sleep, in the road. the head and shoulders were in the water-table; his hat was in the centre of the road, and near it was a small quantity of blood, showing that in all probability the deceased had fallen from his horse. The man got assistance and deceased was removed to the 'Fox Hunter's Inn;' he was then suffering a good deal in his head, and, after his family had been communicated with, he was conveyed home. On Wednesday following, Mr P. Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, was called to attend him, and found the deceased very chilly, with little or no pulsation and suffering extreme pain in his head. In answer to Mr Stoneham's inquiries, he learnt that the deceased, on being brought home, after the accident was at once put to bed, where he slept until 4 o'clock on the Saturday; that he went out on Sunday morning, and on Tuesday walked about his farm, but still complained of pains in his head. He declined, against the entreaties of his wife and friends, to have surgical assistance until the Wednesday, when he purposed going to Ilfracombe, but found himself too ill for the journey. Mr Stoneham, on examination, found a slight scratch, not amounting to a scalp wound, on the back of the head; some medicines were3 sent to be taken immediately, but deceased became worse, and when seen by the surgeon in the afternoon, he was quite unconscious. Dr Budd, of Barnstaple, was then called in, and he pronounced the case hopeless; the deceased sank rapidly, and died on Thursday, about noon. Mr Stoneham expressed an opinion that death resulted fro9m effusion of blood on the brain, caused by concussion, and aggravated by the deceased lying in the wet and cold during the night. The Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally killed by a fall from his horse. MR COATES was much respected in this neighbourhood; and his loss, under such distressing circumstances, is deeply deplored.

Thursday 29 September 1859
MARWOOD - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the 'North Devon Inn,' in the parish of Marwood, by John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JOHN GORE, farrier, of that place, aged 59 years, who, whilst in a state of temporary derangement, had put a period to his earthly existence by hanging himself on the previous day It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was a very irritable man, and that, having been accused by a neighbour of improper conduct toward a little girl, he indignantly denied it and threatened "to see the out of it on the morrow;" he then left the house. Shortly after, he was discovered by his son hanging to a limb of a tree in the hedge of a neighbouring field, and quite dead, the vertebrae of his neck being dislocated. The Jury returned a verdict of "Hanged himself whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity."

MARWOOD - Accidental Death. - John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday, at the dwelling house of MR JOHN BAMENT, yeoman, at Marwood, on view of the body of his grandson, ROBERT BAMENT, aged 11 years, whose death was the result of a casualty which happened about a month previously. On the 22nd August the deceased was assisting to rake the corn arrish in one of his grandfather's fields; he was leading the horse by a halter, having one end of it coiled round his arm. The horse was a very quiet one; but, the weather being hot, the animal was greatly teased and irritated by flies, and on a sudden it started off. the boy held on for a while, but was at length thrown down and one of the iron teeth of the rake entered the right side of his face, inflicting a very severe lacerated wound. Surgical assistance was in instant requisition, and, under the judicious treatment of Mr Cooke, of this town, the patient was apparently progressing favourably (the wound in the face having healed), when unfavourable symptoms supervened and the lad became rapidly worse and died on Saturday last, the 24th instant. The opinion of the surgeon was, that death was occasion by the point of the rake having injured the skull and caused the formation of matter at the base of the brain. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 6 October 1859
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - The Deputy Coroner, J. H. Toller, Esq., held an Inquest, on Monday, at the 'Ashford Hotel,' on the Braunton-road, touching the death of WILLIAM IRWIN, whose body was found on the previous day in the river near Strand Houses. The following evidence was adduced:- Thomas Gould, of Marwood, sworn:- I knew the deceased, WILLIAM IRWIN, who was about 48 years of age. I last saw him alive between seven and eight o'clock on the evening of Friday, the 23rd of September last; he was at that time on the stage of a travelling theatre which was at Barnstaple Fair. He had no one with him. I did not see him go into the theatre, nor did I see him afterwards. At the time I saw him he was looking very well. I have this day seen a body, which was that of the deceased.
JOSEPH IRWIN deposed:- The deceased was my brother. I last saw him alive on Friday, 23rd September last. He was then at the 'Mermaid,' in Barnstaple. It was about one o'clock; he was taking a glass of beer with his sister and brother-in-law. I requested him, after he had had his beer, to go over to the 'North Country Inn,' and take some dinner, which he did. He had afterwards 1s. 6d. from my wife. I think all he had about him did not exceed 2s. I did not see him afterwards. He was decidedly of weak intellect. I have made every inquiry about him since, and was informed by one of the actresses of Weight's theatre, after the description which I gave to her of him, that on the night of Friday, 23rd September, she thought she saw him in company with a young man who had on a cap, and who paid for the admission of both, and that she afterwards saw them leave by the side-door of the theatre together. I have made every inquiry for this young man, but without success.
Richard Mitchell, of Heanton Punchardon, labourer, said:- Yesterday, about eleven o'clock, I, together with John Daniel, of Heanton Punchardon, discovered the body of a man in the river Taw, floating in the water with his back uppermost. We brought the body on shore, and, by the help of a horse and cart, took it to the place where it is now lying. I am informed it is the body of the deceased, WILLIAM IRWIN.
Michael Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- I knew the deceased, WILLIAM IRWIN. He was a man of weak intellect. I have this day seen his body, and made an external examination of it. It was in an advanced state of decomposition, and had been dead for several days. I did not find any marks of violence about the body. The skin on the right side of the face was abrased - apparently from being rubbed on the beach. The skull appeared to be quite sound, as far as external examination would allow me to judge; and his death I believe was caused by drowning. His clothes were perfectly sound.
The verdict of the Jury was, "Found Drowned, but how or by what means no evidence appeared."

TAUNTON - Death of a Clergyman from Prussic Acid. - The Rev. CHARLES THOMAS JAMES, formerly curate of Ermington, and recently appointed Government inspector of model lodging houses and factory schools, was staying at the Railway Hotel, Taunton, on Tuesday night, and intended to start next morning for Tiverton. He had been unwell for several days, and was suffering from indisposition when he retired to rest. The following morning, as he did not make his appearance, the servants entered his room and found him lying on the bed quite dead. Several phials were found in his room - one containing soap liniment and castor oil, another the sediment of mixed prussic acid and almond emulsion, and another containing about half an ounce of prussic acid of Scheele's strength. Lieutenant Charles D. James, 36th Regiment, stationed at Devonport, was immediately telegraphed for, and on Thursday an Inquest was held before Mr Monckton, Coroner. It was shown in evidence that the deceased took prussic acid under medical prescription. Several letters which the deceased had written on Tuesday night were read. One of them, addressed to his son, said that his indisposition almost mastered him, but appointed to meet his son at Plymouth on Thursday. The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from the effects of an overdose of prussic acid, taken to relieve himself from pain. the deceased was well-known and much respected in agricultural circles, not only in this county but throughout England, and had always manifested a deep interest in the welfare of the farm labourer.

Thursday 27 October 1859
GOODLEIGH - Shocking Accident. - An accident, attended with fatal consequences, occurred on Thursday last, at Snapper, in the parish of Goodleigh. Two men, named WILLIAM REDMORE, aged 63, and Thomas Jenkins, aged 23, were at work in Snapper Quarry, when a large quantity of deads fell in, fracturing both of REDMORE'S legs and almost completely burying him. Jenkins, who was loading a butt with stones at the time, ran to his assistance, and had just time to clasp him round the neck with one arm and to place his other under his leg when another fall of earth and stones buried both beneath its weight. The accident is supposed to have happened at ten o'clock in the morning, and the poor fellows were not disinterred until three in the afternoon, when poor REDMORE was dead, and Jenkins seriously injured. the body of the former was taken to his residence, Yeotown Lodge; the latter was conveyed to the North Devon Infirmary, where he was instantly attended to, and where he now lies in a very precarious state. The unfortunate survivor states that while under the mass they conversed, and REDMORE was frequent and earnest in prayer to God - that he distinctly heard the parties who came to the rescue digging around them - that he supposes his ill-fated companion to have died about a quarter of an hour before he was dug out - that he attributes his own preservation from suffocation to the providential circumstance that a large stone which fell in a slanting position protected his head from the weight of earth. On Friday an Inquest was held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the 'North Country Inn,' in the said parish, when the following evidence was taken:- William Symons sworn:- I knew the deceased; he rented a quarry called "Snapper," in Goodleigh. Yesterday, the 20th of October, I was at the 'North Country Inn', in that parish, having a glass of beer; while there, Jacob Grigg came in and asked if Thomas Jenkins was there, and said he was afraid that they were buried in the deads of the quarry, which had fallen in. I immediately went to the quarry, and, after listening a moment, I discovered that some persons were under the deads. I, with several others, set to work to take away the deads. I first discovered the body of Thomas Jenkins; he was greatly injured, and was removed to the Infirmary. We proceeded to search for WILLIAM RADMORE, and in about ten or twelve minutes we found the body of deceased;, he was quite dead. Mr Hiern, surgeon, of Barnstaple, was there, when REDMORE was taken out. Charles Henry Hiern, surgeon, sworn:- I was yesterday sent for to go to Goodleigh, in consequence of an accident which had occurred at Snapper Quarry. I immediately attended. I found William Symons and others throwing out the deads. They first discovered the body of Thomas Jenkins, who was severely bruised about the head and body, and I had him placed in a cart and removed to the North Devon Infirmary, at Barnstaple. The diggers then proceeded, and found the body of WILLIAM REDMORE; he was quite dead when he was taken out; he was bruised about the forehead and temples, and his legs were both broken. I am of opinion that he died from concussion of the brain, occasioned by the falling in of the deads. In my opinion, the quarry is now in a dangerous state; and I had apprehension, while the parties were extricating the bodies, that it would have fallen in. the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased will be remembered as an old and faithful servant of the late Robert Newton Incledon, Esq., of Yeotown.

BRAUNTON - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' Braunton, on Friday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of JAMES MOCK, aged 50, a labouring man in the employ of Mr Philip Tucker, yeoman of that parish. On the evening previous, while in his master's courtlage, assisting to unload a butt in which was a cask containing 60 gallons of cider, the prop which supported the front part of the vehicle shifted and the deceased who was in the butt at the time was thrown out and the cask rolled over him, inflicting injuries which proved fatal within a few minutes of the occurrence. Mr Lane, surgeon, was sent for, and was soon in attendance, but the poor fellow had ceased to breathe. A severe bruise and the fracture of several of the lower ribs were reported to have caused death. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

GEORGEHAM - Suicide. - A painful sensation was created in this parish on Saturday se'nnight by the intelligence that a man named WILLIAM GLOVER, of Croyde, had laid violent hands upon himself. The rumour proved to be too true; and deceased had risen in the morning at six o'clock, and shortly after he was discovered in a outhouse adjoining his dwelling, suspended by the neck from a beam. Medical aid was procured without delay, but it was of no avail, as the vital spark had fled. An Inquest on the body, held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, resulted in a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 24 November 1859
BIDEFORD - Infanticide. - This town was thrown into a state of painful excitement on Thursday evening last, by a rumour that a female servant at one of the principal hotels had delivered herself of a child, and that, to hide her sin and shame, she had wilfully murdered her innocent offspring. The sad intelligence turned out to be too true in its main points, and on Friday afternoon, at two o'clock, an Inquest was held at the 'Castle Inn,' Allhalland-street, where the following evidence was adduced before the Borough Coroner, Thomas Lawrence Pridham, Esq., from which the whole of the facts may be gleaned.
A respectable Jury having been impanneled, of which Mr Christopher Pedler was chosen foreman, they proceeded to view the body of the child, then lying at the police-station. Returning to the 'Castle,' the Inquiry was proceeded with in a small and ill-ventilated room.
The Coroner, in addressing the Jury, bespoke their patient consideration of the subject of investigation. Their duty would be to inquire, First, Whether the child they had just seen was the offspring of the accused. Of this there could be no doubt, for the woman had herself acknowledged it. Secondly, They would inquire, Was the child born alive? If so, Did it come to its death by violence, either on the part of the mother or any one else? Did it die from natural causes? or, Was it placed in a situation where it could not breathe or carry on the functions of life? which would be infanticide.
Julia Gale sworn:- I am a servant at the 'New Inn,' in this town. My fellow servant, JANE BALLMENT, the cook at the inn was missed from the kitchen at 7 o'clock, on Tuesday evening. She said she was poorly, and went upstairs; shortly after I went up to her and found her sitting on a box. She had been ill for an hour-and-half. She said she was suffering pain in her bowels. I had no suspicion that she was in the family way. After that I did not see her for the night; she was not in the bed or room, where we generally slept together. After I was in bed I heard some one come into the room. I asked who it was, and she said "The cook." She then left the room, and I fell asleep. In the morning, she called me, and I perceived that she had been in her bed. After that, between 9 and 10 o'clock, she assisted in getting breakfast for gentlemen in the house. She looked pale, and I asked if she was ill. She replied, "I am very poorly." I did not speak to her afterward. I observed that she was much "slighter" than on the previous day, and I communicated to Mrs Aishton my suspicions - that I thought she had had a child. This was on the Thursday evening, at 6 o'clock. My mistress appeared surprised, and said we had better send for a doctor. On Wednesday night, JANE BALLMENT went to bed, and got up the next morning and went about her duties, as usual. When I mentioned my suspicions, Mrs Aishton sent for Mr Turner, surgeon. I thought the cook had been delivered of a child, and that the body was in her box. I saw marks of blood on the bed and on the floor. I am not aware that the accused has told any one that she was in the family way or that she expected confinement. I was present when the box was opened and the child discovered in it.
Mr Charles Colwill Turner, surgeon, sworn:- I was sent for on Thursday afternoon, by Mrs Aishton, and found that she had suspicion that her cook, JANE BALLMENT, had been lately confined. I sent for the girl, when she confessed to me that she had been delivered of a female child, at between 10 and 11 o'clock at night, on Tuesday, the 15th instant - that she separated the child from the placenta with her own hands, and that she never heard the child cry. I went to her bed room, by her own desire, and saw the child in her clothes' box. Her fellow servant, the last witness, opened the box, and I found the body you have just seen, wrapped in a chemise and a petticoat. After examining it, I sent for the Policeman Snell. When he arrived I made a private mark on the body and saw him place it in a box and lock it - the policeman keeping possession of the key. I have this morning carefully examined the body of the child and find the usual marks on the head of its having been born alive - cranial swelling, or tumifaction of the scalp The point of the nose was pressed from left to right; left cheek bruised; and a bruise extending across the front of the neck from the left shoulder to behind the right ear; the chest raised, which indicated that the lungs had been partially inflated: the navel string was 3 inches long and had apparently been torn or cut with a blunt instrument; the nails of the hands and feet were perfectly formed; the legs and thighs covered with the usual discharge from the child's bowels. The weight of the child was 6 lbs. 10 ozs. - the length 19 inches. These were the exterior appearances, and I consider the child had come to maturity at the time of its birth. I have since made a post mortem examination of the body. On examining the chest I found the lungs partly distended, as if the child had breathed but not cried loudly - the bag of the heart was not covered with the lungs. It was evident from the state of the heart and blood vessels that it had not maintained a separate existence from the mother for any length of time; which was also confirmed from the state of the brain. There was nothing abnormal about the abdominal organs or viscera. I wish, however, to notice that the bladder was empty. I have this morning examined the person of JANE BALLMENT, and find her bosoms distended with milk and the usual appearances of having undergone recent confinement. With every assistance rendered to the mother, a child may be born in a precisely similar way and then present the same appearances as this. There is no evidence of violence having been used to cause death. The vertebrae of the neck is neither fractured nor dislocated.
The Coroner remarked that Mr Turner's evidence did not warrant them in assuming that the child died a violent death.
The Jury, after a long consultation, returned a verdict to the effect that JANE BALLMENT was the mother of the child - that the birth had been concealed, but that the evidence did not enable them to determine whether or not the mother had wilfully taken its life. Of course, when the accused is sufficiently recovered, she will be brought before the magistrates on the minor charge of concealing the birth of the child. We understand that the unhappy woman had only been taken into Mrs Aishton's service about 10 days previous to the sad occurrence.

Thursday 1 December 1859
EXETER - Inquest at Heavitree. - An Inquest was held at the 'Blue Ball Inn,' in this parish, on Wednesday, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of CHARLES SMITH, aged ten years, whose death had been caused by one of the tram waggons on the new railway running over him and killing him on the spot. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

EXMINSTER - Suicide By a Lunatic at Exminster. - An Inquest has been held in this parish before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ROBERT HANCOCK, an inmate of the Lunatic Asylum, who drowned himself by jumping into the canal. It appears that the deceased was out for a walk with other patients on Sunday afternoon last, and was missed by one of the attendants. Notwithstanding that diligent search was made, he was not found until the next morning, when he was seen coming out of a stable and go into another stable by a man who met two attendants looking for him. The attendants proceeded to the stable and spoke to the deceased, who then made a rush to the canal not far off and jumped into the water, and was drowned before he could be taken out. The Jury returned a verdict of "Suicide by Drowning, being at the time of Unsound Mind."

BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident on the North Devon Railway. - On Thursday last an accident occurred on the North Devon line, which, unhappily, proved fatal to an old gentleman named YATES, who resided with his son, MR JOHN YATES, a highly-respectable farmer, of West Sowden, in this parish. The deceased was of rather eccentric habits, but was accustomed to go out alone, being considered inoffensive. On Thursday, about one o'clock, he left this town by the footpath on the embankment known as "The Seven Brethren Bank," adjoining the river Taw, and proceeded in the direction of Tawstock. In less than half an hour afterwards, it seems, he got on the line of railway, and was walking on the left side of the rails and within a yard of two of Pill Bridge, over which the railway crosses the river, just at the time that the 11.10 a.m. train from Exeter was coming in an opposite direction, the speed of the train at this point being about 15 miles an hour. the engine-driver (James Scott) saw the deceased walking on the line, and used the whistle to warn him of the approach of the train. The unfortunate man, being somewhat deaf, gave no heed to the signal, but continued to walk on, and had already reached the bridge when the driver reversed the engine and sounded the guard's brake whistle, in fact, did all in his power to stop the train, but to no purpose. The deceased, though now apparently conscious of his danger, became bewildered, and, instead of turning back or moving into one of the recesses of the bridge, went across the rails to the right side of the bridge, where the buffers of the engine struck him, carrying away the top part of his skull and scattering his brains along the railway for a considerable distance, also tearing off one arm. Of course, instant death ensued. The train was brought to a stand about a hundred yards past the scene of the accident. Under the direction of Mr Patey, the respected superintendent of the line, a special engine was despatched to the spot, and the mutilated corpse was removed to one of the carriage sheds at the Barnstaple station, where an Inquest was held the same evening, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner. A verdict in accordance with the above facts was returned. We need scarcely add that not the slightest blame is attributable to the servants of the Company who had charge of the train when the sad occurrence took place.

Thursday 8 December 1859
CHULMLEIGH - Death by Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the dwelling house of William Penberthy, at Chulmleigh, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of RICHARD HEYWOOD, aged 74 years; who, in returning from Mountacombe, a distance of three miles, where he had been engaged in digging potatoes, stumbled and fell into a pond at Huntacott, from which he was not got out till he was dead. The only person who witnessed the accident was a little boy, a grandson of the deceased, who tried all in his power but had not sufficient strength to render efficient help to his aged relative. - Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned and Suffocated."

CHULMLEIGH - Death By Burning. - On Tuesday last an Inquest was held at the 'King's Arms,' Chulmleigh, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JANE WILLIAMS, who fell into the fire in her house, on the afternoon of the previous day and sustained injuries which had a fatal termination at half-past six o'clock on the following morning. Verdict, "Accidentally Burnt."

WEST ANSTEY - Coroner's Inquest on the Body of an Aged Pauper. - On Thursday last, Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of GRACE SAGE, a pauper, belonging to the parish of Molland, but who had lived with John and Maria Gooding, of West Anstey. The poor creature, who was between 60 and 70 years of age, had been afflicted with a dropsical affection, but had not had medical assistance nor had the relieving officer visited her for six or seven weeks prior to her death; her pay (2s. 6d. a week) had been left at Yeo Mill. She had been unwell for four or five months, and died on Monday, the 28th. A post mortem examination of the body disclosed the fact that the deceased had three ribs on the right side and two on the left fractured - it was supposed, by falling over a stile on a recent visit to the house of Mr Thomas Elworthy. Verdict, "Died from Pericarditus."

Thursday 15 December 1859
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday evening last, an Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, by R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM WHEATON, aged 49, there lying dead. It appeared from the evidence that on the 10th of October, the deceased, who was hind to Mr John Stanbury, of Woolacombe Barton, in the parish of Morthoe, was, in concert with another man, trying to put a young horse into a cart for the first time - that, when attached to the vehicle, the horse suddenly started off at a gallop - that the other man let go his hold, but WHEATON held on to the horse, which made a bolt through a gateway, and threw deceased violently against a wall - that he received a blow in his forehead, was stunned, and partially paralysed - that Mr Stoneham was sent for and attended him till he was removed to the Infirmary, on the 11th of November. Mr Ford, house surgeon, described the state of the patient when he was received. He died on the morning of Thursday last, the 9th instant. Since his decease, a post mortem examination of the body had been made, which disclosed a fracture of the first cervicle vertebrae of the spinal column, known as the atlas, and an effusion of blood into the spinal canal, compressing the spinal cord. This caused paralysis, which led to exhaustion and death. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'London Inn,' East-the-Water, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of MRS SANDERS, the wife of a wheelwright, who died rather suddenly the previous night. The Jury returned a verdict that deceased had died from Natural Causes.

EXETER - Death From falling On a Reaping Hook. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the 'Blue Boar Inn,' Magdalen-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a man named JOHN SHILSTON, who had died at the Devon and Exeter Hospital, on the previous day. The deceased, it appeared, had been a labourer, in the employ of Mr Norris, of Gay's Farm, Sandford, and on the evening of the 27th July last, he accidentally fell upon his reap hook, cutting his knee, close to the knee joint. He was conveyed to his home and medical assistance was procured, but the injuries he had received were of such a serious nature, that it was considered necessary to remove him to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and on the 27th of August last he was admitted to that institution, by means of a recommend from J. H. Hippesley, Esq. He was promptly attended by Mr W. James, and the house surgeon of the hospital, but he gradually sunk, and, on Friday, death put an end to his sufferings. The Jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The deceased has left six young children.

Thursday 22 December 1859
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest At The North Devon Infirmary. - On Tuesday last, the Borough Coroner, Incledon Bencraft, Esq., held an Inquiry at the Infirmary, touching the death of JAMES LUSCOMBE, late a patient in the accident ward of that establishment. On Tuesday, the 13th inst., the unfortunate deceased was at work by gas-light, early in the morning, in the fitting shop, at Mr Thompson's foundry, in Silver-street; he was using a lathe driven by steam power, when by some means his "slop" was caught by a wheel in motion, and his left arm drawn into the machinery, up to the shoulder joint. the unfortunate man's cries brought a fellow-workman named Bishop, engaged in the shop, to his assistance, and the engine being instantly stopped, LUSCOMBE was released, and carried to the Infirmary, where he was attended by Mr J. Ford, house-surgeon, and subsequently by Mr Morgan. He had sustained a compound fracture of the arm, and the muscles and integuments had been severely torn; notwithstanding every attention that surgical skill could devise, the sufferer lingered until mortification ensued, and death terminated his sufferings, on Monday last. A consultation of the professional staff of the institution was held on the previous day, when it was decided that amputation should not be resorted to. The verdict was "Accidental Death."

Thursday 12 January 1860
APPLEDORE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Crown and Sceptre,' on Monday, the 9th of January, on the body of RICHARD CANN, shipwright of this place, who died on Saturday last, from injuries received by falling into the hold of the ship Token on the 29th of December. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 19 January 1860
PRINCETOWN - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held at Princetown, near Tavistock, before George Doe, Esq., Deputy Coroner to H. A. Vallack, Esq., on the body of GEORGE MUGFORD, late landlord of the 'Plume of Feathers' inn, Princetown, who died on Friday, the 6th instant. The case assumed a degree of importance from the fact of its being alleged that the deceased came to his death partly by means of violence. The particulars may be gathered from the following evidence:-
Hannah Down, sworn:- I am a nurse, residing at Princetown. The body which the Coroner and Jury have now viewed, is the body of GEORGE MUGFORD. The deceased was a victualler and resided at the 'Plume of Feathers,' in Princetown. He lived with Susan Grant, who always went by the name of MRS MUGFORD. On Friday the 6th instant, Mr Barrett came to me and said, "Run to MR MUGFORD." I went to his bedroom and saw him in bed and Mary White and Susan Grant by the bedside. He appeared to be very ill and complained of pain in his chest and knees. Dr Wilson was sent for and came to the house at half-past 4 p.m. He gave him some medicine and about a quarter past 7 he died very quietly. Mary White and myself alone wee in the room when he died. I laid him out and found his hand and arm very much swollen. I had noticed the swelling before his death. There was a raw place on his right knee about the size of a half-crown. He also had a black eye. I did not notice any marks on any other part of his body.
Mary White, sworn:- I am a charwoman, and reside at Princetown. On Friday the 6th instant, I was requested to go to the 'Plume of Feathers' immediately. On reaching the house, Mr Barrett told me to run upstairs for my life. When I entered the bedroom I saw the deceased in bed, and Susan Grant holding him up in the bed. At her request I gave him two teaspoonfuls of wine, which he swallowed with difficulty I noticed that his hand was swollen, and Susan Grant said that she had struck him with a brush. I remained in the room until he died. After his death I assisted Mrs Down and I noticed that there was a cut over the left eye, and I heard MRS MUGFORD say that he had done that by falling against a table in the kitchen. I noticed a swelling on the back of the head which he had shewn to me on the 1st inst., stating that young Bickford had caused it. I also saw a mark on the right knee which I had noticed before his death. For many years I have been to the house as charwoman. He was in the habit of drinking a great deal of gin every day. When in liquor he had frequent quarrels with Susan Grant, but was very kind to her when sober, and she was generally kind to him.
John Barrett, sworn:- I am a shopkeeper, residing at Princetown. I have lodged for about 18 months at the 'Plume of Feathers'. About the middle of the day on the 6th instant, I went at the request of Susan Grant to the bedroom of deceased and helped her to get him into bed. I thought he was in a state of exhaustion and that he was dying. I then went and called Mary White. The deceased was very intemperate, and when intoxicated he and Susan Grant were on unhappy terms, and I have seen him frequently strike her, and have also seen her strike him in her own defence. When he was sober they lived very happily. On the 22nd December last, at his urgent request, I made his will according to his instructions, and I and two other persons saw him sign it and we attested it in his presence. He was then perfectly sane. I never saw him out of his mind until Friday the day of his death. On the 31st December last I went to the 'Plume of Feathers,' when Mr Henry Bickford who was in the Tap-room charged me with being too intimate with Susan Grant. He was very violent towards me for half-an-hour. At length the deceased came into the room and there was a scuffle between them, but I did not see any blows struck on either side. I saw the deceased on the floor two or three times. At length Susan Grant took the deceased away and secured him in the bar. I did not observe that deceased had a black eye, but I think I saw his nose bleed. On the Sunday morning following I saw the deceased and he said to me, "That blackguard Bickford has been over and kicked me under the grate and struck me on the head whilst I was fastening my gaiters." I felt his head and found it swollen. the deceased and Bickford were drinking together at intervals throughout the day. Between 9 and 10 at night Bickford followed me towards my bedroom, and as we were engaged in a scuffle the deceased came from his room in his night clothes, but returned to his room and soon after came down stairs dressed and went into the tap-room with Bickford, and I left them together drinking. On the Monday morning Bickford came to the house again, and he and the deceased were drinking together during the day. This was repeated on the Tuesday and on the night of that day Bickford was put to door. About half-past 6 on Friday morning the deceased and Susan Grant came to my door, and on my coming out I saw that he was ill, and noticed a great change in him. He did not appear to know what he was doing until he had some gin and water. He then went to bed and I saw nothing more of him until I was sent for.
Mary Ann Barrett, sworn:- I am the wife of the last witness. On Sunday the 1st instant, I was in the kitchen at the 'Plume of Feathers,' between 8 and 9 in the morning, and heard the deceased cry out "Murder." I have seen Susan Grant push him when he has been drunk, and on the Sunday morning before mentioned, I saw her push him from the kitchen fire, when he fell against a table and cut his eye. She got a sponge and water and washed it. When he was sober she was very kind to him.
John Pope, sworn:- On Saturday night, the 31st Dec., I was at the 'Plume of Feathers,' but while there I did not see any scuffle between deceased and Henry Bickford, but heard them quarrelling. On the following morning I went into the house of the deceased who was in the tap-room, said to me, "The rogue has knocked me under the grate, and kicked me." He then shewed me his head and said "Harry Bickford had done it," pointing out to me two knobs which I felt. During the last few weeks there has been considerable ill-feeling between deceased and Susan Grant, and I have heard them quarrelling about her intimacy with Bickford.
Henry Coham Rowe, sworn:- On Wednesday last, Susan Grant said to me, "Last night I thrashed MR MUGFORD and drove Harry Bickford out of doors with the frying pan and poker, and MR MUGFORD is so sore he can scarcely move and I suppose Harry Bickford is the same, he is at home in bed." She shewed me how Bickford had bruised her arms by holding her.
George Bickle, police constable, sworn:- On Sunday morning, 1st instant, I was called upon to go to the 'Plume of Feathers.' On going there I found the deceased and Henry Bickford standing in the passage. Deceased said to me "I shall give Henry Bickford into your charge for striking me." I told deceased that I could not apprehend Bickford but that he could summon him. On Sunday afternoon last I heard Susan Grant say that she had struck the deceased on the arm with a brush, and today I asked her for the brush, and she gave it to me, and I now produce it.
William John Wilson, sworn:- I am the assistant medical officer at the Convict Prison. I knew the deceased and have attended him on two or three occasions for Mr Pearce, of Tavistock. I have seen him for delirium tremens and for asthma. On the 22nd Dec. last, I saw him and found him suffering from asthma and delirium tremens. He was not in a fit state in my opinion for making a will, and certainly could not have dictated one. Early in the morning of the 6th instant, I was sent for to see the deceased. I found him raving from delirium tremens and he appeared to be sinking partly from delirium tremens and partly from accumulation of mucus in the chest. Mr Pearce and myself have made a post mortem examination. There was a black eye on the left side with a slight cut above the eyebrow. There was a slight swelling with trifling effusion of blood above the left temple. there was another swelling behind the left ear, not very prominent but diffuse. On dissecting it we found that blood was effused into the substance of the temporal muscle and beneath the fascia The right arm and hand were considerably swollen, bruised and covered with viscicles and abrasions which appeared to be the result of some external application. There was no fracture of the arm. On the left arm there was a bruise; on the right knee there was an abrasion. On examining the head we did not find any internal evidence of injury corresponding to the external marks;, we found the membrane and vessels of the brain congested and there was effusion into the cavities and membranes of the brain. We found, on removing the muscles from the side of the chest, the ninth rib fractured: this was apparently an old fracture, for which apparently no efforts of healing were going on. The lungs were very extensively diseased, especially the left. The heart was fatty and rather large, and the right cavities contained a large quantity of coagulated blood. I consider that delirium tremens was the cause of death. The broken rib and disorganized state of the lungs resulting from it might have been the exciting cause of that state of system which predisposed him to the repeated attacks of delirium tremens.
John Pearse sworn:- I am a surgeon and apothecary, residing at Tavistock. I have known the deceased several years, and have attended him at various times for delirium tremens, diseased lungs, chronic bronchitis and a fractured rib. I first attended him for delirium tremens in November last. I assisted Dr Wilson in the post mortem examination, and confirm his evidence on that subject. I think he died of the combined results of disorganized lungs, and delirium tremens. It is impossible to state the exact influence which his recent injuries have produced on his state of health; but I consider that the broken rib set up mischief, which has not been got rid of, and has probably been the exciting cause of his late suffering.
The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned the following verdict - "That the deceased died of delirium tremens, having on his body certain marks of violence, some of which were inflicted by Henry Bickford and Susan Grant; but to what extent such violence accelerated his death, no evidence doth appear."
MRS MUGFORD, the lawful wife of the deceased, GEORGE MUGFORD, is living as housekeeper at Stevenstone. She has one daughter, a fine young woman, and on hearing of her husband's death she went to Princetown to see how matters stood.

Thursday 26 January 1860
EXETER - Supposed Suicide at Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the 'Royal George Inn,' on Thursday, on the body of CHARLES CUNNINGHAM, aged 59, who was found drowned in the canal on Saturday afternoon. The deceased had been for nearly twenty years messenger at the Custom-house, where he had resided. He had been strictly honest, and had been entrusted with as much as £1,000 at one time; but some months since Mr Donelan, the collector of the customs for the port of Exeter, suspected that he was indulging too much in drink, and warned him of the serious consequences that would result from such conduct if it were persisted in. That warning had its effect upon him. He resumed his steady habits, but since New Year's Day he had again given cause for dissatisfaction. On Wednesday last he was so excited that Mr Donelan could not entrust him with the letters to take to the post-office. About half-past four he went into his own apartment and fell asleep. On awaking he was about to leave his house, when his daughter prevented him. He struggled with her, but she locked the door, and eventually succeeded in getting him to bed at 7 o'clock. Mr Donelan had previously suggested to her that she should procure some one to watch her father during the night; but on her succeeding in getting him to bed she considered that that step was unnecessary. When in bed he said, "I'm in my own bed now, but tomorrow night I shall be in a cold one." He slept quietly during the night, but rose in an excited state at a quarter to six on the following morning, hurriedly left his house at six o'clock, and ran over the Quay bridge. His daughter immediately ran to obtain the assistance of her sister, who lives on St. David's Hill. Nothing further was heard of him until Saturday, although from the suspicions entertained, the river was "dragged." On the morning of that day Richard Reynolds brought to the custom-house a hat that he had taken from the water in the canal and which was identified as the hat of the deceased. For a considerable time the drags were employed without success, when Mr C. Sclater, who was present, suggested that a seine should be used. A seine was procured and on its being drawn up the second time it was found to contain the body of the deceased. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, were divided in opinion, twelve of them being for a verdict of "Found Drowned," and five for a verdict that the deceased drowned himself whilst in a state of Temporary Insanity. The law deciding that the opinions of twelve Jurors shall be sufficient for a verdict, a verdict of "Found Drowned" was recorded.

Thursday 2 February 1860
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held by Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of an infant child to which a married woman named HARRIET JONES, wife of ROBERT JONES, labourer, of Barbican, had given birth on the night of Sunday, the 21st ult. It appears that the husband of the woman had been absent from England - in the United States - for two years and seven months, and had only returned home about nine weeks since; that, on being made acquainted with his wife's state, he did not change his demeanour, but continued to live with her until the night preceding the birth of the child, when he left his house; he had since returned, but had not spoken to his wife up to the death of the infant, which took place on Friday morning. The circumstances of the case, and the fact that no medical man had been called in to attend either the mother or the babe, induced suspicions that the latter had come to its death by unfair means. Hence the Coroner's Inquisition. The evidence adduced, especially that of the surgeon, Mr Cooke, who made a post mortem examination of the body, happily dissipated all misgivings as to foul work having been perpetrated. The report of the surgeon was, that the child was full-grown and well-nourished previous to its birth; that the body bore no marks of violence externally; that the bowels were completely empty, the vessels of the brain and lungs greatly congested, the lungs only partially inflated (shewing that defective circulation had been carried on); that the child died from convulsions and not from any unnatural cause. the verdict of the Jury was in conformity with the medical opinion.

GEORGENYMPTON - Singular and Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at Georgenympton, on Saturday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of WM. HEYWOOD, a quarryman, who came to his death in the following manner:- Deceased had been engaged on the morning of the day preceding in digging stones in Stone Down Quarry. When last seen alive he was at work; he was standing on a ledge of rock about three feet wide, with water in a pit about five feet below, and the head of the quarry about seven feet above him. It was remarked to him that he was in a dangerous situation, but he took little heed. At a later period of the day it was found that the head of the quarry had fallen in, and the deads were turned over to see if the deceased had been buried beneath them. This proved not to be the case, but his body was subsequently discovered under the water in the adjacent quarry pit. the inference is, that the falling deads had swept him off the ledge of rock on which he was working; pr that, seeing his danger, he had hastily retreated, and, in endeavouring to escape from being buried alive, had been accidentally drowned. Verdict accordingly.

BIDEFORD - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Terminus Inn,' in this town, on the evening of Thursday last, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., on the body of a man named ROBERT CADE, who died from the effect of injuries received in a lime-kiln on the same morning. The deceased was formerly an inmate of the Union Workhouse, from whence he had recently absconded, and had been leading a vagrant life. On Wednesday night he went to seek shelter at one of the lime-kilns, East-the-Water, and having fallen asleep, he got so dreadfully burnt as to cause his death shortly afterwards. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 9 February 1860
BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday, the 6th inst., at the North Devon Infirmary, by Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of an aged man named EDWARD STOYLE, a mason, there lying dead. The facts will be gleaned from the following evidence. Maria Rubyer deposed:- I have know the deceased for many years. He was a mason, and resided near me. I occupy a house belonging to the deceased's daughter-in-law, BETSEY STOYLE. He was in the habit of repairing the house. On Wednesday last he came to my house to look at the chimney, as it smoked. He brought a ladder and two planks. He placed the planks on two pieces of wood that projected from the wall of my house about sixteen feet from the ground. I heard a noise of something falling, and ran out with my daughter, Mary Ann. We saw the deceased lying on the ground; the planks were on him. I lifted him up; he was quite sensible, but complained that he had broken his elbow: he had blood on his head. A man called Webster helped him away in a hand-cart, in about a quarter of an hour, to his own house. He has often put his planks on the pieces of wood, as above described, when he had to repair the chimney. Mr James Ford, house surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, deposed:- The deceased EDWARD STOYLE, was brought to this Infirmary on Wednesday last, about noon. He was put into bed, and, on examination, I found he had sustained a compound fracture of the elbow joint of the right arm, and that there were several severe bruises near the abdomen and hip-joint. His extremities were cold, and he was in a state of partial collapse. He never rallied entirely. Delirium came on the following day, and continued until his death, which took place on Saturday last, about 2 o'clock. His death was, in my opinion, caused by the accident described by the last witness, his system being so enfeebled by age. Mr Cooke saw him, and the fracture was immediately reduced. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 16 February 1860
TORRINGTON - Inquest. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the Union Workhouse, on the body of an old blind man named LANE, one of the inmates, who died suddenly on Monday morning last. Mr Sellick, master of the Union, said:- Deceased was last admitted into the Union on the 1st of November last, and was chargeable to the common fund: saw him alive and in his usual health on Sunday evening, at supper-time. On Monday morning, about 8 o'clock, the porter came and informed him that deceased had fallen down in the yard. I sent him some brandy, and ordered the porter to fetch Mr Jones, the medical officer of the house. Saw deceased in bed soon after, and found he was dead. Mr Barr, assistant to Mr Jones, arrived in about an hour after it occurred. William Crossman, inmate of the Union, said:- On Monday morning last, the deceased took his breakfast, as usual; after which he went, as was his daily custom, into the yard to beat some oakum, About 5 minutes after, he (witness) went into the yard and was going towards deceased, with some oakum to beat, when he saw that he had fallen from his seat and was lying with his head against the wall, he lifted him up. Deceased sighed twice after; he then called assistance, and removed him into his bedroom, deceased did not speak after. Charles Richard Jones said, he was the medical officer of the Union. On Monday last, he was sent for to see the deceased; his assistant (Mr Barr), first attended, and he went himself in the after part of the day. He examined the body of deceased; found no marks thereon, and was of opinion that he died of "Disease of the heart." - The Jury having heard the evidence, returned a verdict in accordance therewith.

CLOVELLY - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY CARTER, a child two years and a half old, daughter of MR JOSEPH CARTER, of Stetworthy, farmer. It appeared that on Wednesday se'nnight, the child was running about in the back kitchen of her father's residence, when, during the temporary absence of one of the servants (Caroline Carter), by some means her clothes caught fire, and on the return of the servant the poor child was found enveloped in flames. With commendable presence of mind, the girl threw her own clothes around the child, and so extinguished the fire; but the deceased was dreadfully burnt about the arms and face, and notwithstanding Mr Thomas, surgeon, of Hartland, was called in, and every available means used, she lingered until Wednesday last, when she died from the injuries received. The Jury, after hearing Mr Thomas's testimony, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 23 February 1860
WOOLFARDISWORTHY - Death By Burning. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the house of JAMES DUNN, labourer, of this parish, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of his daughter, BETSY DUNN, aged fourteen years. The deceased, with four other and younger children of the same parents had been left in the house on the Thursday previous, for a short time, while their mother was engaged at some short distance in milking cows. She had not long been absent before an alarm was given; and, on hastily returning home, she found the deceased enveloped in flames, which, with the assistance of a neighbour, she extinguished. Oils and scalded milk was applied to several severe burns on the body of the poor child, and surgical aid called in, but all was of no avail; she lingered in pain till Saturday, and then expired. The deceased had been subject to fits which had deprived her of reasoning faculties. Mr Eusebius Rouse, the surgeon, stated that the treatment which she had received previous to his arrival was proper; and from his knowledge of the family he could bear testimony that the children were always kindly cared for by their parents. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 1 March 1860
ALWINGTON - An Alleged Case of Poisoning - Coroner's Inquest. Great excitement has prevailed for some days in this parish, by rumours industriously circulated and too generally credited, that a woman named SAUNDERS, the wife of a labourer, had been guilty of the very heinous offence of poisoning her husband. It appears that the poor man was taken seriously ill on the 19th ult., and, after a brief illness, died without apparently any immediate cause for such a fatal termination. The pair had not lived happily together - having had frequent jars, which countenanced evil surmisings and those sinister reports which issued in the inquiry which it is our duty to chronicle. The unhappy wife was said to have administered poison to the deceased in some pudding she had warmed for his use, and which was followed by sickness, vomiting, and death. The Rev. Prebendary Coffin, the rector of the parish, and Townsend Kirkwood, Esq., therefore deemed it right to communicate the rumours afloat and the suspicions entertained to the Coroner (John Henry Toller, Esq.);, and, after some deliberation, it was deemed expedient - for the ends of justice, if the woman should prove to be guilty of the crime alleged; for the vindication of her character, if she should be proved to be innocent; in either case, for the satisfaction of the public mind and to allay popular excitement - that the body, which had been interred, should be exhumed and subjected to post mortem examination. The learned Coroner, therefore, issued his warrant for that purpose, and, on Monday last, an Inquest was held in the Church School Room, Alwington, when thirteen jurymen were sworn and the following evidence adduced:-
George Palmer sworn:- I live at Alwington, and am a workman, I knew the deceased, JOHN SAUNDERS. He lived at Alwington, and was a labourer.
Elizabeth Beer sworn:- I am the wife of Stephen Beer, of Alwington, labourer. I knew the deceased, JOHN SAUNDERS. I saw him alive and quite well on Saturday, the 18th of February last. He was then at my house. It was about nine o'clock in the evening. He had his supper there. His wife came in a few minutes before him. She had been to Bideford; he had been to Winscott. He had his supper at my house, which consisted of a pudding and a bit of meat. She brought the pudding and the meat into my house, and put the same into a saucepan, and put the saucepan upon the fire. After the same was boiled she gave it to her husband, and he ate it. they appeared to be very comfortable whilst they were with me. As my husband was away, she offered to sleep with me. I did not wish her to do so, but she did sleep with me. After the deceased had had his supper, he went to his own house, which adjoined mine. He was very willing for his wife to sleep with me. I and his wife then went to bed. About twelve o'clock I heard him urging. His room was next to mine. the door was not quite shut, and I heard him urging quite plain. His wife, after being requested by me two or three times to go to him, struck a light and went to him. She asked him what was the matter, and he said he was very sick. He continued to urge, and urged nearly the whole night: and in the morning he was purged. His wife remained with him about ten minutes, and then returned to my room. Between six and seven o'clock in the morning she got up and went into her own house. She passed through her husband's room and I heard her talking to him. About twelve o'clock on the following day (Sunday), as he continued vomiting and purging, she asked me if I thought it was better to send for the doctor? I told her I thought it was. She sent my son to Mr Turner, surgeon, of Bideford, to tell him how the deceased was. It was after twelve o'clock when my son went away; he came back about five o'clock with some pills and powders. She told me he did not vomit after he had taken the medicine; she told me this on the Monday following. About half-past three o'clock in the afternoon on the Monday the deceased died. The deceased and his wife did not live very comfortably together. I do not think she kept him from his meals. She made the pudding before she went to Bideford on the Saturday. He complained of thirst and cold after he was taken ill on the Saturday evening. She was kinder to him in illness than when in health, and from the time he was taken ill on the Saturday evening to the time that he died on the Monday following she was kind to him.
James Saunders sworn:- I live at Alwington, and am a labourer. On Monday, the twentieth of February, I was at Elizabeth Beer's house, about one o'clock, where I had my dinner. Elizabeth Beer was not there when I went there first/ and I went to the deceased's house, where she was, and inquired for him, and was told by Elizabeth Beer that he was very ill. Elizabeth Beer returned with me to her house, where I had my dinner. We had a conversation about the deceased's illness, and she said she did not know what was the matter with him, as he was turning blue. A few minutes before I left Elizabeth Beer's house, the deceased fell out over the bed, and his wife, who was in her own house, went up to him, and said, "Whatever be you about? you will frighten me to death." His wife then called her mother, who went up, and said to her daughter, "Let him be; I would not do anything for him; let him get into bed by himself." I did not hear any other answer made, but left to go to my work.
Mr Charles Colwill Turner sworn:- I am a surgeon and reside at Bideford. I attend the poor of Alwington and I knew the deceased, JOHN SAUNDERS. I have attended him more than once. I once attended him twelve months last November. He had an inflammation in one of his lungs. He came to me about a month since and complained of being shivered. He had some medicine, and I heard nothing more of him. On Sunday, the 19th of February, they sent to me to say he had been sick and shivered. I sent some medicine, and requested they would let me know, on the following morning at nine o'clock, how he was. They did not send, but I went out to see him. I saw him about ten o'clock in the morning. He was then dying, but still sensible. He gave answers to questions I put to him. There was no appearance of his having taken any poison. He did not complain of having been ill-treated. The greatest portion of one of his lungs was no use to him, and he died in the first stage of an inflammation of his lungs. This was my opinion on Monday last, and, having this day seen the body opened, I am still of that opinion. From the disease under which he laboured vomiting is not unusual.
Mr John Thompson sworn:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Bideford. I have this day made a post mortem examination on the body of JOHN SAUNDERS. When I viewed the body there was no appearance indicative of violence of ill-treatment. I removed the front covering of the chest and covering of the bowels. The lining of the ribs, the covering of the heart and lungs, gave no appearance of disease. The substance of the heart in cutting it through was perfectly healthy. In cutting into the lungs, they were in a state of intense congestion, more especially their lower parts. I do not remember to have seen so large an amount in any previous case. Such a state generally concurs in the first stage of inflammation in the lungs. He did not appear to have suffered from pleurisy. The surface of the liver was natural in its appearance, form, and size. Its substance did not contain an unusual amount of blood. The coverings of the bowels and stomach did not appear to have suffered from disease. The internal surface of the stomach was strongly marked with blood vessels, and showed marks of congestion over its surface generally. The inner part of the intestines was also somewhat congested, more particularly in the small intestines. Both stomach and intestines were nearly empty. The kidneys and spleen appeared to be healthy. The amount of fat round these organs was remarkably small. The discolouration of the bowels would be consistent with vomiting and purging. I think the immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs, and that the vomiting and purging were accidental circumstances, and probably caused by the indigestible nature of the supper. The irritation of the bowels and stomach might be produced by an ill-digested meal.
The Inquiry lasted more than four hours. The Jury having deliberated, returned a verdict of "Died from Congestion of the Lungs." The Jury appended to their verdict a declaration "that the inquisition was necessary and proper."
The result of the Inquiry, dissipated every shadow of doubt as to the cause of death. The conduct of the excellent rector (Rev. Prebendary Coffin) is deserving of the highest praise: by a judicious firmness and the exercise of that kindness of heart for which he is so distinguished, the reverend gentleman happily blended the stern duties of a justice of the peace with the generous sympathies of a Christian. The result should have the effect of allaying excitement, and it affords another illustration of the advantages of that ancient institution, Coroner's Inquests.

Thursday 8 March 1860
MERTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, touching the death of JOHN LEWIS, an infant, eleven months old, the illegitimate child of a young woman named MARIA LEWIS, who died on the previous Thursday, under rather remarkable circumstances. The mother of the child, it appears, has for some time resided with her mother, who is a bed-lyer, and Eliza Ward, a sister, but had recently gone into service, leaving her baby in the care of Ward, and occasionally of its grandmother. On the morning in question the child was sleeping in a cradle near the bed occupied by the grandmother, and during breakfast it awoke up, when the old woman put a piece of soaked bread into the child's mouth, on which it instantly became black in the face, and before any help could be got, was killed by suffocation. It was stated by the surgeon (W. Risdon, Esq., of Dolton), who made a post mortem examination of the body, that he found a portion of bread (about 5 grains) in the windpipe, a little blow the pharynx and some portions in the pharynx, and that the windpipe being unnaturally small, the stoppage had caused suffocation. A verdict in accordance with this view was returned.

MONKLEIGH - Melancholy Death. - On Monday, an Inquest was held before the Deputy Coroner, (J. H. Toller, Esq.,) on the body of a young man, aged 23, named SAMUEL CARTER. It transpired that the deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Mitchell, farmer, of Ashreigny, was sent on Saturday with a team to fetch lime from the dock kiln, at Weare Gifford. He left with a load of lime about 11 o'clock in the morning, and was half an hour subsequently, seen minus his hat looking over the bridge into the river, where a hat was floating down the stream. The deceased was warned of the danger of attempting to cross by a man named Maine, who last saw the deceased alive, running down the bank by the river side. Later in the day the horses arrived home without the deceased, and inquiries being set on foot, the river was dragged, and on Sunday morning the body was found in about ten or eleven feet of water, a short distance below the spot where the poor fellow was last seen. It was inferred that in attempting to recover his hat, the deceased was carried away by the stream, and being unable to swim, instantly sank and was drowned. Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned." The deceased was a steady young man, and it was stated by one of the witnesses that he was perfectly sober at the time he left the lime kiln.

Thursday 15 March 1860
WEARE GIFFORD - Death By Burning. - An Inquest was held at this place, on Saturday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of CLARA ROBINS, a little girl 2 ½ years of age, daughter of NELSON ROBINS, a boatman, who, during the temporary absence of her mother, caught her frock on fire, and was so severely burnt that she died shortly afterwards, and before medical aid could be procured. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday evening last, an Inquest was held at the 'Reform Inn', Pilton, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN SHADDICK, aged 11 years, the only son of a widow, who was accidentally drowned in "Pilton Gut" on the night preceding. It appears that the deceased was returning from this town to Pilton, at between 6 and 7 o'clock, by the pathway which leads over the embankment. The tide was very high at the time, and several large logs of timber usually lodged on the sides of the stream were afloat; the poor boy, heedless of the risk, walked to the end of one of these logs, and slipping his feet fell into the water. An alarm was given and the sailors belonging to the smack Dispatch (Balment, master), which was then being warped down the river, endeavoured in vain to rescue the drowning boy, or to recover his boy; which was not found till near midnight, when the tide had receded. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and expressed an opinion that the crew of the Dispatch did everything in their power to save life. It is a distressing fact that the father of the unfortunate boy was also drowned some years since, shortly after the birth of his son.

Thursday 22 March 1860
ABBOTSHAM - Suicide. - An Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' Abbotsham, on Friday last, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, to inquire into the death of a man named EDMUND BALE, who had been found hanging in a linhay or stable on the previous day. Many stories are in circulation regarding the melancholy affair; but it came out in evidence that he was of unsound mind, and a verdict was returned accordingly.

Thursday 29 March 1860
SHEBBEAR - Singular Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at Shebbear, by John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of the infant child of MR JOHN ADAMS, yeoman, of that parish. On the previous Sunday evening the mother of the child fed it with bread, milk and sugar, when it was in its usual health. On retiring to rest at midnight, she suckled it, laid it on her arm, and went to sleep. About six in the morning she awoke and missed the child, which she discovered down in the bed, and apparently dead. On examination, life was extinct. Verdict, "Accidentally Suffocated."

SHERWILL - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the 'Cross Inn,' Sherwill, upon the body of GEORGE TAYLOR, aged 13, who was in the service of Mr John Alford, of Whitefield Barton. On the 10th instant the deceased and another lad (Joseph Lovering) were engaged in conveying wood from Viveham Wood to the house of William Fry, of Eastdown; and, whilst unloading one of the carts, a heavy piece of wood fell on TAYLOR'S head, which bled profusely. The wound was at once washed, and brandy administered, and the poor lad returned to his master's; but the bleeding was not staunched for some time. Acting upon his own desire, TAYLOR went home to his father's house, and four days afterwards he returned to his work - remaining till the Saturday, when he again went home to his parents. On the succeeding Monday, Mr Cooke, surgeon, of Barnstaple, was called in to attend the boy; but he died on the Wednesday. Verdict, "Accidentally Killed by a Heavy Piece of Wood Falling Upon his Head."

Thursday 5 April 1860
BRAUNTON - Frightful Accident. - On Saturday evening last, this place was thrown into considerable excitement in consequence of a report (which proved too true) that one lad had accidentally shot another. It appears that Mr William Hodge, a farmer living at Nethercott, in this parish, desired his son, Simon Hodge, to go and try to shoot a rabbit. This happened about two o'clock p.m.; and on his return with a younger brother, who had a ferret, they passed a shippen which was being cleaned out by another lad, a cousin, called JOHN LOCK, who had engaged as farm servant with his uncle, and had only gone with him on the previous Tuesday. The poor lad, fearing he should not finish his job in time, requested the young Hodge to assist him, to which he readily assented, and placed the gun, a double barrel, in the crib. They had just finished, when Mr Hodge arrived with some yearlings at the court gate. LOCK called out, "Look sharp, Simon; master is come with the bullocks." Simon Hodge thereupon turned round, and took up the gun, and at the same moment LOCK, who had been standing outside, attempted to enter the shippen, when the gun by some means caught in the crib, and went off, lodging the contents in the bowels of LOCK, who exclaimed, "Oh! Simon, Simon!" Mr Hodge immediately ran to his assistance, and caught him in his arms as he was falling. He lived only about two or three minutes after. An Inquest was held on the following Monday by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned. It was shewn plainly by Mr John Passmore, one of the Jury, that, had the gun been on the half cock, instead of the hammer being let down on the cap, the accident would not in all probability have happened.

HOLSWORTHY - Melancholy Accident. - On Thursday evening D. PRIEST, a lad about twelve years of age (son of MR PRIEST, the carrier) had charge of a pony and cart, belonging to William Brimmacombe, miller, when, from some cause the pony suddenly started, dragging the poor boy with him. The lad let go the reins, and the wheel of the cart passed over the whole length of his body. Dr Ash was called, but medical aid was unavailing, and after lingering in agony rather more than an hour he expired. An Inquest was held by Mr Vallack, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" recorded, coupled with a reproof given to Brimmacombe for allowing one so young to have charge of such a known skittish creature.

Thursday 12 April 1860
BARNSTAPLE - Distressing and Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning, at the house of Mr Samuel Adams, tanner, &c., in Bear-street, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John Barry was foreman, on the body of CHARLES ROBERT LOFTUS, nine years and nine months old, son of a gentleman of London, there on a visit, who came to his death under the following melancholy circumstances. The following was the evidence given by the afflicted parents of the unfortunate child:- MRS LOFTUS deposed: The deceased was my son. I put him to bed on Friday night, at about eleven o'clock, in a room on the first storey, and adjoining that occupied by myself and my husband. He (deceased) was then in his usual good health. The room was lit with gas, and I turned it off, intending to leave a little burning, as he was in a strange room. I turned it quite off; and then, I think, I must have unintentionally turned the tap back again I said, "I have turned it quite off; shall I have it lit again?" He replied, "No, mamma;, I do not wish it." I then proposed to leave open the door of his room, but he would not allow me. After an internal of ten minutes I again went into his room, and asked if he were asleep. He said, "No," but asked for his pocket handkerchief, and desired me to call him when it was time to get up. I have not been accustomed to gas - never had charge of it before. I thought when the light was out all would be right. We have not gas in our own house. - MR LOFTUS deposed:- We have been staying with Mr Adams since Thursday night. On Saturday morning, at about ten minutes after seven o'clock, I went to call the deceased. I opened the door and said, "Come CHARLEY, my boy, get up." I at once smelt the gas and ran to open the window. On calling him again, I saw him lying on his back, and foaming at the mouth. I took him in my arms, and ran with him into my own room. He was unconscious. I gave an alarm, and Mrs Adams sent for the doctor, who came in a few minutes. The doctor ordered him to be taken into the air, and I carried him downstairs to the yard at the back of the house. He never recovered his consciousness, and died at seven the same evening. He had convulsions until his death. Dr Budd deposed: I was called to deceased at a little after seven on Saturday morning last. I went to the bed-room where he was lying; he was in a state of unconsciousness - his face swollen and livid, and a frothy saliva was flowing from his mouth. He was pulseless, and the breathing had nearly ceased. I ordered him to be taken immediately into the open air, and a bed to be prepared for him on a table in the court yard. I tried the usual restoratives, such as mustard poultices to the pit of the stomach and the soles of the feet, and kept up artificial respiration for some considerable time until the breathing was re-established, at the end of an hour and half. A jar of hot water was then placed at his feet, and he was kept there till eleven o'clock, when, natural heat having returned, he was brought into the parlour and laid on a couch. He never recovered consciousness and became greatly convulsed. I bled him in the arm, but it afforded no relief; the blood was dark and very fluid. saw him at intervals; but at six in the evening, when I visited him, he was dying. My opinion is that his death was the effect of the gas poison in the blood. I do not like to close my evidence without stating that the use of gas in bed-rooms, except where provision is made for ventilation, is very dangerous. Instances have been known of death resulting from gas poison inhaled during sleep at the end of a fortnight. A contamination of less than one part in nine would destroy life. The Coroner shortly addressed the Jury, directing particular attention to Dr Budd's remarks on the deleterious effects of gas. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death;" and, at their request the Foreman expressed their deep sympathy with MR and MRS LOFTUS in their affliction. Dr Budd was desired to accept the Jury's fees as a donation to the North Devon Infirmary.

Thursday 19 April 1860
TORRINGTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the house of Mr John Snell, Police Officer, of this borough, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of THOMAS VICARY, a young man, aged about 20 years, son of MR CHRISTOPHER VICARY, of Calf-street, edge tool maker, who died on Tuesday evening last, 10th inst., under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Rowland Hooper deposed:- I work for Mr Edward Wills. On Tuesday, 10th inst., I was at work in Torrington Wood Field, thrashing wheat, with a steam threshing machine. THOMAS VICARY, the deceased, with John Symons and others, was there at work. About 2 o'clock, after our return from dinner, I was in the act of feeding the machine, when the deceased was going to his work on the mow. Instead of ascending the ladder, he, without my seeing him, got up over the machine, and, in crossing, stepped on a board on the machine, which was loose. The board gave way, and his left leg was caught in the fly-wheel of the machine. The deceased had been at work there in the morning. As soon as the accident happened, every thing was done to extricate him. Mr Jones was immediately sent for. His leg was bandaged, and he was removed to his home, a distance of little more than half a mile from the field.
Charles Richard Jones, M.D., deposed:- I was sent for on the 10th, shortly after 2 o'clock in the afternoon, to go to a field near Torrington Wood, in the occupation of Mr Wills, to see the deceased, who, I had been informed, had received a severe injury in one of his legs. I hastened towards the field, and I met Rowland Hooper and others removing deceased to his home, on reaching which, I examined his leg, and found that, notwithstanding it had been well bandaged, great haemorrhage had taken place. I applied the tourniquet, and sent for Mr Hole. We conferred together, and both agreed that amputation, which was required, should be deferred until deceased had somewhat recovered from exhaustion, which had been occasioned by the loss of blood. About eight o'clock I attended and amputated the shattered leg, and the deceased died about half an hour afterwards, from the shock to the system had sustained from the accident, and by the loss of blood. There was no loss of blood during the amputation. A verdict of "Accidentally Killed," was returned by the Jury.

Thursday 26 April 1860
EASTDOWN - Death of a Child from a Scald. - John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, held an Inquest at Eastdown, on Thursday last, upon the body of ALFRED LOVERING, three years old, son of DORCAS LOVERING. On the Thursday preceding, the child seems to have gone to the fire-place and turned over a saucepan of hot water, some of which fell upon his neck and shoulders. The scald was very severe, and resulted in death next day. The evidence showed that every attention had been paid to the deceased; and the Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death from a Scald.

TORRINGTON - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday, Thomas Bowler, a labourer of Thornbury, in the parish Damerel, obtained a horse and cart to drive to Hollacombe, with a box for his daughter, who is a servant with Mr T. Brown, of Floyne. He took with him a little boy, named ARSCOTT ROWLAND, with the consent of his parents. On the road, when near Haladon Cross, the horse ran up the bank, and upset the cart, throwing out the man and boy. When Bowler got up from his fall, he saw the side of the cart pressing on the neck and breast of the child, and immediately made efforts to relieve him. When at length he succeeded in raising the cart, he found that the child had been crushed to death. The news was carried to the parents by a neighbour, and their distress may be easily imagined. An Inquest was held before Mr Vallack, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Thursday 3 May 1860
BRADWORTHY - Melancholy Death. - On Monday an Inquest was held at West Putford, near Bradworthy, before the Deputy Coroner (J. H. Toller, Esq.), touching the death of WM. WALTER, yeoman, of that parish. It appeared that about half-past seven o'clock on Saturday morning, the deceased left his house with about twenty bushels of seed oats in a butt drawn by one horse, a young spirited animal. He duly delivered the oats at the house of Mr Charles Colwill Cleave, farmer, of Ash, in Bradworthy, and, having stayed some time and partaken of three glasses of gin and water, the deceased left about ten o'clock, at which time he was riding in the empty butt. This was the last time he was seen alive, and he then appeared, according to Mr Cleave, to be quite capable of transacting business and none the worse for liquor. On Sunday morning, in consequence of MR WALTER not having reached home, his son, RICHARD WALTER, with the assistance of Mr Richard Johns, a farmer, of West Putford, went off early in search of him, and in a parish road leading from Woolfardisworthy to Holsworthy, they found him lying under the butt with the rail upon his neck. He was quite dead and blood was about his nostrils. The tailboard of the butt, which was missing, had been picked up on Saturday evening on the Ash Down road. The butt was found upside down, with the deceased's head under the rail. The horse was lying rather on one side and could not get up; the reins, which were of rope, were broken, and there were wheel tracks in the road, from which it appeared that the horse had in all probability ran away, and come in contact with an angle in the road, where there were fresh wheel marks about three feet up the bank. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death from the upsetting of a cart;" adding a Presentment pointing out the dangerous state of the projecting corner in question, and strongly recommending its immediate removal.

Thursday 10 May 1860
ILFRACOMBE - Fatal Accident. - This morning (Wednesday) the town was moved by the distressing intelligence that a fatal accident had occurred to MR JOHN GIBBS, mason, and the well-known sexton of the parish church., The unfortunate deceased was at work on the stable at Langley College, the residence of the late Rev. W. Chanter. He had stepped, it is reported, from the ladder to the roof, when his foot slipped, and in falling he struck against a linhay, which precipitated him with such violence on his head as to fracture his skull in a very dreadful manner. Death was instantaneous. The body was taken home in the forenoon to his distressed family in the town; an Inquest will be held on the body tomorrow. He had been sexton of the church many years. Singular is the state of the official staff at this church just now: The vicar is at Nice for his health, the clerk is confined to his house ill, the organist has become insolvent and is non est, the schoolmaster was buried last Saturday, and the sexton who dug his grave is now a mangled corpse.

Thursday 17 May 1860
ILFRACOMBE - Inquests: - On Thursday afternoon last, an Inquest was held at the 'Star Inn,' before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN GIBBS, mason, who had been killed, as noticed last week, by falling from a ladder on the previous day. The Jury, on being sworn, chose Mr Richard Gibbs as their foreman; and having proceeded to view the body, the following evidence was taken:- George Snow said: I know the deceased, JOHN GIBBS. I was working with him yesterday, at Langley House, a short distance from the old church. Deceased was sexton of the old church, and was a man about 58 years of age. At the time of the accident he was standing on a ladder which rested against the wall of the stable, the roof of which was under repair. I had been carrying him some stones, and had got off the ladder about ten minutes before I heard him fall. I should think his feet were about twelve feet from the ground. Having occasion to go to make up some mortar, I was about a landyard and half from the ladder, and being round a corner, I was not able to see him at the time he fell. While making the mortar I heard deceased call out "Oh!" twice, which caused me to turn round to see what was the matter, when I saw him lying at the foot of the ladder on his face and hands, bleeding very much from his head and mouth. I caught him up in my arms and made an alarm, when Mary Dadds came to my assistance. Deceased never spoke at all, but was quite dead when I came to him; the cry I heard was uttered as he was falling. He placed the ladder, with my assistance, against the wall himself, and it never budged an inch. The accident happened about eleven o'clock. He was perfectly sober. I cannot account for his falling but on the supposition that he over-reached himself. The ladder was placed on one side the work he was engaged upon. With some help, I carried deceased into the stable, and sent for a medical man. Mary Dadds corroborated the former witness. Mr P. Stoneham, surgeon, Ilfracombe, said: I was sent for yesterday morning, about 11 o'clock, and attended to the call instantly. When I arrived at Langley House, I found the deceased lying in the stable with an extensive fracture in the forepart of the head, quite enough of itself to cause death, which must have been instantaneous. - Verdict, "Accidental Death." Deceased had been sexton of the old church, it was said, 26 years.

BERRNARBOR - On Saturday, an Inquest was held before the same Coroner, at Berrynarbor, on the body of THOMAS HUXTABLE, a child of about 3 ½ years old, son of a labourer. It appeared that the child had a cold, and in that state was taken out into the field. It was found to be very ill when taken home in the evening, but was put to bed without seeking medical aid, which was intended to be got in the morning. Before the morning the child was dead. Mr Stoneham attended at the Inquest by the Coroner's order to make a post mortem examination to ascertain the cause of death. It was decided to have been a case of croup: Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 24 May 1860
THORNBURY - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at the Parsonage House, in the above parish, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a gentleman, named HENRY LUARD, who died on Saturday last, under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Rev. William Edgcombe, sworn:- I am the rector of this parish. The body now viewed by the Coroner and Jury is the body of HENRY LUARD, deceased. He was a gentleman, and had, I believe, been Cashier or Manager of a Bank, in London. He was about 70 years old. I knew the deceased well. On Wednesday last the deceased came to stay with me for a short time. I believe it was his intention to pay for his residence with me, but no terms were come to. He arrived here on Wednesday evening last, slept here the night, and on Thursday evening when I arrived home, about half-past nine, he had retired to bed. On the Thursday night I heard him go into his room, as if returning from the water-closet. I think I heard him moving the second time. On Friday morning he was at breakfast and appeared cheerful, and as well as usual. He told me that he had been obliged to get out in the night two or three times. He wrote several letters in the morning, and was about my premises the whole of the day. He took his dinner and tea, and went to bed about ten o'clock, apparently in his usual health and spirits. The next morning we breakfasted together, and he said he had been enabled to sleep, and that he was better. He was eager about fishing He then wrote two or three letters, and about 11 o'clock he started, instructing my little boy to take his donkey gig to Baystone bridge, at half-past one. I heard nothing about him until about four o'clock, when the boy returned, saying he had seen nothing of MR LUARD. I sent the boy back again to wait for him. About six o'clock, finding he had not returned, I began to be uneasy, and about half-past seven I got alarmed and sent my man in search of deceased, and about eight o'clock I went myself in search of him, and with my man made particular search in the river, and all about it. When it was getting dark, I gave general alarm, and a great many people accompanied us in the search in vain. At midnight we gave up the search. I did not go to bed for the night. At daylight I and others again went in search. About ten o'clock I was informed that the deceased was found in a field close to the church and Mr Trible's house. I went at once to the pot and found the body under the hedge of the field. His hat was near; his fishing basket and rod laid out as if done in a cool and collected manner, and he was in a half-sitting position, with his head on the ground, resting principally on the right shoulder and breast. There was blood about the upper part of his face and the eye, which had the appearance of a blow or cut; blood had come out of his mouth. I don't believe he had struggled at all. He has been labouring under great excitement lately, and he told me he had an internal disease and suffered greatly at times. I have not the slightest suspicion that he died otherwise than from natural causes. he had not vomited at all. Nothing was missing from his person. He had money about him, which, with other things, I secured. I know the deceased has a brother, a clergyman, I believe, to whom I have written, giving him information of the death, and the proposed Inquest.
Thomas Crossman, sworn:- I am a labourer, and reside at Thornbury. Yesterday, hearing that MR LUARD was missing, I went in search of him up and down the river, and about ten o'clock, in a field called Road Meadow, belonging to Mr Trible, close to the churchyard, I found the deceased, just under the gap that I had got over, in the posture described by the last witness.
James Daw, sworn:- About eleven o'clock on Saturday last, I met the deceased in the road. I conversed with him about the state of the water. He appeared as well as usual. It was only 80 paces from the place where he was found dead.
Thomas Linnington Ash, sworn:- I am a legally qualified medical practitioner, and reside at Holsworthy. The deceased, HENRY LUARD, was a patient of mine, and about six weeks since I attended him. I have, today, examined externally his body. There is no mark of violence whatever appearing on his body. I have no doubt that disease of the heart was the cause of death. I am quite satisfied the deceased died from natural causes. Not the slightest suspicion is attached to the case. He has lately been suffering under derangement of the intestines and has been labouring under excitement from reports in circulation about him. The appearance of the eyes indicated disease of the heart. Verdict - "Found dead; cause of death being disease of the heart."

SOUTHMOLTON - Inquests:- On Friday last, the inhabitants of this place were aroused from their usual quietude by the report that the body of an infant had been found concealed in a coal-house, by the police, at the house of a single female named PHOEBY PERRIN, of West Buckland, who lived in East-street, in an apartment by herself. She had been prevented from attending her occupation as a dressmaker for a day or two, and a woman named Lyddon, a neighbour, went in, to render her some assistance. On going to the coal-place, she had evidence that all was not right, and called the police, who, on searching, discovered the body of a new-born female infant. On learning that the child had been discovered, the wretched woman became almost immediately insensible, and continued so until Friday evening, when she died. On Saturday, an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner, on the body of the infant, when it appeared from the evidence of Mr Gardner, surgeon, who made a post mortem examination, that the child had been born alive, but had died from neglect. the Jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Died from Neglect immediately after birth, but whether intentional or not there was no evidence to show."
On Monday, an Inquest was held by the same Coroner, on the body of PHOEBE PERRIN, which had undergone a post mortem examination. Mr Gardner deposed that she had recently been delivered of a child, and that her death had been accelerated by the sudden shock she received from the discovery of the dead infant. - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 31 May 1860
HUISH - Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at Yeo, in this parish, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JOHN GOULD, wagoner to the Right Hon. Lord Clinton, who died on Friday morning last, from injuries sustained on Tuesday, 22nd instant. It appears that on the above day deceased was returning from Eggesford station with a wagon and two horses, laden with superphosphate. In descending a hill near New Bridge, in the parish of Dolton, the wheel came off the drag with a sudden jerk, and broke the chain. The horses were consequently propelled down the hill at a rapid rate, and the chains of the shaft horse were broken. The deceased, who held fast the head of the horse, was driven against a wall near the bridge, and sustained a compound fracture of his thigh and ribs. He was speedily conveyed to his home, and medical attendance at once procured. He lingered until Friday morning, when death put an end to his sufferings. Verdict, "Accidentally Killed." The deceased was a very steady man, and has been in the employ of Lord Clinton for many years. He received a premium of £2 and a bible, at the last Agricultural Meeting held at Torrington, on the 4th instant, for his long servitude.

TORRINGTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the 'West Country Inn,' in this town, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM BIDGEWAY, of New-street, mason, who was found drowned in the river Torridge, on Thursday morning last. the particulars of this melancholy case are detailed in the following evidence:-
ELIZABETH BIDGEWAY sworn:- I am a daughter of the deceased, and resided with him. On Tuesday, 22nd May, my father was at home, with myself and my mother. We all went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock. He went into his room, the door of which was left open. My mother did not occupy the same room, but she slept in another room with me. My father has been suffering from rheumatism, and would frequently walk the room at night. My father undressed, and went into his bed. On the following morning, about six o'clock, I went into my father's room to fetch my brush and comb, and then I found he was not there. I exclaimed to my mother, "Father is not here;, where can he be gone?" Search was then made for him, and on Thursday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, he was brought home. My father has been in a low, desponding way for some months. He had been engaged in building some houses, and he appeared to be afraid they were not worth the money they had cost him.
James Cole, carpenter, sworn:- I knew the deceased, and occupied, as tenant, one of his houses. On Tuesday last I was at work for the deceased at his buildings; he was with me the whole of the day, and he appeared quite rational then. About a fortnight since, I saw the deceased on Bartlett's Marsh, near the river; he had been into the water. I said to him, "Hallo, I have got you; what business had you got in the water." He trembled very much. I led him home by the arm to his house, and I told his wife and daughter where I had seen him. I told his wife to get some dry clothes and put on him as fast as she cold. I made no other remark, but I was impressed at the time with the belief that he had attempted to destroy himself. The deceased was then missing for some hours, and I and others had gone in search of him.
John Folley, mason, sworn:- I have been working with the deceased near twelve months. I have seen him in a desponding state of mind on many occasions. About a fortnight since he was missing, and I and others were sent by MRS BIDGEWAY in search of him. James Cole and I found him in Bartlett's Marsh. I said to him, "I suppose you have been picking pea-sticks, and fallen into the water;" and deceased made a silly smile. My impression at the time was that he had attempted to destroy himself.
ROBERT BIDGEWAY sworn:- I knew the deceased; he is a kindred of mine. On Wednesday morning last, I heard he was missing, and I, with several others, went in search of him the whole of the day without success. I went again on Thursday morning, and about ten o'clock I found the body of the deceased in the river Torridge, near Staple Vale. The Jury having heard the evidence, returned the following verdict;_ "That the deceased drowned himself, being at the time of Unsound Mind."
The deceased was a very respectable man, of about 70 years of age. Besides four nice leasehold dwellings which he has recently built in New-street, he was the owner of several freehold houses and gardens in this town. He was not at all involved. There is no doubt but the undertaking of building his new houses has proved too much for him at such an advanced age.

Thursday 14 June 1860
BISHOPSNYMPTON - Awful End of a Drunkard - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WM. MARLOW, a notorious drunkard, who came to his death on the previous Friday, under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Mr William German sworn:- The deceased worked for me, and has done so for sixteen or seventeen years. He lived with my family, and was about forty-one years of age. He was a very good workman, but was very much given to drink. On Whit-Monday there was a revel at Bishopsnympton, when he was very tipsy, and was also tipsy on the following Tuesday and Wednesday. When he was tipsy he constantly fell about. On Monday and Tuesday last he worked for me, as usual. What he did he did properly, and likewise on the day following, being Wednesday, until dinner time, when he went into my house and ate his dinner as usual. About two o'clock, complaining of being unwell, he made himself some elder blossom tea, and partook of it. He then said he thought he would go and lie down. He first went to and lay down in the tallet; but I did not like his doing so, and I got him to bed. About four o'clock, being our tea time, I took to him some tea and bread and butter, when he complained of a pain in his head and back. He took the tea, but refused the bread and butter, although I repeatedly requested him to take it. I said to him, as I had often said before, that it would be a bad job if he did not give up drinking and lying about. About two hours after I gave him some nitre in some water; and I afterwards took to him some elder blossom tea, which he refused to take. I found that he had been very sick. I gently reproved him, when he begged to be forgiven for that time. I watched him during the night, when he was several times sick; but, as in the morning he appeared to be much worse, I got an order from the relieving officer for Mr Flexman, of Southmolton, surgeon, to attend; but, he not being able to attend, Mr Attwater, of Southmolton, surgeon, came, who saw the deceased, when he appeared to be quite insensible. the usual remedies were applied, but he remained insensible until about eleven or twelve o'clock on the Friday, when he died. After he begged to be forgiven on Wednesday night last, he remained insensible until his death. To the best of my knowledge, he never received any improper treatment in my house. On the evening of Whit-Tuesday last, the deceased came into my house with his head bleeding. I said to him, "Then you have been out and met with it again!" He went out from the kitchen to the back kitchen and fell, and I got him up and put him to bed.
Mr Alexander H. Attwater sworn:- I know the deceased, and had so for years. At the request of Mr James Flexman, of Southmolton, the medical man attending the poor at Bishopsnympton, I went on Thursday last to see the deceased. I looked at him, and after examining him minutely, I found him to be in a perfect state of insensibility. The pupil of the eye was dilated, and insensibility with noisy breathing, evidently shewing there was something in the brain to cause those peculiar symptoms. I ordered his hair to be cut off and his head washed with cold vinegar and water, which was done, and I desired Mr William German to send into Southmolton for some medicine, and I returned home and waited for Mr Flexman's return, and told him the result of my visit. It was then determined that Mr Flexman and myself should go out in the evening, but, having received a message that the deceased was worse, we went earlier, and found him still insensible. I found the medicine had been given him. I have this day, assisted by Mr James Flexman, made a post mortem examination of the body. On examining the head externally, we found several bruises, some old and one of very recent date, by the side of the head. On removing the skull cap, we found extravasated blood on the brain. The brain was then removed, and on examining the skull we found a fracture on the base of the skull, which was sufficient to account for death.
Mr James Flexman sworn:- I have this day, assisted by Mr Attwater, made a post mortem examination of the body of WILLIAM MARLOW. On the head, externally, I found marks of several bruises. The skin, in some places, abraded. On removing the scalp I found it to be one mass of coagulated blood. On removing the skull cap, I found, corresponding with some of the external marks, similar appearances in a less degree, on the membranes of the brain. On opening the left ventricle, there was a considerable quantity of bloody serum. On removing the cerebellum I detected an extensive fracture of the occipital bone, extending into the petrous portion of the temporal bone. From the above appearances, I am of opinion that death was produced by external violence. I consider the fracture of the occipital bone must have taken place since Whit-Tuesday, which could not have been detected unless the head had been opened, there being no depression. Independent of the fracture of the occipital bone, I think the other injuries which he had received would have been sufficient to have caused his death within a short period.
James Rodd sworn:- I knew the deceased, and have known him upwards of fifteen years. I have always known him to have been a very drunken character. I saw him several times during Whitsun week, when he was drunk. He was a very helpless fellow, and given to falling when he was drunk. I have repeatedly seen him fall when intoxicated. About three or four years since I saw him after he had fallen, when he had cut his head on the top part, and blood profusely came. He was very tipsy then.
William Warren sworn:- I have known the deceased for nineteen years. I always knew him to be a drunken character, He was very much subject to falls when he was drunk. During Whitsun week I saw him every day, and except on the Saturday he was every day drunk. On Wednesday of Whitsun week, soon after dinner, as I was going down Bishopsnympton street, I met the deceased coming up, and he spoke to me. He asked me to lend him a "bob," which I considered was a shilling. He was drunk and I told him he was too much so to lend him any money. He then asked me if I would give him the price of a pint of cider, which I also refused to do. He then put himself into a fighting attitude, and said he was Tom Sayers, and fell on the back part of his head, which rebounded. I assisted him up, and he walked away staggering without saying anything, dropping his head upon his bosom.
Thomas Peagam sworn:- I have known the deceased for 18 or 19 years, during the whole of which time he has been a very drunken character, and was subject to falls when he was drunk. I have, first and last, seen him fall scores of times. On Thursday in Whitsun week I happened to be in Bishopsnympton street, and saw him fall upon the ground upon his back. He got up without any assistance, and rambled away.
The Coroner summed up by saying that the gentlemen of the Jury were met there for the purpose of inquiring into the death, and cause thereof, of WILLIAM MARLOW, late of Bishopsnympton; and from the evidence of the medical gentlemen there could be no doubt that the deceased died fro9m a fracture on the base of his skull. Of that fact there could not be the shadow of a doubt, but the next point for their consideration was, how the skull became fractured - whether it was the result of design, or from a fall or falls arising from the intemperate habits of the deceased. They had heard from Mr Wood, the Inspector of the Police, that he and his men had used every effort to trace any evidence which might shew the infliction of the fracture to have been by any person or persons, but without success. The deceased did not appear to have made any complaint to any person of the fracture, and was at his work on Monday, Tuesday, and part of the Wednesday in the last week; and, according to the evidence of his master, did his work during those days properly. Had any other person inflicted the blow he would naturally have made a complaint to some one; but no such words every escaped from his lips. they came then to the falls which the deceased had from time to time received. From the medical testimony it appeared there were many bruises upon his head, some of them old, others of recent date, thereby showing that in all probability, in the absence of any other evidence, that the deceased had received those bruises whilst in a state of inebriation; but when they turned to the overwhelming and agreeing testimony as to his dissolute and drunken habits, it was reasonable for them to presume that the fracture of his skull which caused his death took place during one of those days in Whitsun week when he was, for five consecutive days, in such a state of intoxication, especially as he was seen to fall three times during that week; but at best that was but matter of presumption, as there was no direct evidence to show how the fracture was caused. It would be for the Jury to well consider the evidence; and, should they require any explanation during their deliberation, he (the Coroner) should be most happy to render it to them. In conclusion, he suggested to them for their thought, and for the ends of justice, the advisability of their returning an open verdict; but the case was then in their hands, and they would return such a verdict as they thought, under all circumstances, was the proper one.
The Jury, consisting of thirteen very respectable persons, retired, and when they returned, delivered the following verdict:- "That the deceased died from the effects of a blow, but how or by what means inflicted, no evidence appeared." The Inquiry lasted upwards of five hours.

MEETH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at Meeth, before George Doe, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY JANE JOHNS, daughter of WILLIAM JOHNS, labourer, who died on Saturday last, under circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
REBECCA JOHNS sworn:- I am the wife of WILLIAM JOHNS, a labourer, residing at Meeth. The body which the Coroner and Jury have now viewed, is the body of my child MARY JANE JOHNS, aged two years and two months, On Thursday the 7th instant, I was in the kitchen of my house, and the deceased was near the fire place by the side of the cradle at play. I went into the garden to hang up some clothes. I had not been in the garden more than two minutes, when I heard the child crying. I at once went into the house and found the child in the middle of the room in a blaze, I caught her in my arms and threw a pitcher of water over her, I then ran across the court with her, when I met John Baker and his mother Mary Baker, who took the child from me and carried her into her house. Mr Deane, surgeon, of Dolton, was sent for, and he came in the course of an hour. He made some application to the body of the child, and came again to see her on the following day. On Friday night she had fits, and on Saturday morning the 9th instant, she died.
WILLIAM JOHNS sworn:- I am the father of the deceased. On Thursday the 7th instant, shortly after two o'clock in the afternoon, my master told me that there was something the matter at my house, and I ran over. I found the child in the house of Thomas Baker, all the clothes were off, and she was on her grandmother's lap. She was very much burnt on the face, chest and arms. She died on Saturday the 9th instant, about nine o'clock in the morning, whilst I was present. Verdict; - "Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 21 June 1860
BARNSTAPLE - Inquests Held By The Borough Coroner. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of GEORGE THOMAS BEER, aged four years, son of MR JOSEPH BEER, grocer, &c., Boutport-street, in this town. It appears that on the previous Friday the little fellow was at play in the street when some boy, whose name is unknown, in passing, struck him a blow on one of his arms; inflammation ensued, and within a few days death resulted from this apparently trivial cause. - Verdict, "Died from the effects of a blow."

BARNSTAPLE - On the same day, the Coroner held an Inquest at the North Devon Infirmary, on the body of a lad named THOMAS SMALLDON, aged 12 years, who died from the effects of severe injuries sustained about a fortnight previously by his falling over a cliff, near Combmartin. There were circumstances of suspicion connected with the case, which have already been reported in this Journal: two boys, who were known to have been in his company, denied all knowledge of his whereabouts, when interrogated by the deceased's employer, who was in quest of him; the consequence was, that he lay at the base of the cliff in a shockingly mutilated state for 24 hours before he was discovered and help afforded to him. Verdict, "Accidental Death." - The Coroner passed a severe censure on the conduct of the two boys.

Thursday 28 June 1860
SPREYTON - Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held before Mr Vallack, County Coroner, at Falkadon Farm, Spreyton, on the body of JANE POWLESLAND, aged 68, wife of SAMUEL POWLESLAND, of that place, farmer. It appears that on Friday night last, between 7 and 8 o'clock, the deceased went out milking. She was milking a cow in the linhay, and her niece, MISS HARRIET ANN POWLESLAND, was milking another cow in the court yard, about a dozen paces from the linhay, the door of which was closed. MISS POWLESLAND shortly afterwards observed milk running out at the corner of the linhay, and thinking that the milk pail had been upset, she went thither, and found the deceased lying on her back quite dead, with the milk-pail in her left hand. The pail was upset, but the cow was standing perfectly still, and it did not appear that the cow had moved. Mr Battishill, the medical witness, who saw the deceased shortly afterwards, gave it as his decided opinion that the vertebrae of the neck was injured, which might have been caused by the deceased accidentally falling backwards against the linhay. there was no external blow whatever on the body. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 19 July 1860
Inquests Held By Richard Bremridge, Esq.
FREMINGTON - Accidental Death. An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at Fremington, on the body of a lad named WILLIAM HOLLAND. On the previous Thursday the deceased was driving a horse and cart engaged in transporting hay from the field of a neighbouring farmer to the stack, when his head was unfortunately caught between a gate post and the point of the shaft of the cart and he received such serious injuries as terminated his life on the following morning. Verdict - "Accidentally killed by the shaft of a cart drawn by one horse forcing deceased to and against a gate-post, causing rupture of the vessels of the head."

APPLEDORE - Death by Drowning. - On the same day an Inquest was held by Mr Bremridge, at the 'Royal George Inn,' Appledore, on the body of a lad named GEORGE CLARKE, who was accidentally drowned in the river Torridge, near Southcott-point, on the 6th instant, by falling over the side of a boat which he was sailing. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 26 July 1860
SWIMBRIDGE - Fatal Accident. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at Stowford-farm, in this parish, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of HENRY LIVERTON, a lad about 14 years of age, son of MR JOHN LIVERTON, yeoman, who had died on the Saturday preceding, from the effects of a gun-shot wound. the evidence taken at the Inquisition shewed that the deceased had, on the previous Friday evening, gone into his father's mazard ground with a gun, to shoot small birds from off the mazard trees - that having loaded the gun he laid it on a ladder, and himself lay down; he had not been long in that position before Thomas Balman, who accompanied him and who was employed in picking mazards, heard a report, and immediately the deceased exclaimed, "Oh, Lord! I have shot myself!" He immediately rose from the ground and proceeded toward his house, desiring Balman to go for assistance. Thomas Andrews, who was called to his aid, heard a scream, and immediately found the deceased on the ground. He said the gun had broken his arm, but he did not know what caused it to go off. The deceased was taken to his father's house, and Mr James Flexman, surgeon, of Southmolton, sent for. That gentleman was soon on the spot, accompanied by Mr Furse, surgeon, also of Southmolton. On consultation, after examining the patient, who had lost a considerable quantity of blood, it was determined to amputate the arm near the shoulder joint. The operation was successfully performed, and the medical men left. The poor lad expired on the following day. Verdict, "Accidentally killed by the discharge of a gun."

LYNTON - Death by Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the dwelling house of Mrs Jones, at Lynton, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR EDWIN HOWELL, of Park-street, Bristol, a music and drawing master, there lying dead. The deceased came to Lynmouth on the Saturday preceding, accompanied by a friend, intending to stay there a week. On the Thursday following he went to the sea to bathe; the tide was running up the Channel at the time, and it was very rough; but, as the deceased was a good swimmer, he ventured in - his companion, more discreet, remained on shore. After a while, MR HOWELL was observed to be drifting towards the rocks; an alarm was given, and means were adopted for his rescue; which, however, proved ineffectual until after the expiration of an hour, during which he was tossed about by the sea and beaten against the rocks. When the body was recovered, the assistance of Mr Clarke, surgeon, was called in, and every effort made to restore animation, but in vain. A gentleman named Hellier and C. C. Hodge hazarded their lives in their attempts to regain possession of the body. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned while bathing."

Thursday 2 August 1860
BIDEFORD - Death By Drowning. - A very melancholy accident occurred here on Monday last, at noon, to WILLIAM, only son of MR THOMAS CLEVERDON, of this town, aged about ten years. It appears he was sent to Mr Cox's yard with his uncle's dinner, and on returning from that place he was tempted by several others to bathe; he went beyond his depth, and, being unable to swim, as it was the first time he had ventured into the water, sank to rise no more. The lads who were with him were just of his own age, therefore could not render him any assistance. The body was picked up on Tuesday morning, about eight o'clock, above the bridge, opposite the gas house. An Inquest was held the next day, at the 'Lamb Inn,' before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 9 August 1860
BIDEFORD - Death By Drowning. - On Thursday evening, FREDERICK VINSON, aged about 11, third son of MR WILLIAM VINSON, draper of this town, was unfortunately drowned. The deceased had gone to bathe in the vicinity of the Commercial Wharf, where some timbers are lodged, and not being able to swim he got beyond his depth and met with a watery grave. The body was found at about nine o'clock on the following morning, close to the scene of the catastrophe; and the same day T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the 'Barley Mow' Inn, when a verdict of "Accidental Death by Drowning," was returned.

Thursday 23 August 1860
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., at the 'Crown and Anchor Inn,' in Litchdon-street, to inquire into the cause of the decease of GEORGE HANDFORD, aged 40, hostler to Mr William Pridham, coach proprietor, Joy street, who died after a very brief illness on the morning of the day preceding. The Jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, which was lying in a tenement at the rear of the inn, scantily furnished and bearing unmistakable marks of poverty and wretchedness. On the return of the Jury, the following evidence was adduced:- Mr J. W. Tatham, chemist and druggist, sworn:- I have known the deceased for many years. He was hostler at Mr Pridham's stables. I saw him on Saturday last, at five o'clock in the afternoon, in Mr Pridham's saddlery room. His wife asked me to come in, as her husband was bleeding very much I went in; he was not bleeding, but vomiting, and faint and cold. I directed his wife to have him taken home; to put his feet into hot water and mustard, and to put him to bed. I also gave her three powders for him. He told me he had eaten nothing for two days, and that he was so bad at Ilfracombe (from whence he had just returned), that Mrs Lake, of the 'Clarence Hotel,' had given him a glass of brandy and water. The powders I gave him were mainly composed of ammonia and carbonate of soda. At 11 o'clock on Saturday night, his wife called on me, and said he was nothing better. I advised her to get a medical man. She said he (deceased) wouldn't have any one else. On Sunday morning, at half-past 8, she again called and said her husband was nothing better - that he had not passed any water for 24 hours. I then gave her a draught, containing nitrate of potash and tincture of henbane. I believe that on her return she found her husband dead. I had often seen him before affected in a similar way.
Margaret Dillon sworn:- I live in Barnstaple; am a widow; the deceased was my son-in0law, and was about 40 years of age. I first saw him on Saturday, in the harness room, at Mr Pridham's, shortly after Mr Tatham had left. He was then very ill and very faint. Mrs Pridham let us have a fly, and we put him into it and took him home. On the way he fainted, in High-street. We carried him to his bed-room, and asked if he would have a medical man. He said he would have no one beside Mr Tatham. His wife went to Mr T.'s shop, and returned with three powders, which we gave him at intervals of four hours; we also put his feet into hot water, but they got no heat. I remained till four o'clock on Sunday morning, when I went home and returned shortly after five. He had convulsive fits from 7 to 9 o'clock, when he died.
Mrs Fanny Kelly, wife of the landlord of the 'Crown and Anchor,' sworn:- The deceased lived at the rear of my house, where he occupied two rooms. I went to see him yesterday morning, at between eight and nine o'clock. His wife called me. He was then in his bed; no one was with him but is wife. He did not speak or move. I put a little wine to his mouth. He appeared to be lying in a fit; and he died eight or ten minutes after, without a struggle. Mr C. H. Gamble, surgeon, sworn:- I was called to the deceased yesterday morning, at half-past 8 o'clock. The messenger urged me to come in haste, for the man was dying. I went immediately, and found him dead. I examined the body, but found no marks of external injury. I heard the history of his case, and the conclusion to which I arrived was that he died from a collapse of the nervous system. He had been an ailing man for some time: he had suffered paralysis in the right arm and the bladder, but the principal part affected was his brain. He died from physical exhaustion, accelerated by his having been so long without food. Had any medical man seen him in the night, he would probably have drawn off the water. The medicine supplied by Mr Tatham was strictly proper under the circumstances. The Jury returned as their verdict that "Death resulted from Natural Causes." - The deceased has left a wife, who is in momentary expectation of confinement and three fatherless children.

Thursday 30 August 1860
SOUTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, to inquire into the cause of the death of MISS SARAH COMINS (whose death was recorded last week.) The deceased was thrown from a carriage about 6 weeks previously, and died from the injuries sustained. After a very lengthened Inquiry, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was recorded.

HARBERTON - Suicide of CHANCELLOR MARTIN. - The usually quiet little village of Harberton was on Monday thrown into a state of considerable excitement and great sorry in consequence of its having become known that the esteemed vicar of the parish, the Rev. GEORGE MARTIN, Chancellor of the Diocese of Exeter, had committed suicide. The Rev. Chancellor preached in the parish church on Sunday morning, and read the prayers at the afternoon service. In the evening he conducted family prayers in his own house, as was his wonted custom, and retired to bed at the usual hour. He is said to have exhibited considerable uneasiness throughout the night, so much so, indeed, that MRS MARTIN endeavoured to prevail on him to have medical advice. This he refused; and MRS MARTIN went down stairs yesterday morning, leaving him in the act of dressing. But after some time, finding he did not come down, and that 9 o'clock, the time for morning prayer had come, and her husband had not appeared, MRS MARTIN went up to see the reason for the unusual delay. On opening the door of his dressing room, she was horrified to behold him lying on the floor partly dressed, weltering in his blood, and with his throat cut. Alarm was instantly given, and a messenger despatched to Totnes, a distance of two miles, for medical aid. Mr Owen and Mr Harris, surgeons, of Totnes, were promptly in attendance, but their services were of no avail, as the rev. gentleman lived only about five minutes after their arrival; indeed, they pronounced the case to be hopeless at the first sight. the cause of this dreadful close of a useful life is unknown, but it is said that his family have on more than one occasion of late observed something unusual and peculiar in his manner. The deceased was a canon residentiary of the Cathedral, and chancellor of the diocese. He was in residence at Exeter five months in the year, and the other part of the year he generally resided in his vicarage at Harberton. He was made canon in 1816, and chancellor in 1820; was married twice, and leaves four grown-up children by the former wife, and four by the present MRS MARTIN, and a large family circle and troops of friends to lament his most untimely and mournful end. In him the poor of Harberton have lost a good and charitable clergyman, and the Bishop and clergy of the diocese a wise councillor and a sincere friend.
Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday an Inquest was held on the body, by W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner, at Harberton, when the following evidence was adduced. The first witness called was.
MRS RENIRA HENRIETTA ALDEBURG MARTIN, who said:- The deceased was my husband; lately he has not been so strong, but his general health has not been bad during the last three weeks; he has been very nervous: I remarked it seriously about that time ago; he said he felt himself much overdone by business. He was rector of this parish, Chancellor of this diocese, Canon of the Exeter Cathedral, and was much engaged in ecclesiastical duties. On Friday there was a parish meeting, about which he was very much disturbed. Mr Kellock, solicitor, attended that meeting. On Sunday last, deceased preached in the morning, read the prayers in the afternoon, and baptized a child. He came home in the evening, and was very low; he retired to rest about half-past ten; he did not disturb me during the night; he had not slept well for many nights, nor did he do so on Sunday night. On Monday morning he got up about eight o'clock. When he awoke he said he had a spasm through his heart; he partially dressed himself, and then shaved and put on his boots. I was in and out of his dressing-room every minute, and was very much frightened because he seemed so unlike himself. I was in the same room with him, but separated from him by a partition, and I got close to the doorway; I heard a noise, and was satisfied he was dressing; but suddenly he stopped, and I heard a violent pouring of something gurgling; I ran into the room, and found him kneeling with his arms over the foot pan, and I saw he had cut his throat on both sides; he was not quite dead; I poured brandy down his throat, and sent for Mr Owen, who arrived from Totnes in about 40 minutes; he came while MR MARTIN was still living, but gave no hopes of his recovery; I should think he lived 20 minutes after Mr Owen came; that was about an hour after he cut his throat, but I cannot say exactly.
Samuel Varder, the butler, deposed finding the deceased in the position described by MRS MARTIN. When that lady gave the alarm, he adopted prompt measures for stopping the blood, previous to the arrival of the doctor. In answer to Mr Paige, a Juryman, the witness said he had heard the deceased was distressed about his circumstances.
Grace Ellis said:- I am housemaid in this establishment. On Monday morning last, I went into my master's dressing-room, and found that he had cut his throat, and afterwards on emptying the foot-pan, I found the razor. I believe that was the instrument with which he cut his throat.
T. C. Kellock, Esq.: I am a solicitor in Totnes. I knew the deceased intimately, and for some time resided in his parish. I have been in the habit of seeing the deceased very frequently, and he has been in the habit of speaking to me about parochial matters connected with the church of the parish. I had something to do with the charities for some time - in the first place as parishioner, and afterwards as solicitor, and what I undertook to do was directed by an order of the Court of Chancery, which I received from my London agent last Friday morning. The matter which so disturbed the deceased was, that a special return of the charities having been asked for by the Charity Commissioners, a mistake occurred in the account sent up, the sum of 3s. 2 ½d. being stated as expended, instead of carried forward. He showed me a long letter which he purposed sending to the Charity Commissioners, to explain to them that he had no motive in signing the document in which the mistake occurred. He was so miserable about it that I was satisfied he did not exhibit his usual strength of mind as I had previously known him to do. At my earnest solicitation, and that of MRS MARTIN, he left out those sentences which related to his motives. I said to him "Do sir, dispel every idea of this kind from your mind," and he said, "Oh, sir, I have signed the document; I should have been more careful, as now I shall be disgraced." About the same time he came to me respecting another matter. There had been a certain division in the parish; the parish church having been built in Harbertonford, and he had conveyed the incumbency to Rockford, as the site for the new incumbent, Mr Luscombe. Since then he said to me that he did not think it was right to convey an old house to the incumbent, and he would therefore convey it free from dilapidation and give £200 for the purpose. But it was considered by the surveyor, who was called, that a much larger sum should be laid out. It was necessary to obtain the sum of money on mortgage, and the papers for it were drawn up, and I went with the deceased to Exeter, when the Dean and Chapter approved of the documents, and I was appointed the nominee to receive the money by the Bishop, the Dean and Chapter, the deceased, and the incumbent. At every interview since that time the deceased pressed me to take the £200 that he was going to give in addition to the £400. He said he wished to get it out of hand. Last week he rushed into my office in a very excited manner, and not at all like himself, and wished me to take a cheque for the money. The alteration in him, in matters of business, was very striking, and at last he rushed away from me, saying he should be too late for the train, and then hurried off. Last Wednesday I again called, and had a long conversation with him about the 3s. 2 ½d. and the charities. He again said he should be disgraced, and that he had received no answer to the letter which he had sent to the Charity Commissioners. He then went on to speak about the contract for Rockford, and said he did not like the way in which it was being carried on, for he should be drawn into great expenses. He then spoke of the parish meeting respecting the reseating of the church and a large seat for the parishioners. I left him, promising to see him again; I did not see him on Thursday, but on Friday I came here and brought the Order in Chancery with me, thinking it would be a solace for him to know that all we had been trying to do had been approved of by the Court of Chancery; but to my surprise, he did not ask to look at it. MRS MARTIN was with him, and his mind was so absent that all who were present on the occasion asked him to give up the idea of visiting the church, and I asked him not to go to the meeting, and nothing was done at it, because only the two churchwardens attended, and I returned and remained with him in his room until about ten o'clock in the evening. He kept returning to the same question, and was very uneasy in his mind. I saw him next on Sunday afternoon when I rode over to Harberton Church. I saw him for a minute just before the commencement of the service, and he shook hands with me, and said in an anxious manner, "I shall see you after the sermon." When he came back, MRS MARTIN and myself asked him if he would go for a walk, then he said, with an air of indifference, "Just as Mr Kellock likes." He kept his hand on his shoulder, and then took off his gown, which he threw into a chair. I saw there was a great alteration in him. I went into his study, and as soon as I got there he began to talk of money matters. He said he was not satisfied about the £200 and asked if a cheque drawn on a Sunday would be good? I said that if it would be any comfort to him I would take the money and then had it. He asked for it back again, and I understood him to say he would call on me and bring it. He then began to discuss money matters generally, and he did so in a very incoherent manner, and said "You know that a man with my establishment could not have a large balance at his bankers to put his hands on." I said he would not want it, and the £400 raised on mortgage and the £200 he was to give would be more than ample for the required outlay, and would leave a balance to hand over to Mr Luscombe. He said he would give up the living, and go away into some place where he would not be known, and then went back to the subject of 3s. 2 ½d. He was so excited that I left him, but after a few minutes I saw him through a window, with his brow knitted, and his hands clenched, and he looked so wretched and uncomfortable, that I went in and asked him to go for a walk or come into the garden, and I said, what a blessing it would be if the weather would hold up and we had a fine harvest, but I got no answer. He went into the garden and paced up and down, and began to tell me that his expences were too much, and they must be reduced - his carriages put down, and the horses sold, and so on - and I then tried to divert his mind. He said he had been elected president of the Devon and Exeter Hospital, and ought to be in Exeter on Tuesday at the anniversary sermon, and he thought he would write a note to put it off, but he allowed the post time to go by. He told me of many other engagements, and said figures worried him, and he would give up the agency of the Saving's Bank, and would not go to Convocation; and immediately afterwards added, that he would give up the living, the canonry, and the Chancellorship. He was very much excited, and had been in a low, dejected and desponding way. I met Mr Owen, the medical attendant of the family, on Thursday, and hinted my suspicions as to the condition of the deceased's mind.
Thomas Edward Owen, surgeon, of Totnes, the last witness called, said that he was sent for to attend the deceased on Monday morning, and on arriving found that his throat was cut. He was then breathing, but pulseless. Witness applied lint to the wound, but deceased died about twenty minutes afterwards. The cause of death was haemorrhage from the bleeding of the wound.
Here the Coroner was interrupted by the Jury, who said they did not require any more evidence. The Coroner addressed the Jury, and after a short consultation, they found that the "Deceased destroyed himself while in a state of Temporary Insanity."

BERRYNARBOR - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Berrynarbor, on Thursday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a male infant child, to which a woman named ALICE LEONARD had given birth, on Tuesday morning previous. the birth took place at the house of Jane Hicks; there was no medical attendant, neither was there any one present beside the mother at the time. The evidence of Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, who made a post mortem examination, was to the following effect:- There were no marks of violence on the body, the lungs floated in water but they were not fully distended, and death was not occasioned by haemorrhage. Mr S. was of opinion that the child was still-born, and the Jury returned a verdict in accordance with that opinion.

Thursday 6 September 1860
BIDEFORD - Melancholy Accident. - On Thursday last, a young man named JOHN SHEPPERD, was killed by the falling of a plank while engaged in his work, at Mr Cox's ship-building yard. the deceased was passing at the time of the accident under the rudder hole of a ship in course of building, above which, William Symonds, a joiner, was engaged in fitting some casing. The latter had just at that instant removed a plank for the purpose of giving it an addition planing; this had the effect of disengaging an adjoining one, 6 ½ feet in length, which fell through the hole on the head of the unfortunate deceased causing instant death. An Inquest was held on the body on the following day at the 'Lamb Inn,' when it appeared from the evidence that the deceased was not employed about the rudder, and that his passing under it was purely accidental. Previous to the fatal occurrence, Symonds had cautioned another young man not to stand under the suspended planks, which were only fastened with a single nail. It appeared from the evidence of the foreman that that was the usual plan adopted for such work, but it is hoped this accident will have the effect of inducing increased precaution in this respect. The deceased who had nearly completed his apprenticeship was a young man of excellent character, and was generally respected by his fellow workmen, who testified their esteem by following the funeral procession at his interment on the following Sunday, which was joined by the workmen of other shipbuilding yards of the town and also by the teachers of the Wesleyan School of which communion he was a consistent member.

Thursday 13 September 1860
NORTH TAWTON - A Child Poisoned By His Mother. - On Wednesday last, 5th instant, an Inquest was held at North Tawton, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JOHN DEVENISH, aged 1 year and 2 weeks, the infant son of MR THOMAS DEVENISH, cordwainer, who died on Monday evening last, under the following painful circumstance. It appears that on the above day the fond mother of the deceased perceiving that the child was poorly, administered (what she thought to be at the time) a little magnesia. Shortly afterwards to her horror and dismay, she discovered that she had by mistake administered white precipitate. The agonized mother became painfully alarmed and immediately obtained the attendance of Dr Budd, but all his efforts proved fruitless, and the poor little sufferer died, after a few hours of great agony. - Verdict "Excusable Homicide."

NORTHAM - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held at Northam, on Tuesday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of MR HENRY GRANT DURKE, builder, of Torrington. Deceased had gone on an excursion to the Pebble-ridge, on the previous evening, accompanied by his wife and some friends, 13 in number. He immediately went into the water to bathe, and after he had been in about a quarter of an hour, Mr Williams, ironmonger, of Bideford, who was one of the party, went to call him. Suddenly he was lost sight of, and Mr W. undressed and went into the water and brought out his body. When taken out of the water, life was not extinct and Mr Ackland, surgeon, of Bideford, was promptly in attendance; but before his arrival MR DURKE had ceased to live. He was about 35 years of age. He leaves a widow, who was an eyewitness of the catastrophe, to lament her sudden bereavement. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 20 September 1860
EXETER - Frightful Accident. - On Wednesday evening, an engine cleaner at the Axminster Station of the South Western Railway, named CREEDY, while engaged in shunting some ballast trucks, was knocked down, and the wheels passed over his body, cutting both his legs off, and mutilating him in a shocking manner. The poor fellow was immediately sent by a special engine to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he died the same night. An Inquest on the body is being held this morning, at the 'Blue Boar Inn,' before H. W. Hooper, Esq., Coroner.

Thursday 27 September 1860
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquests. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held at the 'Salutation Inn,' Castle-street, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the bodies of two men named JOHN ASH and JAMES TRACEY, there lying dead. The former was ostler to Henry Dene, Esq., banker, of this town, and the latter an under-gardener in the employ of Dr Yeo, of Fremington House. Both came to their deaths by drowning. ASH, under very appalling circumstances, no doubt existing that at the time of his melancholy end he was in a state of intoxication.
The Jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the bodies, which were lying in a room at the back of the inn. On their return, the following evidence was adduced in the case of the first named unfortunate:-
Joseph Harris sworn:- I live in Barnstaple, and am the landlord of the 'Locomotive Inn.' I have known the deceased, JOHN ASH, from his childhood. He was a native of the parish of Brendon, and about 35 years of age. I saw him last night; he entered my house at a quarter to eight o'clock - he had nothing to drink, and left at about eight o'clock. He was very tipsy. My daughter, Elizabeth Richards, advised him to go home. I have not seen him since. He went in the direction of Mr Brailey's.
James Brailey sworn:- I am a joiner, and live with my father, the landlord of the 'Golden Anchor' public-house. I knew the deceased; he was ostler to Mr Henry Dene, banker. I saw him last evening, shortly after 8 o'clock, when he entered my father's house and asked for two glasses of beer. My father said, "You have had sufficient; you had better make haste home; if I give you more, it will do you a great injury." He was very drunk and rambled about; and, on being refused the beer, he turned round and left the house. The man who accompanied him to our house, and left in his company, was named Kingdon, of Southmolton.
Joseph Stribling sworn:- I am a pilot, and reside in this borough. Last night, about 11 o'clock, I was engaged in mooring the Celia outside the North Walk, near the Pill. It was high water at the time. George Short, the master of the vessel, and my two sons were with me. We got into a boat to come ashore. As we were coming along, seeing something dark, the captain said, "Joe, that's surely a man - back water." I did so, and Short pulled the body into the boat, and we brought it to the slip. I sent for the police, and got a light; and then removed the body to this house (the 'Salutation Inn'). At the expiration of from 20 minutes to half-an-hour, Mr Cooke, surgeon, came. I saw no sign of life in deceased from the time I took him up. The body was floating down with the tide; it was a little warm.
The Coroner said there was another witness (George Short), but he was in a disgraceful state of intoxication. If the Jury thought his evidence material he (the Coroner) would adjourn the Inquest that he might be examined; but he had too much respect for his office to call a drunken man before them. The Jury unanimously declined to hear Short; but he frequently interrupted the proceedings, and was more than once expelled by the police.
Mr Michael Cooke sworn:- I was sent for at a quarter before 12, last night to the 'Salutation' public-house. I examined the body - it was quite cold, and I thought it useless to attempt to resuscitate it. Deceased appeared to have been dead for more than an hour. I found no marks of injury on the body, and have no doubt that death resulted from suffocation by drowning.
Police Serjeant Chanter sworn:- Last night I was on duty at the Station-house, when Joseph Stribling, the younger, called and told me that his father had picked up the body of a man, who appeared to have been drowned. I desired him to call Mr Cooke. I then went to the Castle Quay, and gave directions that the body should be taken to the 'Salutation.' I searched the pockets of his clothes; there was a pair of gloves and a few letters in them, which I produce.
Charles Parkin, a juryman, said, he had heard that the deceased was at his lodgings, at Mrs Warren's, Cross-street, at 11 o'clock last night. If so, he thought it desirable that Mrs Warren should be called in evidence. The Beadle was despatched to make inquiries; but he shortly after returned, stating that Mrs Warren had not seen the deceased since two o'clock on the Friday afternoon.
This was all the evidence, which the Coroner recapitulated to the Jury, who returned a verdict of "Found Drowned."

The case of the unfortunate man, JAMES TRACEY, was then inquired into.
Frederick Moore sworn:- I am ostler at the 'King's Arms' inn, in this town. I saw the deceased at the 'Three Tuns,' High-street, at a quarter to 12 o'clock, last night. He was drinking, but did not appear to be drunk. He was in the company of two men, whose names I do not know. I afte3rwards met him in the High-street, at one o'clock, outside Mr Rowe's, grocer, near the Journal Office. He said "Good night." I said, "Are you going home?" He replied, "Yes, I shall try for it now." He appeared to have drunk a little, but was not very tipsy.
John Stribling sworn:- I am a pilot, and live in Barnstaple. I am 82 years of age. This morning, shortly after 6 o'clock, I was going up the river in my boat, towards my nets, which are set in the Bridge pools. When off the Great Quay, I saw something like a woman's dress in the water. I pulled to it, and tried to heave it in with a paddle, but found it too heavy. I then pulled it up and found it was the body of a man. I called James Phillips, who assisted me to get the body into my boat, and we brought it to the Castle Quay. Four men then carried it to the 'Salutation Inn,' where it now lies. I did not know the deceased; the body was quite dead when I took it up. There was a watch, a knife, a purse, and 5 ½d. in his pockets, which I gave to the landlord.
[The watch was produced; it had stopped at 5 minutes to 12, but it had not run down.]
Deceased was 40 years of age, and leaves a widow and six children to lament their bereavement. Verdict - "Found Drowned."
As the deceased were supposed to have walked over one of the quays into the river, the Coroner and Jury remarked on the present unprotected state of the wharves. There being no fence or barrier to deter parties from walking over, several such accidents have occurred; and it certainly behoves the authorities to take proper means for the protection of life and to prevent a recurrence of such fearful calamities.

BARNSTAPLE - Death By Burning. - On Wednesday (yesterday), an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., at the 'Barnstaple Inn', Trinity-street, on view of the body of MRS JOHANNAH RENNELS, an inmate of Salem Almshouse, there lying dead. The evidence adduced was as follows:-
Mary Hartnoll, of Queen-street, affirmed:- I have known the deceased for many years. I took tea and spent last evening with her, and left her house at half-past nine. She was then in her usual health. This morning I heard of her melancholy end. She has a partner (a Mrs Pearse), who was absent from the house during the night. Grace Taylor sworn:- I am a widow, residing in Salem-Almshouse, next door to the deceased. I have known her for 10 years past. I saw her yesterday at about 11 o'clock, when she went to the market. She was afflicted with a cancer, but was not worse than usual. I went to her house at 8 o'clock this morning. In passing the back door, I smelt a strong smell of something burning, and went in and called to her, but there was no answer. I then went to the kitchen and saw her lying on the floor with her head resting on the bar of the grate; her clothes were burnt, and she was dead. I called for assistance, the neighbours came in, and Mr Gamble, surgeon, was sent for. Mr C. H. Gamble, surgeon, sworn:- I was called to the house of the deceased at about 9 o'clock this morning. The body was in a semi-recumbent position - the head resting on the grate, the body on the floor, on the left side. Her clothes had been nearly all burnt to a cinder. The body was also seriously scorched and burnt in many places. I also discovered a bruise or wound on the left temple, and to the upper bar of the grate there was some hair adhering. The face was placid; the pupils slightly dilated. I should think that in lighting the fire she was taken faint, or had a seizure and fell on the grate and caught fire, and, in a state of unconsciousness, being unable to help herself, she received injuries which caused her death. The shock to the nervous system was sufficient to cause death. There was no appearance f any struggle or of any effort having been made to help herself. The body was still warm. Verdict - "Accidental Death."
The Jury desired the Coroner to suggest to Mr Chanter, the trustee of the charity, that the inmates of the almshouses should not be allowed to sleep out of the premises; as, had the deceased's partner been with her, it was deemed more than probable that timely assistance might have been rendered by which the fatality might have been obviated. The deceased was 76 years of age, and had seen better days. She was the widow of the late MR GEORGE RENNELS, for many years paymaster of the North Devon Militia, a daughter of Mr Pyke, an old and respected tradesman, and has only one surviving near relative, viz., Mrs Vandenhoff, wife of George Vandenhoff, Esq., the celebrated tragedian. She was an intelligent person and greatly esteemed by all who knew her.

Thursday 11 October 1860
STOKEINTEIGNHEAD - An Atrocious Child Murder. - On Sunday last, the inhabitants of the village of Stokeinteignhead, near Newton Abbott, were thrown into a state of the utmost excitement, though the circulation of a report that a servant girl, named ELIZABETH HOOPER, aged about 19 years in the employ of Mr Wm. Bond, had committed a most revolting and atrocious child murder. On Inquiry, it appeared that on Monday forenoon the unnatural young mother, during the absence of her master and mistress at church, gave birth to a child, and immediately cut its head off and attempted to burn it in the grate. The family returned from church somewhat earlier than expected, and Mr Bond, on entering the house, became conscious of a very disagreeable odour, and on approaching the grate, he saw, with horror, the head of a newly-born child on the fire. He immediately raised an alarm, and the police were soon on the spot, searching for the remainder of the infant which they soon succeeded in discovering, wrapped up in a portion of the mother's clothing. The young woman was immediately taken into custody. She had been in Mr Bond's service for several months. Yesterday (Monday) an Inquest was held on the body before W. A. Cockey, Esq., Coroner for the district, at 'Bovey's Church House Inn.' Mr Thomas Brooks was sworn and said: I am a surgeon. I have examined the prisoner. She has recently been delivered of a child, and is now in such a weak state, that I am of opinion she is not fit to be removed to attend this Inquiry. In all probability she will be well enough to attend on Thursday. The Coroner said under these circumstances it seemed to him that it would be desirable to adjourn the Inquest to that day. This was assented to by the Jury, and the names of the Jury were then called over and they were severally bound in the sum of £10 to appear at the same place on Thursday, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon.

Thursday 18 October 1860
SWIMBRIDGE - Death By Burning. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, upon the body of THOMAS DOWDLE, son of W. DOWDLE, of Swimbridge. The deceased was one year and eight months old, and the child seems to have been left with three other children on the preceding Tuesday. In the evening they were sitting round the fire, and the deceased's clothes ignited; he was dreadfully burnt, and died about nine hours afterwards. Verdict - "Accidentally Burnt to Death."

Thursday 25 October 1860
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on Monday last, at the 'Bear Inn,' Green-lane, on the body of THOMAS POPHAM, aged 42. The deceased appears to have been of late suffering from a severe attack of bronchitis, for which he was attended on Saturday morning by Mr Cooke, surgeon. He was a labourer; and, in consequence of his indigent circumstances, Mr Cooke procured for him parochial relief. On Saturday evening deceased ate some veal for his supper, and went to bed; but he had not been there long before he became exceedingly ill, and ere the arrival of medical aid the unfortunate man breathed his last. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

GEORGENYMPTON - Awful Death. - On Saturday morning last, a servant man named PARKER, in the employ of Mr Robert Bowden, butcher, of this parish, was sent to Tiverton with a horse and wagon. On his return homeward he stopped at the 'Rackenford Bell,' and got into conversation with two masons who were stopping there. He then tossed with one of them for some beer, when a dispute arose, which led to fighting, when the blows which PARKER received caused his almost instantaneous death. The mason was taken into custody, and the body awaits a Coroner's Inquest.

Thursday 1 November 1860
MILTON DAMEREL - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at East Wonford, in the parish of Milton Damerel, before George Doe, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of AGNES SANDERS, wife of JOHN SANDERS, farmer, who met with her death on the previous day, under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:- JOHN SANDERS sworn:- I am a farmer, residing at East Wonford, in the parish of Milton Damerel. The body which the Coroner and Jury have now viewed is the body of my wife, AGNES SANDERS. She was 75 years of age. I was in bed with the deceased yesterday morning, and awoke about 4 o'clock, and heard some of the walls crumbling, and thought it was caused by the rats. I heard the same noise shortly after, and my wife said, "I think the house is going to fall down, and we shall be killed." I aid to her, "I think it is the rats." A part of the plastering then fell down, and immediately after I heard a crash, and the roof fell in upon us, and we were both covered with the ruins. The house belongs to me and my brother, and I did not consider that the wall was unsafe. I called out to the servant girl, who slept in the same room, and she gave the alarm to the neighbours, who rendered assistance and took me out. JOHN MOORE SANDERS sworn: - I am a farmer, residing at East Wonford, and am a son of deceased. Soon after 4 o'clock yesterday morning, my father's boy came and called me, telling me that father's house had fallen in, and they could not get out. I partly dressed and ran to the house. I called out to my father, and asked where he was. He answered, "I am on the planch." With the assistance of Mr Hopper and others, we removed the rubbish and beams, and dragged my father out. My mother was under him, and was quite dead. - Benjamin Hopper sworn:- I am a farmer, residing at East Wonford. Yesterday morning, between 4 and 5 o'clock, I went to the house of MR JOHN SANDERS, and found that the wall of the house had fallen out, and that part of the roof had fallen in. I assisted in removing the rubbish, and saw one of MR SANDERS' legs. We got him out, and found that the end of one of the principal rafters was resting on MRS SANDERS' breast. She was bleeding profusely from the mouth and ear, but I did not see any mark of injury on the body. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the 'Royal Exchange' Inn, Bickington, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of RICAHRD KIVELL, a poor old man who has for several years past earned a livelihood by vending coal and coke from door to door, in this town. The deceased had been for some months past in a state of mental derangement, and had several times threatened and attempted self-destruction. On Sunday morning last he was unusually excited, and, after sundry acts of violence, he left his house; nothing more was heard of him until his body was discovered in a quarry pit adjoining the new turnpike road to Bideford, near the one mile-stone. the following evidence was adduced at the Inquest:- MARY KIVELL sworn:- The deceased was my husband. He was about fifty-five years of age. Deceased left his house yesterday morning between eleven and twelve o'clock. He did not say where he was going. He has been in a bad way for some time. The week before last he went about with a razor in his pocket, and has taken the razor to bed with him. I mentioned the circumstance to a tea man, but I never informed the police of it. I did not, yesterday, ask deceased where he was going, as he sometimes went away and stayed the whole day. He bought a horse at Barnstaple Fair, and he appeared to think he had not done so well since. He was not in debt that I am aware of. There was no quarrel between him and myself yesterday morning. He threw along a chair and broke it, and took up his hat and walked off. Deceased was served with a County Court summons last Friday, at the suit of my daughter, LOUISA ADAMS. Deceased was a member of a death club.
Elizabeth Thorne, wife of William Thorne, of Barnstaple, cabinet maker, deposed:- I knew the deceased. He lived next door to me, and I have known him for four years. He has been in a low desponding way for more than a month past. He borrowed some money of his wife's daughter, LOUISA ADAMS, in September last, to purchase a horse, and promised to pay it, but could not do so at the time he had promised, and he was served with a County Court summons last Friday. I went into MR KIVELL'S house yesterday morning; he was greatly excited, and took up an ink-bottle and threw at his wife. He then took up a chair and broke it to pieces. I took him by the arm, and he then said, "I'll do something." He took up his hat, and went out. He returned, took off his white hat, and went out with a black one. A fortnight ago his wife told me he carried about a razor with him, and sometimes took it to bed with him. I advised MRS KIVELL to put it away. - William Leaker, of Fremington, yeoman, deposed:- On Sunday, the 28th of October instant, I was returning from chapel, from Barnstaple, and as I came to Deptford Quarry I saw three boys standing at the edge of the quarry, and they called my attention to a man's hat in the water by the side of the quarry, and the boys also told me they saw something like a black coat, and I saw some bubbles. I then went and got a long pole and put a hook to the end of it, and got the hat. The pole was not long enough to reach the bottom of the pit, and I then got some lines and put on some crooks and dragged the pond, and then discovered the body of deceased. The name of "R. KIDWELL" was in the hat. I had the body removed to the 'Royal Exchange.' I searched the pockets of the clothes and discovered threepence half-penny. The Jury returned as their verdict - that "The deceased drowned himself, being at the time of Unsound Mind."

Thursday 8 November 1860
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, held an Inquest at the 'Rolle Arms,' Rolle's Quay, on view of the body of JAMES HARRIS, an aged man, who had been for some time employed as gatekeeper at the Mill-end Quay toll-house, on the Braunton road. The deceased had attended the auction at the Guildhall, for letting turnpike tolls, on the previous afternoon; and, at a later period of the day, was seen rambling down the High-street toward his home. On his way, he fell against the window of Mr Somerwill's house; and a few steps therefrom he came into contact with the wall near the entrance to Brunswick Wharf, and fell into the road. He was taken up and assisted to his house, where his wife made him up a bed on the floor and laid him on it. At one o'clock, she went to lie down, having previously ascertained that her husband was (as she thought) sleeping soundly; but on going to him at three o'clock, she found him dead. Mr Morgan, surgeon, was called in, and, having examined the body, gave it as his opinion "that the deceased died from congestion of the brain, accelerated by drinking." - Verdict accordingly.

BISHOPS TAWTON - Accidental Death. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held in this parish, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of GEORGE MORRISH, a little boy, two years of age, son of WILLIAM MORRISH, a labourer, residing near New-bridge. On the day preceding, in the absence of his mother, who had gone out to work leaving the child in the custody of his sister, aged five years, the deceased unfortunately fell into a well, adjoining the house, and was drowned. The body was taken from the well by Jane Tucker, a neighbour - it was quite dead. Verdict, "Accidentally Drowned in a well."

Thursday 15 November 1860
PARKHAM - A Sad Accident. - On Saturday last, the 10th inst., a sad accident occurred to a man named WILLIAM BREND, a labourer working for the Bideford Turnpike Trust. It appears that the unfortunate man was at work in a quarry, near Ressington-bridge, for the purpose of raising stones, when some of the top part of the quarry suddenly gave way, knocking the unfortunate man with violence against the rocks and partially burying him in stones and rubbish. the poor fellow was extricated from his perilous position by another labourer, and conveyed home in a cart. Mr Eusebius Rouse, surgeon, of Bradworthy, was promptly in attendance. Upon examination, it was found that the unfortunate man's both legs were broken, and other serious injuries sustained. Every medical assistance possible was rendered, but the poor fellow gradually sank and died. The body awaits a Coroner's Inquest.

PETROCKSTOW - On Monday last, an Inquest was held in the above parish, before R. Bremridge, Esq., on the body of a boy named SAMUEL HUTCHINGS, aged 11 years, the son of a labourer, who was accidentally killed by the upsetting of a cart, on Saturday last. the deceased had on the morning of the above day been sent by his master, Mr Bonifant, to a tanyard in the same parish with a horse and cart, containing the skin of a horse. On his returning towards the house of Mr Bonifant, it is supposed he was driving fast round a corner, when the cart was upset and the unfortunate lad's neck coming under the rails of the cart; he was killed on the spot. Verdict accordingly. There was another lad in the cart but he was not injured.

Thursday 22 November 1860
HARTLAND - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at the 'King's Arms,' Hartland, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of CHARLES PROUSE, there lying dead. The deceased had been employed on the Wednesday previous in assisting the Coast-guard to recover and protect wreck from the barque Frederick the Second; and was relieved from night duty and directed to go home at 6 o'clock p.m. Nothing more was seen of him till the following (Thursday) morning, when his body was discovered, lying under the cliff, quite dead. Mr Thomas, surgeon, was immediately sent for, but of course too late to render any assistance. The opinion of the surgeon was that PROUSE, having drunk a quantity of ardent spirits, and being overcome with fatigue, had laid himself down to sleep, and that congestion of the brain supervened. There were no marks of violence or injury on the body. the Jury returned as their verdict - "Found dead under Milford cliff - death resulting from congestion of the brain, occasioned by drinking ardent spirits and exposure to the cold."

Thursday 29 November 1860
MERTON - Concealment of Birth. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the house of Mr John Luxton, yeoman, at Speccott, in the above parish, on the body of a new-born child there lying dead. From the evidence adduced it appears that Mrs Luxton had for some time suspected that her servant, ELIZABETH BLIGHT, was in the family way, and accused her of it, which she repeatedly denied. On Sunday morning, in consequence of information received from her niece, Frances Stevens, who slept with BLIGHT, Mrs L. was induced to go to her bed-room, where she saw appearances which induced her to believe that the servant had given birth to a child. She was questioned on the subject but stoutly denied that any such thing had taken place. Mr Luxton thereupon went to Torrington, and called in the assistance of Dr Jones, who, on going to Speccott, and examining the girl, became fully satisfied that her mistress's suspicions were well-founded. On being pressed on the subject, BLIGHT partially admitted the fact; and on a search being made the body of an infant was discovered on the dung heap near the piggeries, which was subject to post mortem examination by Dr. Jones. It was the body of a fully developed infant, 6 ¼ lbs. in weight and 20 inches in length, and appeared to have been perfectly healthy. the lungs, on being placed in water, did not float, which was an indication that they had not been inflated. Under these circumstances, the Jury returned as their verdict that the child was still-born. The woman thus exculpated from the more serious charge, will, in due course, take her trial for the minor offence of concealing the birth of her off-spring, the Coroner having given directions to that effect.

Thursday 6 December 1860
COMBMARTIN - Accidental Death. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of PHILIP GOULD, of this place, a lad aged about eleven years, who was accidentally killed by falling down the shaft of Watermouth Lead Mine, in the parish of Berrynarbor, at about 10 o'clock, on the night of the Tuesday preceding. The lad had been employed with William Parkin and James Norman in working at the mine, and it is supposed that in stooping over the edge of the shaft to ask the latter how deep the water was he missed his footing or lost his balance and fell to the bottom of the mine. The poor boy was taken up instantly; he had fallen on his head to a depth of 20 fathoms, and was bleeding profusely from the mouth and ears. He was quite dead. - Verdict - "Accidental Death."

FREMINGTON - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the dwelling house of MR EDMUND FISHLEY, yeoman, in this parish, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of the said EDMUND FISHLEY, there lying dead. The deceased, who was 54 years of age, had left the house at between 9 and 10 o'clock that morning, with the intention of proceeding to his yard to set his labourers to work. He was heard to say that he would also drive his cows to the field. Nothing more was seen of him until near one o'clock when the cows were seen to enter the yard with no one in charge of them. This naturally excited surprise, and Thomas Shaddick, a labourer on the farm, was instructed to go in quest of his master. On coming to Clay Pit Lake, Shaddick saw the deceased lying in the stream, on his face and hands, his face and shoulders being covered with water. He was quite dead. It appeared that he had attempted to cross the lake on a stick, which broke and precipitated him into the water, and being stunned by the fall from his head coming into contact with some spars or stubble, he was unable to extricate himself. - Verdict - "Found Drowned."

BARNSTAPLE - Death By Burning. - On Wednesday afternoon, GRACE CHAPPLE, aged 77 years, an inmate of one of the Litchdon Alms-houses, was discovered in her room, enveloped in flames. Assistance was immediately procured, and the neighbours succeeded in extinguishing the fire, but not before the poor old woman had sustained very serious injuries. She was immediately removed to the North Devon Infirmary, where she was attended by Messrs. Gamble and Ford. She died in great agony at two o'clock on the following morning. It appeared that the deceased, who was very imbecile, lived with another aged person in the same house, and, during the absence of the latter for a short time, her clothes became ignited. An Inquest was held on the body, at the Infirmary, on Friday morning, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 20 December 1860
FREMINGTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Muddlebridge, in the parish of Fremington, on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JAMES HOLLAND, a shipwright and pensioner, there lying dead at the house of Elizabeth Cornish, with whom he lodged. It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased had left his home on the morning of the previous day at nine o'clock, returning at half-past eight in the evening under the influence of liquor. He asked his hostess if she had brought home any tobacco from town and was answered in the negative - she had not been to town. He sat and smoked a pipe, and shortly before ten, went upstairs to go to bed. He had not been there many minutes before the woman heard a fall down the stairs into the kitchen, and on going to him she found that his head had come into contact with the wall at the foot of the stairs; he was speechless and bleeding from a wound in his head. Mr Cooke, surgeon, of this town, was immediately sent for, and was soon on the spot. He found a lacerated wound at the back of the head, of three inches in length; the skull was laid bare and blood was issuing freely. The proper remedial means were used, but the deceased gradually sank and died at half-past twelve. - Verdict "Accidentally Killed by a fall producing Concussion of the Brain."

Thursday 27 December 1860
NORTHMOLTON - Inquest. - On Saturday last, the 23rd instant, an Inquest was held at the 'Somerset Inn,' Northmolton, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of MARY LOOSEMORE, a single woman, aged 22 years, who died on the 20th instant, in giving birth to a male child. Deceased was living in service at Mr Robt. Pincombe's, Pulham farm, Twitchen, who discharged her on the 11th instant, in consequence of her being enciente. She had denied it for some time, but at length admitted it, and that she was within two months of her time. On Wednesday last she was suddenly taken in labour. A midwife was sent for, but before she arrived deceased had given birth to a male child. This was about seven o'clock; and about eleven a.m., finding she was becoming very ill, a surgeon was sent for. Mr Spicer, surgeon, Northmolton, immediately attended, but found that deceased was suffering from pleurisy, which, from the excitement of giving birth to a child, caused death. Verdict - "Died from Natural Causes." - An Inquest was then opened on the body of the child, which died about 12 hours after its mother. After hearing the evidence of the surgeon and another witness, the Inquiry was adjourned to Thursday (this day), that the opinion of another medical gentleman might be obtained.

KINGSNYMPTON - Accidental Death. - On Wednesday last, an Inquest was held at Paststone farm, Kingsnympton, before R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of JAMES PAUL, aged 16, farm servant, in the employ of Mr Richard Elworthy. Deceased was employed on Saturday last to cart dung from the yard to the field. A labourer named Burgess, who was loading the carts, thinking he had been a long time absent, went to look for him, when he found that the horse had fallen down, and in falling had knocked deceased under the shaft. He immediately called his master, and they removed the body to the house. The horse was a very quiet one, and free from vice. Mr Furse, surgeon, Southmolton, was immediately sent for, and soon arrived. On examining the body, he found that the vertebrae of the neck was broken, which had caused instantaneous death. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Deaths By Burning. - An Inquest was held at the 'Newington Inn,' Derby, on Thursday last, before I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of a little boy, two years of age, named JOHN AVERY, son of LEVI AVERY, a labourer living at Derby. On Monday, the 10th inst., MRS AVERY left her children in the kitchen, sitting before the fire, and on her return, about two minutes afterwards, she found the poor boy's pinafore in a blaze. The fire was not extinguished before the child was burnt severely about the face and neck. He progressed favourably until Saturday, when his mother deemed it advisable to call in the assistance of Mr Cooke, surgeon, who used every means to alleviate the sufferings of the unfortunate child, but he gradually sunk, and died on Wednesday evening. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Another Inquest was held by the same learned gentleman, on Monday last, at the 'Union Inn,' Derby, on the body of a little girl named SARAH MARIA RENDELL, who, in the temporary absence of her grandmother, on Saturday last, caught her clothes on fire, and was so severely injured that she expired on the morning of the day of the Inquest. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 24 January 1861
LANGTREE - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, in this parish, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of an aged woman named ELIZABETH FORD, who was discovered in a well near her dwelling on the previous Friday morning, quite dead. Deceased had been seen and communicated with a short time previously. She then stated that she had been unwell but was better. There was no evidence to show how she got into the well - whether accidentally or otherwise, and the Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 7 February 1861
LANGTREE - Death By Burning. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the house of JAMES MARTIN, labourer, of this parish, to inquire by what means his infant daughter, SUSANNAH MARTIN, came to her death on Wednesday preceding. From the evidence adduced, it appeared that on Tuesday, the 29th ult., at mid-day, the mother of the child had occasion to go to the well for water. She first secured the deceased in a chair, at what she conceived to be a safe distance from the fire, and left her with another child - a little boy, four years of age. On her return, after a few minutes' absence, she was alarmed at the infant's cries, and on entering the house discovered that her clothes were on fire. The mother quickly extinguished the flames and undressed the child; when she found her burnt on the right arm, the shoulder, chest, and chin. She applied treacle to the burns, and called in the aid of John O. Rouse, Esq., surgeon of Torrington, who did all that medical skill could devise, but the little sufferer died on the evening of the following day. The opinion of the surgeon was that death resulted from the shock given to the nervous system - the burns were superficial. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 21 February 1861
MOLLAND - Frightful Accident At Molland Copper Mine. - Loss of Two Lives. - An accident, resulting in the loss of two lives, occurred at Molland Mine, on Friday last. The immediate cause of the casualty was the bursting of the boiler of a steam engine; and the particulars will be gathered from the depositions taken at the Inquest held on the bodies, on Monday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner. The names of the deceased were JOHN BENNETTS, aged 16, and ELIZA PEARCE, aged 15 years. A respectable Jury having been impanelled, of whom Mr John Quartly was foreman, the following evidence was adduced:-
Thomas Bennetts deposed:- I knew both the deceased, ELIZA PEARCE and JOHN BENNETTS. They were employed on Molland Mine: ELIZA PEARCE in washing the copper ore, and JOHN BENNETTS underground. Neither of the deceased were every employed in, nor was it a part of their duty to attend the working of the steam engine. I saw the deceased on Friday morning alive, at half-past eight. About nine o'clock I was sitting at the office, engaged on some paper, when I heard an explosion, and I saw the water and steam rushing out of the boiling-house door-way. I immediately went there. I saw John Dunn coming out of the window of the engine-house. He said, "the little girl (meaning the deceased) is in the boiler-house," and requested me to go in and see for her. I did so. I then discovered ELIZA PEARCE; her body was partially covered with the debris and rubbish. I then, as quickly as possible, got her out; she was then living. I, with assistance, removed her to the office of the Mine, and despatched a messenger for Mr Gardner, surgeon, of Southmolton, who is the medical officer of the Mine, and he immediately attended. Deceased, ELIZA PEARCE, was dead before Mr Gardner arrived. John Dunn is the engineer of the Mine, and is the party who has the management and working of the steam engine; the engine is supposed to be of 20 horse-power. the engine was purchased of Matthew Loam, of Liskeard, in Cornwall. The engine was erected and set to work in December, 1857. The boiler was new in 1857, and has not been under any substantial repair since. I am not aware that the boiler has ever required any repair. The plates of the boiler were 3/8 of an inch in thickness.
John Dunn deposed:- I am employed as engineer on the Molland Mine, and have the charge of the engine and boiler, and, in company with William Saul, attend the working of the engine. On Friday last I was in the engine-room. I saw both of the deceased in the boiler-house, about a minute before the explosion took place. I did not consider it part of my duty to order the parties to leave the boiler-house. The men who work underground are in the habit of going there to change their clothes. The pressure on the engine, on Friday morning, at the time the explosion took place, was, I believe, about 50 or 60 pounds. I have worked the engine at between 60 and 70 pounds' pressure. I had believed the boiler to be in a perfect working condition. Immediately after the explosion I told Thomas Bennetts, the captain of the Mine, that ELIZA PEARCE was in the boiler-house, and he immediately went in and took her out. I have examined the boiler. I find the outside shell of the boiler, next to the bottom flue, exploded to the extent of 11 inches and a half in length, and four inches and a half in breadth. The piece of plate iron now produced was taken from it. The interior of the plate bears a smooth surface and free from corrode. The outside of the plate is deeply corroded.
Mr Frederick Gardner, deposed:- I am a surgeon, residing at Southmolton. I, with Mr Ley, am employed by the Molland Mining Company. On Friday, the 15th of February last, I was sent for shortly before 11 o'clock, to proceed to the Mine, Molland, in consequence of an accident which had occurred by the explosion of the boiler of the engine. I immediately proceeded to the Mine, when I was informed that ELIZA PEARCE had died before my arrival. I then saw deceased, JOHN BENNETTS. I found him lying on a temporary bed in the office of the Mine. I found BENNETTS considerably burnt and scalded all over, and he was in a state of collapse. Deceased was perfectly conscious at the time I saw him. I asked him how it happened. He replied, "The boiler had burst while he was in the boiler-house, and that he had been dreadfully scalded." He did not complain of any neglect. I dressed his wounds, and he sat up, but only for a short time, when I had to replace him on his bed again. Deceased languished about fifteen hours, and died from the burning and scalds, and from the shock produced thereby. After attending to JOHN BENNETTS, I examined the body of deceased, ELIZA PEARCE. I found her also very much scalded and burnt, and I am of opinion she died from the injuries she had received. The learned Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned as their verdict - "Accidentally Killed by the bursting of the boiler of a steam engine at Molland Mine."
The melancholy occurrence has cast a gloom over the neighbourhood, and much sympathy is felt for the bereaved relatives and friends of the deceased. Poor BENNETTS was a worthy lad; he earned 12s. a week as wages, out of which he was accustomed to allow his mother 4s. toward the maintenance of her other children, the loss of which will be severely felt.

Sudden Death., - On Wednesday morning, last week, a young woman named GRACE CONOLLY, aged 22 years, daughter of MR OWEN CONOLLY, residing at Hurdle Bridge, near Hatherleigh left her residence shortly after 10 o'clock, and proceeded through a bye lane leading from her father's house towards Jacobstow, for the purpose of meeting her mother. Shortly afterwards, two children on passing through the lane discovered the young woman lying by the side of the road apparently dead. The Sergeant of Police was at once informed of the circumstance, and, as there was no medical man to be obtained, he had the body removed to the house of her father, and means were adopted for the purpose of restoring animation, which, however, proved fruitless. The deceased having previously been subject to fits, it is supposed that she was attacked with one which thus terminated fatally. Mr Vallack made an inquiry on the following Friday, but under the circumstances an Inquest was dispensed with.

Thursday 7 March 1861
HIGHBICKINGTON - An Inquest was held at the above place on the 28th ult., by R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY WEBBER, aged seventy-two. On the morning of the 26thult., her husband went to his daily labour, leaving her in her usual health, and on his return in the evening he found her very ill, and before medical assistance could be procured she expired. From the evidence of Mr Barr, surgeon, it appears that the deceased had had a stroke of paralysis, from which death had resulted. Verdict, "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 14 March 1861
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the body of an infant child, son of a man named FREDERICK BELBEN, a blacksmith, lodging at the travellers' lodge, in Trinity-street. On the Thursday previous the child had been laid to sleep on a table, by its mother; shortly afterwards a man accidentally upset the table and the child sustained a severe bruise on the right side of the head, occasioning concussion of the brain, which terminated fatally on the following Saturday morning. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death of an Infant. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before the Borough Coroner, at the 'Newport Inn,' on the body of EMILY PEDLAR, two years of age, daughter of a gardener residing at Newport. The following evidence was adduced:- THOMAS PEDLAR sworn:- I am the father of the deceased, who was about one year and nine months old. On Monday, the 18th of February, deceased was playing outside my house with my other child. I had occasion to go into the house, when I saw deceased run into the kitchen and seize hold of a teapot, into which my wife had a few minutes before poured some boiling water to make tea. The teapot was on a round table, and the child pulled it off and threw the contents all over herself. I saw that her flesh appeared very red, but I did not think she was much hurt, as I thought the redness might have been caused by the child's crying. I immediately undressed her, and, after applying a little soap, my wife took her to the Infirmary. She, however, seemed to get weaker every day until Saturday morning last, at about half-past five o'clock, when on my wife lifting her up out of the cradle, she died off in her arms. Mr James Ford, house-surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, sworn:- On Monday, Feb. 18th, the deceased was brought to the Infirmary, at about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, by her mother and another person. I undressed her, and found that her face, neck, chest, &c., were much scalded. I dressed the wounds in the usual manner, and, as the child was too young to be admitted without the mother, I thought the best thing I could do would be to send her home. I have called at the house several times since, and have found the deceased sinking under the exhaustion caused by its numerous wounds. I visited it last on Wednesday, the 6th instant. - Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Thursday 21 March 1861
NORTHAM - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of a man named GEORGE GREGORY, who was found suspended by the neck to a post of his bed on the morning of the day preceding, and quite dead. It appeared that the deceased was a lunatic - that he had been discharged from the County Asylum about three years before, and it was intended to send him thither again if this calamity had not happened. The deceased was first discovered after the fatal act by Thomas Birth and Francis Curtis, fishermen, who cut him down. Mr Platt, surgeon, was sent for, but all his efforts to restore animation proved fruitless. - Verdict - "Hanged himself, being lunatic and of Unsound Mind."

COMBMARTIN - Fatal Accident. - On Wednesday last (yesterday), a very sad accident which has plunged several poor families into deep distress occurred near this place. It appears that in the afternoon a number of men were employed in Berry Quarry, the property of Mr Nicholas Cutcliffe, lime merchant, when suddenly a large quantity of rubble, forming the "head" of the quarry, fell in, and five poor fellows were buried underneath. Assistance was immediately rendered, and the unfortunate men were speedily disentombed, when two of them, named respectively JOHN LANCEY and GEORGE HARRIS, were found dead. the former has left a widow and five children; the latter, a widow and two children, wholly unprovided for. Of the other three men, William Hicks and John Lerwill were so seriously injured that they were instantly removed to the North Devon Infirmary, in Willis's van, under the care of C. C. Newberry. The third, George Norman, did not escape uninjured, but it was not deemed necessary to remove him from his home. the occurrence has cast a sad gloom over the place. The bodies await a Coroner's Inquest, which will be held today.

LYNTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Lyndale Hotel,' Lynton, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of ELIAS HOBBS, aged 53, a clock and watch maker, of Bampton, in Somerset. Deceased had been accustomed to visit the locality twice in every year, in pursuit of his calling. He came to Lynton on the Wednesday previous to his decease, and took lodgings. He was then in health, with the exception of a slight head ache, to relieve which he was recommended to take a little medicine, which he declined to do, saying the pain would pass off. On the following Sunday evening, he went to bed at an early hour; but early in the morning he had occasion to go downstairs and on his return to bed complained to a young man (William James Drummond) who slept in another bed in the same room, that he was suffering from pain in his stomach. At about six o'clock, Agnes Groves, housekeeper to her brother, at whose house deceased lodged, heard a noise proceeding from HOBBS'S bed-room, and, on entering, heard him moaning and discovered that he was insensible. She at once aroused her nephew (Drummond), who went to call medical aid, but before it arrived, deceased had breathed his last. The evidence of Mr Clarke, surgeon, who made a post mortem examination of the body, was to the effect that the immediate cause of death was an effusion of blood on the brain. - Verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE - Attempted Self-Destruction. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the 'Masons' Arms,' Hardaway Head, in this town, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MARY FLEMING, wife of JOHN FLEMING, mason, aged 75. Deceased had been ailing for 12 months past, and during the last six months had been bed-ridden. She suffered from extreme debility and occasionally was subject to mental aberration. On Wednesday se'nnight, her daughter (a MRS DALLING) residing in the same house, was in the kitchen, when she heard a noise in the upstair room occupied by her mother, and, supposing that she had got out of bed, which was unusual for her, she ran up, and found the deceased in bed. She remarked, "I'm all right;" but the daughter, suspecting something amiss from her mother's covering her face with the bed clothes, turned down the sheet and discovered that she had cut her throat. A surgeon was immediately sent for, and Mr Augustus Robinson was quickly on the spot. He found an incised wound on the left side of the throat of about 1 ½ inch or 2 inches in length, but of a superficial nature, and a mark on the right side of the throat, as though a suicidal attempt had been made there also. The wound was strapped up, and the unfortunate woman lingered until Saturday night, when she expired. From a remark of the deceased, oft-repeated, "I did not know what I did;" and from the testimony of Mrs Steer, a neighbour, as well as that of Mr Robinson, who considered that she was not in such a state of mind as to be accountable for her actions, the Jury returned a verdict that she died from decay of nature accelerated by a wound inflicted on herself while in a state of Temporary Insanity.

Thursday 28 March 1861
CHULMLEIGH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at Hall Farm, in the parish of Chulmleigh, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of ANN GAY, a little child, aged about two years, daughter of MR JOHN GAY, yeoman, there lying dead. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, in the momentary absence of her mother, fell into a tin pan of hot water, and, though instantly extricated, she thereby received such injuries as terminated fatally within a few hours. The opinion of Mr Davy, surgeon, was, that death was caused by the shock to the nervous system. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 11 April 1861
COMBMARTIN - An Inquest was held at Combmartin, on Saturday last, by J. H. Toller, Deputy Coroner, on the body of MR JOHN LERWILL, a respectable farmer, of that parish. On the preceding morning, at about 6 o'clock, he rose and went out to go and visit the cattle in his shippen; but as he was absent a long time, his wife went to look for him, when she found him lying on his back, quite dead. The medical man expressed it as his opinion that deceased died from disease of the heart. - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 2 May 1861
TAWSTOCK - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held in this parish, on Friday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on view of the body of ELIAS YEO, a labourer, in the employ of MR PHILIP ANDREW, of Parkgate, who accidentally came to his death under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:- Adam Bowen deposed:- I was yesterday engaged with the deceased and John Weeks in removing the tops of some timber in Golden Valley Wood, which Sir Bourchier Wrey had given to us. The deceased was on a ladder, sawing off the limb of a tree which had caught in the fork of an adjoining one. While in the act of sawing the limb, it suddenly gave way, and before he could entirely get down the ladder, it broke off and caught him in the head, and gave him a violent blow; he instantly died, and never spoke or moved afterwards. We had all consulted together on the best way of getting the limb down. When we heard the limb crack, deceased came down the ladder as fast as he could; but before he could get down the limb came off and struck him. It was about eleven inches in diameter, and was lodged about thirty feet in height. The Jury returned as their verdict - "Accidentally killed by a limb of a tree falling on him, producing concussion of the brain." - The deceased was a pious, humble Christian, and, though suddenly summoned into eternity, it is consolatory to his surviving widow and family to reflect that the summons did not find him unprepared.

Thursday 9 May 1861
HIGHAMPTON - Suicide. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at Highampton, before H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM BRIGHT, aged 77, who on the previous Wednesday afternoon committed suicide by hanging himself in a linhay close to the highway, immediately opposite to his own house. From the evidence of Mr Arthur Owen, surgeon, it appears that deceased had been suffering from chronic bronchitis, and that at the time of committing the act his brain was in a weak and disordered state. - Verdict, "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 23 May 1861
BIDEFORD - Inquest. - On the evening of Friday last, T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest at the 'Blacksmiths' Arms,' East-the-Water, touching the death of a child named JOHN HENRY JONES, aged 6 years, grandson to MR HENRY SLOCOMBE, of the Gas Works. The object of the Inquiry was to ascertain the probable cause of the child's death, as no medical man had seen it during the brief illness which preceded its dissolution. A Jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the body; and on their return the following evidence was submitted for their consideration:- Henry Slocombe stated the deceased child was the son of his daughter MARY, who was married to a man named JOHN JONES. The latter left the country before the child was born, nor had he since held any communication with his wife. The mother resides in Bristol, and the deceased child had been always brought up under the grandfather's roof. He was always a weakly little fellow and not unfrequently was ailing. On the Sunday previous to his death, he complained of illness, and on the Monday symptoms of a sore throat and difficulty of breathing, accompanied by a cough, began to manifest themselves. His grandmother, meanwhile, gave him some senna tea, put him in a bath, and placed a mustard plaister on the chest. Through the Tuesday the child appeared to be better; but on Wednesday he became worse, and about 12 o'clock that night his breathing became more difficult, and the body was violently drawn up together. Witness went for Mr Ackland, who, on hearing the symptoms, gave some powders to be taken at intervals, promising to see the child in the morning. The child died shortly afterwards. ELIZABETH SLOCOMBE, wife to the preceding, deposed to the main facts above stated; adding that on the Tuesday she gave the child a grey powder, which, on the recommendation of a friend, she procured from Mr Cadd, chemist. He appeared easier and went to sleep, after which she sent to Mr Dingle for a cough mixture, from the following recipe - half-pint whitewine vinegar; 6 ounces liquorice; 2 ounces almond oil; and half-an-ounce of tincture of opium (laudanum). She mixed the several components adding only half the quantity of laudanum purchased. Mr Dingle had labelled the bottle containing the latter "poison." Towards Wednesday night the child became very bad, and she sent her husband for Mr Ackland; he brought back four powders, and she immediately gave the child one, but he could not very well swallow; he did not throw it up again. She again sent for Mr Ackland, but before he arrived the child was dead. The Coroner briefly summed up, alluding to the responsibility of the grand-parents in whose charge the child had been left, and their culpability in not before sending for a medical man. The Jury returned a verdict of "Death from Natural Causes" - expressing a regret that the services of a medical man had not been secured at an earlier stage of the child's illness.

Thursday 30 May 1861
Inquests By Richard Bremridge, Esq.
MONKLEIGH - Accidental Death. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held by the learned Coroner, in the parish of Monkleigh, to determine the cause of death of JAMES REDCLIFFE, in the employ of Mr William Partridge, yeoman, of Landcross, who died on the day preceding from the effects of an accident. The following evidence was taken:-
Edward Nethercott sworn:- On Tuesday morning last, I was going to fetch my master's (Mr William Partridge) horses, when I met JAMES REDCLIFFE riding the colt and leading the other. I got on the other horse. After proceeding together about a mile towards my master's house, which was in the parish of Landcross, the deceased fell off the colt. I immediately got off and caught the colt, and went home and told my master that JAMES REDCLIFFE had fallen off and was up in the road.
George Nancekivell sworn:- I work as labourer with Mr William Partridge. On Tuesday morning last, in consequence of information my master received, I was desired to go up the road to see for deceased. About 50 yards from my master's house I found deceased standing in the road, and there was a pool of blood on the ground, about two yards from him. When I found deceased, he was wiping the blood from his face. I took him to my house and washed his face, and then took him to his master's house.
Elizabeth Partridge sworn:- On Tuesday last, about eight o'clock, JAMES REDCLIFFE was brought into our house by George Nancekivell; the deceased was unable to walk in. He went to the pump and washed himself. I then got some hot water and washed his head. Soon after he went into the garden to work. I saw some blood coming from his ear. I desired him not to go to work, but to go home. I pressed him several times in the course of the morning to go home, but could not prevail upon him to do so. He appeared perfectly sensible. I got deceased into the house at twelve o'clock and gave him some tea and bread and butter, and when the servants returned to dinner I sent deceased home in a cart, in charge of Thomas Skinner.
Charles Richard Jones, surgeon, sworn:- I was sent for on Tuesday afternoon, about four o'clock, to attend deceased. I immediately went to Monkleigh, and found deceased in bed in his house. I asked him what was the matter, and he said, a slight cold. I had been informed that he had been thrown from a colt, and I asked deceased if he had had a blow. He appeared perfectly unconscious of having met with any accident. I examined him and found a slight wound, about an inch and a half above the right eyebrow. I found a great deal of haemorrhage from the left ear, which did not proceed from any external wound. the ear was perfectly black, as was also a portion of the temple bone behind the ear. He appeared to be suffering from concussion of the brain, and I had no hope of his recovery. I applied some leeches to his head, and gave him some aperient medicine. Deceased died the following day from a fracture of the base of the skull. Verdict - "Accidentally Killed by a Fall from a Horse."

ASHREIGNEY - Death From Eating Unripe Gooseberries. - On Saturday, an Inquest was held at Ashreigney, touching the death of WILLIAM HEALE, a little boy of about four years of age, son of poor parents, of that place, who died on the night of the previous Thursday, after a short illness. The following evidence was taken:-
CAROLINE HEALE sworn:- The deceased, WILLIAM HEALE, is my child. On Thursday, the 23rd of May last, he was quite well. In the afternoon, at about 5 o'clock, he went out of my house accompanied by Elizabeth Rodd, a child of about his own age. He remained out about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and when he returned he complained of a pain in the abdomen. My husband asked deceased if he had been eating anything, when he replied that Elizabeth Rodd had given him some gooseberries. I held deceased on my lap by the fire. Mr Dene, the surgeon, of Dolton, was in the village attending some one and he came and saw deceased. Mr Dene advised me to go to bed and to take deceased with me. My husband went to Dolton for some medicine, and returned about one o'clock. I gave deceased a part of the medicine sent, but he died shortly after taking it. He did not vomit after taking the medicine.
Wavell Arundell Dene sworn:- I am a surgeon residing at Dolton. On Thursday evening, the 23rd instant, I was at Ashreigney attending a patient, when I was informed that deceased was very ill. I went to him and found him in a great deal of pain in the stomach, and in a state of collapse. I found the child had been sick, and I was also informed that he had been put into warm water. I advised the mother to go to bed and to take deceased with her to keep him warm. I wrote a prescription, and sent the father to Dolton for medicine. I was then of opinion that deceased had taken something of a poisonous nature. I did not see the child alive again. I went to Ashreigney the following morning and found deceased dead. I have made a post mortem examination, and I discovered nothing in the stomach; but I found the intestines in a highly inflammatory state, and am of opinion that deceased died from enteritis, or inflammation of the small intestines. Verdict - "Died from Enteritis, and not by any violent means."

Thursday 6 June 1861
LANDKEY - Death From Excessive Drinking. - WILLIAM MILLWARD, aged 71, living as hind with Mrs Buckingham, of Landkey, was found dead in bed on Monday morning. MILLWARD was a man of most intemperate habits. At an Inquest held on Tuesday, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, Mr Jackman, surgeon, of Swimbridge, stated that the deceased died from congestion of the brain, produced by excessive drinking, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly, expressing their regret that publicans should supply persons with spirits or beer while in a state of inebriety.

BRAUNTON - Sudden Death. - On Sunday night last, as two men named Henry Lock and Robert Tucker, were on the road from Braunton t the village of Saunton, they saw a woman named ELIZABETH FOXFORD, a servant of Mr Philip Avery, standing against a gate. On accosting her, she complained of illness, and requested them to help her back to Saunton to her sister's, where she had been on a visit, which they readily consented to do. They had not proceeded far, however, before she gave way, and sank on her knees. Lock immediately requested Tucker to run to Saunton for assistance, but he had not left many minutes, before she expired in Lock's arms. An Inquest was held on the body, on Monday last, by John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when a verdict was returned of "Died suddenly from Disease of the Heart."

WESTDOWN - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM JOSLIN, aged three years, son of a labourer of this parish. During the temporary absence of his mother, on the previous Saturday, the deceased accidentally ignited his dress and received such injury from burns in the thighs, abdomen, and chest that he died on the following day, notwithstanding the skill and attention of Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, who adopted every means in his power to produce a contrary result. - Verdict, "Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 13 June 1861
Inquests Held By R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner.
ST GILES IN THE WOOD - Visitation of God. On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at Gaydon, in the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Wood, on view of the body of WILLIAM PERRYMAN, labourer, of that parish. Deceased had gone to bed at about half-past nine o'clock on Sunday night, when he appeared to be in his usual state of health. On the following morning, at about half-past five, a man named Robert Ellis called to the deceased to go to his work, and, receiving no answer, his brother, with whom he lived, went up to his room and found him dead. Mr J. C. Hole, surgeon, of Torrington, who had examined the body, gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from disease of the heart. - Verdict of the Jury:- "Died from ossification of the valves and vessels of the heart."

LITTLEHAM - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday last (yesterday) the learned Coroner held an Inquest at South Heal, in the parish of Littleham, on the body of JOHN BALE, a little boy aged 10 years, who died suddenly on the afternoon of the previous Monday, while attending a Sunday School treat at Landcross. The opinion of Dr John C. Baker, who was called in, was that deceased had died from congenital disease of the heart, accelerated by running, and the Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Inquests Held by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner:-
WEST ANSTEY - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held at the house of John Burnell, at West Anstey, on Tuesday last, on the body of JOHN ELWORTHY, labourer, aged 67, who came to his death in the manner described by John Burnell, who deposed as follows:- I knew the deceased, JOHN ELWORTHY. He was my brother-in-law, and resided with me, and was about sixty-seven years of age, and was a labourer. I last saw him alive on Sunday last when he, together with my daughter and myself, went to Mr Babbage's, at East Anstey, to spend the afternoon. The deceased drank some ale there, but he did not drink sufficient to make him tipsy. He has lately complained of a pain in his head, and I have known him drop away two or three times. He returned on Sunday evening, between 10 and 11 o'clock, and said he had such a pain in his head he hardly knew what to do. He went upstairs for some gin to give Henry Nott, who came home with him. The deceased tasted some of the gin, with water, but said he did not like it, and drank no more. He had drank some ale at Mr Babbage's, but he did not get tipsy on Sunday. Between 11 and 12 o'clock the deceased rose up to go to bed, wished me good night, and went upstairs. I then proceeded to shut up the doors, but, in about three or four minutes, hearing a noise in the stairs, I went to the place and found the deceased with his head resting on the last stair and his legs upwards. I put my arms round him, and took him and sat him up. His head was unsteady, and he sighed two or three times, and I heard nothing more. I light was brought. William Short, who slept in the same room as the deceased, came down stairs as I was taking him up, and he assisted me. We took the deceased upstairs; and, as we were doing so, blood came from the back part of the head. He never moved after being taken up from the stairs. We did all we could to restore him, and also sent for medical aid. The light that we had was burnt out, and the deceased went to bed without, and did not ask for one. Mr Trevor, surgeon, of Dulverton, who had examined the body, was of opinion that death had been occasioned by a fracture of the bone of the skull or upper portion of the spine. Verdict, "Accidentally Killed by falling Down Stairs."

Thursday 20 June 1861
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner. - Last week we reported an accident which occurred to PHILIP HENRY PUNCHER, ship-carpenter. The poor fellow died on Saturday morning from the effects of the fall, and a Coroner's Inquest was held on the body the same day, at the 'Admiral Rodney' public-house; when the following evidence was adduced:-
John Lock sworn:- I knew the deceased; he was a shipwright, and we worked together in Mr Alfred's Cook's yard, at Ilfracombe. On Monday last the 10th of June, we were working together on a ship, building in Mr Cook's yard, and while at work he fell from the stern of the vessel to the ground, about 20 feet. I immediately went to his assistance and found deceased senseless. I assisted in removing him to his house, and Mr Stoneham, the surgeon, was immediately sent for.
Mr Philip Stoneham, surgeon, sworn:- On Monday, 10th of June last, I was sent for to attend deceased at about half-past seven in the morning. I immediately went and found the deceased in his house. I examined him and discovered the scalp at the back of the head torn down, and a partial fracture of the cervicle vertebrae, so as to occasion paralysis of the upper and lower extremities. Deceased was conscious when I saw him, and remained so until his death which took place on Saturday, the 15th inst., at half-past six. Verdict - "Accidentally Killed by a Fall, producing a fracture of the Cervicle Vertebrae."

Thursday 11 July 1861
APPLEDORE - Death By Drowning. - On Wednesday afternoon, the body of a little boy, named RICHARD BROOKS, aged about five years, was found floating on the water. He had been missed by his parents, who reside in Appledore, for an hour, and the body appeared to have been in the water about that time. An Inquest was held on the body on Thursday, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, when a verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Thursday 18 July 1861
ILFRACOMBE - Death By Drowning. - On Friday morning last, intelligence was received of a melancholy accident which had happened to MR CHARLES WILLIAM CLARKE, hosier, &c., of No. 3, Portland-place, Clifton, while bathing in the sea near the Tunnels, at this well-known watering place. It appears that MR CLARKE came to Ilfracombe upon a visit for the benefit of his health, he having lately suffered from indisposition. On Friday morning, about half-past seven o'clock, the unfortunate gentleman proceeded to the Tunnel beach for the purpose of bathing. The weather was stormy, and there was a heavy sea running; nevertheless, MR CLARKE entered the water. He was not a good swimmer, and the ground swell, or under current, carried him out of his depth. Two lads, at some little distance, observing the imminent peril of the ill-fated bather, endeavoured by every means in their power to render him assistance, but in vain, and in their praiseworthy and gallant attempts they well-night forfeited their own lives. The body was picked up a few hours after. An intimation of the distressing occurrence was forthwith communicated to MR CLARKE'S friends at Clifton, and his father immediately started for Ilfracombe. The deceased was bereft of his wife about two years since, and leaves an only child, a girl about five years old, to mourn his sudden death. The sad event has not only cast a gloom on the bereaved family, but has deeply depressed a wide circle by whom the deceased was much respected and by whom his untimely death will be much deplored.
An Inquest was held on the body on Saturday, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, and a respectable Jury.
James Parker deposed:- I am employed by Mr Price, to look after the bathing beach. I was there yesterday morning. The deceased, MR CHARLES WM. CLARKE, came there to bathe at about half-past seven; he had bathed there before. Deceased went into the water, and after he had been there five minutes, I saw that he was out of his depth, and could not get in. I got the oar of a boat, and endeavoured to reach deceased, but felt I was drawn out. Deceased reached the oar, but could not hold it. I then sent for assistance. Mr Scamp, the proprietor of the Baths, came; but just as he arrived deceased sank, and I did not see him after until he was taken out of the water by James Scamp.
Mr William Hall, of Hensleigh, in the county of Leicester, said:- I knew the deceased, and have known him some years. He resided in Portland-place Clifton; he was a hosier and outfitter. Deceased was on a visit to me here. I saw him last alive on Thursday night. He has been in the habit of bathing since he came here; I have accompanied him once or twice. I did not accompany him yesterday morning.
James Scamp, boatman, of Ilfracombe, deposed:- Yesterday, about half-past eleven in the morning, having been informed that a gentleman has been drowned in the bathing place, I went over to the place in a boat with a drag. I saw a shade under the water, and I thought it might be the body. I then let down the drag, and took up the body of deceased into the boat, and conveyed it ashore. Deceased was quite dead when he was taken up. There was a considerable ground sea yesterday morning. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned while Bathing."

Thursday 25 July 1861
NORTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Somerset Inn,' in this place, on Monday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of MRS MARY WILLIAMS, whose death took place on the previous Saturday while on the road to Southmolton. The facts will be gathered from the evidence of Mrs Poole, which was as follows:- I knew the deceased. She is the wife of SILVISTER WILLIAMS. She is living separate from her husband, in the parish of Twitchen, with her uncle James Buckingham. On Saturday last, I was going to Southmolton market, on horseback. About 10 o'clock I was over taken by the deceased, who was also on horseback. She said she was going to Southmolton market, and we rode on together. I was a little in advance of her, when I looked round and saw that deceased had let fall her basket; and I saw her leaning forward on the horse. I immediately went to her assistance, and she never spoke afterwards. At that moment John Blackford was coming on the road from Northmolton, and I called to him to make haste and come to my assistance. We then got deceased off the horse, and laid her down by the side of the road, and sent off for Mr Spicer, the surgeon of Northmolton, who immediately attended. The body of deceased was then removed to the 'Somerset Inn,' at Northmolton. The evidence of Mr Spicer, surgeon, who was called in, was to the effect "That deceased died from aneurism of the aorta." Verdict accordingly.

TAWSTOCK - Awful Effect Of Intemperance. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the 'Hotel,' in the parish of Tawstock, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL MADGE, aged 61, who was found lying dead by the road-side at an early hour on the morning of that day. The following evidence was adduced at the Coroner's Inquisition:-
Hannah Lock sworn:- My husband is an innkeeper, and keeps the 'Hotel,' at Stoneyland, Tawstock. I knew the deceased. On Monday night, the 22nd of July, between 9 and 10 o'clock, he called to my house, accompanied by John Nicholls, and asked for a pint of beer, which they drank. They remained at our house drinking until 12 o'clock, when they both left. they were a little the worse for liquor. They also drank three glasses of gin each.
George Lock sworn:- I am an innkeeper, and live at Tawstock. Deceased, accompanied by John Nicholls, came to my house about 7 o'clock last evening. They had one pint of ale, and remained about five minutes. They returned about 9 o'clock, and left a trifle after 12. They did not, to the best of my belief, drink more than three pints of cider between them. They had some gin, but my wife tended them with it, and I don't know the quantity they drank. Whether MADGE smoked or not I cannot say. When MADGE and Nicholls left, they were the worse for liquor, but could walk.
John Nicholls sworn:- I am a gardener, and reside at Tawstock. I knew the deceased, and went with him yesterday evening, about half-past 6, to Mr Hogg's, at Newton Cross. We left there about 6 o'clock. Deceased appeared quite well. On our way to Newton we stopped at the 'Hotel,' at Stoneyland, and had one glass of beer each, and no more. Before we left Mr Hogg's, at Newton, we had each of us a glass of beer there. On our return from Newton we again stopped at the 'Hotel,' at Stoneyland. We arrived there about 10 o'clock. We were both of us wet through. While there, deceased asked what I liked to drink. I replied, "I don't like their beer, I will have a pint of cider." We left the Hotel about 12 o'clock, and, while there, we drank three pints of cider between three of us. After drinking the cider, I was anxious to leave, but deceased, said, "Since you have obliged me by going and budding those roses, you shall have a glass of rum or gin before you go, which you like." We drank each of us three glasses of gin before we left. After drinking the gin, we sat for about half an hour, and each of us smoked a pipe of tobacco. We then left together, to go home; we walked together to Eastacombe Hill. Deceased stopped at this point, and I went on. I called to deceased to come on, and deceased replied, "You go on and I will overtake you." I have never seen deceased alive since. William Brown pointed out to me the place where deceased was found; it was the same place where I left him.
William Brown, of Tawstock, labourer, deposed to finding the body of the deceased at four o'clock in the morning, on Eastacombe Hill.
Mr Cooke, surgeon, gave evidence that death resulted from exposure and exhaustion and insensibility consequent upon excessive drinking.
The Jury returned as their verdict - "Found Dead; death having resulted from exposure to wet and cold when suffering from exhaustion and insensibility occasioned by intoxication." The learned Coroner severely reproved the landlord or the 'Hotel' for his misconduct in keeping open his house till midnight and supplying intoxicating liquor to persons who had already drunk more than sufficient. The circumstance will probably endanger his licence.

Thursday 1 August 1861
BERRYNARBOR - Inquest Held By John H. Toller, Esq. - On Monday last the learned Deputy Coroner held an Inquest at Berrynarbor, to inquire into the cause of death of a man named JOHN HOLMES, the sole occupant of a dilapidated house who was last seen alive on Saturday evening, and on the following day, at half-past one p.m., was discovered in his chimney corner, quite dead. The facts were disclosed in the evidence of Philip Hicks, who stated:- I knew the deceased, JOHN HOLMES. Yesterday afternoon, at about half-past one o'clock, some school-boys came to me and said they had been to the deceased's house, but could not get in. they were often in the habit of going there. I went to the door and found it bolted on the inside. I called to him, but received no answer. I got up and looked in from the window and saw a screen before the fire. There was a little hole in the screen, through which I could see an arm. I then went to the policeman and gave him notice of it. I returned with the policeman, who broke open the door, and we went in and found the deceased lying in the chimney; his shoulders were against the wall and his head back under him. He was quite dead, cold and stiff. I don't think he wanted for anything, as I saw in the house beans, potatoes, and flour. There was a bed in the house. The house was shockingly bad, and not fit for the residence of a human being; but I believe he preferred living there. Sometime since he was ordered to go into the Union, but he refused to go; but last week I heard him say that when Winter came on he thought he should go into the Workhouse. He always appeared to be happy and comfortable when I saw him. I have this day seen the body, which I identify as that of JOHN HOLMES. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, gave evidence that the deceased died from a severe fit of apoplexy - that death was not accelerated by his living in such a dilapidated house - that deceased had food to eat and blankets to lie on, though he preferred lying on straw. Verdict, "Found Dead - Death having resulted from Apoplexy."

BIDEFORD - Melancholy Death of a Lady By Poison. - On Monday, pain and excitement were occasioned here, for a report got circulated that a lady had met her death by poison; and to relate, the rumour proved too true. The deceased had been, from the Friday previous, the guest of Mrs Willcock, and had left Lord Clinton's of Huish, in whose family she had lived upwards of 20 years as governess.
An Inquest was held on her body at the 'New Inn,' on Tuesday morning, before Thomas Lawrence Pridham, Esq., Coroner, when the following gentlemen were sworn as jurymen:- Messrs. J. C. Saunders (foreman), F. Lee, Edward H. Down, John Williams, James Joce, William Walter Cole, James Wyatt, William Vinson, John Vellacott, William L. Vellacott, William V. Oatway, and William Cadd.
The Coroner opened the proceedings by stating that they had before them a very painful case; but however painful, it was one which required a strict investigation. No doubt they had heard many things out of doors, but he would beseech them to banish everything like an out-of-door rumour from their minds; for he need not tell them that these rumours too frequently proved untrue. He should proceed with the case by called a lady, a friend of the deceased, who procured what it is stated to have caused death - he referred to Mrs Stephen Willcock. Then they would have before them Dr Jones, who would doubtless prove to their satisfaction the cause of death. Nevertheless, if a proper decision could not be arrived at from the evidence now to be placed before them, a post mortem examination of the body might be made; but he hoped, under all the painful circumstances of the case, they would not flinch from their duty. He begged to call Mrs Willcock.
Mr Incledon Bencraft rose and said that he had been instructed to appear on behalf of Mr Griffiths, and he hoped no objection or opposition would be offered to it. The Coroner stated that he believed he would be expressing the opinion of the jurymen (it was his own) that all that they required was a proper investigation of the case, in order to meet the ends of justice.
Mrs Willcock sworn:- I am well acquainted with the deceased. We were old school-fellows. Her name was FRANCES ANN ROWLAND. I think she was 41 years of age. I have not seen her frequently of late years; it has been of long intervals. She has been our guest. She came on Friday evening last. When she came she appeared perfectly well, but said, "I have been taking medicine." On the following Sunday she said, "I am very well indeed." Yesterday morning she complained of being unwell, and said to me at half-past seven, "I have been suffering from diarrhoea, and have been awoke since six." She further said, "I have felt like this before, which I attribute to the change of air." She had eaten some pickled cabbage with her supper the night previous, and I said, "I am afraid your supper has injured you." She replied, "No, I have been like it at Dawlish." She still complained of pain and sickness, and at 12 o'clock said, "I think I had better take a little medicine;" adding, "I will take rhubarb and magnesia." I then told her that a little rhubarb and laudanum had been recommended to me by nurse Williams, and should I inquire of her (nurse Williams) the exact quantity? I went to nurse Williams, who said, "It was 3d. worth of rhubarb and three drops of laudanum." These words I wrote at the time, which I here produce. I am certain of the quantity that nurse Williams told me, who further said, "If it was required, I might repeat the dose with five drops of laudanum." I then thought I would go to Mr Griffiths, being always sure of him. I saw Mr Griffiths when I got into his shop. I said, "I want 3d,. worth of tincture of rhubarb, and three drops of laudanum in it." I told him (Mr Griffiths) that I had been recommended to the prescription by nurse Williams. Mr Griffiths said, "Yes;" and he then gave it me. I could not swear to the bottles that were used from. Before he gave it me he labelled it, and it was labelled "Tincture of Rhubarb." The bottle produced is the same given to me by Mr Griffiths, to the best of my belief. I said, in the course of conversation, pointing to a particular place, "What a nice thing it is that you keep your poisons separately." He replied, "They are not all poisons, there is tartar emetic there." I took the prescription home, where I found my friend at her needle-work. I said, "When will you take your medicine?" She answered, "I am feeling poorly, I think I will go upstairs and lie down a bit." After a little while I followed. When I had reached her room she said, "I have been sick;" which I perceived from the state of bed-room. She did not undress. I poured out the medicine into a wine glass, and she drank it immediately. I gave her a bit of sugar, when she said, "It is nauseous;" adding, "I suppose it is the laudanum."
The Coroner:- I must take you back again to Mr Griffith's shop.
Evidence resumed:- When Mr Griffiths gave me the medicine, at his shop, I said to him, "Have you put in the laudanum?" He replied, "Tincture of opium, it is the same thing." Our dinner-bell had rung. I left her at one o'clock, and about two I went up again. She was perfectly sensible; her face was very red, and white round her eyes. She said, "I have not been asleep." She preferred lying still a little while longer, but remarked, smilingly, "I don't know how people feel when tipsy, but I am very comfortable." I then left her, thinking it for the best. She had lain down and closed her eyes. At three, or half-past, I again visited her. I took off the blankets, and thought she was dead, poor thing. (Here Mrs Willcock was deeply affected.) She breathed slowly, with closed hands and eyes, and her face much swollen. I rushed downstairs for my husband, and said to him, "I think they have poisoned MISS ROWLAND - go for Dr Jones." She was so frightfully altered that I did not know her In a few minutes Dr Jones was there.
By a Juror:- She was not sick after she had taken the medicine. I cannot tell whether Mr Griffiths measured it before he gave it me. I am not aware that the deceased brought any medicine with her.
By Mr Bencraft:- She came from Heanton to Mr Drake's, and Miss Drake left her at my house on Friday last. She left Lord Clinton's on very good terms, and had an idea of returning again - that I understood from her.
By a Juryman:- I do not think I said 3d. worth of laudanum. I said it to myself, not loud enough to be heard.
By Mr Bencraft:- I said I want 3d. worth of laudanum to myself; I did not utter that to Mr Griffiths. By the time I got near Mr Griffiths I corrected myself.
Mr Thomas Griffiths sworn:- I am a chemist and druggist. I have a shop in High-street, Bideford. I have heard what Mrs Willcock has stated. She came into my shop yesterday, about one o'clock. She asked me for 3d. worth of tincture of rhubarb and three drops of laudanum. I gave her first the rhubarb. I then added four, or it might be five drops of laudanum. I measured it first. I am quite clear upon the matter - that is, as far as it is possible to be. I took the laudanum from a cupboard in passing, and added it after to the rhubarb.
By Mr Bencraft:- The tincture of rhubarb is in a much larger bottle than the laudanum.
By a Juror:- I gave the larger quantity from the larger bottle, and added the laudanum after; that I am sure of.
Randal How sworn:- I am 17 years of age, and am an apprentice to Mr Griffiths. I well remember Mrs Willcock coming into the shop, and I heard Mrs W. say that Mrs Williams had recommended a prescription for a lady to take. I saw Mr Griffiths take a bottle from where the tinctures are kept. I distinctly saw him drop from the small bottle which he took from the poison case as he passed round the counter. I have not used the "measures" since.
By Mr Bencraft:- I am sure the first portion came from the shelf where the tinctures are kept. I heard Mrs Willcock ask for 3d. worth of laudanum first, but she corrected herself afterwards.
By a Juror:- I heard Mrs Willcock ask afterwards for the few drops of laudanum. I heard her correct herself distinctly.
By the Coroner:- When Mr Griffiths put in the laudanum, he asked her if she was sure that it was two or three drops she required.
A. N. Jones, Esq.:- I am a surgeon, residing at Bideford. I never knew the deceased. I was called to her about half-past 3 or 4 o'clock. I met Mr Willcock, who had been running past my house; he said, "A lady had taken rhubarb, and was swelling;" I replied, "Let me understand the case before I go." I went and was shown up stairs; I found a lady on a bed with face congested and purple, breathing slow, with occasional sighing; the pupils of her eyes were contracted. I imagined, from what Mr Willcock had stated, that she had been poisoned; he stated the quantity given, viz. 3d. worth of rhubarb, and 3 drops of laudanum. She (Mrs W.) asked me if that could produce the symptoms within the period and of which the patient was then suffering? I now asked to see the bottle that had contained the medicine. Mrs Willcock instantly produced it. I smelt its contents; my impression was that it had contained laudanum. I know of nothing else conveying the same odour. I then requested that Mr Griffiths might be sent for; he instantly came, and appeared perfectly satisfied that he had dispensed as ordered; he seemed quite collected. I then requested an emetic of sulphate zinc, 30 grains. She swallowed it with my assistance; I saw her swallow it. She did not vomit much, about a small coffee cup full. I did not remark any particular odour. I should have expected laudanum, if there. I now sent for Mr Thompson, who was out; ultimately the whole of the doctors of Bideford were there with the exception of Mr Ackland, sen. All endeavoured to relive the stomach of its contents. From the symptoms before me, I concluded that the patient laboured under narcotic poison. After the exhibition of the effects of the emetic, Mr Pridham arrived and brought with him his stomach pump, which was used; but no odour of laudanum. Brandy and water was injected into the stomach, and the stomach well washed out. She was jolted about, and every means employed. Doctor Marshall Hall's plan produced a slight effects in respiration. About 20 minutes after 6 she died. I saw no other resemblance to any other disease. Narcotics take different turns on different constitutions. I never saw two cases similar to what I saw yesterday. Something has been said of apoplexy, but they are not similar. I don't think it possible that she died of apoplexy. I think she died from narcotic poison.
By the Coroner:- I should not be more satisfied with a further examination of her body. The small bottle produced is the same as that produced by Mrs Willcock, and I have no doubt but that it contained laudanum. I prefer not speaking to the proportions of that bottle. Considering that it be laudanum, I am surprised at the length of time, the stomach being empty, of its taking effect.
The Coroner to the Jury:- Gentlemen, it remains for you to say what course shall be adopted; will you have a post mortem examination. By adopting that course; you would find whether the deceased had died from apoplexy, and you would also have the evidence of other medical men. The case is in your hands, and I have no doubt that you will do everything necessary to meet the ends of justice.
Messrs. Thompson, Ackland and Turner gave evidence supporting Dr Jones's opinion. At length, the Jury concluded that a post mortem examination was absolutely necessary, and the Inquisition was adjourned to eight o'clock p.m.
On the Jury re-assembling, the first medical witness was Mr W. H. Ackland, who stated:- I made a post-mortem examination of the body of MISS ROWLAND this day, with other medical men, also with a Prosector, from the Royal College of Surgery, Mr Lee, of this town. May I, Mr Coroner and Gentlemen, refer to my notes and give you evidence from them before going into detail? - I think the case would be better understood. In this the Jury concurred, and Mr Ackland continued - "list, the body presented the usual rigidity after the time of death. The neck and upper part of the chest were discoloured, livid, more so than other parts of the body I also perceived a discharge of a frothy character about the mouth and nostrils. On making an incision into the scalp, the blood vessels were highly gorged with blood, the membranes of the brain were similarly gorged; the brain itself contained a greater number of bloody points than usual, the ventricals of the brain contained no serum. I examined the brain in every part, which was in other respects remarkably healthy. The lungs on their surface were slightly congested, but the substance of the lungs particularly at the base, was highly gorged with blood. The lungs were remarkably healthy, except as stated. The heart was healthy, with the exception of the muscle being slightly flabby; the cavities of the heart were empty, the blood of the body unusually fluid. The liver, except an old adhesion, was likewise healthy. The gall bladder full; the kidneys, stomach and the intestines were also healthy; the stomach contained little less than a pint of dark coloured liquid, the intestines nothing unusual. That is the result of the post mortem examination.
By the Coroner:- The heart was perfectly healthy. In cases of narcotic poisons, the blood is generally more fluid than usual; that is a fact laid down. No opium could possibly be detected. I, with others, tried for that odour but could not smell it; the liver was the same. Simply from an examination of the contents of the stomach I could not discover any traces of narcotic poison - that is, the odour of opium. I consider the deceased, as far as the organs were concerned, to be above the average of healthy. Having examined the body very minutely, I conclude, from the appearance of the scalp and the appearance of the brain, that the deceased had taken narcotic poison.
By a Juror:- I have stated that the intestines were healthy. I think there was no other class of disease present.
By Mr Bencraft:- There was no foreign matter in the lungs, nor in any of the organs leading to them.
Mr J. Thompson, surgeon, said:- With respect to this post mortem examination, I quite agree with the conclusions of Mr Ackland. I think the deceased died from narcotic poison; it follows from her being killed that she must have taken a large amount.
Doctor Jones:- I coincide entirely with the other medical men. I think the deceased the most healthy I ever saw; there is not the slightest sign of apoplexy. She died from narcotic poison.
Mr Turner:- I also coincide with the opinion expressed, that she died from narcotic poison.
Mr Willcock stated that he had examined the boxes of the deceased in the presence of a policeman and Mr Turner. Every search was made.
Mary Scott proved that a glass which she had washed, and which she had received from her mistress, Mrs Willcock, smelt of laudanum. Knew its odour, having used it for face ache.
By Mr Bencraft:- I cannot tell whether the lady took any poison or not.
Mrs Willcock was again called, and proved having given the glass which contained the medicine to the last witness to clean, and further stated that the bottle which Mr Griffiths gave to her was never touched by any person but herself; never out of the paper in which Mr Griffiths had placed it.
The Coroner briefly summed up the evidence, characterizing that given by Mr Griffiths as a "negative evidence." At half-past 11, the Jury gave the following verdict - "That FRANCES ANN ROWLAND died from the effects of laudanum, inadvertently supplied by Mr Thomas Griffiths, instead of tincture of rhubarb."
The Foreman:- Mr Coroner and Gentlemen, - We have had a most painful duty to perform, but from the evidence given this day it was impossible for us to come to any other conclusion than that given you. Let me say that we hold Mr Thomas Griffiths in the highest esteem, and believe him and know him to be highly regarded by every one who knows him. I am speaking for myself, and for the whole body of jurymen. (Great approbation.)
The Coroner then requested the presence of Mr Thos. Griffiths, in order that he be bound in his own recognizance to -
Mr Bencraft rose to correct the Coroner by informing him that he had no power to ask his client for a recognizance. Addressing the Coroner warmly, the learned advocate said, "You have no power, Sir, to do what you are talking about; you ought to know that you have no jurisdiction in that respect, but in cases of murder and manslaughter; you will see it laid down in Jervis. I speak to you, Sir, as a brother Coroner, and tell you once again that your power is at an end."
Here terminated a most painful Inquiry. The verdict of the Jury is well spoken of. The friends of the deceased, and the poor victim likewise, have a large share of sympathy from the public, and there is no one here, knowing the goodness and high character of Mr Griffiths, who does not deeply sympathize with him likewise, in this sad misfortune.

Thursday 15 August 1861
TORRINGTON - Suicide in the County Gaol. - On Saturday last, a prisoner, named BRIMMACOMBE, of this place, who was under sentence of three years' penal servitude, committed suicide in Exeter County Gaol. A prisoner in the adjoining cell heard a peculiar noise, and informed one of the female warders, who, on going to the cell of BRIMMACOMBE, was frightened to see her hanging to the gas pipe by two or three old rags and her staylace, her feet touching the ground. An alarm was immediately raised and she was cut down, but life was extinct. An Inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of "Temporary Insanity" returned.

Thursday 29 August 1861
MORTHOE - Fatal Accident. - On Thursday, the 15th instant, at nine a.m., as a girl named GRACE STREET, in the employ of Mr Irwin, of Borough, was assisting to take in three of her master's horses from the field, one of them (an old horse) kicked at her and knocked her down. Mr Irwin ran to her assistance and found that a wound had been inflicted on her forehead from which blood copiously flowed. She could not stand, and was conveyed to Borough-house, where Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, was soon in attendance. On the following day the patient was removed to the North Devon Infirmary, where she gradually got worse until her decease, which took place on Saturday night last. An Inquest was held on the body on the Monday following, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., when all the facts were detailed in evidence, and the House Surgeon gave it as his opinion - formed as the result of a post mortem examination of the body - the death had resulted from a fracture of the skull and laceration of the brain. Verdict accordingly.

BRATTON FLEMING - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at the 'White Hart Inn,' Bratton Fleming, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of an aged person named AGNES LOCK, who had met with her death under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Dr Forester deposed:- I am a doctor of medicine, residing at Barnstaple. On Thursday evening last, at about seven o'clock, on my return home from Highbray to Barnstaple, as I turned round Kipscombe Hill to Bratton Down, I saw about three hundred yards in front of me, a female riding on a horse with a boy walking by her side. My attention was especially drawn to her, by seeing her just at that instant lean forward and incline to one side as she was looking at the near forefoot of her horse. In a few seconds after her head fell sideways on to her knees, and she then rolled very gently to the ground. I think the horse then stopped. I drove on as fast as I could, and when I came up I found the deceased lying on her back, with her eyes open and fixed, and her jaw stopped. She was quite pulseless. I happened to have an ammonia mixture in my carriage, some of which I attempted to administer, but the power of deglutition was gone; in fact, she was dead. A little boy about eight years of age was with her, who told me he was her grandson. Subsequently on a young woman named Eliza Tamlyn coming up, I desired her to wait with the boy by the side of the body, while I went for assistance. I found, on arriving at Bratton, that she had a son residing in the village, upon whom I called, and he forthwith started to fetch the body. I have no doubt that the deceased died before she reached the ground, and that senile disease of the heart was the cause her death.
WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn:- I identify the body as that of my mother, AGNES LOCK, the wife of WILLIAM LOCK, of Lynton, joiner. On Thursday evening, soon after seven o'clock, Dr Forester, of Barnstaple, came to my house, and asked me if I had a mother living at Lynton, and on my saying I had, he said she was lying dead in the road. I said, are you sure she is dead? He said he was quite positive she was, and that he had seen her fall off the horse. I immediately went to the place Dr Forester directed me. I saw my mother by the side of the road. Eliza Tamlyn was by the side of her and also a boy named Bowden, about eight years of age, who had come from Paracombe with the deceased. I questioned the boy as to the state of health the deceased was in coming along the road, when he told me she was not well when she left Paracombe and that in coming along the road she begged him not to urge the horse so fast, as she could not bear the shaking. The deceased was about eighty years of age.
Eliza Tamlyn:- I now live at Bratton Fleming. One Thursday evening last, about 7 o'clock, as I was going from Hipscombe to Bratton Fleming, I saw a carriage in the road still. I thought that the horse had fallen, but on getting nearer I saw a gentleman and lady standing in the road by the side of a person who, to all appearances was dead. The gentleman who I afterwards found was Dr Forester, felt the body and pronounced it to be dead. The Doctor desired me to wait by the body whilst he went for assistance, and after waiting there about a quarter of an hour, WILLIAM BLACKMAN came, who said the body was that of his mother. Other persons came, and she was taken to her son, WILLIAM BLACKMAN'S house. Verdict, "Died suddenly from Disease of the Heart."

Thursday 5 September 1861
BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death By Drowning. - On Monday evening, the melancholy intelligence was communicated to the inhabitants of this borough that a young man named JAMES JARVIS, tailor, son of a widowed mother residing at Orchard Terrace, Newport, had been accidentally drowned in the river Taw, near Black Barn; a spot which has long been invested with sad interest from the almost yearly recurrence of fatal casualties in its immediate vicinity. The rumour proved correct, and large numbers congregated on the river's banks, while efforts were being made by some experienced men to recover the body of the deceased by means of drags and the drawing of a fishing net. These efforts were at length successful, and the corpse was conveyed to the house of the bereaved parent, to await the Coroner's Inquisition. On the following morning, at eleven o'clock, the Inquest was opened before the Borough Coroner (Incledon Bencraft, Esq.), when the following facts were disclosed in evidence:-
Charles Brown sworn:- I am a saddler, of Barnstaple, now residing at the 'George and Shakespeare,' and working for Mrs Davie. I saw the deceased yesterday, at the 'Golden Lion' Tap. It was then eleven o'clock in the forenoon. At about 12 o'clock he left. While there, he had a glass or two of beer. At one o'clock he returned to the Tap, and remained in my company till half-past four. During the whole of that time he was drinking with me. I should think he drank five or six glasses of age during the afternoon. He shook hands, and asked me to come up here and take tea with him, which I declined. He then wished me good day, and I saw him go across the Square. He was "rather fresh" - not drunk, decidedly, but a "little elevated." He walked without staggering. I have not since seen him alive. I saw his body just now.
By the Foreman:- Before he left the Tap he took a glass, drank a small quantity and said, "I begin to feel a little drunk." I said, "Well, you begin to shew it, and I'd advise you to go home on the quiet." He put down the glass and left.
By a Juror:- I consider he was capable of taking care of himself.
By the Coroner:- He appeared cheerful - not depressed or in any trouble.
Nicholas Price Carver, gentleman, sworn:- I live at Newport; am a student at college. I was bathing last evening at a quarter to five, near the Black Barn, a few paces from where MR JARVIS went into the water. My brother and Hector Munro were bathing with me. I saw the deceased take off his clothes on the bank, and go into the water, about 50 or 60 paces below us. He plunged in, and swam out a little distance - about 18 yards. He then turned back about six feet, and then went down. My brother, Mr Munro, and myself went over and trod water in the hope that he would rise, but could neither see nor feel anything of him. He never rose, nor did he make any sign or noise. The depth was about 15 feet. The tide was just beginning to ebb. There was a good deal of water there. We remained in the water seven minutes, but it was so cold that we could not remain longer. We dressed, and left in half an hour. Some one had gone for the drags. I saw the body picked up by means of a net at a quarter to eight, very near where I saw him go down.
By the Foreman:- He plunged in, and swam very indifferently - his head was down, and I remarked that he was a strange swimmer.
John Shaddick sworn:- I am a fisherman, of this borough. At the instruction of Mr Stribling, my master, I went up to the spot where the deceased was drowned, and at the fourth draught we brought up the body. The bottom at the spot was mud - about 16 feet at high water. We brought the body to Black Rock, and through Slimy-lane. I don't think the grappling irons touched the body; the little injury done to the eyes was probably occasioned by sticks and stones at the bottom.
The Coroner said it was evident that, whether drunk or no, the deceased was not in a fit state to go into the water. It was certain that death was accidental. The conduct of Mr Carver and his friends was deserving of all praise.
Verdict, Accidentally Drowned.

NORTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Thursday, last, the 29th of August, by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the house of the deceased, upon the body of MR WILLIAM WESTCOTT, of this place, who was accidentally drowned in a singular manner, while allowing his horse to drink on the previous day. The following was the evidence from which the only facts known may be gleaned.
MR JOHN WESTCOTT deposed:- The deceased was my father and was fifty-eight years of age. Yesterday morning about half-past five o'clock the deceased and myself left home with sheep for Southmolton fair. The sheep were put into the sheep market, at Southmolton. Twenty were sold, and the remainder I drove back to my father's farm, about the middle of the day. Before I left Southmolton, I several times saw my father, and saw that he was perfectly sober. I left Southmolton to come back to the harvest. Last evening, about a quarter before nine, I met the deceased at Northmolton town. He rode the same pony he rode in the morning. The pony was given to shying, and the deceased was a short time since thrown. As he appeared to be the worse for liquor, I left a cart which I had in charge at Northmolton, with the intention of accompanying him home, but I was not able to keep up with him, and I heard him going on the road towards home. He said he wished to go a little faster. When I got within a short distance of my father's farm, I heard my father call out, "John, John dear John, come to me." When I came to turn in round the court gate, I heard a splash in a large pond which is in the farm yard. I ran to the pond, but, first I could see nothing, but in about a minute I saw something, and I got into the water, when I saw it was my father lying upon his back. He did not seem to move in the water, and he did not speak. I pulled him out and called for help, but there was no one near. I placed him down upon the ground as I could not lift him. He made not the slightest motion, and neither breathed, nor spoke. I jumped upon the pony which my father had ridden, and which was standing by the court-gate, to go off for Mr Spicer. The body was taken into the house.
ROBERT HOLCOMBE WESTCOTT deposed:<- I knew the deceased, and am related to him. I am a butcher, and live at Northmolton town. This morning I went down to the pond to see if there were any parks of the pony's feet and I believe I traced the footsteps of the pony, which MR WESTCOTT rode in the direction of the pond, and from the pond I shewed the marks to several people, who concurred with me in the same opinion. I heard of the accident last evening and immediately went to the deceased's house.
Robert Henry Scanes Spicer deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Northmolton. About a quarter after nine o'clock yesterday evening, I received a message to go and see MR WESTCOTT. I immediately went but found him dead. I examined the body, and, although believing he was dead, I used all the usual remedies for resuscitation, but without avail. There were no marks of violence about the body, but from outward appearances, and the evidence I have this day heard, I am of the opinion that the deceased came to his death by drowning. Verdict:- "Accidental Death by Drowning."

BRAUNTON - Death by Drowning. - On Friday last, August 20th, an Inquest was held by J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the house of Mrs Elliot, at Braunton, upon the body of a boy named WILLIAM MORRIS, which had been picked up on the previous day. The following evidence was adduced:-
William Reed deposed;- I reside at Braunton and am a cordwainer. I knew the deceased, WILLIAM MORRIS. He was a labouring boy, and was about sixteen years of age. Yesterday morning, about eleven o'clock, I saw him outside my shop door. He told me he was going to Velator's bath. I made an engagement with him to survey some turnips belonging to Mr Passmore, of Ash, at 3 o'clock. I desired him not to go, and, by way of joke, said to him, "why BILLY, you will be drowned if you go bathing," and he replied, "No I shan't, Mr Reed." I desired him to be back by 3 o'clock, and he promised he would and desired me not to leave before he came back. I remained home until 5, expecting he would be back. About 8 o'clock in the evening, I heard that he was drowned. I waited until the cart came with the body, and assisted in taking the body to his father's house. His father's name is SAMUEL MORRIS, and he is a labourer. He could not swim.
Francis Drake sworn:- Yesterday afternoon, about 5 o'clock, I happened to be fishing at Pill's Mouth. A little above Pill's Mouth, there is a rock called blackstone rock. A person named James Mitchell and his sons were with me. At blackstone rock I saw something white, which had the appearance of a white sheep. Mitchell sent a boy to see what it was, and he came back and said he thought it was a man, but he was afraid to go up to it. The boy was only about ten years of age. We all went up to the place, and found it was the body of WILLIAM MORRIS. The body was lying a little on one side, and was completely dead. Upon an elevated part of the beach his clothes lay, and they were not above three land-yards from the spot where the body lay. The body lay in a very dangerous place for a person to bathe. We despatched a boy to Braunton for a cart, and we remained by the body until a cart came, when it was taken to the father's house. The place where the body lay, was at blackstone rock. There were no marks of violence upon the body.
Verdict - The deceased was Accidentally Drowned whilst bathing.

Thursday 19 September 1861
BRENDON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Thursday, an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the house of Mr Henry Litson, at Brendon, on the body of RICHARD LANG, the infant son of ANN LANG, who died on the previous Monday, after a very brief illness. Various surmises had been afloat as to the cause of death, but all these were set at rest by the verdict of the Jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr Clarke, surgeon, of Lynton, who made a post mortem examination of the body and gave it as his opinion that the child died from misplacement and disease of the lungs.

Thursday 3 October 1861
SOUTHMOLTON - Death By Drowning. - Some excitement was caused on Wednesday, when it became known that MR JOHN WEBBER, a respectable maltster, in South-street, who left his house on the previous morning, had not returned. He was last seen alive near Parkhouse-bridge, and from his having been in a low state of mind for some time, various rumours soon became rife. the Mole was dragged on that and the following day, but it was not until Friday morning, his body was recovered. On the afternoon of that day, an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner, and the following Jury, viz., Mr J. A. Kingdon, foreman, Messrs. Thomas Chapple, Wm. Collacott, Joshua Collacott, William Kingdon, James Kingsland, William Kingdon, John Lethbridge, James Moore, John Parsons, Robert Snow, and John Thomas, when the following evidence was taken:-
James Bulled on his oath said:- I live in Southmolton, in South-street. I know the deceased JOHN WEBBER intimately. I last saw him alive on Tuesday morning last, about 7 o'clock. He frequently complained to me of pain in his head, and that he was very uncomfortable in his mind, and that things were not as they used to be, having lost his wife about 9 months since, and he knew not what to be up to, to cheer up his spirits. I advised him to take some medicine. He has been in a desponding state of late. He complained to me, and crying said, no one knew what he suffered, but himself.
Richard Smith on his oath said:- I reside at Furseberry, in this parish; have known the deceased for the last 30 years. On Tuesday morning last, between 9 and 10 o'clock, I saw the deceased; between 8 and 9 o'clock in South street, he came up and spoke to me, whilst I was talking to Mr Thomas Chapple. I asked him how he was, he said, "very poorly." I asked what was the matter, he replied "You know." He frequently complained to me how very uncomfortable he had been, since the death of his wife. I went to Macklin's quarry, and the deceased accompanied me there. I had some conversation, and I witnessed nothing particular in his manner, or conversation, only he was lower spirited than usual. At the quarry he left me, and returned towards Southmolton; I afterwards saw him in Mr Hitchcock's marsh, on Parkhouse, near the reservoir, walking upwards. About a quarter of an hour after I saw him returning down the same marsh, near the bridge. I never saw him alive afterwards.
William Chapple said, I am a constable of this Borough. I have known the deceased many years, and hearing that he had been missing for several days, went in search. This morning about 9 o'clock, I started and took with me a grapple and irons. I went to Parkhouse, having heard that was the last place he had been seen. I found some men at work near the bridge. I inquired if they had seen anything of the deceased; they said not since Tuesday, when they saw him go up, but not back. I commenced to make search with my grappling irons, and threw them under the bridge twice. The second time I caught hold of the body; I took it on to the side of the bank, and was assisted by Joshua Collacott to land the body. We took it into the road on a hurdle. I searched the pockets and found a watch, which I now produce. When taken from the deceased it was stopped; the hour denoted by it was 8 minutes after 9; three keys, a crook, 6s. 6d. in silver, 6 ½d. in copper, and a small apple.
The Coroner summed up the evidence, and briefly addressed the Jury, who returned the following verdict, "That the deceased was found drowned in the Mole, that he bore no marks of violence; but how, or by what means he became drowned, no evidence thereof had been adduced."

TORRINGTON - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at St. Giles in the Wood, by R. Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on Wednesday, the 25th inst., on the body of FANNY BRIGHT who had hung herself. The following was the evidence:- Mr John C. Hole, surgeon, sworn:- I knew the deceased, and had attended her for some years for dispepsia. I was sent for on Monday last to go to her residence. I was informed that she had hung herself, and had been cut down. I found her living, but insensible, with the mark of a rope round her neck. I had observed great peculiarity about her. She was low and desponding. I bled her and applied a mustard poultice to her chest and legs. She died on Tuesday from asphyxia, occasioned by suspension by the neck.
ABRAHAM BRIGHT sworn:- The deceased is my wife. She is sixty-one years of age. She had been ill for about twelve months, and at times quite out of her mind. On Monday, 23rd, I left home for work at 7 o'clock, and returned about a quarter before 6 in the evening. I left her in bed, and ANN BRIGHT, my daughter, in the house. I, on coming home, called to my wife, who was upstairs. She replied she would be down in a moment. She came down and had supper with me. Deceased said she would go and make up the beds, and left the kitchen. I heard her walking about upstairs. Mary Sussex was sitting with me. Mary Sussex, after some time, called up and asked what she was about. Deceased answered and said she would be down in a moment. She afterwards called down to ask what the time was. Mary Sussex said, "It wants a quarter to seven by your clock." Mary Sussex then left, and a few minutes after I went upstairs. I then found her hanging with a rope fastened to a beam or cross piece in the chamber. I then cut her down and called for Mary Sussex. I then sent off for Mr Hole, who immediately attended. Deceased died on Tuesday. Her mind had been worse for some days, and on Saturday she went off towards the river and was fetched back by my daughter. In consequence of her state of mind a watch was kept on her.
Susan Sussex corroborated the last witness as to the state of mind of the deceased. - Verdict - "Hanged herself being of Unsound Mind."

Thursday 10 October 1861
SOUTH SYDENHAM - Shocking Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday afternoon, on the body of a young woman, named MARY ANN KERSLAKE, aged 20. The deceased was the daughter of a farmer, living at South Sydenham, near Tavistock, Devon, and had been in the service of the Rev. H. Fowler, master of the College School, Gloucester, as housemaid, for about a year. Latterly her fellow-servants had noticed that she was "flighty" in her manner; she talked strangely, told lies without object, and some night would wake the girls, who slept n the room with her, by praying loudly, and on other occasions by her furious swearing. On Sunday week she had been telling some ridiculous stories; the housekeeper, who had known her from a child, spoke kindly to her, and she promised amendment. In the afternoon, instead of attending church, she visited the Docks, and after tea she accompanied two of the other servants to the church door, where she suddenly left them, and went to Hampstead, and drowned herself in the canal. Her bonnet was found in the canal on the following day, and some children's clothes on the towing-path on the previous day, but it was thought that these belonged to some other persons, who were reported as missing, and that the deceased had returned to her friends in Devon. Search, however, was made on Monday, and her body was found lying in the canal. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 17 October 1861
NORTHMOLTON - Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at Marsh, in this parish, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of THOMAS BIDDER there lying dead. The following evidence was given:-
Joseph Chapple deposed:- I was informed on Tuesday night that THOMAS BIDDER was missing. I was employed by Samuel Thomas to go in search of deceased yesterday morning. I and John Bowden got a grappling iron and rope, and went on the river Mole, in the parish of Northmolton. After searching for some time, we found the body of deceased in the river. He was quite dead. We got him out and searched his pockets, and found a printed paper similar to one relating to the income-tax and notice of appeal. We also found a penny, a half-penny, a steel box with tobacco, and a pocket-knife closed. I knew the deceased, and about June last he spoke to me of age, and said he was in his 78th year. John Bowden found the hat of deceased. Near the place where the hat was found there was a mark on the bank having such an appearance as if a person had slided into the river. John Bowden gave corroborative evidence.
Eleanor Shapcott, wife of Henry Shapcott, of Southmolton, deposed:- Deceased lived in my house. He appeared to be fretty, but occasionally suffered from headache. Deceased was home on Tuesday night, and went to bed as usual. He got up on Wednesday morning, and went out. I have not seen him since Tuesday night. In consequence of his not returning to dinner, on Wednesday, I got uneasy and mentioned his absence to Mr Thomas, my neighbour, and search was made for him.
John Harris, yeoman, of Southmolton, deposed:- I knew deceased, and met him on Wednesday morning, at six o'clock, in Parsonage Lawn. He said "Good morning Mr Harris," and I replied "Good morning." We said no more, and passed on. - Verdict, "Found drowned in the river Mole."

Thursday 24 October 1861
ILFRACOMBE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at Two-potts, in this parish, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of an infant child, two months old, there lying dead. The child, EVA MARIA JEWELL, was daughter of ELIZA JEWELL, and had been weak and sickly from its birth; it became worse on Monday evening, the 7th instant, and continued indisposed until the Saturday following; no medical man was called in, but the grandmother gave it a little magnesia. It died on Tuesday, the 15th. From the evidence of Mr Stoneham, surgeon, it appeared clear that the child died of marasmus, and a verdict to that effect was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Death By Burning. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning last, at the North Devon Infirmary, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of a labourer named JOHN ROGERS, of the parish of Eastdown, whose death resulted from his clothes accidentally catching fire. The particulars were disclosed by the evidence of the witnesses examined.
William Fry, of Eastdown, labourer, deposed:- I have been employed lately working a horse whim at Viveham Mine, in the parish of Eastdown. I was well acquainted with the deceased, JOHN ROGERS. On Wednesday night last he came to work the whim, at about a quarter past ten o'clock. I left when he came. He was then in his usual state of health, and wished me good night when I left. He was quite sober. At the time I left there was a little fire burning in the tool house close to the whim.
Mr Nicholas Chamings, of Eastdown, yeoman, deposed. On the night of Wednesday last, the 16th inst., I returned from Barnstaple to my residence at Viveham. I left Barnstaple about half-past ten o'clock. When I came near the iron mine, which adjoins the road leading to my house, I smelt a great stench, and saw a quantity of smoke, and the reflection of fire. It came from the direction of the horse whim. I saw a mass of fire under the whim, and on coming nearer I saw it was a man. He was staggering about. I dismounted, let go my horse, and ran towards him. He was then all in a blaze. I caught him by the hands, and pushed him into a pit of water which was close by. I then threw water over him, and succeeded in putting out the fire. I next went for assistance to some cottages close by, and William Ballment and William Fry came with me to where the deceased lay. When I returned to him he spoke to me, and I got him on his legs. We procured a cart, and he was taken to the North Devon Infirmary within half an hour from the time I first saw him. There is a small tool house close to the whim, in which there is a fire place, and I observed there was a large fire there and a good deal of smoke.
Mr James Ford, house surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, deposed:- The deceased was brought to this institution on the night of Wednesday last, between the hours of twelve and one o'clock. He was undressed and put into a bed. His clothes on his left side were burnt almost to tinder. On examination, I found the whole of the left side of his body severely burnt, and on the left arm the skin was quite destroyed and the surface charred. His back was also slightly burnt. He was cold and collapsed, but quite conscious. I applied the usual dressings, and gave him restoratives. He lingered on until last Saturday morning, when he died about ten o'clock. His system never recovered from the shock it had sustained. His death was caused by the injuries he sustained by fire. He told me he had lain down before the fire in the tool house.
Verdict - "Accidentally Burnt." The Jury, with one exception, gave their fees to the distressed widow of the deceased.

Thursday 7 November 1861
BRAUNTON - Fatal Accident. - An accident of a serious nature occurred on Monday night at the North Buckland Iron Mine, in the parish of Georgeham, in which five men were engaged at work. Two of these, contrary to orders, went to a part of the mine which had not been worked for five months or upwards, and began to dig; they had not been long doing so, before a quantity of the debris fell in. One man named JOHN LANCEY, of Paracombe, was killed instantly, and the other, named John Lovering, was bruised up to his neck, leaving one arm and his head only clear: LANCEY leaves a wife and six children to mourn his untimely end quite unprovided for. An Inquest was held this day (Wednesday) and a verdict returned of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 14 November 1861
TORRINGTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Rolle Arms Inn,' before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of LYTICIA, the illegitimate child of FANNY TAYLOR, Mill-street, aged about 4 months, who died on Saturday morning last, under circumstances detailed in the following evidence:- FANNY TAYLOR sworn:- I am a single woman, and reside in Great Torrington, the deceased is my child. On Friday last, I sent my little girl (ELLEN TAYLOR), to Mr Handford's, Druggist, to get a pennyworth of "Syrup of Poppies." She brought it back to me and said she had it at Mr Handford's shop. I gave the deceased about half or three quarters of a teaspoonful about 12 o'clock. shortly afterwards the child fell asleep, and continued asleep 'till near half-past three o'clock. I then nursed the child for some time; about 6 o'clock I gave the child another dose of the syrup of poppies. About 8 o'clock, the child went to sleep, and I put her into the cradle, and about 10 o'clock I undressed her and took her to bed with me; she did not wake up when I undressed it. She was a very cross child, and I have been in the habit f giving her syrup of poppies every day since it was six weeks old, in order to keep it quiet. In the course of the night on Friday, I suckled the child a little, but observed that she breathed hard. I woke up about half-past 8 o'clock on Saturday morning, and feeling the child was cold, I jumped up and shook her, when it made a faint moaning noise twice. I then called Elizabeth Butt, who lodges with me, and begged her to call some one, as I thought my child was dead. She said, "nonsense, you are dreaming." She then got out of bed and called assistance. My mother came shortly afterwards, and at my request she went for Mr Hole, surgeon, who at once came. He asked me what I had given the child, I told him; he saw the bottle, and said the poppies was too strong for the child. Elizabeth Butt corroborated the evidence given by the mother of the deceased, and in answer to the Coroner, stated that the child had been treated kindly, and taken proper care of by the mother during the six weeks she had resided with her. John Copplestone Hole, surgeon, sworn:- On Saturday morning last, between 8 and 9 o'clock, I was sent for to attend deceased. I went and examined the child, the body was then warm, there were no marks of violence. I asked the mother what she had given the child, and she said Syrup of Poppies. I then asked what quantity, she said she had given it about half a teaspoonful on the preceding day about 2 o'clock, and had repeated the dose about 6 o'clock in the evening. She also told me that the child breathed hard during the night, that the deceased was in its usual state on the previous day, and that she gave it the Syrup of Poppies to keep it quiet. I was then satisfied and am still of opinion that the child died from narcotic poison. The Coroner briefly summed the evidence, and the Jury gave the following verdict. "That the deceased died from the effects of narcotic poison, carelessly administered by its mother."

Thursday 21 November 1861
BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death By Burning. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday morning, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr Tatham was foreman, on the body of JOHN PERRY DAVIS, infant son of MR JOHN DAVIS, painter and decorator, 47 High-street, which had met with its death from a distressing accident on night preceding. The facts will be gathered from the following evidence:-
Elizabeth Bowden sworn:- I live with MR DAVIS, as nursemaid. I had the care of the deceased, who was about six months old. I left him in his cradle in the nursery, at a quarter to 8 o'clock last night. He was then asleep. The cradle was of wicker work and was covered with chintz. I came down to fetch the elder child, whom I took to the nursery, and having undressed and washed him, I put him to bed in an adjoining room. I then went and prepared the baby's meat for the night; after which I sat down in the kitchen to needle-work - making a night shirt for the eldest child. I remained down for half-an-hour and then went up with the saucepan with the baby's food, to the nursery. I then saw that the oil cloth under the cot, was on fire, and ran down to call MR DAVIS who was in the back parlour, where he had just taken his supper. He ran up instantly and then went down for water. The back parlour is immediately under the nursery. The baby had been ill from an affection of the chest, and MRS DAVIS desired me to leave the fire in, as she intended to put a plaister on his chest. We have not been accustomed to leave the fire in after the baby went asleep. This was the only occasion on which the fire was left in when I came down. There was a piece of wood on the top of the fire. It was a long piece when I put it on, and I set it on its end up the chimney. I put it on after dinner, and it was almost consumed when I put the elder child to bed; it was then lying across the fire.
MR JOHN DAVIS, father of the deceased, deposed:- I returned home last night, at 20 minutes past 9, and finished supper at 20 minutes to 10. We took supper in the back parlour, and had just finished when the last witness came in, in a great fright, and said, "O, Master, do go up into the nursery!" I went up instantly, and MRS D. said, "Get some hot water to put it into." she thought the child had a fit. When I opened the door, I saw that the room was full of smoke, and there were two little patches of flame, about five or six inches high, near where the cradle had stood. The cradle was a bassinet lined with chintz. I took up the body from the midst of the fire and burnt my fingers severely, so that I was obliged to drop it. I got water and extinguished the fire. The child was dead. The bassinet, the head of which was about a foot from the fender, was entirely burnt. When I discovered the fire, it was about a quarter to 10 o'clock. At a quarter to 8, before I left the house, to go out, I looked into the nursery and saw that all was safe. The child was asleep and the fire very low in the grate. I am of opinion that the fire must have been smouldering for hours under the India rubber floor cloth, as the ash plank of which the floor was composed was burnt through. I was accustomed to take the child from the basinet when I went to bed; he always slept with me, and had done so from his birth. Thirza Ridd, also a servant to MR DAVIS, gave corroborative testimony.
The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." Great sympathy is felt for MR and MRS DAVIS, under their distressing bereavement; their only consolation is, that their loved one, "absent from the body, is present with the Lord."

SALCOMBE REGIS - Shocking Death of a Young Lady. - An Inquest was held a few days ago at Salcombe Regis, in this county, on the body of MISS EMILY MARY STEPHENSON, daughter of MR DAVID STEPHENSON, of the Cape of Good Hope, before Mr Spencer Cox, the Coroner for the district, when some distressing facts were elicited. It appears that the deceased young lady was staying with her grandmamma, an old lady residing at Myrtle-cottage, Salcombe Regis. There had been a wedding there, and MISS STEPHENSON and other young ladies retired to their rooms to dress for dinner. While stooping down to open a box her sleeve caught fire from a candle, and being attired in white muslin she was immediately enveloped in flames. She screamed for help, and some gentlemen in the house ran to her assistance, and having covered her with clothes they thus succeeded in extinguishing the flames. The poor young lady, however, was so dreadfully burnt that she died soon afterwards. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 28 November 1861
EXETER - Coroner's Inquest at Exeter - Verdict of Manslaughter. - An Inquest was held at the 'Valiant Soldier Inn,' on Thursday, by H. Hooper, Esq., the City Coroner, on the body of MARY ANN RICE, aged 44. It appeared that deceased had cohabited with a man named SCOWN, and about 4 months ago she was received into the Devon and Exeter Hospital with a broken jaw, which as she gave out arose from an accidental fall against a table. Whilst in the hospital she told a nurse that SCOWN had pushed her against the table and broke her jaw. She told others that he had kicked and injured her. these statements were corroborated by the evidence of the neighbours, by whom she was known to be ill-treated by SCOWN. She left the hospital on the 29th of August, but returned there again on Tuesday last. The House Surgeon at the hospital stated that the jaw never united, that her lungs were much disorganised, and her constitution generally bad. He attributed her death to constitutional disease, aggravated by pain and inability to take proper nutriment on account of the broken jaw. The Coroner, in summing up, said the tendency of the evidence was to show that death was accelerated by the ill-treatment of SCOWN. The Jury, after brief consultation, returned a verdict of manslaughter against SCOWN, who was thereon committed for trial, bail being taken for him - himself in £100 and two sureties in £50 each.

KENTON - Child Murder at Hamhead. - A Coroner's Inquest was holden at the house of Mr Samuel Cornish, farmer, of Westleigh Barton, in the parish of Kenton, on Monday evening, before Mr Crosse, County Coroner, on view of the body of the female infant child of SUSAN PULLEN. On Friday evening SUSAN PULLEN, who was a servant in the house of Mr Cornish, having complained of being poorly was sent to bed; and on Miss Cornish passing PULLEN'S bedroom door, about ten o'clock that night, she was surprised to hear the crying of an infant. Miss Cornish at once told her mother what she had heard, and Mrs Cornish immediately went to PULLEN'S bedroom. She also heard the infant cry, and saw it in bed with PULLEN. She desired her to take care of the child and told her she would send for a nurse and the doctor. She had suspected PULLEN of being pregnant. Mrs Cornish sent for a woman, and the next morning she sent for Dr Pycroft. The child was not quite dead when Dr Pycroft came. Dr Pycroft having made a post mortem examination, said he found each side of the infant's skull broken as if by violent blows. There were also other marks of violence having been used. The Jury, after an Inquiry extending over five hours, found the verdict of "Wilful Murder" against SUSAN PULLEN. The unhappy young woman being too ill to be moved, is in the custody of the police at Mr Cornish's house.

PLYMOUTH - Death From Falling Down Stairs. - An Inquest was holden at Oldrey's 'Black Lion Inn,' Exeter-street, Plymouth, on Monday, before John Edmunds, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of ELIZABETH MARTIN, the wife of a plasterer residing in Exeter-street. The evidence went to show that the deceased, who was about 57 years of age, a sober, hard-working woman, accidentally fell over the stairs in her own house on the previous day, and died from the effects of the fall in the course of the night. Mr Harper, surgeon, saw her immediately after the accident. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 5 December 1861
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at the 'Currier's Arms,' Vicarage-street, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, on the body of ANN MILLER, who had died suddenly on the Saturday evening previous. Isaac Bennett, an operative in the Derby lace factory, deposed as follows:- I was going into the town on Saturday evening, at about half-past seven, when my attention was attracted to a person who was sitting on the door step of Vicarage Lawn Cottage. On inquiry, I found it to be a woman who had been taken suddenly ill. I offered to help her home, and we had proceeded about half way when deceased, who appeared to have an affection of the throat, desired me to allow her to rest a while, which I did; we then went on again. When we reached Higher Maudlin-street, I called Mrs Allen to my assistance and we got deceased to her lodgings, at Mr Fisher's, and sat her on a chair in the kitchen. She then lay back in my arms for a short time, during which I sent for a doctor; but she expired before he came. I should think about 20 minutes elapsed from the time that I first saw her till she died. Mrs Allen corroborated the last witness. Mrs Maria Fisher deposed:- The deceased and her husband lived with me. She has not enjoyed good health for some time, having suffered from asthma. On Saturday evening she left home in unusually good spirits, with the intention of making some purchases in the town. She remained away about an hour, when she was brought back by Mr Bennett and Mrs Allen. Deceased was a person of very moderate habits; she had taken her tea at about half-past four o'clock on the afternoon in question. The doctor said he thought that disease of the heart was the cause of death. - Verdict: "Died from the Visitation of God."

Thursday 12 December 1861
SHEBBEAR - Inquest By Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner. Case of Shocking Destitution. - On Wednesday last the learned County Coroner (Richard Bremridge, Esq.) held an Inquest at the 'Devonport Inn,' Shebbear, on the body of a poor woman named MARY MORRISH, respecting the cause of whose death and the circumstances preceding and attending it various rumours had been in circulation, exciting the intense interest in the neighbourhood. The Jury having been impannelled proceeded to view the body, after which the following evidence was taken:-
Philippa Larkworthy deposed:- I knew deceased; she was a widow woman, and was about thirty-three years of age. She lived next door to me, and has done so for the last eight years. She worked as a glover. I never heard her complain of wanting anything. I saw her on Thursday evening, the 28th of November, in her own house; she was suffering from a complaint in the throat. She told me the doctor had seen her, and that she was better; but that something had broken in her throat, and that some portion of it had gone into her stomach. She did not, on Thursday evening, make any complaint to me of any neglect on the part of the doctor. She never complained to me of want of food, nor did she complain of any one. On Saturday last, about half-past two, I was in my own house with my husband. He went to the Vicarage on business; and had scarcely left the house five minutes when I heard a groan. I fancied it proceeded from the house of deceased, and I thought she might be worse. I went and opened the front door and saw her lying on the floor in her kitchen, on her left side, and her head rested on her left hand. I immediately left and called Ann Brock, and told her that deceased had fallen along in the kitchen. She immediately went to deceased's house and I followed her. Ann Brock's son attempted to get her up, and his mother said it was a fit. Shortly after Mr Hore, the clergyman, came to the house.
Ann Brock deposed:- I knew deceased, and lived near her. I have known her some years. I saw her on Friday night last, in her own house, sitting on a chair by the fire. I asked her how she was, and she said she was better. I also saw deceased last Tuesday fortnight, the day she was taken ill, and I requested her to come into my house by the fire. She came in, and I got her some hot water, and she made some tea: she brought the tea with her. She came to my house again the following day, and brought a screw of tea with her, which she made in a cup and drank it. On Thursday she again came to my house, and I gave her some tea. She did not bring any tea with her. On Friday she came to my house again, and I gave her some tea. On Saturday morning I went in to deceased as soon as I heard she was down. I said, "MARY, how art?" She replied she was very bad, a great deal worse. I then said, "Why don't you have the doctor?" She replied she was waiting for her sister to come and go after him. She never complained to any one of the want of anything, nor that the doctor had been neglectful. I then sent for Mrs Blight, the policeman's wife, to come up and talk with her. She came up, and asked deceased how she was; and she replied rather worse. Mrs Blight said she would send for her husband. Mr Blight, the policeman, and the Rev. Mr Hore came in together. I told them I thought I should find her dead, because she had no fire. Mr Blight and Mr Hore left together, and in about a quarter of an hour Mr Hore's servant brought up a large jug of broth and a shilling. I warmed the broth and put some bread in it and gave it to her. On Sunday morning I saw deceased, about 9 or 10 o'clock, and I asked her how she was; she answered that the doctor had been there. I then asked her what he said, and she replied the doctor said it was quinsey, and she must keep herself very warm. I saw her every day up to Saturday, the day of her death. I never heard her complain of any one, or that the doctor neglected her, or that she wanted anything. After the doctor had seen her she had a fire every day, and appeared comfortable.
Mr Robert Rudall deposed:- I am a surgeon, residing at Sheepwash, and the parish doctor for Shebbear. On Saturday, the 23rd November, on my return from Torrington, I found a medical order from the overseer of Shebbear to attend MARY MORRISH. On Sunday morning, the 24th ult., about six or seven o'clock, in pursuance of the order, I attended on deceased. I was accompanied by two women, one of whom knocked at the door, and MARY MORRISH asked who was there. One of the women replied it was Mr Rudall; she then came down, opened the door, and admitted us. I asked her what was the matter, and she said she had a bad throat. I examined it and told her it was quinsey, that she was to keep it warm with poultices, and it would break in a day or two, and she would be all right again. I told her I would send her some opening medicine, which I did. She said "You must be pleased to go over to Mrs Mill." She did not say what for, and being so early I did not go. I did not see her on Monday or Tuesday. On Tuesday I sent her a gargle, and in the evening I received a note from Mrs Mill desiring me to see MORRISH. On the following morning (Wednesday) I saw deceased; she was sitting in her room downstairs by the fire. I said to her, "It's broken now, and you are better." I examined her throat and told her that there was a fair passage, and that she might eat anything. Mrs Blight, the policeman's wife, brought me a piece of paper and pen and ink, with which I wrote a recommendation for relief, addressed to Mr Heale, relieving officer. On Saturday, the 30th of November, I was informed that deceased was dead, and I went and examined the body. There were no marks of violence, and I am of opinion that deceased died from disease of the heart.
Rev. W. S. Hore deposed:- I am the vicar of Shebbear. On Saturday, the 23rd November, Wm. Blight called on me about ten o'clock in the morning, and said there was a sad case of destitution which he considered it his duty to report to me. He said MARY MORRISH was the person. The question of relief then came up, and the result was that I told him he had better go to Spearman and get a medical order and also relief. I may have expressed an opinion that possibly Spearman, the overseer, might refuse to give it, as our overseers have sometimes difficulty in getting the sums reimbursed. I went with Blight and saw MARY MORRISH. I afterwards sent her one shilling and some broth. I then had a conversation with Spearman about the medical order and relief. Spearman promised to give the medical order - as to relief, he said that the medical order would bring the doctor, who would best know what MORRISH required. I thought this reasonable, and assented. I had given her relief which would assist her until the next day, when the doctor would arrived. On Tuesday Blight again saw me and said he must call in Mr Owen or some other medical man. I told him not to do so until he had seen Mr Rudall, and heard what he had to say. I then sent by him to MORRISH one shilling, and I am informed by my family that that answered. Tea, sugar, and honey was also sent by Blight. I saw MARY MORRISH on Tuesday, at her house, and spoke to her on the question of parochial relief. It appeared she had received none. She had told Mr Rudall that Mrs Mill had told her to request him to go to her, and she would settle the relief. I did nothing more, as Mr Heale, the relieving officer, would see her the next day. On Friday I heard deceased was better. On Saturday I was called at her house, and found her senseless in her kitchen. I immediately felt her wrist, and there was no pulse. I ran for some brandy and moistened her lips; but deceased was dead.
William Blight deposed:- I am in the County Constabulary, and reside at Shebbear. On Saturday, the 23rd November, about nine o'clock in the morning, Ann Brock's daughter came to my house requesting me or my wife to come up to her house. I sat at breakfast, but sent my wife, who returned and stated to me that Ann Brock and deceased wished me to intercede and to go to Mr Spearman for relief for deceased, as she had nothing to subsist on or fire to sit by; also for an order for medical attendance. I went direct to Mr Spearman, the poorwarden, whom I met in Shebbear Town. I stated that deceased wanted medical attendance and relief. In reply, Mr Spearman said he could do nothing of the sort, and if he did it must be out of his own pocket. He refused to give the order, and referred me to Mrs Mill. I went to her, and she said she was not the poor-warden. She also said that Mr Spearman was the person for me to apply to. I then went to the vicar, Mr Hore, and stated all the circumstances to him. He said it was not Mr Spearman's duty to relieve, but that Mr Heale was relieving officer. I then stated to Mr Hore that it had been reported to me by my wife, Mary Horn and Mary Sanders, that she was in a state of starvation. Mr Hore told me he would relieve her; and deceased told me that he had given her one shilling and a drop of broth. I went and saw deceased again, on Sunday, the 234th ult., and she told me she had laid out the shilling in candles and coals, and a little tea. She also told me that Mr Rudall, the surgeon, had called that morning, and she had been obliged to get out of her bed and go downstairs to open the door, and she could scarcely get back again. No one was in the house but deceased when Mr Rudall called. She said she requested Mr Rudall to call on Mrs Mill. I called on deceased again, on Monday morning, and saw her sitting by a very small fire. On the same day I sent a stick by my boy, and told him also to go to Mr Hore's for a little arrowroot, which he had. I went again on Tuesday morning, and she said if she had not got broth or something that she could swallow she should die. She wished me to go and get further relief and medical attendance, and I said, "I will go to Mr Balkwill, the churchwarden." I went, and told him if deceased had not go relief or medical attendance she would die. I then asked Mr Balkwill if I was justified in getting another medical man, and he said he thought that I was the proper person to do so. He also said that Mr Rudall was very neglectful. I left Mr Balkwill and went to Mr Hore, the vicar, and asked his opinion. He asked me if I had communicated with Mr Rudall, and I replied, "No." Mr Hore said, "I advise you to see Mr Rudall, and let me know what he says on my return. A police case occurred, requiring my attention, and I sent Betsey Curtis to Mr Rudall. On leaving Mr Hore's house, he gave me a shilling for deceased, and also some tea, sugar, honey, and vinegar. Deceased said, "If I had had this before I could have made use of it." The sister of deceased being present said, "What she takes in now comes out of her nostrils." I saw deceased again on Wednesday, and she said, "I am a little better; but I am greatly afraid that what has broken in my throat is gone into my stomach." I said, "You ought to have a little opening medicine." She replied, "I have had no opening medicine." I then said, "I am afraid it will be a bad job with you." Deceased told me that Mr Rudall was there on the Wednesday, and that it had broken in the throat and had gone downwards. I did not see deceased on Thursday; but I saw her on Friday, and she did not say she was better on that day.
The learned Coroner summed up the evidence and suitably addressed the Jury, pointing out the several particulars which demanded their attention and should govern their verdict.
Verdict - "Died from disease of the heart; there being no neglect on the part of the parish doctor or overseer."
The conduct of the reverend incumbent and the policeman was most praiseworthy; but it is a sad reflection that in this Christian country a fellow-creature can linger out such a miserable existence and prematurely drop into a pauper's grave, when the probability is that, by timely aid and proper attention, such a melancholy catastrophe might have been avoided.

Thursday 26 December 1861
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday evening last, an Inquest was held at the 'Union Inn,' Vicarage-street, by Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of an infant child to which ELIZABETH HARRIS had given birth on the previous Wednesday. The facts will be gathered from the evidence:- Mary Furse sworn:- I am cook in the service of a gentleman and lady residing in Bear-street. BETSY HARRIS was housemaid in the same service. She had lived there about 10 weeks. I knew she was going to be married, and that she intended to leave on Monday next. I was out on the morning of Wednesday, and returned at half-past 12; found HARRIS in the kitchen; she shortly afterwards went upstairs, called to me in about ten minutes, said she was ill, and desired me to send for Mrs Colwell, of Princes-street. Mrs Colwell came, and she was removed to her house in a fly. She was about to be married to George Jones, policeman. Susan Colwell sworn: - I knew BETSY HARRIS; she was in the habit of coming to my house. I was sent for to attend her in childbirth on Wednesday, at one o'clock. [Some parts of the evidence were unfit for publication.] Mr Fernie, surgeon, who had made a post mortem examination of the body of the infant, gave it as his opinion that it was still born. - Verdict accordingly.

MAMHEAD - Alleged Child Murder at Mamhead. - SUSAN PULLEN, servant, was indicted, and also charged by the Coroner's Inquisition, with having, on the 23rd November, wilfully murdered her new-born child, at Mamhead. They are were unfit for publication. The Jury, after a very brief consultation, returned a verdict of Not Guilty.

Thursday 9 January 1862
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday evening last, an Inquest was held at the 'Rising Inn,' Newport, in this Borough, before R. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Coroner, to inquire into the cause of death of JAMES JENKINS, labourer, whose body was found on Monday evening in the river, off Castle Quay, quite dead. The following evidence was adduced:-
ANN JENKINS, sworn:- the deceased was my father. He left home on Saturday, at 2 o'clock, and went toward Barnstaple. He was driving a hand-cart containing some spokes, which he said he should sell and purchase a hake with the proceeds. He was 59 years of age, and has of late been in his usual state of health. He was sober when he left home, but on the Friday night he was very drunk. I have not seen him alive since Saturday. His body was brought home last evening. He has left a widow and three sons and a daughter. I am the youngest of the family.
Richard Abbott, sworn:- I am a labourer, and knew the deceased; have known him for several years. Saw him last on Saturday evening, at half-past six, standing outside Mr Bentley's coal cellar, near the Castle Quay. I spoke to him, and from his manner I thought he had been drinking,. I left him standing on the flagging, and went into the cellar. I have often seen him drunk.
Mr John Parminter, sworn:- I am an innkeeper, and live in Barnstaple, where I keep the 'Elephant Inn,' in Paige's-lane. I knew the deceased, who came to my house on Saturday. He was not in the habit of visiting there, save occasionally to sell chips. He came in on Saturday afternoon, at three o'clock, called for half-a-pint of ale and I gave change against 6d. He remained half-an-hour and drank three or four half-pints. He left and came back three quarters of an hour after and called for another half-pint of ale, and gave a shilling in payment. He then drank four or five half-pints more and left at 6 o'clock. He was then got into a funny talking way. He was talking French or Irish or something of that king; he was not sober, but walked away very well.
Thomas Heard, sworn:- I am a sailor, of Sunderland, and belong to a vessel named the John and Ann, now lying at Castle Quay. Yesterday (Monday), at half-past four o'clock, I went over the side of the vessel and saw a body sticking out of the water which was six or seven inches deep. On going to it, I found the body of a man lying under the bile of the Abra. I called assistance and tried to get the body out, but could not, as the body was entirely under the vessel. We made a rode fast to a foot and when the vessel was sufficiently afloat to be listed, at half-past 10, we got the body out and put it into a boat and conveyed it to the South Walk slip, whence it was carried home on a plank.
A Juror remarked that some protection should be placed at the edge of the quays and wharves.
The Coroner said such a representation had been once or twice before made to the authorities. He suppose nothing would be done till a Town Councillor was drowned. However, if the Jury wished, he would write a letter to the Mayor and Council on the subject. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 16 January 1862
BARNSTAPLE - Death From Lock-Jaw. - Coroner's Inquest. An Inquest was held on Friday evening last, at the 'Stafford Arms,' Trinity Street, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq. (Borough Coroner), on the body of JOHN DOWN, a labourer, in the employ of Mr John D. Young, iron and brass founder and manure merchant, &c., who died that morning from the effects of an accident. The following witnesses were examined:- Thomas Reed sworn:- I am a brass finisher, and work for Mr Y9oung. I have known deceased for several years; he was in the habit of driving the engine which crushes bones in the manure manufactory. On Saturday last, I was in the office, at about half-past 10 o'clock in the morning, when deceased came in, and, showing me his hand, said "Here, Thomas, see what a job I have done." I looked at his hand and saw that the top of one of his fingers was torn off and that the others were much hurt. I asked him how he did it, and he said that, as he was greasing the engine (which he did while it was in motion, as he was in the habit of doing, and against which I had often cautioned him), his foot slipped and he, to save himself from falling, put forward his hands, which became entangled in the wheels, and thus the accident occurred. He did not seem to be at all melancholy on account of his misfortune, but, on the contrary, was cheerful and composed. I advised him to go to the Infirmary, and, fearing lest he should get faint on the road, I sent a young man named Thomas Jenkins to accompany him. Mr Cooke, sworn:- I am a surgeon residing in this borough. About three o'clock yesterday morning, I was sent for to attend the deceased, JOHN DOWN. I found that he had received an injury in the middle finger of his right hand. He was also suffering from rigidity of the muscles of the neck and inability to open his mouth, which I immediately recognised as symptoms of what is commonly called "lock-jaw." I administered a dose of medicine but with no effect. I visited him, in conjunction with Mr Ford, the house-surgeon of the Infirmary, at about 9 or 10 o'clock, when I found that the symptoms had increased. We attended him several times throughout the day and we attempted to administer chloroform but in vain. Deceased rapidly sunk and died this morning at half-past 6 o'clock. His death was occasioned by "lock-jaw." - Mr James Ford sworn:- On Saturday morning last deceased came to the Infirmary, at about 12 o'clock. I examined his hand and found that the middle finger was torn off. I dressed it in the usual way., He came to the Infirmary twice afterwards, to have his hand dressed, and on both occasions he fainted away, which shewed that he must have been very weak. I attended him with Mr Cooke, and saw from the first his was almost a hopeless case. The symptoms of "lock-jaw" became more aggravated every time we saw him. He died from exhaustion and partial suffocation, occasioned by the rigidity of the muscles of the neck. - Elizabeth Greenwood sworn:- I live in Belle Meadow, near to where the deceased used to live. I attended him from half-past 6 o'clock last evening until half past 6 this morning, when he died. During the night he suffered much, but retained his senses to the last, and appeared composed in his mind. - Verdict:- "Accidental Death." The Jury was a very respectable one, the Mayor being the foreman.

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On the afternoon of Tuesday last, an Inquest was held in the Council-room of the Guildhall, before R. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of our late respected and excellent townsman, MR CHARLES GRIBBLE, of Newport, whose melancholy and lamented decease we announce in another column.
A respectable Jury was impanelled, of which the Mayor was chosen foreman. The Jury having viewed the body, which was lying in the Grand Jury room of the Guildhall, the following evidence was taken:-
James Holloway sworn:- I am a cabinet maker, and was in the employ of the deceased as salesman at his Furnishing Bazaar: I have been in his service 23 years next April. I lived on the premises, Cross-street. I saw MR GRIBBLE this morning; he came to the warerooms at about a quarter to 10, as usual. I spoke to him; he appeared to be in his usual health, and did not complain of indisposition. I saw him transact business with Mr Keall He then told me that he was about to attend a meeting at the Guildhall, and left the warerooms at 12 o'clock, having previously given me instructions to attend a sale, to purchase a few things. He has for years complained of a difficulty of breathing, on his first coming in in the morning; but I do not know that he was suffering from any disease.
Dr Forester sworn:- I am a Doctor of Medicine, residing in Barnstaple. I was present at the Guildhall, this morning, and sat directly opposite the late MR GRIBBLE. At about half-past one the deceased, who was in the left-hand gallery, rose to address the meeting. He had not proceeded far with his remarks before I perceived his hat to drop from his right hand. this was preceded by a slight hesitation in his speech; he then became speechless, there was paralysis of the left side, and his jaw dropped. I remarked to a friend of mine (Mr Henry Gribble) that he was death-struck. I ran upstairs and saw persons bringing him into the jury room. His breathing has ceased; he was pale and pulseless. I suspected the cause of death and looked to the pupils of his eyes: that of the left was dilated to twice the size of that of the right eye, which was about its normal size; the right eyeball was slightly drawn outwards. There was some muscular spasm of the body generally. I believe that MR GRIBBLE died from asthenia or a total failure of the contractile power of the heart, sequent and dependent upon an effusion into the posterior and internal parts of the brain; such effusion being caused by the giving way of a blood vessel on the brain, the result of undue excitement.
The Mayor remarked that his friends had witnessed for the past five years a gradual decline of strength in the deceased, and that for a few days he had complained of pain in his head. Verdict - "Died by the Visitation of God." The Jury presented their fees to the North Devon Infirmary.

Thursday 13 February 1862
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - Accidental Death. An Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary on Monday morning last, by R. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of HENRY WILLIAMS, a mariner belonging to the schooner Nancy, of Hayle, Cornwall, who died from the effects of an accident which befell him at Ilfracombe, on that day week, the particulars of which were published in our last. The following evidence was given at the Inquest:- Richard Harry, of Hayle, Cornwall, master mariner, deposed:- I am master of the schooner Nancy, of Hayle aforesaid. The deceased, HENRY WILLIAMS, was my brother-in-law. He was an able seaman on board my said vessel. We came into Ilfracombe about ten days since, from Neath, and were lying in the harbour, wind bound. On Monday, the 3rd instant, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing on the deck of a vessel called the Jane, of Hayle, which was lying alongside of mine. The deceased came from my vessel on board the Jane, and went from thence to a vessel on the other side called the Stephen Knight; when, passing over the bow and down a ladder which was resting on the beach, he accidentally fell and broke his leg. He was taken directly to a public-house, on the Ilfracombe Quay, and two surgeons - namely, Mr Vye and Mr Stoneham - at once attended him. He was sent to this Infirmary, in a fly, the same night. I saw him here last Wednesday; he was quite sensible, and appeared to me to be progressing favourably.
Mr James Ford, house surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, deposed:- The deceased, HENRY WILLIAMS, was brought here last Tuesday morning, about one o'clock, in a close carriage, accompanied by Mr Edward Vye, of Ilfracombe, surgeon. On removing the splints which were round his right leg, I found a wound an inch in diameter half-an-inch above his inner ankle; blood was oozing from it and a large portion of the tibia was protruding. It was a bad compound comminuted fracture. Some splinters of the bone had been removed. I reduced the fracture, and put it in an apparatus. In the morning Mr Gamble saw him, and a portion of the bone which protruded was taken off. He appeared to be going on favourably until last Friday, when some unfavourable symptoms appeared; and the same night I saw gangrene had set in. A consultation of the medical officers was held, and it was decided not to amputate, in consequence of the prostrate state of his system. He gradually sank, and died on Saturday night last, at about twelve o'clock. His death was caused by mortification, the result of the injuries he had received to his leg as before described. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 February 1862
NORTHMOLTON - Inquest by Richard Bremridge, Esq. - On Thursday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Somerset Inn,' Northmolton, before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JOHN HERNAMAN, labourer, of that parish. Deceased had been an inmate of the union workhouse, and was for some time previously in a bad state of health. On the Tuesday his wife removed him from the union to her own house, at Northmolton, but the exertion was too much for him and he died soon after he got there. J. C. Cutcliffe, Esq., surgeon of the union, stated that deceased died from apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony; at the same time they stated their opinion that it was very wrong to allow his removal when he was so very ill and weak.

Thursday 6 March 1862
MEETH - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday, the 26th ult., an Inquest was held at Crocker's Hele, in the parish of Meeth, before George Doe, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of THOMAS BARKER, aged 17, farm servant to Mr Henry Abel, who met his death on Monday, the 24th ult., under circumstances detailed in the following evidence:- Robert Strang deposed:- I am a painter and glazier, residing at Hatherleigh. On Monday last, about noon, I was at work in the front of Crocker's Hele farm house, when I heard a cry which seemed to come from the barn. I heard a second and a third cry, and ran towards the thrashing machine which was worked partly by three horses and partly by water power. I saw the deceased, THOMAS BARKER, lying across the main bar of the machine, which is a portable one. I tried to stop the horses, but could not do so, being prevented by the power of the water, but at length one of the men in the barn turned it off. With the assistance of the men I took up the deceased, and carried him into the house, and a surgeon was immediately sent for. Henry Abel deposed:- I am a farmer, living at Crocker's Hele farm. On Monday last, shortly after 11 o'clock, deceased (who was a servant living in my house) began to drive the horses which were working a portable thrashing machine adjoining my barn. I was in the barn, feeding the machine, and after it had been working about two hours I found that it was not going well, and told a boy to see what was the matter. Just at that time Mr Strang called to them to turn off the water. We found the deceased lying as described by Mr Strang, and took him into the house and sent for a surgeon. We undressed him, and found a large wound on the left arm, and another on the right thigh. In about a quarter of an hour Mr Gould, surgeon, of Hatherleigh, came and examined the deceased, and, finding it a bad case, went back to Hatherleigh and brought Mr Truman, another surgeon, with him. They said that the arm and thigh were broken to pieces and that he was very much injured in other parts of the body. They bound up the parts injured but said they did not think he could live long. Deceased stated that he could not tell exactly how he got caught in the machine, but the arm of the machine carried him about three parts round. He was very restless and thirsty during the afternoon, and about nine o'clock in the evening he died quietly. The Jury having heard the evidence, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 13 March 1862
NORTHAM - Inquest by John Henry Toller, Esq., - An Inquest was held at Northam, on Tuesday last, on the body of JOHN LEMON, who had died suddenly on the previous Sunday evening. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had been suffering for some years from disease of the heart. Feeling unwell on Sunday evening, he took some medicine and went to bed; he had not been there long, however, before he rose in his bed and complained of being very ill. Mr Pratt, surgeon, was immediately sent for, but before that gentleman arrived he expired. The medical testimony went to show that deceased died from disease of the heart. - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 20 March 1862
SOUTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last an Inquest was held in Tout's Court, East-street, Southmolton, on the body of a little boy named SAMUEL TRAWIN, son of SAMUEL TRAWIN, jun., mason, who was dreadfully burnt, about a fortnight since, by his clothes taking fire during the temporary absence of his mother. The poor little fellow suffered very much until Sunday, when he died. - Verdict, "Died from bronchitis, accelerated by the burning he received."

Thursday 27 March 1862
Man Killed. - On the 6th inst., a man named GEORGE EDWARDS was killed in a claim at Burnt Creek, through the fall of a prop on his head, which was being lowered down at the time in a bag. An Inquest was held, when it appeared that the prop was being lowered in a bag in which there was a hole. The deceased had called out two or three times "pull up," lower away," hold on," and when the bag was down about fifteen feet, the prop fell through the hole, and right on the skull of the deceased, which it fractured, killing him almost instantaneously. The deceased was about twenty-five years of age, a native of Seaton, in Devonshire. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. - Marlborough Advertiser, January 10.

PLYMOUTH - Suicide of the Hon. CLARA MACKAY. - On Tuesday last an Inquest was held at 10, Windsor-terrace, Plymouth, the residence of the Right Hon. Lord Reay, a Scotch Peer, on his lordship's daughter, the Hon. CLARA MACKAY, aged 39, who committed suicide by throwing herself from her bed-room window, a height of 40 feet from the ground. The principal witness was his lordship's housekeeper, who deposed - "Last Thursday morning deceased told me she felt very much grieved in her mind, but she would not tell me why. On Monday morning I took her breakfast to her in her bed-room, which is on the fourth storey, and she then told me she would take it, as it was her papa's wish, but that she did not want it. About a quarter past 11, I again went into her room to look for a key belonging to his lordship's wardrobe. She asked me what I was looking for, and on my replying, said, "Whatever you want to get, you know where it all is, for I shall not be with you long." I did not find the key, and left the room, Lady Reay's bell having been rung. The window was then up. Deceased had lifted it while I was there. In about five minutes I was alarmed by the cries of the cook, and on going down I saw deceased the quite senseless in the kitchen, where she had been brought by the other servants. I had received directions from Lord Raey and deceased's sister to be very attentive to the deceased. I heard that she was in an asylum before I came to live here. Since last Thursday I have seen her crying at times, and walking about the room rubbing her hands, and seeming very much distressed. She was a pious and religious woman, and the attachment between herself and parents was mutual. When she said, 'I shall not be with you long,' it was not spoken as if she was in her senses I can swear that, so far as I can judge, she was not in her senses when I left the room. On Saturday night last she said to me, 'I know, Emma, you are a good girl, and I hope you will never have in your minds the thoughts that I have in mine. I have not bodily sickness, but it is in my conscience, and I keep on grieving.' She cried a good deal, and put her hands to her head. She was then in a very melancholy state. After hearing some further evidence, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide while in a fit of Temporary Insanity.

KNOWSTONE - Suicide. - On Monday last, a man about 50 years of age, named JOHN TUTES, committed suicide by hanging himself. He had been detected a few days previously committing an unnatural offence and he was warned that he had better leave the neighbourhood. An Inquest was held on the body by John Henry Toller, Esq., when the Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity."

MERTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the house of JOHN WADLAND, labourer, touching the death of his daughter, aged five years, who in the temporary absence of her mother ignited her dress and sustained such severe injuries as to cause her death in three days. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 April 1862
EXETER - Fatal Boiler Accident. - An Inquest was held at the 'Blue Boar Inn,' Magdalen-street, Exeter, before H. W. Hooper, Esq., on Saturday, on the body of MARY ELIZABETH COLEMAN, aged eleven years, who had died at the Hospital on the previous evening in consequence of scalds received that afternoon through a disruption of the boiler of the engine working the printing machine at the Western Times office. Shortly after one o'clock on Friday the deceased, who is the daughter of the parish clerk of St. Olave's, went to the office with her brother's dinner, and as the machine was not at work they sat down in front of the fire. Presently Solomon Govier, a printer, heard a slight noise in the engine-room, and a boy came to the window between it and the machine-room, crying "Let me out." The boy being released ran out in front. Then Govier heard the girl crying "Oh kill me, kill me!" He groped his way through the dense steam to the front of the boiler, where the girl was lying amid the ashes and boiling water, and carried her out. she was taken to the Hospital, and lingered until about eight o'clock in great agony, when she died from the injuries and shock to the system. The stoker and a boy were also so scalded as to be obliged to go to the Hospital and two boys were slightly injured. The boiler, which is drum-shaped, was erected in 1846, and had been examined periodically; the last time in December 1861, when Mr A. Bodley, the engineer, reported it to be in fair working condition. After the accident he discovered a narrow fissure, describing the arc of a circle, of about twenty inches in length on the lower part of the head of the boiler, close about the rivits which fastened the angle irons, through which all the water had escaped. There the expansion and contraction had worn the metal from the thickness of 1 ½ inches to ¼ of an inch. The stoker observed the water dropping into the fire on the Thursday night, and told the foreman and the machine man of it. On the Friday about noon the three examined the boiler; the last-named saw water dripping for two minutes, but as it stopped then, he thought it an escape from a pipe. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," entirely exonerating everyone concerned from blame.

BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - This morning (Wednesday) a painful instance of the uncertainty of life occurred at the residence of Mrs Harkness, grocer, of this town. For some time past, WILLIAM HEWETT, Esq., and his lady, have (since their removal from Warmington Hill), resided with Mrs Harkness. Last night the lady and gentleman retired to rest as usual. On awaking, however, MR HEWETT was horrified to find his wife dead by his side. An Inquest was held this day (Thursday) when a verdict was returned of "Died by the Visitation of God."

HOLSWORTHY - A Child Murdered By Its Mother At Tetcott. Coroner's Inquest And Committal Of The Prisoner For Wilful Murder. On Friday last (28th March), an Inquest was held before H. A. Vallack, Esq., County Coroner, at Fernhill, in the parish of Tetcott, on the body of RICHARD HOCKIN, aged 20 months, illegitimate child of MARTHA HOCKIN, single woman, then in custody of the police charged with having wilfully murdered her said child on the previous day. The following witnesses were examined:-
Ann Oxenham, deposed:- I am the wife of James Oxenham, of the parish of Tetcott, farm labourer. On Wednesday last, 26th March, about nine o'clock at night, MARIA HOCKIN came to my house, having her son, RICHARD HOCKIN, with her; the child is about twenty months old. She asked for William Headon, who lived next door, and I told her that I would go and call him. About 10 o'clock, William Headon came in, and then I went upstairs and left him and MARTHA HOCKIN and her child in my kitchen. About eleven o'clock William Headon left, and then prisoner told me that he had promised to maintain the child, meaning the one she was then pregnant with. She was in very deep trouble, and told me she had taken nothing to eat or drink since the morning. I gave her some tea, some bacon, and bread and butter. About twelve o'clock she rose up to go, and as I was about to go to bed she said, "Will you lend me a stool, and let me sit in your porch till daylight?" I replied "Yes," and gave her a stool. I then went to bed, leaving her sitting in the porch, with her boy in her arms, wrapped up in her mantle. We wished each other good night, and she added with much grief, and appeared very low, "If twasn't for this dear little baby I should not care." Then I left her, and went to bed. The next morning, about seven o'clock, I saw her a short distance from my house; she had her child in her arms, and was screaming. I went to her, and found her sitting on the bank with the child in her lap. The child's clothes looked very wet; it was dead. She exclaimed, "I've drowned my child; do kill me." I had never spoken to MARTHA HOCKEN before the Wednesday night; she was a stranger to me. William Headon and the prisoner were lovers.
John Shephard Beer, of Tetcott, farm labourer, deposed:- Yesterday, 27th March inst., about six o'clock in the morning, whilst in my bedroom, I heard a noise like some one screaming, as if in great grief. I dressed myself as soon as possible, and went towards the sounds, and found that it was MARTHA HOCKIN. She was by the orchard gate, about seven landyards from my house. She was sitting on the bank holding the dead body of her child in her arms on her lap. The child's clothes were wet, and he was dead. The hair of the child was dry. Before I got to her, where she was sitting forward, she continued saying, "Do kill me! I've killed my baby! I've drowned it! I've drowned it!" I asked her where she did it? She didn't then say where, but afterwards, when several persons were gathered round her, she said, "I drowned him in Lana Lake; I've no friend on earth." Lana Lake is about half a mile from this house, in the parish of Tetcott. She also said, "My father, brothers, and sister passed me in Holsworthy on Wednesday last, smiled at me, and passed me."
Thomas Pearce, Esq., of Holsworthy, surgeon, deposed:- I know MARTHA HOCKIN, who is now in custody of the police. On the 11th of July, 1860, I delivered her of a male bastard child, and have since then attended her in sickness. I know that the child now viewed by the Coroner and Jury is the prisoner's child. yesterday, the 27th of March instant, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the body of the deceased in this house. I observed no marks of violence whatever. I have today made a post mortem examination of the body, and found considerable congestion of the lungs. The pericardium contained bloody fluid; no coagulum in the heart. The stomach contained about four ounces of water, and I could not detect any food. The viscera was healthy. I have no possible doubt that drowning and suffocation was the cause of death. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against the prisoner, MARTHA HOCKIN, who was committed under the Coroner's warrant to take her trial at the next Assizes at Exeter.

Thursday 10 April 1862
BIDEFORD - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Town Hall, on the body of ELIZABETH CATHERINE HEWETT, of Bridge-street, who was found dead in her bed on Wednesday morning last. A very respectable Jury having been sworn (Mr W. P. Sanders, foreman) they proceeded to view the body; after which the following evidence was taken:-
WILLIAM WHALLEY HEWETT (Brother-in-law to deceased) deposed that he had known the deceased for about 20 years - ever since she was married to his brother; he last saw her alive about half-past ten on Tuesday night last; she was not then in good health; he had seen her at five o'clock the same afternoon, when he did not notice anything the matter with her; he did not consider her an invalid; she was very ill at half-past ten, when he believed it was a fit she had, but she got much better afterwards; she was in bed; apparently asleep, when he left; he thought she was in a fit because of her rolling her eyes and being insensible; she knew him all through the attack; he tried to give her some water, but she apparently could not swallow; he had never seen her so bad before, but she had been unwell previously; he was not aware that she had had similar attacks before; his brother went to bed about half-past ten, when he thought she was much better; his wife and others assisted in putting the deceased to bed, she went to sleep immediately; they were about to send for Mr Ackland, but, finding she was better, they did not do so; she did not take anything while she was in the state he had described; he was not aware from his own knowledge that she had taken anything whatever; he had an idea that when she had laid down for an hour or two she would be all right. He was called out at half-past four the next morning, when Mrs Harkness came and told him MRS HEWETT was dead; he immediately went to the house, and found her chest and arms quite warm; his brother said he discovered she was dead by feeling her hands cold; there was a night light burning in the room; they at once sent for Mr Hogg, Mr Turner and Mr Ackland; Mr Hogg rubbed something on her feet, but nothing was administered to her by the mouth, that he saw.
Mr W. H. Ackland, surgeon, last saw the deceased alive on Tuesday at noon, when he visited her husband; she was not under his immediate care. He was sent for to MR HEWETT a short time since, and till that time he had not seen her since she left Warmington Hill, and he could not help remarking what an alteration had taken place in her during the last few months. He last attended the deceased in August, 1861; she was then suffering from epilepsy. Not having attended the deceased, for some time past, but, taking into consideration the strong predisposition she had to epilepsy, he had not the least hesitation in saying that death ensued from disease of the brain. He ascribed her death to apoplexy, consequent upon softening of the brain; he considered that she had been dead about four hours when he saw her. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

BROADWOODWIDGER - Death By Drowning. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held at Nethercott, in the above parish, before H. A. Vallack, Esw., County Coroner, on the bodies of BETSY ROCKEY, aged 11 years, and JOHN HENRY ROCKEY, aged 5 ½ years, daughter and son of MR JOHN ROCKEY, of the above place, yeoman, who were drowned on Wednesday, the 2nd instant. It appeared from the evidence, that on the evening of the above day about 6 o'clock, the two deceased children were returning home, having been feeding some lambs, in company with their two sisters and a brother. On their way back, one of the children, a little girl, named HARRIET, expressed a wish to go and see the water in the river, which had become high with the recent flood. The eldest sister (CHARITY) said she would go with her, and they and the other children, accordingly went. They had not been there long, before HARRIET and the two deceased children crossed the river upon a wooden bridge, which crosses the river, where it runs across the highway at the bottom of one of MR ROCKEY'S meadow, about a quarter of a mile from the house. On their returning back again over the bridge, HARRIET was in front, and she got over safely. The two deceased were in the middle of the bridge when the little boy slipped, and fell into the water on the lower side of the bridge; his sister (BETSY) gave one agonizing scream, and jumped in to try to save her brother. The other brother seeing what had happened, also jumped in to try to get hold of them, but the water being four or five feet deep and running very fast, the bodies of the two deceased disappeared almost immediately. The eldest sister then ran to a shallow part of the river in the meadow, in the hopes of getting hold of them there, but could see nothing of them. About four hours afterwards, the body of the little boy was found in the water by a miller, named George Taylor, and on the following morning, the body of the deceased girl was found by a man named James Lugger. At the close of the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 17 April 1862
SOUTHMOLTON - Suicide. - Coroner's Inquest. On Monday last, an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., on the body of MARY TRAWIN, relict of the late JOHN TRAWIN, woolcomber, aged about 60, who was found drowned the preceding morning in the river Mole, near Parkhouse. It appeared that she had been for some time subject to fits of insanity, and had when thus afflicted threatened to destroy herself, stating that she should e found if missed near Parkhouse Bridge. She left her home on Saturday night, about nine o'clock, and was found about six the next morning. Verdict - "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 24 April 1862
DARTMOUTH - Fatal Accident at Dartmouth - We have t record the melancholy intelligence of the death of MR JOSEPH JAGO, who was drowned in Dartmouth harbour on the evening of the 17th inst. Deceased was a sworn weigher, appointed by the corporation, and also had pretty much to do with the navigating of vessel sup and down the river. An Inquest was held on the body on the following Saturday, before J. M. Puddicombe, Esq., Coroner for the Borough. In the course of the evidence it was stated that only half-an-hour previous to the catastrophe, deceased asked the assistance of a man named Wollaton to help him into his boat, as he felt a giddiness in his head. This Wollaton did, and, further, wanted to go with him, as he fancied something was the matter with him. Deceased, however, refused any other assistance, thanked the man, and said he was all right again,. Shortly afterwards his body was discovered lying across the moorings of his boat. It is supposed he must have been seized with paralysis while in the act of mooring his boat. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Saturday morning an Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, before R. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a Jury of which the Mayor was foreman, touching the death of JOSEPH NEWCOMBE, there lying dead. The Jury having been impanneled proceeded to view the body, and on their return the following evidence was taken:- John Squire sworn:- I am 16 years of age. My father is ostler at the '[Horse and Groom' public house. I occasionally assist him. On Thursday night, at half-past eight o'clock, I went there to assist in cleaning the yard. At nine o'clock my father left the deceased and myself to deliver the horses. The deceased was employed by my father to assist him on Fridays. The deceased looked into the parlour, and then came to me and said, "They are in there, drinking; we'll take out the horses and ride them up and down a little, till they come out." There were then only two horses left in the stable. We then took them out, and I mounted one and deceased the other. He trotted till he came to Vicarage-street; then he cantered till he came to the 'Mermaid,' when his horse broke into a gallop. I followed, because I could not keep back my horse. Deceased was some short distance ahead of me. He appeared to pull the horse round, just opposite the manure stores, and fell off. My horse stopped, and I got off and saw the horse in the middle of the road, standing on three legs - the boy was off, so was the saddle. I spoke to deceased but he did not answer me. I found him lying near the tree with his feet in the stirrup iron and the saddle under him. The horse deceased rose was blind in the off eye. A young man came up, and said the horse's leg was broken (the near hind leg); and I went for assistance. I returned and saw persons taking the deceased to the Infirmary. The injured horse was the property of Mr John Pyke, of Highbickington, yeoman. John Kiefft sworn:- I live at Pilton; am a labourer, working at the paper mill. I was in the North Walk at half-past nine on Thursday night, when I heard a horse coming down the road, at a rapid rate. I immediately heard a crash - the horse fell and threw its rider against a tree of the railing of the Walk. I ran to the spot, and found the horse standing on three legs in the middle of the road. I looked about for the rider and found him lying inside the Walk; the saddle was hanging to his foot; the girths of the saddle were broken. I spoke to the deceased, who did not reply; his head and face were covered with blood. I assisted in taking him to the Infirmary, on a door. I did not leave him from the time of the accident till I had seen him delivered to the officers of the Infirmary. James Burrows, private of the Royal Marines, gave similar testimony. - Mr James Ford, house surgeon of the North Devon Infirmary, sworn:- The deceased was brought to this infirmary at half-past nine on Thursday night. I examined him; found his head and face covered with blood. He was perfectly unconscious. Both pupils were dilated and insensible to light. Blood was flowing freely from the right ear and also the nose. I found no scalp wound or external fracture. The only injury I could discover was a slight bruise over the right eye. We got him into bed, endeavoured to restore the heat of the body, but he never rallied but died three hours after. I am of opinion that death was occasioned by fracture of the base of the skull with effusion of blood within the cranium. The deceased was about 18 years of age. The Coroner shortly summed up, reprehending the practice of lads taking out persons' horses and riding them in a reckless manner. The Mayor referred to the careless conduct of ostlers and innkeepers, who permitted mere children to ride horses and drive carts at a rapid rate through the streets on market days. Mr Ford said a similar case of accident occurred on Wednesday, to a boy belonging to Pilton, though not so severe in its character. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death." The Jury gave their fees to the widowed mother of the deceased.

Thursday 1 May 1862
PILTON - Deaths By Drowning. - On Wednesday last (yesterday) an Inquest was held at the 'Rolle's Quay Inn,' in the parish of Pilton, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, touching the deaths of HENRY LIST GAYDON, 10 years of age, son of MR ROBERT GAYDON, paper manufacturer of Pilton, and THOMAS HARTNOLL, aged 11 years, son of MR THOMAS HARTNOLL, joiner, formerly of Pilton, now of London.
The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner remarked that, as a question had arisen, he wished to state that the bodies were landed at Pottington (without the borough of Barnstaple); therefore it became his duty to hold the Inquest. The bodies had been improperly removed from the county into the borough; and he should, if they desired it, though a painful duty, order them to be brought back again to the county. He had received a letter from Mr Incledon Bencraft, the Borough Coroner, pointing out that the Inquiry should be held by him (by the 6 and 7 Vic., chapter 12), as the bodies were lying dead in the borough. He (Mr B.) considered it his duty to hold the Inquest - the Act 6 and 7 Vic., cap. 12, sec. 2, stating that "the inquest shall be holden only by the Coroner having jurisdiction in the place where the body shall be brought to land."
Mr Bencraft protested against Mr Bremridge's holding the Inquest within his jurisdiction. The learned Coroner then proceeded.
Frederick Tanner, a little boy, sworn:- I know the deceased. I went with them to Pottington at 6 o'clock last evening. HENRY LIST GAYDON and THOMAS HARTNOLL went there for the purpose of bathing. GAYDON first went into the water. He did not go out far, but after two or three minutes he appeared to be drowning, and HARTNOLL went out to save him. Both sank together -there was no one near to save them. I then went for assistance. I met my brother, William Tanner, who is older than me, and a boy named Pedler. Other persons came to search for the bodies. The Coroner then invited the Jury to accompany him to view the bodies, which were lying at the houses of their parents, at Pilton. Mr Bencraft again protested, that neither the Coroner nor his Jury had power to view any bodies lying within the boundaries of the borough. The Coroner had received Mr Bencraft's protest, and would hereafter join him in getting a decision on the point from the Court of Queen's Bench; but at present he should proceed with his duty.
John Ridd sworn:- I am a wood turner, and live in Pilton. Last night, at 8 o'clock, I was informed that HENRY LIST GAYDON and THOMAS HARTNOLL were drowned. I went to Pottington to search for the bodies in the river Taw. I waited for some time till the tide had receded. I then took a light, and with George beer and ROBERT GAYDON, the father of the deceased, searched along the river's edge, and at about 11 o'clock I found the body of the boy GAYDON lying between two large clods of mud in the tide way, on the beach, about 8 feet from the green sward. The left hand was in the water. George Beer, smith, of Rolle's Quay, Pilton, confirmed this testimony. William Youatt, fisherman, of Potter's-lane, Barnstaple, sworn:- I was informed last evening that two boys had been drowned off Pottington. I went for the drags and dragged the river, but did not succeed in finding either of the bodies. Afterwards I was present when the body of HENRY LIST GAYDON was found. This morning I renewed the search for the body of THOMAS HARTNOLL. I found it outside Pottington wall- beyond the point, in the water of the river Taw. The Jury returned a verdict in each case of "Accidental Drowned in the river Taw."

Thursday 8 May 1862
ILFRACOMBE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday last an Inquest was held by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the 'George and Dragon' public house, in this town, to inquire into the cause of death of JOHN LOOSEMORE, there lying dead. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, who was rather eccentric, had lived a dissolute life and had been accustomed for five years to sleep in a loft over a piggery at the rear of the public house. He was frequently intoxicated, and on Sunday evening at six o'clock, when he was last seen alive, he was under the influence of drink. At nine o'clock the landlady went out to feed her pigs, and discovered that LOOSEMORE had fallen down from the loft and that he was dead. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, was called in, and found an extensive laceration of the scalp, such as would result from a fall. It was his opinion that death was the result of extravasation and concussion of the brain. - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 15 May 1862
CLAWTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last an Inquest was held before H. A. Vallack, Esq.; at the 'Dolphin Inn,' Clawton, on the body of a new-born female child, found buried in an orchard there, on the 9th instant. It appeared, from the evidence, that on the morning of the above day, Frederick J. Jennings, police-constable at Clawton, having suspicion that MARY ANN BASKERVILLE, a widow woman with whom he had lodged for upwards of twelvemonths, had given birth to a child, he searched an orchard adjoining her house, and in her possession, where he found the body of a newly-born female child, buried about a foot deep and quite concealed from view, wrapped up in a brown holland apron. The body was at once removed to the above inn and information given to Mr Sargeant, superintendent of police at Holsworthy, who proceeded to the inn, and, having seen the body, went to the prisoner's house, and charged her with having concealed the birth of the infant found buried in her orchard. She at first denied that it was her child, and then partly fainted, but on recovering said, "What will become of my poor children?" The prisoner was afterwards taken to the house of Susan Hill, wife of William Hill, P.C., of Holsworthy, who examined her and told her that she had recently been delivered of a child. Prisoner then said, "I don't deny but that I had a child; but it was dead when it was born. It was in the night, or else I should have called some person. If it had not been dead, I should not have killed it." The medical evidence was to the following effect:- Mr Thomas Pearce, a legally qualified medical practitioner, residing at Holsworthy, deposed:- On Friday last, the 9th instant, at the request of the superintendent of police, I examined the body of the newly-born female child, now viewed by the Coroner and Jury. It appeared a full-grown child. The umbilical cord was broken, not secured by ligatures in the usual manner; the child appeared free from injury externally; the scalp was of a livid appearance; the body appeared natural in every respect, and I thought the child had been possibly born alive. I have today examined the body again. There are no marks of violence appearing. I have made a post mortem examination. The general appearance of the viscera was healthy; the lungs floated in water; the stomach was empty, without the slightest appearance of any food; the cavities of the heart empty, dark-coloured blood in jugular veins. I divided the windpipe and in the larynx or upper part of the windpipe I found what I now produce, which seems to be a portion of grass and straw, of the same description as a heap of dung in the orchard, but the side of the pit where the body was found. If the child had been born alive, the grass and straw I found would have been sufficient to have caused suffocation and death, but there was no appearance in the lungs or otherwise to indicate suffocation. I think the child was born alive, and might have died from the irritation caused by the grass and straw in the larynx. There was no congestion in the lungs. I think it had been born four or five days before I first saw it; it was then discoloured, and if it had been opened I think the carbonic acid gas in the lungs would have caused them to float. Mr Thomas L. Ash, of Holsworthy, surgeon, corroborated the evidence of Mr Pearce. The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned the following verdict: "That the said female child was buried and concealed by the said MARY ANN BASKERVILLE, but how or by what means the said child came to her death, no evidence thereof doth appear.

Thursday 29 May 1862
HARTLAND - Accidental Death. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held at the dwelling house of Mr William Oke, yeoman, in this parish, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, to inquire into the cause and circumstances attending the death of JOSEPH HOWARD, whose death resulted from accident on the Tuesday previous. The facts will be gathered from the following evidence: - Thomas Jeffery deposed:- I knew the deceased, JOSEPH HOWARD. He was a labourer, and was about 70 years of age. On Tuesday morning last about eight o'clock, being at work at Southall Farm, in the parish of Hartland, I heard a noise as if a wall had fallen down, and someone cry out. Daniel Oke, of Southall Farm, was with me at the time. We went to the spot and found that a cob wall had fallen down, and JOSEPH HOWARD underneath the debris. His legs and a part of his body were covered. He said - "Take it off my legs." We took it off in a minute, and saw that his right leg was broken. We helped him into his house, took him upstairs, and helped to undress him and put him to bed. A medical man was sent for. After we had taken off his clothes we saw that his other leg was broken. He complained also of having a pain in his stomach. Mr R. R. G. Thomas deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Hartland. On Tuesday morning, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock, Mr Oke's son rode up to my door, and informed me that JOSEPH HOWARD had broken his right leg by the fall of an old cob wall, and requested me to come out directly to see him, which I did as soon as possible. I found him lying in bed with his stockings on. These I cut off and found a compound communuted fracture upon both bones of his right leg, and a compound fracture of the large bone of the left, just below the knee joint. I questioned him and found him very low and exhausted, with the pulse very feeble, and I decided on sending for another medical man before I proceeded to reduce the fractures of the legs. I administered a little nourishment and waited the arrival of Mr Carter, surgeon, of Hartland town, whom I had sent for. We consulted together and proposed to return the bones into the places. To do this we found it necessary to amputate one inch of the bones of the right leg and about half-an-inch of the large bone of the left leg, when we were able to set the bones of the legs. We thought him in a very dangerous state. We gave him a little brandy and water, ordered the overseer to provide him with necessaries, and left him. He complained of great pain over the whole region of the abdomen, and over the small of the back. After taking the brandy and water he vomited, which is always a bad sign. Everything was done for him that we could possibly suggest, both by the kindness of his neighbours, and our own directions; but he died from exhaustion in a collapsed state about 11 o'clock on the same night from the injuries he had received from the fall of the cob wall. Everything was done for him that could possibly be done up to the time of his death. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 12 June 1862
EXETER - Suicide of a Gentleman By Poison, at Exeter. - The Deputy Coroner of the City of Exeter (H. D. Barton, Esq.), held an Inquest at the 'New London Inn,' on the body of MR JOHN BLUNDEN STRONG of Sidmouth. On Tuesday afternoon he arrived at the 'New London Inn,' where he was well known, by the Sidmouth mail cart; he left the hotel shortly after, and returned again at about 10.30. He went to the coffee-room, where he was seen by Robert Hanaford, a waiter, to sit for some time apparently reading the direction of a letter or card. He went to bed about eleven o'clock; he had been to bed about twenty minutes, when the waiter went to his bed-room and found the room in darkness. The next morning the boots found deceased's boots outside his door, he cleaned them and returned them. About two o'clock the boots was requested by the chambermaid to go to his bedroom and awaken the deceased; he knocked, but receiving no answer opened the door and went in. Deceased was lying on his back, his arm outside the bed-clothes. Witness felt him, he was cold and dead; he immediately went to Mr Pratt, had a surgeon called, despatching a messenger on horseback to Sidmouth, to deceased's friends, and ordering the clerk, Mr Thomas Hambley, to lock deceased's bedroom door. Mr Wilson Caird, surgeon, arrived and viewed the body, found no marks of violence on the person, and from appearances he thought deceased had taken poison. He immediately searched the room, and on the dressing table he found a leather and linen cap, such as it used to cover the tops of bottles with stoppers, and on the bed-steps he found a tumbler containing a blue phial bottle, in which were from 30 to 40- drops of Prussic acid. On the deceased, when searched by Mr Thomas Hambley, were three letters, one addressed to R. Wreford, Esq., solicitor, Exeter, and £1 5s. 3d. in money. Mr Wreford and the deceased had been school-fellows, and he confided to Mr Wreford many of his transactions. The deceased has of late years been in very embarrassed circumstances, having spent a considerable fortune of his own, and the greater portion of his late wife's. He was expecting, at the death of a cousin, a considerable amount of property; but the cousin recently died and left the property to two aunts. This disappointment is said to have been the cause of his destroying himself. He had often been heard by Mr Wreford to say he would destroy himself if he had the pluck. The deceased has two sons in New Zealand and one in England. He has himself been in New Zealand, and when there he was confined in an asylum. The Jury, after a consultation of twenty minutes, returned a verdict "That deceased destroyed himself whilst in an Unsound Stat e of Mined."

Thursday 19 June 1862
GEORGEHAM - Suicide. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Georgeham, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of JAMES SANDERS, of Marwood, who committed suicide by hanging himself in his bedroom on the day preceding. The deceased was 72 years of age, and had for a long time been in an excited state, requiring to be watched by his family. He had been staying at the house of his son, JAMES SANDERS, of Georgeham; and on the Friday afternoon, professing himself to be drowsy, he retired to bed. He was subsequently visited by his son, and at three o'clock was discovered to be suspended by a handkerchief from the roof of the bed. He was instantly cut down, but life was extinct. - Verdict, "Hanged himself, being of Unsound Mind."

Thursday 26 June 1862
BUCKLAND MONACHORUM - Suicide of a Supposed Murderer. - BENJAMIN CORBER, of Milton, in the parish of Buckland Monachorum, committed suicide by hanging himself on Thursday. The greater interest is attached to this event from the deceased having on several occasions been before the public in connection with a horrible murder which was committed at Milton, on Saturday, the 30th October, 1852. Up to the 29th of October, 1852, there had lived in the village of Milton a widow woman, named Mary White, who was 65 years of age. She had formerly in conjunction with her son, carried on a grist mill at Milton, but the son having married, differences arose that eventually led to a separation. The son continued in the mill, and the mother went to reside in a cottage near, and opened a general shop, on a small scale. This shop she kept up to the time of the murder. At that time she was supposed to have some £12 or £15 in the house. On the evening of the 29th, she was seen by a person who visited the shop to purchase some small article. On the following morning, in consequence of her window shutters not having been taken down, the neighbours became alarmed, and after unsuccessfully trying the door, BENJAMIN CORBER, a small farmer and pork butcher, who lived near, and was, we believe, some connection of Mrs White's, obtained a ladder, and on looking in through the window saw the body of the old woman on the bed, which was much stained with blood. On going in, it was found that her head had been all but separated from the body, being attached simply by a bit of skin at the back of the neck. There was no evidence of anything having been taken from the room, but the £12 or %15 the old woman was supposed to have had was not to be found. Some small silver money was in its proper place, and a basket containing some silver spoons was undisturbed. The first suspicion certainly pointed towards John White, the son, who had been on bad terms with his mother, and who on bringing the chief of the police at Tavistock acquainted with the fact said there was "a woman," or "an old woman with her throat cut at Milton." The Coroner's Inquest after an adjournment, resulted in a verdict of "Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown." - In consequence of Grace Worthley, who lived at Milton, stating that her husband saw CORBER go to Mrs White's house at about two o'clock on the morning of the murder, CORBER was on the 2nd of Dec. apprehended, and, after several hearings before the magistrates, he was committed for trial on the charge of wilful murder. Another ground for suspicion against him was the statement of a Mrs Beer that MRS CORBER had said her husband was absent from his home two hours on this night; though Mrs Beer, on examination, denied having made this statement. Another ground of suspicion against him was that, on the 2nd of November, the Tuesday after the Saturday of the murder, he paid to the Messrs. Eastlake £10 for rent, due to the Rev. George Hunt, although he was not known to have had anything like that sum a few days before the murder. At the spring assizes of 1853, for the County of Devon, the bill against CORBER was thrown out, and he returned to his home at Milton, where he has ever since continued to reside. On the 26th of October, last year, a man Holwill, a leading stoker on board H.M.S. Indus, came before the magistrate at Stonehouse, and stated that in August 1860, when at Rio Janeiro, a man named Robins, a miner, told him that he murdered old Mary White, at Milton, in Buckland, and that CORBER was wrongfully accused of the murder. Robins said he did the murder, and took away £75 from the house. Holwill said when Robins told this he was apparently sober, and he evidently knew the neighbourhood very well. When Holwill began to question him as to his connections in the neighbourhood he refused to say any more, and the next time he saw him he pretended not to be able to speak English. Before leaving Rio, Holwill learnt that Robins had hung himself. CORBER'S sister interested herself to have Holwill's statement made public. Prior to this there had been several stories about the murder, but they had all left the affair just as mysterious as it was before. There were not wanting persons who continued to suspect that CORBER and his companion, on the night the 29th Oct., knew more about the murder than they would like any other person to imagine. BENJAMIN CORBER, however, continued to carry on his farm, and his butchering, and latterly he has added to that a drinking house for the sale of cider, if not beer. It is said that he was sometimes reminded of the murder of Mrs White, in a way he did not like, by boon companions, and there is a story afloat in Plymouth that an instance of this kind happened no longer ago than Thursday night, when he protested his own innocence, and hoped that the flesh would drop off his hand if he did it, and he hoped the man who killed the old lady would be hanged. If guiltless, circumstances were against him, and that he was certainly to be pitied. That his life was unhappy was evident to those who knew him, and it is stated that he has been more unhappy and low-spirited than usual lately, and that his habit of occasional indulgence in intemperate drinking made him worse, and the finale is that on Thursday morning he got up and milked his cows (a task, by the bye, that had devolved for some time before her death on the murdered woman), and shortly afterwards he was found by his son, a boy, hanging by the neck in an out-house on his premises quite dead. Mr Bone, the Coroner, was communicated with, and he has directed an Inquest to be holden, at Milton. Mr Bone held the Inquest on Mary White, ten years ago. CORBER is not thought to have left any confession of his guilt or protestation of innocence with reference to the murder.

Thursday 10 July 1862
BISHOPS TAWTON - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, at Lee Farm, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of ELIZA ANN GENT, daughter of MR JOHN GENT, yeoman. The following evidence was adduced:- MR JOHN GENT sworn:- I am a farmer, and live at Lee Farm, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton. The deceased was my child, and was five years and a half old. Last evening, about half-past six o'clock, I was thatching a hay-rick. About five landyards from the rick there was a cart shed, underneath which there was a cart, or butt, and five of my children were there at play. All at once I heard the children scream out and the butt fall. I ran to the spot with a boy who was with me, and found one side of the butt resting upon the right side of the head of the deceased. The face was upon the ground. We instantly lifted up the butt, took up the child, and found it was perfectly insensible. I immediately sent for a medical man, and in the meantime the head of the child was kept up, and the temples bathed with warm water. Some blood came from the nose and mouth. The medical man came from Barnstaple about a quarter before eight o'clock. The child died about a quarter before ten o'clock last evening. Mr Joseph Harper, sworn:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Barnstaple. At seven o'clock last evening I received a message to go to Lee Farm, where an accident had happened. I immediately went, and when I got to the house I found the father sitting with the child upon his lap. I examined the child, and found she was quite insensible, with blood issuing from both nostrils, breathing very hard and noisy. The surface of the body was quite cold, and the pulse weak and irregular. On the right side, behind the ear, there was a large swelling of the size of a hen's egg. There was some swelling also on the back of the head. Over the left temple there was a large bruise. The left eye was swollen and very black. There was also some swelling on the left cheek. I cut off the hair round the bruised places, and applied some cold lotion, and had the child removed to bed and undressed, put two mustard poultices to the calves of the legs, a warm jar to her feet, and covered her up warm. Her breathing still became worse, a bloody froth came from her mouth, she had several slight convulsions, and she died at a quarter before ten o'clock last evening, of compression of the brain, produced by a fracture of the right side of the skull. The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

SOUTHMOLTON - Fatal Accident. - On Tuesday evening, the 1st inst., as WILLIAM HOSKINGS, aged 56, colt breaker, of this town, was returning from Chittlehampton Fair, he was thrown from his horse near Bray Mills, in the latter parish. He received a severe fracture of the skull and a concussion of the brain by the fall. He was taken home in a cart, where he remained in an unconscious state until Saturday morning, when he expired. An Inquest was held on the body the same afternoon, before James Flexman, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

Thursday 24 July 1862
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest by John Henry Toller, Esq. - On Tuesday last the learned Coroner held an Inquest on the body of FRANCES BRAILEY, an aged woman, who, while on a temporary visit to the house of a neighbour, suddenly fell off the chair on which she was sitting and instantly expired. The medical gentleman who was called in (Mr Foquet) gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from the rupture of a blood-vessel of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

SIDMOUTH - Suicide at Sidmouth. - MARY ANN BOWDEN, a cook in the service of Mrs Hopkins, Fort Field Terrace, committed suicide on Saturday, by hanging herself to the bed-post. It appears that the lady's sideboard containing spirits had been broken open during her absence on Friday, and the deceased had been suspected of the crime. On Monday a Coroner's Inquest found a verdict of Felo de se. The Coroner, Mr Cox, concurred in the verdict.

Thursday 31 July 1862
TORRINGTON - An Infant Found Dead. - On Wednesday last (yesterday), a Coroner's Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., at the house of Miriam Hawkins, in this town, to inquire into the cause of the death of ELIZABETH BIDGEWAY, the infant child of ELIZABETH BIDGEWAY, singlewoman. The mother had taken the child with her to bed on the night of Tuesday; but in the morning, when she rose to give the infant suck, she discovered that it was dead by her side. Several witnesses spoke to the delicate state of the child's health from the time of its birth; and the medical attendant (Mr Rouse) gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from imperfect action of the heart. - Verdict accordingly.

ST. GILES - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last (yesterday), an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Deputy County Coroner, at the house of Mr Henry Moore, yeoman, in this parish, touching the death of ANN CLARKE, of Roborough, aged 65, who had gone to the house on the previous Friday, to attend Mrs Thorne during her confinement. On Monday night, when retiring to rest, deceased had a very violent cough and exhibited alarming symptoms. Medical assistance was instantly sent for, but she died before midnight. On a post mortem examination of the body by Dr Jones, of Torrington, it was discovered that death resulted from disease of the heart. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

WESTLEIGH - Melancholy Death By Drowning. - Inquest By John Henry Toller, Esq. - A painful sensation was created on Saturday evening, by the alarming intelligence that MR JOHN COATS HOLMAN, of Eastleigh Barton, a respectable yeoman, of this parish, had been drowned while bathing at Northam Burrows. The intelligence unhappily proved too true. The facts will be gathered from the following evidence taken at the Coroner's Inquest held by John Henry Toller, Esq., at the house of Mr John Cork, at Northam, on Monday last:-
Mr Thomas Chamings sworn:- I knew the deceased, MR JOHN COATS HOLMAN. He was about thirty-nine years of age. I saw him alive on Saturday evening last; I was with him at Northam Burrows on that evening. The deceased said he wanted to bathe, and he would do so if he could get any one to bathe with him. I said I would go, and we sat upon the pebbles for half an hour, partly undressed, waiting for the tide to go back. When we thought it was sufficiently gone back, we took off the remainder of our clothes and went in. There was a great swell at the time, and we could not feel the bottom, and we were constantly thrown back upon the pebbles by the waves. My belief is that the deceased was stunned by the pebbles, and, seeing him washed about, I three times caught hold of him by the hair of his head, which every time slipped through my fingers, the deceased appearing to be at the time quite insensible. From the deceased being constantly washed to and from the pebbles, it was impossible for me to secure him; I used every effort to do so. I at one time found him holding by one of my heels, when we were both thrown along, and he let go. I believe he was perfectly sober when he went into the water. I called for assistance, and some persons came up and took him out of the water. I had great difficulty in saving myself. The deceased before he went into the water told me he could swim, but from the breaking of the waves he was unable to do so. The deceased lived at Westleigh, and was a gentleman farmer.
Mr John Hoare sworn:- I live at Bideford, and am a whitesmith. On Saturday I and several others went to Northam Burrows to spend the afternoon. Between six and seven o'clock I heard some young women call out that there was a man drowning. I went to the top of the pebble-ridge, and seeing some one who I was afterwards told was Mr Thomas Chamings, I thought it was the drowning man. Mr Chamings then called for help, and I ran down; Charles Reed was with me at the time. When I came to the edge of the water, I saw the man floating. I caught hold of Charles Reed's hand to reach out, but let go, and went to the body by myself, and caught hold of the right arm. He was on his face and hands, with the head under water, and with other assistance he was got in upon the pebbles. I believe he was quite dead, as he neither moved nor breathed. We carried him up over the pebble-ridge, and laid him upon the green on the other side, where he was well rubbed. He was carried to the green with his face downwards, and everything was done that could be thought of to restore life.
Mr Chas. Colwill Turner, surgeon, sworn:- On Saturday evening I received a message to go to Northam Burrows, to see MR HOLMAN, who had been bathing, and was thought to be drowned. To save time, I took the horse which brought the messenger, and rode to the Burrows. When I came there I found the body lying upon the green by the side of the pebble-ridge, and Captain Pickard and Captain Stoyle, two seafaring captains, very judiciously carrying out Dr Marshall Hall's treatment in cases of drowned persons. On examining the body, I found that all evidence of life had ceased, but I suggested their persevering in the same line of treatment, and had some stimulants applied, but at the same time I thought it would be of no service. I ordered the body to be removed to the nearest house, which was done. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned while Bathing." The premature and melancholy decease of MR HOLMAN has plunged his widow and large family, together with numerous friends and acquaintances, into deep distress.

Thursday 28 August 1862
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday (last) evening, an Inquest was held at the North Devon Infirmary, by Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of CHRISTOPHER SELDON, late of Bishop's Tawton, and servant to Thomas Brailey, Esq., whose death resulted from injuries received whilst working at a thrashing machine, on the Saturday previous. The facts will be gleaned from the evidence of Mr Brailey, who deposed:- The deceased was in my service, and had lived with me as a general servant since Lady-day, 1861. On Saturday last, the 23rd inst., he was engaged in driving the horses that were working a thrashing machine, at Overton, where I reside. The driving gear is portable, and was placed outside my barn. I was myself engaged in the barn. I heard the deceased call out to the horses to stop, and I came out. When I came outside I found the deceased lying near the horse wheel. His left leg was broken near the ankle. I fetched some brandy and gave him, and a man in my employ, called John Popham, who was working in the barn, suggested that the broken limb should be bound up. The deceased told me that whilst he was endeavouring to get off the platform of the machine his legs became entangled in the horse wheel. I had him conveyed to this Infirmary without delay in a pony cart. The accident occurred between 11 and 12 o'clock in the forenoon. The evidence of Mr Ford, the house surgeon, shewed that death ensued from loss of blood and an entire prostration of strength. The injuries were severe - a compound fracture of the left leg below the knee, with extensive laceration and contusion of the fleshy parts - but the patient never rallied. He died on Tuesday evening. - Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 4 September 1862
BLACK TORRINGTON - Inquest. - On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held before H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner, at Black Torrington, on the body of JOHN BROOK, who met with his death on the previous day under the following circumstances. It appeared from the evidence that on Monday evening the deceased was in a quarry-pit, on Dunsham Farm, raising stones for the parish. About four o'clock, a man named George Braund, who was at work about two land-yards off, hearing a noise as if the bank had fallen in, ran to the spot, and found that the side of the quarry had fallen in, and, having seen deceased working there a short time before, felt certain he was buried under the debris. Witness then called for assistance, and, in about half-an-hour deceased was taken out quite dead. The body was in a stooping position, bent down double with about a ton weight of stones and rubbish covering him. The spine was broken. Deceased was very deaf, and was about 71 years of age. Verdict, Accidental Death.

Thursday 11 September 1862
FRITHELSTOCK - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' in this parish, on Friday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of JAMES GERRY, aged 60, a labourer of that parish, who died from gangrene of the intestines on the previous Wednesday afternoon, after a few days' illness. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence of the medical man (Mr J. C. Hole), whom they charged with neglect in not sooner attending his patient.

Thursday 25 September 1862
PLYMOUTH - On Monday an Inquest was held at Plymouth on the body of MR T. W. MORGAN, an artist, whose dead body was found in the public road, near Plymouth, on Sunday morning. After a lengthy inquiry the Jury found that the deceased died from haemorrhage, caused by a wound in his head, but that there was no evidence to show how the wound had been caused.

Thursday 2 October 1862
BARNSTAPLE - Inquests Held By The Borough Coroner:- Found Dead. An Inquest was held on Friday last, by R. I. Bencraft, Esq., on the body of MRS SUSAN FRY, aged 64 years, widow of WALTER FRY, deceased, who was found dead in her bed on the morning of the previous day. The following evidence was adduced:- Elizabeth Roulstone deposed:- I have been lately attending my aunt, Mrs Ann Steward, who resides in the house next but one to the deceased. On Wednesday last I saw the deceased at her house, and asked her how she was. She replied that she was very poorly, and I told her she ought to have some one with her, particularly at night; she said she felt pains from her side to her chest. I heard her the same night, about nine o'clock speaking to some woman who was leaving her house; the deceased was lighting the other person out of her house. She said she was so ill she could hardly walk upstairs. Mr Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- I have known the deceased for several years; she was the widow of WALTER FRY, late of this town, shoemaker. I was called to her residence yesterday, about twelve o'clock, and found her in bed quite dead, lying in a quiet position on her back; she appeared to have died without a struggle. I observed a wine glass half full of laudanum and water on a commode by her bedside, and there was a pint bottle three parts full of laudanum and water on a dressing table in the bed-room. I have, during the last few years, often seen the deceased; she was in a bad state of health, and her lungs appeared to be diseased. She may have taken an overdose of the medicine that was by the bedside as above described. There were no marks of violence on her body, or appearances of her having burst a blood-vessel. Mr William Bale deposed to entering the deceased's bed-room by the window and finding her dead on the morning in question. The Jury returned an open verdict of "Found Dead in her Bed."

BARNSTAPLE - Death From Apoplexy. - On Monday morning last, an Inquest was held at the 'Horse and Groom' public house, Boutport-street, by R. Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MR WILLIAM SEARLE, painter and glazier, formerly and for many years a postal messenger from Barnstaple to Tawstock, Alverdiscott, Newton Tracey, &c., who was found dead in his bed at his residence in Myrtle Place, on the previous (Sunday) morning. The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner remarked that the deceased had lived by himself at the place aforesaid; and in such cases, where persons died suddenly, it seemed right and proper that an Inquiry should take place into the cause of death. Many cases of sudden death occurred where such Inquiry was not necessary -w here relatives and friends were living around and could give a satisfactory account of the cause of decease. He now invited the Jury to view the body. On their return the following evidence was taken:- Elizabeth Morris sworn:- I am the wife of Wm. Morris, labourer, of Myrtle-place. I have known the deceased for fourteen years; for three years he has lived near me - about four doors from my house. He lived by himself, and I attended to his household affairs. I last saw him alive at half-past 11 on Saturday night, when he had gone to purchase ½ lb. of butter, and he called and shewed it to me and asked if it was good. I said it looked very nice. He appeared to be in his usual state - complained of being poorly, having pains in his head, and said he thought he should go home and go to bed. I saw him go straight home, and heard him fasten his door. He was a man of sober habits. The next morning, at ten o'clock, the postman called, and knocked but could not make any one hear, and I went up and rattled at the door. As no answer could be obtained, Thomas Wilson, who lives near, went up over a ladder, broke a pane of glass, and got into deceased's house. He opened the door and the postman (Finch) entered and went up to his bedroom. I went up afterwards and saw the deceased lying on the side of the bed, partly dressed, having on his trousers and stockings. I immediately sent for Mr Cooke, surgeon, who came shortly after. Thomas Wilson deposed that he was an engine driver, and lived the next door but one to the deceased. Yesterday morning I broke a pane of glass in his window and entered his bed-room, when I saw his body on the bed; his face was black and he was quite cold. Mr Cooke, surgeon, deposed:- I was sent for yesterday morning, to the house of deceased. He was a patient of mine - had been so for two years. I found deceased lying on the bed on which he had slept, on his face and hands;, he was partly dressed. I examined the body and found that he was dead but still warm; there were no marks of violence, but his face and head were much congested with blood. He had apparently been dead about two hours. In my opinion his death was caused by an attack of apoplexy. From the expectoration I saw in the utensil I should suppose that he had had a severe fit of coughing - that it produced a rupture of a vessel on the brain, causing instant death. He had not applied to me for medical assistance for several months. I don't think he wanted for anything. He had a small pension from the post office and an annuity from the sinking fund. He was a man of strictly sober habits. He was about 65 years of age. - Verdict - "Died from Natural Causes."

INSTOW - Distressing and Fatal Gun Accident. - Another of those painfully-distressing accidents arising from the careless use of fire-arms which have of late been too frequent in this neighbourhood, occurred at Instow Barton, the residence of Mr George Lock, on Friday morning last, resulting in the death of a fine young woman named JANE MADGE, aged 18 years. The facts will be gathered from the evidence taken at the Inquest held on Saturday, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, and a respectable Jury:-
Thomas Folland deposed:- I am a servant in the employ of Mr George Lock. I knew the deceased, JANE MADGE; she was also a servant in the employ of Mr Lock. I believe she was about eighteen years of age. On Friday, the 26th September, about six o'clock in the morning, I was in the kitchen. I had received directions from my master some short time since that when I had time I was to take down his gun and clean it. On this morning I took it down, and Master William Henry Lock, who is about twelve or thirteen years of age, was in the kitchen, and he asked me to let him have the gun to see if he could level it. JANE MADGE was standing in the doorway at the time; she said to Master William Henry he might fire at her and she would stand the shot. I gave the gun to William Henry to hold before I got off the form; he levelled it at deceased. I said, "Better not point to anybody, for it may be loaded." The gun, however, went off, and the contents lodged in the head of deceased. Master William Henry, on my cautioning him not to point the gun, as it might be loaded, replied, "It is not, for it has no cap on."
Charles Snow deposed:- On Monday last I arrived on a visit to my brother-in-law, Mr George Lock, at Instow. On Tuesday last I went out for the purpose of shooting. I cleaned the gun now produced, and loaded it with powder and shot. I discharged the gun once, and reloaded it with powder and shot. I returned about one o'clock to Mr Lock's house, with the gun loaded, and I placed it on the rack over the kitchen chimney piece, the same place I took it from. I do not remember that I stated to any one in the house that the gun was loaded. I remained and dined with Mr Lock, and left his house the same evening. I mentioned to Mr Lock that I returned the powder and shot to the cupboard he usually kept it in.
The learned Coroner remarked on numerous instances in which the culpable negligence of parties using fire-arms was followed by serious and fatal consequences; and expressed his surprise and regret that parties were not thereby induced to act with ordinary caution, so as to prevent a recurrence of such calamities. In the present case he did not wish to aggravate the feelings of any one concerned; but he had grave doubts whether for such an act of carelessness as taking a loaded gun into a dwelling house, a party was not liable to a charge of manslaughter. It was most painful to reflect upon the sacrifice of life resulting from such indifference or want of thought. The evidence in this instance shewed that, so far as the immediate instrument of the sad catastrophe was concerned, the fatal occurrence was purely accidental, but he must admonish all parties to be warned and to learn wisdom and prudence therefrom. The Jury returned as their verdict - "Accidentally shot by William Henry Lock." The deceased, who was a respectable and well-conducted girl, was much esteemed by Mr Lock and his family, whose distress may be conceived but cannot be described.

Thursday 16 October 1862
EXETER - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday afternoon an Inquest was held at the 'Blue Boar Inn,' Magdalen-street, before the City Coroner, H. W. Hooper, Esq., on the body of WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN, aged 21, a native of Newton St. Cyres. It appeared that the deceased worked as a labourer for Mr Spiller, who has the contract for the new works at the St. David's Railway Station. On Friday afternoon another labourer named Geens was driving a barrow with a large stone in it, and the stone happened to fall out. Geens called to a man named Dyer to come and assist him to replace the stone, which he did, and the deceased accompanied him. While raising the stone Geens knocked his finger and Dyer tied it up for him; the deceased, standing looking at them, did not notice an engine that was backing with some empty carriages, and the steps of one of them knocked him across the line, and both carriages and engine passed over him. He was taken up and conveyed to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was attended by Mr Edye, but it was soon found that his case was hopeless. In answer to the Coroner, Mr Mears, superintendent at the St. David's Station, said he had made an experiment with another engine, and found that the deceased could not have been seen by the driver or stoker from a distance of thirty feet, but they could have seen him at a further distance. Mr Huxley, house-surgeon, said when he received the deceased his left arm and leg were torn nearly off, and there were several fractures of the left thigh, and also a large wound on the groin. He considered the immediate cause of death to have been the shock to the system by the injuries received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death".

Thursday 23 October 1862
Inquests held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner.
FREMINGTON - Death By Drowning At Fremington. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held by the learned Deputy Coroner, at the 'New Inn,' in the parish of Fremington, to inquire into the circumstances connected with the death of ELIZABETH CANN, aged 57, who was accidentally drowned in a stream near that spot on the preceding evening. The facts will be gathered from the evidence adduced:
Mary Ann Burgess deposed:- I am the wife of George Burgess, of Fremington, labourer, and reside there. I knew the deceased, ELIZABETH CANN; she was about 57 years of age. I was last evening at the Wesleyan chapel, Fremington; the deceased was also there. A little before eight o'clock last evening, service being over, the deceased and myself came out together. Several other persons came out at the same time. The night was very dark; and deceased remarked to me that it was very cold. No doubt thinking I was not getting out quick enough, she put her hand upon my shoulder and pushed me a little on one side, but not rashly, and after she had taken two or three steps I lost sight of her. I thought she was making a little more to the right for her house than she ought. On the right of the roadway there is a mill-stream, which was much swollen. I went to my house, and I thought the deceased went to hers.
John Fairchild deposed:- I live at Fremington, and am a labourer. About half-past eight o'clock last evening, a sister-ion-law of the deceased, named FRANCES CANN, came to my house and asked my wife whether she had seen anything of the deceased, as she was afraid she was lost. My wife said she had not seen her after she had come out of the chapel. I then went out to try to find the deceased. There were several with me, and after searches were made for nearly an hour she was discovered in the flood-hatch, under Mr Pigot's orchard, and when taken out of the water was found to be quite dead. When she was found in the water, her face and the whole of her body was under water. The jury returned as their verdict - "That the deceased was found drowned," accompanying their finding with a representation that the dangerous state of a certain piece of waste ground required the erection of a fence or wall.

EAST PUTFORD - Death from Disease of the Heart. - On Monday last, an Inquest was also held by the same learned Coroner, at the house of the deceased, in the parish of East Putford, on view of the body of WILLIAM HARRIS, labourer, aged 62, there lying dead. The following was the evidence taken:-
William Yeo deposed:- I live at East Putford, and am a farmer. I knew the deceased, WILLIAM HARRIS; he worked for me occasionally, and was working for me on Thursday last. He was about sixty-five years of age, and was a labourer. A part of the day on Thursday he was splitting wood, and about four o'clock in the afternoon I requested him to pin up a shrub in my garden. He then complained to me of a pain in his stomach, and I gave him a wine-glass of gin, which he drank, and went out. About half-an-hour after he had taken the gin, I met him and asked him how he was, and he said he thought he was better. About an hour after that, as I was coming across my yard, I was met by my wife, who asked me to come in, as she said she thought WM. HARRIS was dead or dying. I went in and looked at him and felt his pulse, and, thinking it had stopped, I sent off for Mr Rouse. I think he was dead when I got into the house.
Thomas Hartnoll deposed:- I live at East Putford, am a labourer, and work for Mr William Yeo. About half-past five o'clock, on Thursday last, as I was coming down Mr Yeo's yard, I heard one of Mr Yeo's children say that WILLIAM HARRIS had fallen from a ladder. I immediately went to the spot, and found him lying upon the ground on his back. He gasped two or three times, and did not take any notice of me. The ladder was against the wall. I had seen him about five minutes before upon the ladder, pinning up the shrub. When I got to him I called for assistance, and he was carried into Mr Yeo's house, but he neither moved nor spoke. When I saw him upon the adder he was about three feet from the ground.
Mr Eusebius Rouse deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Bradworthy. On Thursday evening I was sent for to go to Mr William Yeo's, at East Putford. I accordingly went, and saw the body of WILLIAM HARRIS, but he was quite dead. I examined him, but there were no marks of violence upon the body. He had been crippled for years. I am of opinion from the evidence I have heard, and from the examination which I have made, that he died from disease of the heart, and that the fall from the ladder did not accelerate his death. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical opinion.

Thursday 30 October 1862
MARWOOD - Fatal Gun Accident - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, at Marwood, on the body of MR WILLIAM BATER, a fine young man, aged 28, son of MR BATER, yeoman of that parish, who unfortunately met with his death under the following circumstances:-
Thomas Andrew Skinner, deposed:- I live at Marwood and am a farm servant. I knew WILLIAM BATER, the younger. He was the son of MR WILLIAM BATER, of Marwood, and was about 21 years of age. About two o'clock yesterday afternoon, as I was at work in my master's farm, the deceased's brother, GEORGE BATER, came to me and asked me if I would be pleased to lend his brother, namely the deceased, my gun, which I did. Before GEORGE BATER left, the deceased also came. GEO. BATER said they wanted it to shoot rats about the moors. GEORGE BATER loaded the gun with powder and shot, and the deceased rammed down the lead. They then left and about an hour afterwards they returned and after assisting me in my work, and my day's work being finished, I accompanied them in further search of rats. They went up over their ground and I went up my master's pond. They then had a gun each. We also saw some rabbits, one of which the deceased shot, and on another running to a hole the deceased placed the butt end either against the hole or against the rabbit I don't know which, when the gun went off, and the deceased fell. I took up the deceased in my arms and called for GEORGE, who was upon the top of the hedge, who ran for assistance. The deceased neither moved or spoke, and I believe his death was instantaneous. I work for Mr Seage, of Marwood.
Mr Joseph Harper, surgeon, deposed:- I reside at Barnstaple. I have this day seen a body, which I was informed was the body of LWILLIAM BATER, the younger. There was a place torn in the waistcoat and also in the shirt, which corresponded to a wound in the body, just below the emsiform cartilage in the middle of the body. The wound was large enough to admit two fingers, edges torn and inverted. On introducing the fingers into the wound a number of shots could be felt inside and the liver could be felt torn and lacerated as well as the upper portion of the stomach. It was a gun shot wound and death must have been instantaneous from injury to the solar plexus and large blood vessels. Verdict:- "Accidental Death from the discharge of a gun."

Thursday 13 November 1862
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the 'Union Inn,' Derby, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of ALBERT COTTLE, a child of about four years of age, who sustained an injury of the spine while playing in the Playground of the National School (Magdalene District), on Friday, the 24th ult., which terminated fatally on Sunday evening, the 9th inst. - Verdict: "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 November 1862
THORNBURY - Death By Burning. - On Wednesday, 12th instant, an Inquest was held at South Wondford, in the parish of Thornbury, before H. A. Vallack, County Coroner, on the body of a little boy, named ARSCOTT JOLLOW, aged three years, son of GIDGEON JOLLOW, labourer, who met with his death on Monday, the 10th instant, under the following circumstances:- On the above day, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, the mother of deceased had occasion to go to an old house about five or six landyards off, for some turnips, &c., leaving deceased alone in the house, sitting by a small fire, eating a bit of pie-crust which she had given him. About ten minutes afterwards a lad passed where she was, and told her that her little boy was crying. The mother then sent home her other little boy (aged five years) to quiet the child. He, however, soon returned to his mother, saying that ATTY (meaning the deceased) was burning to death. The mother ran to her house and found the child in the middle of the room, lying on his face and hands. All the clothes were burnt off him except a little of the body of the petticoat round the waist. The body of the child was burnt nearly all over, and in about five minutes after the mother had returned to her house, the child breathed its last. - Verdict:- Accidentally Burnt.

EXETER - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the 'Blue Boar Inn,' Exeter, on Wednesday, before H. D. Barton, Esq., on the body of a man named NIX, living in Magdalene-street. Death resulted from lock-jaw caused by a wound in his hand, from the bursting of a rocket. Verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 27 November 1862
CLOVELLY - The Missing Children - Discovery of the Bodies - Coroner's Inquest. - Our readers have been made aware of the painful excitement that has prevailed in Clovelly and the surrounding parishes from the sudden and unaccountable absence of ELIZA LEE and ELLEN LEE, children of JAMES LEE, a labourer, of this parish, who had been missed since the evening of the 8th instant; and last week we gave a detail of the efforts made by the inhabitants and by the police to discover their whereabouts, and how, up to Thursday morning, those efforts had been unsuccessful. We have now to report the discovery of the bodies of the poor children, through the vigilance of a member of the County Constabulary, in West Wood, Clovelly, at noon on Thursday; thus negativing the "sinister rumours" to which we referred, which tended seriously to implicate one of the natural protectors of the unfortunates. On Friday an Inquest was held on the bodies by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, when evidence was adduced which detailed particulars of melancholy interest.
Henry Jenkins deposed:- I live in the parish of Hartland, and work for Colonel Fane, of Clovelly Court, as a labourer. I knew the deceased ELIZA LEE and ELLEN LEE; they were the children of JAMES LEE, of the parish of Clovelly, labourer, and were, I am informed, about the ages of ten and two years. On Saturday, the 8th of November inst., I was ploughing in one of Colonel Fane's fields, and in a corner of the same I saw the two deceased children. It was about a quarter to five o'clock in the afternoon. ELIZA LEE, the eldest child, was lying upon her back, and the youngest, ELLEN, was lying upon her sister, face to face. I went to them, took up the youngest in my arms, and walked back to the plough, the elder sister accompanying me. I then let her have the child, and told her to go home. She did not say anything in reply, but went away with the child in her arms, and I continued my ploughing. I had seen them before during the day, namely, when I returned from my dinner about ten minutes past two. ELIZA LEE was at that time in a coppice adjoining the field in which I was ploughing, picking up sticks, and ELLEN LEE was standing by the sticks ELIZA had picked up. ELIZA came over to me at the plough, and told me what she had been doing, but that she should not pick up any more until the boys came down; the boys, she said, were her brothers. I told her to pick up sticks until BILLY, her brother, came down, and when he came to send him to me; and on her asking what I wanted of him, I told her I would give him a penny to go up after some tobacco for me. She then said she would go up after the tobacco, which she did, and returned with it, and I gave her a penny for her trouble. She had taken the child with her in her arms. After she brought back the tobacco, she remained in the field whilst I took two or three rounds with the plough, when I missed her and her sister, and, having previously told her to go home, I thought she was gone there; but afterwards, about a quarter to five o'clock, I saw both the children in a corner of the field, as I have before mentioned. ELIZA LEE made no complaint whatever to me, either of want of food, ill-treatment, or being afraid to go home. I have this day seen the bodies; they have on the same clothes as on Saturday, the 8th day of November instant.
Richard Nicholls sworn:- I am a first-class police constable, and am stationed at Woolfardisworthy. On the 10th day of November instant, I received information of the loss of ELIZA and ELLEN LEE, and proceeded to take steps to search for them, which search was continued until yesterday, about twelve o'clock at noon. Search was made in every parish where it was supposed anything could be heard of them. We yesterday resumed our search at Old Park Gate, in the parish of Clovelly, and proceeded on the path leading to Mouth Mill. When we came as far as West Wood, and had gone on the path about one hundred and twenty paces, I turned out of the path to get further up into the wood, when I saw the bodies of the two children about fifty feet from the pathway. ELIZA, the eldest, was lying quite flat on her back, with her left arm across her breast. The right arm was thrown carelessly out, and rested upon the breast of the youngest child. The left leg was drawn up and the right leg was straight. The clothing was very much torn, particularly the frock. She had on two petticoats, a flannel one and a cotton one, with a calico chemise, a pair of brown cotton stockings, and a pair of boots worn out at the toes, through which the toes were visible. There were scratches on the arms and legs, as if from brambles. ELLEN, the youngest, was lying by the side of her sister, with her face down the hill, on her back, but a little inclined on the right side. Her left hand was across her breast, and her right rather carelessly thrown out and extended; both legs were drawn up. Her bonnet hung round her neck. She had on a cotton frock, a very good pair of shoes, and a pair of white cotton socks. We got a horse and cart, and took the bodies from the spot and brought them to one of the coach houses at Clovelly Court. I was accompanied in my search in West Wood by three other policemen. I was induced to go to the spot again this morning, where the bodies were found, by accidentally hearing that the bonnet and neckerchief of ELIZA had been found, and when I came to the spot, about eighteen feet up, I discovered a place trodden down as if the children had been lying there. I think they must have come down the wood to get to the place where they were found; this was from half a mile to three-quarters of a mile from Old Park. Within my knowledge ELIZA LEE has gone away twice before, and some months ago we made search for her and she was brought to my house at Woolfardisworthy. I recollect the night of Saturday, the 8th of November instant; until about one or two o'clock on Sunday morning it was dry and cold, when it came on to rain. It rained nearly the whole of the day on Sunday. On the Monday morning the father of the children came to me at Woolfardisworthy and told me they were missing, and I and the rest of the police commenced a search. I am informed that the bonnet and neckerchief of ELIZA were found after the bodies were discovered yesterday. From the reports which were in circulation that the children had come to their deaths by improper means, I searched the house and premises of the parents, and have made most particular and minute inquiries, and do not upon my oath believe that there is a shadow of foundation for such reports.
Elizabeth Bartlett deposed:- I am the wife of James Bartlett, of Clovelly, farmer. I reside in the house next to JAMES LEE. JAMES LEE and MARY LEE are the parents of the deceased children. Ever since I have lived near them, which has been seven years, I have never seen or heard of their having been unkind to their children. I have been there when they have had their meals, and I have heard the mother ask them whether they had had enough; and I believe they have been treated as kindly by their parents as most children. I have never seen them beat their children ever since I have been in the place.
Dr Ackland sworn:- I live at Bideford, and am a doctor of medicine. I have this day seen the bodies of ELIZA LEE and ELLEN LEE. I found them lying in one of Colonel Fane's coach houses. The elder girl was apparently about ten years old, well formed, but rather thin for her age. Her ragged clothing was wet and cold, and consisted of a chemise, a flannel petticoat, a cotton petticoat, and a black frock in rags. She had on stockings, which were down over her ankles and torn. The boots were completely worn out, with the toes projecting and bare. On the body being stripped I found the following appearances:- the eye-lids were open; the eye-balls were sunk deeply in the sockets, soft and yielding to the touch; the nose sharp and pinched; the mouth was wide open; the throat fuller than natural. Both forearms presented many scratches and bruises, as from brambles; the fingers were bent a little on the palm of the hand. The belly was flat, and slightly green at its junction with the thighs, especially on the right side; the thighs and legs in front were livid. On turning the body posteriorly, fern and oak leaves were found in the back of the head; slight lividity on the loins, more so on the back of the thighs and calves of the legs, which were also scratched like the arms. There were also some slight abrasions of the cuticle or scarf skin. The soles of the feet were white, sodden, and wrinkled. The limbs were free from rigidity, and although I examined the body very carefully I could neither detect any fracture or marks of external violence. ELLEN, the younger child, apparently about two or three years old, was lying a little on her right side, with the left arm crossed over the chest; there was a number of small maggots between the arm and the chest. The right arm was lying by the side. She was better clad than her sister; a small sun bonnet was hanging loosely from her neck, and her clothing consisted of a small short cape over her shoulders, a ragged pinafore, a small cotton frock, a tweed over-petticoat, an under one of flannel, and a chemise. The feet were covered with very good socks and shoes. Long flaxen hair hung loosely over her face, and her head was pillowed in dead oak-leaves. The eye-lids and mouth were wide open. The eyes were deeply sunk in the sockets, and of a blue colour, but the eye-balls were soft, and their external coats in small folds. There were several small maggots in the right eye. On stripping the body, it presented the appearance of a healthy child in a very good state of nutrition. The face, fore-arms, thighs, and legs, particularly the right leg, were scratched as from thorns. The surface of the body presented patches of lividity, with a number of maggots on it, and here and there slight peeling of the cuticle. As in the other child so in this one, I could find no marks of external violence. The putrefaction being decidedly influenced by the temperature of the air, it was very much retarded. I consider that death was produced by cold, accelerated by moisture in the form of sleet and rain. Sensibility under such circumstances speedily disappears, and a state of torpor ensues, followed by profound sleep. In this state of lethargy the vital functions gradually cease, and death takes place.
The Coroner summed up the evidence, and the Jury returned a verdict of - "Found dead in a wood named 'West Wood', from cold and exposure to the inclemency of the weather."

Thursday 4 December 1862
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - On Wednesday morning last, MR HENRY ARTER, of this town, was discovered dead in his bed room, to which he had repaired but a few hours previously. The deceased was well known in Barnstaple and its neighbourhood, and his sudden death is solemnly monitory. A Coroner's Inquest was held last evening, when a verdict of "Death from disease of the heart," was returned.

Thursday 11 December 1862
BARNSTAPLE - Inquest Held By The Borough Coroner. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at the 'Railway Hotel,' Boutport-street, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on view of the body of JAMES PASSMORE, aged 78, formerly master of the sloop Betsey, of this port, who was found dead in his bed, on Sunday morning, at his house in Myrtle-place, where he was living with his wife. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased retired to rest on Saturday night, in his usual state of health, and in the morning was discovered to be dead. The body was lying on the right side and still warm. The testimony of Mr Fernie, surgeon, was to the effect that death had resulted from disease of the heart, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 18 December 1862
BIDEFORD - Coroner's Inquest. - Death By Drowning - An Inquest was held at the 'Torridge Inn,' on Saturday evening last, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, on the body of JOHN RODGEMAN, who was found dead on the Saturday morning, under the circumstance detailed in the following evidence:-
William Bassett, boatman to Mr Colwill, lime-burner, deposed that as he was going, according to his custom, to the kilns, about half-past 5 on Saturday morning, he met in Mr Colwill's yard at East-the-water two of Captain Pyke's workmen, who said there was a man that had not come home all night, and they had been looking round Mr Turner's limekilns. It was moonlight and they all went over the sands. Witness went on the starboard side of the Jane and Mary, laying beside Mr Colwill's quay, and thence alongside the barge, where he saw a man's foot. He called out, and they got a mattock and shovel, and dug him out; the flat of the barge was over his head. He recognised him as RODGEMAN by his jacket and they put him in a handcart and drew him home. Captain Pyke's men had told him before that RODGEMAN was missing.
Mr P. Colwill, jun., had seen RODGEMAN, about eight o'clock on Friday night. He came to witness's office to sell a lot of oats. Witness left him at the door, and he turned as if going to the limekiln, on the Barnstaple road, though he did not know that he had anything to do in the yard. He seemed in good spirits. Very shortly after that witness hard some one had fallen into the river, for one of the men belonging to the steam boat said that he had heard a splash in the water and gurgling in the throat; but no one was found, and they thought the splash was from a rope. The Jury did not consider medical examination necessary, and returned an open verdict of "Found Drowned."

Thursday 1 January 1863
BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - Death By Burning - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the 'Currier's Arms,' Vicarage-street, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of MRS ELIZABETH GLIDDON, who met her death by burning under circumstances detailed in the evidence:- Georgina Dark deposed:- I am a servant of Mr Wm. Fry, of this place, butcher. The deceased was Mrs Fry's mother; she was, I have heard, about eighty-seven years old. She has resided with my master about four months. She was very infirm, and could not walk about without assistance; she used to get up every day, and I used to assist her down stairs. On Friday evening last I gave her her tea about six o'clock, and left her sitting in the settle in the kitchen whilst I went to the mangle across the street, at Mrs Reed's. There was not much fire in the grate and a candle was burning on the large table in the middle of the kitchen. I was engaged mangling about five minutes, and on returning to our house I smelt fire as I came to the door. I ran into the kitchen, and saw the deceased lying on the floor; her cap and clothes near her neck were burning; the candle was on the floor near the deceased, but not burning. I tried to stop the burning with my fingers, and then procured some water and threw over her. I then called a neighbour, Mrs Coles, and she came in with some other people, and the fire was put out. Deceased was shortly afterwards taken upstairs, and Mr Fernie arrived immediately and attended to her. She died yesterday morning, about ten minutes past three o'clock. She sank gradually from the time of the accident until she died at the hour above-named. Mr Andrew Fernie, surgeon, deposed:- On Friday last, the 26th inst., about half-past six o'clock, I was called to the deceased at Mr Fry's, in Lower Maudlin-street, and found her upstairs on a chair; two women were undressing her. She was undressed, and put into bed. I examined her, and found she was burnt very severely about the fact, neck, chest and both arms; the burns were very deep, she was cold and exhausted, and appeared to be in great pain; she was perfectly conscious. I dressed the burns, gave her brandy, and had her feet made warm. I heard her say the candle set her on fire. I continued to attend her until her death, which took place yesterday morning. I saw her at ten o'clock the previous night; she was then sinking. Her death was occasioned by the shock to her system caused by the severe burns. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 15 January 1863
ALWINGTON - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held at the School House, Alwington, on Thursday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of GEORGE AUSTIN, who met with his death on the previous Monday under the melancholy circumstances detailed in the following evidence:- John Clements, on his oath, said:- I live at Parkham, and am a labourer. GEORGE AUSTIN is hind to the Rev. Herbert Barns, at Alwington. I last saw the deceased on Monday last, going for a load of turnips with a horse and cart. He passed me quietly. I heard nothing more of him for five or six minutes, when I heard the horse come galloping with the cart, but the deceased was not with it. I went in search of the deceased, and found him lying on the ground, where the turnips had been pulled. He was lying upon his back, and blood was coming from his mouth, and there was a mark of mud on the head, as if one of the wheels of the cart had gone over it. The head was five or six inches deep in the mud. I then called his father who was near, and carried him home.
Rev. Herbert Barnes gave evidence to show that he had frequently seen the deceased riding on the cart without reins, and had rebuked him for so doing.
Dr William Henry Ackland deposed that he found the deceased in bed, the subject of a shock that usually accompanies the infliction of a severe injury - in this case amounting to extreme collapse. There were also difficulty of breathing, and expectoration of frothy bloody mucus. Loud crepitation was heard throughout the lungs, particularly at the upper part of the left lung, corresponding to the only bruise then to be seen on the body, viz., on the spine of the left shoulder blade. Fracture of the second rib was detected near the same spot; this piercing the substance of the lung, produced the symptoms before named. Saw him again in the evening, and found him considerably better as far as the lungs were concerned, but important symptoms indicating irritation of the brain supervened, caused, as I at that time stated, by fracture of the base of the skull, and I looked on the case as almost hopeless. He died the next morning. I consider the cause of death to be fracture of the base of the skull. Verdict, "Accidentally killed by being thrown from a cart."

BARNSTAPLE - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last an Inquest was held at the 'Currier's Arms,' Vicarage-street, by Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, touching the death of an infant named CHARLES BRACHER, son of JOHN BRACHER, a soldier, of Boden's-row. It appeared from the evidence that the child had, on the Saturday previous, inhaled the steam issuing from the spout of a kettle of water that was boiling on the hob. He screamed a little at the time but soon revived; after the lapse of a few hours alarming symptoms again appeared and medical aid was called in - partial relief was afforded on the evening of Thursday, the 8th. - Verdict "Accidental Death."

Thursday 5 February 1863
HOLSWORTHY - A Sad and Fatal Accident happened on Tuesday se'nnight, to MR DENNIS KINGDON, solicitor, of this place. He had been out spending the evening with some friends, and returned home at eleven, when, after attending to a matter of business, he proceeded to his bed, but unfortunately before he arrived at the top of the stairs, he fell backwards over six or seven stairs, and sustained a concussion of the brain, of which he died on Thursday morning last. An Inquest held by H. A. Vallack, Esq., Coroner for Devon, resulted in a Verdict of "Accidental Death." [MR KINGDON was well-known and respected in Torrington, where he practiced in his profession for several years.]

Thursday 19 February 1863
TAWSTOCK - A Child Drowned In A Pan Of Water. - An Inquest was held on Saturday last, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at Lake, in the parish of Tawstock, on the body of an infant named EMMA MUXWORTHY, aged 16 months, who, during the temporary absence of an elder sister, on the morning of the previous day, fell into a pan of "blue water" in which clothes had been rinsed and was suffocated. - Verdict: "Accidentally Drowned."

Thursday 26 February 1863
BIDEFORD - An Inquest was held at the 'Cornish Arms,' Lower Meddon-street, on Saturday last, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of URSULA TAYLOR, a child of about five years old, who died suddenly on Friday morning last. The body presented an emaciated appearance, and the head was covered with large scabs. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the child had been poorly for three weeks, but had not been attended by a doctor. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 5 March 1863
HARTLAND - Suicide Of A Disappointed Lover. - For a young man in the vigour of youth, and possessed of warm and unblighted affection, to become enamoured of one of the fair sex, and, if deceived, to put an end to his existence by violent means is a case of too common occurrence; but for a widower arrived at the mature age of 63, to hang himself through disappointed love, seems almost incredible. But in the instance to which we are about to advert this is painfully true. It appears that an ardent Romeo had, within a short month of his first wife's decease, paid marked attentions to, and been accepted as a wooer of a fair widow of independent means, residing opposite his own dwelling. So warm was this attachment known to be, that the interesting couple had been subjects of remark and of idle gossip in the town for several months past. What makes it still more remarkable is the fact that they were lovers when young, so that when the swain became united in nuptial bonds to his first wife he made a most grievous mistake, for his first love reigned predominant in his affections and as the sequel has proved he loved her to distraction. Conscious of his predisposition in favour of intoxicating beverages, the fair lady exacted of him a promise to abstain from their use in future, but, alas! he cancelled his part of the social covenant, and was moreover so avaricious as to require her to make over her money to him before putting on the ring. The bride-elect at once became alive to her danger, which the counsel and entreaties of her friends had previously failed to make her conscious of, and immediately took measures to secure her own safety, ere it was too late. The wedding was to be celebrated on Thursday, February 22nd. All the preliminaries were arranged, vehicles and bridesmaids were to be in readiness by the joyous morn. The bridegroom watched with eagerness the dawning of the auspicious day, but when 8 o'clock arrived, seeing the window-blinds of his chere-amie's residence still down, he hastened across the way to arouse her from her slumbers. But, alas! its fair occupant had "taken to herself wings and flown away," having started in the night for Bideford in order to take the early train for London, where she intends to reside. Our Romeo thus baffled in his hymeneal enterprise, fell into a violent rage, and wreaked his vengeance in every possible way. The excitement thus created terminated in his own destruction, which caused a sad consternation in this town on Sunday last.
The Inquest:- An Inquest was held over the body of EDWARD HOCKIN, deceased, on Tuesday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner. The Jury having been sworn:-
ELIZABETH HOCKIN deposed: I am the daughter of the deceased; my father was 63 years of age. He had been an auctioneer, but had retired from business. He was engaged to be married to a MRS BATE, a widow. On Thursday, 22nd February, the said Mrs B. left as I have heard for London. On my father hearing this he became very excited, and continued to get worse until Sunday last. At half-past 10 on Sunday morning, he became very violent, and I ran out of the house, thinking he would quiet down. I thought him so excited that I had put the razors out of the way. I remained at my sister's about half-an-hour, and then returned to the front door and spoke to my father, and tried to calm him, but he was no more composed than before; a quarter of an hour after I sent Mrs Babb to see my father and to try to compose him. She came immediately and said something had happened. I then discovered he had hanged himself by a rope to a pole of wood just at the door leading to the stairs. He was just dead. Before Mrs Bate left he was quite composed and rational.
Mrs Babb deposed: I knew the deceased and live next door. He has been for some time past in an excited state. On Sunday morning I went to his house to endeavour to compose him. On going into the kitchen I saw the deceased hanging on the stairs, one end of the rope attached to his neck and the other round a rail of wood over the doorway. Mr Thomas, surgeon, was immediately sent for and attended. Mr Lemon came in and cut him down.
Mr Lemon deposed, on Sunday last I was called and informed that MR HOCKIN had hanged himself. I ran immediately and cut him down. He was quite dead. I saw deceased the same morning Mrs B. left. I went with him to the house; he was in an excited state.
Dr R. R. G. Thomas, sworn:- I was sent for on Sunday morning to attend deceased. I found him lying on the kitchen floor. Lemon had informed me he had found him hanging. I met deceased some time before, and he was in a very excited state. The Jury returned a verdict of "Deceased destroyed himself by hanging, whilst in a state of Unsound Mind."

KINGSNYMPTON - Inquest On a New-Born Child. - On the 26th ult. an Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' in this parish, before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of a newly-born child belonging to ANNA JEWEL, a single woman. This woman lived in a lone cottage, a little way out of the village. On Monday she was at work in a field, picking stones, and on Tuesday morning she sent into the village to a woman to come and see her. When the woman arrived, she informed her that she had been delivered of a child during the night, that it had breathed but it was now dead. As she had had several children before, it was deemed right that the facts should be communicated to the Coroner, and an Inquest was the result. J. A. Tidboald, Esq., surgeon, of Chulmleigh, made a post mortem examination of the body and stated that the child had not breathed. - Verdict: Still Born.

KINGSNYMPTON - Suicide. - An Inquest was also held at Kenserry farm, in this parish, on Monday last, before J. H. Toller, Esq., on the body of JOHN SHAPLAND, a farmer, who had committed suicide, by cutting his throat, on the Saturday previous. Deceased had been in a desponding state of mind for some time, the cause of which was unknown, and on Saturday morning he left the house for a short time. His wife was about to go in quest of him, when he opened the door and walked in with his hand to his throat, from which blood was flowing profusely. He said, "My dear, I have done it at last." - Mr Furse, surgeon, of Southmolton, was at once sent for, but the unfortunate man was dead before he arrived. - Verdict: "Temporary Insanity."

Thursday 26 March 1863
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident. - A very distressing and fatal accident occurred at the Barnstaple Station of the North Devon Railway on Friday last. A young man named WILLIAM HENRY PAVEY was in the act of towing the "Creedy" locomotive engine into the shed for reparation, when, by some mishap, his foot slipped and the engine passed over him, crushing his legs in a frightful manner and fracturing several of his ribs. The poor fellow was taken up and conveyed to the Infirmary, where prompt attention was given by Dr Ford, the house surgeon, and Mr Morgan, one of the surgeons of the establishment, but the patient rapidly sank and expired in half-an-hour.
An Inquest was held on the following day before the Borough Coroner (Incledon Bencraft, Esq.), when the following evidence was adduced:- William Bull sworn:- I am the foreman of the locomotive department of the North Devon Railway. I was engaged at the Barnstaple Station yesterday, at quarter past two. I was at the end of the locomotive shed. I saw the deceased there; he was in the act of detaching the tow rope from the "Creedy" engine. We were towing the engine, which was disabled, into the shed. I was between 90 and 100 yards from the deceased, looking toward him. I saw him stumble. His face was toward the engine and he was walking backward. I saw him unhook the tow rope, when he made a false step and fell and the leading wheel of the engine passed over his leg. He was on the right hand side of the engine. The ashpan (which is about eight inches from the ground) passed over and compressed his chest, and then the trailing wheels passed over him. George Vanstone was very near and assisted him with the rope. I immediately went to the deceased, who placed his hand on his chest and said "Oh! dear!" I procured a door on which I placed him and sent him to the North Devon Infirmary with all despatch. He had been three years in the employ; was a sober, steady man. He has been in the habit of using the tow rope continually. He was what we call a "coke man;" although we do not now use coke, but coal, for the engine fires. Deceased was 26 years of age.
By a Juryman:- The deceased fell forward between the metals on the right hand side; the lifeguard of the engine twisted him round, so that his legs came under the metals; the weight was about 14 tons which passed over him.
George Vanstone sworn: - I am a labourer in the employ of the Railway Company. Was employed with PAVEY in towing the "Creedy" into the shed, yesterday afternoon. I had hold of the rope close behind deceased, who was nearest the engine. I saw him unhook the tow rope from the engine; he then stumbled and fell between the metals in front of the engine. I saw the leading wheels go over his legs. I had a narrow escape myself. As soon as the engine had passed over deceased I went back and rested his head on my knee. I heard him say, "Oh! my dear wife!" A door was brought, and I assisted to convey him to the Infirmary.
Dr Ford sworn:- The deceased was brought to this institution a little before three o'clock yesterday afternoon. I examined him with Mr Morgan, surgeon, who happened to be in the house at the time. We found that both of his legs were dreadfully crushed; the bones broken into numerous fragments, and the flesh torn as far as the knees. We also discovered that some of his ribs were fractured. He was cold and almost pulseless; still conscious. He complained of being cold in his stomach. Warmth and restoratives were applied and he rallied somewhat; recognised his wife and friends standing round. We were then enabled to put him into bed, but he died within half-an-hour. Death was the result of loss of blood and collapse of the system.
The Coroner briefly addressed the Jury, remarking that the service in which the deceased was engaged was one of great danger, and the safety of the men employed depended on their keeping their footing. A Juryman remarked that it was possible for the engines to be shunted in some other way than that adopted in this instance, which was attended with so much danger, and a suggestion to that effect was appended to the verdict - "Accidental Death." The Jury desired that their fees might be given to the distressed widow of the deceased, who is near her confinement and therefore a fit object of charity.

- Inquests by R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner
TAWSTOCK - Suicide By Drowning. - The learned Coroner held an Inquest at New Bridge, in the parish of Tawstock, on Tuesday, touching the death of HENRY MORRISH, who drowned himself in the river Taw on the previous Monday, while suffering from mental aberration. The following evidence was taken at the Inquisition:-
ANN MORRISH deposed:- The deceased was my son; he was 37 years of age. About 16 years ago he received severe blow in the head, from which he suffered a great deal; he has been deaf in one ear ever since; he has suffered from it from time to time, and occasioned considerable excitement. On Thursday last, hearing that my son was ill, I went to see him; he was looking very p9orly; I left him at about eight o'clock. On Monday morning deceased was worse, and I went there about eight o'clock in the morning. I found Mr Chidley and Mrs Hoyle there. Deceased's wife had gone off to Barnstaple for the doctor. My daughter-in-law came back about ten o'clock; deceased was down stairs, looking very wild. We then got him to bed and gave him some medicine. He was quiet for some time, and then jumped out of bed, and we could scarcely hold him. After some time we got him into bed again. He lay quiet a little time, and then screamed out and got out of bed and sprang through the window; we caught hold of him and held him as long as we could, but he escaped down to the river Taw and got in. He was got out of the river some time after.
MARY MORRISH, widow of deceased, corroborated the evidence of ANN MORRISH, and further said that she had been married to deceased about thirteen years, and during that period deceased had suffered occasionally from excitement; that he had not been at all the worse for liquor for many days before his death.
RICHARD MORRISH, of Bishop's Tawton, deposed:- On Monday last, on hearing that my brother had thrown himself into the river Taw, I went to search for him. His body was found between three and four o'clock. He was quite dead when we took him into the boat. He was about thirty land-yards from where he jumped in.
Michael Cooke, Esq., deposed:- I am parish surgeon for Tawstock. On Saturday morning I received an order to attend deceased. His wife explained the state he was in, and I sent medicine and saw deceased in the afternoon. I found him suffering from inflammation in the lungs; but he stated he was much relieved by the medicine I sent him, and said he hoped to be able to go to work again on Monday. On Monday morning, MARY MORRISH, his wife, came to me between eight and nine o'clock, and said her husband was worse - that his mind during the night had been greatly disturbed. I gave him some more medicine, and direction as to his treatment, and told her I would see him in the course of the day. On going out to deceased in the afternoon I was informed that he had thrown himself out of the bedroom window and into the river Taw, where he was drowned. From the information obtained, I considered he was delirious owing to the inflammation from which he was suffering. The Jury delivered as their verdict - "Drowned himself in the river Taw, being of Unsound Mind."

LITTLEHAM - On Monday last the learned Coroner held an Inquest at the 'Hoops Inn,' in the parish of Littleham, on the body of FREDERICK GLOVER, a little boy, aged five years, son of ANN GLOVER, single woman, whose death was the result of burns received from the accidental ignition of a quantity of straw during the temporary absence of his mother. The facts were detailed in evidence:-
ANN GLOVER sworn:- The deceased was my child; it was illegitimate, and was five years of age at the time of its death. On Saturday, the 7th of March last, about noon, I went out for the purpose of gathering up a few sticks, leaving the deceased in the house. There was no fire there when I left. I remained out about three quarters of an hour, and on returning home I saw the child in the window. I found the house full of smoke and I called my neighbour, Mr Alexander Dennis, for assistance, and discovered a quantity of straw on fire in the backhouse. I saw that the deceased was burnt about the neck, face and arms. There was a box of matches in the oven's mouth when I left, and on my return I discovered that the box of matches had been removed from the oven, and were lying on the floor near the fire-place. I sent off for Mr Turner, the parish doctor, who came and attended the child. It has had every care since it happened, and died yesterday, the 22nd of March.
Mr Charles Turner, surgeon, of Bideford, deposed:- I am medical officer for this parish. I was sent for on seventh of March to attend deceased. I went in the afternoon, having first sent something to be applied to the wounds. I found deceased severely burnt about the face, neck, and arms. I did all that was necessary or could be done. I continued in attendance. Deceased died on the 22nd of March, from the effects f the injuries received. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Burnt."

Thursday 9 April 1863
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest Held By R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner. - The learned Coroner held an Inquest on Saturday last, at the '[Britannia Hotel,' Ilfracombe, touching the death of MISS ELIZABETH VYE, of the above place. The following evidence was adduced at the Inquisition:-
Ann Coats deposed:- I have known the deceased for many years. She is a single woman; but I do not know her age. I lived near the deceased at Ilfracombe. She has been residing in Broad-street, Ilfracombe, since Oct. last. She lived entirely by herself, keeping no servant; a person by the name of Sarah Groves was employed by her as charwoman. I saw her on Tuesday last in the middle of the day; she was very unwell and complained of pain in the back and side. She then told me she was taken unwell on Sunday last when she was in bed. I went to see deceased on Tuesday, in consequence of learning from Sarah Groves that she was unwell. I told her I wished she would have medical advice, but she declined it. I also saw her on Wednesday last, when I found her still very unwell. I again advised her to send for a medical man, but she refused. I wished her to allow me to stay the night, but that she refused, and requested me to take the key of the kitchen to lock the door after me, and to come to her in the morning. After I left I heard her bolt the kitchen door after me. On Thursday, the second of April, I went to deceased's house about seven or eight o'clock in the morning. I unlocked the door, but found it bolted on the inside. Deceased heard me unlocking the door, and said she would come and open it. She was in the kitchen; she said she had come down stairs about four o'clock. I did not ask her if she had been in bed, nor did I go upstairs to see. I lighted the fire and put the kettle of water on, and went to call Sarah Groves. I then went back and told deceased that I had called Sarah Groves, and that I would come and see her by and bye. She was then very ill and complained of pain in her back. At about half-past twelve I again went to see her. I found the door bolted and deceased called to know what was there; I answered, "It is Mrs Coats, and I have something nice for you;" it was a custard pudding. She opened the door and let me in; I found her sitting in the chair; she was much as I found her in the morning; she declined to eat the pudding, but said she would try to eat some with her tea. I again lighted the fire and put the kettle on. About four o'clock I again went to the house of deceased, and knocked gently, but could get no answer, and I did not like to disturb her. I went there again about two hours after, but could not get in. About eight o'clock I again went to the house of Sarah Groves. I remarked to her that I would see her before I went home. She rattled the door and tried the window for some time, but could get no answer. Sarah Groves then discovered that the door was open; but we neither of us went in. I went and fetched Mr Vye, who returned with me; I got a light, but we did not find deceased in the kitchen. I exclaimed, "She is gone to bed." Sarah Groves, seeing a door leading to a passage open, said, "Look in there." I discovered deceased lying in the passage; she was then dead. Mr Stoneham was sent for, who immediately attended. I have heard deceased say that she had relations in Neath.
Sarah Groves deposed:- I knew the deceased and worked for her as charwoman regularly since Oct. last, and occasionally before. Deceased kept no servant and no one slept in the house but deceased. On Monday last she called me about half-past two and I went to her and found her very ill. I lighted her fire for her and made her some tea. I went to and fro several times after that; she complained of great pain in her back. I left her last on that day, at about half-past nine. I left her in the kitchen, in the chair. I went again on the Tuesday, about the same hour. I lighted the fire again, and got her some tea. I still found her very ill, and applied some hot water to her back, in a jar. I saw her several times on that day afterwards, and left her about half-past nine. I, on that day, asked deceased if I should fetch Mr Vye; she said "No." She expected him there with a letter on some business. She also said if I saw Mr Vye, I was to tell him that she could not see him, as she was very unwell. On Wednesday last, I went to deceased about ten o'clock, I found her in the kitchen, in the chair, still very unwell. I lighted the fire and gave her some tea but she could eat nothing with it. Mrs Coats and myself remained with her a great portion of the day, and we several times applied hot water to her back. On Wednesday evening I informed Mr Vye how ill she was. I then went back and told deceased that Mr Vye wishes she would have medical assistance. She said Mr Vye was very kind, and she would see him the next day. On Thursday morning I again went there and found Mr Coats had been there and lighted the fire. Deceased complained still of being very ill. I made some tea, and left. I went in a short time after and saw her drinking some tea, which she did with some difficulty. I did not see her alive after. About half-past one I went to deceased's house and knocked at the door and she asked what I wanted. I told her I had a message from Mr Vye, she said I cannot open the door, I am in a perspiration. I told her Mr Vye wished her to have a medical man; she replied that she was a little better and that she would see him by and bye, and that she if wanted me she would knock for me. I did not see her again until I found her dead at half-past eight o'clock the same evening.
Philip Stoneham, Esq., surgeon, of Ilfracombe, deposed:- On Thursday evening last, about nine o'clock, I was fetched by Mrs Groves to go to the house of deceased, as she believed she was dead. I immediately went and found Mr Vye and Mrs Coats in the house. I was pointed to a passage leading out from the kitchen. I there discovered the deceased on the floor, having fallen from a chamber utensil which was near her. I discovered she must have been dead some hours. I caused her to be removed into the parlour and laid on a sofa. there were no marks of violence appearing on her person. From the evidence I have heard, and from the appearance of the body, I am of opinion deceased died from apoplexy, most probably caused by exhaustion. From the circumstance of her living without any servant, I, with Mr Vye, examined some drawers upstairs, and discovered some bank notes, amounting to £60, and £21 in gold, together with some papers. Mr Vye took possession of the same for safe custody. The Jury returned the following verdict:- "Serous Apoplexy, accelerated by exhaustion and want of proper food."

Thursday 16 April 1863
Coroner's Inquests. Inquests Held By John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner.
HUNTSHAW - Death By the Visitation of God. - On Wednesday, the 8th instant, the learned Coroner held an Inquest at Huntshaw, on the body and to Inquire into the cause of death of MRS MARY SUSSEX. The following evidence was taken:-
WILLIAM SUSSEX sworn:- I am a labourer, and reside at Huntshaw. The deceased was my wife and was about 39 years of age. About one o'clock, on Monday last, I returned home from my labour to dinner, and being rather early, it was not quite ready, but my wife, who was at home preparing it, gave me some cold meat, as I was in a hurry to go to an off farm to take some dung to some potatoes. There were some chicken in the house, and my wife, whom I never saw better and who was quiet cheerful, took them up and carried them to an outhouse. One of my little children, who is about eight years of age, accompanied her, but she had not been gone about two minutes when the little girl came back and said her mother had fallen down. I went to the outhouse and found her lying upon the ground. I took her up and spoke to her, but she gave no answer. She breathed twice and was dead. Medical assistance was sent for immediately.
Mr John Oliver Rouse sworn:- I am a surgeon, and live at Great Torrington. About one o'clock, on Monday last, I received a message to go to Slack, in Huntshaw, to see the deceased who was dead. I accordingly went and found her in bed dead. I was told she had been dead about two hours. I had the clothes taken off, and examined the body. There were no marks of any external violence, but I discovered she was about mid-way pregnant. All motion of the foetus was imperceptible. The body was still warm. She had complained to me of palpitation of the heart, and I always had an idea she had heart disease. She was more than usually congested on the surface, and I attribute her death to heart disease. The Jury returned a verdict of "Sudden Death from Disease of the Heart."

TORRINGTON - Death By Burning. - The same day the learned Coroner held an Inquest at the 'Globe Hotel,' Torrington, on the body of an aged widow named FANNY HILL, who was accidentally burnt on the previous Saturday, and died on Tuesday evening. The only facts that could be ascertained were disclosed in evidence.
James Ward sworn:- I am a carpenter, and reside at Great Torrington. I knew the deceased, FANNY HILL. She was a widow, and was about eighty-four years of age. Last Saturday night, about half-past seven o'clock, as I was in a neighbour's house, at Great Torrington, I saw a light in the street, and I at first thought it proceeded from some boys in the street setting some straw on fire. I looked outside and said, What are you about? but I could see nothing but FANNY HILL going up the street all in a blaze. I ran to her and passed my hands down over her and burnt my hands. I made every effort to put out the flames, and had nearly extinguished them when Richard Sanders, of Great Torrington, came to my assistance. I was nearly smothered. She fell to the ground before Richard Sanders came up. She was taken up and I assisted her to her home. When I first got to her she said, "Good God, what am I come to?"
Richard Sanders deposed:- I am a sawyer, and live at Great Torrington. On Saturday night last, about half-past seven o'clock, as I was proceeding to my home I saw some one in a blaze, in the street. I ran to the spot and found it was FANNY HILL. She had fallen to the ground. James Ward was by the side of her upon the ground. I used my best efforts to extinguish the flames, and burnt my hands. The flames were extinguished and I took her home and sat her down in a chair and took off what I could of her clothes, when Mr Rouse came, and I left her to him. When I first saw the flames, in the street, they were at least seven feet high. She exclaimed several times, "Good God, what am I come to?" but I did not hear her say anything else.
Mr John Oliver Rouse deposed:- I live at Great Torrington, and am a surgeon. About half-past seven o'clock, on Saturday last, I was called upon to go to see the deceased, who, I was informed, had been much burnt. I went to her house, and saw her amongst a crowd of people, sitting in a chair, smouldering in burnt clothes. My brother had before proceeded me. I immediately ordered her to bed, and had her stripped and found her suffering from severe injuries of the left upper extremity and side throughout. The usual remedies were applied, and I attended twice or three times daily since, but she gradually succumbed, and in my opinion, died from shock to the nervous system - the effect of injuries received from fire. She died last evening between five and six o'clock.
Margaret Barrett sworn:- I knew the deceased, FANNY HILL. About half-past seven o'clock on Saturday night last, the deceased attempted to come to my house whilst in a blaze. I went to her. James Ward and Richard Sanders were in the street with her. The flames were extinguished and she was taken home. I have attended her ever since. I at times asked her how she came on fire but she was not clear about it. She said she had some gin and water and that she took a pipe, but that she could not tell whether it proceeded from the pipe or the fire, as she was taken faint. She was in her perfect senses. She lived next door to me. She always lived by herself and would never have any one to live with her, although often requested by her friends, to have some one with her. She wanted no necessaries, as she was in the receipt f £70 a year. Verdict - "Accidental Death from Fire."

Inquest Held By Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner.
CHELDON - Accidental Death. - On Saturday last an Inquest was held by R. Bremridge, Esq., at Cheldon, in this county, on the body of WM. FEATHERSTONE, aged 13, who was found dead under the following circumstances:-
Mr William Harris sworn:- The deceased was a servant in my employ; I believe he was about thirteen years of age. On Thursday morning last, the 9th inst., I directed him to take my mare to the blacksmith for shoeing. About twenty minutes after this I went out into the yard adjoining my house, and I saw the mare in a field, at a short distance, without any one on it; and I fancied I saw deceased lying in the field. I directed my servant, James Lee, to go and see for the deceased. He ran over and I followed him, and found deceased lying in the field. He was quite dead when he was taken up. From the appearance of the field and also of the mare - from the dirt on the mare - I concluded that she must have fallen and rolled over on deceased. The mare was nine years of age and was not a vicious animal.
James Lee, deposed:- I live as servant with Mr Harris. On Thursday morning last, Mr Harris, in consequence of seeing the mare in the field and the body lying on the ground, sent me over, and he came over after me. I found deceased lying on the ground; he was quite dead. He was lying on his face towards the ground. Verdict:- "Accidentally Killed by the Fall of a Horse."

Thursday 30 April 1863
MOLLAND - Melancholy Suicide. Inquest Held By John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner. The learned Coroner held an Inquest on Thursday last, at the residence of the deceased, touching the death of MR JOHN COURTNEY HALSE, a respectable yeoman, who had in a fit of temporary mental aberration put a period to his existence. The facts will be gathered from the evidence adduced:-
Elizabeth Chown deposed:- I knew the deceased, MR JOHN COURTNEY HALSE. He was a gentleman farmer, and resided at Molland, and was about fifty-five years of age. On the night of Tuesday last, believing him not to be right in his mind I watched him. He went to bed about eight o'clock and got up at twelve; when he came down by the fire I got him a cup of tea, some bread and butter, and some eggs. He talked very strangely. I watched him the day before. His spirits were bad and he made use of scarcely anything. He had been very low for about a fortnight and talked at times incoherently. On Tuesday night last, finding his gun missing, and fearing the deceased contemplated doing some harm, I went to see for it and found it in the linhay upon the ground. From twelve o'clock until four yesterday morning he sat by the fire in the kitchen; occasionally going out in the court. He was very strange and melancholy. About half-past three o'clock he said he should go across the court, after which he should go to bed, but he sat on sometime after he said so. About four o'clock he asked me to light a candle, and I put it in a lantern and gave it to him. Before he went out he said he felt a little easier from drinking the tea. Thinking he might be going to the linhay, where I found the gun, I watched him and found he took a direction towards the privy. Finding that he stayed longer than he did before, I went to the privy. I pushed open the door and found him sitting upon the floor with blood upon it. I did not see him move. I was so frightened that I ran away and called for assistance. On Tuesday afternoon, not thinking the deceased was in his right mind, I sent for his brother's son, who came and remained about one hour or so. I knew that his razors were put away on that night. The brother's son is called LEWIS HALSE, and he told me before he left that it would be better for his uncle not to be left by himself during the night, which occasioned me to sit up with him.
John Mildon deposed:- I knew the deceased. I had lived with him as a servant for about a month. For the last four days I have observed him to be in a very low and melancholy state. He seemed to be low spirited and did not give his orders as he was accustomed to do. Before his death I spoke of his melancholy state to my fellow-servants. About four o'clock yesterday morning Mrs Chown called me and said she thought master was dead. I threw on my clothes and went down stairs and went to the privy where Mrs Chown directed me. I there saw my master upon the floor. I saw blood upon the floor and about my master's clothes. I just went inside and then left, and went for Mr Furse, surgeon, of Southmolton.
John Hill deposed:- I knew the deceased. He was my nephew, and have worked for him in and out as a labourer, for thirty years past; during which time I have always considered him to be a good man of business. Last Monday morning, I came to work for him, and I observed a change in him. He looked melancholy and did not speak to me as he was accustomed to do. He complained in his head. I saw him on Tuesday afternoon, and remarked to a fellow-workman that if ever I saw a man maze my master was, and remarked so again late in the day.
Mr Edwin Furse deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Southmolton. Yesterday morning, about half-past four o'clock, I was sent for to go to Pulworthy, to see MR JOHN HALSE. I arrived soon after five and found the deceased in a privy, sitting with his head against the wall, surrounded with a large quantity of blood and found life to be quite extinct. There was also blood about his clothes. I examined the place and found the knife which I now produce. I ordered him to be removed to his bed-room, and then examined him. A wound extended across the neck and had divided the carotid arteries on both sides, together with the trachea, oesophagus and muscles back to the vertebrae. There were no other marks of violence about the body. Death must have been almost instantaneous from haemorrhage. I have no doubt the wound was done with the knife I now produce. The neck-tie was on his neck, and he must have thrown up his neck when the wound was inflicted. I have not the slightest doubt that he did it himself.
The Coroner having summed up the evidence, the Jury returned a verdict - "That the deceased destroyed himself whilst labouring under Temporary Insanity."
[This melancholy occurrence has plunged a highly-respectable family into the deepest gloom. The calamity that has befallen them is one which gives them a claim to public sympathy. It is an inscrutable providence which suddenly deprives a strong-minded man of intellectual and moral power and leaves him a prey to a disordered imagination.]

PLYMOUTH - Fatal Accident at Tregantle. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Plymouth Guildhall, before J. Edmonds, Esq., to enquire as to the circumstances attending the death of ALEXANDER MENHINICK. The deceased, who was about 23 years of age, was a farm labourer, and worked for Mr Thomas Cook, of Millbrook, sub-contractor for the building of the fortifications at Tregantle. On the 1st instant, the deceased was employed in undermining a heap of rubble, nine feet high, whilst two men, named Lemin and Screech, were engaged in filling a cart with it. The centre part of the heap gave way, and the deceased ran backwards, but was brought up by the cart and portions of the rubble in falling, and fractured both his legs. Screech also sustained a slight injury. The deceased was removed to Millbrook, where he was attended by two surgeons. He was subsequently taken to the South Devon and Cornwall Hospital, where he remained, under medical treatment, until Friday last, when death put an end to his sufferings. The Jury re3turned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 May 1863
APPLEDORE - An Inquest was held on Friday last at the 'Royal George' inn, West Appledore, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., Coroner, on the body of GEORGE HOOPER, aged 72, of this place, who died on the 29th of April, from the effects of injuries received some five weeks before, when he accidentally fell down the hold of the ship Elizabeth Yeo. - Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 14 May 1863
APPLEDORE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Coach and Horses Inn,' Appledore, yesterday (Wednesday), before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of ROBERT BOWDEN, son of MR PHILIP BOWDEN, master mariner, who was found dead in his bed on the morning of Tuesday. The evidence adduced was to the effect that the deceased when very young met with an accident by falling from the quay at Appledore, and received such injury that his right side was paralysed, and his mind impaired. Since that time he has been subject to epileptic fits, which resulted in his death on Tuesday. Deceased was 24 years of age. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 21 May 1863
ILFRACOMBE - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'London Inn,' in this town, by John H. Toller, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a pauper and cripple named THOMAS HARRIS, aged 59, who was found on the 15th of April last, lying on Lathstone limekiln, with his head leaning over the kiln and in a state of insensibility. He was taken to Ilfracombe and lodging and attendance procured for him by the Overseers; he lingered till Saturday last, when he expired. The evidence of Mr Stoneham, surgeon, was that death was the result of injuries sustained on the occasion referred to. - Verdict - "Died from extensive burns, accidentally received."

Thursday 4 June 1863
LYNTON - Accidental Death. - Coroner's Inquest. An Inquest was held on Friday last, at the 'Lynn Cottage Inn,' Lynton, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, on the body of THOMAS PILE, miller, of Berrynarbor, there lying dead. The facts were detailed in evidence:-
John Huxtable sworn:- I knew the deceased. He was a miller, residing at Berrynarbor, and was forty-eight years of age. On Tuesday last I accompanied him to Lynton, to sell a horse. We arrived at Lynmouth about two o'clock, and went to Mr Greer's, at the 'Rising Sun.' Deceased sold his horse to Mr Greer for fifteen pounds. The sale was effected about half-past eight. We had about seven pints of beer, which were paid for by deceased. We also drank two glasses of gin and water each before we left Mr Greer's house, about nine o'clock. I had my horse with me, and as deceased had sold his it was arranged that we should ride in turn on our way home. We had drank, but were neither of us tipsy. I got on the horse first, at Lynmouth, and rode up as far as the top of Direction Hill. I then got off, and held the horse while deceased got up. I walked on in advance a short distance. I heard the horse start, and as I turned round I saw deceased falling over the animal's head. It was in that part of the road where there is a large root or mote of a tree, on the right hand side coming from Lynton. I immediately ran back and looked over the wall; I saw it was a steep place, and thought the deceased must be killed. I immediately got on the horse and rode to the nearest house; I saw William Richards, and told him what had happened. He immediately went down to the spot and found the body, and with assistance brought it to the 'Lynn Cottage Hotel.' I then saw deceased; he was quite dead.
William Richards sworn:- I am a labourer, and reside at Lynton. On Tuesday night last, shortly after ten o'clock, the last witness rode up to my house after I had gone to bed. He said a horse had started and thrown a man over the wall, and he was sure he must be dead. I immediately got up and dressed myself, and went to search for the deceased. I found him in the water, and he was quite dead. Other persons came to my assistance, and we removed the body to the 'Lynn Cottage Hotel.' Mr Clarke, surgeon, was sent for, and soon attended.
George Greer sworn:- I am an innkeeper, of Lynmouth. On Tuesday last the deceased, accompanied by John Huxtable, arrived at my house about two o'clock. Deceased had brought a horse for me to see, and I purchased the animal from him for fifteen pounds. We struck the bargain about half-past eight. They had some gin and water after the horse was sold, and left my house soon after nine o'clock. Deceased appeared to have drank a little.
John Clarke, Esq., sworn:- I am a surgeon, residing at Lynton. On Tuesday night last, about eleven o'clock, I was sent for to go to Direction, to see a man who had been thrown from his horse. I immediately started, and on my road thither I was informed by William Hooper that the man was dead; that he had fallen over the wall nearly opposite Mr Crook's house, and that they had taken his body out of the water. I asked if he was sure he was dead, and he told me he was. I then saw them bringing deceased through the wood, the other side of the river. On his being brought to the 'Lynn Cottage,' I saw that he was dead. I have since seen the body and examined it. There was a wound extending through the scalp to the skull about three inches in length. I could perceive no fracture of the skull. From the discharge from the mouth and nostrils I am of opinion that there was some internal fracture, that the vessels became lacerated, and that deceased died from the injuries received. The Jury returned as their verdict "That the deceased was accidentally thrown from a horse, receiving a fracture of the skull and a concussion of the brain."

TAWSTOCK - Coroner's Inquest. - On Friday last, an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., at the dwelling house of Mr Allen Ridge, at Tawstock, on the body of MARY ANN BURDEN, who was discovered on the preceding evening, lying on her face in an oat field, by Mr G. Lewis, boot and shoe maker, and C. C. Angel. Life was extinct; and the evidence adduced shewed that the deceased had been long subject to epileptic fits, and the medical witness (Michael Cooke, Esq.) who made a post mortem examination gave it as his opinion that deceased had fallen down in a fit and had been suffocated. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 11 June 1863
LYNTON - The Late Inquest. - We omitted to state in our report of the Inquest recently held at the 'Lynton Cottage Inn,' on the body of THOMAS PILE, miller, of Berrynarbor, who was accidentally killed by being thrown from his horse, certain remarks made by the Coroner (Richard Bremridge, Esq.) in addressing the Jury. It was stated that in all probability the horse on which the unfortunate man was riding at the time of the accident, shied at a large "mote" or root of a tree that had been permitted by the Highway Surveyor to remain by the side of and to obstruct the road, notwithstanding remonstrances that had been made to him on the subject; and the learned Coroner remarked that if that fact had been deposed to in evidence he should have advised the Jury to return a verdict of "Manslaughter" against the Surveyor.

Thursday 25 June 1863
PILTON- Suspected Infanticide. - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening, at the 'Rolle Quay Inn,' Rolle's Quay, in the parish of Pilton, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, and a Jury of which Mr John Pile was foreman, touching the death of an illegitimate male infant to which a young woman named ELIZABETH KING had given birth and which died that morning. The learned Coroner having briefly stated the subject of inquiry, the Jury, accompanied by a medical gentleman, proceeded to view the body, and on their return to the inn the following evidence was taken:-
ELIZABETH KING sworn:- I am a widow, and reside on Rolle's Quay, in the parish of Pilton. My daughter, ELIZABETH KING, lives with me. She was delivered of a child on Thursday last; I think at about 11 o'clock in the forenoon. I was from home at the time and she sent for me; and on my entering her room she said, "Mother, I've got a baby! Run and call Mrs Goss." I saw the child, and then left the room to send for Mrs Goss, who is a midwife. I sent a neighbour, and remained with my daughter, who anxiously waited for Mrs Goss's arrival. She came in about five minutes; and first looked at the baby and then attended to the mother. The child was poorly till yesterday (Friday), when, at Mrs Goss's suggestion, we sent for the doctor. I went myself and called Mr Fernie. My daughter was very desirous that a medical man should be sent for. He came in a short time; at about 1 o'clock. He said I was to bathe4 the throat of the child with warm water and give it sugar and water. It had difficulty ins wallowing and was convulsed, but it slept well last night, though it was very ill and low. This morning the child continued very ill and Mr Fernie saw it at 12 o'clock; it got worse and died shortly after - between 12 and 1. I knew my daughter was in the family way; but did not know that she was so far advanced; nor did she know it herself, so she has since told me.
Mrs Mary Goss sworn:- I am the wife of William Goss, of Barnstaple cabinet maker, and am accustomed to act as midwife. I was sent for on Thursday last at 4 o'clock. A neighbour named Beer came to me and begged I would run as fast as I could to ELIZABETH KING, who was in labour. I went and found the mother in an exhausted state, in bed. I attended to her. She could not speak to me for several minutes. The child was wrapped up and lying near the bed, and I then attended to it. ELIZABETH KING told me it was her child and she then described all that had happened. She said she was engaged to be married. I have no suspicion of any intentional injury to the child. I think what was done was done ignorantly and innocently. Yesterday, not thinking the child would recover, I sent for Mr Fernie. I observed marks on the neck, on the right and left side, when I washed the child. I remarked to the mother, "This is a bad job - these marks." She said "I can't tell what 'tis."
Andrew Fernie, Esq., sworn:- I am a surgeon, of Barnstaple. I was sent for yesterday, at 1 o'clock, to see ELIZABETH KING, on Rolle's Quay. I went accordingly. I was shewn the child of ELIZABETH KIGN in the arms of Mrs Goss. The child was breathing with difficulty. I examined it to discover the cause, and observed some unusual marks on each side of the neck, such as might be caused by the nails of the hand. The neck was swollen. I had the child stripped and examined it more particularly; but, with the exception of two slight scratches on the back the body was in a healthy state. I looked into the mouth of the child, and saw that the tongue was of an unusually livid colour. In consequence of the symptoms I observed in the child, I concluded that some injury had happened to the throat which produced such symptoms, and I expressed an opinion that the child would die. It got worse and died this morning. I saw it this morning when it was dying, and I told the mother so and she appeared grieved and cried. I believe that death was caused by the injuries to the throat, which interfered with the breathing. I have no suspicion of unfair treatment or intentional injury. Probably it was done in the agony of parturition.
The Coroner addressed the Jury pointing out the leading facts detailed in evidence. The child was illegitimate, and when it was born the mother was alone; no medical man was called in; and the child's death was the result of injuries denoted by certain marks on the neck. Those marks were caused by the mother, and the Jury would have to determine whether in their judgment they were caused by an involuntary act or with an intent to inflict injury and destroy life. If the former, they would find that death resulted from accidental causes; if the latter, they must return a very different verdict.
The Jury returned as their verdict that the injuries sustained by the child were ignorantly inflicted by the said ELIZABETH KING while in the agony of labour, and that the death of the infant was accidental.

BRAUNTON - Found Drowned. - On Monday last, the body of a man called THOMAS BERRY, a native of Appledore, was picked up on Saunton Sands and taken to the dead-house, at Braunton, to await a Coroner's Inquest, which will be held at 3.30 p.m. (This is the man drowned in attempting to board a vessel on Thursday last, the full particulars of which will appear under the head Appledore.)

Thursday 9 July 1863
DEVONPORT - Murder of a Child by its Mother at Devonport. - On Thursday morning, a woman named ELIZABETH THOMAS, residing in John-street, Morice Town, murdered her child, a female infant, three weeks old, not named, by cutting its throat with a razor. She was at once apprehended, and brought before the magistrates, who remanded her without entering into a detailed examination of the case. In the meantime, at half-past one, an Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before A. B. Bone, Esq., the Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr J. N. Daw was foreman. The Jury having proceeded to view the body which was at the parents' residence, the following evidence was adduced:- Joseph Dyer: I am a stonemason, living in the house No. 35, John street, Morice Town, and am the brother of ELIZABETH THOMAS, who has been living in the house with her husband and four children. This morning, about 20 minutes to 6 o'clock, I came down stairs and went into her room, being about to go to my work. The door of the room was wide open, and when I entered she was not there. Her husband, who had been ill for some time, was in bed asleep, and the deceased infant was lying on its back on the hearth-rug before the fireplace. I saw blood on its night dress. The only other person in the room except the husband was another of the children, who was also asleep. I went over to the deceased infant and lifted its head. It was then living, and gasped. There was a covering over the neck. I called to its father and asked where ELIZABETH was, but he did not wake, and I then went on the landing fearing lest my sister might have drowned herself, and met her coming up the stairs. She had a pitcher of water in her hand. I said, "Oh! ELIZABETH, what have you done to the baby?" She looked at me very innocently, and said, "I cut its throat." We then both came into the room together, and she sat down on a chair by the fire-place, just opposite the child. I said, "What did you do it for?" and she replied, "I don't know." I then said, "What did you do it with?" She answered, "The razor." I said, "Where is it?" and she said, "Here," taking it into her hand from the table. I said, "Give it to me," which she did. It was, I think, partly shut, and had blood about it. She said, "I have been working hard all night, and I thought I had killed all in the house." The Jury expressed their conviction that the poor woman was insane, and returned the verdict of "Wilful Murder" suggested, the committal then being made out. The prisoner was not present during the proceedings, it having been thought, under medical advice, that such a course would be prejudicial to her.

BISHOP'S TAWTON - Awfully Sudden Death. - On Tuesday evening, a man named HINDE, of Venn, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, who had arrived by the last train from Plymouth, was proceeding on foot towards his home apparently in good health. He had reached as far as the residence of Capt. Urmston, Rosehill Villa, Rumsam, when, without previous premonition, he fell down and suddenly expired. - A Coroner's Inquest issued in a verdict of "Died by the Visitation of God."

Thursday 16 July 1863
WEST BUCKLAND - Accidental Death. - The learned County Coroner (Richard Bremridge, Esq.), held an Inquest on Monday last, at West Buckland, to inquire into the circumstances attending the death of ABRAHAM BOWDEN, a lad aged ten years, who died on the previous Saturday from injuries accidentally received. The facts will be gathered from the evidence of Henry Bale, who deposed:- I am a labourer, and have been employed on Middle-hill Farm. On Saturday last, the 11th instant, we were carrying hay in a field called Tanpark. The deceased was on the back of a horse in a cart used for carrying the hay. I saw him coming up over the field; the horse was going faster. I saw deceased getting off the further side, and in doing so his body got entangled in the ropes, and he was dragged about twelve or fourteen yards. The horse was racing and kicking a little, but whether he touched deceased I could not say. I assisted in stopping the horse, and deceased was taken up; he was marked in the forehead, and his chest appeared injured. Mr Gamble, surgeon, was immediately sent for. The horse was perfectly quiet. The deceased complained in his chest, and died in about half an hour, and before the surgeon arrived. I do not think the wheel passed over the child, but the rope was long enough to allow the body to come into contact with the wheel. Deceased was not compelled to drive or ride the horse, but he did it of his own free will. The deceased was son of ABRAHAM BOWDEN, of West Buckland, labourer, and was ten years of age last February. The evidence of the surgeon (C. H. Gamble, Esq., of Barnstaple), who examined the body was, that death resulted from a rupture of a blood vessel in the chest. Verdict - "Accidentally Killed by being thrown from a horse in a cart."

BRADWORTHY - Inquest by John Henry Toller, Esq., - On Wednesday last, the learned Deputy Coroner for the County, held an Inquest at the house of Mr Thomas Cann, yeoman, touching the death of MARTHA SUSANNAH HOPPER, an infant of two years old, who had died on the previous Monday evening. There were sinister rumours as to the cause of death, but on the evidence of Mrs Harriet Wright and Mr Eusebius Rouse, surgeon, the Jury returned a verdict of "Died suddenly from general debility."

FREMINGTON - Accidentally Drowned. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, at Fremington, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, touching the death of JAMES NEWCOMBE, aged 17 years, a farm servant in the employ of Mr John Dullam. The particulars will be gathered from the following depositions:- John Dullam sworn: - I knew the deceased; he was 17 years of age, and a servant in my father's employ. On Sunday, the 12th day of July, the deceased, with myself and two other parties, went down to the river Taw, for the purpose of bathing; the tide was then flowing in. We all undressed and went in; deceased went out further into the river than I and the others did; I saw him struggling, and I went to his assistance, but it was out of my depth, and I could not get to him; I called out for assistance, but no one came. Deceased was taken out near the same place about three hours afterwards when the tide went back. I could not swim myself, nor could either of the other parties. Christopher Ridge deposed: - On Sunday last, the 12th of July, hearing that JAMES NEWCOMBE had been bathing and was drowned, I went down to assist in getting the body. I discovered it, after the tide went out, in the middle gut of the Islay, on the banks of the river Taw. Deceased was quite dead when he was taken out of the water. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned while Bathing."

Thursday 23 July 1863
TORQUAY - Shocking Accident to a Lady at Torquay - An Inquest was held on Friday evening, on the body of MISS MARY ANN BLAKE, eldest daughter of ADMIRAL BLAKE, who died early on Thursday morning, from injuries sustained on the previous Thursday night, when her dress accidentally caught fire. From the evidence adduced, and which mainly corroborated what has before appeared in this paper, it appears that about eleven o'clock on Tuesday night deceased, who had retired to her room, was heard to scream. The coachman and housemaid at once proceeded there, and found her on the floor, enveloped in flames. Her sister, MISS E. BLAKE, was also trying to put out the fire, and got fearfully burnt herself. The servants procured hearth-rugs and water and after removing her burning apparel, put her to bed; she never rallied, however, and died a little before three o'clock on Thursday morning. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

Thursday 30 July 1863
Melancholy Death of MR HEWS, Lord Poltimore's Bailiff. - This morning the villages of Poltimore and Broadclist were the scenes of great consternation, consequent on the reported suicide of MR ROBERT HEWS, the Bailiff of the Right Hon. Lord Poltimore. Numerous exaggerated reports were in circulation as to the cause and circumstances attending the melancholy catastrophe; but the facts appear to be as follows:- MR HEWS, who was about 63 years of age, had from his boyhood been in the service of the Poltimore family. He succeeded his father as gamekeeper to the late lord; and on resigning that occupation, he was appointed bailiff. In both capacities he appears to have earned the good-will of his neighbours; and to have enjoyed the confidence of the late and present lord. Within a very recent period certain charges had been laid to MR HEWS - charges which, on being brought to the knowledge of Lord Poltimore, were fully investigated by him and the Hon. and Rev. Mr Fortescue, on his lordship's return to Poltimore on Tuesday last. The result was that yesterday (Thursday) morning MR HEWS was dismissed the service of Lord Poltimore. This morning (Friday), he went accompanied by a servant boy, named George Coombes, a lad, about fifteen years of age to dig some potatoes in one of his fields. On leaving his house he took a double-barrel gun with him, in order as he said, to endeavour to shoot some of the rooks which were carrying off the potatoes. On arriving at the field, which is situate near the village of Poltimore, on the road to Broadclist, he placed the gun in the hedge. He assisted Coombes in digging some potatoes, and then said to him "Boy, go over after my gun," adding immediately afterwards, "Oh, never mind, I will go after it myself, for fear you may shoot yourself." He then went to the hedge for the gun, and Coombes saw him reach up for it, being only a few yards distant at the time. The barrels of the gun appear to have been pointed towards him, and he took it down with his left hand. The gun was full-cocked, and immediately after MR HEWS had taken hold of it the lad heard a report, and saw the unfortunate man fall backwards. Coombes rushed up, and found his master was shot through the left breast. The charge of the right-hand barrel had entered just below the shoulder bone, severing the main arteries leading to the heart, as subsequently proved by Dr Collins, and death must have been almost instantaneous. The barrel must have been very close to the breast when it was discharged, as the hole made through the coat and waistcoat seemed to indicate that the gun had been loaded with a bullet. In fact it was generally reported that the gun was loaded with bullets; but on the charge in the second barrel being drawn by Mr Robert May, the game-keeper, and Sergeant Burnell, in the presence of Lord Poltimore, it was found that it contained only ordinary shot; and there is no doubt that the other barrel was similarly loaded. the deceased was conveyed to his house; where an Inquest will be held tomorrow (Saturday) morning, before R. R. Crosse, Esq., Coroner. The evidence of Coombes strongly tends to show that MR HEWS was the victim of an unfortunate accident, and such was the verdict returned by the Jury: although whether the death was premeditated will ever remain a mystery. MR R. HEWS leaves a widow and family to mourn his untimely end.

Thursday 6 August 1863
RINGSASH - A Man and Horse Drowned in the Taw. On Saturday afternoon last, a man named THOMAS ROW, servant to Mr Skinner, of Hansford Farm, Ringsash, met with a most melancholy death by drowning. It appears that he foolishly attempted to cross the river Taw, with a horse and cart, just below Colleton Barton House, not being aware of its depth. When about mid-way across he got quite out of his depth, and in a few minutes both the unfortunate man and horse sank. When discovered the body had been in the water about an hour, and life was quite extinct. Dr Ford, of Chulmleigh, was promptly in attendance, but it was of no avail. An Inquest was held on Monday, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, when a verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

Thursday 13 August 1863
COMBMARTIN - Accidental Death - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Tuesday last, the 11th inst., at the 'Red Lion' inn, Combmartin, by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM LATHAM, of the said parish. The facts of the case will be gathered from the following depositions:-
Thomas Watts deposed:- I work for Mr Nicholas Clogg, in his lime quarry, in Well Park Meadow; the deceased was in the same employ. I was at work yesterday with the deceased, in the quarry; he was boring and I was malletting to him, about half-past eleven, and we had been boring about a quarter of an hour, when about a butt-load of dead ground fell in on the back of deceased. I immediately got him out, and removed him to Henry Jewell's house. He was quite sensible when he was taken out. Mr Kingdon, surgeon, was immediately sent for. The deceased lived for about two hours after the ground fell in on him. Mr Clogg the owner of the quarry, had cautioned us in the morning not to work there.
Mr A. S. Kingdon, surgeon, sworn:- I was sent for yesterday, between eleven and twelve 'clock, to attend deceased. I immediately went, and found deceased at Jewell's house. I examined the body and found he had received considerable internal injuries; the pelvis, I believe, was broken; he was suffering from great prostration. I did everything to give relief, but I had from the first an unfavourable impression of the case,. He was so weak that I could not allow him to be removed. I remained with him about an hour, and on returning, at about half-past two, I found he was dead. He died, I am of opinion, from internal haemorrhage.
Mr Nicholas Clogg, the owner of the quarry, stated he had cautioned deceased and Thomas Watts as to working the quarry the same morning the accident had occurred. Verdict - "Accidentally killed by the falling in of a lime quarry."

EXETER - Melancholy Gun Accident at Exeter. - An Inquest was held at the 'Windsor Castle Inn,' Summerland-street, Exeter, on Thursday evening, before the City Coroner, and a respectable Jury, touching the death of MARTHA WINSOR. The facts were disclosed in evidence:-
ANN WINSOR, mother of the deceased, wept bitterly and said:- My husband is a servant, and resides in Russell-street. The body shown to the jury is my daughter. She is called MARTHA WINSOR, and a single woman, aged 18. She lived home, and was a tailoress by trade. She left my house last evening in good health to sleep at Mrs J. Brennan's. I heard nothing of her till today, about twelve o'clock, when Mrs Burgoine came and told me to make haste and come to my daughter, and be prepared for the worst. I saw there was something, and I ran, when I found my daughter was shot and covered with blood. There was full half a bucket of blood at least.
Sarah Ann Brennan said:- I am a married woman; my husband is a plasterer; the young man present is called Abraham Brennan. I knew the deceased; she slept with me last night. This morning, as usual, she went to work at Mrs Thomas Brennan's, who resides at 33 Codrington-street. About twelve o'clock Abraham Brennan came in the room, and gave us an apple each. Mary Ann Shears and the deceased were in the room, and while the deceased went to the cupboard for an iron, Abraham Brennan went to the corner of the room, took up a gun, and began rubbing it, as I thought, to clean it. Mr Brennan's dog came in, and Abraham held the gun to the dog, and said "Charley, come on." The dog ran to the back of the deceased and made a noise; the deceased stooped down and the gun went off, and deceased instantly fell back, the contents of the gun having entered her neck, the shots coming out of her mouth. Abraham Brennan caught hold of me, and said, "She is dead! she is dead!" and ran out into the street, like a madman. I called to Mr Burgoine, who went and fetched her mother The gun belongs to Mr Thomas Brennan.
By a Juror:- It was last used by my husband, Abraham Brennan, and a young man. The deceased was on good terms with Abraham, who had kissed her only a few minutes before.
Mary Ann Shears corroborated the last witness's evidence.
John Harvey was called, and said:- I am a butcher, residing at St. Sidwell's. I met Abraham Brennan this morning between nine and ten. e said to me - "Helloo, where are you going?" I said - "I am going to my sister's; will you go with me." He replied, "I will." We returned, and went as far as the Bude Haven, and met a lad called Flodder, who said to Brennan - "Where are you going?" He replied - "I don't know, as Warren is gone away." I said - "If I was you I would go as far as Haldon." Flodder said - "I would not, as you are out of a situation, it will throw you into expenses." He said - "No, I wan't; I'll go and take my gun, and go as far as Mr Merrifield's field, and shoot some sparrows."
Mr Samuel Perkins said:- I am a surgeon, residing in Exeter. I was called this morning about a quarter past twelve to go to Codrington-street to a gun accident. I went, and was shown into a back room, where the deceased was on the floor, surr9unded by two pools of blood. Her hands were blanched, and rested on her breast; also her face. She was quite dead. I found a circular wound the size of a florin on the right side of her face. The upper and lower jaw were fractured. The lower and upper lips were lacerated. One third of her jaw was hanging out of her mouth. One half of her tongue was also absent. On examining the mantlepiece, which I should think was eleven feet high, I found eleven shots, which I produce, and which were flattened. The wound outside was circular, black, and smelt of gunpowder. I also picked up from the mantlepiece a piece of newspaper, which smelt of gunpowder, and flesh adhered to it. I also picked up a small portion of the tongue. The wall was splattered with blood. About five feet from the body towards the window on the floor was the remaining portion of the tongue. I also picked up two shots, which were by the legs of the deceased. She died from exhaustion and sudden loss of blood, produced by a gun-shot wound.
By the Coroner:- The mother of deceased said that the deceased was not engaged to Abraham Brennan.
Abraham Brennan was cautioned by the Coroner in the usual manner. He said he took up the gun, not knowing it was either loaded, cocked, or capped. It was purely accidental. He seemed deeply affected at the catastrophe. The Coroner summed up, and the Jury immediately returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 20 August 1863
- Two Cases of Drowning - Inquests.
WEST BUCKLAND - Inquest by Richard Bremridge, Esq. - On Thursday last an Inquest was held by the learned Coroner, at West Buckland, on the body of WILLIAM WILLIAMS, a pupil at the Devon County School, who was unfortunately drowned while bathing on the day preceding. The following evidence was taken:-
Edwin Henry Morris sworn:- The deceased was a school-fellow with me. Yesterday, about half-past four, he with myself and Bruce went down to a pond to bathe. We all went into the water together, and were in about five or ten minutes when we saw WILLIAM WILLIAMS go under water; he rose and we called to him. He remained up a few seconds and then sank again, but we could just see his hands. I immediately went off and called two me, who came and one went off for further assistance. The other got a hook to get at the plug to let the water off the pond. Thomas Higgings then came down and took him out. Deceased never spoke after he was taken out of the water, and I believe he was dead.
Thomas Higgings deposed:- I am a labourer, of West Buckland. Yesterday afternoon I was informed that there was a boy in the pond on Middle Hill Farm. I went to endeavour to get him out; the water was about five feet deep. I dived for him, but missed him; I afterwards got him out. Deceased was quite dead when he was taken out. Mr Andrew Fernie deposed:- I am a surgeon, of Barnstaple. I was sent for yesterday evening, about six o'clock, to go to the school at West Buckland. I immediately attended, and was informed that WILLIAM WILLIAMS was taken out of the water, and supposed to be dead. I carefully examined the body. There were no marks of violence apparent. I found deceased was dead. There was no appearance of cramp in the limbs. There can be no doubt he died from suffocation and drowning. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

BARNSTAPLE - Inquest by John Henry Toller, Esq. - On Thursday evening last, a little boy named THOMAS OLIVER, aged 12 years, son of MR OLIVER, blacksmith, Silver-street, Barnstaple, was unfortunately drowned whilst bathing in the River Taw, at Pottington. Several persons were near the spot, and witnessed the melancholy occurrence, one of whom (Mr Greenwood, master mariner, of this port) jumped into the water, and attempted to save the poor boy's life; but, the tide flowing very rapidly at the time, he was unable to reach the spot before the little fellow sank to rise no more. Attempts were made to recover the body immediately, and throughout the whole of Friday and Saturday nets and grappling irons were used, but without success. On Saturday evening, however, the body was discovered by a lad named Huett, floating between Black Barn and the Railway Bridge. He immediately procured assistance, and it was brought to the shore, and conveyed to the 'Ring of Bells' public house, in the parish of Bishop's Tawton, where it was kindly received by the landlady, Mrs Snell. An Inquest was held on Monday morning, and a verdict of "Accidental Death" returned. The deceased was a scholar at the Blue Coat School; his affable disposition had won for him the love of his teachers and schoolfellows by whom he is sincerely regretted. Twenty of his schoolmates attended the funeral on Tuesday, with crape strings in their caps, and the scene at the grave was most affecting. Great sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents, and public prayer was offered up for them on Sunday morning, at the Wesleyan Chapel.

ILFRACOMBE - A Child Killed By Falling Out of a Window. - Caution to Parents. - A sad accident, attended with fatal results, happened at Ilfracombe on Saturday last, to a little girl, named MARY JANE RUDD, daughter of a ship-carpenter, named JOHN RUDD, living in Roper's-lane. It appears that her sister was dressing the little girl in an up-stair room, when she ran over to the window and leaned out, attracted by some object that was passing. Unfortunately she leaned over too far, and, losing her balance, she was precipitated head foremost into the street below. She was instantly picked up by Mr Best, and medical aid was immediately sent for. Philip Stoneman, Esq., surgeon, arrived within five minutes, when he found the child still totally insensible. There appeared to be no fracture but there was a good deal of extravasation between the skull and scalp. Mr Stoneman immediately applied cold clothes to the head of the poor little sufferer, and she partially recovered. She was visited by the surgeon five times during the day, but she gradually sank from the effects of the accident. An Inquest was held on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, when a verdict of "Accidental Death from a Fall" was returned.

Thursday 27 August 1863
BRATTON FLEMING - Inquest By Richard Bremridge, Esq. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at the 'Stag's Head,' Bratton Fleming, on the body of ELIZABETH PHILLIPS, who died on the previous Friday evening, after a brief illness. Sinister rumours having been circulated as to the supposed cause of death, the learned Coroner held the Inquisition, at which the following evidence was taken:-
William Gregory sworn:- I married a daughter of the deceased and she resided with me. She has lived with me for three years. She was in her seventy-fifth year; she has been an invalid for many years, and has had medical assistance from Mr Fernie, the parish doctor, for some time. She was a member of the Bratton Fleming Death Club, and had assigned over her interest in the club to my wife. On Thursday last about four o'clock, she came downstairs, and about half-past four she was standing at the table and breaking some bread into a tea cup, she was attacked and could not speak, and her left hand and side was drawn up. I went to her and put my hand round her and asked what was the matter, but she could not speak; she appeared to have no use in her legs. I placed her in a chair, and called a neighbour, Grace Hunt. When Grace Hunt came she appeared a little revived; Grace Hunt asked what was the matter, and she replied she was bad all over. Mrs Hunt then washed her face in cold water, and said she would give her a drop of gin, as that had relieved her before. She gave her a small glass of gin and she drank about half of it. At this time Grace Webber came in; she spoke to her, and deceased replied, she was ill over. Mrs Hunt then said they had better put her to bed; they did so, and covered her up. After she was in bed they tried to lift up her left arm but she had no use of it; they then examined her legs and her left leg was quite stiff. Mrs Hunt then gave her the gin which was left in the glass. I then asked deceased if I should send for the doctor; she replied, "Bill, what good is it to send for the doctor? he has said many times he could do me no good." - At this time, Phoebe Hill came in and asked deceased if she would have something to eat. Deceased replied, she thought she could eat a bit of her ham, if she had it. Phoebe Hill then went and fetched a slice, and cut it up in small pieces, and put it in her mouth, which she swallowed; the second piece she could not swallow. I then asked deceased if she would have a pipe of tobacco, and I filled a pipe and left her smoking it. I then went to work at Bampfield Mine, Northmolton, leaving word with Grace Webber, Mrs Hunt, and Sarah Seage, that if deceased was worse I was to be sent for. On Friday night, I received information that she was dead.
Grace Webber, deposed:- I am the wife of George Webber, of Bratton Fleming, Devon, carpenter. I knew the deceased, she was my aunt. I was in the habit of seeing her once or twice a week; I saw the deceased on Thursday last, between four and five o'clock. She appeared in a dying state. Mrs Hunt was holding her up. I asked what was the matter; she said she was ill all over. Mrs Hunt said, "What do you think of her, Mrs Webber?" I replied, "I think we had better get her to bed." Deceased said, "Grace Webber will carry me there." Mrs Hunt said, "She can't carry you." I replied, "I could carry her," which I did, and placed her on the bed. I remained with her a few minutes, and went downstairs to see my little boy, leaving Mrs Hunt and William Gregory with the deceased. I then removed some things which lay on the table, consisting of a piece of newspaper, a powder in a paper with "Sugar of Lead" written on it, some lucifer matches, and tobacco, and a pot f ointment. All these things I placed on the chimney piece in Wm. Gregory's kitchen. I then went upstairs again. William Gregory said, "It will be better to have the doctor for her." I said, "You may please yourself; she is worse than ever I saw her." I asked my aunt if she would have the doctor, and she replied, "The doctor would do me no good." Mrs Hunt said it might be a satisfaction to have him. Gregory said he could not fetch the doctor - he must go to Molton. I said "If you must go to Molton you must." Gregory and myself asked her if she would smoke a pipe of tobacco; deceased replied she would, and Gregory went and filled a pipe and gave it to her. Gregory then left for Molton, and said "If deceased was worse he was to be sent for." Mary Barrow, my mother, then came in. She looked in upon her and said, BETTY, meaning the deceased, was poisoned. She had seen a Mary Courtice, who had been poisoned, and deceased was like her. I then said to my mother, "Go down stairs, and see for the little paper I put on the mantel piece." She went down and returned and said there was none there. I asked the deceased what she had had to eat. She said, she had a cup of tea and two pieces of bread and butter. I asked deceased who gave it to her, and she replied, "Gregory." I asked her if it was very good tea, and she said, "Yes, it was good and sweet." I then asked her if she would have anything more to eat and whether she could eat a nursery biscuit. She said, "Yes;" I said, "You shall have it." I took the biscuit from a drawer in her bed-room. Mrs Hunt told me where to get it. I went down stairs, took some water out of the kettle, which I put on the biscuit with a little sugar, but she could not eat it. Deceased said she had something to tell me; I replied, "If you have you had better tell me at once." She said, "About what he gave me in the saucer." I said, "What did he give you in the saucer, and what was it like?" She said to me, "Do you know what they call savage?" I replied, "I did not." Deceased said, "It is like a little old fir tree; it was not that, but it was that taste." Deceased said, "I have more to tell you," but she told me nothing more; I then went home leaving Mrs Hunt there. On Friday morning I went to the secretary of the Bratton Death Club, to see if Gregory's name was put on the club books, and to have it transferred, if it could be done. Deceased said that if it could be done it should, and that she would give it to me and a little of it to Betsy Alford. Deceased said she would never go to Molton.
Grace Hunt deposed:- I lived a neighbour to the deceased, and have known her many years. On Thursday afternoon last, William Gregory, a little after four, came to me and asked if I would come up, as grandmother, meaning deceased, was taken very ill. I went up. When I arrived at Gregory's I saw deceased in a chair apparently as if she had a seizure. I got some water and washed her face, and she did not recover. I spoke to her and deceased replied, "I am very ill." I then asked Gregory if a little drop of gin would do her any good. I went and got some, and gave her about a table spoonful. Mrs Webber then came in; we thought of putting her to bed, and deceased said Grace Webber would carry her to bed. I replied to Grace Webber, "I don't think you could take her to bed." Webber replied, "I could carry AUNT BETTY very well," and she took her up and carried her upstairs. William Gregory said, "Grandmother, I will fetch the doctor." The deceased replied, "The doctor will do me no good." Gregory then said, "I should not like to have you die without a doctor." Gregory had then to go off to Molton to his work. He left word with me that if any change took place, or deceased was worse, he was to be sent for. Soon after Gregory left, Mrs Barrow, the mother of Mrs Webber, came in, and saw deceased. She said, "AUNT BETTY, you look like one poisoned." She was like one who had been poisoned before of the name of Courtice. I replied, "You don't think that, to be sure." I was in the room with deceased, Mrs Webber, and Mrs Barrow. I did not hear Mrs Webber tell Mrs Barrow to go down stairs and search for anything. I don't know that Barrow did go down to search for anything. Mrs Barrow did not come upstairs and say she could find nothing. I saw nothing on the table in Gregory's house when I first went there, but cups and saucers. If there had been any paper, a paper of powder, or a pot of ointment there, I certainly should have noticed it, but I saw none. Mrs Webber went home about nine o'clock and put her children to bed, and came back and remained with me during the night with the deceased. I never heard deceased say, "About what he gave me in the saucer." Nor did I ever hear her say "Do you know what they call savage?" or that it was "like a little old fir tree;" but did hear Mrs Barrow say that deceased had said so. I knew deceased was a member of the Bratton Death Club. Grace Webber went on Friday to the secretary of the Bratton Death Club to request him to make a transfer to her of the interest deceased had in the Club. Deceased died about six o'clock on Friday evening. I heard nothing whatever about the powder, or that anything had been put away in Gregory's house, until Saturday afternoon.
Mr Andrew Fernie deposed:- I am the parish surgeon for Bratton Fleming, and have attended deceased. She was in general bad state of health, suffering from inflammation and ulcers in her legs. I have, in pursuance of the Coroner's warrant, made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased. I first examined the head, and discovered a large clot of blood on the brain, produced by the rupture of a vessel; and I observed traces of a smaller clot which had been partially obscured. I examined the chest and found the heart and lungs healthy. I examined the abdomen, and took out the stomach with great care, and examined it and found it healthy - entirely free from all traces of any irritant poison - and I am of opinion deceased died from apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict "Died from Rupture of a Vessel on the Brain."

EXETER - Sudden Death in Exeter Market. - WILLIAM TURNER, a labourer, in the employ of Mr Ward, coal merchant, whilst on a visit to his mother in the Lower Market, Exeter, on Saturday, suddenly fell down and was taken up insensible, and shortly afterwards died. At the Coroner's Inquest it was proved that deceased had formerly been addicted to excessive drinking, and that he died from fatty degeneration of the heart, such as alcohol produces. The verdict was given accordingly.

Thursday 10 September 1863
TEIGNBRIDGE - The Murder at Teignbridge. - The Coroner's Inquiry concerning the death of JOHN MEERS, aged 31, whose body was found in the water under one of the arches at Teignbridge, on Friday, the 22nd of August, was resumed on Tuesday, at the Union Inn, Teignrace. William Hamlyn a labourer, of Leverton, deposed that the last time he saw deceased alive was on Thursday, the 13th of Aug., at Newton Races, in company with a fellow-workman, called Coleman. He saw him several times during the evening. He appeared to have been drinking. Between 9 and 10 o'clock he saw deceased near the grand stand, and heard him say to Heath, "Heath, you are quite a different man from what I took you to be." Heath did not reply. Thomas Harris, a bargeman, of Newton said that on the night of the first day of the races, about half-past 10 o'clock, he was returning from the races, and when near to Kingsteignton-bridge, a man came up and caught him by the legs and attempted to throw him over the bridge. A man called Bully came to his assistance. He followed the man, who was a stranger to him, to the 'Dartmouth Inn,' Newton, where he was told his name was Bunker. Witness also said that he saw the deceased on the second day of the races on the racecourse. John Heath, a potter of Bovey Tracey, was next called, and, after being cautioned by the Coroner in the usual way, deposed to having seen the deceased at the Newton Races on Thursday, the 13th of August. The last time he saw him alive was between 11 and 12 in the evening. Deceased was then sitting on a form in the last booth towards Newton. He appeared to have been drinking. Witness shortly afterwards left to go home, in company with a man called James Lethbridge. When witness left the course there was fighting going on in one of the booths, between some sparring men and a number of Kingsteinton men. Witness got home between 2 and 3 o'clock in the morning. On his way home he passed over the bridge where the deceased's body was found. On passing the booth the deceased spoke to him and said, "Heath, you have assaulted me." Witness, in fighting, hit the deceased twice in the face, knocking him down each time. He never quarrelled with the deceased before, as there was no one in the pottery he respected more. The Jury returned the following verdict:- "That the deceased was murdered by blows inflicted upon him, and afterwards thrown into the water, by some person or persons unknown." The Coroner said that he perfectly agreed with the verdict, and intimated his intention of communicating with the Secretary of State, with a view of having a reward offered for the discovery of the perpetrator.

Thursday 24 September 1863
LANDCROSS - Suspected Infanticide. - An Inquest was held on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the newly-born male child of ELIZA MOSS, single woman, a servant living with Mr William Partridge, of Landcross, which it was suspected had come to an unnatural death. The following evidence was taken:-
Elizabeth Partridge sworn:- I am the wife of William Partridge, of Landcross, yeoman. I know ELIZA MOSS, single woman. She has lived in my service more than three years. I never heard anything against her (except that about a fortnight ago there were reports that she was in the family way, but I did not believe them). She had been complaining of a very bad wound in her foot, and went to a medical man for some medicine. Her mother went with her. It was on Thursday last, and she had medicine four times a day. She went to bed on Friday night last, about ten o'clock. She did her work up to the last minute, and I had not the slightest suspicion she was in the family way. On Saturday morning last, about a quarter after six, she came to my room and said she was ill, and could not go down. I said to her, "Is your foot worse?" and she said it was. I said, "Very well, then you must go to bed again," and I got up. Just before eight o'clock, a woman, named Ann Brown, who comes to work for me every Saturday, came, and I poured out a cup of tea and desired her to take it up to ELIZA MOSS, and bathe her foot with lotion. She went upstairs with the tea, and shortly came down again and said there was something the matter. I told her to go back and see what was the matter. She directly again came down stairs and said she had questioned her as to what was the matter, when she said she had had a dead baby, and that it was under the bed, and that it was born about two o'clock in the morning, and never moved or cried. I immediately sent for Dr John Thompson, of Bideford, and her mother. Dr Thompson came and saw the child, and requested the policeman to be sent for, to go for the Coroner, but that he did not think it was quite come to its time, but very nearly so. I gave her in charge of her mother and have not seen her since.
Ann Brown sworn:- I live at Landcross, and am the wife of William Brown, of Landcross, lime-burner. On Saturdays I go to Mr Partridge's, at Watertown Farm, to work. I went as usual last Saturday, about eight o'clock in the morning. I know ELIZA MOSS. She is a servant at Watertown Farm. When I came, on Saturday morning last, I saw Mrs Partridge, who said ELIZA MOSS was not well enough to come down, and desired me to take her up a cup of tea. I went up to her room and found ELIZA MOSS sitting on the bed-side. I asked her what was the matter, when she said she had been very poorly in the night. Seeing something about the room I suspected all was not right, and I went downstairs and told Mrs Partridge so, who desired me to go up stairs again, and ascertain what was the matter. I did so, and, on asking ELIZA MOSS what was the matter, she told me she had had a baby, and that it was under the bed. I took out the child and examined it, and found it was dead. I saw no marks of violence about the body, but the umbilical cord was not tied. She said the child was born about two o'clock in the morning, but that it was dead when born, and never moved. I then left the room and went down and told Mrs Partridge what I had seen, and what ELIZA MOSS had stated to me. When I took the child from under the bed it was covered by part of a dress. It was lying on its face. The child I have this morning seen was the same child.
SARAH MOSS sworn:- I live at Bideford, and am a widow. ELIZA MOSS is my daughter. She lives as a servant at Mr Partridge's, at Watertown Farm. On Thursday last I saw her at Bideford, and thought she was very large, and asked her if she was in the family way, but she made no reply further than desiring me to come out to Mr Partridge's on the following day. I told her I could not come on that day, but that I would on the following day, namely Saturday. On Saturday Mrs Partridge sent for me and on my arrival I was told that my daughter had had a child. I went to her and she said she was very sorry for what had happened, and on my asking her why she had not told me of it before, she made no reply. I fancied she told me that the child breathed once, and I told Dr Thompson so on Saturday night last, but my daughter denies having said any such thing. I saw the child on Saturday night last, but did not observe any marks of violence about the body.
John Thompson, M.D., sworn:- I live at Bideford, and am a Doctor of Medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in England. On Saturday morning last, I had notice to go to Watertown Farm, to see ELIZA MOSS, who had been confined of a child. I accordingly went, and found her in bed, and attended by Ann Brown. She stated to me that during the night, about two o'clock, she had been confined of a child. I asked her as to her condition, and, she said, "she was doing pretty well," and I examined her, in order to see that she was doing well. I inquired for the infant, and Ann Brown unfolded some clothing and produced a male child, together with the placenta. The child seemed a small child, but I thought it had arrived at the age of nine months or nearly so. The placenta presented the usual natural appearance. I looked at the body of the child, which seemed natural in its proportions, and had the usual fair appearance of the skin, together with a good development f the hair and nails. The face of the child was considerably discoloured and the nose flattened towards the lips, and the lips were compressed, and between them were some fibres of cotton. There was also some discolouration on the back of each hand. I said to Ann Brown "I think this child has lain on its face," and she said, "Sir that was the position in which I found it." I found the muscles f the child rigid. That is the usual condition some hours after death. I said it would be necessary to report this case to the Coroner, and directed that the police should be informed of it. I have attended today, and by the direction of the Coroner made a post mortem examination of the body of the child. On washing the surface of the body over the face and neck I found on the right side of the neck, towards the front part, two well-0marked scratches with abrasion, with abrasion being probably about half-an-inch in extent in each, a scratch extending to some little distance beyond the abrasion. There was an abrasion with a scratch on the opposite side of the neck. The chest of the child was opened and the parts within observed. The lungs did not cover the heart. The lungs, hart, and thymus gland were removed in one mass and placed in water, where they floated perfectly. The lungs were then separated from the hart and thymus glands and placed in water, when they floated buoyantly. Then the heart and thymus gland were placed in water and they sank at once to the bottom of the water. The lungs were next pressed and found to be elastic. They were next cut into pieces and each piece pressed separately, when froth escaped, and the mouths of the bronchial tubes were apparent. Each portion of lung was afterwards placed separately in the water and floated perfectly. There was no putrefaction about the lungs. On separating the lungs and heart from the chest, there was some escape of blood. I do not know that it was more than the usual quantity. The gall bladder contained bile. The stomach had some glairy fluid coloured in part by a substance like meconium. In the large intestine there was plenty of meconium. There was no water in the bladder. The appearance of the contents of the abdomen was not peculiar. I examined the heart and its blood vessels and those about the liver, but there was no indication to be drawn from this examination. I then examined the head. The blood vessels of the scalp were much distended, so also was the covering of the skull. Inside the skull the covering of the brain contained a very large amount of blood but the brain itself and the ventricles did not contain a larger amount than usual. There was no fluid in the ventricles or the membranes of the brain. No part of the body examined seemed diseased. Before opening the body I ascertained that it weighed about five pounds nine ounces. the lungs, heart, and thymus gland together, weighed three ounces. The lungs scarcely two ounces. The heart and thymus gland rather more than one ounce. I omitted to mention that the child had been separated from the placenta by tearing the cord at about two inches and a half from the child. From the appearance presented by this examination I believe this child had breathed and was probably born alive. It is possible for a child to breathe just before the body is born when only the face comes in contact with the air. That is not usual. The probability is that the child came by its death unnaturally, but I could not give a positive opinion as to its being accidental or by design. I omitted also to mention that I did not observe any fracture on the skull or any other part of the body. It is possible that the death of the child may have been produced accidentally.
The Jury returned the following verdict:- "That the new born male child was found dead, but how r by what means he became dead there is not sufficient evidence to show."

ILFRACOMBE - Melancholy Occurrence. A Young Lady Drowned. - Great excitement was produced in the town on Friday last, by the statement that a young lady named MISS CONSTANTIA WHITE, who has been on a visit to this town for the last few weeks, had met with a watery grave. Sad to relate, the news proved too true. It appears that the unfortunate lady resorted to the beach, as she had been accustomed, for the purpose of bathing, and to have her farewell dip previous to leaving for Lynton on the following day. There was a heavy ground-swell on at the time, and in opposition to the request of the attendants refused to take the precaution of being fastened with a rope. After plunging into the water she was quickly perceived to have floated out beyond her depth, and assistance was quickly sought and procured. Three gentlemen who happened to be near came to her rescue, and with the aid of a boat succeeded in bringing her on shore. She was then conveyed to the baths where Messrs. Moon and Foquett, surgeons, were soon in attendance, and every attempt at resuscitation tried, but to no avail. The medical gentlemen appeared to be of opinion that death must have resulted from a determination of blood to the head to which she has been subject, as she was quite dead when brought on shore, although she had only been in the water about seven minutes, and during that time had continued to float on her face and hands, which is not usual with persons when drowning. the melancholy event spread a deep gloom over the whole town, and much sympathy was felt for the young lady's mother, who has to bewail the untimely fate of her only daughter. This is the first fatal accident which has occurred at this beach since it was opened for the purpose of bathing in 1836, and now no blame can be attached to the officials. An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, when the following evidence was adduced:-0
Mary Dadds deposed:- I live at Ilfracombe and am a bathing woman. Yesterday morning, about eight o'clock, the deceased, LUCY CONSTANTIA WHITE, came to my bathing machine for the purpose of bathing. I told her it was too rough to bathe, but she did not heed what I said. She undressed and went into the water and threw the rope away and went right out. I and others called out and said she was in danger, but she took no notice of what we said. The sea was very rough, and after walking out a little way she threw herself back, got right again and threw herself back a second time, when she did not again recover herself, and was carried out to the breakers. I called for assistance and I saw a gentleman near, and he went into the water as soon as possible, swam to her and brought her to shore. She had bathed several mornings before. She did not call for assistance, and I did not see her struggle when she was carried out to the breakers. I saw she was in very great danger and I called for assistance. She was in lodgings with her mother at 2, Arlington Cottages, Ilfracombe.
Arthur Hutchinson deposed:- I am at present in lodgings at No. 1, Bath Cottages, Ilfracombe. About 8 o'clock yesterday morning I happened to be down on the beach, at Ilfracombe, and heard a woman calling for assistance. On looking towards the sea I saw a person in the water, about twenty yards out, lying without making any effort. I undressed myself and went out. When I got to her she was quite motionless, and I thought her to be quite dead. She was on her face and hands. I brought her to shore and delivered her into other hands.
Robert Henry Moon deposed:<- I am a surgeon, and reside at Ilfracombe. Soon after eight o'clock yesterday morning there was a message brought to me that there was a lady either drowned or drowning at the ladies' beach. I went away and by the time I got down they had got her into the baths. She was in a warm bath when I arrived, and I desired some blankets to be brought to me as soon as possible, and had her taken out from the warm bath, and as quickly as we could had her bathing dress taken off and all means used to restore animation, but without effect. Just after I arrived Mr Foquett, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, came in and also rendered every assistance in his power. We persevered for about an hour and fifty minutes attempting to restore animation, but there was not the slightest appearance of life from the time I first saw her.
The Jury returned the following verdict:- "That LUCY CONSTANTIA WHITE died whilst bathing in the sea."

Thursday 8 October 1863
BIDEFORD - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Blacksmith's Arms,' on Wednesday morning (yesterday), before the Borough Coroner (T. L. Pridham, Esq.), on the body of PHILIP ANDREWS, son of MARY ANDREWS, an unmarried woman. It appears that the deceased boy, who was only two years of age, scalded himself on the 22nd ult., during the absence of his mother. The neighbours kindly dressed the wounds, and did not call in medical aid until Friday last, when it was found that mortification had set in. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 29 October 1863
BARNSTAPLE - Awfully Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held at the 'Golden Fleece,' Barnstaple, on Tuesday last, before Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of GEORGE BARROW, who died suddenly on the previous evening. The following facts were detailed in evidence:-
GEORGE BARROW deposed:- The deceased was my son; he was 22 years of age. He was a sailor, and had been home from sea about a month. He resided with me. He had been troubled with a cough for nearly two years. Last Sunday he was engaged in assisting a pilot to bring a vessel up the river. He returned at about 8 o'clock in the evening. He then told me that he had brought up a quantity of blood. He had his supper and went to bed soon afterwards. He had his dinner with us yesterday, about one o'clock. He then said his stomach was sore, but his cough was much easier. I saw him afterwards on the quay, near Messrs. Yeo and Co.'s, about half-past four o'clock. He took my pick-axe to carry it home for me. I have not seen him alive since.
James Gliddon deposed:- Last night, between five and six o'clock, I was on duty in the North Walk, opposite the Blue Coat School. I heard some one cry out "Oh! oh!" several times. I then saw the deceased, who was in the Walk staggering along and saying "Oh!" I saw him reel and I jumped over the rails, but before I could reach him he fell down flat on his back. I saw blood coming from his mouth and nostrils. Mr Fredk. Baker then came to me and we got the deceased into a sitting posture, and Mr Baker went for a surgeon. The lad's mother came soon afterwards, and several other persons, with whom I left him, whilst I went for Mr Fernie, who came back with me in a few minutes and examined him. When I returned I heard he was dead. His body was soon afterwards removed to his father's residence, in Tuly-street.
Mr Fernie, surgeon, deposed:- Last evening, about half-past five o'clock, I was fetched by the last witness to the North Walk, where I found the deceased in a chair. Several persons were round him. He was quite dead. Blood was coming from his nose and mouth. His face was pale. He was at once removed to his father's house. In my opinion his death was caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in his chest. Verdict - "Died suddenly from Natural Causes."

HATHERLEIGH - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday morning last, at the 'New Inn,' touching the death of JOHN HOOPER, the younger son of MR JOHN HOOPER, "mine host" of the same inn, when the evidence of John Bowden and Wm. Worden, brewer, &c., went to show that the deceased was in the brewhouse of the '[George Hotel', at play, at about eight o'clock in the evening; that while engaged with his companions, deceased stepped back and fell into the tub of hot beer which had only a few minutes previously been discharged from the copper; the witness (Bowden) immediately assisted to pull him out, and that deceased ran immediately home. The scald was so severe about the body, arms and legs that the poor little fellow only survived the shock and injuries 18 hours. Medical assistance was immediately procured. The Jury immediately, without the least hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 5 November 1863
NORTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday the 27th ult., an Inquest was held at Northmolton, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of MARY WEBBER, a widow woman, 78 years of age; who died on the evening preceding. From the evidence adduced it appeared that the deceased was found by her son, with whom she resided (on his return from work), lying by the fire with her right arm burning, and her clothes nearly burnt off. She was lying upon her back. She held in her hand a frying pan with some potatoes in it. She was insensible, but groaning. The son extinguished the fire. She had been preparing her son's supper. She was removed to bed, but was unable to say how it occurred, and died the next morning about half-past seven o'clock. Dr Spicer was sent for, and examined the deceased. He now gave it as his opinion that the cause of death was the serious injuries she received, and he thought it probable that she might have fallen into the fire during an epileptic fit. Verdict - "Accidental Death from Burning."

Thursday 12 November 1863
CHITTLEHAMPTON - Fatal Accident - A Farmer Shot. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, at the late dwelling house of the deceased, on the body of MR THOMAS WREFORD, yeoman, of Chittlehampton, who was fatally wounded by the accidental discharge of a fowling-piece on the previous Friday, under the circumstances detailed in the evidence:-
CHARLES WREFORD was then sworn; he said; - The deceased was my father. I resided with him. On Friday afternoon last, my brother, WM. WREFORD, came to me where I was at work on the farm, and told me that an accident had happened to my father. I went to my father's house as quick as I could, and found my father sitting upon a stool, and being attended to, and blood was dropping from him. It was about 4 o'clock in the afternoon when my brother came to me, and rather before 5 o'clock I went out upon the premises to endeavour to find out how the accident happened. I met a servant man of my father's, named William Dendle. I told him what I was about, and he accompanied me. As we passed the shippen door, which was wide open, I saw a gun lying upon the straw with the muzzle towards the entrance. I took up the gun and saw that one of the barrel shad been recently discharged. We looked further and saw the hat of my father, which was ripped. We put the gun and the hat away. The gun was my father's, and was sometimes kept in the shippen, standing up behind the door. I have often seen my father carrying it. I took my dinner with my father on Friday, and he appeared to be in his usual health and spirits. The gun goes off at half cock. There were some spots of blood in the shippen.
Elizabeth Smaldon deposed:- I live in the parish of Chittlehampton, and am the wife of James Smaldon, carpenter. On Friday afternoon last, about 4 o'clock, I was requested to go to MR THOMAS WREFORD'S, as an accident had happened to him. I lived near him. I went to the house and found that MR WREFORD had been injured in the head. He was sitting upon a stool. Blood was coming from his head, and cold clothes were being applied to it. I have attended upon him since Friday On Saturday forenoon, his wife and myself were by his bedside, and she remarked she wished he could be sensible, to tell her how it happened, when he opened his eyes, which was not affected, and said “acc” two or three times, when I said to MRS WREFORD, he has said “accident” as plain as he can speak it. He at different times asked for things, such as bread and butter, and tea. I was present when he died yesterday morning, about two o'clock. He was about 56 years of age.
WILLIAM WREFORD deposed: - I live at West Leary, in the parish of Chittlehampton. I knew the deceased, THOMAS WREFORD. He was my father, and occupied a farm at West Leary. The last time I saw him well, was on Friday last about dinner time, about one o'clock. I took my dinner with him. He was quite cheerful; and after dinner he went to the yard, and I went to my work, which was to bring potatoes from a field to a cave. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I happened to be opposite the garden gate, going to the field with a horse and cart form some more potatoes, and saw my father just by the stable door, walking towards the house. Blood was blowing from his head and he stopped. Just as I got up to him he began to walk again. I asked him what was the matter, but he did not make any answer. I then called for James Dadd, who was caving the potatoes, and he immediately came. I assisted my father into the house. When we came into the house, my father said, “Let me sit down on a stool,” and he sat down. Dadds just looked at my father's head, and then went away for the doctor. When I went to work on Friday afternoon last, I saw no one in particular about my father's premises. My father died about ten o'clock yesterday morning. During his illness, I saw him several times, but he never stated how the accident happened.
James Dadds deposed: - I live in the parish of Filleigh. I knew the deceased. I worked for him as a labourer. Between three and four o'clock on Friday afternoon last, as I was caving potatoes for my master, I heard his son WILLIAM WREFORD calling to me to run as quick as I could. When I came to the yard gate, I saw him leading his father along. Blood was coming from the deceased's head. I helped the deceased into his house, and sat him down upon a stool. I then went for Mr Ley, surgeon, of Southmolton. I sat up with the deceased on Saturday night, but he never said anything so as to throw any light as to how the accident happened. About three o'clock on Friday afternoon last, I heard the report of a gun over in the buildings. I did not think it strange, as I thought my master might be shooting rats or pigeons as he sometimes did. He came to me at about two o'clock, and gave me some directions, and appeared to be in very good health and spirits. I saw no one in particular about the deceased's premises on Friday last.
Richard Ley, Esq., deposed: - I am a surgeon, and reside at Southmolton. I knew the deceased, THOMAS WREFORD. On Friday last, I was sent for to attend on him, he having met with an accident. When I got to his house, I found him sitting in the kitchen, supported by two women. I examined his head, and found what I supposed to be a gun shot wound extending from the ear to the middle of the forehead. The skull was cut through and the brain protruding nearly as large as my fist. I returned the brain into the skull, and dressed the external wound as well as I could. While I was applying the sutures, he appeared to be sensible, and said, “Don't give me so much pain,” and he also told one of the women not to press his head so tight. I attended to him until yesterday morning, when he died from the effects of the injury. I have been to the shippen, and near the place where the gun was found there were the marks of blood. I have examined the head of the deceased, and found that the shot entered above the ear, and escaped from about the middle of the forehead. The part of the head where the shot entered was black, caused by being burnt by the powder. It is possible that the gun may have been put into such a position either by accident or design so as to go off and to cause his death.
Verdict: - “Died by the discharge of a gun, but how or by what means such gun was discharged there was not sufficient evidence to show.”

Thursday 19 November 1863
BERRYNARBOR - The Late Fatal Catastrophe - Recovery of the Bodies. - The bodies of the poor men, RICHARD PEAKE and CHARLES PRISCOTT, who were buried alive by a land-slip at Henstridge quarry, on the 7th instant, as reported in our last, were disentombed on Saturday, the 14th, after seven days' unceasing labour in removing the debris. They were sadly mangled, as may be supposed. On Monday last, an Inquest was held on the bodies by Richard Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, at the 'Lion' inn, Combmartin. The evidence adduced was short and inconclusive, the accident having occurred in the absence of any eyewitness - no one being present save the unfortunate men whose untimely fate we record. The learned Coroner, in addressing the Jury, remarked as a general principle, on the importance of proper precautions being taken by the proprietors of mines and quarries to prevent similar casualties. Both the Coroner and Jury, however, acquitted Mr Gear, the proprietor of the quarry in question, from all blame. - Verdict, "Accidentally Killed." - The bodies were interred shortly after the Inquest - that of PRISCOTT, in the churchyard, by the rector; that of PEAKE, in the Baptist buying-ground, by the Rev. William Davy. Both funerals were numerously attended. The sad event has cast a gloom over the entire neighbourhood.

Thursday 26 November 1863
HATHERLEIGH - Accident:- A Coroner's Inquest was held on Friday last, touching the death of JAMES EDWARDS, carpenter. It appears deceased was upon a ladder at Reed House, cleaning the water shoots at a height of about 25 feet when he fell down and received such a concussion and injury that the poor fellow lingered in great pain until he died on Thursday morning. From the evidence of Wm. Luxton, who was steadying the ladder, it appeared that deceased was seized with a fit which was the cause of the fall; and he turned head foremost over the ladder and pitched upon his head on the pleasure ground, causing a depression as deep and hollow as a basin. Verdict - "Accidental Death."

Thursday 3 December 1863
APPLEDORE - Melancholy Death From Drowning. - On Tuesday evening, a most melancholy occurrence happened at this place, to JOHN PRANCE, Esq., Paymaster R.N., by which he unfortunately lost his life. The particulars of the sad circumstance will be gathered from the evidence adduced at the Inquest held at the 'Belle Inn,' before R. Bremridge, Esq., County Coroner, yesterday (Wednesday) morning. The Jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, after which the following witnesses were examined:- Captain W. Eaton deposed that this (Wednesday) morning, at 7 o'clock, his attention was called to something under the Quay. He discovered it to be the body of JOHN PRANCE, Esq., who was lying in the water with all his clothes on, with the exception of his hat. He got the unfortunate gentleman removed to his residence, but life was extinct. No marks of violence could be found on him. He had known him before, and had heard that he had served in the Navy many years.
Mr R. Dart said he had known the deceased for several years. He supposed he was about 65 years of age. The deceased was a paymaster in the Royal Navy. He last saw him on Tuesday evening between seven and eight o'clock, at the 'Royal Hotel,' near the Market. Remained with him about an hour, and left about nine o'clock. He was perfectly sober, and would have to pass the Quay on his way home. The night was very dark. He did not see him alive afterwards. The Jury returned the following verdict:- "Found drowned, there being no evidence to show by what means the deceased fell over the Quay." We have called attention, more than once, to the necessity of placing posts and chains along the Quay to prevent similar accidents to the above, which have been of frequent occurrence in this port. It is to be hoped that this melancholy affair will impress on the inhabitants the absolute need of such a protection.

TORRINGTON - Fatal Pugilistic Encounter at Kingscott, near Torrington. The Inquest on the Body. - Immense excitement has prevailed at Torrington and the neighbourhood during the past week consequent on the death of a young man, named ELI LONGMAN, resident in the town, from the effect of blows received in a fight. It seems that the deceased, on the 11th of Nov. (the day on which the fight took place) went to the meet of the Hon. Mark Rolle's hounds, after which he proceeded to the 'Rolle Arms,' in the parish of Kingscott. Here a small party was assembled, and the deceased remained drinking with them during the whole afternoon. Towards the evening some angry words were exchanged by the deceased and another man named Pincombe. The landlord refusing to draw any more beer the party left, and when at the cross-way near the house a fight took place. Pincombe knocked the deceased down twice, and while lying on the ground kicked him. During the fight another man named Sussex also came up, and struck the deceased. the poor fellow was helped home in a very weak condition, and, as the evidence adduced at the Inquest will show, subsequently died of the injuries he received. the cause f the quarrel has not come to light, neither of the witnesses examined being able to say how the row began. It is generally believed, however, that (as in too many instances) a woman was in the case. Rumour says that Pincombe was formerly engaged to a servant girl, but was discarded by her, the deceased having usurped her affections. It is supposed that a jealousy was thus excited, and it is said that Pincombe had determined on the first opportunity to serve the deceased out. The facts of the case having been reported to the authorities, a warrant was issued for the apprehension of Pincombe and Sussex, and they were soon lodged in the Torrington lock-up.
[Full page description of the Inquest, ending in the following verdict:]
The Jury were then locked up to consider their verdict, and after about an hour's deliberation they returned into Court, with the following verdict:- "We find that the deceased, ELI LONGMAN, died of tetanus, produced by a wound in the elbow, which was received during the fight which took place near the 'Rolle Arms,' between the deceased and John Pincombe and Joseph Sussex, but from whom he received such wound there is no evidence to show."

Thursday 10 December 1863
BARNSTAPLE - Sudden Death. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at the 'Stafford Arms,' before R. I Bencraft, Esq., on the body of JOHN HEAL, aged 70, who died at the 'Turf Tavern,' on Saturday last. He had complained of feeling cold all day, but towards evening took tea, and then drank some beer given him by a friend. he afterwards went into the back yard, where he was found dead. Mr Cooke, surgeon, said deceased had been ailing for some time past, and had probably died of apoplexy., Verdict accordingly.

BARNSTAPLE - Suspected Infanticide - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquiry of a painful nature took place on Saturday last, at the 'Exeter Inn,' Litchdon-street; which seriously involved the conduct of a young girl named ELIZABETH BLACKMORE, daughter of respectable and worthy parents residing at Paracombe, and upon the result of which the most important issues depended. An Inquisition was held by Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., touching the cause of death of a female infant child, to which the aforesaid ELIZABETH BLACKMORE had given birth and which she had concealed for several days. A respectable Jury was impannelled comprising Mr John Norrington, foreman, Mr Edward Parsons, Mr John Rowe, Mr John P. Kiell, Mr John I, Knill, Mr. Thos. Hearson, Mr H. T. Gibbs, Mr F. W. Tripe, Mr W. W. Hill, Mr John Parry, Mr Henry R. Williams, and Mr Z. Smyth.
The Jury having been sworn, the Coroner detailed the leading facts of the case, which, he said, was one of rare occurrence in this town, as nothing of the kind had before formed the subject of inquiry since he had held the office of Coroner. A young person named ELIZABETH BLACKMORE, following an occupation in Barnstaple, was delivered of a child within the borough, in a room and in a bed where another person was sleeping, and yet her companion was not aware that anything of the kind had taken place. Subsequently the mother asked a person to assist in getting rid of the body; the father of the young woman was communicated with, and he removed the body to Paracombe, but afterwards brought it back, delivered it to the surgeon, and gave information to him (the Coroner), which induced him to order a post mortem examination. The duty of the Jury was to inquire into the cause of death. Other proceedings might eventually be taken for concealment of birth, which was an offence cognizable by law. The parents of the unfortunate girl were entitled to the utmost sympathy; but the Jury must return a verdict according to the evidence, painful as their duty might be.
The Jury having viewed the body, which was enclosed in a shell, the following witnesses were examined:-
Miss Isabella Ross sworn:- I live in Barnstaple, at the house of Mr Brannam, Boutport-street. I am an assistant at Mrs Pelling's, milliner. I know ELIZABETH BLACKMORE, who has also resided at Mr Brannam's since September last. She was an apprentice at Mrs Pelling's. She occupied the same bedroom as I did and slept with me. No one else slept in that room. On Tuesday, the 24th November, she was very ill and unable to go to her work. After 12 o'clock, at night, I heard a noise, and found MISS BLACKMORE very sick. She was out of bed. I asked her what was the matter, and she said she was very sick. She came into bed again and complained of pain in her stomach - said she was suffering from acidity. She continued to be sick at intervals till four o'clock in the morning, when she came into bed and appeared to be much better. I then went to sleep again. We had no other light than moonlight - the moon was shining brightly. During the time, from twelve to four o'clock, MISS BLACKMORE frequently used the utensil. I said I would call Mrs Brannam if she continued to make such a noise, and she then suppressed the noise; but occasionally she would again cry out from intense pain. I got up at half-past seven; but she had her breakfast in bed. Mrs Brannam came into the room while I was dressing and asked why MISS BLACKMORE did not answer, as she was wont to do. I told her I thought she was asleep. Mrs B. said she had heard us talking in the night, and I told her MISS BLACKMORE had been very sick - I thought from the effects of medicine she had taken the day before. Mrs B. said she would bring up her breakfast; she thought MISS BLACKMORE had taken too strong a dose. I did not see MISS B. again till four o'clock. She was then in the sitting room, and appeared to be extremely weak. She did not go to work that day at all, and went to bed with me at the usual hour. The day following she went to work at ten o'clock and left work at four o'clock. On the Friday she went in the morning and did not return to her work after dinner. She was very ill and complained of the cold. I did not know what had happened to her - had no suspicion - she had never told me she was in the family way. There were no cupboards in the room, nor had she any box. She had taken physic three times, and I thought the illness was the effect of the medicine. Whilst she was out of bed during the night, I also got out to draw the blind that we might have more light; but it made such a noise that I did not do so, lest I should wake Mrs Brannam, who sleeps in the next room, on the same floor. When I was out of bed, MISS BLACKMORE was using the utensil, which was near the washstand and at some little distance from the bed. I did not hear the cry of a child, nor any sound of that kind. If such had happened, I must have heard it.
By the Foreman:- I think I was out of bed twice during the night. She was very nervous, and I thought she was making the most of her pains. I have always been on friendly terms with her. She is about 18 years of age.
Mrs Brannam sworn:- I am the wife of John Brannam, baker &c. ELIZABETH BLACKMORE has lodged in my house since September last, and has occupied the same bed-room and bed as Miss Ross. On Tuesday, the 24th November, I gave MISS BLACKMORE two pills in the morning, two at dinner-time and two in the evening. I was supplied with the pills by MRS BLACKMORE, her mother, who told me that she bought them at Mr Cotton's on the previous Friday. MRS B. requested that I would see that she persisted in taking them. Her mother was aware of a physical irregularity, which the pills were intended to correct. I heard talking during the night in Miss Ross and MISS BLACKMORE'S room, and thought6 the medicine had had the desired effect. I saw indications which induced me to believe so. She appeared very poorly and weak, and I gave her her breakfast and took her some broth for dinner. She came down to tea. She made no communication to me, and I had not the slightest suspicion that she had been in the family way. I heard that Elizabeth Delbridge, an old servant of MR BLACKSMORE'S, had visited her on the Sunday following. On Wednesday last, Mrs Vellacott told me the report, which I denied. In the evening, MR BLACKMORE (the girl's father) told me what had happened.
Elizabeth Delbridge sworn:- I reside at Rumsam, in this Borough, and am a household servant. On Sunday morning last I received a note from ELIZABETH BLACKMORE, whom I had known some time before, having lived with her father two years previously. I wrote to MRS BLACKMORE and enclosed the note. In her note she said she was in trouble - that she had been very wicked and feared she should die. She said she might die before the end of the week, and if she did she said, Where should I go? She desired me to ask for a parcel, when I called. I did so, and she asked Mr Brannam for a newspaper to wrap it up. After a long conversation, I extracted from her that she had delivered herself of a child, on the Wednesday night, and she then asked me to take it and throw it into the river. She asked me if I knew a young man who lodged at Mr Hennings', in Bear-st., when she lodged there; and remarked, "Tis he that has got me into this trouble." She said the child was dead born. I said I would not do it; she went upstairs and I left. (This conversation took place at the foot of the stairs, and was not overheard by a third party.) I wrote to her father, who came to me on the next evening at Rumsam. I then told him what had happened. He commended me very much for not taking the body away.
MR CHARLES BLACKMORE sworn:- I am a shopkeeper, and reside at Paracombe ELIZABETH BLACKMORE is my daughter; she will be 19 years of age in April next. On Monday, the 30th November, I came to Barnstaple, in consequence of a note I received from the last witness. I called at her master's house, at Rumsam, and saw her before I went to my daughter. In consequence of a communication from Elizabeth Delbridge, I called at Mr Brannam's, where I found her in the sitting room, at five in the afternoon. I told her I had seen Elizabeth Delbridge, and that I was deeply grieved at what she told me. She told me she had been delivered of a child (still-born) on the preceding Wednesday. She told me it was in her box. I said, "It can't remain there; I will take it home;" and she fetched it. It was in a wrapper which I had given her. She went upstairs for it, and I took it away, without opening it. At that time I was under the impression that the delivery had been premature - as my daughter had not resided in Barnstaple more than seven months. When I got home I opened it in the presence of my wife, and found the body of a female child wrapped in several of my daughter's garments. I went the next morning and consulted Mr Clarke, surgeon, of Lynton. On the Wednesday following, I again came to Barnstaple, and called on Mr Gamble, surgeon. I told him what had happened and asked him to attend my daughter professionally. I got a shell into which I put the body of the child; and brought it to Barnstaple, on the Thursday, and delivered it to Mr Gamble, and gave notice to Mr Bencraft, the Coroner. I have not since spoken to my daughter on the subject, at the suggestion of the surgeon, as she is dangerously ill.
C. H. Gamble, Esq., surgeon, sworn:- I have made a post mortem examination of the body of a female child, which I received on Thursday last, at my house, Litchdon-Terrace, which body the Coroner and Jury have now viewed. I found the child had come to maturity - it is fully developed; the weight, 7 lbs.; and the length, 20 inches. Decomposition had commenced. I found no marks of injury, save an abrasion under the right jaw, with a slight swelling and discolouration. There was a small quantity of blood oozing from the mouth. The tongue was not swollen nor protruding; the eyelids were firmly closed. With the assistance of Mr Newman, house surgeon of the Infirmary, I opened the chest. The lungs were incompletely inflated, the pericardium not being covered by them. We then removed the lungs, which we placed in water and found that they floated. We cut them into small pieces, which also floated. No pressure would expel the air from the lungs. We opened the skull; the brain was soft, from decomposition. We then made an incision in the discoloured part over the angle of the jaw, where was a large clot of coagulated blood. The weight and size of the body were slightly above the average. I do not consider the hydrostatic test infallible. The umbilical cord was three inches long, and had a jagged appearance. From the appearances, and as the result of this examination, I am of opinion that the child breathed when partially born - that in her efforts to deliver herself the mother ruptured the jugular vein, which caused the extravasation of blood, and that then the child died or shortly after. There were no marks of suffocation and the results of the post mortem examination negative such an idea. The discolouration was from decomposition. With the exceptions mentioned, the functions were healthy and perfect.
The Jury returned as their verdict - "That the said child was found dead; that it was the illegitimate child of ELIZABETH BLACKMORE; that the body bore no marks of intentional violence, and that the said Jurors say there has been no evidence brought before them to shew whether or not the said child was born alive."
The Coroner and Foreman remarked on the satisfactory manner in which the witnesses had given their evidence; and eulogized the judgment and discretion which marked the conduct of Elizabeth Delbridge, the openness and candour of MR BLACKMORE, the father of the unfortunate girl, with whom they deeply sympathised.

TORRINGTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Tuesday last (8th instant) an Inquest was held before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, at the Board-room of the Union Workhouse, touching the death of EDWARD HICKEY, who died on the morning of the 7th instant, under the following circumstances:-
George Henry Sellick sworn:- I am master of the Great Torrington Union. I knew the deceased EDWARD HICKEY, he was in his 60th year; he has been an inmate to and from for many years past. I admitted him the last time on the 23rd October last, he was then suffering from a cold and has been under Doctor Jones's care occasionally since he was admitted. On Sunday morning last, I saw him in bed, when he appeared to be in his usual health; this was the last time I saw him alive. On Monday morning the nurse came to me about four o'clock and told me that the deceased was taken very ill; I directed her to send the porter for Doctor Jones. Deceased soon afterwards died, and I sent a letter to Mr Jones to inform him of it. He has had every care since he has been in the house.
C. R. Jones, M.D., sworn:- I am medical officer for the Torrington Union. I knew the deceased, and have attended him several times since he has been here. He has been under treatment for itch. I saw him on Saturday last, when he said he was better. On Monday morning, I received a letter from the Master of the Union acquainting me of his (deceased's) sudden death. I then went to the house and examined the body. I found no marks of violence, and conjecturing that his death was occasioned by disease of the heart I wrote to inform you of it. I have this morning, with my assistant, made a post mortem examination of the body. I find that death arose from fatty enlargement of the heart and liver, the stomach was also greatly distended, and the diaphragm was pushed up high into the cavity of the thorax, pushing the heart as high as the first and second ribs. The valves of the heart contained earthy deposits. On opening the cranium I found the membranes and the vessels gorged with blood. I am of opinion that deceased died from congestion of the brain induced by an abnormal condition of the heart, liver and distended stomach. I believe the deceased has had every care whilst an inmate in the house.
John Land and Elizabeth Williams, gave corroborative evidence. At the close of the evidence the Jury at once returned a verdict, "That the deceased died from Natural Causes."

Thursday 17 December 1863
SOUTHMOLTON - The Late Death From Excitement. - We last week mentioned the sudden and melancholy death of ELIZABETH MARSH, and there having been several rumours circulated connected with the cause, an Inquest was held on Wednesday, before the Borough Coroner, James Flexman, Esq., and a respectable Jury, of which Mr Philip Widgery was foreman. Betsey Chapple and Agnes Phillips, two neighbours of the deceased, gave evidence as to the condition in which they found her on the Tuesday previously. Edwin Furse, Esq., surgeon, deposed that having been sent for on the day before named, he went to the deceased's house, and found her on the floor insensible, pulseless, and dying. Whilst he was present she opened her eyes, stared wildly, and said to her husband, "O! Bill, I am dying." There were no marks of violence on her body, and he could not then certify the cause of death. The Jury expressed their desire that a post mortem examination of the body should be made, and the Inquest was accordingly adjourned to the following Monday.
Adjourned Inquest. - On Monday evening last the adjourned Inquest was held at the Guildhall, before the Borough Coroner. Edwin Furse, Esq., deposed that on Thursday morning the 10th instant he made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased He found the heart to be in a highly advanced stage of fatty degeneration, and there was a rupture at the apex of the heart, through which a pint of blood had escaped into the pericardium. He believed that death had resulted from the rupture of the heart, which was accelerated by excitement. He did not consider it necessary to open any other parts of the body.
After a little discussion, the Jury without retiring returned a verdict, "That the deceased died from Natural Causes, accelerated by excitement." The remains of the poor woman were buried in the cemetery on Sunday last, and an exceedingly large number of her friends and neighbours attended her burial. Deceased was 37 years of age, and has left four infant children, one of whom is a nurseling.

Thursday 24 December 1863
Coroner's Inquests By Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq.
BARNSTAPLE - An Inquest was held on Saturday evening last, at the 'Mason's Arms,' Hardaway Head, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM MCANDREW, there lying dead. The following evidence was adduced:-
JANE MCANDREW deposed:- The deceased was my husband. He was a blacking maker, and was 77 years of age. We received two shillings a week parish pay; our rent was one shilling and ninepence a week. The deceased used to earn a trifle by making blacking. My sight is almost gone, and I am not able to earn anything now. My husband has lately suffered much from cough but has not been under any medical man lately. He applied to Mr Cooke about three weeks ago, and brought home some medicine, which he took. He used to sleep in the room where he now lies. He had two straw mattresses, three blankets, and a quilt. I removed those things after his death. He died on Friday morning last, between eight and nine o'clock. He had a pint of beer on Thursday night, which he drank; he ate some bread and pork, and also had some tea. He went up to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, I remained in the room with him all the night. He did not appear to be worse than usual. He died off very quietly. I then went down and sat by the fire. Mrs Perkins, my neighbour, was the first person I told he was dead. I told her of it about an hour after it happened. I next told Miss Cockram of it; I did so on Friday night last. The deceased was crippled in the hip joint. He has been very weak lately.
Eliza Perkins deposed:- I am the wife of William Perkins, brickmaker, of Barnstaple. I live next door to the deceased. The last time I saw him alive was on Monday, the 14th instant; he appeared to be as usual, he was carrying two jugs of milk, and seemed to be very weak and tottering. Last evening, at about 5 o'clock, his wife came to my door and said "WILLIAM'S gone, he is gone to heaven; he is dead, he died very happy." She is I believe of a wandering intellect; she left saying she would go for her niece.
Michael Cooke, Esq., surgeon, deposed: I knew the deceased, and have attended him occasionally on his coming to me. About three weeks since he came to my surgery, complaining of an eruption he had about his body. I examined him and told him it was owing to the filthy state of his skin; he was also suffering from bronchitis, and was in a very weak condition. I believe I have not seen him alive since. I examined his body today, it was lying on the floor of a back bed-room, in the position the Jury have viewed it. there are no appearances to indicate that he died from other than natural causes. I think his death was accelerated by want of proper care and clothing. His body is very dirty and covered with vermin. There are n marks of violence about him.
The Jury returned the following verdict:- "Died from Natural Causes," but desired to express its opinion that his death had been accelerated by want of proper attention and clothing.

BARNSTAPLE - Another Inquest was held on Monday, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., on the body of MR HENRY THORNE, of Reform-street, Derby, who died suddenly the preceding evening under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence:-
Jane Grace deposed:- I am the wife of John Camp, bailiff, of Barnstaple. The deceased lodged with my husband. He had been with us about eleven weeks, had eaten his meals regularly, and appeared to be stronger than when he first came to live with us. He rose yesterday about nine o'clock, and appeared to be as usual. He had his breakfast, and sat by the fire n the front room, he did not go out of the house during the day. He made a hearty dinner at one o'clock. He had his tea about six o'clock, and shortly afterwards took a candle and went upstairs to bed. About ten minutes afterwards my husband went upstairs and called to me to come up. On going into his room I saw the deceased; he was undressed in his bed, but was insensible. My husband went directly and called in a neighbour, a Mr Fry, and then went for the deceased's son, MR H. KING THORNE, who came shortly afterwards. Mr Cooke, surgeon, arrived a few minutes' afterwards, and said he was dead.
Michael Cooke, Esq., surgeon, Barnstaple:- I have known the deceased for several years. I have attended him professionally but not within the last two years. Last evening a little before half-past 6 o'clock, I was called on by Mr John Camp, and on coming to his house I found the deceased in the bed he now lies in. He was undressed and covered by the bed clothes; he was quite dead but warm. I examined his body but found no appearance to indicate that he had died from other than natural causes. I cannot say what the active cause of his death was, either apoplexy or disease of the heart, but from the appearance of the body I believe it was caused by apoplexy. The Jury returned a verdict of "Died suddenly from Natural Causes."

BIDEFORD - Death By Scalding. - On Friday last, T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, held an Inquest on the body of ELIZA LEE, a child about three years old, residing in Old Town. It appeared that the poor little thing "while the mother's back was turned," fell into a large pan of hot water, was terribly scalded, and only lingered a few days. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

HUNTSHAW - Inquest before J. H. Toller, Esq. An Inquest was held at Huntshaw, on Monday last, before John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, touching the death of HENRY BROWNSCOMBE. The following evidence was taken:-
Susannah Priscott deposed:- I am the wife of William Priscott, of Gammaton Moor, in the parish of Bideford, innkeeper and blacksmith. Our house is called the 'Rising Sun.' I knew the deceased MR HENRY BROWNSCOMBE. He resided in the parish of Huntshaw; he sometimes came to our house; he was there for the last time on Friday last. He came about eleven o'clock, and said he had come from Brownscombe Moor; he had two glasses of beer. He also had five glasses of gin and water, comprising fifteen-pence worth. He left my house about three o'clock in the afternoon. I cannot say that he was sober. He paid 8 ½d. and left the rest upon trust, saying he had no more money about him. I saw him take out sixpence from his purse, and there appeared to be nothing there besides. He ate nothing in my house.
Emanuel Sussex deposed:- I live at Huntshaw and am a farm servant. I knew the deceased, HENRY BROWNSCOMBE; I last saw him on Friday afternoon between three and four o'clock. He was by a gate at Gammaton Moor road, leading into a field which he occupied, upon his knees, as if he had slipped his foot. I helped him up and put him against the hedge, and desired him to stay there until I came again. I then went away to tell Mr Priscott of it. Mr Priscott came out with me into road and we saw deceased walking on. I then left Mr Priscott and went down into the road where I had left my donkey; I went on with my donkey on the way the deceased had taken, and I thought I should overtake him. The road was crooked, and I could not see very far, and finally I did not overtake him. I thought he must have gone into his field.
John Sussex deposed:- I live at Huntshaw, and am a farmer's son. I knew the deceased. I last saw him alive on Friday afternoon, between three and four o'clock; he was walking on Gammaton Moor road towards his home. I asked him how he was, and he replied he was very well; he was a little the worse for liquor. I asked him whether I should accompany him home; he thanked me and said he could go home very well by himself I then left him, having a different road to go. As I passed back he had just been taken out of the hedge trough and was quite dead. Between the spot where he was taken out of the hedge trough and the spot where I left him is about sixty landyards.
JOHN BROWNSCOMBE deposed:- I live at Huntshaw, and am a farmer. The deceased was my father and I resided with him; he was about seventy-one years of age. Yesterday morning I took my breakfast with him and he appeared to be very well, and between nine and ten o'clock we left the house together for the purpose of pursuing our different occupations. He intended going to Brownscombe Moor, which is in the parish of Huntshaw, to see his colt. I believe he went there as I went a part of the way with him, and he left me, going in the direction of the Moor, and I went to an off farm called Huxwell, which we occupy. A little after four o'clock I was at Brownscombe Village coming home, when I saw a man called John Davey, running, and I heard him inquiring for me. I went toward him when he said, "I have bad news for you, your father is dead up in Gammaton Moor road." I sent a person home to report it, and accompanied John Davey to Gammaton Moor road, and at the spot there were two persons named William Priscott and James Oatway, who had got the deceased out from a water trough, and they were supporting him; he was quite dead; he was then taken home. Immediately I came to the body I sent away for Mr Rouse, surgeon, of Great Torrington. The water trough was about ten landyards from a field occupied by the deceased.
James Oatway deposed:- I live at Yarnscombe and am a farmer. Yesterday afternoon, as I was returning from Bideford to Yarnscombe, with a load of coals, when I came to Gammaton Moor road, a little after four o'clock, in a hedge trough I saw the body of a man. I stopped the horse, got off the cart, and went to the trough, where there was water, and found deceased lying on his face in it. I lifted up his head and I believe he was quite dead; I did not know him. I went for assistance, and John Davey returned with me to the body, and I found it in the same position I had left it. John Davey left to inform JOHN BROWNSCOMBE of the circumstance, and I stayed by the body, when in a few minutes William Priscott came and we lifted the body out of the trough. the hedge trough is in a very dangerous state and is easily open to accidents.
William Priscott deposed:- I live at Gammaton Moor, which is in the parish of Bideford. A little after four o'clock yesterday afternoon, as I was at work in my shop, I heard calls for me to come down, as MR BROWNSCOMBE was dead. I accordingly went down, and found Mr Oatway and several other persons, and MR BROWNSCOMBE lying with his head out over the trough. Mr Oatway and myself then proceeded to get the whole of the body out; we accordingly did so, and in few minutes MR JOHN BROWNSCOMBE came, and the deceased was taken home in a cart. He was quite dead.
Mr John Oliver Rouse deposed:- I am a surgeon, and reside at Great Torrington. I knew the deceased, HENRY BROWNSCOMBE. He was a patient of mine. On the evening of Friday last, I was sent for to see the deceased. On my arrival, I found him in bed, cold and stiff, and quite dead. He had apparently been dead some hours. I examined the body; there were no bruises or marks of any kind apparent, but the face and head were swollen, livid, and congested. there was a slight mark on the right eye, which was accounted for by his having had a blow from a stubble some days previous, of an unimportant character. It is my opinion that the deceased died from congestion of the brain, accelerated by the mixture of beer and spirit on an empty stomach.
Verdict:- "Found dead in a hedge trough, in which there was water, from congestion of the brain, accelerated by the mixture of beer and spirit on an empty stomach", and the Jurors having viewed the said hedge-trough, do present the very dangerous state of the same, and hope that immediate steps will be taken by the proper authorities to have it put into good and efficient repair.

Thursday 31 December 1863
BARNSTAPLE - Fatal Accident - Inquest by Incledon Bencraft, Esq. - An Inquest was held at the 'Curriers' Arms, Vicarage-st. on Saturday, to inquire into the death of MR JOSEPH DEWE, who had fallen over the stairs of the inn (where he was lodging), on the previous evening. The deceased had resided in this town for two years past. He was a man of eccentric and intemperate habits. He was in receipt of a good income and was in expectation of some day getting a large sum of money as a bequest. He appeared to be between 35 and 40 years of age. A respectable Jury, of whom Mr B. Manning was foreman, was sworn, and the following evidence taken at the Inquest:-
Mr John Garland, landlord of the 'Curriers' Arms, deposed:- The deceased has lived with me about a year and nine months. He appeared to be a man of independent means, but eccentric habits. He would drink freely at times, but had not been drinking lately. He was not out of my house on Friday until 8 o'clock p.m., when I accompanied him to the opposite side f the street to a friend's house, where we remained about three quarters of an hour. He ate a hearty dinner, but was sick about an hour afterwards. He appeared much depressed in spirits on our return home, and I saw him crying; and on my wife asking him what was the matter, he said he should like to go to bed, which he did, and I saw him undressed and in bed, and left him with the gas burning, as was usual. About 20 minutes afterwards being in my cellar, which was under deceased's bedroom, I heard footsteps in the room; and, going upstairs, I found him trying to put his trousers on. On remonstrating with him, he said he would have my boy with him, and would go downstairs and wait until he came in. (My son always slept with him.) Finding that he was determined, I assisted him to dress, and he left the room. As I was putting out the gas I heard him fall over the stairs. John Abbott immediately ran out from the kitchen, and assisted me in taking deceased to his room. He was quite unconscious, and I immediately went for Mr Fernie, surgeon. Deceased lingered until seen o'clock this morning, when he expired. Mrs Jane Garland, wife of the last witness, corroborated this statement.
Mr Fernie, deposed:- I attended the deceased, and found him bleeding from both nostrils and the right ear. I felt a swelling at the back part of his head. His face was pale, his skin cold, and his pulse very weak. He was quite insensible. I immediately ordered him to be undressed, applied hot water to his feet, and had his head shaved. Within one hour he moved a little, but was convulsed - had three fits. I remained with him until two o'clock on Saturday morning, and I am of opinion that deceased died from a fracture of the base of the skull, which produced internal haemorrhage. I have known him 18 months, and have attended him occasionally during that period for disordered liver and kidneys, eruptions of the skin, and other complaints caused by intemperate habits. I have not seen him since the early part of October last. He had informed me that he had partly served his time as a medical student, and that he was very comfortable at his lodgings. He always spoke in terms of respect of Mr and Mrs Garland, and bore testimony to their kind attentions to him in his illness. The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that although it appeared that the deceased was of intemperate habits, there was no evidence before them that he had been drinking for some days past. A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

BIDEFORD - Awfully Sudden Death. - An accident of a painful character which resulted in the death of MR J. JEWELL, landlord of the 'Castle Inn,' Bideford, occurred on Wednesday morning last. It appears that the deceased, who was a very corpulent man, accidentally slipped his foot and fell over the stairs, when he was precipitated to the floor on his head. He was not heard to speak or groan afterwards. An Inquest was held on the body at the Town Hall, the same evening, before the Borough Coroner, T. L. Pridham, Esq., and a respectable Jury; Mr Hooper, foreman. Mary Ann Griffiths said:- I am a servant at the 'Castle Inn,' lately kept by MR JEWELL. About the middle part of the day I was in the underpart of the house, and I saw my master in the closet on the ground floor. I said to him, "You must please to come up." I then came up stairs, and went into the kitchen, when I heard a noise in the passage, and I went out, and on looking down the stairs leading from the passage to the court, I saw the said JOHN JEWELL, with his head lying on the flooring stones, and one foot on the stairs. I went down the stairs, and called my mistress, who desired me to call Mr Craig. My master did not speak or groan when I first came to him. Mr Craig came directly, and with further assistance my master was taken upstairs. A doctor was sent for, and Dr Hoyle came soon afterwards; but my master was dead. There was nothing on the stairs to cause him to slip. William Craig, of Bideford, cooper, sworn:- I knew the late JOHN JEWELL, and my workshop is near the 'Castle Inn.' This morning about half-past eleven o'clock, the preceding witness called me, saying, "For God's sake come in; my master has fallen down the stairs; do come in and help him up." I went in directly, and on going down the stairs I saw the said JOHN JEWELL with his head on the flooring stone. He was bleeding profusely from the back part of his head and his feet were resting on the stairs. I caught him up in my arms, and held him until further assistance. He did not speak or groan, and I believe he was dead when I first came to him. He was removed upstairs; but was examined by Dr Hoyle, before he was removed. The Jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 7 January 1864
BIDEFORD - Another Fatal Accident. - On Saturday last, an Inquest was held at the 'Torridge Inn,' before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of SAMUEL HOOKWASY, who died from a piece of wood called a wall-plate falling upon him at the New Church.
George Hutchings deposed:- I am in the employ of Mr Edward Martyn White, and on Wednesday last I was working at the church building. About 10 o'clock in the morning I was on the roof of the church. There was a wall-plate about 18 or 19 feet long on the top of the wall. I told Robert Essery, a lad who was with me, to take up a piece of wood from the roof, and in doing so he hitched it under the wall-plate, which canted over, and fell to the ground. SAMUEL HOOKWAY was directly under, at work with two other men, and I called out to "Stand clear!" The two men moved away; but HOOKWAY took no heed, and the wall-plate struck him on the head, and knocked him down, and he was stunned. I went down directly, and found him insensible, and he continued so for a few minutes, when he came to himself and was assisted home by two men.
Fanny Williams said;- On Wednesday last I was called to attend SAMUEL HOOKWAY after the accident. He was in bed. I heard him speak but once. He died on the 1st January inst. The doctor, Mr Rouse, considered he had received a concussion of the brain, the result of the accident. Verdict, "Accidental Death."

Thursday 21 January 1864
TIVERTON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquiry was held on Friday evening, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of WILLIAM DICKER, aged 58, a carter in the service of his brother, JOHN DICKER, a timber hauler, residing in Westexe, Tiverton. According to the evidence adduced at the Inquest, which was adjourned to the following day for a post mortem examination, the deceased had been at his usual employment on the day referred to and was returning from Cruwys Morchard. There were two timber wagons, the one driven by the deceased riding in advance of the other. Suddenly the deceased's body was found in the road quite dead, and, it appeared had been run over by the wagon and crushed in a most fearful manner. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," at the same time remarking upon the vicious character of one of the horses driven by deceased, and which might possibly have contributed to the occurrence of the accident.

Thursday 28 January 1864
MORETONHAMPSTEAD - Suicide in a Police Cell at Moretonhampstead. - An Inquest was held on Saturday by F. B. Cumming, Esq., the County Coroner, on the body of WILLIAM COX, who had been taken into custody on the previous night for stealing a smock-frock from a lad named Taylor. The deceased was seen alive in the cell at eleven o'clock, when he asked for a light to enable him to read a newspaper. The request was, of course, not complied with. On the policeman re-visiting the cell at 12 o'clock he found that the deceased had tied his belt and a woollen "comforter" together and suspended himself by them to the bars of the cell. He was immediately cut down, and a surgeon sent for, who pronounced him to be quite dead. A verdict of Felo de se was returned.

Thursday 4 February 1864
TIVERTON - Suicide of a Tradesman. - On Wednesday morning the town was thrown into considerable excitement by a report that MR GEORGE DUNN COBLEY, draper, had died by his own hand, a report which was too sadly confirmed. It appeared from the evidence adduced at the Inquest, held before F. Mackenzie, Esq., Coroner, that the deceased had been for some days past confined to his room through indisposition, and that on Tuesday some strange delusions had laid hold of his mind. He sat up with his sister and his assistant, Mr Henry Davey, until about two o'clock on Wednesday morning, when he left the room for the purpose, as was thought, of going to the closet. Mr Davey, however, heard MR COBLEY shut his bedroom door and immediately followed him, when he found him on his knees with his throat cut with a razor, which had unhappily been left on the dressing table. Mr Reed, surgeon, was immediately called, but life was extinct, as he could have survived only a few minutes. The Jury returned a verdict of "Temporary Insanity." MR COBLEY was an old established tradesman of the town, a member of the Town Council, and one of the Improvement Commissioners, and was widely and deservedly respected.

Thursday 25 February 1864
OKEHAMPTON - Fatal Accident to a Child. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at Hughslade Farm, on the body of ELLEN GRENDON, aged five years, daughter of MR JOHN GRENDON. The little child was in the farm-yard on Thursday last, when a playful colt kicked her in the head, causing instantaneous death. Verdict accordingly.

Thursday 3 March 1864
BIDEFORD - Coroner's Inquest. - On Wednesday last an Inquest was held at Webbery Cottage, before John Henry Toller, Esq., and a Jury of whom Mr Nicholas Page was foreman, on the body of JOHN HUNT, a youth of about 19, a general servant to Major Garrard. It appeared that a new room had been built over the coach-house, in which a pot of coke had been kept burning to dry it. Afterwards the deceased had to sleep there, and kept the burning coke-pot on a flat stone in his room at night, without his master's knowledge. He used to bar his door, but keeps his window partly open; he became sick, and was removed to the house and treated by Major Garrard for a bilious attack. On Tuesday night he again slept in the room; the next morning he did not come down, and was not aroused by his fellow-servants calls. His door was found bolted, as usual, and the window closed, though not fastened. An entrance was affected, and he was found to be dead. T. L. Pridham, Esq., Surgeon, who had been called in, said the probable cause of death was the inhalation of carbonic acid gas. The Jury had no doubt that deceased was suffocated and, on the suggestion of Mr Pridham, returned as their verdict - "Accidentally died from asphyxia, the result of inhaling carbonic acid gas."

CULMSTOCK - Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Monday, at Oldbeat, before Spencer Cox, Esq., Coroner, on the body of MARY WELLAND, aged 77, the wife of RICHARD WELLAND, an agricultural labourer. The deceased has for many years been subject to epileptic fits, one of which came on suddenly on Wednesday, the 17th instant, when she fell into the fire and sustained such severe injuries from the burns and consequent shock to her system that she died on the following Friday. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death."

Thursday 10 March 1864
BIDEFORD - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at Ashridge, on Thursday, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, on the body of an old man named CREALOCK. It appears that deceased had been ill for nearly a week, and his friends did not apprehend danger until medical aid was useless, and he died on Wednesday morning. Mr Turner, surgeon, of Bideford, gave it as his opinion that deceased died from natural causes, and the Jury returned a verdict accordingly.

Thursday 17 March 1864
BIDEFORD - Death from Lockjaw - Coroner's Inquest. - An Inquest was held on Wednesday last, by John Henry Toller, Esq., Deputy County Coroner, on the body of the young man GRIBBLE, whose serious injuries resulting from an accident in Mr Cox's shipbuilding yard a short time since, was duly reported, and whose death from lockjaw was announced in our last.
The following evidence was adduced at the Inquest:- William Hoyle, shipwright, deposed: - I work at Mr Cox's shipbuilding yard. On Tuesday, February 23rd, I was at work under the bottom of a vessel near the deceased, who was working on a vessel in the dock with another named Shepherd, when I heard a noise, and, turning round, saw that the stage on which GRIBBLE had been working had fallen, and that deceased was down in the dock. I jumped down over the Quay, and found deceased lying on his right side, quite still, with his left leg under one of the planks I took him up, and found that his leg was broken. Others came to assist, and we took him to his aunt's. When he was got into a chair, he complained of being cold, and asked if his leg was broken. I believe the stage was properly secured; Shepherd, the man who fell at the same time, was not hurt so much. George Palmer corroborated this testimony.
ANN GRIBBLE, aunt of deceased, gave unimportant evidence.
Dr John Thompson deposed:- I am a Doctor of Medicine and a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons. I was sent for to attend deceased, on the occasion of the accident; which I did without delay. I found him suffering from a compound comminuted fracture of the bones of his leg, extending to the ankle joint. There was not much apparent bruising of the limb. The principal blood vessels and nerves did not seem much injured. Some broken bits of bone were removed; the limb was set; and the patient put to bed. Dr Ackland was with me, and gave his advice and assistance. On the following day we both saw the patient, as did also Dr Pratt, of Appledore. The patient seemed as well as could have been expected. Dr Ackland and myself continued to attend him daily, and he was also seen by Dr Hoyle. We watched the case with much apprehension; but the man appeared to go on tolerably well for many days. About the middle of last week inflammation appeared about the middle of the leg, deeper than the skin, as if an abscess were forming there. GRIBBLE said he thought that, in falling, he received a blow on that spot. Instead of matter forming and coming to the surface, the inflammation extended along the limb, which felt boggy. We, therefore, held a consultation at which Dr Pratt and all the medical gentlemen of Bideford attended, and they supported us in the opinion that it was necessary immediately to amputate the limb above the knee. This I did, on Saturday last. Dr Pratt administered chloroform, and the other medical gentlemen gave their assistance, as required. The patient had no pain in the performance of the operation, nor subsequently. During Sunday and Monday, up to Tuesday morning, although the man was in a precarious state, he appeared as well as well as we could expect; but then symptoms of lock-jaw appeared and the lower part of the wound had a suspicious appearance, as if the old disease had again come on. The closure of his mouth increased during the day, so that he could only partially open his jaw toward evening. About seven o'clock the main artery gave way, and death shortly supervened. Dr Ackland and myself attended at once. After death we opened the wound, and examined for the cause of bleeding. We found that the old disease had attacked the stump, and disorganised a large portion of it, including the main artery, and this was the cause of the haemorrhage. I am of opinion that lockjaw was the result of the accident, and not of the operation. Erysipelitous inflammation occasionally happens in compound fractures, and is a very dangerous complication. We have no means of saying whether it may or may not occur in any given case. I am the medical attendant of the Benefit Society to which the deceased belonged; Dr Ackland has attended the case in consultation with me; the services of the other medical gentlemen have been gratuitously rendered. In reference to the cause of the accident I may remark that a large nail or hook driven into the spar on which a scaffolding rests, as is sometimes done, would have prevented the chain slipping; but it appears that the men thought it quite secure even without a nail.
The Jury returned as their verdict "That the deceased died on Tuesday, March 8, from the effects of a fall received on Tuesday, Feb. 23rd, whilst at work on a stage which was fastened to a certain vessel; but the fall was occasioned by the accidental slipping of the chain; and we recommend that, in future, a nail be driven in, to prevent, if possible, the slipping of such chain."
The Funeral:- The remains of the deceased were interred on Sunday last. The corpse was followed to the grave by the male teachers and some of the children of the Independent Sunday School, and by a very large number of the fellow-workmen of the deceased. The Rev. G. Williams performed the last rites in the presence of an immense concourse of people. The Rev. W. Clarkson preached at Lavington Chapel, on the subject, on Sunday night.

SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death. - On Monday evening last, an Inquest was held at the dwelling-house of ROGER LYTHABY, a thatcher, in this town, on the body of ANNE LYTHABY, his wife, there lying dead; before James Flexman, Esq., the Borough Coroner. Mr Philip Widgery was foreman. The following evidence was adduced:- Mary Ann Conybeer deposed:- I am the wife of William Conybeer, and reside with ROGER LYTHABY, the husband of the deceased. I have lived with them for the last three months, during which time I never heard the deceased complain of any illness. Yesterday I did not leave home, and in the evening, about half-past seven o'clock, the deceased went out to get half-a-pint of beer for her supper, which she was in the habit of doing. She was absent about five minutes, and returned bringing the beer with her. She then sat down and drank a small quantity of it and ate a little piece of bread. She was sitting at the table when I saw her head drop. I spoke to her, but receiving no answer I lifted up her head, put my finger into her mouth and took out the bit of bread; she never spoke afterwards. I knocked at the wall, and my neighbour, Ann Hill, came to my assistance. The deceased breathed once after Ann Hill entered the house. Ann Hill was next called, and said:- I am the wife of Thos. Hill, and reside within a door or two from the deceased. Last evening, about half-past seven o'clock, Ann Nott called at my house and said, "For God's sake, do make haste up to ROGER LYTHABY'S, for I think ANN LYTHABY is dying." I did so, and when I entered the house, I found deceased sitting on the floor, and Mary Ann Connybeer supporting her. I helped to support deceased, who only breathed once after I entered the house. I sent off for a doctor, but before his arrival she was dead.
ROGER LYTHABY said:- I am the husband of the deceased ANN LYTHABY. She would be 82 years old next July. She has nearly always enjoyed good health; but of late (within the last twelve months) she has complained a little in her head, but not ill enough to go to a doctor; she has at times complained of giddiness. I went to chapel last evening; when I left my wife she was as well as usual. I was called out, and my neighbour told me my wife was very ill; but before I arrived she had died. - The Jury returned a verdict of "Died from Apoplexy."

Thursday 31 March 1864
ILFRACOMBE - Accidental Death. - A little boy, 5 years old, the son of MR MARLOW, of this place, met his death on Sunday last, by falling into a pan of scalding water. It appears that the water in which the greens for the day's use had been boiled, was inadvertently placed on the floor, and in a moment when the mother's back was turned, the little child fell in. The verdict returned at the Coroner's Inquest was, "Accidental Death."

LUNDY - Suicide at Lundy Island - On Tuesday morning a man was brought from Lundy Island, who in the early part of that day had committed suicide. The following are the particulars:- The deceased, who is a Scotchman, called GEORGE CAURIGE, apparently about 40 years of age, was engaged a few months ago as clerk by the Company who are digging granite at Lundy Island. He appeared to be a very respectable, intelligent man, but of a melancholy, reserved disposition. He was known to have been about 11 years in India, and while there to have suffered from sun-stroke, and once, during his stay at Lundy, symptoms of mental deficiency were exhibited; still no one suspected anything likely to lead to suicide. On Sunday night deceased slept in the same room with another person, Mr Patrick Delley, surveyor. this gentleman rose about six o'clock, leaving his companion asleep, having occasion to return again shortly after, he saw deceased up, partially dressed, and washing himself. About 8 o'clock Mr Delley again returned to his room, and, on beginning to ascend the stairs, was startled to see deceased dangling by a slight cord to the banister. The alarm was at once given, and on the arrival of Mr R. D. Gole, the unfortunate man was cut down, but life was found to be quite extinct. Measures were taken without delay to convey the body to Ilfracombe, in order that it may receive a Coroner's Inquest. This took place on Tuesday, under the direction of J. H. Toler, Esq., Coroner. After a full investigation, and the hearing of a few witnesses, the substance of which evidence is embodied in the above account, the Jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased committed suicide whilst labouring under "Temporary Insanity." Deceased is said to have been a single man, very respectably connected. His friends have been communicated with.

Thursday 14 April 1864
BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death By Drowning. - On Monday morning last, an Inquest was held at the 'Fraser's Arms' public house, Pilton, before R. I. Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John Moore was foreman, on the body of a little boy, named HENRY COLWILL, aged two and half years, who was drowned in a stream at the bottom of Shearford-lane, on the day previous. The learned Coroner having stated the facts of the case, the Jury proceeded to view the body; and on their return the following evidence was adduced:-
William Evans deposed:- I am eight years old, and live at Pilton. I went yesterday (Sunday) afternoon to walk in Shearford-lane with HENRY COLWILL and several other children. At the bottom of the lane the stream is crossed by a plank. I attempted to carry the deceased across the water, but I slipped, and we both fell in. I caught hold of a piece of timber and got out, but the deceased was washed down the stream.
Hester Kelly deposed:- I am the daughter of John Kelly, of Pilton. I went for a walk with some other children yesterday, about half-past two o'clock. We went to pick some primroses and HENRY COLWILL was with us. We walked down the lane near the stop gate. There is water there, and a plank across it. I walked over the plank and carried one baby, and William Evans carried the little boy, COLWILL. I did not see or hear them fall; but I saw Evans get out of the water and the deceased floating down the stream.
William Hill deposed:- I am a painter, and live at Pilton. Yesterday afternoon, between three and four o'clock, I was walking near the first mile stone on the Ilfracombe road, when I heard a number of children screaming. I went to the other side of the hedge and asked them what was the matter; and with some difficulty I discovered that a child had fallen into the water. I ran down as fast as I could, and found the deceased, HENRY COLWILL, about 200 yards below the plank where he fell in. The water was about two feet deep, but running very swiftly. I went into the water and took out the child, but he was quite dead. I carried the body as far as Maretop, when a woman took it out of my arms. I noticed that the boy Evans was very wet. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

TORQUAY - Fatal Boat Accident at Torquay - Two |Lives Lost. - On Sunday night, at between seven and eight o'clock, a party of seamen were about to return on board H.M.S. Prince Consort, at present lying in Torbay, their leave of absence for the day having expired. Fourteen men embarked in a small boat that would ordinarily accommodate but six or seven, and, as might be expected, shortly after leaving the pier head, and when off the Breakwater of the Baths, the boat was observed to be shipping water: the boatman put the boat about and endeavoured to reach the shore again. Before, however, they could gain the landing-place, the boat filled and sank, leaving the men struggling in the waves. Assistance was promptly rendered. Some spars were thrown to them, and some managed to swim on shore themselves. Eventually twelve were rescued; one of the boatmen, named ROBERT HAYMAN, and a seaman, named WINTER, a native of Buckfastleigh, were picked up dead. We are sorry to learn that HAYMAN leaves a wife and five children. The Inquest was held on Tuesday, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner: the Jury returned a verdict of "Accidental Death," and on the suggestion of the Coroner, it was determined that the local authorities should be written to about providing means for saving life at the pier head, and also recommending the boats to be licensed, so as to prevent the chance of overcrowding.

Thursday 21 April 1864
BIDEFORD - Sudden Death. - On Sunday evening a woman aged about 60 named MISS CHOPE, residing in Silver-street, was found dead in her chair. It appears that deceased has been unwell for several days; but was out door on Saturday. She did not come out of her room, as usual on Sunday, and the person with whom she was lodging entered the room and found as above stated. It is supposed that death was the result of natural causes. An Inquest was held at the 'Torridge Inn,' on Monday, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., when a verdict was returned in accordance with the above facts.

SOUTHMOLTON - Another Child Burnt to Death. - Within a few months three children have been burnt to death in this town. On Monday last, an Inquest was held before James Flexman, Esq., Borough Coroner, at the residence of MR MASON, officer of Inland Revenue, on the body of his son, a fine boy 6 years of age. Mr Philip Widgery was foreman. MR MASON, who was very much affected, appeared with his arm in a sling, his both hands being severely burnt, and stated that on Sunday morning last, about half-past 8 o'clock, he was upstairs in his house and heard his son screaming; he hastened down as quickly as he possibly could, when to his horror he discovered his little boy rushing round the room with his night clothes on fire. He at once did everything in his power to extinguish the flames, after which he applied oil and wadding, and sent for Dr Allarton, who told him he had treated him very properly. His chest and arm were severely burnt, but still he hoped he would recover.
Mrs Comins stated that she was a neighbour of MR MASON'S, and was soon on the spot after the unfortunate accident; she also assisted in putting out the fire. The Jury, after hearing the evidence, pronounced a verdict of "Accidental death." The sympathies of the inhabitants are great for MR and MRS MASON, as their little son was much beloved.

SOUTHMOLTON - Sudden Death of a Child. - The same Coroner and Jury sat immediately after the last Inquest at the Union workhouse on the body of an infant child of a woman named JENKYNS (aged 18 years), there lying dead. The evidence of the mother, the Union nurse, and an inmate who slept opposite, was taken, and it appeared that the child was nursed and fed about four o'clock on the Saturday, previously, it was taken to bed in the arm of her mother, and was breathing about two o'clock in the morning when she awoke. At five o'clock she again awoke and felt its chin, which she thought was cold, and immediately made an alarm. Mary Ann Fisher, who slept opposite, and the nurse were soon in attendance, and the child was pronounced dead. It was one month old, and was as well as usual the night before, although it had never been a flourishing child. - Verdict "Died by the Visitation of God."

NORTHMOLTON - Coroner's Inquest. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held at Northmolton, before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, to Inquire into the cause of death of MARY, the wife of JAMES WESTACOTT, labourer and pensioner from the 62nd Regiment. Deceased was 47 years old, and for some time had been subject to epileptic fits. MARY SMITH, sister to JAMES WESTACOTT, was in the habit of visiting the deceased during the husband's absence, to see that she did not injure herself, and on Wednesday evening, the 13th inst., about 6 o'clock, she went to WESTACOTT'S house and found her busy preparing her husband's supper. She was then apparently very well, and she had not had any fits for the previous 7 weeks. About an hour afterwards she went there again when the deceased was lying on the floor, her right arm and face being very much burnt and her foot scalded; she could not give any account of the accident, only that she was pouring the water from the tea kettle to the teapot, and she felt great pain in her arm. Dr R. S. Spicer attended her but she gradually sank and died at midnight on Saturday. It is presumed that she had a fit whilst at the fire, which was on the hearth, fell forward, and on recovering her consciousness, drew herself out on the floor. - Verdict: "Accidental Death."

Thursday 28 April 1864
ILSINGTON - Death From Fire at Ilsington. - On Monday last an Inquest was held at the 'New Inn,' by F. B. Cuming, Esq.,. Coroner, on the body of a child, named RICHARD HONEYWILL. WILLIAM HONEYWILL, the deceased's father, stated that on Saturday last, seeing a large quantity of smoke near his house, he was going home, when he met some children, who said the pig's house was on fire, and his child was in it. He then ran up and found the pig's house in flames, and threw some water into it, and went in and found that some bundles of reed and the roof were burning. The deceased, who was sitting near the road, was insensible when he took him out. He sent for a doctor, who said there was no hope of deceased's recovery. He died on Sunday morning. He was three years and eleven months old. He did not know how the fire originated. He and his wife were both from home, and the house was locked up. The Coroner having summed up, the Jury returned a verdict that deceased died from injuries received from a fire in a pig's house on the 16th instant, but how the fire occurred there was no evidence to show.

BARNSTAPLE - Accidental Death By Drowning. - An Inquest was held on Monday morning last, at the North Devon Infirmary, before Richard Incledon Bencraft, Esq., Borough Coroner, on the body of JOHN WILLIAM BROWN, a pupil at Mr Featherstone's academy, who was drowned whilst bathing near Black Barn, in the river Taw, on Saturday evening last. The Jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was adduced:-
Walter Edward Huet deposed:- I am twelve years of age. On Saturday last, the deceased, JOHN WILLIAM BROWN, was at my father's, to receive his dancing lesson; he left at about half-past four o'clock. I went on an errand for my father, and on my return, at about quarter to five, I met him near Mr Gamble's, surgeon; after some conversation, we went to Black Barn, above Cooney Cut, to bathe. We undressed and went into the water, and, after being there about ten minutes, we agreed to return, but in the attempt to do so the deceased was washed off his legs. I attempted to follow, and was also carried away. I lay on my back and floated; I heard deceased call out, and saw him sink. I managed to struggle to the shore. I saw the crown of his head the whole time. No one went near him until Lewis arrived. He appeared to be quite dead when he was brought to shore.
Thomas Lewis deposed:- I am a labourer, residing in Queen-street, in this borough. On Saturday last, I was at Newport, delivering coals for my master, when I heard a woman say that there were two boys sinking in the river, near Black Barn. I proceeded to the spot as fast as I could, and there saw the last witness, who told me there was another boy in the water. I saw something dark on the surface, and on going toward it found it to be the hair of the deceased. I immediately brought him out, and he was taken to the North Devon Infirmary as fast as possible, but I believe he was quite dead.
A. J. Newman, Esq., deposed:- I am house surgeon at the North Devon Infirmary. The body of the deceased was brought here at a quarter to six o'clock on Saturday evening last. I immediately applied the usual remedies recommended by the faculty in such cases, constantly changing the position of the body, causing friction to be applied, &c. I also tried artificial breathing, but I did not perceive the slightest animation, or anything to encourage the hope that he would recover. I am of opinion that the deceased was dead before he was brought to the Infirmary.
The learned Coroner said this was a very melancholy case, but they had cause to be thankful that they were not there to hold an Inquest on two bodies instead of one; for the other boy had had a very narrow escape. The deceased added another to the long list which he could remember of those who had fallen victims to the numerous dangerous pits at that part of the river. Mr Featherstone, on being appealed to be one of the Jury, stated that it was entirely without his knowledge or consent that the boys went to bathe without proper surveillance. He had always strongly interdicted the practice. The Jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally Drowned."

BIDEFORD - Awfully Sudden Death. - On Thursday evening, as some young men, belonging to the Wesleyans were leaving chapel, the evening being fine, a walk was proposed, and they proceeded to the North Parade or New Bank, and when nearing Mr Cox's ship-building yard, at Cleave House, MR RICHARD BALSH, jun., one of the company ran forward to speak to a friend, and as he did so, was observed to stagger. He was asked what was the matter, to which he answered "All right," and almost immediately fell. He was quickly lifted to his feet, but he instantly breathed his last. Dr Turner was sent for who pronounced life to be extinct. He was taken into the office of Mr Cox (the clerk being present), from which place the body could not be removed, the office being in the parish of Northam. An Inquest was held on Saturday (why not on Friday?) before J. H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, when a verdict of "Died from Natural Causes" was returned. It was found impossible to remove the body until Sunday morning, when it was buried in the public cemetery, at Bideford; the Rev. S. Atkinson performed the service. Deceased was much respected.

Thursday 5 May 1864
PARKHAM - Accidental Death. - An Inquest was held on Friday last, at Parkham, on the body of a shoemaker named JOHN MOASE, who had fallen down stairs about a week before. At the time deceased did not complain very much, and he even assisted in lifting some heavy weights shortly after; but on Sunday morning, after he had taken breakfast in bed, his daughter, who had gone down-stairs, on returning found him extinct. Verdict accordingly.

WESTDOWN - Fatal Accident. - A painful accident, attended with fatal consequences occurred on Monday se'nnight, at Higher Aylescott, in this parish, to MR HENRY WADLAND, yeoman. Deceased was in his stable attending to his mare, who had a foal - he had just given her a supply of corn and was about to mix a little chaff with the feed when the mare turned and kicked him violently in the chest, the concussion fracturing the vertebrae of his neck at the base of the skull. Deceased walked a few paces from the stable door toward his house and pressed his hands to his chest, then dropped down and died instantly. Mr Stoneham, surgeon, of Ilfracombe, was sent for, but he pronounced life to be extinct. An Inquest was held on Wednesday, before John H. Toller, Esq., Deputy Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of which Mr John Gammon was foreman, when a verdict was returned of "Accidental Death." MR WADLAND was a man of excellent character and greatly respected by his fellow-parishioners, who sincerely lament his untimely end.

Thursday 19 May 1864
HONITON - Inquest. - An Inquest was held at the 'Turk's Head' inn, on Wednesday afternoon, before Spencer M. Cox, Esq., on the body of GEORGE LOTT FLOOD, aged 78 years, who died on Tuesday morning last. Deceased lived in one of the alms-houses, and on Saturday last went home from the market drunk, and fell downstairs. No one lived in the house with deceased, but he was seen to fall down by a boy named Viney, who got in at the window and touched deceased, who did not move or speak but made a gurgling noise. The boy went for Dr Jerrard, and the old man was not got upstairs for some time, as no one could be got to help. Dr Jerrard considered that dead arose from apoplexy, brought on by concussion of the brain in falling. The Jury returned a verdict to that effect.

Thursday 26 May 1864
BIDEFORD - A Bather Drowned. - A very painful occurrence took place on Saturday afternoon, in the drowning of a lad named THOMAS GEOHEGAN, son of the station-master at Bideford. The particulars will be gathered from the evidence given at an Inquest held in the evening, at Mr Balch's, East-the-Water, before T. L. Pridham, Esq., Borough Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr A. Greening, the lad's school-master, was foreman.
Robt. Burnard said:- I am 14; I have known deceased about 3 weeks. I was going on the sands with a boy called Cole, and saw some boys swimming in the river. It was about a quarter to 12 and nearly low water. They were near the station, out from Cross-park Rock. GEOHEGAN asked me to go out, and I consented. There was a small boy who said he would stop while we undressed. We undressed and went into the river together. Cole did not go with us. The gut was not much past knee-deep. I told GEOHEGAN not to go out of the gut, as there was a very deep place near, and he could swim but a little. He did not answer, and I swam across the part where the bottom is all in pits and becomes very deep. When I was across I saw him struggling in deep water, and went to rescue him: he pulled me under several times and nearly drowned me, so that I was obliged to leave him and swim ashore. He did not speak the whole time he was in the water. I called assistance, and some men from a lighter launched a boat and went in search of him. I had to swim about twice the width of the street before I got into deep water. Just after I got ashore he disappeared. The men tried to find him with oars, and a man named Colley fetched the grappling irons from the bridge. Mr Robert Hookway came across the sands, with Mr Cadd, the latter of whom undressed, dived, and brought up the body. This was about half-an-hour after he disappeared. He was drowned in about 8 ft. of water. The body was taken to the station, and held there till they sent for Mr Hogg, when it was taken into his father's house. Some of the Jury said there was a deep gravel pit at the spot. - By Mr Greening: I have bathed with GEOHEGAN before, and he could swim but very little. By Mr Capern: I knew the spot was dangerous, and warned him in consequence. Mr Greening said there had been several accidents there, and suggested that the Town Council should put up a board marked "Dangerous." Verdict - "Accidental Death."

DITTISHAM - Fatal Accident. - On Saturday afternoon last, an Inquest was held at Bramble Tor House, in the parish of Dittisham, before F. B. Cuming, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable Jury, of whom Mr W. Grills was foreman, touching the death of RICHARD ROWS, who, it appeared from the evidence of George Bale and John Kimber, was so crushed by a tree that three hours afterwards he died. The deceased, who was a labourer, was on the 13th May felling timber at Bramble Tor and whilst felling an elm tree he jumped from the hedge and fell and the tree fell on his legs, breaking them both. He was taken to his house, where he died three hours afterwards. Deceased was forty-three years of age.

TIVERTON - Fatal Accident. - An accident, which resulted in death, took place at Bolham, on Friday night, under the following circumstances. It appears that MR JOHN HANCOCK, farmer, of Bampton, attended his uncle's annual sheep-shearing at Bolham. About midnight he took his departure, riding a small Exmoor pony. The friends having seen him ride off the premises with a gun in one hand, suddenly heard the pony, which had started at a brisk trot, come to a dead stop just as he was passing the chapel, and immediately after start off again. One of the party heard a fall, and this induced them to go out and see what had happened, when they found him lying on his back in the road in a state of insensibility, with the saddle between his legs, the girths of which were broken, and the gun, with the stock broken short off, lying near him. He was removed to the house and medical aid promptly sent for. Mr Beedell, surgeon, of Tiverton, attended the unfortunate man as quickly as possible, and remained with him all night. He gradually sank, and died on Saturday about midnight. An Inquest was held on view f the body at Bolham, on Monday afternoon, before F. Mackenzie, Esq., the Borough Coroner. Mr Robert Elsworthy, Jonas Hancock, and Mrs Hancock were examined, the evidence clearly showing that deceased had died from the effects of the accident. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

HONITON - Fatal Accident. - An Inquest was held at the 'White Hart Inn,' Offwell, on Tuesday, before S. M. Cox, Esq., and a most respectable Jury , of whom the Rev. J. G. Copleston was foreman, on the body of a young man named GEORGE TIBBETS, aged 24 years, a carter in the employ of Sir E. M. Elton, Bart. , of Widworthy Court, who, it is supposed, came by his death under the following circumstances. Deceased had been to Honiton with a load of bark in a waggon drawn by three horses, and was returning towards Widworthy (with a load of freestone), riding on the shafts of the waggon. When near the entrance